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USC Tobacco Industry Monitoring Project Collection

Defense Department Smoking Policy

Date: 01 Jan 1987 (est.)
Length: 4 pages
2047563280-3283
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snapshot_pm 2047563280-2047563283

Abstract

Document on the Defense Department (DoD) Smoking Policy that suggests to defeat a full implementation of military-wide anti-smoking policies and an increase in cigarette prices in military commissaries and exchanges. Defines a strategy to successfully fight efforts to establish a smoke-free environment in the military: monitor the implementation of the anti-smoking policy, maintain close relationships with Armed Services, Appropriation Committee, and DoD members, identify those members that are most willing and able to present PM's views and lobby on its behalf, coordinate efforts with other industry players, initiate campaigns.

Fields

Strategy
Yes
Type
Manual, Handbook, Catalogue
Rept, Report, Other
Named Person
Aspin
Bingaman
Bliley
Boren
Broyhill
Chappell
Cochran
Daniel
Ford
Helms
Jones, W.
Mcconnell
Mcdade
Nunn
Sisisky
Trible
Warner
Weinberger
Target Market
Military
Named Organization
AIR Force
Appropriations Comm
Armed Services Comm
Army
Congress
Defense Dept
General Counsel
House
Military Sales Force
Miller
Navy
Senate
TI, Tobacco Inst
White House
Subject
anti-smoking advocacy
legislation
health education program
impact of regulations
military personnel
regulation
smoke free policy
smoking reduction
smoking prevention
smoking restriction
tobacco education program
tobacco use
sales pricing
lobbying

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Page 1: obt52e00
Defense Department Smoking Policy Objective: To inhibit full implementation of military-wide anti-smoking measures and to preserve the current DoD cigarette pricing policy. Background: During the last year the Defense Department has issued a directive and, subsequently, the Army, Air Force, and Navy have issued regulations, restricting smoking and cigarette promotion on military bases. An attempt by several Senators to ban the sale or raise the price of cigarettes in commissaries, exchanges and ship stores was unsuccessful. TI and Philip Morris joined forces with other military-oriented organizations to lobby for the defeat of this initiative. Current Status: Full implementation of the anti-smoking policy will not take effect until after January 1, 1987. Meetings have been scheduled by the DoD Health Affairs staff for early 1987 to develop strategies to promote the concept of a smoke free military. It is expected that we will see the military embrace an enthusiastic campaign to stop servicemen and women from smoking and/or to prevent enlistees from starting. An attempt by several Senators to increase cigarette prices in commissaries is likely. Serious consideration will also be given to privatizing the commissary system. This idea will be strongly opposed by those groups representing military personnel and suppliers; the same groups that we allied ourselves with during the 99th Congress to defeat smoking restrictions and price increases. Strategy: We will continue to keep an eye on the implementation of the military anti-smoking policy and to share with our allies any instances where coersion has been used to achieve results or in which the services have overstepped the bounds of the DoD Directive. We will continue to maintain our close relationships with the members and staff of the Armed Services and Appropriations Committees to anticipate and prevent any legislation to increase the price of cigarettes in commissaries.
Page 2: obt52e00
Defense Department Smoking Policy Strategy (continued) : We will continue to maintain our relationships with, as well as to identify new contacts within the Administration and the Defense Department who have responsibility for the morale and welfare of military personnel. We will coordinate our efforts with PM USA, PM International, Miller, TI and those groups who are actively working to protect the current military benefits structure.
Page 3: obt52e00
Summary of DoD Action: PM: - Established close working relationships with the members and staff of the Armed Services and Appropriations Committees in the House and Senate. Identified those members most willing and able to present our views. Provided those members/staff with neccessary support documents to allow them to intelligently speak on our behalf. Maintained contacts with officials within DoD [Military Personnel and Force Management, Legislative Affairs, General Counsel] and the While House. Worked closely with those groups that were willing to lobby on our behalf. (veterans groups, commissary suppliers - we are members of many of these groups, non-commissioned officers, other organizations which represent servicemen and women, etc. ) i~ ~ Worked closely with TI's outside counsel. ~ ~ Provided TI with statistics and argumentation for the ~ development of position papers. (Information came from ~' USA's and International's military sales forces) lND Generally assisted TI in its lobbying effort by keeping 00 close contact with the Virginia delegation, the House and Senate leadership and those members with whom we have stong ties. [Senators Warner, Trible, McConnell, Helms, Ford, Broyhill, Nunn, Cochran, Representatives Daniel, Chappell, McDade, Aspin, Bliley, W. Jones, Sisisky...] TI: - Hired outside counsel with strong DoD-related experience. Prepared a paper on military smoking and health issues to be used as a rebuttal for any report released by the DoD Asst. Secy. for Health Affairs. Initiated a Congressional letter writing campaign to persuade Secy. Weinberger that smoking restrictions and/or price increases were not an acceptable solution. Prepared an analysis of the DoD Directive in comparison with the provisions of the Army, Navy and AirForce regs. Provided this analysis to key House and Senate committee members. Worked with key Senate and House members to develop strategy which resulted in Army modifying its anti-smoking program. Worked with House Armed Services staff to draft language to protect the rights of commissaries to sell cigarettes. Coordinated effort to defeat Bingaman/Boren committee and floor amendments to raise prices in commissaries.
Page 4: obt52e00
Commissary Issue - DEATH OF COMMISSARY SYSTEM: The budget might contain a change in the commissary appropriations - may go to contract system or privatization. ($657 million FY86) In any case should we support those groups which will lobby to keep the commissaries intact. (erosion of benefits) We should assist them only if they are willing to support us. If not, we may be better off with a totally private system - consider international concerns. FREIGHT SUBSIDY: How does this impact the freight subsidy - no indication that budget contains any recommendations - in our favor is the fact that commissary system depends upon transfer of personnel throughout the service periodically. commissaries - 5% exchanges - markup MWR plus cost within the operations and maintainence account - $'s appropriated for sales overseas - distribution controlled by headquarters in U.S.

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