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Health Care: for People or for Profit?

Date: 22 Oct 1987 (est.)
Length: 517 pages
TIMN0322275-TIMN0322791
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18 Oct 1987
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Minnesota AG
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HEALTH CARE: FOR PEOPLE OR FOR PR®FIT? Program and Abstracts TIMN 322276
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7 APHA Annual Meeting Program and Abstracts New Orleans
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Convention Information THE OFFICIAL PROGRAM 115th ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION AND RELATED ORGANIZATIONS Theme: HEALTH CARE: FOR PEOPLE OR FOR PROFIT? Program Schedule Advance sessions Business Meetings/ Social Hours Exhibits Abstracts , New Orleans, Louisiana Sunday, October 18 - Thursday, October 22, 1987 AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION 1015 15th Street, pIW Washington, DC 20005 Index of Participants TIMN 322278
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ENLIST TNE TEAM THAT FIGHTS LICE FAST. RID' has the combination of ingredients that kills all lice in 10 minutes Pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide work together to maximize the killing power of RID. Clinical tests prove its efficacy' And only RID kills lice in an average of 10 minutes (10.5 -±- 3.4). That's 40% faster than the "fastest" competitor tested, and over 90% faster than Kwell;i the leading Rx alternative? Our clean-up hitter, a patented RID °' comb, removes 100% of nits3 quickly and easily Only the RID nit comb removes all nits-both hatched and unhatched-quickly and easily. This makes it easy to comply with the "no nit" policy followed by many schools and gets kids back to school faster. RID Unbeatable teamwork makes it No.1 References l. Robinson DH, Shepherd DA. Control of head hce m schoo6 children. Curr Ther Res 1980;27 1-6. 2. Meinking TL et al: Comparative efficacy of treatments for pediculosis capitis infestations, Arch Dermatof 1986; 122~267-271. 3. Todd R: Comparative efficacy of mt removal combs. Presented ot the Southern Public Health Association Meeting (Poster Session), Mobile, Alabama, June 27, 1985. The molecular models shown are representarons des.gned to symbolize the ingredients in R1D. PfzPll: Leeming/Pacquin Divisioas nW. r0.n New Y_s 10017 NF And teaching guides help health professionals build more effective lice eradication teams Educational materials specially developed by Leem i ng/Pacqu i n support the teamwork between healthcare professionals and parents to control lice in the communi#y. TIMN 322277
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0 1 4 t TIMN 322279
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Table of Contents Program Com mittee, APHA ...................................................... 4 Convention Information ........................................................... 1 0 Program G uide ..................................:................................. 1 0 Registration ..................................................................... 1 0 Hotel and Hall Locations ....................................................... 1 0 Meal Ticket Sales .............................................................. 1 0 The Exhibits .................................................................... 1 0 Professional Placement Service ................................................ 1 0 Continuing Education ........................................................... 1 0 Information and Other Services ................................................ 11 Meeting Schedule at a Glance ................................................... 2 2 Index of Program Schedule by Primary Sponsor ................................ 2 3 Film Festival ...................................................................... 1 5 Section Awards ........................................................ ........ 2 0 Program Schedule ................................................................ 3 9 Advance Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Continuing Education ............................................................. 144 Business Meetings ................................................................ 148 Social Hours ...................................................................... 154 Governing Council, APHA ........................................................ 156 Section Councils, APHA .......................................................... 158 Agency Mem bers ................................................................. 162 New 40-Year Members ........................................................... 162 Audio Cassette Order Form ...................................................... 165 The Exhibits ....................................................................... 167 Abstracts ................................................................... A bstract 1 Index to Program Participants ................................................ Index 1 Hotel Floor Plans ........................................................ 3 4 Inserts Chronological Summary of Program Schedule Capsule Summary of Exhibitors .$f TIMN 322282
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The Official Program of the 115th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association and Related Organizations $10.00 Prepared by: Helen Ingram Cauthen, Editor Michelle Horton, Production Editor Convention Staff: Bob Johnson, Convention and Exhibits Manager Monica Dixon, Convention Assistant Cover Design: Donya Melanson Associates, Boston, MA 1987 Program Planning Committee The Association extends its sincere appreciation and special thanks on the 1987 Program Planning Committee for the valuable time and effort contributed by its members in developing the program for the 9d5th Annual Meeting. Section Program Chairpersons James W. Luckey, PhD (A&D) Daniel R. Longo, ScD (CHP) Jed S. Hand, DDS, MHSA (DH) Donna M. Lacombe, MSPH (ENV) Cathy E. Falvo, MD, MPH (EPI) E. E. Ho, PhD, RD (F&N) William Rakowski, Phd, MA (GH) Kit Simpson, MPH (HA) William B. Ward, DrPH (IH) Gary D. Davidson, DrPH (LAB) Bernard Guyer, MD, MPH (NFCH) Deborah Freund, PhD, MPH (MC) June Nelson, MS, BSN (MH) r` Michael A. Silverstein, MD, MPH (OHS) John R. Carson, MA (POD) Judith Senderowitz, MA (PFP) Barbara E. Giloth, MPH (PHE) Ida M. Androwich, MS, RN (PHN) Constantine J. Maletskos, PhD (RH) Michael Hoadley, PhD (SHES) Edward A. McKinney, PhD, MPH (SW) Jan W. Kuzma, PhD (STAT) Siu G. Wong, OD, MPH (VC) Members-at-Large Bradford Gray, PhD Louanne Kennedy, PhD Jack Kasten, JD, MPH J. Henry Montes Co-Chairpersons Ruth Roemer, JD William H. McBeath, MD, MPH Staff Liaison Helen Ingram Cauthen TIMN 322281
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~ AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION Fif#een+h Stree+, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005 • (2021 789-5600 10 15 0 5 Fifteenth Street W~shington 20005 • 202 ) 789-5600 WILLIAM H. McBEATH, M.D., M.P.H., Executive Director Dear Annual Meeting Registrant, On behalf of the officers and members of APHA, it is my pleasure again to welcome each colleague attending this 115th Annual Meeting in New Orleans. We hope you find the 1987 convention the most rewarding you have ever experienced. This week will climax an intense year-long period of preparation. Dozens of dedicated APHA members and staff have worked diligently to organize the program, scores of exhibitors have arranged displays, hundreds of platform participants have planned quality presentations, and now thousands of us have involved ourselves by being here to share actively in the result. Amid growing commercialization of health services and'increasing privatization of national health policy, we have chosen to focus this year's program on "Health Care: For People or For Profit?" Today entrepreneurs promote multi-unit health care delivery and financing firms which compete for profitable markets as a business venture. Perceived differences in organizational behavior are attributed to facilities under for-profit or not-for-profit auspices, with differential effects upon access, cost, and quality of care; while others say the distinctions between voluntary and proprietary are blurring. Health care professionals anxiously defend patient care quality from potential adverse effects of the bureaucratization of medicine, the commodification of services, and the corporatization of providers; while less frequently citing the obvious corollary erosion of professional autonomy and control. Notwithstanding claims for increased efficiencies, the inherent inequities of a profit- driven marketplace are becoming more and more obvious for those without resources. The activities of this week are intended to inform us about pressing problems, to sensitize us to important issues, to introduce us to proposals for action, to stimulate our individual and group aspirations, to deepen our professional concern and commitment, to equip us for more effective impact - in short, to facilitate more accomplishment in the challenging responsibilities which make up public health today. We hope this meeting will make a difference! TIMN 322286
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The Best Treatment To Kill Lice And Nits ~ 97% Effective with OneApp/ication ~~  More Effective Than Rid'  Mom Effective Than Kwe//' Rid 63% , &e-fiee Patknts 14 Days Post-Tieatwto AfterSingAeApaicatpn.',2 Minima/ scalp absorption, no CNS toxicity as ivported with /indane overexposure;' 'x. ~ FOR NO ICE~ CREME RINSE permethrin 1% earcouphs w.+rcom.0o. 3ai0 Grmwaltis Road Wehcame Retauoh Trlatfq4e Park, RC 27705 Copc ®,997 &rmuphs Wdrnrtr Co. AI ripMs nnnvd. N1.092 Pkm n.fekmv po.fabrief am.~,of p3aft,,;nfmutiort. VLwcT~~Mn TIMN 322284
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a THE JOSSEY BASS HEALTH SERIES a Shizuko Y Fagerhaugh, Anselm Strauss, Barbara Suczek, Carolyn L Wiener HAZARDS IN HOSPITAL CARE Ensuring Patient Safety This new book shows how to organize work activities to ensure clinical safety-that is, foresee, avoid, and manage haz- ards-while remaining sensitive I to the needs of patients. Draw- ing on extensive observations and interviews at numerous hospitals, it identifies common sources of clinical hazards and offers strategies for coordinating the work of medical and administrative staff so that a focus on safety is explicit. October 1987, $21.95 (tentative) William A. Glaser PAYING THE HOSPITAL The Organization, Dynamics, and Effects of Differing Financial Arrangements William A. Glaser presents an in-depth analysis and compari- son of how hospital operations and capital improvements are financed in Europe and North America. He illustrates how dif- ferent fmancial arrangements work in practice and explains their strengths and weaknesses, providing the comprehensive information needed to effectively evaluate options for fmanc- ing hospitals and containing costs. October 1987, $45.00 Dean C. Coddington, Keith D. Moore MARKET DRIVEN STRATEGIES IN HEALTH CARE The authors show how health care organizations can select, plan, and put into practice the best strategies for competing successfully in today's marketplace. "This book, written by two market researchers, is a signif- icant contribution to the 'how-to' literature in health care because of its market-oriented approach to strategic plan- ning =Healthcare Rrtancial Management May 1987, $29.95 Basil S. Georgopoulos ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE, PROBLEM SOLVING, AND EFFECTIVENESS A Comparative Study of Hospital Emergency Services Based on the largest empirical investigation of hospital emergency care ever undertaken in the United States, this book provides an in-depth examination of the organizational factors that determine the clinical and economic effectiveness of health care systems. S also offers practical information for improving emergency tUt efficiency and effectiveness. November 1986, 532.95 UNDERSTANDING AMERICAS ~t DRINKING the PROBLEM Hazards Don Cahalan a AkoW Don Cahalan UNDERSTANDING AMERICA'S DRINKING PROBLEM How to Combat the Hazards of Alcohol Don Cahalan shows what has gone wrong with our alcohol control programs and how they can be set right. In this book, he pulls together the most recent information on the prev- alence of alcohol problems, public health policy on alcohol, the effectiveness of prevention and treatment programs, and taxation strategies. He analyzes the pros and cons of new strategies proposed by public health planners for reducing alcohol-related problems, presents specific recommendations for more cost-effective treatment of alcoholics, and more. September 1987, $22.95 Lawrence Metzger FROM DENIAL TO RECOVERY Counseling Problem Drinkers, Alcoholics, and Their Families This new book draws on numerous case studies to pre- sent a practical, step-by-step guide to helping problem drinkers and alcoholics through the recovery process. It provides a diagnostic model for identify- ing the nature and severity of an individual's drinking prob- lem. It offers guidelines for a four-stage process of treatment that includes techniques for gathering information, building trusting relationships with clients, making accurate diagnoses, and more. Ready November 1987, $23.95 (tentative) Michael T. Matteson, John M. Ivancevich CONTROLLING WORK STRESS Effective Human Resource and Management Strategies This new book offers detailed guidelines for identifying, managing, and preventing unnecessary stress at work. The authors examine what causes stress in the workplace, describe how stress affects individuals and entire organizations, and provide strategies to help individuals and companies mini- mize stress. October 1987, $25.95 Richard P Sloan, Jessie C. Gruman, John P Allegrante INVESTING IN EMPLOYEE HEALTH A Guide to Effective Health Promotion in the Workplace This new book offers comprehensive guidelines for pro- gram managers on planning and implementing health pro- motion programs-and evaluating their effectiveness. Using case examples, the authors illustrate the financial benefits of sutxessful programs, examine potential ethical conflicts raised by health promotion programs, and more. September 1987, $27.95 Order from address below or call 415/433-1767 Jossey-Bass Inc., Publishers • 433 California Street • San Francisco 94104 TIMN 322283
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CONVENTION INFORMATION Program Guide The program is arranged in chronological order. The sessions are numbered consecutively, with each day assigned a four (4) digit series. Monday sessions carry the 1000 series, Tuesday, 2000 series, etc. The program participants are indexed according to the session number. A dot (0) next to a presentation indicates that its abstract is available. Session numbers will be posted outside of the room locations. Meetings scheduled prior to the Opening General Session are REGISTRATION New Orleans Convention Center Exhibit Hall C Saturday Oct. 17 1:00 pm-7:00 pm Sunday Oct. 18 10:00 am-7:00 pm Monday Oct. 19 8:00 am-5:00 pm Tuesday Oct. 20 8:00 am-5:00 pm Wednesday Oct. 21 8:00 am-5:00 pm Badges must be worn for admission to sessions, exhibits and the Professional Placement Service. included for your information at the end of the program schedule in the 5000 series. Use the Capsule Summary of the Program Schedule (tear-out page) for quick reference for the time, title and location of all sessions. An index of sessions by primary sponsor is located on page 17. All business meetings and social hours of APHA Components, Caucuses and Related Organizations are listed on pages 137-145. PROFESSIONAL PLACEMENT SERVICE The placement center is located in the New Orleans Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C. Job search and interviews will be conducted on-site. The hours of operation for this service will be the same as the exhibits. No one will be admitted without a registration badge. The hours are as follows: Sunday 12:00 pm-5:00 pm Monday 9:00 am-4:00 pm Tuesday 9:00 am-4:00 pm Wednesday 9:00 am-4:00 pm I HOTEL AND HALL LOCATIONS Clarion Hotel (504) 522-4500 Days Inn-Canal St. (504) 586-0110 De Ia Poste Motor Hotel (504) 581-1200 All new job orders Placement Service day in order to be i P and applicant forms must be turne Registration desk, no later than 2:0 ncluded in the binders for the follo d in at the 0 pm each wing day. 1 Holiday Inn-Chateau Lemoyne (504) 581-1303 A HA PRESS R OOM Holiday Inn-French Quarter (504) 529-7211 The press room is located in the Marriott Hotel, Hotel Meridien New Orleans (504) 525-6500 Le Pavilbn Hotel (504) 581-3111 Bonaparte Room. T Saturday he office will be open: 8:30 am-5:30 pm Monteleone Hotel (504) 523-3341 Sunday 8:30 am-5:30 pm New Orleans Marriott Hotel (504) 581-1000 Monday 8:30 am-5:30 pm Pallace Suite Hotel (504) 525-5525 Tuesday 8:30 am-5:30 pm Radisson Suite Hotel (504) 525-1993 Wednesday 8:30 am-5:30 pm Royal Orleans (504) 586-5333 Thursday 8:30 am Royal Sonesta Hotel (504) 586-0300 Westin Canal Place (504) 566-7006 IN~MATION, LOCATOR SERVICE, AND MESSAGE CEN TERS MEAL TICKET SALES A computer listing of annual meeting registrants and their hotel Meal tickets for food functions sponsored by APHA Sections and specified Caucuses and Related Organizations may be purchased at the APHA Meal Ticket Booth located in the registration area. See schedule for location and times. Tickets must be purchased at least 24 hours in advance of the function. THE EXHIBITS The exhibit show will be held in the New Orleans Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C during the following hours: Sunday 12:00 pm-5:00 pm Monday 9:00 am-4:00 pm Tuesday 9:00 am-4:00 pm Wednesday 9:00 am-4:00 pm APHA ASSOCIATION OFFICE The APHA Association Office is located in the Marriott, Mardis Gras J,K. Saturday 8:00 am-6:00 pm Sunday 8:00 am-6:00 pm Monday 8:00 am-6:00 pm Tuesday 8:00 at~-6:00 pm Wednesday 8:00 am-6:00 pm Thursday 8:00 am-6:00 pm locations will be posted daily next to the APHA Information and Message booths at the following locations: New Orleans Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C New Orleans Marriott Hotel Royal Sonesta Hotel Incoming messages for Convention attendees will be received at the above locations during registration hours. Messages may be left by calling the hotel's main number and asking for the APHA Message Center. Check the message boards periodically for incoming calls. Messages cannot be delivered. CONTINUING EDUCATION The C.E. Institutes wil take place in the New Orleans Convention Center. Continuing Education On-Site Registration will take place in the Convention Center. Registration Hours are: Saturday 9:00 am-12:00 noon Sunday 8:00 am- 9:00 am Detailed information concerning offerings are provided on the continuing education page of the program. 10 TIMN 322287 ~ F
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Ear/con Hearing Testing Instrument Advanced technology since 1980. Affordable: Competitively priced. Fast: One second tympanometry. Portable: Three - six pounds, 7.5"W x 3" H x 9" D. Reliable: Digital calibration ensures repeatability and durability. Quality: Now with THREE YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY, FREE first year calibration, and prompt service. Expandable: Impedance, manuallautomatic audiometry, and acoustic reflex. Test Results: LCD display or optional printer.
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Think R&C Shampoa TWice the ovicidal activity Y If you think lice control is only a matter of eradicating lice, thinkagain. Reinfestation is still possible from remaining lice eggs. That's whyyou should recommend R&C SHAMPOOS -the only OTC pediculicide with superior ovicidal activity. It's a powerful ovicidal shampoo In two studies, R&C SHAMPOO demonstrated at least twicethe ovicidal activity of RIDS lotion 12 So your recommendation for R&C SHAMPOO® means there's far less chance of lice eggs ever hatching or causing an infestation. Unlike some pediculicides, R&C SHAMPOO® contains patented ingredients in a true shampoo base that lowers surface tension. This may enhance the ability of the pyrethrin in R&C SHAMPOOS to penetrate the nit, thus exposing it to higher ovicidal concentrationsZ and helping to prevent the reinfestation cycle. It's a fast-acting pediculicide Your recommendation for R&C SHAMPOO®-the fast-acting pediculicide-can help stop the spread of lice to other children and family members. Clinical and laboratory studies have proven R&C SHAMPOOS provides rapid and complete efficacy against lice1-3 In fact, two hours after treatment, R&C SHAMPOO® demonstrated significantl~ superior pediculicidal activity over RID® lotion' It's an easy-to-use lice control treatment You'll find that parents and children like R&C SHAMPOO® because it's easy to use...and as simple as everyday shampooing. They especially appreciate its unique shampoo base that makes one-step administration possible. There's no need for the rinse-out shampoo recommended by other nonpre- scription pediculicides. Additionally, R&C SHAMPOO® is supplied in an unbreakable plastic bottle with a special applicator cap designed to provide even distribution throughout the hair and scalp. By making the treatment more convenient, R&C SHAMPOO® helps make compliance with the directed regimen more certain. You can help stop lice. Recommend the R&C lice control system R&C Shampoo® The only true shampoo-based pediculicide with proven superior ovicidal activity-kills lice and their eggs on contact. RBeC Spray® Kills lice and nits remaining in carpeting, upholstery and bedding to prevent reinfestation or transmission to other family members. (Not for use on humans or animals.) R&C Lice'Ileatment Kit The only complete treatment kit includes: • R&C SHAMPOO® • R&C NITCOMB • R&C SPRAY® Your recommendation of the R&C LICETREATMErvT KiT helps assure implementation of a complete lice control program in each child's household. References 1. Pitman NK Hernandez A: Comparison of pedkulicidai and ovtcidal effects of two pyrethnn-piperonyi butoxide medications. Data on file. Reed & Carnrick.1983. 2. Data on file. Reed & Carnrick.1987. a CorderoC. Zaias N: Clinical evaluation of the pediculicidai and ovicidat effects of two commercial products containing pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide. Data on file. Reed & Carnrlck.1983. For free educational materials, call Reed & Carnricktoll free: 1-800-KIL-LICE. In New Jersey, (201) 981-0700. Think twice... Think R&C for lice control •R&C Shampoo® •R&C Spraye ~ •R&C Lice Treatment Kit ® 1987Reed&Carnridc PrintedinUSR. RC6120 6/87 ( REED & CARNRICK U I Piscataway, NJ 08854 TIMN 322280 _
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LOST AND FOUND For all hotels, please inquire at the front desk in the hotel registration lobby. FIRST AID STATION New Orleans Convention Center. TRIPS AND TOURS Tour information is available at the Tour Booth in the APHA registration area, New Orleans Convention Center. Tours will be provided to various points of interests. Tour information, times, locations and dates can be found on the trips and tour page of the final program. TAPING POLICY Individuals are allowed to record and photograph only to the extent that it is not disruptive to presenters/audience; and to the extent there is agreement by the session presider and speakers. This tape may not be used for commercial use. Audio Cassettes of various sessions will be available for purchase. See cassette order form for details. APHA SMOKING POLICY APHA prohibits smoking at all of its functions. Thank you for not Smoking. HOSPITALITY SUITES See Social Hour Section of the final program. COPIES OF ANNUAL MEETING PAPERS For copies of papers presented at the Annual Meeting, please contact the authors directly. A complete index of program partic- ipants with their addresses is included in the back of the program. APHA does not keep copies of papers after the meeting. See th. AIDS R.cord Exhibit #1"! THE AIDS RECORD COMPLETE COVERAGE OF THE ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME EPIDEMIC Three excellent information and resource services for all profes- sionals involved with the AIDS epidemic: TI» AIDS Record newsletter - news, recent data, funding oppor- tunities, upcoming events, resource contacts. twice a month Th. AIDS Rtieord T.lephonte Resource Stwrles - fast responses to topline questions, leads for more information. "Essential reading for keeping up with AIDS developments" Dennis Andruiltir; National Association of Public Hospitals "...most reliable statistical updatad data available" Sylvia swawt Specialized Hospital Programs, Inc. aaThs raast Informativa of all the AIDS publications. EiatllantN' Laverne A Wintermeyer. MO State EpidemiWoflist Iowa Department of Public Health Th. AIDS Record Ditsctory of Key Program Offictals In Federal, Stats, County and City Gov.mmants - hundreds of people, programs, addresses, telephone numbers. 6N•YfXYA COR/ORATION Ths AIDS Record 810-DATA Publishers 1518 K Street. N,W. - Mezzanine Washington. D.C. 20005 (202) 393-AIDS ---- ~---------------------- NAME. PAOFESSKNJ: ADDRESS. STATE. Z{P TELEPHONE: I t CNIATEA RATES. f2T5 /er Za sxN. m U.t:. anC Ca+iad: f)5 wcb aC~ftkxW copy h a.me .mekp 3325 reei d WaW: s700 .ach so6tiaW cev/ h sam. enwkp. DIr.clay crov a Y sen0 m. _ caps ct tM Dir.clay oriy fu7,95 eacn br rwr~wCacrlews. SuE.criOas r.cu.. oN ccpr tre. per WA fu0acrµnr: aoatimu cepr ar• f30 .acn. e.0. r..Wenb.W {% eWt M[ I6 Nt el4n. UwGEMY 0 a= IitN mr Purctrse Ord.r I t Y~ Aoct.. Expkatfon Datc 11_ NarrN u N app.as on ati.dPt utrG _ Yewr tiqn.turc •Y/dT NAYFf Oi rNN.flM.E EUpGWief ON 4CK OF THIS CARe•• fJ ww, Yet f- h pnt 4 em N wl s-.W1N~ aNLL#M. Charg. ord.rs only - Call 202-393-AIDS i/ 12
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CU L ~ A What? ! ? Come visit us at Booth 241 and see what a Culturgram is. These 4- page briefings on customs, courtesies, and life styles of different people are ideal for those in community health planning, food and nutrition, international health, social work, and other public health professionals who assist people from diverse cultures. Culturgrams provide information on topics such as social customs and courtesies, life style, the people, and the nation's history and government, which is condensed for fast, easy understanding. They have been prepared for 90 areas of the world and are popular with professionals who have more interest than time to study about different peoples. They are perfect for in-service training or as a quick 'reference before visiting with an immigrant client. It is possible to compare the peoples of Mexico, El Salvador, and Puerto Rico. Contrast Samoans, Tongans, and Tahitians. Better understand immigrants from Poland, China, and Australia. Whether working with immigrant populations in the United States or preparing for an assignment abroad, Culturgrams are a must for more effective interactions. The original 56 Culturgrams are in their 6th revision with our current 1986 edition. Over 1.5 million have already been sold to refugee and resettlement agencies, schools, libraries, international businesses, cultural exchange groups, government/military personnel, missionaries, and many other organizations and individuals working with or hosting peoples of the world. An entire set of 90 Culturgrams costs only $23.00 (which includes UPS shipping). This prices each Culturgram at only 220. *Come visit us at Booth 241 for a free Culturgram and catalog Brigham Young University David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies Publication Services, 280 HRCB, Provo, Utah 84602 (801) 378-6528 , TIMN 322291 ;
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FILM AND MEDIA FESTIVAL AT A GLANCE NEW ORLEANS CONVENTION CENTER, ROOM 36 MONDAY, October 19 12:30 2: 00 2:40 3:00 3:35 4:00 4:30 4:55 5:55 Professor Bodywise's Traveling Menagerie, 60 minutes Taking Our Bodies Back: The Women's Health Movement, 33 minutes. About Drug Abuse, 15 minutes Fear of Fat: Dieting and Eating Disorders, 26 minutes Saying No to Drinking Drivers, 23 minutes Unemployment: The Hidden Crisis, 22 minutes A Different Heart, 20 minutes Abortion Clinic, 52 minutes Taking Charge: Teens Speak Out on Sexuality and Birth Control, 22 minutes TUESDAY. October 20 8:30 9:30 Don't Cry for Me, 54 minutes Vision Screening In Preschool and Schooi Age Children, 35 minutes 12:30 AIDS: Answers for Young People, 20 minutes 1:00 AIDS: What Everyone Needs to Know, 18 minutes 1:25 AIDS: Face to Face, 28 minutes 2:00 Not Ready to Die of AIDS: The Story of Paul Cronan, 52 minutes 3:00 The AIDS Movie, 26 minutes 3:30 About AIDS, 15 minutes ~3:50 AIDS: The Choice is Yours, 15 minutes 4:10 AIDS: The Deadly Disease, 15 minutes 4:30 Educating Patients About AIDS, 30 minutes 5:05 AIDS: Changing the Rules, 26 minutes WEDNESDAY, October 21 8:30 9:05 9:35 10:05 Kids and Drugs, 28 minutes Fools Dance, 28 minutes Why Walk?: The Principles of Racewalking, 25 minutes Beyond Brochures: New Approaches to Prevention, 25 minutes 12:30 Teenage Suicide: An Approach to Prevention, 60 minutes 1:35 Understanding Common Breast Problems, 12 minutes 1:50 Fitting the PIeces - Managing Nuclear Waste, 25 minutes 2:20 Sex: A Topic for Conversation/For Teenagers, 25 minutes 2:50 Daughters of Time, 29 minutes 3:25 How to Prevent Nuclear War, 30 minutes 4:00 CPR for Bystanders, 30 minutes 4:35 Portrait of Hope, 24 minutes 4:55 Helping your Baby Sleep Through the Night, 24 minutes 5:25 Criticesj Choice, 13 minutes 5:40 Osteoporosis: The Real Facts, 17 minutes 19
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APHA On-Site Meal Ticket Sales Form 115th Annual Meeting The tickets listed below will be sold at the Meal Ticket Counter in the APHA registration area of the New Orleans Convention Center, Hall "C". Tickets are good only for the specific functions listed on the ticket. Please check your tickets before leaving the Meal Ticket Counter. No refunds of exchanges will be possible. Please purchase your tickets as early as possible. Seating capacity is limited at certain functions. Tickets are available on a first come-first served basis and are generally not available within 24 hours of the function. Tickets will not be sold at the door. Meal Ticket Counter Hours of Operation: Saturday, Oct. 17, 1:00 pm - 7:00 pm Sunday, Oct. 18, 10:00 am - 7:00 pm Monday, Oct. 19, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Tuesday, Oct. 20, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm ***Please check your Convention Program for the exact times and locations of these functtons*** TUESDAY, October 20, 1987 Function Quantity Function Code Desired Code Breakfast -- $14.00 Maternal and Child Health Section (Martha May Eliot Luncheon) E Latino Caucus Breakfast A Mental Health Section Luncheons -- $17.00 (Awards Luncheon) F Chiropractic Forum B Public Health Education Section (Awards Luncheon) G Environment Section (Homer Calver Luncheon) C Public Health Nursing Section H Health Administration Section Statistics Section (Awards Luncheon) D (Spiegelman Award Luncheon) I Quantity Desired --------------------------------------------- APHA Leadership Recognition Banquet Tuesday, October 20, 1987 New Orleans Marriott Hotel Grand Ballroom 6:00 pm -- The President's Reception 7:30 pm -- Banquet, Presentations, Entertainment Banquet and Cash Bar -- $34.00 per person J Banquet and Two Drinks -- $39.00 per person K ----------- - ---- - - - - - ------------------------- WEDNESDAY, October 21, 1987 Function Quantity Function Quantity Code Desired Code Desired Breakfast -- $14.00 Gerontological Health Section (Awards Luncheon) New Professionals Section (Ruth Webb Breakfast) L Luncheons -- $17.00 Food and Nutrition Section (Awards Luncheon) M Laboratory Section (Awards Luncheon) Dinner -- $25.00 N 0 Black Caucus of Health Workers (Hildrus A. Poindexter Awards Dinner) P NOTES: In an effort to pgovide nutritious meals, menus for the above functions have been selected in cooperation with the Food and Nutrition Section of APHA. Vegetarian meals will be available upon request (please see the hoteLcaptain in the room prior to the start of the function). TIMN 322298
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PLEASE NOTE--Continuing Education offerings have a fee in addition to the registration fee for the Annual Meeting. The CE offerings held on Sunday do not require Annual Meeting Registration. Continuing Education credit and certificates will be provided to participants after the Annual Meeting. Attendance is limited-FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED! The following have approved APHA as a provider of CE offerings: Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education American Nurses' Association FILM FESTIVAL Numerous award-winning films are scheduled to be shown at the Fourth Annual APHA film and media festival. These films will be shown several times during the three-day film festival. Detailed descriptions concerning each film can be found on the film media page of the program. HANDICAPPED INFORMATION Accessibility Information is available at the Information Booth at the Convention Center, APHA Registration Area. Numerous sessions this year will focus on issues dealing with the handicapped. In the need for assistance and/or informtion, contact the convention Code Hotel .1 2 Clarion Hotel • 1500 Canal St. Days Inn-Canal St. • 1630 Canal St. 3 De la Poste Motor Hotel • 316 Chartres St. 4 5 6 Holiday Inn-Chateau Lemoyne • 301 Rue Daphne Holiday Inn-French Quarter • 124 Royal St. *Hotel Meridien New Orleans • 614 Canal St. 7 Le Pavilion Hotel • Baronne at Poydras 8 Monteleone Hotel • 214 Royal St. 9 'New Orleans Marriott Hotel • 555 Canal St. 10 Pallace Suite Hotel • 1732 Canal St. 11 Radisson Suite Hotel • 317 Julia St. 12 Royal Orleans • 621 St. Louis St. 13 *Royal Sonesta Hotel • 300 Rue Bourbon 14 Westin Canal P1ace • 111 Rue Iberville office staff located at each meeting location. Convention Bureau Monitors are also available for assistance and information. The APHA Housing Bureau will also handle any special accommo- dation needs for handicapped persons making a request. Visual interpretation for the deaf will be available at the Opening and Closing General Sessions. Seating will be reserved on a first come-first served basis. Numerous scientific sessions will focus on issues dealing with the handicapped. Each meeting room has space designated in the back of the room for wheelchairs. MEMBERSHIP BOOTH The APHA Membership Booth is located in the APHA registration area located in the New Orleans Convention Center. Hours of operation are the same as for registration. F--,a oayD11~`~ao~ ~ J i . E. _j" ~L-L C\ G _--7r7M 7:~ "~~X_ u s 11 TIMN 322288 1 9 11 L-JU 0 ©
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How to Prevent a Nuclear War (New Day Films) 30 minutes How to Prevent a Nucl,ear War is a refreshingly upbeat and positive film about the kinds of activities that anyone can engage in to lessen the threat of nuclear war. Shown working for peace are a Republican housewife, a flight attendant, a shipyard welder, a physicist, a gospel choir and many others. Also included is a cameo appearance by satirist Tom Lehrer. This film will leave viewers with the feeling that they can and must make a difference About AIDS (Pyramid Film & Video) 15 minutes This candid film tells us what AIDS is, how it spreads, and what we can do to protect ourselves. It features current terminology, clear and explicit computer graphics, and a professional approach that is especially appropriate for educating the public about this life-threatening epidemic. CPR for Bystanders (Pyramid Film & Video) 30 minutes A basic life support film designed to supplement CPR training classes for professional rescuers including medical and health care professionals and emergency medical technicians. Training modules include: assessment, ABC's of CPR, one rescuer CPR, child CPR, infant CPR, choking, risk factors in heart attack, signals & actions for survival, and dramatic re-enactments. Critical Choice (Pyramid Film & Video) 13 minutes This is one of a series of films dealing with Issues in Bioethics. In this video a hospital director, struggling to allocate scarce resources, must decide whether to authorize an emergency liver transplant needed to save one child's life, or instead to fund a new program that could prevent up to 30 infants from dying within the next year. Critical Choice is particularly useful for inservice education. Portrait of Hope (Pyramid Film & Video) 24 minutes Portrait of Hope, Ellen Kingsley's personal account of her about with breast cancer, offers information and encouragement to the one out of every eleven women who must face this life-threatening disease. The film provides vital information about discovery and diagnosis, treatment options, physical and psychological aspects of recovery, effects of the illness on personal relationships, and the importance of early detection in saving lives. Helping your Baby Sleep Through the Night (The Media Center for Health Concerns) 24 minutes Using a warm and reassuring tone, the video teaches parents of new babies how to eliminate middle of the night feedings. Informative and entertaining, the video incorporates the latest leep research, and illustrates practle-al methods for preventing sleep problems. It is ideal for use in parent education classes, and well-baby clinics. 18 Don't Cry for Me (Umbrella Films) 54 minutes Don't Cry jor Me is a documentary about five outstanding individuals who have one thing in common: they were all born with Cystic Fibrosis. While these young adults all have CF, this program is not as much about the disease and dying as it is about life and living. It is about people who are aware of their shortened life spans, and who wish to share their feelings about life and death with all of us. Vision Screening In Preschool and School Age Children (University of Calgary) 35 minutes = Vision Screening presents a general introduction to ~ the principles and strategies of vision screening, ~ including history-taking, critical points in the ~ screening procedures, and choice of appropriate tests. Through three short vignettes, the video demonstrates methods of screening 'Distance Visual ; Acuity", and "Muscles Balance Coordination" ` through a series of tests administered by community, health nurses working with children and parents. Vision screening is designed principally as a ~ teaching and review film for nursing students and community health nurses. TIMN 322295
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1987 SECTION AWARDS $ECTION AWARD : y 1i# I :oa R= SESSION NO. CHP Richard H. Schlesinger David Abernethy, MPH 1105 DH John W. Knutson Distinguished Service Award Martha J. Fales, PhD 1155 ENV Homer Calver Lecture Distinguished Service Award To be announced To be announced 20BO EPI Wade Hampton Frost R. Palmer Beasley, MD 1109 F&N Lectureship John Snow Award Helen R Stacey Award George B. Hutchinson. MD, MPH Susan E. Winchester. RD, BS 3081 H Mary C. E an Award Joseph A.alsh Award Honorable Mention Key Award for Excellence Susan A. Kersch, RD, BS Carla Bouchard, MS. RD Kathleen Grassi, BS Phyllis Allen, RD, BS Gall Woodward, RD, BS Stanley J. Brody, JD. MSW 082 HA in Gerontology Excellence in Health To be announced 2083 IH Administration Distinguished Career Award To be announced . Sunday, 2:00-5:00 LAB Difco Award Roger L Anderson, PhD 3087 MCH Young Professional Award Dorothy Howze Browne PhD 2032 . MC MH Outstanding Meritorious Service Annual Mental Health To be announced Therese LaLancette, MA, MPH 2093 MH/EPI STAT Section Award Rema Lapouse Darrel A. Regier. MD,MPH 2136 OH&S POD Alice Hamilton Award Stephen and Mary Ann Toth a) Practitioner To be announced Marvin Shapiro, DPM Sunday. 4:00-5:30 PFP b) Student Carl Shultz To be announced Anne Murray, MPA 1137 PHE Tribute in Memoriam Sarah Mazelis Distin uished Career L Nan Stout, MPH Patricia Dolan Mullen, DrPH 2098 PHN Early ~areer Ruth B. Freeman Unda J. Wright, MPH Delores Wennlund, MSPH, RN 2099 SW STAT Distinguished Career CreativeAchievement Outstanding Achievement in Public Health Social Work Annual Lowell J. Reed Lecturer Anne Stewart Helton, RN, MS Yetta Appel, PhD To be announced 159 Spiegelman Award LJ.Wei,PhD 2101 C Statistics Section Award Dis ished Service Award Joel C. Kleinman, PhD Judy Bean. PhD Theodore Colton, ScD Thomas W. Pruett, OD 096 Ou ding Project Award Outstanding Student Award Helen Keller International Jean-Paul Heldt, MD 20 TIMN 322297
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The New Orleans Convention Center 6 a ~ 8 ~9 0{ 1 -12-{ ~ I1 14 13 ~ 16 8 15 1 --- 0
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INDEX BY PRIMARY SPONSOR Sponsor/Session Title SECTIONS Session No. Sponsor/Session Title Session No. APHA GENERAL SESSIONS Opening General Session: Local Health Services: Crisis on the Front Line ......................... 1000 Concurrent Special Session ...............................2068, 3071 Evening General Session .......................... 1159 Closing General Session ........................... ~4033 American Public Health Association Film and Media Festival ........................... 1002 Highlights of Federal Initiatives in Minority Health ...... 1003 Approaches to Implementing Model Standards in Eight Health Agencies Poster Session ................... 1004 The Insurance and Liability Crisis: Vaccines, Malpractice and Product Liability the Hidden Agenda Revealed .... 1005 Health Care for Profit: State and Local Impact and Public Policy Options ...........................................................1029 16th Annual President-Elect Session ................. 1083 Film and Media Festival ........................... 1084 APHA Public Hearings on Proposed Resolutions and Position Papers .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1085 American Public Health Association Evening General Session ...................................... 1159 Organizing for Public Health Advocacy ............... 2004 Film and Media Festival .......................... 20041 Special Session: What We Know About For-Profit Health Care: Access, Costs, Quality, Accountability .......... 2068 Special Session: Recent Changes in the Sponsorship and Organization of Health Services ................... 2069 Special Session: The Privatization of Public Health Services ...................................... 2070 Film and Media Festival ........................... 2074 State Health Insurance - A Step Forward or Back? ..... 20741 Model Standards for Community Preventive Health Services: Progress in Implementation and Data Benchmarks Efforts ............................ 2106 Primary Intervention: Individual vs. Community Service .2107 Film and Media Festival ........................... 2163 Special Session: Action on Apartheid ................. 2164 American Public Health Association President's Recegtion .................................... 2232 APHA Leadership Recognition Banquet and Sedgwick Memorial Award Presentation .................... 2240 Film Festival ..........................................................3005 American Public Health Association Governing Council Sessions II & III ............................... 3070 Special Session: Health vs. Profits ................... 3071 Special Session: Uncompensated Care and the For-Profit Motive-A Debate ............................. 3072 Special Session: International Perspectives on Private Participation in Health Care ...................... 3073 Film and Media Festival ........................... 3075 Child Care Workshop-Child Day Care Health and Safety Standards ..............................Film and Media Festival ........................... 3152 115th Annual Meeting Closing General Session ......... 4033 C. E. Institute 1- A Problem Solving Methodology for Improving Community Health .................... 5005 C. E. Institute 2- Model Standards for Community Preventive Health Services: An Educational Tool for Teachers of Preventive Medicine and Public Health .... 5010 C. E. Institute 3- WorkShop on Health Status Measures .. 5012 Governing Council Orientation ..................... 5013 Candidates Forum for APHA National Offices ......... 5015 American Public Health Association Governing Council Session 1 ..................................... 5017 APHA Orientation Session ........................ 5020 APHA Year 2000 Public Hearing .................... 5021 APHA Icebreaker All Sections Social Hour ............ 5022 Candidates Forum US Presidential ................................ 5022 OPENING GENERAL SESSION 115th Annual Meeting ............................ 1000 APHA Highlights for Sunday, October 18 Public Health Exhibition APHA Candidates' Forum APHA Governing Council APHA Member Orientation All Section Icebreaker SECTIONS Alcohol and Drugs Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs: What Do We Know About the Problems and Their Solutions? Poster Session Part 1 ................................. 1001 International Marketing of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs 1028 The Worksite as a Positive Force for Health: Alcohol and Tobacco Intervention Efforts ..................... 1098 Getting the Most for Our Alcohol and Drug Treatment Dollar ....................................... 1099 Double Trouble: The Young Drinking Driver .......... 2001 Recent Developments in the Classification of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence ......................... 2002 Who Uses Tobacco and How Can We Help Them Stop Poster Session ................................. 2071 The New "War on Drugs"-A One-Year Progress Report and Critical Review ............................ 2104 Health Consequences of Alcohol and Drug Use and Abuse ....................................... 3003 Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs: What We Do Know About the Problems and Their Solutions Part II ...... 3074 Preventing Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Multilevel Perspective ................................... 3095 Money Talks! Bucks, Booze and Butts ................. 3096 Smoke, Smokeless, Smoke Less! ..................... 3165 Drugs, Alcohol and AIDS Update ................... 3166 Drug Abuse and the Neonate ....................... 4000 Dental Health Fluoride Availability and Dental Fluorosis Prevalence .... 1036 Symposium on Cost-Effectiveness and Benefit-Cost Analysis ..................................... 1106 John W. Knutson Distinguished Service Award in Dental Public Health ................................. 1155 Dental Health Contributed Papers I .... 2011 Survey of Local Dental Health Programs: Implications for the Future .................................... 2012 Dental Health Poster Session I ...... 2079 The Evolution of Infection Control Practice: Dentistry as a Model for Other Health Professions ................. 2112 Dental Health Roundtables ........................ 2179 Dental Health Contributed Papers III ................ 3011 Dental Health Contributed Papers II ................. 3012 Dental Health Poster Session II 3078 ..................... Periodontal Disease: Is it a Public Health Problem? ...... 3102 Analyses of Factors Affecting Dental Health of the Public .3171 23 TIMN 322300
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APHA HIGHLIGHTS FOR SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18 Complete List of Advance Sessions - See Page 140 12:00 noon - 5:00 p.m. PUBLIC HEALTH EXHIBITION Opening Ceremony - 12:00 noon Ruth Roemer, JD, Presiding New Orleans Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C 12:00 noon - 1:30 p.m. 2:00 - 5:00 p•m- 5:00 - 6:00 p.m. APHA CANDIDATES' FORUM Marriott, Mardi Gras Ballroom E APHA GOVERNING COUNCIL--SESSION I Marriott, Grand Ballroom APHA MEMBER ORIENTATION Marriott,Mardi Gras, Ballroom E 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. ALL SECTION ICEBREAKER All Registrants Invited to Attend Marriott, Grand Ballroom SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION TIMN 322313
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3024 AIDS: Current Issues in Management of Health Administration Services 8:30-10:00 am 3034 AIDS Related Issues in the Lesbian and Gay Lesbian & Gay Caucus Community 8:30-10:00 am 3054 AIDS: Implications for Family Planning and Population and Family Sexuality Education 8:30-10:00 am Planning 3061 AID S Social Work 8:30-10:00 am 3069 Minority Women's Health Care in the '80s Women's Caucus 8:30-10:00 am 3088 AIDS Funding and Costs Lesbian & Gay Caucus 10:30-12:00 noon 3091 Health Education Poster Session II--AIDS Public Health Education 12:30-2:00 pm Education 31015 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: AIDS Epidemiology 2:00-3:30 pm 3126 Children with Special Health Care Needs Maternal and Child 2:00-3:30 pm Health 3158 Racism and AIDS Lesbian & Gay Caucus 2:00-5:00 pm 3160 A Window on the Future of Occupational Occupational Health & Health and Safety: Contributed Papers VI 2:00-5:00 pm Safety , 3188 Public Health Aspects of AIDS: A Global International Health Perspective 4:00-5:30 pm 3191 Bi-coastal AIDS Prevention with Special Lesbian & Gay Caucus Populations: Issues on Outreach and Educational Modalities 4:00-5:30 pm 3209 AIDS Social Work 4:00-5:30 pm THURSDA~ 4007 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: AIDS II Epidemiology 8:30-10:00 am 4026 Health Education Research II Public Health' 8:30-10:00 am Education 4033 Closing General Session- AIDS: Challenge American Public to Public Health Health Association 10:30-12:00 noon { 32 10 TIMN 322309
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Marriott Hotel 2nd Floor \ '~--- --WI9 6 ~ 5 ~ 4 ~ ~L.. .~ ~..~.~ rLa Galerie 3 i 2 ; 1 r&- -'! T Exhibit Hall 3rd Floor F_j Mardi Gras 1 C, G ~ Ballroom ~ B H ~ E D IA Ir-+"11 r-n . t ' s. . il *$$ ~ Grand Ballroom Carondelet I Bissonet 1 Acadia EJEMi - - ih~ = S 4th Floor Iberville Regent Bacchus Bonaparte ' r-A-1 r-,r-S- ~------~ ® Upper Mardi Gras m ® 1 m 1 i ~ 1 r -~"t._~ 5th Floor 2 FLOOR PLAN TIMN 322312
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 19 HEALTH CARE: FOR PEDPLE OR FOR PR®Fft? TIMN 322314
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efforts are presented. There Is particular emphasis on organizational and policy change and on fostering coalitions and networks. Unemployment: The Hidden Crisis (Contra Costa Health Services Department) 22 minutes This award winning film portrays vignettes of unemployed workers discussing the devastating emotional, social, physical and financial impact of prolonged unemployment. With commentary by knowledgeable and caring frontline workers (a doctor, mental health worker, social worker, and employment specialist and policymakers). The video goes on to present a community-based model for dealing with the health and social effects of unemployment through face-to-face counseling, hotlines and referral services. It reveals the importance of coordination of services and public policy change. A Different Heart (Fanlight Productions) 20 minutes A Dfferent Heart profiles three families with children who were born with heart defects and other health problems. Using interviews with the children themselves, as well as the parents, the film chronicles the struggles each family faces as they try to create normal lives for themselves and their children. The film addresses such issues as setting realistic limitations for children without making them feel "different," coping with the possibility of multiple operations, and dealing with the emotional strains of having a child born with heart defects. Abortion Clinic (Fanlight Productions) 52 minutes A frankk and compelling look at this highly charged subject, Abortion CIinic focuses not only on a clinic where more than three thousand abortions were performed last year, but also on the activities of a "Right-to-Life" doctor who pickets the clinic every Saturday, offers counseling on alternatives, and provides free housing to women who decide to carry their pregnancies to term. In its even-handed approach, the film looks at not only a young woman who chooses to terminate her pregnancy, but also another young woman who considers an abortion, but then choses to carry her pregnancy to term. In exploring the decision-making of these and other women. Abortion Clinic demonstrates that simplistic "pro-choice" vs. "pro-life" debates offer little real comfort to the millions of young women-- and men--who every year must make for themselves one of the most difficult decisions of a lifetime. Taking Charge: Teens Speak Out on Sexuality and Birth Control (Fanlight Productions) 22 minutes Taking Charge interweaves the intimate conversations of five teenagers and a physician concerning birth control and sexuality. It looks at the myths and misc9 nceptions which many teens hold, and the complex realities they confront in seeking to deal with this new and confusing aspect of 16 their lives. The program stresses that accurate information about birth control is the first step toward making mature decisions. Taking Charge is designed to trigger discussion among teens, parents, health care professionals and others concerned with teenage sexuality. AIDS: Face to Face (Films for the Humanities and Sciences) 28 minutes AIDS Face to Face follows Phil Donahue as he visits the AIDS ward at St. Clare's Hospital in New York. In his conversations with dying patients, Donahue pinpoints the role of family and professionals in caring for victims. Few of us will be spared acquaintance with at least one victim. This program tels us what we must know and do. Kids and Drugs (Films for the Humanities and Sciences) 28 minutes Kids and Drugs tells the stories of five teenagers and their battles with drug abuse. The program provides insight from experts and explores parental denial, children's denial, warning signs and the stress that drug and alcohol abuse inevitably put on the family. Not Ready to Die of AIDS: The Story of Paul Cronan (Films for the Humanities and Sciences) 52 minutes Not Ready to Die ofAIDS documents 16 months in the life of AIDS patient Paul Cronan, a New England telephone repairman. The camera is with Cronan as he experiences the gamut of emotions from despondency to rage to despair to acceptance as he battles the disease and the prejudice of fellow employees. One man's experience with AIDS becomes a primer for all of us--a tool for understanding--at a time of mounting apprehension. Fools Danee (Generation Films) 28 minutes This award winning film is set in a contemporary American convalescent home, a mysterious patient with a penchant for Shakespeare reaffirms the joy of living despite the presence of old age and death. The strange yet wonderful new patient is at first regarded as simply senile and then downright disruptive as other patients begin demonstrating their own brand of joie de vivre. But soon he proves there is method to his madness and teaches both staff and residents that life, even in the shadow of death, is to be enjoyed and lived to the fullest. Professor Bodywise's Traveling Menagerie Live Production (Kaiser Permanente) 50 minutes Professor Bodywise's Traveling Menagerie Is a live theatrical performance by professional actors using both puppets and full-size costumes. It was sponsored by Kaiser Permanente as a community service to promote basic health education for children. The production Is designed to promote individual responsibility for one's body, to emphasize basic health and safety messages for students in grades K-6 and to instill a positive attitude toward healthy choices in lifestyle. TIMN 322293
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The Monteleone 1 • • Queen Anne Room • I West ~ 0 Bonnet Carre Room Mezzanine Foyer ero East • m La Nouvelle Orleans , Room .~ _ ~1C_ pfl berville ~ Iberville I North ~ South 1 Hotel Meridien 1 Lasalle Grand Ballroom 11 St. Jerome 7 Maurepas, 9 Rosalie FLOOR PLAN r ® La Nouvelle Orleans "WC_ Bienville 5 Conde F- 8 Orleans 6 Frontenaz t-T ~ 10 Saint-Claude TIMN 322310 -
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• D MOM IPTMIT1714~1 ALL FILMS WILL BE SHOWN IN THE NEW ORLEANS CONVENTION CENTER, ROOM 36 AIDS: Changing the Rules (AIDSFILMS) 26 minutes A critically acclaimed educational documentary targetting adult heterosexuals, hosted by Ron Reagan, Beverly Johnson and Ruben Blades. This informative straight-forward (verbally explicit where appropriate) film says what others have been afraid to say: how to protect yourself even if you are sexually active. Osteoporosis: The Real Facts (Accredited Professional Educational Seminars) 17 minutes Osteoporosts : Tlz.e Real Facts helps the viewer make informed decisions about preventative and therapeutic measures regarding osteoporosis. The film describes the risk factors, cuts through the myths and misunderstandings regarding calcium and estrogen therapy, and shows proper types of exercises for the osteoporotic person as well as for prevention. Taking Our Bodies Back: The Women's Health Movement (Cambridge Documentary Films, Inc.) 33 minutes Taking Our Bodies Back explores ten critical areas of the women's health movement, from the revolutionary concept of self-help to the issue of informed surgical consent. The film documents a growing movement of women to regain control of their bodies. It shows women becoming aware of their rights in dealing with the medical industry. The film takes a look at: self-help and self- examination, birth at home, abortion, high school women, breast cancer, health care for women of color. About Drug Abuse (Channing L. Bete Co., Inc.) 15 minutes About Drug Abuse is an attention-getting video that helps viewers understand why some people use drugs, and the losses they may face: their health, jobs, family--even their lives. It gives information on the physical and psychological effects of drugs, and tells where to locate help. The video utilizes a 3- part format with: on the street interviews, commentary by noted experts and special animation. About Drug Abuse is designed for viewers age 11 and up. AIDS: Answers for Young People (Churchill Films) 20 minutes A film created to help teach the facts about AIDS in a manner appropriatte for upper elementary and junior high school students (ages 11-14). How AIDS is transmitted is explained. Emphasis is on prevention (including abstinence), soothing unnecessary fears while explaining why and how to avoid high risk behaviors and fostering compassion for persons with AIDS. AIDS: What Everyone Needs to Know (Revised) (Churchill Films) 18 minutes This award-winning authoritative film was made in cooperation with the UCLA AIDS center, which examines the threat of AIDS coolly and thoughtfully. Viewers learn how the AIDS virus destroys the body's immune system, and how that lays the body open to other diseases, common and exotic. There is discussion of symptoms, diagnosis, how AIDS is and is not transmitted, the growing danger to the general population, and how to protect oneself. This revised version contains updated statistics, the latest information about the progressive nature of AIDS, and interviews with several AIDS patients. Fear of Fat: Dieting and Eating Disorders (Churchill Films) 26 minutes An instructive and moving look at the contemporary societal compulsion to diet and the potentially life-threatening eating disorders which often result. The film looks at how different societies have had wildly differing requirements for beauty, then focuses on contemporary examples of women trying to meet these expectations. In interviews and discussions, anorectics, compulsive overeaters and bulemics explain how they drifted into eating disorders, and what they have learned about the health and life-threatening consequences. Saying No to Drinking Drivers (Churchill Films) 23 minutes One key to the teen drunk driving problem is the crucial moment when a student decides whether to step in the car--as passenger or driver. This film provides essential tools students need to cope with peer pressure. Typical situations are dramatized with optional discussion stops; positive modeling by peers reveals options and solutions, including the most effective one: planning ahead. Beyond Brochures: New Approaches to Prevention (Contra Costa Health Services Department) 25 minutes Beyond Brochures explores different approaches to health policy and prevention efforts and proposes a model to assist health professionals in the development of prevention strategies. The model outlines a continuum of intervention levels ranging from individual education to policy change. Examples of successful local, state and national 15 TIMN 322292
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MQNDAY 4~1~SSI®NS IID~~No WrTH AIDS 19 ~.~ ~ ~ 1016 AIDS and State Health Agencies National Association of 12:30-2:00 pm Public Health Policy 1055 Women and AIDS: Part I Lesbian & Gay Caucus 2:00-3:30 pm 1057 AIDS: Treatment of a Chronic Illness Medical Care 2:00-3:30 pm 1068 The Politics of AIDS Education: How to Function Public Health Effectively in a Political Climate Education 2:00-3:30 pm 1091 AIDS Virus Antibody Testing in the Public Laboratory Health Laboratory 2:00-5:00 pm 1118 Legal Spects of AIDS Treatment and Screening Health Law Forum 4:00-5:30 pm 1121 Women and AIDS: Part II Lesbian & Gay Caucus 4:00-5:30 pm 1153 Approaches to the AIDS Dilemma: Social Association for the Science Perspectives Social Sciences in 7:00-8:30 pm Health 1164A Black Caucus Special Session on AIDS Black Caucus 7:00-8:30 pm TUESDAY 2040 AIDS, Plague of the Century: Mental Health Perspectives 8:30-10:00 am 2078 Community Health Planning Roundtable 12:30-2:00 pm 2123 Economic Impact of AIDS on the Health Care Delivery System 2:00-3:30 pm 2130 Attitudes About AIDS and Homosexuality 2:00-3:30 pm 2183 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Health Risk Behavior 4:00-5:30 pm 2199 AIDS Education 4:00-5:30 pm 2220 AIDS Education in the Schools 4:00-5:30 pm WEDNESDAY 3010 AIDS and Black Folks: Straight Talk 8:30-19:00 am Mental Health Community Health Planning Health Administration Lesbian & Gay Caucus
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Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Dental Health Contributed Papers V ................. 4004 Dental Health Contributed Papers VI ................ 4005 Environment Understanding and Addressing Community Attitudes Toward Hazardous Waste Facilities ................. 1037 Nonregulatory Hazardous Waste Management Programs . 1107 Pediatric Environmental Issues ..................... 1108 Environmental Aspects of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) ............................... 2013 Homer N. Calver Lecture, Luncheon and Business Meeting ...................................... 2080 Environmental Risks: Policies and Practices ........... 2113 Environmental Health Concerns in Day Care Centers .... 2114 Consumer Protection Programs ..................... 2180 Indoor Air Quality Concerns ....................... 2181 Community Exposure to Environmental Contamination .3014 Environmental Health Poster Session ................ 3079 Emergency Response Issues and Planning Efforts ....... 3103 New Issues in Local Environmental Health Programs .... 3104 Use of Risk Assessment in Protecting Public Health and the Environment ............................... 3172 Water Quality Issues and Programs .................. 3173 Epidemiology Epidemiology Poster Session I ...................... 1006 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Reproductive Epidemiology ................................. 1038 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Surveillance ........ 1039 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Cardiovascular Disease ...................................... 1040 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Infectious Disease Vaccines ..................................... 1041 Wade Hampton Frost Lecture/John Snow Award/Section Business Meeting .............................. 1109 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Infectious Disease .... 2115 Factors Related to Mortality and Functioning in the Elderly: The National Institute on Aging's Established Population for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (EPESE) ...... 2116 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Keeping Healthy ..... 2117 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Computers/Testing Validity in MCH ............................... 2118 Risk of Cancer in Developing Countries .............. 2166 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Health Risk Behavior .2183 Healthier People: Probability-Based Health Risk Appraisal .................................... 2184 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Infectious Disease .... 3015 Epidemiology Poster Session II ..................... 3080 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Aids .............. 3105 Epidemiology: Late Breakers I ...................... 3106 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Assessing Risk ...... 3107 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Cancer ............ 3108 EPI Late Breakers II .............................. 3174 The National Cancer Institute Supplements to the 1987 National Health Interview Survey: Part II ........... 3175 Epidemiology Contributed Papers: Aids II ............. 4007 Food and Nutrition Nutrition Surveillance and Food Intake Patterns Poster Session ...................................... 1007 Agnes Higgins Award ............................. 1042 Dietary Guidelines for Cancer Prevention: Science, Policy, Dissemination ................................ 1043 Current Issues in Nutrition: Dealing with Myths and Misconceptions ... . . . .. .... . .. ................1110 Food in Africa: Long-Term Perspectives ............... 2014 Innovative Public Health Nutrition Ideas: Poster Session .2081 Cost-Effectiveness of Nutrition Intervention Programs ... 2119 A Marketing, Approach td Health Promotion/Nutrition Intervention 2185 Assessing Changing .................................. etary Patterns in Community Health Promotion .............................. 3016 24 Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Kaiser Foundation Health Promotion Program ................3032 Awards Luncheon .....................................................3081 Breastfeeding Promotion .......................... 3110 Nutritional Epidemiology and Evaluation ............. 3176 Innovative Approaches to Maternal and Child Nutrition Programs .................................... 3177 Model Programs of Nutritional Intervention ........... 4008 Forum on Bioethics Ethics, Decision-Making and Long-Term Care ......... 1044 Ethics and the Health Professions .................... 1111 Ethical Dilemmas in Financing Health Care ........... 2015 Assessing the Ethical Dilemmas Posed by Reproductive Technology: A Panel Discussion ................... 2120 Ethical Issues in Marketing Health ................... 2186 Social Justice and Health Policy ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3017 Ethical Dilemmas in Policy Making and Clinical Practice . 3111 Ethical Issues in an Era of Medical Technology ......... 3178 Gerontological Health Gerontological Health Poster Session I ............... 1008 Chronic Conditions in the Older Population ........... 1045 Entering and Leaving the Nursing Home .............. 1046 Strategies in Financing Long-Term Care Services ........ 1047 Disease Prevention/Health Promotion in Community- Wide Health Education Programs ................. 1112 Case Mix in Long-Term Care ....................... 1113 Program Initatives Along the Continuum of Care ....... 1114 Injury Prevention and Control in the Elderly ........... 2016 Prospective Payment, Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) and the Health Care System ...................... 2017 Topics in quality of Care and Quality Assurance ........ 2018 Gerontological Health Poster Session II ............... 2082 Analyzing the Cost Dimensions of Health Services Delivery ..................................... 2121 Programs for Older Adult Health Education ........... 2122 Health Maintenance Organization Enrollments, Disenroliments and Financing .................... 2187 Hospitals and the Aged: Longitudinal Case-Management Experience ................................... 2188 Health Professional Education and Commitment to Long-Term Care of the Aged ...................... 2189 Profit and Ownership Type in Health Care ............. 3018 Meeting the Challenge of Alzheimer's Disease .......... 3019 Personal Health Behavior in Late Life ................ 3020 Awards Luncheon ....................................................3082 Developing the S/HMO for Effective Health Care Provision ..................................... 3112 Resident and Facility Dynamics Within the Nursing Home Setting ..................... . ` ........... 3113 The Health and Functioning of Minority Elderly ........ 3114 State and Local Programs for Older Adult Health ....... 3179 Home Care: Clientele, Cost and Quality .............. 3180 Geriatric Primary Care and Cost Containment: Diaster or Dialectic? .................................. 3181 Health Administration State and Local Health Department Linkages .......... 1009 Medicaid Program Innovation Roundtables: Research and Policy ......................Health Administration Poster Session ................ 1011 Computer Software Exchange ...................... 1012 Technology Assessment ........................... 1048 Health Care Cost and Competition: Dealing With Today's Agenda .....................................Impact of DRGs ................................. 1050 State of the Art Report on Minority Access Issues: A Workshop/ Panel........................................ 1081 Computer Software Exchange ...................... 1088 Changing Pattern of Public and Private Health Insurance . 1089 Ambulatory Care in a For-Profit Environment .......... 1115 Physician Behavior ............................... 1116 TIMN 322301
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OPENING GENERAL SESSION HEALTH CARE: FOR PEOPLE OR FOR PROFIT? 115th Annual Meeting Monday, October 19, 1987 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon 1000 New Orleans Convention Center, Ballroom Convener William H. McBeath, MD, MPH Executive Director American Public Health Association Welcome Sandra L. Robinson, MD, MPH State Health Officer and Secretary Department of Health and Human Services State of Louisiana APHA Presidential Addressg,,,,ns "The Right to Health Care: 6affte and Gaps" Ruth Roemer, JD President American Public Health Association Keynote Address 1987 Margaret Baggett Dolan Lecture "Profit: A Look at the Bottortr Line" Rashi Fein, PhD Professor Department of Social Medicine and Health Policy Harvard School of Medicine McBeath Robinson SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION ~ 38 PROGRAM SCHEDULE Roemer Fein TIMN 322315
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Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Sponsor/Session Title The Sick Citadel IV: For-Profit Activities of Academic Medical Centers ............................... 1147 Building Local Health Policy Research/Advocacy Groups . .. .... ... 1148 The Impact of the World Debt on International Health Care ........................................ 2061 Medical Profits and Competition in the South: Home-Grown Problems and Solutions .............. 2062 Health vs. Wealth: Conflict of Interest Within the Private Health Industry ............................... 2157 Race, Class and Health Important Issues for the Progressive Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2158 The Impact of Medical Indigency on Access to Preventive Health Care ................................... 2224 Public vs. Private: An International Survey on Systems of Funding National Health ........................ 2225 Research on the Impact of Corporate Decision Making on American Health Care and the Health Labor Force .... 3064 The Commodification of Health Care ................ 3065 Women's Caucus Women's Caucus Poster Session I ... .1027I Quality of Care and Reproductive Health Services: United States-Third World Linkages ...................... 1097I Women and Poverty-Selected Papers ................ 1151 Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Holistic Health Approach to Treatment .................................. 2066 Gender Issues in Health Care Delivery ................ 2067 Sexuality and the Older Woman ..................... 2162 National Center for Health Statistics: Selected Studies on Women's Health ............................... 2172 Abortion in the US: Reproductive Rights Under Siege ... 2231 Minority Women's Womens Health Care in the'80s ..... 3069 Womens Leadership Role in Community Health -The Time is Now: Roundtable Discussions .............. 3150- Women and Child Survival ......................... 4031 Peace Caucus Nuclear Testing on Trial: The Desert Defense Experience . 1135 War and Peace: Issues in Public Health .............. . 30961 Nuclear War, Militarism and Public Health-International Perspectives .................................. 2144 Action for Peace: A Workshop ...................... 3134 RELATED ORGANIZATIONS American Association of Public Health Physicians American Association of Public Health Physicians Luncheon .................................... 2072 Association of Community Health Nurse Educators Creative New Programs for Public Health Nursing Education, Practice and Research ................. 2234 Application of Models for Advancement in Public Health Nursing Practice, Education and Research ........... 5025 Association for the Social Sciences in Health The Certificate of Need (CON) Program in Social Science Perspective: The Experience in Virginia ............. 1031 The Changing Face of the HMO Industry ............. 1032 Case Management of High-Cost Users ................ 1033 Hospital Organizational Behavior Issues .............. 1034 ASSH Contributed Paper II: Health Care for the Elderly: Emerging Issues `. . r..... . ...................... 1101 Delivering Care to the Elderly in HMOs ........... 1102 Approaches to the Aids Dilemma: Social Science Perspectives .................................. 1153 Session No. Measuring Case Mix for Quality Assessment ........... 2005 Research on Issues of Medicare Capitation Payments .. 2006 Antitrust in the Health Care Sector: Economic and Legal Perspectives ............... .... ......2007 Contributed Paper III: Uninsured and Access-The Dynamics of Insurance Coverage .................. 2109 Studies of the Behavior of Health Plans and Enrollees .... 2110 Privatization of Psychiatric Inpatient Services .......... 2111 Quality of Care Issues in a Changing Environment ...... 2173 Perspectives on the Delivery of Mental Health Services in HMOs ... 2174 .. Impact of the Hospital . Prospective P.ayment System (PPS) on Long Term Care System .................. 2175 Competition in the Health Care Sector: Ten Years Later .. 2233 Assessment of the 1982 Medi-cal Reforms in California .. 3007 HMO Participation in the Medicare Risk Program ...... 3008 Contributed Paper IV: Health Expenditures and the Elderly: Social and Policy Influences ............... 3009 Contributed Paper V: Physician Manpower and Reimbursement Issues .......................... 3098 Progress Report From the Social HMO Consortium ..... 3099 Contributed Paper VI: Social Factors in Disease Prevention and Treatment ....................... 3167 Recent Findings From the Social Sciences Relevant to Health Education .............................. 3168 Contributed Paper VII: Social and Economic Issues in Health Status ................................. 4001 Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine golg Low Birth Weight Prevention-Progress Report ........ Bureau of Health Professions Strategies for Increasing the Number of Minority Health Professionals and Improving Access to Health Care .... 2076 Chiropractice Forum Low Back Pain .................................. 1035 Chiropractic Education ........................... 1103 Chiropractic Health Services Delivery ................ 2009 Coalition for a National Health Service Is a National Health Service Possible in the United States? 2177 Coalition for a National Health Service Organizing for a National Health System : ............. 3169 Committee on Health Politics The politics of Health: Prevention, Delivery, Financing ... 1104 Community Health Planning Health Policy Forum 1: Report of the Institute of Medicine on for Profit Enterprises in Health Care ..... 1087 Schlesinger Award Session ......................... 1105 Discussion Among State Health Planning Agencies: Current Developments and Issues ............. . . . . 2010 Community Health Planning Roundtables ............ 2078 Health Policy Forum II: Quality of Care in a Competitive Environment 2165 National Health Prob.................................. ems and Policies: Using Planning to Address Them .............................. 2178 Data and Methodological Issues in Competitive Environment .................................. 3013 Community Health Planning Roundtables ............ 3077 Facilitating Consumer Choice in a Competitive Environment .................................. 3101 The Changing Locus of Health Planning .............. 3170 Assuring Services for the Uninsured ................. 4003 29 TIMN 322306
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phy Waik? La Gitana Enterpr.[ses) 25 minutes W.y Walk explores the principles of exercise Nalking. It includes basic information about 3tarting a walking program, measuring target heart rate, and selecting footwear. Through a series of Interviews the film looks at some of the benefits of walking for older people, for people with back problems, etc. Thomas Knatt, a former national racewalking champion demonstrates racewalktng technique using his three Its of racewalking: relaxation, rotation, and reach. Teenage Suicide: An Approach to Prevention (LexCom Productions) 60 minutes This two part video series deals with the growing phenomena of teenage suicide, discusses early warning signals and outlines realistic, scientif3cally based advice designed to save young lives. With dynamic slice-of-life vignettes, the video focuses on the long-term relationship between parents and teens and highlights how specific actions and reactions can impact on a teen's level of confidence and courage. The film examines the common mistakes leaders of young people make that lead teenagers to believe that life's problems and solutions are out of their hands. AIDS: The Choice is Yours (Meridian Education Corp.) 15 minutes AIDS: The Choice is Yours offers information that can save young people's lives. The video talks about what AIDS is and what it is not; how the disease can and cannot be contracted, and why it is almost always fatal. It is explicit in its use of terminology and methods of protection. AIDS: The Deadly Disease (Meridian Education Corp.) 15 minutes AIDS: The Deadly Disease examines what we know about AIDS and maintains that the only real protection from sexually transmitted AIDS is to refrain from sexual activity until as adults, you are ready to establish a relationship with someone you are sure has not had and will not have sex with anyone else. The film emphasizes the fact that there are serious choices to be made and that the consequences of those decisions are very severe. Understanding Common Breast Problems (Milner-Fenwick, Inc.) 12 minutes The film portrays two women experiencing the common problems of breast tenderness, benign tumors and cysts and nipple discharges. It briefly discusses the treatments involved, the risks of breast cancer, breast self examination techniques and the role of mammography. The filrnm is reassuring about the problems and the risk of breast cancer. Educating Patients About AIDS (MED-ED Productions) 30 minutes In this video, experfs set the record straight, discussing the history and probable origin of AIDS and how it rapidly spread among high risk groups. The program explains, through animation and physician interviews, the symptoms and progression of the disease as it attacks and subverts the body's immune system. It features Dr. Nicholas Ifft, President of the Philadelphia AIDS Taskforce, and details the heroic efforts of researchers who worked to develop the screening for HTLV-III, and who continue to seek a cure. AIDS addresses the most frequently expressed fears about contracting the disease and ourlines the various risk factors, while also suggesting methods of physical and emotional support for patient, families and associates throughout the treatment regimen. Fitting the Pieces - Managing Nuclear Waste (Modern Talking Picture Service) 25 minutes What is high-level radioactive waste and how do we control and manage it? Answers to these and other questions about this highly controversial issue are discussed fully and simply in this illustrative, comprehensive documentary. A fascinating animated sequence traces spent nuclear fuel's route to a geological repository deep underground. Appropriate for junior high students and older, it is cleared for television broadcast. Produced for AIF and the US committee for Energy Awareness. Sex: A Topic for Conversation/For Teenagers (Mondell Productions, Inc.) 25 minutes One of a three-part video series, SF:]L A Topic of Conversa.tion/For Teenagers. The main goal of the film is to stress the importance of sexuality education. A quick talk about the birds and the bees will not address children's real questions about sex, nor will technical diagrams of the fallopian tubes. The film seeks to teach parents how to be the primary sex educators of their children, and how they can instill a sense of sexual responsibility In their children. Through a series of lively question and answer encounters between Dr. Gordon and teenagers, teenage viewers will hear the questions that their peers have about sex. Daughters of Time (New Day Films) 29 minutes Thousands of women are seeking nurse-midwives to be their primary care-givers during pregnancy and birth; yet certified nurse-midwives must still struggle to practice their time honored profession. This film profiles three caring and competent nurse- midwives working to give women and their families safe, compassionate and personalized health care. The AIDS Movie (New Day Films) 26 minutes Interviews with three patients with AIDS give this film a very special power to impact on viewers the realities of AIDS and communicate essential information about transmission and prevention. A powerful and poignant look at one of our society's most urgent problems. 17 TIMN 322294
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Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Conference of Public Health Laboratorians Scientific Program ............................... 5011 Awards Banquet ................................. 5024 Health Law Forum Public Health and the Constitution .................. 1090 Legal Spects of Aids Treatment and Screening .......... 1118 Health Law Forum ..........................................3026, 3156 International Human Rights Committee American Public Health Association Health and Human Rights ......................... 3006 Women, Children and Health in South Africa .......... 3153 The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Health Promotion Program: A Special Session ...................... 3032 National Association for Public Health Policy Aids and State Health Agencies ..................... 1016 Toward a National Health Program: Progress Reports - Business Meeting .............................. 1092 Access to Medical Care for the Mentally Disabled ........ 2042 Affirmative Action -The Public Health Agenda ........ 2043 An Occupational Health Legislative Agenda ........... 2137 Legislative Policy ................................ 2138 Medical Care Through Health Departments: Prospects for the1990s. .. .. ............. 2139 Toxic Hazard Prevention-State-of-the-Art . . .......... 2206 Policies Which Shape the Role of Health Departments ... 2207 Tobacco Policy .................................. 2208 The Liability Crisis in Maternal and Child Health Services: Where Does it Come From? Where is it Going? What Can Be Done? . ...................... 3047 Federal Medical Care Legislation .................... 3048 Diet and Disease ................................ 3132 Alcohol Policy .................................. 3200 National Association of County Health Officials National Association of County Health Officials and United States Conference of Local Health Officers and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials Luncheon ...................................... 2094 National League for Nursing Community Health Services Accreditation Update: Focus on Client Outcomes ............................ 5019 Violence and Abuse Prevention in the School .......... 2057 Contributed Papers I: Family Life Issues and Effective Programs Directed to Youth .. .. 2058 School Health Education and Services Poster Session II .. 2100 The Influence of Special Interest Groups .............. 2154 Aids Education in the Schools ...................... 2220 Poster Session III: School Health Ecucation and Services . 3093 Comprehensive School-Based Clinics ................ 3142 Contributed Papers II: Health Education Approaches Effective With Youth ............................ 3143 Credentialing the Health Education Specialist .......... 3207 Contributed Papers III: Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug- Related Concerns in the School ................... 4030 Society for Public Health Education International Health Education ..................... 5000 Medical Care Education ........................... 5001 Worksite Health Promotion ........................ 5002 School Health Education .......................... 5003 Chapter Delegates ................................ 5004 Past Presidents ................................. 50041 Opening General Session-Shifting Sands, Objectives Past, Present and Future ......................... 5006 Poster Session ................................... 5007 Professors of Health &iucation ..................................5007I Medical Care Education ...........................................5008II Worksite Health ...................................................5008III School Health Education ........................................5008IV Women and the Workplace ........................................1150 Special Interest Groups ........................... 5008 Symposium Presentations ......................... 5009 Symposium Presentations Group A ...........................5009 Symposium Presentations Group B ............................5009I Symposium Presentations Group C ..................,........5009II International Applications of School Health Education ... 5027 U.S. Conference on Local Health Officers Scientific Session: United States Conference of Local Health Officers, National Association of County Health Officials ...................................... 2160 W. K. Kellogg Foundation Health Promotion Programs for Adolescents ........... 1097 University of Michigan School of Public Health University of Michigan School of Public Health Breakfast . 3002 UCLA School of Public Health Dean's Council UCLA School of Public Health Dean's Council Breakfast . 3000 Physician's Forum Improving Access While Securing a National Health Pro ..................................... 5016 Physici~ans' Forum Annual Dinner ................... 5023 Public Health Workers for Life Abortion Policy and America's Largest Protestant Denomination ................................ 1158 School Health Education and Services School Health Education and Services Poster Session 1.. 1025 The Health Status of'Cb.Odren ...................... 1072 Research Related to SeGool Health: Educational Settings-A Natural for_Quantitative Research ....... 1144 John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health Society of Alumni Johns Hopkins School ot<Hygiene and Public Health Society of Alumni Breakfast ...................... 3001 30 TIMN 322307
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Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Population and Family Planning Population and Family Planning Poster Session ......... 1019 Population and Family Planning Business and Award Session ......................................1137 Operations Research in Family Planning: Latin America . 2049 After Pregnancy: Decisions and Outcomes Among Adolescents ................................... 2050 Task Force on Adolescent Pregnancy/Special Session - Research Update II ............................ 209611 Innovative Materials for Male Involvement in Family Planning ................................... 2096III Data on Adolescents and Adolescent Services From School Samples ...................................... 2146 Contraceptive Programs for Men: Removing Barriers .... 2147 Operations Research in Family Planning: Asia and Africa 2148 Determinates of Adolescent Sexuality and Pregnancy .... 2212 New Contraceptive Technologies .................... 2213 Assessing Approaches to Reproductive Health and Family Planning Tratning .............................. 2214 Surgical Contraception: Issues in the US and Developing Countries .................................... 2238 Managing and Delivering Domestic Family Planning Services ...................................... 3053 Aids: Implications for Family Planning and Sexualty Education .................................... 3054 Factors Affecting Contraceptive Continuation and Effectiveness in Developing Countries .............. 3135 Issues in Abortion: US and Developing Countries ....... 3136 Policy Perspectives on Funding Family Planning and International Population Programs: Dollars and Sense . 3202 Similarities and Differences in Contraceptive Use Patterns 3203 Motivational Campaigns to Communicate Family Planning Information and Services ................ 4023 Demographic and Health Surveys: Recent Findings ..... 4024 Public Health Education Health Education Research Can Influence Practice and Policy: Innovative Experiences From the Experts Roundtables ............................ 1020 The Politics of Aids Education: How to Function Effectively in a Political Climate ........................... 1068 Health Education Theory: Which One and Why Bother? . 1093 Ardor and Authorship: Publishing in Health Education .. 1138 Public Health Policy and Health Education ............ 1139 Health Education and the Mass Media: Changing the Message ..................................... 2051 Assuring the Quality of Health Promotion Programs .... 2052 Health Education Poster Session I ................... 2097 Public Health Education Awards Luncheon ............ 2098 Controversy: Health Education for the People or for Profit? .................................... 2149 Involving the Consumer in Health Decision Making ..... 2150 Son of Health Prevention and Disease Promotion ....... 2215 Innovations in Financing Health Promotion .................2216 Screening for Disease Risk: Future Technologies and Ethical Implications ............................ 3055 Health Education Research I ....................... 3056 Health Education Poster Session II - Aids Education .... 3091 Changing Laws, Changing Environs, Changing Behavior .3137 Community Intervention: Can It Be Done Without the Big Budget? ................................... 3Worksite Health Promotion ...... . . . ........ 3204 Health Education for Indigent Populations ............ 3213 Education Strategies for Health Mothers, Healthy Babies . 4025 Health Education Research II ...................... 4026 Public Health Nursing Presenting with Pizzaz s~ .......................... 1021 Strategies for Enhancing Public Health Nursing Practice Poster Session I ................................ 1022 Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Impacting on the Health of Specific Populations Poster Session II .................................... 1023 Assuring Quality in Community Health Nursing ....... 1069 Using Audio Visuals for Impact ..................... 1070 Medicare Community Nursing and Ambulatory Care Act, H.R. 1161, S.B. 1010: Providers and Consumers Discuss the Issues .............................. 1094 Toward a Research Agenda for Public Health Nursing .... 1140 Care of the Homeless: Meeting the Challenge .......... 1141 Maternal and Child Health Nursing: Cost, Documentation and Other Concerns ............................ 1142 Emerging Trends: Changing Roles ................... 1157 Educating Community Health Nurses: Methods and Money ....................................... 1157I Strategies for Professional Presentations ............... 2053 Public Health Nursing's Interventions With Family Violence ..................................... 2054 Home Care Survival: Reimbursement and Productivity Issues ....................................... 2055 Public Health Nursing Luncheon .................... 2099 Health Beliefs of Children, Adolescents and Young Adults 2151 Town Hall Meeting ............................... 2152 Smoking Cessation Strategies in a Variety of Populations . 2217 Public Health Nursing History . . • . . . . . . . . . 2218 Nursing Models to Promote Health and Wellness .•..... 2239 Research in Home Care ........................... 3037 The Community Health Perspective in Baccalaureate Nursing Education ............................. 3058 Politics and Policy Development .................... 3059 Nursing Outcome Measures With Cancer Patients ...... 3092 Care of the Elderly: Research Strategies and Programs .. 3138 Roundtables Public Health Nursing: Policy Initiatives and Issues ....................................... 3139 Aspects of Research Related to Public Health Nursing ... 3205 Surviving Contemporary Problems: Strategies for Nurse Managers .................................... 3Collaborative Ventures ............................ 3215 Measuring Outcomes in Community Health Nursing .... 4027 Providing Pubhc Health Nursing Services to Special Populations ................................... 4028 Changing Community Health Nursing Roles ........... 4029 Radiological Health Radon and the Public: Exposure, Risk and Control ...... 1095 Radiation Protection in Chiropractic Clinical Practice ... 2171 The Mammography Alternative -An Effective Measure .. 3141 Social Work Social Work Poster Session ......................... 1026 Social Cultural Problems and Issues in Health Care ...... 1073 Teenage Pregnancy ... 1074 Health Policy Issues in Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . • . 1075 Homeless Americans ............................. 1145 Discharge Planning ....................•..••••.••1146 Chronic Illness .................................. 2059 Psychosocial Issues in Genetics ..................... 2060 Problems and Issues in Child Welfare: Racial and/or Ethnic Considerations .................•...••.••2155 Industrial Social Work ............................ 2156 HMOs .....................................Black Health Concerns ............................ 2222 Social Work Practice in Rural Settings ................ 2223 Aids .......................Social Work Practice in Health Care ................. 3062 Homeless Youth ................................. 3063 Impact of "For Profit" Programs on Access ............ 3145 Wnting Workshop ............................Employment Assistance Programs ................... 3208 Aids .......................................... 3209 Problems and Issues in Maternal and Child Health ...... 3210 27 TIMN 322304
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Nip® REME RINSE c RINSE permethrin 1% PEDICUIICIDAL/OVICIDAL ACTIVITIES: ln v(ba data indicate that permethrin has pediculicidal and ovicidal activrty apainstPed"c- ulus humarxfs var, c4pitis. The hgfi cure rate (97-99%) of Nix in patients with head lice demonstratad at 14 days folknving a single appiication is attribiaable to a combination of its pedculicidal and ovieidai activities and its residual persistence on the hakwhich may also prevent reinfestation. I NDICATIONS AND USAGE: Niz is indicaiedforthe sinpie-appli- cation treatment of infestation with Pedieulushumanusvars eapi'is (the head louse) and its nits (eggs). Retreatrrrerx for recurrences is required in less than 1%af petients sincethe ovicidal activitymay be supplemented by residual persistence in the hair. If live kce are observed after at least seven days following the initial applicMion, a second application can be yivan. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Nix is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to any of its components, to any synthetic pyret)xoid or pyretlxin, or to chrysanthamunts. WARNING: € hypersensitivity to Nix oxurs, discontinue use. PRECAUTIONS: Ganeral: Head lice infestation is often accompanied by pruritus, erythema, and edema. Treatmentwith Nix maytemporardyexecer- bate these condd'ana. Information for PaUents: Patients with head rice should be advised that itching, redness, or sweirnp of the acalp may occur after application of Mix. If irritation persists,they should cortsuittheir physician. Nix is not irritating to the eyes; however, patients should be adwsedto avoid contact with eyes during application and to fiush with water immediafely if Nix pets in the eyes. In order to prevent accidental inyestion by ch~en, the remaining contents of Proc should be d'iscarded after use. Combing of nits following treatmentwith Nix is not nacessaryfor effective treatment. However. patients may do so for cosmetic or ather reasons. The Nts are easify canlxdfrom the hair treat®d with Nix after drying. C.rcirapensis, Mutaq.nesds. {mpairrnentof FartiFity S«car- cinogenaitybioassays rn.ere evaluated wifh permet9xm, three eacit in rats and mice. No tumorlyenk:ky was seen In the rat studies. However, spacies-specific increas®s kt pulmonary ad®nomas. a common benign tumor of mice of high sporaaneous ba&qround Incidence, were seen in the three mouse studies. In one of these studiestharewas an inareased incidence of puknoraryahrootar-cell carcinomas and benign liver adenomas only in fema1e mico when permathrin waa yiven in the'vfood ata concentration of 5000 ppm. Mutayenk:ity, assays, wtiich give useful correlative data for inter- pretinp results from carcinogenicity bioassays in rodents, were negative. Permethrin showed no evidence of mutapenia potential in a battary of in vlva and in vrvo genetic toxicity snidas. Permethrin did not have any adverse effecton reproductive func- tion at a dose of 180 mp/kp/day orally in a threeyeneratlort rat study. ductGon st ~es have y~ean i'hcts: PregnancY Catepory B: Repro- performed in m~, rats, and rabbits (20440o mp/ky/day orally) and have revealed no evidence of impairod fertility or harm to the fetus due to pennathritt.7here are, however, no adequate and well-contrafted studies in pregrorx women. Because animal reproduction swdies are not always pre- dictive of human response, this drug should be used duriny preg- nancy only if dearly needed Nursing Mothars: k is notknown whetherthisdnp is ezcreted in human miik Because many drugs are excreted in human m7k and because of the evidence for tunwripenic poteMiai of pennetttrin in animal studies, consideratiort shouki bepiuentndiseominurcg nurs- ing temporariiyor withholding the drug vWale the nqtitar is nursing. Pediatrie Uaa: Nix is safe and effective in children two years of age and older. Safety and effectiveness in children leas than two years of age have not been estabiished. ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most frequent adverse reaction to Nix is pruritus. This is usualtya consequence of head lice infestation hself, but may be temporarily aggravated following treatrnsnt with Nix. 5.9%of patients In clinical studies esperienced mild temporary hchinq; 3.4%ecperiencod m0dtransient buminp/stinpinp,tinplinp, numbness, or scalp discomfort; and 21% experienced mild aan- siant ®rythema, adama, or rash of the scaip. DOSAG€ AND ADMINiSTRATION: Adults and Children: Nix is intended for use after the ha-x has been washed with shampoo, rinsed with water and towel dried Apply a sufficient volume of Nix to saturate the hair and scatp. N'x shoukd remain on the hair for 10 minutes before being rinsed off with water. A single treatment is sufficient to eliminate haad lice Infestation. Combin9 of nits is not required for therapeutic eH-~ea~.y, but may be done for casmetic or other reasons. SHAKE WELL BEFORE USING. HOW SUPPoJ€D: Nix (Permethrin) 1%(wt/wt) Crome Rirra is suppried In plastic squeeze bottles that contain 21 oz weighing 56 g. (NDC-0061-078481) Store at 15°-25°C (59°-77°F) 1 DiNapoiiJ,AustinR,ErgfendorS,etal:Eradkationofllaswitha sirqle treatment (urpubfishad data, 1987). 2 Taprin D, MeiNdnp T,Cas174eroP,sra1; 1%erenarinseforthetreatmetrtd pedicuha humanus ver infestation. PsdratrOennaro1196%, 3,4:344-348. 3 Davies J, Dedhia H. Morgade C, at al: Lirdane poisoninps. Arch Lbrmatd 1983; 119:142-144. Copr. O 1987 Burroughs Wetkbmo Co. AN rights reserved. iwroughs MLt#com. Co. 3C3~ Caaxaitfs RaW weeceaN Rssaarsi 1iaey)s Pak, NC 27708 NI-092 What will you tell her about screening mammography? Many of your patients will hear about screening mammography through a program launched by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Radiology, and they may come to you with questions. What will you 'tell them? We hope you'll encourage them to have a screening mammogram, because that, along with your regular breast examinations and their monthly self examinations, offers the best chance of early detection of breast cancer, a disease which will strike one woman in 10. tfyou have questions about breast cancer detection for asymptomatic women, please contact us. /`7iY{GPJCAN ~~~~~~~R~ .7VWG~ I ® W Professional Education Dept. National Headquarters 90 Park Avenue New York, New York !00)6 or your local society American 1891 Preston White Drive College of Reston, Virginia 22091 Radiology (703) 648-8900 TIMN 322285 t
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Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Medical Care Who Will Pay for Indigent Care Under Private Sector Cost Containment? ................................. 1056 Aids: Treatment of a Chronic Illness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1057 Health Promotion and Public Health in Rural Communities ................................. 1058 Methodology in Health Services Research: Research Synthesis ...................... ... ... .1059 Impact of PPS (Prospective Payment System) on Medical Care ...... ... .... ......1127 Medicaid Capitation Programs: Lessons Learned I ...... 1128 Medicaid Capitation Programs: Lessons Learned II ..... 2035 Medical Care Contributed Papers III: Extensive and Expensive Care ................................ 2036 Drug Policy and Pharmaceutical Services: Determinants of Prescription Drug Use ........................ 2037 Attracting and Keeping Health Professionals in Medically Underserved Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2038 Medical Care Poster Session ........................ 2089 The Public/Private Mix in Worldwide Health Systems .... 2132 The Changing Rural Economy and Its Impact on Health Care: Problems and Solutions ........... . ......... 2133 Psychiatry and the Right to Refuse Drug Treatment: A Progress Report ............................... 2134 Medical Care Contributed Papers IV: Financing Care for the Po or ............................................................. .2135 Case Mix Measurement and Reimbursement in Ambulatory Care .............................. 2200 Selected Topics in Health Economics ............ ..... 2201 Medical Care Contributed Papers V: Quality of Care Issue. 2202 Update in Health Services Research ........ . ......... 2236 City Blues and Rural Rags: Health Status and Health Care Differentials in Urban, Suburban, Rural and Frontier Populations ................................... 3040 Medical Care Contributed Papers VI: Competiton and Alternative Health Delivery Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3041 Assessing the Safety of Marketed Drugs: Who Pays, Who Plays, Who Cares? .............................. 3042 HMO Participation in the Medicare Risk Program ...... 3043 Federal Programs and the Chronically Disabled . . . . . . . . . 3127 Financial Burden of Medical Care for the Elderly ....... 3128 HSR Issues in Cost and Quality of Care ............... 3129 Medical Care Contributed Papers VIII: Ambulatory Case Mix and Costs ................................. 3196 Public Sector Proprietarization: Contracting Out and Competition .................................. 3197 Dynamics of the Medicaid Spend-Down Process and Financing Strategies for Long-Term Care ............. 197I Managed Care: Results From Medicaid ............... 3197II Program Format for "An Evening With Aaron Shirley" .3218 Services Research From the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program ................................. 4020 Mental Health Mental Health Poster Session I ...................... 1015I International and Cross Cultural Aspects of Mental Health ................................. 1060 Some Mental Health Issues in Childhood and Adolescence .................................. 1061 Fiscal Imperatives and Mental Health Care ............ 1062 The Promotion of Mental Health .................... 1129 Research on Mental Disorders in Primary Care ......... 1130 Mental Health of Special Populations-Ethnic Minorities, Women and the Elderly ......................... 1131 Nuclear War or Peace: Mental Health Implications ...... 1156 Understanding Gender Differences .................. 2039 Aids, Plague of the Century: Mental Health Perspectives.. 2040 The PsychologicalCogsequences of Life Threatening Experiences .................................. 2041 Mental Health Poster Session II ..................... 2092 Mental Health Section Awards Luncheon ............. 2093 Rema Lapouse Award Lecture ...................... 2136 Mental Health Roundtables ........................ 2203 Mental Health Contributed Papers ................... 2204 Work Place Stress and Interventions .................. 2205 Mobile Outreach Programs for Homeless Mentally Ill Persons 2237 ...................................... Mental Health Care: For People, For Profit, or Politics? ... 3044 Mental Health Perspectives: Minority Groups .......... 3045 Meeting the Needs of the Chronic Mentally Ill .......... 3046 Mental Health Poster Session III .... . 3090 Predicting Dangerousness: A Dilemma for Public Mental Health ....................................... 3130 Services for the Chronically Mentally Ill-The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative ............... 3131 Perspectives of the Homeless and the Homeless Mentally Ill ................................... 3131I Workshop: NIMH-Sponsored Research on Prevention of Mental Illness ................................. 3131II Advocacy for the Mentally Ill ....................... 3198 Effectiveness of Services for Seriously Mentally IIl Persons 3199 Occupational Health and Safety Occupational Health and Safety Roundtables I . . . . . . . .1017 Occupational Health and Safety Poster Session I........ 1018 Contributed Papers I: Looking for Association in Epidemiologtc Studies .......................... 1064 Biotechnology: Different Perspectives on Worker and Community Health ............................. 1065 Contributed Papers II: Identifying and Controlling Hazardous Exposures . . 1066 Occupational Health and Safety Contributed Papers III .. 1133 Reaching Minority Worker Population at Risk: New Research and Education Initiatives ................. • 1134 More than a Paycheck: Toward Health and Equity for Women in the Workplace ........................ 2045 Participatory Risk Assessment: Involving Those at Risk in Notification and Screening Programs ............... 2046 The Hazards of Wood Dust and Other Dusty Trades ..... 2047 Occupational Health and Safety Roundtables II ........ 2095 Occupational Health and Safety Poster Session II ....... 2096 Occupational and Environmental Diseases: Establishing Causation .................................... 2141 State of the Art Methods and Findings in Occupational Ergonomics ................................... 2142 Contributed Papers IV: Productivity, Profits and Worker Health .............Contributed Papers V: Health and Safety on an International Scale 2210 Surveillance for Worker Health: The Nee.............. for Policies and Programs .................................... 2211 Drug Testing in the Workplace: For Whose Benefit? 3050 Strategies in Hazard Communication and Higlt-Risk Notificatton: Recent Experiences and Impltcations for Hazard Control ................................ 3051 Health Hazards in the Petrochemical Industry .......... 3052 Health and Safety of Transit Workers: Collaboration Between Unions and Researchers .. ... 3133 A Window on the Future of Occupational Health and Safety: Contributed Papers VI .................... 3160 Worker Education for Safety and Health .............. 3161 Industrial Hygiene Assessment ..................... 3201 Contributed Papers VII: Case Series and Cross Sectional Studies of Health and Safety Problems on the Job ..... 4021 Occupational Health and Safety Contributed Papers VIII .4022 Podiatric Health - . Cost Containment and Quality Care-Are They Compatible? .................................. 1067 Socio-Economic Aspects of Immobility Among the Aged . 1136 Roundtables: Selected Subjects in Podiatric Public Health 2048 Public Health and the Diabetic Foot ................. 2145 26 TIMN 322303
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Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Strategic Choices in Organizations ................... 1117 Health Promotion -Disease Prevention .............. 2019 Farm Health and Safety ........................... 2020 Quality of Care Issues ............................. 2021 Computer Software Exchange ...................... 2022 Health Administration Awards Luncheon ............. 2083 Computer Software Exchange ...................... 2084 Economic Impact of Aids on the Health Care Delivery System ...................................... 2123 Indigent Care: State Responses ..................... 2124 Managing Under Siege: Media Relations .............. 2125 Informing Policy Development: Some Perspectives of Effectiveness, Efficacy and Efficiency ............... 2167 Computer Software Exchange . . 2168 Data Systems Linkages in Public Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2190 Issues in Alternate Systems for Medical Care Delivery....2191 Malpractice Insurance Crisis ..................................... 2192 Issues in Alternate Systems for Medical Care Delivery .... 2193 Database Development ........................... 3021 Nursing Home Reform ............................ 3022 Software Development for Use in Health Care and Insurance Settings .............................. 3023 Aids: Current Issues in Management of Services ........ 3024 Computer Software Exchange ...................... 3025 Poster Session Long-Term Care Issues ................ 3083 Public Health Practice Roundtables .................. 3084 Computer Software Exchange ...................... 3085 Indigent Care: Local Responses ..................... 3115 The National Cancer Institute Supplements to the 1987 National Health Interview Survey: Part 1 ............ 3116 Graduate Medical Education Policy: Beyond the '80s .... 3117 Quality of Home Care ............................ 3118 Computer Software Exchange ....................•.3155 Long Term Care II ............................... 3183 Indigent Care: Program Implementation .............. 3184 Access .................................4009 Patient Satisfication .............................. 4010 Capitated Payment ............................... 4011 Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Epidemiolopy of Injuries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • - • • • . 105 I TransportaUonIn uries ......................••.••.1119 Epidenuology of )lnjuries .......................... 2024 Injury Control and Emergency Medical Services Poster Session ...............................Injuries and Public Policy .......................... 2126 Medical Care of the Injured ........................ 2127 Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint ................... 2194 Latebreakers for Injury Control and Emergency Health Services .. . . . . . . . . .....................3027 Public and Private Injury Databases .................. 3119 Latebreakers I: Injury Control and Emergency Health Services...................................... 3185 Methodological Issues in Injury ..................... 3186 Injuries and the Elderly ........................... 4012 International Health International Health Poster Session .................. 1013 Special Mini-Plenary Session -The State of Women's Health: A Global Persnective .. .. 1053 International Health Society 42nd Anniversary ......... 1152 Evaluating Child Survival Programs .................. 2025 International Health Student Solicited Papers Session .... 2026 Changing Role of Government in Financing Primary Health Care ................................... 2027 Epidemiologic Transition to Chronic Health Problems in Third World Countries .......................... 2028 ,,a in Primary Health Care ...... 2128 Community Participatio Industrial Health Issues in the Third World ............ 2129 Maternal Health in Developing Countries ............. 2195 Traditional Medicine ............................. 2196 Private Financing of Primary Health Care ............. 2197 Maternal and Child Health in Third-World Countries .... 2235 Qualitative Social Science Methods .................. 3028 Health Care Marketing in Child Survival .............. 3029 Cost Effectiveness of Immunizations: Is There a`Best' Way? ......................Monitoring Health Worker Activities ................. 3031 Evaluation of International Primary Health Care Progams , 31191 Physician Surplus/Supply in Third-World Countries ..... 3120 Alternative Perspectives on Health Care Supply ......... 3187 Public Health Aspects of Aids: A Global Perspective ..... 3188 Disaster Management ............................. 3189 Should the US Continue to Participate in and Financially Support the World Health Organization? ............ 3217 Infant and Child Care Programs ... .... 4013 Priorities of the International Women's Public Health Network ..................................... 4014 Interdisciplinary Training to International Health ....... 4015 Public and Private Sector Perspectives on the Production, Promotion and Distribution of Oral Rehydration Salts . 4016 Laboratory Aids V rus Antibody Testing in the Public Health Laboratory . 1091 Infectious Diseases: Parasites and International Health ... 2030 Prenatal Monitoring: The Role of the Public Health Laboratory . . . . . . . 2170 Use of Molecular Technique in the Public Health Laboratory-DNA Probes and Plasmid Profiling ..... 3033 Laboratory Award Luncheon ....................... 3087 Laboratory Contributed Papers: DIFCO Award ......... 3157 Maternal and Child Health Maternal and Child Health Poster Session I ............ 1015 Community-Wide Approaches to Promoting Maternal and Child Health .................................. 1122 Adolescent Health and Pregnancy .. ... 1123 Barriers to Prenatal Care: Comparison of County, State and National Natality Followback Surveys ........... 1124 Injury and Violence Among Children and Youth ........ 2031 Maternal and Child Health Young Professional Award Session ...................................... 2032 The Role of Medicaid in Financing MCH Services ...... 2033 Prenatal Care and Birth Outcome ................... 2034 Martha May Eliot Luncheon ....................... 2086 Maternal and Child Health Poster Session II ........... 2087 Martha May Eliot Forum: Impact of Managed Care Plans on the Health of Women and Children .............. 2131 Child Health Issues in Community Settings'and Day.Care 3035 Maternal and Child Health Advocacy: Setting New Priorities ..............................3036 Prenatal Care and Utilization . .. . . . . . . . . . . 3037 F'inancing Maternal and Child Health Services ......... 3038 Smoking and Pregnancy Outcome ................... 3039 Maternal and Child Health Poster ................... 3089 Management of Breastfeeding Mothers: Implications of Drugs and Toxins and Other Environmental Contaminants .................................. 3123 Public Health Issues in Genetics .................... 3124 Home-Based Programs to Reduce Low Birthweight and Infant Mortality ............................... 3125 Children with Special Health Care Needs ............. 3126 Roundtables on Perinatal Systems: Successes and Pitfalls .3192 Improving Breastfeeding Incidence in Low Income Populations ................................... 3193 Accessibility of Genetic Services .................... 3194 Prenatal Risk and Birth Outcomes ................... 3195 Analysis of Infant Mortality Data: New Approaches to Tough Problems ............................... 4017 Maternal and Child Health Late Breakers ............. 4018 Contributed Papers: Child Health ................... 4019 25 TIMN 322302
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Sponsor/Session Title Session No. Sponsor/Session Title Statistics Issues in Statistics Affecting Public Health Programs .... 1078 Statistical Issues in Health Services Research ........... 1079 Statistics Contributed Papers 1: Vital Statistics .......... 1149 Progress Toward the 1990 Health Objectives and Beyond .2063 Statistics Contributed Papers III Analysis Issues ........ 2064 Applications of Categorical Data Methods for Longitudinal Studies ........................... 2065 Spiegelman Award Luncheon ....................... 2101 Lowell Reed Lecture and Statistics Section Awards ...... 2159 Role of Confidence Intervals and Tests of Significance in Reporting Public Health Resarch Results ............ 2227 Statistics Contributed Papers II: Health Issues .......... 2228 Statistics Contributed Papers IV: Medical Care Utilization 2229 Statistics Contributed Papers V: Methodologic Issues ....2229I New Vital and Health Statistics Data Collection and Classification Documents ........................ 3066 Overviews of Clinical Trials: The Meta-Analytic Approach .................................... 3067 Statistics Contributed Papers VI: Mortality and Morbidity Issues ....................................... 3068 .. ............... Statistics Poster Session . . . . . . . . . . 3094 Selection of Variables in Multivariate Analysis .......... 3147 Multinational Comparisons of Birthweight-Specific Perinatal Mortality Rates, 1980-84 ................. 3164 Statistics Contributed Papers VII: Surgery Methods ..... 3211 Cancer Registries and Health Promotion .............. 3212 Statistics Contributed Papers VIII: Medical Care Methods 4032 Vision Care International Vision Care .......................... 1096 Vision Care Poster Session ......................... 2102 Vision, Speech and Hearing Issues for the Young and Elderly ...................................... 2161 Nision Care Section Contributed Papers .............. 2230 Cost Efficient Eye Care ............................ 3149 APHA COMPONENI'S American Public Health Association Action Board Health Care for Profit: State and Local Impact and Public Policy Op tions ............................................................1029 American Public Health Association Program Development Board State Health Insurance--A Step Forward or Back?............. 2075 Primary Intervention: The Individual vs. Community Services ...................................... 2107 New Professionals The Invisible Hand: A Satire ....................... 1063 Contributed Papers: Current Issues in Public Health ..... 2043 Vital New Videos on Incest ........................ 2140 Ruth Webb Memorial Breakfast: Breakfast With Woman of Achievement in APHA ......................... 049 CAUCUSES American Indian and Alaska Native Caucus Maintaining Ourselves: Wellness Programs and Indian Communities ................................. 1082 Bridging the Gap: Report on the Task Force on Parity of Indian Health Services 2003 .......................... Contributed Papers: Visualizing Indian Health Poster Session ...................................... 2073 Help for Families: Maternal and Child Health Programs in the Indian Healt)yService ...................... 2105 Health Care Financing: Use of a Fiscal Intermediary ..... 3004 Promoting the Health of th First Americans: Contributed Papers on American Indian and Alaska Native Health .3151 28 Session No. Asian American Caucus Health Problems of Asian American and Pacific Islanders...1030 Health Problems of Asian Refugees and Migrants ....... 1100 Black Caucus of Public Health Workers State of the Art Report on Minority Access Issues...........1081 Prevention Strategies to Improve Black Health Status .... 1086 Providers of Resources Affecting the Future of Black People ............. ......................... 101086 The Monday Evening Gathering of Black Caucus Members ..................................... 1154 Black Caucus Special Session on Aids ............... 11541 Depression and Suicide Among Blacks: The Silent Epidemic ............ 2008 Special Section: Action on Apartheid .............a ............2164 Aids and Black Folks: Straight Talk - Few Answers ...... 3010 Poster Session Black Caucus of Health Workers ......... 3076 Community Initiative for Teen Pregnancy Prevention .... 3154 Colloquium of Senior-Level Black Health Directors: Strategies for the 1990s .......................... 31681 Hildrus A. Poindexter Awards Dinner ................ 3216 Building a National Black Health Agenda: Strategy Session ....................................... 5014 Open Forum: National Politics and Black Health Issues . . 5026 Latino Caucus Latino Caucus Contributed Papers Poster Session ....... 1014 Analyses From the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) .................. 1054 Health Issues on the Island of Puerto Rico ............. 1120 Latino Caucus Breakfast Session: Impact of the New Immigration Law on the Health of Latinos .......... 2198 Collection of Data in Latino Communities: Issues to Consider . . 2000 Reports From NCI Hispanic Smoking Projects . . . . . . . . . 3121 Influencing Health Behaviors of Latinos .............. 3190 Lesbian and Gay Caucus Women and Aids• Part I ........................... 1055 Women and Aids: Part II 1121 Attitudes About Aids and Homosexuality . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2130 Aids Education .................................. 2199 Aids-Related Issues in the Lesbian and Gay Community .3034 Aids Funding and Costs ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3088 Guidelines and Recommendations for Healthful Gay/Lesbian Bisexual Activity: A Workshop ......... 3122 Racism and Aids ................................ 3158 Aids -A Panel Presentation ........................ 3191 National Public Health Student Caucus Dean's Forum .........................................................1132 Public Health Career Forum ....................... 2209 Public Hospitals Caucus Patient Dumping One Year After Cobra Roundtables .... 1024 Managing the Unmanageable: What I Learned From Running Public Hospitals ........................ 1071 Insuring the Uninsured: Consumer Perpsectives From FourStates ................................... 1143 Public Hospitals: Mental Health Activities and Reimbursement Dynamics ....................... 2056 Competition: Impact on Public Hospitals ............. 2153 Rebuilding Public Hospitals: Not Just Bricks and Mortar . 2219 The Team Approach: Medical and Support Staff Relations 3060 Medicaid Case Management: Assessing Quality ........ 3140 Quality of Care in Public Hospitals .................. 3206 Socialist Caucus Health Activists Roundtables ....................... 1027 Special Program: Enough of Bandaids: The Need for a National Health Program ........................ 1077 T1?AN 322305
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Monday 12:30-2:00 PM • Board 3 The Impact of Indigent Health Care Legislation on the Hispanic Population in Texas-Clara A. Gonzalez, MPH; and Adela N. Gonzalez, MPA • Board 4 Elderly Hispanics: Response to Managed Health Care-Judith R. Davidson, PhD • Board 5 The Effect of Hispanic Classification on Perinatal Statistics and Understanding of Barriers to Prenatal Care: Comparison of Birth Registry and Survey Data-Sarah Johnson, MPH; Maria Aguiar, MPH; Michael Kogan, MA; Ellen Gibbs, EdM; and Jeff Hansen, BA SPONSOR: LATINO CAUCUS - - - 1015 Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH POSTER SESSION I Presider: David E. Heppel • Board 1 Follow-up Study of Obstetricians and Gynecologists with an MPH: Employment, Income and Attitudes-C. F. Coffelt • Board 2 Developing Primarily Pictorial Information for High-Risk Mothers on How to Prevent Low Birthweight in Infants-L. Steckel; J. Haffey; and M. Zimmerman • Board 3 The Role of Social Support and Information in Promoting Self-Care and Prenatal Care Utilization: A Cross-Project Evaluation-E. Gibbs; R. Greenberg; S. Johnson; and C. Knapp • Board 4 A Case-Control Study of Selected Risk Factors for SIDS- K. Hollenbach; and J. Emerson • Board 5 Estimates of Gray Zone Children and Their Use of Public Child Health Services in 23 Maryland Counties-D. M. Strobino • Board 6 Utilization of Vital Records in Assessing Postneonatal Mor- tality-M. Davis • Board 7 Comparison of Infant Mortality to Other Reproductive Out- comes in a Georgia Health Department-B. N. Samuels; and M. Hill • Board 8 Cause Specific Postneonatal Mortality in Alabama: An Anal- ysis by Race and Residence, 1980-83-C. M. Druschel; and C. B. Hale • Board 9 Outreach and Follow-up in a Comprehensive Community Based Adolescent Clinic-L. Doles; and A. L. Smith • Board 10 Timing of Prenatal Care and Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome-G. Buck; D. Cockfair, A. Michalek; P. Nasca; S. Sandfast; and L. Sever SPONSOR: MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 10151 Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C MENTAL HEALTH POSTER SESSION I Presider: Bagar Husaini, PhD • Board I The Effect of Television on Midlife Suicide, 1968-84- Steven Stack, PhD • Board 2 Television Violence and Children-Mark A. Quinones, PhD; Marian R. Passannte, PhD; and Diane Shrier, MD • Board 3 Patterns of Distress Following HIV Antibody Test Notifica- tion-Robert Stemple, MPH; Jeffrey L. Moulton, MPH; Thomas 1. Kelley, MA; Dennis H. Osmond, MA; and Andrew Moss, PhD • Board 4 An Epidemiologic Study of Psychiatric Distress and Alcohol Use-Amy Dryman • Board 5 Confidentiality: A Study of Clinicians' Knowledge, Attitudes and P;actice-Beatrice A. Purdy, MSW; Ruth Morales, MSW; and+bahila Gonzalez, MSW • Board 6 Crises Normalization-Hugh Polk, MD I • Board 7 Social Support and Personal Resources in a Longitudinal Rural Study-Gary J. Linn, PhD; Bagar A. Husaini, PhD; Stovall R. Whitten, MD; and Regina Monnig, PhD • Board 8 Fourth Year Experience-LICSW's Treatment Cohort 1985- William Daley, PhD; and Stephen P. McLane, MSW • Board 9 Measurement of Child Maladaptive Behavior, Identification of Risk Factors of Child Maladaptive Behavior, and an Investigation of the Protective Effect of the Child's First Grade Experience-Lisa Werthamer-Larsson, MSW; Shep- pard G. Kellam, MD; Lawrence Dolan, PhD; and Hendricks Brown, PhD • Board 10 Comparison of Two Interventions to Reduce Radiation Ther- apy Distress: A Pilot Study-Marcia Schirazi, MPA SPONSOR: MENTAL HEALTH SECTION 1016 Monteleone, La Nouvelle Orleans East AIDS AND STATE HEALTH AGENCIES SPONSOR: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY 1017 Convention Center, Room 37 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ROUNDTABLES I Presider: Peter Dooley, MS • Table I Occupational Health Surveillance Activities in Federal and State Agencies-Kathleen O'Leary, MS; and Martha Stan- bury, MSPH • Table 2 Committees on Occupational Safety and Health (COSHs): Present and Future-Peter Dooley, MS • Table 3 Ethics Codes of Occupational Health Professions: A Com- parison-Barbara Chatterjee, MS; and Kathleen Fagan, MD • Table 4 Defining a Case: "Borderline" Presentations of Asbestosis and Occupational Asthma-Raymond Demers, MD; Thomas Robins, MD; and Edward Bresnitz, MD SPONSOR: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY 1018 Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POSTER SESSION I Presider. To be announced • Board 1 Prevalence of Hepatitis B Serologic Markers in EMS Providers in Central Texas: A Study of Occupational Risk-Diane Simpson, MD; Lynne Sehulster, PhD; T. Demetri Vacalis, PhD; and Gary Quick, MD • Board 2 A Comparison of OSHA Antineoplastic Drug Handling Guidelines with Practice in Health Care Facilities-Barbara Valanis, DrPH; Katherine Driscoll, JD; Virginia McNeil, MSN; and L. Hatchett • Board 3 Comparison of'I7uee Methods for Calculating Work-Related (WR) Injury Mortality Rates to Detect Geographic Differ- ences-Sharon Keefer, MS; William Marine, MD; Janet Weiser, MPH; and Kristin Paulson, PhD • Board 4 A Retrospective Cohort Mortality Study of Aircraft Mainte- nance Workers-Robert Spirtas, DrPH; and Patricia Stewart; MS • Board 5 AIDS in the Workplace: A Union's Education Efforts- Shaun Knox, MPH • Board 6 Use of a Self-Administered Questionnaire to Obtain Occu- pational Information on Pregnant Women-Brenda Eskenazi, PhD; and Kristi Pearson, MPH • Board 7 What Health and Safety Hazards are Perceived in the Work- place-Robert Brackbill, PhD 6 Board 8 Reacton of Asbestos-Exposed Workers to Notification and Screening-Clare Sullivan, MS; Beth Meyerowitz, PhD; and Cheri Premeau 42 PROGRAM SCHEDULE I ~ - TIMN 322319 ~
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Monday 12:30-2:00 PM ... 2:00-3:00 PM • Board 4 Prevalence of Childhood Sexual Assault in a Communit Sample--Judith M. Siegel; Swan B. Sorenson; M. Audre Burnam; Jacqueline M. Golding; and Judith A. Stein y • y 2:40 Health Problems of Japanese-Americans in Seattle-T. Nemekata, PhD, DrHSc; R. Hasegawa, PhD; C. Greenway, MA; J. Kumasaka, MA; and A. Arakaki-Lock • Board 5 Trends in Prescribing Psychotropic Medication for Chroni cally Mentally Ill Females-Harriet H. Fetner, BS; Shary - • n 2:55 Hepatitis B Infection among Students in a School of Nursing in Taiwan-J. F. Wang, PhD, RN R. Batey, Pharm D, MsPH; Harry H. Wright, MD, MBA and William S. Hall ; • 3:10 Hepatitis B Screening and Vaccination for Asian Refugees-John T. Riess, MCP; and G. Y. Tanaka, MSW • Board 6 Prevalence of Perimenstrual Symptoms-Nancy Fugate Woods , SPONSOR: ASIAN AMERICAN CAUCUS PhD; Martha Lentz, PhD; Ellen Mitchell, PhD; and Dian a Taylor, PhD W ' C S 1031 Meridien, St. Claude PONSOR: OMEN S AUCUS THE CERTIFICATE OF NEED (CON) PROGRAM IN SOCIAL SCIENCE PERSPECTIVE: THE EXPERIENCE IN VIRGINIA Presider: C.M.G. Buttery, MD, MPH 2:00-3:30 pnt 1028 Marriott, Le Galerie 2 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND OTHER DRUGS Presider: Kathryn Magruder-Habib, PhD 2:00 The Impact of International Trade in Alcoholic Beverages on Research Agendas-David H. Jemigan; and James F. Mosher, ID 2:20 The Growth of Tobacco Use in Developing Countries-Eugene M. Lewit, PhD 2:40 The Social Epidemiology of Non-Medical Drug Use: Intemational Comparisons of Sources of Supply and Distribution Networks- Michael Montagne, PhD 3:10 Ethical Considerations in the International Promotion of Prescrip- tion Drugs: Topics for Resolution-Barry Bleidt, PhD SPONSORS: ALCOHOL AND DRUG, INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, FOOD AND NUTRITION 1029 Marrtott, Le Galerie 1 HEALTH CARE FOR PROFIT: STATE AND LOCAL IMPACT AND PUBLIC POLICY OPTIONS Presider: E. Richard Brown, PhD Presenters: Reports from APHA Affiliates on extent and impact of for- profit health services in states and local areas, and public policies that affect them Discussants: Molly Joel Coye, MD, MPH Commissioner of Health, State of New Jersey Quentin D. Young, MD President, Health and Medicine Policy Research Group SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION ACTION BoARD 1030 Royal Sonesta, Belk Grove HEALTH PROBLEMS OF ASIAN AMERICANS AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS: ASIAN AMERICAN CAUCUS Presider. Ted T. L. Chen, PhD, MPH 2:00 An Overview of Health Problems among Asian American Popu- lations-Ted T. L. Chen, PhD • 2:10 Caring for the Elderly: A New Japanese Initiative-K. Koizumi, PhD; M. Dosch, DEd; and G. Burdman, PhD • 2:25 The Elderly Samom&-Yoshiko Shimamoto, PhD • 2:00 History and Current Status of CON-Monroe Lemer, PhD; David Salkever, PhD; Steve Mick, PhD; and Greg de Lissovoy, PhD • 2:20 The Economics of CON in Virginia-David Salkever, PhD; and Greg de Lissovoy, PhD • 2:40 Political Theory Aspects of CON in Virginia-Monroe Lener, PhD; and George Vlasak • 3:00 The Sociological Dynamics of the CON Process in Virginia- Steve Mick, PhD; and Greg de Lissovoy, PhD Discussants: Samuel V. Stiles, MA David Landes SPONSORS: ASSOCIATION FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN HEALTH, HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 1032 Meridien, Rosalie THE CHANGING FACE OF THE HMO INDUSTRY Presider: Odin Anderson • 2:00 Financial Trends in the HMO Industry: An Update-Christine Btudevold;and Ingrid Reeves • 2:20 HMOs: The Significance of the For-Profit and Non-Profit Orien- tation-Mark Schlesinger; and Constance Horgan • 2:40 The Consolidation of the HMO Industry: The Growth of National Fhms-Cynthia Polich; Maureen Shadle; and Laura Pitt Discussants: Louis Rossiter Joan Trauner SPONSORS: ASSOCIATION FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN HEALTH, MEDICAL CARE 1033 Mertdfen, Orleans CASE MANAGEMENT OF HIGH-COST USERS Presider Stanley S. Wallack 2:00 A Family-Centered, Community-Based Case Management Model for Chronically Ill Children-Steve A. Freedman 2:15 Preliminary Results from an Evaluation of a Private Sector Case Management Program for High-Cost Illness-Mary G. Henderson, PhD 2:30 Psychiatric Treatment for Adolescents: A Challenge to Utilization Review Programs-Ellen L. Bassuk, MD 2:45 Targeting Expanded Long-Term Care Services in Social HMO- Walter Leutz, PhD, MSW 3:00 Case Management Strategies for AIDS Patients-Jan Roughan, RN Discussant: Sol Levine, PhD SPONSORS: ASSOCIATION OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN HEALTH, MEDICAL CARE 1034 Meridlen, Frontenac HOSPITAL ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR ISSUES Presider John F. Newman, PhD • 2:00 Options for Revising the Medicare Economic Index-Mark S. Freeland, PhD; and Ross H. Arnett III PROGRAM SCHEDULE 45 TIMN 322322
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Monday 8:30-10:00 PM 1159 Marriott q Arcadia MONDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:30-10:00 pm AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION EVENING GENERAL SESSION "0 CANADA" Presiding: Ruth Roemer, JD President, American Public Health Association Malcolm G. Taylor, PhD Faculty of Administrative Studies York University, Canada Political Development of Canadian Health Insurance Leonard S. Rosenfeld, MD School of Public Health University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Samuel Wolfe, MD School of Public Health Columbia University, New York City Eugene Vayda, MD, FRCP (C) Faculty of Medicine University of Toronto, Canada The Birth of the Saskatchewan Health Insurance Program Coping with Medical Opposition The Current Health Insurance Scene in Canada Response Panel: The Relevance of Canadian Experience to the United States Sidney Lee, MD, DrPH President Milbank Memorial Fund Cecil G. Sheps, MD, MPH Health Services Research Center University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill ,SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION 4# 64 PROGRAM SCHEDULE
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Monday 12:30-2:00 PM Program Schedule Advance Sessions-See Page 140 Business Meetings and Social Hours-See Page 148 NIf )ND 1Y. O(°I"t )liI•:R 19 12:30-2:1/0 pm 1001 Convention Center, C. Exhibit Hall ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND OTHER DRUGS: WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS? POSTER SESSION PART I Presider: To be announced • Board 1 Clarifying the Utility of the Bogus-Pipeline: Effects on Enhancing the Validity of Self-Reported Adolescent Drug Measures-Chudley E. Werch, PhD; Dean Gorman, PhD; Phillip Marty, PhD; Janet Forbess, MS; and Barry Brown, PhD • Board 2 Comprehensive Nutrition for Alcoholics in Prison-Lily Hsu, MS • Board 3 Getting High at Work or School: Prevalence and Correlates of Disruptive Substance Use-Michael D. Newcomb, PhD • Board 4 Are an Individual's Alcohol Use Perceptions Useful in Understanding His/Her Drinking Behavior?-Roderick D. Duquette, EdD - • Board 5 Correlates of Alcohol Use and Misuse among Young Stu- dents-Jean T. Shope, PhD; Pamela Campenelli, MA; T. Dielman, PhD; and Amy Butchart, BA • Board 6 Physical Health and Mental Health Characteristics of Children at High Risk for Alcoholism-Jon E. Rolf, PhD; and Jeannette Johnson, PhD • Board 7 Alcohol Intake and Alcohol Problems among College Students Grouped According to Ethnic and/or Religious Identity- Julia A. Lee, PhD • Board 8 Alcohol and Tobacco Use on Prime Time Television (1985, 1986)-Patricia A. Madden, MPH • Board 9 The Epidemiology of Drug Use among College Students- Patrick R. Clifford, PhD; Elizabeth W. Edmunston, MA; William R. Koch, PhD; Fred Peterson, PhD; and T. Demetri Vacalis, PhD • Board 10 Alcohol Use and Depressive Symptoms among Anglo, Black and Mexican American Males-James Neff, PhD; and Sue Hoppe, PhD SPONSOR: ALCOHOL AND DRUGS 1002 Convention Center, Room 36 FILM AND MEDIA FESTIVAL 12:30 Professor Bodywise's Traveling Menagerie 2:00 Taking Our Bodies Back: The Women's Health Movement SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION 1003 Marriott, Le Galerie 3 HIGHLIGHTS OF FEDERAL INITIATIVES IN MINORITY HEALTH Presider: Patricia D. Mail 12:30 Introduction-Patricia D. Mail 12:40 Overview of -ISctivities of the Office of Minority Health, FY 1987-Herbert W. Nickens, MD 1:00 Cancer in Minority Populations: Are We Making Any Progress?-Claudia R. Baquet, MD 1:20 Addressing Minority Substance Abuse: Specific Federal Initiatives in the Health Resources and Services Adminis- tration-Vivian T. Chen, MSW 1:40 Defining minority health status through implementation of NHANES III: what will we learn? Speaker TBA 2:00 Establishing minority-specific health status objectives: im- proving measurement and surveillance of progress. Herbert W. Nickens, MD, Director, Office of Minority Health, USPHS. 2:20 Questions SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION EQUAL HEALTH OPPORTUNITY COMMITTEE 1004 Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C • APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING MODEL STANDARDS IN EIGHT HEALTH AGENCIES POSTER SESSION Board 1 Project Overview-Deborah A. Digilio, MPH, Director Board 2 The Data Benchmarks for Model Standards Project Results-Helen I. Meissner, ScM, Project Analyst Board 3 The Alameda County Health Care Services Agency/ Health Officers Association of California Implementation Project Board 4 The Colorado Department of Health Implementation Project Board 5 The Delaware Department of Health and Social Service, Division of Public Health Implementation Project Board 6 The Gateway District Health Department Implementation Project Board 7 The Hartford Health Department Implementation Project Board 8 The Jefferson County Department of Health Implementation Project Board 9 The Onondaga County Health Department Implementation Project Board 10 The Tulsa City-County Health Department Implementation Project SPONSORS: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION, THE MODEL STANDARDS FOR COMMUNITY PREVENTIVE HEALTH SERVICES PROJECT 1005 ~' I p1ro$r&0+..Marrfott, Le Galerie I THE INSURANCE AND LIABILITY CRISIS: VACCINES, MALPRACTICE AND PRODUCT LIABILITY THE HIDDEN AGENDA REVEALED Moderatoc Anthony Robbins, A Speaker: e Honorable A. xman JD Discussants: dler, JD r udetti, MD, JD SPONSO ' AN PUB ASSOCIATION PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT BOARD PROGRAM SCHEDULE 39 TIMN 322316
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Monday 2:00-3:00 PM 1041 Convention Center, Room 41 EPIDEMIOLOGY CONTRIBUTED PAPERS: INFECTIOUS DISEASE VACCINES Presider. Alan R. Hinman, MD • 2:00 Under-Reporting of Hepatitis: A Cost Analysis of an Outbreak- J. Bridge; M. Tormey; and I. Mascola • 2:15 Benefit-Cost Ratio of Premarital Syphilis Screening Is Less Fa- vorable than Screening for Phenylketonuria, Rubella and Congen- ital Syphilis-Roderick E. Edmond; Linda M. Frazier, MD; and Kathryn Magmder-Habib, PhD • 2:30 False-Positive Tuberculin Reactions with Aplisol-K. Bell, MD; M. Kallay, MD; S. Weigers, MD; and A. M. Groth-Juncker, MD • 2:45 Influenza Vaccine Efficacy in Nursing Homes: Maryland Experi- ence-Fend-yink C. Lin, MD; Tom Papadittms, MD; Norman A. Dean, MD; and Patricia Powers, MS • 3:00 A Pertussis Outbreak Fostered by Low Immunization Rates-P. DeCourcey, MPH; P. Etkind, MPH; M. A. Barry, MD; and L. M. Mofenson, MD • 3:15 An Outbreak of Measles among Unvaccinated Preschool-Aged Children-Sonja S. Hutchins; J. Escolan, L. E. Markowtiz; C. Hawkins; A. Kimbler, R. A. Morgan; and S. R. Preblud SPONSORS: EPIDEMIOLOGY, LABORATORY, VISION CARE, PODIATRIC HEALTH 1042 Marriott, Le Galerie 4 AGNES HIGGINS AWARD Presider Nancy Gay Robinett-Weiss, RD, MS 2:00 Opening Remarks 2:15 Presentation of the 1987 Agnes Higgins Award-Gabriel Stickle • 2:20 Address by Award Recipient A Healthy Pregnancy: The Struggle to Define It-Howard Jacobson, MD • 3:00 Services to High-Risk Women: The Development of a Partnership WIC/MCHlFamily Planning-Alice J. Lenihan, MPH, RD; Phyllis A. Gray, MPH; and Marcia S. Roth, MPH • 3:15 Instrument for Quantitative Assessment of Prenatal Nutrition Care Services-Audrey T. Cross, PhD, JD; Sharon Duke, BA; Mary Kenney, BA; and Sally DeGolia, MPH Jacobson SPONSORS: FOOD AND NUTRITION, MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH, MARCH OF DIMES 1043 Marriott, Le Galerie 6 DIETARY GUIDELINES FOR CANCER PREVENTION: SCIENCE, POLICY, DISSEMINATION Presider. Lauren L. Koumjian, MS 2:00 Introduction • 2:10 NCI Guidelines for Cancer Prevention: The Rationale and Policy Implications-Ritva R. Butnun, PhD • 2:30 The ACS Brings Kome the Dietary Guidelines for Cancer Risk Reduction-John Seffrin, PhD • 2:50 Effective Cancer Prevention through an Understanding of the Mechanisms of Nutritional Carcinogenesis-John H. Weisburger 3:10 Reactor-Lorelei DiSogra, EdD SPONSORS: FOOD AND NUTRITION, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PUBLIC HEALTH ED- UCATION 1044 Meridien, Ile De France Ballroom 3 ETHICS, DECISION-MAKING AND LONG-TERM CARE Presider: Marc D. Hiller, DrPH • 2:00 Gaming as a Method for Ethical Decision-Making: A Tool for Continuing Education-Cindy C. Wilson, PhD; and F. Ellen Netting, PhD • 2:20 Foregoing Life Supports: Interdisciplinary Education for Health Care Professionals-Mildred Z. Solomon, BA; Bruce Jennings, MA; Cheryl J. Vince, EdM; and Vivian Guilfoy, MA 2:40 Ethical Issues Confronting Discharge Planners: Assuring Autonomy for the Elderly-Marc D. Hiller, DrPH; Richard H. Fortinsky, PhD; and Catherine A. McGuire, BS 3:00 Discussion SPONSOR: FORUM ON BIOETHICS 1045 Convention Center, Room 19 CHRONIC CONDITIONS IN THE OLDER POPULATION Presider Laurence G. Branch, PhD • 2:00 Musculoskeletal Disease in the Elderly: Prevalence and Associated Functional Impairment-Susan L. Hughes, DS W; Rowland Chang, MD; Gerald Blandford, MD; Perry Edelman, PhD; Ruth Singer, MM; and Patrick Schuette, MD • 2:15 Comorbidity and Disease Clustering-Marybeth W. Montague, MS; James M. Walrath, MA; and Wanda W. Young, ScD • 2:30 Sensory Impairment and Physical Instability in the Elderly- Lowell M. Gerson, PhD; and Gary McCord, MA • 2:45 Falls in the Community Health Impaired Elderly-Khin H. Aung, MPH; and Ellen R. Schmidt, OTR • 3:00 Personal Care Dependency in the Older Population: 1962-84- Kathryn Bayard Tracy, MPA 3:15 Questions and Discussion SPONSORS: GERONTOLOGICAL HEALTH, PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, PO- DIATRIC HEALTH, FOOD AND NUTRITION, VISION CARE, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INJURY CONTROL AND EMERGENCY HEALTH SERVICES 1046 Convention Center, Room 18 ENTERING AND LEAVING THE NURSING HOME Presider: Susan C. Hedrick, PhD 02.00 Hospital-to-Nursing-Home Placement Delays: A Pilot Study- William G. Weissert, PhD; Cynthia Matthews Cready, AB; and Susan Decamp Freeze, BSN • 2:15 True Length of Stay for Nursing Home Patients-Christine Pattee, DrPH; and Korbin Liu, PhD • 2:30 Discharge Status and Subsequent Destination for Nursing Home Residents-William D. Spector, PhD; and Mary C. Kapp, MPhil • 2:45 Incidence and Management of Acute Illness Episodes in Long- Term Care Facilities: A Comparison between the US and UK- William H. Barker, MD; Peter Mott, MD; and Anne Brye,r, MD • 3:00 The Risk for Institutionalization among the Aged-Jersey Liang, PhD; Edward J. Tu, PhD; and Nancy Whitelaw, MA 3:15 Questions and Discussion SPONSOR: GERONTOLOGICAL HEALTH PROGRAM SCHEDULE 47 I ~ TIMN 322324
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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20 HEALTH CARE: FOR PEDPLE ORFOR PR®F[1? PROGRAM SCHEDULE 65 ~ TIMN 322342 ~
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pm ea N N 22 ANNUAL MEETING REGISTRATION A01~ANCE SESSiONS EXNIBfTS PLACEMENT SERVICE GOVERNING COUNCIL ICE BREAKER ANNUAL MEETING REGiSTRATION EXNIBtTS PLACEMENT SERVICE OPENING GENERAL SESSION LUNCH INDWOdNT SESSIONS PUBLIC HEARINGS HS~RL DINNERI EVENING SESSIONS GENERAL SESSION . ANNUAL MEETING REGISTRATION EXHIBITS i PLACEMENT SERVICE INDIJOINT SESSIONS SPEOIAL SESSION IUNCN „ INDlJO1NT SESSlONS PRES REGEP LEADERSHIP BANQUET LUNCH INDWOiNT SESSIONS TIMN 322299
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1084 Convention Center, Room 36 FILM AND MEDIA FESTIVAL 2:00 Taking Our Bodies Back: The Women's Health Movement, 33 minutes. 2:40 About Drug Abuse, 15 minutes 3:00 Fear of Fat: Dieting and Eating Disorders, 26 minutes 3:35 Saying No to Drinking Drivers, 23 minutes 4:00 Unemployment: The Hidden Crisis, 22 minutes 4:30 A Different Heart, 20 minutes 4:55 Abortion Clinic, 52 minutes 5:55 Taking Charge: Teens Speak Out on Sexuality and Birth Control, 22 minutes SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION 1085 Marriott APHA PUBLIC HEARINGS ON PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS AND POSITION PAPERS Group A Eugene Feingold, PhD, Mardis Gras Ballroom A Group B Frances M. Veverka, MPH, Mardis Gras Ballroom B Group C Thomas L. Hall, MD, DrPH, Mardis Gras Ballrom C Group D Albert Wertheimer, PhD, Mardis Gras Ballroom F SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION JOINT POLICY COMMITTEE 1086 Convention Center, Room 37 PREVENTION STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE BLACK HEALTH STATUS 2:00 The Politics of Prevention in Minority Communities-Patrick Clifford, DrPH; and Woodrow Jones, Jr., PhD 2:15 Primary Prevention of Cancer (Smoking) among Black Populations: The Design, Rationale and Methodology of a Research/Intervention Study-William A. Darity, PhD; Alvin Winder, PhD; Georgia P. Cemoda, DrPH; Edward Staneks, PhD; and Robert Tuthill, PhD 2:30 Prenatal Caring-A Way to Reduce Infant Mortality-Marcia Griffith, MPH; Raymond L. Cox, MD; and Karen Sturdivant, BS 2:45 Breast Cancer Screening in a Black Population: Two Years Experience at an Urban Public Hospital-David A. Ansell, MD; Jacquelen Dillard, RN; and Marcia Rothenberg, RN, MA 3:00 A Comparison of Injuries and Deaths among MajorTrauma Victims by Race: The Need for Stress Reduction among Blacks-Paul B. Simms, MPH - 3:15 Increasing Compliance in Hypertension among Blacks-Keith C. Ferdinand, MD, FACC PROVIDERS OF RESOURCES AFFECTING THE FUTURE OF BLACK PEOPLE 4:00 Current Status of Black Health Professional Manpower-Marcellus Grace, PhD 4:15 The School-Based Clinic as a Health Promotion Tool to Improving the Health Status of Black Inner City Youtlr-Jennifer Hill-Young, MSPH, RN; Gerald Kitzi, BS, MEd; and Q. B. Welch, PhD 4:30 Implications of Health-Related Issues in Early Childhood Devel- opment-Yvonne Jenkins, MD 4:45 The Rise and Decline of Black Hospitals in the United States- Mitchell F. Rice; PhD 5:00 Questions and AnsXrs SPONSOR: BLACK CAUCUS OF HEALTH WORICERS Monday 2:00-5:00 PM 1087 Royal Sonesta, Grand Ballroom North HEALTH POLICY FORUM I: REPORT OF THE INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE ON FOR PROFIT ENTERPRISES IN HEALTH CARE Presider: Daniel R. Longo, ScD 2:00 Background of Study and Overview of Issues-Walter McNerney 2:30 Study Methodology and Quality of Care Issues-Bradford Gray, PhD 3:00 Cost and Uncompensated Care-Stephen Shortell, PhD 4:00 Future Implications-Walter McNerney 4:30 Discussion-Questions and Answers SPONSORS: COMMUNITY HEALTH PLANNING, MEDICAL CARE 1088 Marriott, Mardi Gras I COMPUTER SOFTWARE EXCHANGE Presider•. Don Wallace, MD SPONSOR: HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 1089 Convention Center, Room 26 CHANGING PATTERN OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE Presider: Mary F. Arnold, DrPH 2:00 Trends in the Extent and Depth of Insurance Coverage and Number of Persons Uninsured and Underinsured-Gail Wilensky, PhD 2:30 Trends in Employer and Employee Contributions to Health Ex- penditures and in Out-of-Pocket Cost to the Public-Pamela Farley- Short, PhD 3:00 Trends in Medicare, Medicaid and Long-Term Care Financing- Deborah A. Freund, PhD; Thomas H. Rice, PhD; and William G. Weissert, PhD SPONSOR: HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 1090 Royal Sonesta, Teche PUBLIC HEALTH AND THE CONSTITUTION Moderator. George J. Annas, JD, MPH • 2:00 Mandatory Drug Testing: Is It Constitutionally Petmissable?- Leonard H. Glantz, JD • 2:20 Equal Protection Review of Access to Health Care after Cle- bourne-Wendy Mariner, JD 2:40 Advertising Restrictions and the First Amendment Thomas Chris- toffel, JD • 3:00 A New Look at a Dying Issue: The Constitutional Right to Refuse Treatment-Andrea Fox Schwartz - 3:20 Discussion SPONSOR: HEALTH LAW FORUM 1091 Convention Center, Room 28 AIDS VIRUS ANTIBODY TESTING IN THE PUBLIC HEALTH LABORATORY Presider: Martin S. Favero, PhD 2:00 The Role of HIV Antibody Testing in the Prevention and Control of AIDS-Walter R. Dowdle, PhD • 2:30 HIV Antibody Testing: A Concern for Methodology-Jane P. Getchel, DrPH 3:00 Impact of HIV Antibody Testing on the Public Health and Private Laboratory-Michael T. Osterholm, PhD • 3:30 Current Results from Screening Programs for HIV Antibody in the United States-Roger Y. Dodd, PhD 4:00 HIV Antigen Testing-Charles A. Schable, MS SPONSOR: LABORATORY PROGRAM SCHEDULE 53 TIMN 322330 I
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• 7:20 Beyond Diagnostic Related Groups: Nursing's Perspective for the Future in Developing Reimbursement for Ambulatory Services- Terry R. Misener, RN, PhD • 7:40 The Changing Role of the Public Health Nurse in Epidemiology- Cinda Jackson, RN; and Alexander F. Taylor, MPH • 8:00 Nursing 2020: A Study of the Future of Nursing-M. Wamick, MN; T. Sullivan, EdD; L. Green, MA; P. Krochalk, DrPH; J. Lee, RN, MSN; J. Lind, MN; D. Smith, MSN; and P. Underwood, DNS 8:20 Discussion Monitor: Christine Bridges, RN, MS SPONSOR: PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 11571 Marriott, La Galerie 6 EDUCATING COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSES: METHODS AND MONEY Presider Judith Scully, MSN • 7:00 A Needs Assessment-Driven Approach to Comprehensive Planning of Continuing Education for Community Health Nurses-Donna Monday 7:00-8:30 PM J. Peterson, MHS; L. M. Wulff, RN, MSN; G. R. Alexander, MPH, ScD; and C. E. Miles, BS • 7:20 Perspectives in Gerontology: Designing Programs for Nurses- Cindy MacQuarrie, RN, MN • 7:40 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for Community Health Nurses: Development of a Curriculum-Elizabeth T. Anderson, RN, DrPH; and Judith M. McFarlane, RN, DrPH • 8:00 Continuing Education Needs of Registered Nurses in Home Health Care-Susan Williams, RN; and Jim Williams, MBA 8:20 Discussion Monitor Barbara Groeschell, RN, BSN SPONSOR: PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 1158 Royal Sonesta, Gris-Gris • ABORTION POLICY AND AMERICA'S LARGEST PROTESTANT DENOMINATION Presider: To be announced Presenter. Gary Crum, PhD SPONSOR: PUBLIC HEALTH WORKERS FOR LIFE PROGRAM SCHEDULE 63 TIMN 322340 I i
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Monday 2:00-3:00 PM ... 2:00-5:00 PM • 2:25 Population Undercount as an Issue for Public Health Programs- Clifford C. Clogg, PhD • 2:50 Strategy and Issues in the Program of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey-Robert S. Murphy, MSPH • 3:05 New Approach of the National Health Interview Survey-Owen T. Thomberry, Jr., PhD 3:20 Discussion SPONSORS: STATISTICS, EPIDEMIOLOGY, POPULATION AND FAMILY PLAN- NING 1079 Convention Center, Room 15 STATISTICAL ISSUES IN HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH • Presider: Paula Diehr, PhD • 2:00 Credibility Methods in Setting Pure Premium for Medicare-Insured Groups-Naihua Duan, PhD; Willard G. Manning Jr.; and Joseph P. Newhouse • 2:30 Research Cost Analysis of a Randomized Cancer Prevention Trial- Nicole Urban, ScD; Larry Kessler; and Steven Self • 3:00 Statistical Issues on Comparing Two Prospective Reimbursement Models-Sonja Johansen, PhD SPONSORS: STATISTICS, EPIDEMIOLOGY, SCHOOL HEALTH EDUCATION AND SERVICES, HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, VISION CARE NIO\D%l.O(°IOBfR 19 2:1/0-5:0/1 ptn 1081 Convention Center, Room 39 • STATE OF THE ART REPORT ON MINORITY ACCESS ISSUES: A WORKSHOP/PANEL Moderators: Violet P. Cherry, ACSW, MPH Lewis H. Clarke, MA Michael A. Jenkins, MPA, MPH The first part of the Workshop will address an update on Minority Access to health training, health careers and jobs in the health professions and will include the following: 2:00 Recruitment and Access to Medical Education and to Schools of Public Health-Kathleen A. Torres, MPH 2:10 Implementing an Effective Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Program in a State Health Department-Maxine Williams Knox, MA 2:20 Implications of P.L. 94437 Relating to American Indian/Alaskan Native Health Manpower-Michael E. Bird, MPH; David McCoy, JD, MPH; and Rick St. Germaine, PhD 2:40 Update: Minority Management Fellowship Program-NY State Health Department Alfred F. Fischer, MPA 2:50 Minorities in the Governmem Sector-Kenneth N. Moritsugo, MD, MPH 3:00 Recruitment of Minority High School Students into the Health Professions-Marcellus A. Lewis, MPH Discussant: Edward Salsberg, MPA • Access to Consultation Moderator Michael A. Jenkins, MPA, MPH Panel of Speakers from Minority Access Issues Workshop Participants will have access to the entire speaker panel. Consultants will provide advice, counseling and guidance on jobs, and job related resources, educational opportunities advancement in the health professions, in small group sessions or individual interviews. The groups will cover specialty areas such as: Government sector (Federal, State, County, Local), inter- national health, public antt priv te sector health delivery systems, research and management consultant fids. SPONSORS: HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, BLACK CAUCUS OF PUBLIC HEALTH WORKERS, LATINO CAUCUS 1082 Royal Sonesta, Bacchus MAINTAINING OURSELVES: WELLNESS PROGRAMS AND INDIAN COMMUNITIES Presider: Sam Elrod, MPH • 2:00 Interorganizational Native American Wellness Programs-Billy Rogers, MSPH; and Randy Bamoskie, MPH • 2:20 Practicing What We Preach ... at Health Promotion Confer- ences-Billy Rogers, MSPH; and Randy Bamdskie, MPH • 2:40 Mutton Stew and Fry Bread: Employee/Community Wellness on the Navajo Reservation-Linda J. Wright; Frank Holmes; Donna Leno; DeAnne Pete; and Elvira Crockett • 3:00 The Use of Empowering Leadership Training within the Cherokee Nation Mental Health Program to Promote Healthier People and Communities in Rural Areas-Charles H. Heller, PHD • 3:20 A Navajo and Pueblo Interorganizational Approach to Cardiovas- cular Fitness-Sally Davis, MEd; and Ken Hunt, BS • 3:40 No Smoking Please-Mitchell V. Owens, MPH; and Joyce Eisel Owens, PHD • 4:00 Health Promotion at the Work Site: Weight Loss Competition- Jean Charles-Azura, MPH; Lauren Tancoma, CHN; and Kathleen Charles, MPH • 4:20 Eat Right New Mexico: A Statewide Nutrition Awareness/Weight Control Program-Bruce Leonard 4:40 Discussion SPONSOR: AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE CAUCUS 1053 Marriott, Grand Ballroom Bissonet 16TH ANNUAL PRESIDENT-ELECT SESSION THE FUTURE OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN THE UNITED STATES Presider: Bailus Walker, Jr., PhD, MPH Professor of Environmental Health and Toxicology School of Public Health Sciences University at Albany State University of New York President-Elect, American Public Health Association This session will discuss the findings and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences-Institute of Medicine's Commission to Study the Future of Public Health in the United States 2:00 Findings and Recommendations of the Commission Richard Remington, PhD Vice President, University of Iowa Chair, Commission to Study the Future of Public Health in the United States 2:30 Panel Discussion of the Commission's Report Wslksr, Jr. SPONSOR: AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION 52 PROGRAM SCHEDULE
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Monday 2:00-3:00 PM 1047 Convention Center, Room 20 STRATEGIES IN FINANCING LONG-TERM CARE SERVICES Presider: William D. Clark, MA • 2:00 Life Care at Home: A New Option in the Finance and Delivery of Long-Term Care-Eileen J. Tell, MPH; Marc A. Cohen, PhD; and Stanley S. Wallack, PhD • 2:15 Continuing Care Retirement Communities: An Analysis of Finan- cial Viability-Hirsch S. Ruchlin, PhD • 2:30 Risk-Based Financing for Long-Term Care: A National Replica- . tion-Rick T. Zawadski, PhD; and Eileen Kunz • 2:45 Long-Term Care Risk-Sharing Program: What's in It for Medic- aid?-Marc A. Cohen, PhD; Eileen J. Tell, MPH; and Stanley S. Wallack, PhD • 3:00 Methods for Targeting Community-Based Long-Term Care Pro- grams-Thomas W. Grannemann, PhD; and Jean B. Grossman, PhD 3:15 Questions and Discussion SPONSORS: GERONTOLOGICAL HEALTH, HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, MED- ICAL CARE 1048 Convention Center, Room 29 TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT Presider: Kit Simpson, MPH • 2:00 When Lightning Strikes Twice: HCFA's Decision to Pay for Heart Transplants--4'negory de Lissovoy, PhD • 2:15 Institutional Diffusion of Small-Volume Infusion Pumps, Tech- nology Assessment Research-Barbara Ann Bukoski, DrPH; Jay H. Glasser, PhD; and Michael Decker, PhD • 2:30 Criteria and Procedures for Reviewing Technology Acquisition in Large Hospital Systems: The Case of the US Veterans Adminis- tration-Cyril U. Roseman, PhD • 2:45 Cost-Effectiveness of Extra-Corporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy- E. I. Chatziandreou, MD; K. Carlson, PhD; M. Weinstein, PhD; and A. Mulley, MD SPONSOR: HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 1049 Convention Center, Room 31 HEALTH CARE COST AND COMPETITION: DEALING WITH TODAY'S AGENDA Presider: Pamela Paul-Shaheen • 2:00 Competition in HealthCare: The Experience of Firms Offering a Choice among Alternative Forms of Health Insurance-Gregory de Lissovoy, PhD; Thomas Rice, PhD; and Jon Gabel, MS • 2:15 Coding Errors Can Cost Hospitals Millions of Dollars-John B. Wayne, MBA; Linda H. Potts, MPH; Edgar D. Charles, PhD; Susan D. Hom, PhD; and Bene Baldwin • 2:30 New Allocation Systems for Hospital Nursing Care under DRG Regulations-Bangalore Nagaprasanna, PE, DBA; and Thomas M. Dunaye, DrPH • 2:45 Affordable Heatlh Care: A Collaborative Effort-Pamela S. Walsh, MPH; and Deborah L. Ebers, MHSA • 3:00 Trends in Hospital Decision-Making Based on Service's Losses and Gains-David E. Gagnon, MPH; Rachel M. Schwartz, MBA; and Catherine Rowlands, MBA SPONSOR: HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 1050 Convention Center, Room 27 IMPACT OF DRGs Presider. Merilya Cof DrPH • 2:00 The Impant d'~'PPS on Discharge Status of Medicare Beneficiaries- June M. Buckle, MSN; and Phoebe D. Sharkey, PhD • 2:15 The Impact of DRGs on the Quality of Hospital Care-K. C. Connelly, MA; P. I. Dreyer, PhD; I. R. McManus, MPH; and J. D. Bogen • 2:30 Going Home Early: Impact of DRG's on Home Health Service Referral-E. Greer Gay, MPH; Samuel L. Baker, PhD; and Jennie J. Kronenfield, PhD • 2:45 Rehabilitation under Medicare PPS and the Increasing Need for Transitional Care Services-Herbert Traxler, PhD • 3:00 The Impact of PPS/DRGs on the Use of Diagnostic Imaging Technology-Jane Levitt PhD SPONSOR: HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 1051 Royal Sonesta, Oak-Alley EPIDEMIOLOGY OF INJURIES Presider. Steven C. Macdonald, MPH • 2:00 Socioeconomic and Demographic Sources of Variation in County Homicide Rates-James A. Mercy, PhD; Patrick O'Carrall, MD; and Diane Roberts • 2:15 Injuries Due to Falls in the Construction Industry-Steven Mac- donald, MPH; Goldy Kleinman, MA; Stanley Freeman, MA; and Nancy Hammond • 2:30 Trends in Fatal Pediatric Immersion Injuries, California, 1960- 85-Jess Kraus, PhD; Gina Aharanoff; Shaken Arzemanian; and Garen Wintemute • 2:45 Current Courses of Aquatic Spinal Cord Injury Due to Diving: Summary of 43 Case Studies-Royce VanEvera, MS; and Kathryn Scott, MS • 3:00 A Study of Injury and Alcohol Diagnoses as Comorbid Condi- tions-Kathleen M. Helsing, MPH; and Carey V. Azzara, MA • 3:15 Effect of Legal Drinking Age on Youth Suicide and Homicide Rates-Pedro Satumo, MD, MPH; James Mercy, PhD; and Patrick O'Carroll, MD, MPH SPONSORS: INJURY CONTROL AND EMERGENCY HEALTH SERVICES 1053 Meridlen, Ile De France I SPECIAL MINI-PLENARY SESSION-THE STATE OF WOMEN'S HEALTH: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Presider. Carmen Barroso, PhD 2:00 Pregnancy in Developing Countries: Must Poor Women Continue to Die? Allan Rosenfield, MD, MPH 2:10 Family Planning and Women's Health: A View from Africa- Esther Boohene, MD, MPH 2:20 Improvements in Perinatal Health Care: A European Perspective- C. Arden Miller, MD Discussant: Carmen Barroso, PhD SPONSORS: INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, POPULATION AND FAMILY PLAN- NING, MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 1054 Marriott, Mardi Gras Ballroom L ANALYSES FROM THE HISPANIC HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY (HHANES) Presider•. J. Henry Montes • 2:00 Risk Factors Associated with Depression among Mexican Amer- icans-Hortensia Amaro, PhD; Richard D. Campa, MA; Jose Peres Avila, MA; Rupert Whitaker, MA • 2:20 Barriers to Health Care among Hispanics: Evidence from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey-Antonio L. Estrada, PhD, EMSPH • 2:40 Reported Asthma among Puerto Rican, Mexican American and Cuban-American Children: HHANES, 1982-84-Olivia Carter, MHS; Peter G. Gergen, MD; and Pedro J. Lecca, PhD 48 PROGRAM SCHEDULE f TIMN 322325 l

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