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l r 50330 7510 -76 IX Cal-81 Le Devoir RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET 76 IX Cal-81 0 ~~~ `~AFI"-~ J~MO~fG~°~ANAIS~A~f'~~G~'t"Y'E"`~A~TtJFAC'1'I)iZERS°~ *(Les fabricants de cigaretes engages dans une "Tar War".)* Le Devoir, p. not given (Jan. 27, 1981) (in•French) *Keywords:* carbon monoxide, smoke, constituent; nicotine, smoke, constituent; tar, smoke, constituent. -. . ..-~...r. ~ ... .~~.,.~.,~.,~ 4 n 0 2 t 28 8
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i .50330 7505 CICARI:TTtS--TAR/CICARETTES-=NICOTINI: / TOPACCO--T"AXATI0i7/ TOIiACCO--SAIOKINC--AP7TI-SItOKINC CAriPAICN/ 72 XI Re -77 RJR CLASS N0. PAMPHLET 72 XI Re2-77 's.p.• , S.P. ~rayton, W., Jr. (1•icKinsey Co., New York, N. Y., U. S.) THE TAR AIdD NICOTINE TAX: PURSUING PUBLIC HEALTH _TlIROUGH TAX INCEt~TIVES.~ Yale Law Jour. 81 (No. 8) 1487-1516 (July 1972) (in English) *Note date.* ' ~ This-article seeks to define and evaluate the tar+and nicotine tax ; alternative. First, it explains «•hy oovernment must switch to a tar + and nicotine tax strategy if it is to have a significant irnpact on smok- ing. Second, it evaluates the effectiveness of such a tax, both in theory, : and in the light of New York's experience.' Finally, it explains the structure that would give the tax the ~ eatest, possible impact. Q 5 0 A n a, 2.. I2 .~ Z
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~ ... ~_. . ;rnr 1f;C0-- 50330 7503 74 IX Co TOizACCO=-5t10F;C--TAR/TOBACCO--SrtOKI?--NICOTINE/ RJR CLASS NO. PA:1PtiLEE 74 IX Co t Consumentengids_.: Rt, l1> ..~~& .. 'h~t3ACC0 SOLU I:1 .Ei'll~:h'E'i'fiEM ti'bS"' *(Tcer ea nicotin in shag.)* "' ~' ConsumentenSids, 21,(No. 10) 420-21 (Oct. 1973) (in Dutcn), *Keywords:* tar, sc:oke, constituent; % nicotine, sraol:e, constituent. ; . . . S i *1974, No. 5, 1•T 1776* *d* I ~ Tobacco cher:~istry: .- 4 J. 3..A.ii.~.al.t.:.f..7uN.~ts)•.ih.p' 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 28 1
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50330 'I504 1 RJR CLASS NO. PA:•iPNLLT IX Un~-75 s.p. Tobacco Institute Testing Laboratory, Washington, D. C., U. S. Tobacco Inst. Testing Lab., report, variously paged (Aug. 18, 1975) (in English) ~ l ~t *Keywords:* nicotine, smoke, constituent; fVb a 3 Ct ~7 tar, smoke, constituent. NU."9 V Ci952)). , A~o.as (~~i81) *1q75, No. 15, w 5588* *d* Tobacco cliemistry: . . 1 0 5 0 0 n 0 2 1 2 3 2.
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7/ Rcprintc~l front CANCER. \'ol. 23. No. 4, April lllf~. Cup)riglu, © 1969, by thc American Canccr Socicty, Inc. J. It. Lippincutt Coml,an}. f, ~w- y7/a ~ I'ritttcd iu U.S.A. TAR AND NICCTINE- RETRIEVAL- T~.'.0~7 GIGARETI'ES AVAILABLE -IN -CANADA -. \'V. F. FORBES, P1tD, DSc, FRIC, J. C. RolslNso.r, MASc, AND M. STANTON, ACIC ) Tar and nicotinc yields were dctcrntiucd for 85 brands of cigarcttcs available in Canada. Generally, lungcr cigarettes and those withttut filter tended to have Itil;hcr r.trr anJ tiicutinc cuntcuts. No sinnificant rcl;icinctl di/fcrcnccs could be clctcctcd. A considerable rauqc in tar and uicotinc coiitcnt was observed Im• tN'ccn Lrands of similar cicc and tvltc. TLc results lt:uallcl the findiugs rc- ported in rclatcd studics and again sugqcst that a cigarette of rclatively low ta at1~( ni~tiucr~contynt, ~.~hic2 is ~+roloLly less hazardous, can be tnauu• 0 5! ur~ rc: Iti•. U ~G ~ 50330 ?502
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r:ng1 ls!1) Cr,it;ida ll, i,aTtlaent '.A F:.iR CLASS S .'.a ; 1'.~,PIIL1:i: 71, ?.' Ca tiO.1R1 ~ieal til ;;i.ll are, (2~t.1„'a, Can::da Z- ~"~?~yAAtt}~I'iiCATIi:$~~~'~='t~N•?Glt~ikR~2'TI:S: - Canada DeI). Nat. Health We] fare, :r'ew,; Release, Ottawa, Can. (1971) (i.n *1971, No. 20, jJ 8697* *d* Toba:;ca analysis (medicinc) : 0 S A A n ~ A 2 I.. _2 ~$. q.. _. .... ,..~._.~.,,...,.~..........~..~„ 50330 7506
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. 50330 7511 ~ I By ~A~E11~nd I. A. At;ov-EL-FADL Faculty of Agriculture, University of Alexandria, Egypt F I ~ ~~P ol60lo ico Academioe Sritntiarum KunDaricge,, Vol. (1-?J, pp, 31-35 (1979) Effect.of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on the Volatile 76 II Re2-81 S. P. Oil Content of some Medicinal Plants : Sclerorinia sclerorlorum was first recorded on ani;e in Egypt. It was pathogenic on coriander, killa, dill, anise and fennel respectively. The fungus is a winter pathogen. infection with S. scleroriorurn decreases the volatile oil percentage of anise, caraway and fennel. Khilla (Ammi risnaga, L.), Anise (Pimpinella anisum, L.), Caraway (Carum carvi, L.), Celery (Apium grareolens, L.), Coriander (Coriandrum satirum, L.), Fennel (Foeniculum rulgare, Miller) and Dill (Anethum grareolens, L.), are im- portant members of drug and Condiment crops, and have a special importance among the medicinal plants in some parts of the world as in A. R. E. 0 5oo0 0 2.1 2 a9
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50330 7508 . w,~.:._ ....._~:.;.:y...:> :~...:>:._...,..._.> ._._..:.._ ., ._~, .. .. - , . . u ... . ; . - I I I I tinA8-74 SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHETMICAL•S' UNITED STATES PRODUCTION AND SALES OF V `°t~`=~i:~4.,i.G.:~, U ~j F S '~ ~ 117~ 1972,1513,19?q ~ I°17s- P li tL . re .uninarv Vnited States Tariff Commission ~,- .1913blarch UPIITED STATES T.kRIFF COMMISSION Washington ~., ~I Q.I RI ~! 2 8 b f
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GiCT:AT BRITAIN--TOBACCO/TJP,ACCO---SMOKE--TAR/TOBACCO-E--NICOTINE 50330 7507 SMOKING HABITS--ANTI-S"SOKINr, CAMPAIGN/ 73 Great Britain Health Departments; Great Britain (;overnment Chemist XI Gr 1973 A collection of material
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50330 7513 j VI Re -78, S.Y.9 m i The Catalytic Action of1Vlolybdenum(V) for NO Oxidationt Keizi HAStttuoro", Shozi WATANASa' and KYltita'V~RAtK~"l '"1...-.. - . • The Osaka Municipal Technical Research Institute; Ogimati, Kita-ku, Osaka-shi SJO Japan Department of Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering,. Kyoto Univcrsity ; Yoshida, Sakyo-ku, Kyolo-shi 606 Japan The oxidation of NO with oxygen chemisorbed on reduced MoO,-AhO, catalysts was studied by various physico-chemical techniques. The oxidation over the catalysts was rapid at room temperature. The data of ESR measurements suggested that NO reacted with O,' but did not with 0- at the temperature lower than 100°C. The number of active sites on the catalyst was determined on the basis of thq saturation value of adsorbed NO and O, and wa9 found to be nearly equal to the content of Mo(V), [Mo'•]„ in the supported molyL-w11cnum oxide soluble in water. The variation of the number of active sites with the amount oU supporied molybdenum oxide and the extent of its reduction agreed well with the variation of [114o"]~ with them. It is concluded that the oxidation activity is attributable to [Mo°4JT. ~ t Studies of DfoOi-Alsoi,Catalysts in Ethylene Polymerization. V. 0 s0 00 0 ;z 1 2 9 1 n
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50330 7522 . -- -.--`~' _ ~:""'w`~CAi~€R AQUATIC ANIMALS, EFFECT OF WATER POLLUTION ON/ VETERNARY ONCOLOGY--CONGRESSES/CARCINOGENS/ WATER --POLLUTION--HEALTH EFFECT/6NVIRONMENTAL HEALTH/ ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES RC 61 Ne 77 Volume 298 AQUATIC POLLUTANTS AND ~I OGIC EFFECTS WITH EMPHASIS ON EOPLASIA Edited by H. F. Kraybill C. J. Dawe, J. C. Harshbarger, and "AWW;j~ TheWVew York Academy of Sciences New York, New York 1977 _. _ -- .:. ~~ -- s.
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50330 7520 U. S. REF Q 151 La 1975 ..._._.._ J andGothefA/VOrk9)ofO0JlettiZ Rography Copyright © 1975 by Gale Research Company BIOGRAPIiY--DICTIONARTES/BIOGRAPIIIES--DICTIONARIES/DICTIONARIES/ ~~ ~ ~. ,~~~ ~s 1. United St9tes--Biograohy--Indexes. 2. Canada--Bio raph Indexes. I. La Beau, Dennis. 11. Tarberti Gary C.'Ax. Z5305.U5B56 . . [CT213] 920'.073 75-19059 ISBN 0-8103-1077-5 FIRST EDITION 1g75-197n Vol. 1 (A-F); Vol. 2(G=-M) ; Vol. 3 (N--Z) ~ ~ A Guide to More Than 725,000 Listings GALE RESEARCH COMPANY in Over Fiiiy Current Who's Whos DETROIT, MICHIGAN 48226 i
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50330 7523 jFORECASTING/INTERNATIONAT. RELATIONS--RESEARCH/ 1/ PRAEGER SPECIAL STUDIES IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS AND GOVERNPAEN' tIn Y Plannhlg 3730 Be Alternative 1975 World fi utures Values, Methods, edited by and Models , Loc~Es R051C Beres r..~..~ :~/"aVrata K.'" `~Y •`.I ~' ~- 0 S tl 0 Praeger Publishers New York Washington London ~~ . ~1. ~~ ~ . •
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. 50330 7518 1 . . VII Re6-80 S.P. Gidrokhim Mater. 69 108-16 (1977) -- H= A;HLOROCYCLUHEXATJE, NET AkHOS, AI1D CHLOROa'H05 DB3QU0S2<.VION IN SOIL AND THEIR MIGRgION WITH THL dM;rZS OF SUIVXE RUNOFF 0 ' . Hydrochemi.c al Institute, Novocherkassk bry 'If'v"X~W-%:Np ~ Yorotova L.G., Demchenko A,.S., Bra-zhnikova. L.Y. Great quantities of chemicals and among them pesticides enter the biosphere due to intensive chem.icalization of agriculture. Upon the influence of different factors the greater part of pesticides is decomposed in soil forming primary products and certain prepara- tions Ab fre®e3ftedl i9 sai1.l fa 2 L`eng time due to high persistency. r
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i 50330 7521 . Oral Surg. Oral Med. Oral Pathol. 45(4)560-7(1978) , 76 II Re , S.P. The correlation between I organoleptic -78 mouth-odor ratings and levels of volatil4ulfur compounds Nicholas F. Schmidt, Ph.D., Seymour R. Missan, M.S., WilCirt~d :I:'T'6rbet! D.D.S., Ph.D., and Aaron D. Cooper, Ph.D., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. VICK DIVISIONS RESEARCH AND UEVELOPtitENT, RICHARDSON-INERRELL, INC. An organoleptic rating (OR) technique and gas-liquid chromatography were emptoyed to study the relationship bctwecn orat•malodor rating's and the corresponding conccntrations of oral volatile sulfur compounds ( VSC) ir a total of 102 subjccts in two separate studies. Both studics demonstrated a statistically significant positive corretatiop between the intensity of perceived oral malodor and the concentration of VSC (H=S + CIhSH) emitted by individual subjects. The volatile sulfur compounds, hydrogen sulfide (HlS) and methyl mercaptan (CH,SH), : . , are receivino increasing recognition as significant contributors to oral malodor. Numerous investigators,''B using chemical, amperometric, mass spectrometric, or gas-liquid chromatographic methods, have demonstrated that these two components are the principal d s~0 voQilel9ulft2 corfpou2ds 19eseR in the head space of putrefied saliva and in individual samples of mouth air. In most persons, H2S and CH,SH constitute over 90 per cent of totalV.
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50330 7515 ~ ~ ...., r:._~......_..:a~.. ._.n.....~....~~.~__.. ..._. ~..~...~......,va< f.. _. ...~r OOF Y~.3AHe~~~4G.1 L~~!_~(2~\El.7i/:I 4.f1TFSA.w 11,S , /1. i1, ~+ .lTfl ~' 1.Ld u[i-I ~j k ~1~0 liT'F{C'r zusutii ~Q 433--441 F~A.Un I:n;1.2uh R»zLaozL . 0 - s.0 0 ..0 - 0 2 .1.2 9 3 . .
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i I 50330 7529 ) ) FOOD--CONTAMINATION/ P Bibliotheca Nutritio et Dieta Q . 141 Na 29 So 1980 , . ~ ~ S. Kuger'• Basel • Munchen • Paris • London • New York • Sydney 4 s ~ ~ i ,. . .. . . - . . . . t . Series Editor Ruschlikon•Zurich ! C Somojyi ~ S Karger • Basel • Munchen • Paris • London • New York • Sydney ~~ ~.0a e.) 0 5 0 0 0 0 z13 0 ,7 16th Sympusium uf thc Group of Eqrupean Nusritionists, Budapest, November 8-10. 1978 Forei n Substances : and_ utrition r Editors " !. C. SomoRyl, Ruschlikon•ZGrich iM J'M*iirttBudepest
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'UYCA srt •(( cF~ct~ilttyttr::. •: Y'~7js •i 3:{~c~ s~~ c~~ .. . .; L .. t ~ - .` .~ ~....a~:a.J ......~.o-..• \,ue1..:.:.'t _..... f ` UV 1.~4ty..
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i , f •1 c . . , 1974/75 GENERAL AGREEMENT ON TARIFF& AND TRADE ve GENEVA, 1975 0 5 0 0 tl 0~ I 3 0 4 f
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5 op. I -?,' Q.U -0-0 .9 ().. . •3 •a ':xo:j;uTsl-6•'p: ' fTT4A 911+51 • aTod ' L • PattSs ' 0,; , 'O~: `9 ':'au:+S •£TVr1. 'S •Pi?Lj3,j •CTO,j '~ •Pzit`:jS •aYor. `E •a.,y,s •nJOA `Z 'p;>vos •JJTID,'1 'T'PaI;a5' (f;IISJ.) Sd.',,tlIS, tI2ZIta1 Ziix AQ Sa'JNIIti:.OS zic7xMr:i, TR;L aJ 5.:,1:.'r t; i tTtix ;'Y. ft°,,7:'Q<~~?;d ni~ 53Y~fI~i;aS ao;aV3W'-;,O ;3xa»~S. ~~~~aS P~~~vq un LZSL 0£EOS
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._. .-. -4.6 a.... .a:Wi'.w.1i ..: s 75 XI Eu TOBACCO--TA.YATION/TOBACCO--MANUFACTURE AND TRADE--EUROPE/ Q RJR CLASS NO. PAMP!lLET l~#~ XI Eu 'Europeans,Economic Community, Luxembur8 ~QF:~fUI3ACC0-~JITHIN TARIt~F3'"AaVn' t?Trlf:fi~RF.GULATIUIV. , ~Y,t~j~1.~,EtAD Y:p . TyE>`F.U.ROPEAN~'ECOI10i•1YC 'COPLKU:3ITY ~AS' PULLISHEU IN TIIE GFiU11N GOVER'*iENT TARI FF "'C pk:VAltT.c1EXT• BULLETIN 1970 A:ND 1970 European Economic Community, variously paged (1970, 1974) (in German) *1975,No. 4, W 1328* *d* Tobacco economics: 0 S ~ 0 ~~ 2 f3 0 6
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50330 7535 ) xx tta 6 ~'a Tato~-: ~, (1969) ~ ~~ . .... . i « _. ..... ~..~' i :. ....'.'.~ .: ~. . ~ ~t .. . .....1 t ~ ~ . . Q. 5 0. 0 .0 G.. 2 . .I a. i . .a. . .
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,., .,, 11 .,:.: 4 .. r f k n,Yaj y ~' fti:~Y L? ! .., . ... . . `~ .`•..{ : . . • . . ~ ~ 7 .4 7. ~ n.`Ij k. 9ESL OEEOS i
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I r DULC.ETIN OF TIIB CIIL'MiCAt. SOCILTY ON JAPAN, vOt.. 49(l), 12-15 (1976) Studics'of 11ToO,-A110, Catalyst invrithytenc Polymcriza,tion. III. The Naturc of Mo(V) and Its Relation with Activity 78 III Ha2 POLYM ERS & PpLYMERIZATI0V--C.ITALYSTS/CATAI,YSTS/ oht.t.$TtN OV TIIP. Ct1l.'AtttrtL SOCtE'1Y OY JAt'AN, vot.. 49 (12), 3•1Ui1-3•112 (1g7t;) (Vol. 49, No. 12 (Vol. 49, No. 1. IV. Klnctics and Stu1cI:Io11>,ctry of the Itcduction ~ , Kcizi I tnstnntoTO, Shoxi WATANAnH, zncl 'Kin~ ~CA11titt!s~' T6e Osaka 1llrulki/xrl Ti•rlurical rucardi liutittrlc, Ogitiiali, 1Cita-iEu, 0saka 530 , In ordcr to dctcrminc the active ccntcr of cthylcnc polynlcrization over MoO,-A1,O„ the g-tcnsor and the ftmount of molybifcnum(V) in each chcmical statc wcrc dctcrniincd by means of I:SR mcasurcnicnt. The anisotropy of thc g-tcnsor rcvcalcd the strength of thc crystal field in tltc state; thc dccrca sing order of thc strengths w:ts as follows: statc(S)>statc(\t)>statc(W)>iNfoOs-SiO:_;frcc MoOs. In thc statc(S) tnolybdcnum oxidc is iruolublc in aq.10,%i-NI1„ in the statc(M) it is soluble in aq. NH, but insoluble in water, and in the statc(W) it is soluble in water. Thc amount of uiolybdcnum(V) in the statc(W) was studicd in comncction with the activity, because only the statc(W) was suitable for polynurization. The behavior of the activity was in fair asrccmcnt with that of the molybdcnum(V) contcnt in thc statc(W) and this contcnt dcpcdncd on the amount of supported MoO, and on tLe extent of rcduction. The amount of molybdcnuln(V) in the state (W) correslwndcd to tlle atnount of chcmisurlscd hydrogen, which was a polymcrization initiator. The chcmisorption of oxyEcn on the catalyst causcd a complctc disappcarancc of both the activity and thc molybdcnunt(V) content in the statc(W). 1 cfo c it as ncludcd t iat c ac vc ntc of the polymerization was molybdcnum(V) in the statc(W). 0 . il' (~ ~ u .~ '~ ~ ~ ~ in order to rcvcal the formation tncchanisrn of the active qwcics in cthylcnc polymcrization, the rcduc- tinn of thrrc I:imds of mol.•Ixlrnunt oxides. I, 11, and 111. which arc ins,nlublc in aq 10 At•N11,; suluble in
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i , 50330 7541 ) REF Q 123 Ta 1971 DICTIONARY OF TEU,450 ;. _ . . :TERMINOLOGY/ ENGINEERING--DICTIONARIES/ ~ ~ Ph.D., Vice President, Research and Technical Devefopment, American Societyof Safety Engineers Compifed and Edited by __._~._~__, _._. - -..:...~_.~..v....._..__...... .... USED IN THE SAFETY PROFESSION ~"'~w' Publisned by - ~' DECEMBER, 1971 . American Society of Safety Engineers .~ . 850 Busse Hwy., Park Ridge, III. 60068 COPYRIGHT $3 1971, American Society of Safety Engineers, Park Ridge, Illinois 60063 , All Rights Reserved Printed tn the United States of America V ~ i 3. I 9 0 5 0 0 a a
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So330 7539 ' ~~i'....J.. . ... ........a........i. ~.... _ - . ,... ..: :J.. ... . _. .:aiis4_..~.x ..:.__..... ._~ :SG.....w....~ '-=du•~a•1.,..... ., ,.-•:;.a. .r-r:;+ae.-;i • Pestic. ScL 1974, S, 555-559 VII Reb 75 A Radiochemicai and Gas-Chrontatobraphic Study of the S•p • T~etermination of Dichlorf•os Itcsidues in r . . : Stored Grain . . . . . Richard A. Hoodless, Frank J. Jackson, Kettti6th R:M$rtant and Brenda E. Grtffiths Department ojlndustry, Laboratory ojthe Government Chemist, Cornwall Nouse, Stamford Street, London, SE19NQ (Manuscript receised 29lanuuary 1974 and accepted 29 April 1974) k, . ,..,.,.~_.....-..n..:.. An investigation into the extraction of dichlorvos from stored grain and satis- factory storage conditions for samples received for analysis has been carried t out using ("Pj-dichlorvos. It has been shown that samples can be effectively stored at-17° C and that methanol can be used for the extractable d:chlorvos but does not remove the organophosphorus residue bound to the grain. ~~i•p.,..w>.1{ve}~!v^~KfN
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50330 7517 80 III Ab ~ l C1s?y) (11A V% MASS SPECTRA OF SA'tC ESQUITERPENE LACTONES WITH C-OH GROUP. .,. __t_. y.v.WA4AJ-.41-~~~ /_.. .k . .~. . . 1: ~1. A6oy.z,zaco, SI~ B. Pauu;cc, B. ~l. ?'crpatov, 7II. 3. ~acLrsro~ A1r111t7 :111TC aT ' U. l1. A b d u 1 1 a e v,*Y a. V. R a s h- tC.lt~lrt~i ti It Ii~A• p kes. V. A. Tarasov, Sh. Z. Kaai- ~ CT.1RtIT(`:ICtI CCCI:DIITf mov7F'Slass, spcctra ot some sesyuilerl tt 311aCoI111a 11- )1 1tC Ilf):IISOJ1siCT penc lakloncs with a C-OH grouv ; n br;t(•C-CIII'I(T- pt111tPTpIIlICCialJt f1ult(`jtC111Ur 7TII!( CONtIIr1l4lllil. O-Ir111t.'tll(1, ~Irn N:1p:LI:rCp rf Pacncl:to)KenltC t(IICJIt1pclRulAX 33MCCTIITCnrii (1C31:0 actlslroT I(:r{sTruly pacua!1a. Mt,t npcnno:lcs>r,n:nl, aTO 'f:1CT1r'1110(` pCIl1CIlII(` n:IrnNoii 1:1.'t:Illir 3al::nOiIa- CTCn It raccmoTpcnlnt traGopa lial(Tt11t0n C O11ill%t norrusInlu,lNt rt oAlntal- Jtnyr•t3i +ICIlfltorr(untlrCSt 3aMCCT11TC1If1MN, It AJrff 3TOi1 IICnII (1pI1n:ICK1111 pltA 0' 5 0=0 0 , 0 2 1 2 9 5
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, 50330 7537 } r POTENTIAL CHANGES TO STRATOSPHERIC OZONE . . . . , FROM POSSIBLE CHLOROFLUOROCARBON PRODUCTION SCENARIOS ''. I I I Du -80 ti '_ Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California :;~. Liv~crcaore, California 94550 S. P. Donald J. W4rebbles and RaynpotM L Tarpi ~ ~'` AA Recognition that anthropogenic activities may affect stratospheric ozone concentrations has led to a growing concern over man's potential effect an the stratosphere. A change in stratospheric ozone concentrations ba.s potentially ~ significant biological, agricultural and climatic Impacts because of the importance of ozone as an absorber of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Wlthin this context, the U.S. Enoironmental Protection Agency (EPA), because of its recponsibility for protesticg the stratosphere under the Clean Air Act Amendments of l?77, is concerned with r~rg~ulat~ Actio~s tp co~ptroj tt emissions of cblorofluoroca:bons (CFCs). The 1J J \• ~ l U '~. , rr.:~,r.~n.r . .' ..'R-:.
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i 1 ) 50330 7551 ~ ~ QCFOOD- -6 451 Ce 1979 ,0 ~-- . , I- . ~WATION of MAS S/S PECTRA of ~ ~ VOLATILE COMPOUND S in FOOD ,(VOhtlME 1 (1979) VOLUME II. (197Ql M.C. ten NOEVER de BRAUR; J. BOUR',N1Ati, miss G.F. LA VOS Central Institute for Nutrition and Food Research - TNO po. box 360. 3700 AJ Zeist the \etherlands 19'y
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,rJ~ •C~iT1 t;.~Y iG jT,` i IU ~;q '7:.'JitJ l~.u f;.. CMV .r'.;:.,TDaIN -,i^,T}' 'T•l • J r1 ~ ~ r' r +-.- •s ~ UO0 t C i i ZhSL 0££OS
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Sp33Q 'S53 ~ 1 Re 1 667 Kn! ~i W. W. ~ sc~'ivBucN DE 9,M-UND KRF~s~rN kEa/~. r1~d 8/ a~C~i~~Ula_to~ e,ea,ay)~Jy. VY ~nipp/n9 ana~o~ ~oose~. y p. 1957 a.3zl Ferd~na~d ~n~e Ver/ay sto ttgart
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50330 7534 ) RICE/SORGHUPi/r1ILLET/MAIZE/BEANS/VEGETABLES/CASSAVA/SWEET POTATO/YAriS/TARt)/_ 4 TOMATOES/PEPPERS/BANANAS/TiANGOS/ORANGEICITRUS FRUITS/COCONUT/COFFEE/CACAO/ TEA/COTTON/JUTE/KENAF/SPICES/SUGARCAN~kUBBF,R/VANILLA/CARDnt•fOM/PEPPERS/ I SB UNITED NATIONS FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, Rome, 1974 111 Un Fi10 Agricrdtural Studies A'o. 93 1974 I4ANDBOOK OF PLANT INTRODUCTION IN TROPICAL CROPS ." w I Editcd by J. Lr6N Plant Production and~Protection Division FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF TItE UNITED NATIONS ROME 1974 / 0 5 A 0 n o 2 13 1 2
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50330 7550 w Y9 7 0 _ 5_. 0 - 0 .0 .0 ~ BIOLOGICAL PROBLEMS 1 N , . W!ATER PG'_LGTI QN Transactions of a Seminar on (liolopical ProDlems In Water Pollution hela at the Robert A. Taft Sanitary EntineerinQ Center Cincinnati, Ohio Aprif 23 - 27. 165(3 Cov9lled arta Eaitea by CIAdfNCF N. fABlkflC" 4U.;S+ OEPARTIVif OF HEALTh, EOUZATiOtI, AND WELFARE Public Health Service bureau of State Serviees Division of Sanitary Engineering Services l:otcrt A. Taft Sanitary Enginecrin3 Center 3 2 a 1957
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Z: 2~ P. I c~ •o u U 0~ p (, j {ot (4~~„T~ 1 Yr t?L ..t' + t . f 'I :' ' Tr ~arn.•L• ~-. . S•~S.CI~SIfrT~ ;~~ rt~~ •C~~ui:Ji i~ui:Jii LI'~a~)L"'U':~ F7, a Go ) 71' /
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i 50330 7533 E III I}u -75 S.P . .. _ .. ___,..~ .... --•-.........,_.. . ._;.: ; 2 : t 1 ! ( i. .~ 1 13iochintica et Bib7hysica Acta, 372 (19',4) 55-71 O EIs^vier Scientific Pubiishing Coiripany, Amstcidam - Printed in The Nethcrlands LOi\G mERM I'C1tFUSIO\' OF TIIE ISOLATED RAT LIVER MAINTENANCE OF ITS FUICTIO:IAL STATE BY USE OF A' FLUOILOC ARBON EMULSION WILHELM KRONE, WIELAND B. HUTTINER, SIEGHARD C. KAT11•'F, BOJE RITTIC'r'., HANS J. SEITZ and 1\.QLF.Q6ANCifiARINOWSt'tI± With the technical assistance of BRIGITTE DUNKELIIANN and DAGIMAR LUDA Jnstitute o(Pttysiotogicot Chemistry. University o(Namburg, 2 Hamburg 20, Dlartinistrasse 52 (G.F.R.) (Received April 9th, 1974) Summary .., In order to establish a long-term perfusion system a fluorocarbon emul- sion was developed and employed for the perfusion of isolated rat liver up to 20 h. Its suitability for maintaining some specific organ functions was com- pared with that of a commonly used red cell-containing medium. All livers perfused with the fluorocarbon medium released phosphoglucose isomerase, glutam ate-o xaloacet ate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase almost line- E _.; arly arly at a low basal rate, glutamate dehydro~enase release beginning after 5 h j perfusion. In contrast to that,.a certain percentage of the livers perfused <<;ith :^--~- ..hich J ' . . ' ~ ' ~ . . ~ . . ~ . ~ ... . . . . . . ' ~~'~--fTr....Y.. . , ' .. . ~ . . . ..u . .. . . . . ~ ~ .. . , . • . . ~ , /~1..
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i 50330 7524 . • . • TAXrS/TAk2F`F . . - . - _.: _ . ~. s 75 I Un4-75 DRAWBACK. . : U. S.Department of the Treasury . A Duty P.efund on Certain Exports Customs Service Historically the word "drawback" has ti Wash innton, D.C. 20229 1974 denoted a situation in which a duty or tax, •',": lawfully collected, is refunded or remitted, • = wholly or partially, because of a particular use . (2)-If both imported merchandise and domestic merchandise of the same kind ..:. made of the commodity on which the duty or and quality are used to manufacture l , , ~• Drawback was initially authori2ed by the .:. th n d b ck di t 99 raw no excee ng e a per- . first tariff act of the United States in 1789. cent of the duty which was paid on the Since then it has been part of the law, although. i from timpto time th mported merchandise is payable on the e cond t h' h d i ions un er vy .~. exparts. It is immaterial whether the~j it is payable have changed. ~t 41actual imported merchandise or the ~` The rationale for drawback has always been domestic merchandise of the same kind to encourage American commerce or manu-.• .. and quality was used in the exported facturing, or both. It permits the American artic!es: This provision in the Code makes manuf i acturer to compete n foreign markets •• it possible for firms to obtain drawback without the handicap of including in his costs; without the expense of maintaining and consequently in his sa!es price, the duty :separate inventories for imported and . . - . . . . ~"SJ .... .~ ~ ~ _.. J .__~.-~~ _ • . . .... bx was co lected. ~'articles some of which are exported 0 5 0 0 c~ Q~ 1 3 0 2
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e 50330 ,.,...~..~...~... r... FOOD--PACKaGIKG--MATERItiLS/ Quality Assurance of Incoming Packab ng Materials for XX MeF-H-700-73 the Food Industry Qual. Contr. Food Ind. 3 373-415;1972) ~ MkU-X3OOOWiV_,'Pr.RVEtt* and C. L SM[TNb Confinenlnl Calr Contpvny', Inc. 1.Introductiol .. ... .. .. ., „ „ 373 2. General Quality Ce.uidcrations of Packaging Materials .. „ „ 376 A. The Valuc of Quality vs. the Cost of Quality .. 376 B. Defect Dcfinitions and Quality Standards-Joint Effort of Fabricator and User 379 C. The Spccification of Quality for Packaging Materiais .. .. „ 380 D. Quality Itali,tS of Packaring Material Suppliers ., „ 382 3. Quality Characteristics of Specific Packaging Materials .. „ ., 383 A. Rigid Containers .. ,. ,. „ „ „ 383 B. Semi•Rigid Containers 389 C Flexible Containers and Packaging Materials 394 '~ D. Container Closures ~ 396 4. Legal Restrictions and Regulatory Requirements for Food Packaging ~ Materials . . 397 .~~ S. Sampling Inst+cction Systems for Incominc Packaring Materials .. .. 402 A. Idtroduetion and Discussion of J3as:c Principles 402 s B. Classification of Incoming Samp:inc Systcrns by Sampling Methods 406 ._. ~ ..'....~....-.....~.~.-. C. Cost Com;+arison of Single, Oouofc and Scqucntia! Systcnu !(avint; the ~-_-F_--._... . _ . . .. . ._ . _ . . .. _. .~. . .... . ._ _ ~.. . ...~_. .. __ __ ___. _ .._ 0 5 •I 0 0 0 2 1 3 2 •.
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PIFE SMflXIING--GERMANY/PIPE TOBACCO--GERMANY/TOBACCO--MANUFACTURr ANi)'f1?APE / TOBACGO--HISTORY/ TS RJR CLASS NO. TEXTBOOK TS 2240 lto 1974 2240 IIo IIochrain, ti. 1~574 *(no affil.)* HANDBOOK FOR PIPE SMOKERS. *(Das~iVaschenbuch-des'~-l'Pef#erirautcheiryl)* Wilhelm Heyne Verlag, Munchen, Ger., 173 p. (1974) (in German) A collection of info.ation on the art of pipe smoking, purchase of pipes, developtmeat of pipe :r.azufacture, quality of pipes, art in the nanufacture of pipes, care of pipes, growing and processing of tobacco leaves for pipe tobacco manufacture pipe tobacco manufacturers and distributor's in Germany. 1974, No.10, W4161 Tobscco economic$(wanufacture)
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f r . _ ,. . _ 50330 75.30 ~ ~ Reprinted from ACS SYbipOS/UM SERIES, No. 46 ALGORITHMS FOR CllfiMICAL COMPUTATIONS Ralph E. Christoffcrscn, Editor Copyright 1977 by the Amcrican Chemical Society Reprinted by permission of the copyright owner I ]t -7$ eS - ~ 4 ~ . ._ . _ . - - . . . . . 7 \s . • . Graph Algorithms in Chemical Computation Utw .,. i; J;. , , ;-ir;1ri . .. ;:na, s L•,~..., , . L ..•r.. . --Computer Science Dept., Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 The use of computers in science is widespread. Without powerful number-crunching facilities at his** disposal, the ` modern scientist would be greatly handicapped, unable to perform the thousands or millions of calculations required to analyze his data or explore the impliqtytions.of his favqrite theory. He (or his'assfs~tant) thus"~equires at least some familiarity with computers, the progra=ing of computers, and the methods which might be used by computers to solve his problems. An entire . branch of mathematics, numerical analysis, exists to analyze the behavior of numerical algorithms. However, the typical scientist's appreciation of the computer may be too narrow. Computers are much more than fast adders and multipliers; they are symbol manipulators of a very general kind. A scientist who writes programs in FORT:2AN or some similar, scientifically oriented computer language, may be unaware of thP [
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50 330 7538 Chem. Mikrobiol. Technol. Lebensm. 2,184 -IS; (1973) XX Meh'-D-303-74 The Volatile Constituents of Zarragon,(Artemisia dracunulus) • ~ N. S. ZARGHAMI and G. F. RUSSELL University of California, Department of Food Science & Technology. Davis, California 95816 lEingegangen am 5.3. 19731 / Summary: The major volatile constituents of tarra;on are composed of aromatic and terpenic compounds. Methyl chavicoi, 1,2-dimethoxy-4-allyIbenzene, and eu.menol are among the aromatic compounds. Cis and trans- -ocimene, cis and trans-allo-ocimene, linalool, 1,8-meihadiene, and geraniol are included among the major terpenes present. Because of the small amounts of sample available, structures of the trace Constituents were not determined Die flildkti(;en Inhaltsstoffe von Tarragon (Artemisia dracunulus) Zus++;amenfassung: Die fluchtigen Hauptbestandteile von Tarragon sind aromatische Verbindungen und Ter- pene. Mtthyl diavicol, 12-Dimethoxy-4-allylbenzol und Eugenol uberwiegen unter den aromatischen Verbin- dungen. Die hauptsachlichen Terpene sind: Cis- und trans-Ocimen, cis- und trans-allo-Ocimen. Linulool, 1,8- Menthadien und Geramul. Wegen der kleinen Probamengen wurden keine Strukturbestimmungen von den nur in Spuren enthaltenen Inhaltsstoffen vorgenommen. Les Composants Volatils de Tarragon (Artemisia dracunulus) 1tEsumEs Les composants volatils de tarragon sont des composes aromatiques et des compos~s de terp6ne. Parmi "`"'~7~-Jt•`^ '- . . kyuts.o.!-.l.~+i.v.otJv~r-~t,A,4.Uulhwnuzl..at,.~J~4ie.E ,e,rtet 0~S 0 0 0 42 I;5 1 6
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r 50330 7554 { Ans, Jean d', 1581- ed. `i'aschcnbuch fiir Chelniker t)nd PhYsikr.r, hrcg. von Jesr d'Ans und EAten Las. 3. bericlitirte Auf1. ]9;l-G tC1JM1 rlli, 1S361i0 disrgrs. 21 crn.Vo1. ~1. ) Includes Llultogralrhies. •'3rj e,{r.- v. r 1. Cherulstry-Tabk~,, etc. 2. I'hytilcs-Tabirs, etc. ._r. T.ri:c, Ellen 1Ss5- jolnt ed. QI)G5.:1G 1G1J ~'~'l 541.9 50-15(1t Library ut ConLress 151blr ~~ 0 0 0 0• 2 1 3 a 2
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i , 50330 7519 0 ..w ~K1.. M..w~... MA..'~.4 ..~...... la.. t~ .......~• .~. • ~e/. /%/0) ^^^•~^~rutnTrst tl( -IS-E11 V0 ~ ..~... .c..~~~~ ' D ia,.~.~ Yl1F: ~1•Lr^:6Gi 9J)-oli:5t7.s; Kaltxi;tavA xttat. tlaytt C. A. 13o,zr:or, tt E. 1'. Pncrnauxru;cc, J1. 11.,;7'uparca, S•. /a. ~ . ._..__. _... ~ -- ---..... ...... .. ..,, . ..r.....•.,...,r,r: ~C:IS74-1G20 tdicrodr:tcrminattort' of atmospht.ic carhon, tnopo><• k .. Ide hy gas chromatoqraphy w+r~-hrom tutr LcesAOC opred(Ieme m, - Iot.nn,cnUau~ot,sr uq'_:uda v aUnoslcrnum vnt4uh'). Yc3 ov SA• Rastlan• oi{.ov C.G.Alr , 4.•'na r!amtarq3. 1.'u;Ava. USS1. Oct. 1973. No.1Q µG2•~rf. f ics,an/ Desuf; Gon os a meUwd for tr,e draermmaGon of small concenira:oons of car- Lon (-y mcans of crdnan!tas chromalorraphY tq't'pmcnt. The scn- iitrvity fimit of U1c tnt:nrid rs .'•:ng CO;m3 {pczk am, Oucle: 5n:m). it could re• •ch 1 m,)'rnd if Uvc zcro Lnc rs vcry sla~te. 7I,c duraoon of anaryvs rs 15mrn ~ 4nctucirrog semple prcpar.ilwn) lor an an votumc of 3Gtwnl. Pt900 0 S0 0 0 0 2 1 2 9 7
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, ~,..s...~.y.0 tr 0 O S w9'... ~ ~...:w. va.~:l~+r:..._.....: __ . s:~:.i:.,..+...,.. ~ .... ._ . ~~" , I `0;.% 1 . ~ ;}Y 9 G:Ja.4' ~.:5.` Jaj a1z;L:0o ~ ~ G03 1:.=.).Tlf Xc k ( EbSL OEEOS
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50330 7559 XI Co6 76 TOBACCO--MOISTURE--DETERMINATION/ S.P. RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET XI Co6-76 s,p. CORESTA Technology Group TASK3.T0RCE'`DETERMINATIQN.,O~~~Q~ST~1Ii~.:CONT~.N`1"-'i CORESTA Technology Group, p. not numbered (1976) (in English) Dr. Senkus coordinator. • . ~/' . . . ... . ~ ~. f_~.. .. . .. *Keywords:* moisture, cured, constituent. , = A • . 0 5 0 0 0 0:2 1 33 7
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, 50330 75 ....~. ~ _ .-~+..._.._..w_...~.....~w...~ - .....~..--~...`..1~--....~.~...~...3...~.-~w..»-r~L.:.J..-...-...rt~A...r!.....-ar-....... el ~ V lnrect Phpriol 1971 Vot 17 pp 2235 to Pergamon Prest Printed in Great Britain .,,.,. 42.43.. ~.. SEX PHEROMONE OF THE GRAPE BERRY MOTH: IDENTIFICATION BY CLASSICAL AND , ELECTROANTENNOGRAl-T IVIETHODS, AND FIELD TESTS W. L. ROELOFS, J. P. TETTE,* E.-T. TASCHENBERG, and A. COXIEaUt New York State Agricultural Experiment Station Cornell University, Geneva, New York 14456 (Received 19 March 1971) Abstract-The grape berry moth, Paralobesia Liteana, sex pheromone structure was found to be cis-9-dodecenyl acetate by classical analytical methods and b]l~eletl't~oa,~t[nn2rarr{ dat~~ti•it~ sy~hetic standards. The synthetic phcro- m~dnc is attractive to male grape berry moths in the viney~rd, although trap ettractancv can be increascd twentcfold bv emittint a mixture of the attractant
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50330 7562 ~ Ref. RS 141 Un I ~ .r * >* r L Approaches to Drug Insurance ll-sigT:. U. S. vi I:dc.nattc>nl r;rzd I;n_1fi?Y'l3q t)i1-iC;' Af.' FG:'C;-. :1.1 ry+ tf~ ti Fo.:~,y~}_• ~) '. 11f i tv i tild:iJi]iaiii.:~S ZY 1959 95 p ; ;~~~ U. S, L•: pt. Itekl~:h, 1-c;F,cat:on, I%~H-nre, 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 ~ 4 0
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50330 7548 i .r. V,,,. ;i a lrAtIa.,,g,a.! %~~---.~,~-+ -'." Hulnizhrey, Eugene F ed. hluiciics, edited by Eugene F. Humphrey l.indl Dave 11 Tarumoto. Contributing authors: C. J?imes Glenn lanc* ot:hertj 13oGton, Fluid Amplifier Associlt.ct~ (1965, iv, 2t',8 p. Illus. 2U cm. Originatecl tu a tinanufaoturtug,course given at the Harvard Uni Ve~sity School of Lusiness Adrnin:stration. Iucludes btbliogrnphles. 1. hln(d amplifiers. r. Tru•umoto, Dave H., joint ed., n. Title. TJ840.II7 B t ~' G21.26 65-2763: Ltbrary of Congri's9 ' 1Ci7f51 . .. _-.. ._ . _ _._._. ... --~ o s.b 0 0 0. 2 1 3 z 6
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e , 50330 7561 l IIEART--D I S L/:S ES'/ RC. 681 Un 1975 ~SK~OR~~;~ •V= ~~ Nw~.. ,,,~~6e,f?a`i'tC7D ISI-AS ~ Decemb~r 12-13,1974 March 4-5,1975 Bethesda, Maryland DHEW Publication No. (NIH) 76-922 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE Public Health Service National Institutes of Health ' 0 S o 0 n0 2 ~; NATIONAL HEART AND LUNG INSTITUTE Division of Heart and Vascular Diseases Report by the 3 3 9 0
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-- I 4 6
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o l~!~ a v 0 v~ q• =~ ~~~.:~.....~._- e ., I ~----> ~ /~i.rl-;l '1ii~A / y ` 'V!. 4`1~7 wN ~••.JT+~.JJ t - ( (OL6I) E 9 v { a III ( ZESL OEEOS
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liD 69 B a 1975 2c. PYDL c. p 5 o o 0 () 2. MANAG EM7;NIr 50330 7569 by TASK -'FORCES ' A Manual on the Operation of Interdisciplinary Teams Lawrence I'V. Bass Consultant, formerly Vice President Arthur D. Little, Inc. Washington, D. C. Lomond Books Mt. Airy, Maryland. 1975 3 4 7
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50330 7564 ~ ,. . Ref. ~ RS }~ 141 a Un ! 1 ~,'£ASK"><aitCis:Ttj~t ~FR~~i:RIFi~f4i~:al~iJt:B, ;ht~ Drug Makers and the Drug DistriL•u[ors. U. i. Of li':Ilth, idolrar^, Of: iee ri Z::r .. , . rG~''-o r)tt }'Y,'..r,Ct:f-p t:Xon Tf3SF: T'Q :Ci, ():1 P!c3:,C;:; ?i' O.d hR[JGS, hr'Jf, t1li::eL'S and C1:;: !).uj; li$htrlt7utor:3. 1'}5t> 85 rages Il. S. 1)epC- lie3kth, i:::cieation, Wclir,ze, W::ui,f.nf;ton, •J, C. ~ s 0 4' n 0 ~ ~~ 4 2
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I . , 7 50330 7540 TOBACCO--SMOKING--PSYCHOLOGY/SMOKING HABITS--PERSONALITY/ 1GT/t.X~c a d. I~-L(~ •~~ L•~ /~.J G-CoG ~/9Ls D 1450 %Iw 14, 19tdt %%NtOkl•~(i AND III IZ1(/.\1IIY ~ 80TIEy-$~-_. SMOI:ING AND I'!'ItSOti:1l.IT1'* lY IL J. 1•:YSI;N('K, Ph.D. lnsliturc r,/ P.r,rrhirNry. Condan &NtYRA WOOLF. tt.Sc.(Econ.) ,wo 4 ENG[.AND MasY Ghsen•a(ion The discovery of a stmistical aaociation or correlation between lung cancer and smoking (Doll and Hill, 1952, 1954 ; Hammond and Horne, 1954 ; Stocks and Camp- bell, 1955 ; llcrkson, 1958) has led some investicsttors to put forward the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between thcse two factors. Thia hypothesis has been severely criticized by Fi,her (1959). 13crk-wn (1958), and others, on the grounds that altcrnativc and equally plausible theories existcd and had not been di%proved. Thc c~ics~ft~trrthr pol,~•~ted~~to ;a,ru~ty~ weak r<,ints~yt thc tu. ar mc(tjl sr i. he fSct t`:rt it~r:~A?cd not aggravatc the alletcd elfectc of smoking, hur, on the ` _ dimcnsiorrrl theory of txr•.onality Wyscnck, 1947, 1952. 1957, ly(,ua, 196Ob!. 'lluce main hypothcscs were aevaneed. ati well as two minor emc.. 'I he termc userl in .tatinf; these hyputhc.cs ('extr:r.•craion," " neuroUc• isnt;' " rigidity "1 has. been dclinrii in tcrms of this theory and ,rre not hcrr redclincd : the reader is referred to the refcrence% jua cited /or a detailed account. Accordinc to thr h•• r hypotiic.is,smoking habitsshould be related to extrrrcr •iun in thc scrr.e that the numbei of cigarettes smoked would increa.e with degree of extraversion. This hypothesis was derived from the well-known characteri.tic of Ihe extraverted personalit% to concentrate on ol+iccts in tlre uuter world, in contrast to the introvert, who tends to be preoccupied with hie own thoucht proccsscs and other internal statts. According to this hypothesis one would expect extraverts to he particularly heavy consumers not only of ciearette% but also of alcohol, swects, and other pleasure-giving ohjects in the external world. The second hyMhesis was to the effect that the more emotionally unstable, neurotic type of person would be the heavier smoker because •mokinc. like many other motor and sensory habits, rctirices the strength of an arruscd emotion. Consequently, for a person of thi, type cigarcttes would become a.odace and might almost be regarded in the tight of a medicine. ..h`T
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, 50330 7558 ~ . .e . Q llorrer, Otto. 210 D~ ,1ion6rio tascabile delle linoue teiiesca et i- D taliana )er 1' inaustri& chiaiica. 1•Iiiciio, Tu;r.buz•ini, _1.9I+3. Cesare : 67 p. 17 cui.. O o~cla- (10 ;~ 1 ~3 b
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50330 7572 ) as:g`~~, V3 -,_ ~' see aloo F3it'cer substances _.~...,.
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50330 7546 ~ i Co2 irl;'J n r 1Kf~n 1^',r.• a[. .. ~Lnn ~ l~C i 1jIC~J~1 ~ f-~I T" r l.i~!' Ilt ~:)!L .L-I ~ ' 47i'.0,t 1` C..I~i- ftJ:l':::1~1:'X~ -.•.......i 1 ,
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50330 7547 ~ , Ref. TP 9 E 1 , ;'~ r13': , .. .V ~ .; .k aYe .~~ Encyclopedia of chemical technology, edited by Re,ymond I: Kirk and Donald F. Othmer. Assistant editors: J.:net D Scott and .lntliony Standen. \ew York, Interscience IJn- cyclopedia li;1-17- v. 11lus. 27 cm. Includes bihlio;raph!es. CovTE:N•rs.-v. 1. A to AuUarimfdes.-v. 2. Anthrone to cnrbon-arc.-- v. 3. Carl,on (cont'd) to cinchophen.-v. 4. Cinco'.e to deztrose.-v. 5. Dl- to expio:;ices.--v. 6. I:xplo.Ices (cont'd) Iii f::rfural.-v. 7. Fur naceq to io!itc+.--v. 8. Ion esrhan„e to metal pl,•itin,;.--v. 9. Metal sur• face treutment to penic111In: -v. 10. Pentacene to polynjetb!ne dycS.- v. 11. 1'olyols to rutin. 1. Chemistry, Techntcut-llictlonarlesh i. Kirk, lt,iymond Elier• 18'.N}- ed. TP9.E63 660.3 48-Q3krcy` Library oE (;onbre,s ' tr5iCl=101
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i ~' 50330 7570 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS/COMPUTERS--PROGRAMS/STATISTICS--COMPUTER PROGRAC~ PRENTICE-HALL SERIES IN PERSONAL COMPUTING Portia ls.ac.on, Editor QA ~ 276 ~ Ta ~ 1981 BASIC-PACK STATISTICS ,fom-..tS&nr,C,u. ~~'rsry~ G~ PROGRAMS • ~.~. FOR SMALL COMPUTERS • Prenrice-He/% Inc.. EnQ/ewood CliHs, IYew Jersey 07632 0 5 0 0 0 () 2 1 ;5 4 8
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50330 7566 } ' Ref. ; RS j 141 ~ Un ~ ' j , Ttlc Drug Users. U. S. hepa,rtneut oi' HeA2i:h, l:ctucctY.an, .^r.d 0YYiCO C.~f °4t13 T.1S?: Oii Yi:~:SCr:Ti TIG?! ti;Ti.':: i, 'iit^ Iili.~~ iJ:i4LIc• '"~a~;;ltFl . ArIJ~i 145 U. S. rt~j?t. I1e?A.2j*2, EdL1L`t3tiUlly 1E'Cxiae0, l'?ai;il:,.p.tott, U. C. 0 5.t1 o d Q;2 I 3 4 4
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50330 7565 ~ r , l+ ~ ~:J Ref. The Drug Prescribers. RS 141 U. S. nf li;:r,llat, i;duc<<s:xo-ri, :.el:i Wn1.fnre, OfIliCo oE tha Si?Cri:tary} '':?s',: Force c:=z 1'z~sscr~ nL3a;~ i~rtat :, T^,E;K >:Ct;?Cl', ON PRESC?<IPTIO:d 11RU;;S, The. Drl.,. pi:r::..L?: lb::.s. -t, 19t"~£i 50 page3 U. S. D'=pC. llealth, R3uc4t?o;i, ;;e1S°are, WtzshIngtrnn, !1. C. 0
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- •. TOBACCO--SNUFF/T0I3ACC0--il I STORY/ RJR CLASS NO. TS 2240 Ha 1970 Hartel, K. D. *(no affil.,)* TEXTBOOK TS 2240 lIa 1970 - 2tANDB00i{ ON SNUFF TOBACCO. ' *(Das- Tascheribuch ~A+ori~~Schnupf.tabak~* . ..~~1 ..i W ilhelm Hc3me Verlang,M.unchen, Ger. , 124 p(1970) (in German) ;, A collection of information on the art and develop.:ent of the use of snuff in various countries, :aanufacture of snuff, art in the manufacture of snuff containers, teaching of snuff use and enjoyment of snuff use. ~ : ? na~~~ ~ ~,~tq i. .a
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r 50330 7576 ~ 11 Anuiiat review of psychology. v. 1--f; 1950-- ~r` St,uifonl, Calif., Annual Reviews. 23 cw. Editor: v. 1- 0. P. Stone. 1. I'sgctiology-1'carbooks. Lfl~rnry oi Con;resy ~51q10~ i. Stone, Catrin Perry, 1SJ2- 1~1'~0.a5~ ~ 150.53 50---131 4 .-os0 0 n 0.1 1 3 ,s.4
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. ... P' 's. P 1.___... f> ._ _._..._...~~.._. AR G01,j ao a•,•<:ti:.l:':.?TVtiI 1^. Z41S OL£ v~.._ .. ,. I
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/ t . 50330 7557 TS 2240 Wi. 1968 - - -• _. _..._....v.._~..,..::.,~ ... ._, CIGAR TOBACCO/CIGARS--MANUFACTURE AND TP.ADL/CIGARILLOS/TOI3ACC0---IIISTORY/ ~.a. _ ....~ ..-e.i.~1'.~~...~.a_ ..`.. RJR CL tiSS NO. TEXTI300t; TS 2240Wi 1968 Wilhelm Heyne Verlag,rtunchen, GEr. j HAND)300K FOR CIGAR SMOKERS. I *(Dss -Taschenbuch des• Zigarxcnruu.chern(.)Y 156 p. : Wilhelm Heyne Verlag, Munchen, Ger. (19~Y)/(in German) A collection of important information :for the cigar smoker relating . * to origin of cigar wmoking, growing of cigar tobacco, processing of cigar tobacco, import of cigar tobacco and cigars, quality of cigars from domestic and foreign manufacturers, trends in cigar smoking and development of cigarillos. / 1974, No. 10, W 4159 Tobacco Economics(ManafactLre) .
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50330 7586 } TRANSLATION RJR CLASS NO. TRANSLATTON Byckling, E. (Amer-Tupakka Oy, Hyryla, Finland) - THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF CIGARETTE PAPER ON THE PROPERTIES AND T}:E TASTE -OF THE CIGARETTES. "1w • "* Beitr. Tabakforsch. 7 (No. 1) 54-60 (1973) (in German - complete English translation available) . *1975, No. 6, W 1849* *d* Tobacco chemistry: _ _ . ... .. . . . . . ~ . .. _. _. ...---.. 0 5 0 0 0 02 1 3 6 4
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7 0 U d U'S 0 ~ q-~Jvi. ~ /:i~t C:7 ~. • "°.. •' •• T•r ! • 9 L 1 i .~ -4 at • i.a ZQtjCZ > ~£ F ~ U1v~ti~r'a~s~~~ T£'~ i bLSL OE£OS . ,,~ ~, .
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.0.lu.A) . u ..5 ~....... t01. 0011, °uiT~ UG ~i ~~+atiC 4' G, tf. :~tt -;,;. ~ ~so4 ot;d !T tT'.' r"'>1 _: (,rI r ~ rt, 1 ,l ll.t' ~~ J<~,Lw:'..]J.~J.J Z0O ~ Yi (. ShSL OEEOS , i
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, .L.. r..n..w..v~... ~.....~.w.+.w.... .~r....._~......v.a.i.._...~-....N._.e.rw~.A~..:..:l4'.~.iY:}..« ..u..~Y.r.K.r.l-Ja+:.wa1L=.A..i......at'111.i.-tY.Y~S ...l... izc 767 Bo 1972 CA'N'CrR---RV.SFARCIII , J. Bryant et a.l. . MSS Information Corporation • 655 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.•i.0021 Fred G. P,-,ci:, J"ithYCL;Tusseron Peter A COLLECTION OF RE.PfiINTS Papers by , ... ,, ~ ~~ =;~~::~s~ TOI~A~co--S:icKZ\G--11i.~~i,T1i r rFECrl ' ' a..:.~..w.:.~.~--.. 50330 7571 . . . T . ~ ' L-.~- l,!1^.l'•.~`_ 1.,..-. .....w,..-_«,. ~r.r ..-.... • ._ . . . ... - T.,-.. - . '^rwr........._..L.....-........... r...-.,....... .....~ . .....,.w. . . .+.. . ,. 05p0~G~ i ~4 `l
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50330 7577 )_ • .. 81 V Ar -TASTE/ ~ _ Physiologfcal Psychology 1981, Vol. 9 (1), 102•108 I i Environment-dependent taste-aversion extinction: ' A question of stimulus novelty at conditioning TREVOR ARCHER and PER-OLOW SJODEN Uppsa/a University, Uppsala, S-75106, Uppsala, Sweden In Experiment 1, four groups of rats were exposed to two saccharin(Sac)-lithium chloride(Li "- pairings in a novel animal compartment. In subsequent daily extinction trials, Sac (two grou} or water (H,O) (two groups) was presented either in the same (as conditioning) or a differer compartment. There was no evidence that the presence or absence of the conditioning comparc ment influenced the amounts of Sac or H,0 drunk. Postextinction preference tests (Sac vs. H,O), performed in the conditioning compartment, showed a compartment-dependent extinction effect: There was a significantly stronger aversion in the group drinking Sac during extinction in a di:- ferent (from conditioning) compartment than in the group drinking Sac in the conditioning com- partment. In Experiment 2, four groups were given two Sac-LiCI trials in a novel (2 groups) or a familiar (2 groups) compartment. One "novel compartment" group and one "familiar" group were offered Sac during daily Sac-aversion extinction trials in the conditioning compartment, and the remaining groups drank Sac in a different compartment. Again, intercompartment gen- eralization of the Sac aversion was demonstrated: There was no evidence that the particular compartment present influenced the strength of aversion during extinction. Postextinction preference tests showed the previously observed compartment-dependent extinction effect only O S 0 jp th~as~Qf th4 "ntvel !cpmp~rtru~;nt" groups. Thus, in view of previously reported data, the (~mli~ oitlondf~iotil4~g tlf~ls 8hd tlSe novelty of the conditioning compartment were shown to be critical to compartment-dependent taste-aversion extinction.
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50330 7563 Ref. TASK Current RS American and Foreign Programs. 141 l}n U. S. .- D^pw~.. .tr.:~:t o~~ f~•:?t?•, Gt?l!^ _ aCi0:1, EIId We:lfere, Offirc of 4,i1n 5ecret4ry, 'r6* T'ciice on t'reccripticn i)r;±^s TASK fi0?:C': ON PP.zrC};1:pI'IU:r' DRa'GS, Currew: M,erfcan zaci raz•Lil;n 1958 205 ptges U. S. })cpt. }}ealth, Education, WelfcarF., tdreghin};tt.n, D. C. ,
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I r 50330 7591 I SENSES AND SENSATION/SMELL/TASTE/ QP 458 Co 1979 PDDL 110 pd'sn.,,.n STANLEY COREN UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COEUMBIA CLARE PORAC : UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA LAWRENCE M. WARD UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COtUMBIA ACADEMIC PRESS ~~ NEW YORK - SAN FRANCISCO A SUB5IDIARY OF HARCOURTOBRACE JOVANOVICH, PUBLISHERS 3 () ~eit,kewl-
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i 50330 7567 ~ ~ Ref. RS ~ 141 I Un U. S. ci' I3e;?;h, j':~.'L1a%e , lii:li :%i tai`.~. 1'Ci2 t.t. on I'xar•,;rfpi::Lcn :i~i~ !'IJ.ZGii ll.V P?,E.Cit.1.11";MJ DRJt -:7, 1'~iT.r.Tr KL't Vi:L. r~<+ 1969 c`j6 p._:_3 v. .~.. D;?P~•. l{'.:^10h, ~:4•:.L'c'..~.1c.12~ ~•a~1:Lra"~., t;.? ,ti1Mg;:c,tt, D. C. 0.. ..I..\J '. 0 . 0' o '2 1 - -V.• 4 '5
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Briickner, fIermann. Die biocli.niie aes tabaks und der tal,nkverarbeitimu m; besonderer beriicksiclitil;unh der cheniischen yuali,i:`zbcstit: r-iun,;. 'l.u-lcich ein licispiel der natii:•1iche,i reriindcrung un methodi~cl:en untersuchung pflanrliclier nenuss-, hcil- un futtermittel bei ilirer ,;ewinnunr;, verarbeitmn- und nufL•ewel run;. Von dr. Hernuu~n I3riickner ... Bcrlin, P. Parey, 133, sil, 9-!O p. 111us., diagrs. 23}°m. Bibliographical foot-nutes. 1. Tobacco--iChemistry, 2. l'lbbacco-Cnring] Librnry, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture b3B•13.32 ($B275 J ~`s, egr ac-Mi ~ -.,.......,,.,;, ~..
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i , ~.__ V ._..__..._.~._.._. J 131 2 P:<a~~~~rS:3 UY Tl'j5`!`:: i f'r?13 Q',~'.','aco ~ r'
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50330 7578 P. BF FUNDAMENTALS 30 OF WILEY SERIES IN BEHAVIOR Ba 1978 C(-Q l I(~IC. KENNETH MACCORQUOUALE, Editor STATISTICAL ANALYSIS/ PSYCHOMETRICS/TASTE/SMELL/PERCEPTION/ University of Minnesota s~SYCHOPHYSICS I ~ A WJLEY•IUTERSf:lE:.%CE Pl'DI.N'.ATIn:C • 3 IOH% Wll(Y d, S0~5, New York • Chichester . Or PDDL A N D ~ ut, ELLIOT NOMA (~,- r Univcrsity of Michigan }y1'! , jnNbor,Michigan Dartmouth College Hanover, New Hampshire ( / IOHN C BAIRD * t~ S 0 0 0 0 2 1 3S 6
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Arclt. Oto-Rhino-L:u~~.~Zlu,~t i--t'e,i (l~onz re(3berichl /~7+iL ©"~j~~j~rinbc t •1'crlag 1975 75~~ pv.• ~ Zur Pliy 6i1111lgic des Gcruclls- wnd Gc=cl>macl.s>illllc•s R. v. Bauutgartcu PLysiologischcs Iustitut clcr L'niversiliit Jlninz Y.ingcgnngcn anl 30. \ovc•ulbct• 1074 ~~,.-~... .umck= Phy: iolog}• of01raction lncl 7.'n~ta P Slutuunry.'Pl)c flmc•tional org:ulizntion ot•oll:x•tion nnlt l:~t~i ,rirc bricfly dis:•u.scti in nlor- pholoFic•nl, p11yviolol;ic;ll. biuch:•mic•:11 ancl bcllnlioural lc•rmv. Ulfac•tion itl ar.iaulla se•rves Oftell for lntl;{ r:It1Ll` 11:1v1QiiLlnl•ill ~ 5 tl A t~ A;~ 1~ 5~
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l 50330 7592 ~ SENSES AND SENSE dRGANS--AGING/VISION/TASTE /HEARING/ ~ OLFACTION/PERCEPTION/SENSORY EVALUATION/ QP 458 'Co. 1981 AND1 1' PR AGING John F. Corso, Ph.D. ' Distinguished Pro essor of ~ PsJc)wlo f gy and Chai!man S : , NSOJC lY . , ... Departnent_of Psychology State Unii;ersity of New lork, Cortland SYSTEINIIS : ~ P~j ~ C]~~'~'I®N PRAEGER SI'ECIAL-STUDIES • 1'RAEGER SCIENTIFIC L1 l 1. Y . , %.. ' U50Q!l0 2 1 3 I 0
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50330 7580 7$ V Ral Amer. Jour. C1 in. Nutr. 3l (6)1 n5K-inv(,runP ]A7R, -The psychophysics of,fastez Linda M. Bartoshuk,' Ph.D. ~ . ABSTRACT Modem psychophysical studies of sensory systems have produced new insight into sensory function and new techniques that have application to the clinical evaluation of taste. Most previous taste evaluation has been done with threshold measures that are subject to a variety of problems and that also fail to provide an accurate picture of suprathreshold sensitivity. The scaling of suprathreshold intensity reflects a patient's taste world more accurately than thresholds. Am. !. Crin. Nutr. 31: 1068-1077,1978. Taste dysfunction is a disturbing problem for many individuals. Taste anomalies can affect health not only through effects on food and fluid intake but also because of the general loss of morale accompanying the loss of an important source oEpleasure. Accurate clinical assessment of taste func- tion is essential both to understand the source of dysfunction and to sttpoPrt -^«;- . ~~ 0 A n Q 2 1 3 5 6 to the concentration that is detected or recognized 50% of the time. The up-down procedure A variety of techniques can be used to generate taste thresholds (see References 1 and 2 for a general discussion of threshold methodology). In practice, hiQhlv efficient I
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I 50330 7584 81 V Be2 ' TASTE/ B176 LU341 P 363 BERR K ~+~- I3/13`~_~ pA (I FpI , J COMP PHYSIOL PS1C l Relation of Consummatory Responses and Preabsorptive Insulin Release to Palatability and Learned Taste Aversions Kent Berridge and Harvey J. Grill Department of Psychology and Institute of Neurological Sciences University of Pennsylvania Ralph Norgren Rockefeller University The oral stimulation arising from food in the mouth produces a stereotyped sequence of ingestive consummatory responses in rats and a rapid release of insulin prior to the absorption of nutrients into the blood. Conversely, when noxious taste stimuli are infused into the mouth, a different, aversive set of consummatory responses is evoked, and no insulin is released. These experi- ments demonstrate that pairing a sapid taste solution with LiCI suffices to re- verse the consummatory response sequence to subsequent presentations of that taste from ingestion to aversion and to abolish the preabsorptive release of insulin to that taste. This indicates an experience-produced shift in the palatability of the taste. It was further shown that a palatable but categori- ca noncalo~ict.as,te el~'cits b hav,ioral{'ngestion but no insulin release, and it Q S(~ is~ncl~i ledithat s~parAte breloled.6ntrol systems operate to produce con- summatory behavior and ingestive neuroendocrine responses. t
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_. .~ ..............---...._ -------- _ QP PERCEPTION, V. I--X/HUMAN INFORI•1ATION PROCESSING, V. VIII, IX/ ODOR, V. X/ 50330 7588 f TASTE--TESTING, VOL. VIA/VISION, V. III, V VIII, IX/CODING THEORY, V.VIII/ J 3Ca P$YCHOLOGY, PHYS,IQLOGICAL, V. I--X/SENSES AND SENSATION, V. I--X/SMELL, V.VIA/ TASTE, V Y,III %NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF SMELL, V. VIA/ OLFACTION, V. VIA/VISION, V.III,V HEARING,UIII/BIOPHYSICS OF TASTE, Vol. VIA/ TOBACCO--TASTE--TESTING, V. VIA, NOISE V. IV/PAIN V. VIB/TOUCH, V.VIB/LANGUAGE & LANGUAGES, Vol. VII/SPEECH, V.VII/ FLAVOkANTS--SENSOiFY EVALUATION, V. X/ , HA\I)BOOK OF PFRCI:P'I'IOV j V,T-~ EDITORS: Edirard C. Cartcrette and ltforton P. Friedman Department of Psychology ' University of California, Los Angeles ~ Volume I: Htstprtcal and Phtlosophical Roots of Perceptton. 1974 Los Angeles, California ~ - Volume II: Psychophysical Judgment and Measurement. 1974 -4C. LhOD 4 "Z r" ! vVolume III: Biology of Perceptual Systems. 1973 V~'olume IV: Hearing. 1978 rVolume V: Seeing. 1975 ~ Volume VIA: Tasting and Smelling. 1978 /Volume VIB: Feeling and Hurting. 1978 dVolume VII: Language and Speech. 1976 '' Volume VIII: Perceptual Coding. 1978 VVolume IX: Perceptual Processing. 1978 VVolume X: Perceptual Ecology. 1978 0 0 5 0 0 0 0' 2 1 3 6 6
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i / , 50330 7583 : , i a QP 458 Be : 1971 Editorial Board :..= : 11ondbook o f Sensoryy Physiology Ii• Autrum • R. Jung - W. R. Loc"enstein D•.~"~I.3iacKay • II-L.Tcubc;r i - -`Edited by Lloyd .11. Beidler T. E. Aer-ce - J. Atema • J. E. BardaeL- L. M. Bartoshuk L. M. Beidler • R. M. Benjamin • R.11L Bradley • Z. Bujas If. iiurton • L. P. Cole • A. I. Farbaayn • L. Guth ' H. Ea/mus • M. Kare • K. Kurihara - D. H.:11cBurney R. G. <<Iurray -,lf. Nachmaa • C. PfaLr'mann • DL Sato R S. Shallenberger • Y. Zotterman ~~~ria_~cr-~•crL•tp Berlin • Ileidclbcr„ • New York 1971 . holurne IV CJicmical Senses • Part 2 a~ 0 Q~ Q 2 1 3 6 ~ ,
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GeMZru, 1='rank Artht:r. Thhuman senses. Now York, ;vil(,,y f1J,i3) 363 p. illus: 2•1 cm. (A Wiley publication In p:,YcLolnj:y ) 1 , 1. Senses and sensation. t. TItie. I3F233.G43 ~ ~ 152 Librnry oC Congress E20J r..:.... 0 S Q Q t~ t) ~ ~ 3 7$ G2-13S81
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i , f 50 330 7595 ) 1 mposium on Olfaction and Taste, 5th, QP nternational S y -1 458 92 w ~ ~? Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology 1975 &Medicine, 1974. . 1 . . Olfaction and taste V. Includes index. 1. , rell-Congresses. 2. Taste-Congresses. I. Denton, Derek A. 11. Coghlan,`rohn P. Ill. Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine. ~ IV. Title. [DNLM: 1. Smell-Congresses. . Congresses. W3 OL45J QP455.157 1974 612'.86 75-14069 ISBN 0-12-209750-S ACADEMIC PRESS, INC. 111 Fifth Avenue, New York. New York 10003 / United Kingdont Edition pub1is11ed by ACAD13X1IC PRESS, INC. (LONDON) LTD.' 24/28 Oval Road. London N W 1 1 Library of Co~gress CataloeinA in Publication Data Howard .u.~+ 2. Taste- 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 713
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1. ..~. .~,. .:~... ~, . u lu. V: .U... ~. .:a ~;...b:.~c:...r...~•r~ v.._..._ ... . ... .. . ~.......~ ~ i. _ ...... . 'tta 'Ql,ti~XoP'--[i~s .1?'.5+.' aOVO r.OT r 13 9 GY 4fr ~r) 1. ~r~tlw(1 •: C r~r 7•: u:lotIpo.:.i Tr'i, io uoT-tiYr:YCA;1 X.soG'ao, uo Pu'.? 2a'pt5a~L xoj Sjvjws utn-y ~ ~~c ~ 1QQd UIV~ ~ di, ~,~.._~-,..... _ I £LSL OEf OS
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50330 7587 ~ @P 456 C Cameron, Alcxantler Thomas, 1882-1947. The taste sense and the rclativ© sweetness of su ;ars an other swec.t substances. New York, SuFyp:r Itesc;Arch hour.dt tion, 1947. 72 p. f11ua., dingrs. 23 cm. (Sugar F.cSenrch Foundatlon. S( ,enti0c repoi t serics, no. 9) Bibltogrnphy: p. 67-70. 1. Tnste. 2. Sugurs. (Sertes) QP•i~G.C.3 ;' "'612.87 45-417: Lfhrnry of Congrem r 151 ..o s n a~~ r} ~..~..~ .~..~
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I I I 50330 7589 ~ ~ 81 V C12 TASTE/ ~1'.cron. VoT.:12. No.3a DP.299-300. 1981_ Printed in Great Britain. Rhe Zbngue-Vomeronasal Zransfer Mechanism in David L. Clark . Department of Biology ~ Central Michigan tfiiversity Mt. Pleasant, Michigan 48859 The role of the snake tongue in chemosensation has long been established and its importance in predatory, reproductive and aggyessive behaviors has been well documented. However, the exact mechanism of transfer of environmental chemical information to ~ Jacobson's (vomeronasal) organ has not been substantiated. The literature speculates that the tongue itself makes the transfer through the insertion of the tongue tips into the internal lumen of the vaneronasal organ. Paired anterior processes. in the floor of- the i-at &-ake's (Elaphe) mouth'have recently, been identified (Gillingham and Clark, 1981, Can. J. Zool.) These elevate following each tongue retraction (Fig. 1). Scanning electron microscopic examination reveals the process' size is slightly smaller than the duct to the vcmeronasal organ and the bifurcate tongue makes ventral contact with these processes on retraction. Each process is thrown into transverse folds and at higher magnifications sagittal and parasagittal pores are found on these ridges, possibly as openings to nucus glands beneath. This represents strong evidence that the anterior processes pick up chemical information fran the tongue and mediate the final transfer to Jacobson's (voneronasal) organ. . . ~,-,-._.....~......._......,~...r...,..,.,.- .,, . , ~ 0 5 0 0 0 02 13 6 7
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50330 7598 ;Tasto~ ~+6rJnt f.h~ t`_`~r•s Fr~ t;o ~+ ~'hi ' s isla ..o '.liS~of 1 . 0 -.sy • -.._--.__..,.... ._. ._~-..... . . .-.,-,qr.....,-..>--..r.o.; -.+.... . . ..0 S •c3 0- •0 0 • 2. 1. 3•.7.6..:..
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50330 759q i i i 13:>.wson, i:Is:e IIalstrom, 1913- Sensorti• luetlcocls for nieasuriii~; clil,'erellces in foocl qu:,;it,, rctvic•xv of li;crattu.e aucl hrocc!alin2;:, of conference, i,ret;:u• by 1;1.sie 11. U«w:nn ai)cl Betsy L. IIarris Nri•th t.hf: of litltli A. l:eclstrorrl ianci othcrs, 11'ashin;;toa iG. S. GoV Prittt. O1f.1 1i151. iy, 131 p. illus. 24 cm. (U. S. Dept. of Aerict!lture. Agricultu: fnform,ition bulletin no. U. S. I)eht. of Af;r. r.ibr. 1Ag3SAb no.34 "Literature cited" : p. 11°--134. 1. Fiavor. li. fiensr, and smse or„ans, 2. 1 ood--An ;1 Fou(l•-(lu itity] x. liarris, Betsy L., joint autlior, ri.'I9tie. t: • rles) 5~~1.&74 no. 34 ~ 611.1 Agr 51-37 \ for l.ii,r.u•y of Congress l5°It 0 a n Q tl 1~ ~ I s 7~
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l ! / I yt7t~,,, ,A:. Jtd4*,-f ~3 (-Z) ;5~3(. -S) ~a U S-7 5~) , 50330 7531 ) 72 III Re-79 Generation o~Respirable Aerosols of Power Plant Fly Ash for Inhalation Studies with Experimental Animals . ~.~ Y Otto G. Raabe•, Kenneth D. It4cFarland, and tift3'A'"a`'!~`fTh§taiS'j 'elZ 11 A Radloblology Laboratory and California Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616 • Methods and equipment have been developed and used for the laboratory generation of fly ash aerosols that simulate respirable particles in effluents from coal-burning power plants. Size-classified fly ash particles smaller than 5 µm in aerodynamic diameter were dispersed with a Wright dust feed rnechanism and passed throu„h a specially built cyclone separator to remove agglomerates and large particles. An "~Kr discharger reduced the aerosol electrostatic charge distribu- tion to 13oltzmann equilibrium. The resulting aerosol was introduced into a 3.5-m1 exposure chamber suitable for ex- posure of rodents or nonhuman primates. During a 180-day exposure period, aerosol samples collected by electrostatic precipitation and examined by buth transmission and scan- ning electron microscopy had iui a'verat;e count median di- ameter of 0.GS pm (0.02 µm SE), with an average geometric standars{ de~ ti~,~of ,,4 ((1,02 ~1;). ~~4rod!•n1imlc 810 ditributicft~s, c cri{t~iccllivtll~t) ca.1,~id~•rint~a! 41 id 1119 ern};e mass median aenxlynumic diameter of 1.98 µm (0.02 µm respirable particles than found in untreated exhaust gaser Because particles larger than approximately 5 µm in aer dynamic (resiilnnce) diameter have relatively hi; settling speeds (greater than 5 cni/min) and are not usual carried long distances, the respirahle particles smaller th, about 5 pm D,,, are the most likely to form stable aerosols the atUnosphere.'1'he larger particlc: settle rapidly and ,: unstable in the air. As the cffluent cuols in the plantezhait ducts, in the.moke stack, and finally upon release to the : mosphere, organic and metallic cumpuunds can diffuse to a! collect on fly ash surfaces; the smaller, more respirable p: ticles.vill have a higher relative mass concentration of tht campounda. . Studies of such aerosols need to emtihasize these respiral parlicle..'lb examine the potent ial health hazard associat with these fly ash aerosols, we have developed an impro% I method for t;eneratint; laburalury ;u•ru.,ols of fly nsh that ;i retrrescntative of tlie respirablc acrosul, released frum cu. burnine roower nhmts. '
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~ 50330 71503 ~ TOBACCO--SMOKING--TASTE .THRESHOLD--EFFECT/ DISSERTATIONS--COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY/ NICQTINE--PHARMACOLOtY/. TORACCO -.,S190KI.NG--PS1(CHOLOGY/TOBACCO--SMOKING--TASTE THRESHOLD TS 2240 Gr 1980 !HS FFFBC'fS OF NICO?DIS ON lOOD OONSIMP?ION iNDk4ST6 lRFFERENCES ~ . Neil Elrorett CrunDerg Supmitted in partial fulfillaent of tha requirements fcr the degree of Doctor of Philosophy ia the Faoulty of Pure 3oienoe CGLUiBId UNIVERSITY 1980 0 5 0 0 n o2 1 ,3 a 1
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. z 0 •u 0 .0 s -0. . i'v-I:i:rlt~~T~jq' C) ~S:~~YYa,..; Pc~~ tt~, ;•a~i~r3 °~~•f~:::i 30 •y~:~~ 'S '2 ~lJa 7~ ..~.i''..~^`ll ~~~.t ~~ ~'~ X w•P• ~. l. x ~,~~..a .. ~ ti e •.s.,.l ,au s., ~, aSlt~er.t 1 1 ~~~. 7•.,..~.`rt.. a~1 vwnva `Mrt. ~ ~+~~~~E; 1~'~a•s~;~~~~~+.~~~- ~ ~,~~ ~a;~:i,~,. 09SL 0££0S I
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r 50330 7605 ,.~' ~.._ ,.a - -.:r ._._l.i.~.._................ ....__-.+•~....,, ....._~.-~..~ r.:ti.....an..v,; - _„ IIiJ QP 4 58 7;7~"y; . .. . , ~ ~ ^.~ l.n-n:-., We Nsyat~3h:C, Tnace:,h1 (Ed. ) OLNAC:17vT1 A1I:) Ta;;a;; ~~ . 1965 835 Pogea T.'ere-lewon Yrcsm t:r.a Yorl: r -V ' `s' 0,04), il.. 2,4,J ••.43. .3
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I 50330 7582 ; • L ' J SMF:LL/ &74~ . L" . 1-9-zv.. ~7~-/,Ta (/ 9 2,1) . ~ , , /gOR, JfSTE AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE . ~ by M.O.J. BEETS International Flavors and Fragrances (Europe) Amsterdam, Holland S • After a concise review of the anatomy of the olfactory and gustatory systems, the processes taking place during stimul- ation of the receptor epithelia involved iri olfaction and gustation are discussed. The informational basis of specific anosmia, taste blindness and cross-adaptation is explained. The application of these phenomena and of electrophysiology as tools in the study of structure-activity relationships in chemoreception is illustrated by means of examples. These relationships are discussed in some detail for several classes of olfactory and gustatory stimulants. Finall' . a ~'ew ~spe. ts-y.hiQ11 ~ be of interest inYfood . r~ea~lh~ ,~~~iontd .•7 ~7 , .
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/ I 8+A11• Psyehayobt:c S,c• L(1) ql~sp( y7, Alcohol as the aversive stinlulus, . .. *MAW& . in conditioned taste aversion and r WILL.IAhi J. HOUSC ~/J Unir rsity of S t:tl: Caroliao aYAA'-c1Soutl: Caru:iaa,2J301 : Multiple pairings of alcohol injections with saccharin•tlavorc•d water produced a lon;-lasting aversion to the normally preferred saccharin solution. Alcohol injections of 1.76 g/kg produced a strung aversion to saccharin•flavored water while injections of 1.17 g/kg produced only a moderate aversion. Single pciirings of alcohol and saccharin•flavored waler were not effective in producing an aversion. /~' CATH[:1tINl•: S. L)AVISON ,y~; ~~ / U:tii iiity oj5 C'arulrnu CulunlN/5..hNi 4irs..lr.n 29203 The investigation of the biological factors in human alcoholism has relied rather heavily on experimentation with laboratory animals. It has provcn difficult, however, to produce an animal analogue of alcoholism. A number of exp;rimental animals, notably laboratoty rats, do not sltow a preference for alcohol in a frec-choicc situation nor will rats voluntarily consume hit;hly preferred saccharin solution in a saccharin=watcl free-choice situation. METHOD Subjects an1l Procedure Fony mal, rats, four groups of 10 each, were a6pted t:,
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50330 7616 RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET 75 X Mc McBurney, D. H.; Moskat, L. J. (Univ. Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa., U. S.) TASTE THRESHOLDS IN COLLEGE-AGE SMOKERS AND NONSMOKERS. Perception Psychophys. 18 (No. 2)7 71-73 (1975) (in English) 0 5 0 4 0 02 13 94
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78 V r:r Aner. .Tevir. r1 in. Nlitr. 'tl i~) t n7P,-1 nQ7 ry ~^ ~ % 1978) (•~ine , . 2 760 50330 _ y Obesity andv6weet,..fastd'' 2 loel Grinker, Ph.D. I 5;_ -.1 Theories of obesity Obesity is a disorder in which food intake is excessive. Various theories have empha- sized physiological, cognitive, social and sensory components in feeding, i.e., periph- eral or hepatitic metabolism (1, 2), condi- tioned satiety (3-5), hyperinsulinemia (6), early nutritional or genetic effects on adi- pose cell morphology (7, 8), external re- sponsiveness (9, 10), and epidemological and cultural factors (11, 12). In studies of human obesity it is often impossible to dis- tinguish causation from correlation since the behavioral and metabolic pathology of the obese is a combination of genetic predispo- sition, cultural variables, the cognitive and social consequences of obesity and early environmental influences. Because of these e.. _a:_ osQ~4~~a;~ ~ velopment of obesity is associated with both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of adipose tis- sue (20, 21). In experimentally. produced obesity as a result of lesioning of the VMH, the obesity is primarily associated with hy- pertrophy of the adipose depots. In normal rats, adipose cell proliferation is generally complete by the time of weaning (22. 23). In humans, early onset of obesity is usuaily associated with hyperplasia of the adipose depots, but individuals with late onset obe- sity can be hypercellular (24). Obese chil- dren are reported to show a different devel- opmental pattern of cell proliferation (25) than normal nonobese controls. Recent studies suggest that even mature animals can increase the measurable num- ber of adipose cells when stimulated to overeat by high fat or high carbohvdrate ii
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50330 7599 ~ i /TASTE/ TASTE--PSYCHOLOGICAL PfiIDiCII'LF:/ ODOi.S/ OL'r'ACiION/ QP 455 Eu 1974 Transduction Mechanisms in ~,~emore4eptior~ Procee ~ngs of a symposium erganized by the European Chemoreception Research Organization V3i at the Royal Holloway College, Egham, Surrey, England. . 24th to 26th September 1973 Editor-in-Chief T. M. Poynder Editorial Panel L H. Bannister H. Bostock , G. H. Dodd Information Retrieval Limited . London ~ S n 4 n .
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, . 50330 "1606 ` ~,,,I,. . r .. r,,. .;~'~ZI*& -77 ry `'1'1'yv1- Taste acuity can be altered by administration of thiol-con V taining drugs and Cu "or Zn to man and animals(1-4). From a model(3,4) explaining these effects in terms of reactions among ' , metals and thiols we predicted that any divalent transition metal would affect thiol-induced hypogeusia in a similar manner. Ni++ was chosen to test this hypothesis because of its low toxicity __, 0 in5nar0 iJOai tin Qral2ir (.5b .Zd Sts 4igh aff~ni.tY_fot tba,olsj6)._,-_ NICKEL/ZINC/ TASTE/? 'Life Sciences -- Voi. 9, Part II, pp. 701-709, 1970. KILAULOVU m GrU." t BriYai HYPOCF.USIA CORRECTED BY Ni++ AND Zn++ R. I. flenkin and D. F. Bradlcy* Pergamon Press National Heart and Lung Institute, Bethesda, Maryland *Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York (Received 30 January 1970; in final form 23 April 1970)
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IIcul,ncr, Plolfgamg, ] 877- renuss ilnll I3el:iitLwun ~lii~cli clieiniscl.o ~:fittcl. 1~"ic: baden, Verl,in fiir 11n~e~~•ancltJ 11'i~,_eiischafteti, 1J; `%. 38p. 21cin. 1. Taste. 2. rarcotics. Pull name: \l'olfbnnE Otto J.continrd IleuUue: ii. . L L, F; 0,P456.1-148 1952 ~..~. Library ot Congress 52-33Q51 ~ s o 0 0. z ~~ 81 b : ~ ,
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50330 7612 2c. ~1c • ) f. J PDDL ~QP i431 ~Ka ~ .._,... U 5(l 0 0 il :z 1 3 9 0
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i , 50330 7619 } Si'4ELL/OLFACTION/ODORS--CONGRESSES/SENSORY EVALUATION/TASTE/ QP 458 Am !1! 1981 Odor Quality _ and Chemical Structure Howard R. Moskowitz, EDITOR Based on a symposium Weston Group : sponsored by the Division, of : Craig B. Warren, EDITOIt' International Flavors and ' Agricultural and Food Chemistry Fragrances, Inc. - at the 178th Meeting of the A C S SYMPOSlUM SERIESI4 VA/merican Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., 3 9 7 '~ AMEAICAN CHEM{CAL SOCIETY i, : Septen~erS13n19~9 . n~ 2 1 WASHINGTON, o. C. . 1991
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I 50330 7604 QP 431 Ha 1972 3 C. F' DL`L 2 C. SENSES AND SKNS}? OItCANS/SIG'.1T/ F1:l1RINC/TASTEOM ELL/ TO'JCII/KINAESTIII:SIS/VISION/ -~- ~:~ Rotans~ F{ar ~ r u. ; e Ph.D. F . Pd B.Ps Sc S , . , ., . . I /~~ /~ ~+ /~"C'V•t ~' ~~ ! l!: ~!•~'i.~: tt L•vcrhtitnw Senicr Fellow, Department of Food Science, ~ r _I r-1 University of Readiny. CHURCItILL LIVINGSTONE ~/es EDINitURGlI AND LONt`ON , • t,LCv 0 5 t? Q ~ Q ~ 1 ~~ 2
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e 50330 7609 i ~ „ I I , . { ..,: ... .. OLFACTION/ . . B889 MJ858 P 1730• 143y HYDE RJ ~ •- J DENT RES 60 (10) ( 198~~ ~.j, : _>X+ ' 82 V Hy Tongue Brushing entifric and ~ ;_1 ~ge Effects on aste'and ~ ell R.J. HYDE, R.P. FELLER, and I.M. SHARON Dental Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Loma Linda, California 92357 and School ojDentis., try, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92350 Tongue brushing with and without dentifrice In young adult and old sub/ects affected taste detec- tion thresholds, but not taste intensity scaling, for tucrose, NaCI, citric acid, and caffeine. Citric acid (sour) and caffeine (bitter) tasted signiJkantly less intense in the older subjects. Olfactory detec- tion thresholds for pyridine lmproved slightly O; r,: n Aajterj{ongo bruGing T theqldtrSbjes~t. , l/'~' J Dent Res 60(10):1730-1734, Octobet1981 were completed by each subject. Subjects were instructed not to smoke or ingest any thing besides water for one h befor testing. Taste perception. - For each subject, fivr sessions were held at a standard time of day in the following order: orientation, two control trials, tongue brushing alone, and tongue brushing with a commercial denti- f.irr • Thie cenuenoe encured that subiects
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r / tEHAVIORAL AND NEURAL lIOLOGY 31, 110-113 (1981) dpr_Z e~~ ...x.•..~~-,!•4~°x+-M~] :.U has been suggested that bombesin functions as a satiety signal. However, the-: °... - .. _:• __ t+eduction in eatins after i*ction of bombesin could be due'to malaise. A oeutrai -'"' "~` "- . 1)avor was paired with an injection of bombesin, reported to reduce rood intake, in :. Recently Gibbs, Fauser, Row4, Rolls, Rolls, and Maddison (1979) showed that an injection of bombesin (BBS) administered before a meal reduces the amount eaten. Because BBS fails to affect the initial rate of feeding, body temperature, or water ingestion, they argue that BBS pro- ==~• a two-bottle conditioned taste aversion test. The neutral flavor was significantly °' tivoided• We conclude that bombesin reduces food intake ttuoujh some aversive tonsequences and nat through satiation. _ `~2'. ``..' :... „si. R.. w.e,... -.~..... ..., ...~ .. .-- ................,.....~.. -. ,..., . . - . -._,. .. . -. -- •= duces such a reduction, not by causing malaise, but by producing satiety. . 050 o.0 0 2 ~ 37s
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, 50330 7615 a g ) 39( - 3 9 1<~ y7~~ On the Study of -:~ast~~~Changing Policies 78 V xt1 I 0 5 () By T. A. MARSCHAK* To enter the field of taste changes one ought to find danger exhilarating. The perils are extreme. First, the very ground threat- ens to fall away at one's feet: the economist, as policy adviser, is supposed to seek efti- eiency, but whether a given policy is effi- cient depends upon the preferences of those affected, and those preferences may depend in turn on policy. Second, if one continues to believe that even in a world of change- able tastes the foundation for policy and prediction has to be a theory of individual rational choice, then one risks turning Eco- nomic Man into a complex monster of cal- culated schizophrcnia, who chooses or manipulates future mutations of himself. Third, and most alarming of all, one risks discovering that true progress in this field 00 0 2 1 3 9 3 massive shift by many people in the way they choose to use their time, a shift to- wards "leisure" and away froin the ex- change of time for purchased goods, means a gain or a loss in social welfare. This issue seems to lic at the core of popular debates about "lo«ered aspirations" or (a recent slogan) "voluntary simplicity" or the con- tention that "small is beautiful." Sonie claim that such a shift is actually under wpy in American society and that it would 'in any case be some sort of national salvation. Others claim there are no serious signs of such a shift and that it would in any case be a national (even worldwide) disaster. It is often a loose emotional debate, lacking a middle ground. Not all economists have ignored the
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50330 7617 ,,.•. , p~ lloncrier~, T: w 431. The c1lelnical sen-'es. `;e%r S'ork, .1. Wiley 1191GJ ~ M vii, 424 p. Illus. 23 ciu. _ I 3.4 ~ ~ ' I:iblio;;ta[)hy : p. 37G• ; ~;`~ ;.. 1 1. Si•nsc•y nnd Srw7ation, 2. i'hysioloi;ic•al cbeluistry. T. 'lYtle, 612.86 A as-s;;:o' Illinois, Univ. Library.f ~ for Library of (;oi:g ress ~64c }i . . ~ . () . ;~ .. : I . ~... ~~.. .~ .. . . ~ -••5 ~ 0
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. , 50330 7625 J ; 4 5s ; We i ~ v:.: . -,.:.. 2` i: 2f: fmar.:? ,Ga.Xt:C'C'-`(:i; of OiZQ f:y L1i7.V.r:i y..t.t aa U,.t.r. ,:+55nr ant-.a•if'.. ..~_._ ..~ ... .... ..... .._ ---_. _.._....~. Fi'.~c%G-N.F.S L:X Uf:W':iflibv iv:.kf YUt'l ~a}:Cia~S 0 5 0 0 0 02 I~l Q:3
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f 7629 1 50330 /HEARING/ OLFACTION/ TASTE/ SENSES AND SENSATION/ ,)U(0L~~~' Edited by Bertram Scharf Northeastern University George S. Reynolds, Consulting Editor University of California, San Diego Scott, Foresman and Company Glcnview, Illinois, ^ DaUas, Tex. Oakland, N.1. Palo Alto, Cal. Tucker, Ca. Brighton, England 0 5 0 0 o a 2 1.4 0 7 1
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! 50330 7631 ) RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET 75 VI Se Scmenova, N. I.; Chenikov, V. V.; Shopovalov, E. N.; Zelenskayz. A. ll. *(no affil.)* EFFECT OF ISMUL•'RCrTRIN ON Tlir 7'11S,~^~R ;I~iDF:Xi: S OF TOBACCO. 4:'tfit~" ...... Izv. Vyssh: AJchevn. Zaned. Pishc}:: Tekhnol. 1974' ~wo. 5) 1G7--8 (1974) (in Russian with English abstract) *Keywords:* isoquercitrin, tobacco, additive. *1975, No. 11 ld 3915* *d* Tobacco analysis: 0 s 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 09
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1 . .~•. .~..~ • .. ' . .. 50330 7596 ~ ~8.~~~ z ~~~- 149a 13ioplryaic~d,/rnunrtlnd.11i,1a7~ SFNSUIiY ItECEP7Y)IiS / ~ TII-P%I•CIl A PHYSICO-CHEMICAL MODEL OF THE STIMULATION OF TI~STE RECEPTOR CELLS BY SQLT. ~, John A. DeSimone and Steven Price*, Department of Physiology, Medical College of Virginia, ~ Richmond, Nirginia 23298 A taste cell uwcosal surface is regarded as a planar region containing bound anionic sites and openings to ionic channels. It is assumed that the bulk aqueous properties of the exterior phase are not continuous with the surface, but terminate at a plane near the r surface. The region between the (Stern) plane and the membrane is regarded as having a ,1 lower dielectric constant than bulk water. This fact admits the possibility of ion pai ,fr formation between fixed sites and mobile cations. Mobile ion pairs entering the region , may also bir.d to a fixed anionic site. Thus, it is assumed that mobile cations and ion pairs are potential determining species at the surface. Binding cations neutralizes sur- face charge, whereas binding mobile ion pairs does not. This competition accounts for the Observed anion effect on stimulation_of taste receptors by sodium salts. The potential profile is:obtained by solving'Laplace's equation irt'the Stern region and Poisson's equa= • tion for the aqueous phase. The complete potential profile is constructed by superimposing this phase boundary potential (and another one obtained at the cell inner surface) with an ionic diffusion potential across the r^embrane. The medel accounts for the anion effect on receptor potential, pH effects, the reversal of polarity when cells are treated with FeC13 d h 11 t d an e so ca e water response , depolarization of the taste cell upon dilution of the stimulating solution below a critical lower limit. The prc;.osed model does away with the ~ necessity for both bound cationic and anionic receptors, and further suggests that limited : access to a Stern-like region continuous with membrane channels may generally serve to ~ control transport of ions. 0 s a o n o 2 1 3 7 4
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50330 7622 ; ~ f 6/OR 1-/~SI~CT.S `4GfIO.'v s'flf~,t~iM~ ~ p 0~t ,~/7 "' - - o AD4S f?xSrARe sT f>~'~ STATIr5W'AND OLFACTION ~,.- -:,.. - An 7nlernational Symposium Genu>ca, June 1970 V- Sparsored by s. rirmenich et Cie 0 5 n 0dit~l b6 2 140 0 G. OHLOFF AND A. F. THOMAS
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1 1 ; 50330 7614 I i k. P DISSF.R.TATIONS--KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY/ nFN'fh'CTAF.IIiS/ TASTTi--TLSTINC--F00D/ 71-2s,s27 TASTE/ ~ + Q ~ 191 4 Lu WN, Clark Kel-Lock, 19v3- ' COHPARATIVE STUDIES OF hJN.AY SA~IVA CONSTITUENTS AND CHEMOCEPTOR RESPONSE IN TASTE. ; ~ '1971 Y - i~ y k Kansas State Univeristy, Ph.D., 1371 8iochemistry ; . ~ ~. Food Science program Department of Biochemistry ~ - ~ . , ~ . e . University Microfilms. A XERC(Company. Ann Arbor. Michigan •.. '. .,:. ~ ---•-- -~ .. .--- .. I 0 n 02 t a a 2. 11
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50330 7628 Animal Learning A Behavior 1980, 8(4), S43•S49 Flavor aversions and deprivation state 81 V Re SAM REVUSKY, RICHARD W. POHL, and SHANNON COOMBES Memorial UniversitY, St. John's, NewjoundlandAlBM9, Canada In the first four experiments, it was found that aversions tou;accharin solution produced by contingent poisoning were similar regardless-of whether the rats had been trained under the test deprivation or under a different deprivation; the two deprivation states used were thirst and satiety. In Experiment 5, rats were poisoned after drinking grape juice while hungry or poisoned after drinking milk while thirsty, but they were not poisoned after grape-thirst or milk-hunger combinations. In abstract terms, poisoning occurred after AX and BY stimulus combinations, but did not occur after AY and BX combinations. There was some learning under these discrimination conditions. It is now well established that stimulus properties of food and drink have a strong tendency to become associated with important physiological consequences of feeding and hence to control w4at i~tco{~un~d {C~rcis& ~pel~g, (1~66~~ Tb~s al,ows"~ssbhat~'Qe porting this suggestion was a well-documented gen eralization by Bolles (1967, pp. 254-264) that dis criminations based on deprivation level are mucl more easily learned when the reinforcement is foo, or drink than when it is shock escape. From this an
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, 50330 7626 t / ~ K. H. PLATTIG \ Institut fur Physiologic und Biokybernetik, der Friedrich Alexander Universitat, UniversitrLtsstra,6e 17, D-8520 Erlangen, W. Germany • a. L / 3 (/0 ~ ~ 7! ' . < . .~- ~ ~ ) S: t!:L'./ ~ ~1'hysiology of I'erception of. Odour and '.Taste : , .. .. . . . General principles of the morphology and physiology of smell and•taste perception are presented and discussed for readers not particularly specialized in biology; selected details about current research are included. Gustation and olfaction aree considered • together as . the conchae (or turbinates) and is in part reversed by "chemical senses". This means, from the usual point of turbulences,and directed to the highest dome of the nose. view, that the primary process of excitation of the res- Although the entire surface of this nasal cavity is covered pective sensory cells is a chemical interaction between with respiratory mucosa cells forming the "respiratory certain membrane sites of these cells and the stimulating region", there is just one little area of about 2.5 cmz in odorous or tasting molecules. the top just above the upper concha which is called the The difference between taste organs and smell organs, "olfactory region", and it alone bears olfactory sensory which is fairly evident in man and in all mammals, is not cells (Fig 1). There are about 20 to 50 million olfactory as well manifested in insects and fish. One could say, receptor cells in this region within an area, including however that for all animals except for those living in both nasal cavitiest,sl, of about 5 cm2. In the schematic 0 ~~0.0 0 2. 1 4 a4 J 4 -; -- --,s i
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50330 7636 ~ ~.._~....., ...1:_a....._..._.,.. ........., .__.E_....._..... ..........._.................__....r..,._...~....... .~...~.....~sw~.~k..~........ QP 456 .: Te :::.°'.,'.?.:~ii~ , .... itcIr . . _ . . ., , ~l:t.a.l ..l.•.....~_.r!~~ a. ..........._ :ir .ai...:)~~.1.:~)..~:1 I .. . . ~ . .:7r :. t....,.-,t D l:v ,•> ..~....,.r
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81 V $W BEHyd1ORAL AND NEURAL BIOLOGY 30, 345-349 (1980) eN /The Operant Assessment of~ste Discrimination ! 50330 7635 1 i H. $COTT SWARTZWELDER. MARK B. TAYLOR. DAVID B. PEELE, . C~.IOHN P. MASTROPAOLOBURTON M. $LOTNICK, -AND3ANTHONY L. RILEY' Department oJPsychology, The American University Washington. D. C. 20016 The present report represents a new technique for the assessment of taste discrimination in rats. Rats were trained to lick a three-tube configuration for the presentation of a 0.01-cc taste stimulus. Following the sampling of a specific taste (S°), rats were further required to make 20 additional licks for a 0.05-cc tap water reinforcer. Following the sampling of a second taste (S4). licking was not rein- forced. Rats acquired this discrimination in an average of 200 S" and 200 S' trials. This technique can be used to determine taste discrimination without the con- founds of taste and position biases noted in earlier work on taste discrimination and should prove useful in studies of taste psychophysics. ,.~ 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 M q~~
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50330 7601 _,... ..... ~.,..~ .~...._._.. _. - -~~-••-~---~---~- - - - - - --__ 1 81 V Gi TASTE/ 1 -/CACK OF RESPONSE OF SALT TASTE _~ ~ THRESHOLD AND PREFERENCE TO DIETARY SODIUM RESTRICTION IN MILD HYPERTENSION• ` ' " To the Editor: Patients with essential hypertension are reported to have a greater preference for sodium chloride than normotenaivea' Evidence regarding taste thresholds is conflicting.' We undertook to test the hypothesis that a reduction in dietary sodium intake of untreated men with labile blood pressure elevations sufficient to reduce blood pressure would result in an increase in sodium chloride taste threshold..and a decrease in preference for salty liquida Sodium chloride "taste thteahold and preference of 15 middle-aged white men with labile blood pressure elevations (diastolic blood pressure >90 mm Hg on screening, average blood pressure after four clinic visits 133/87 t SD 13/6 mm Hg) were measured twice before and at least once after a 5•month interven- tion program aimed at lowering sodium intake to 70 mmol/day. Threshold was measured by presenting patients with a series of 14 unknown NaCI solutions ranging in concentration from 1 to 60 mmol/L and determining the lowest concentrations correctly differentiated from water and recognized as distinctly salty. ___-..~,..,.~.~,.,.,.....,....~_ __~_ ..._._.,_._....__.___ . 6176 LV859 P 138 .~ A~GIL LM LL RF HEART J /0.1- (J) LllQ~ ~~, 13Q University of Minnesota School of Public Health Stadium Gate 27 611 Beacon St., S.E. Minneapolis, MN 55455 REFERENCES 1. Schechter PJ, Horwitz D, Henken RI: Salt preference in patients with untreated and treated essential hypertension. Am J Med Sci 287:320, 1976. 2. Langford HGI Watson RL, Thomas JG: Salt intake, diuret- ics and the ` treatment of hypertension. Trans Am Clin Climatol Assoc 88:32, 1977. _ - Richard F Ronald J. Prineas, B.S., M.B., Ph.D. Paul Anderson, M.D. Joseph fCebede, M.D. Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene , 05Q00' 0 2 1 379
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r 50330 7590 d)7, r0 1 / soDIUrt c9r.ORrnF/ Salt/aste*and disease'~ 2 , Robert 1. Contreras,' Ph.D. : ir . r- / , A$STRACT Sodium appetite reflects the importance of sodium homcostas6tad the relative scarcity of sodium for many terrestrial animals. Man, for various reasons, alsaatems to have a specific preference for salt which he consumes in excess of need, and thsias been characterized as an important contributor to hypertension. Gustatory sensibility is ne=sary for the development of sodium appetite. Thus, research on the possible role salt taste sctsitivitY plays in controlling NaCI consumption in the sodium deficient rat was reviewed as alptential model for the study of salt taste and hypertension in man. Taste acuity experiments "a first by examining salt taste thresholds. These studies found that thresholds were not iirtttd by sodium deficiency in rat and the results in hypertensive humans were inconclusive.'.P.reshold., determinations may not reveal true sensitivity differences because they varied signiticaWF across experiments and because they are restricted to a small portion of the intensity domia. When research was directed to suprathreshold stimuG. concentrations a rat or man migStaonsally experience, the evidence suggested that hypertensive humans, like sodium-deficientats. were less sensitive to the taste of salt. This reduced sensitivity may account, in part, for tbe.faet that these two groups consume more salt. Am. !. Gfn. Nutr. 31; 1090-1099, 1978. 0 S 0 Q n 02 ~~ 6 8
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. 9 50330 7610 ~ , F'1.AV0RANTS / I l . . / : Auftreten von Bitter;eschmack -- --- ' ------ ' . Z. Lebcnsm. Untcrs: Forsch. 161, 267--269 (1970) beim trockenen Erhitzen von Proteinen HaraldJugcl, IlcrbcrtWicscr und I1ans-DicterBelitz lnatitut fitr Lcbcnsmittclchemie der Technischcn Universit:it und Lebensmittelchentie. Lothstr. 17, D-8000 Atiinchen 2 ( Bz leilsthrdt /ur---- ~ o Lebensmittet-- - ~ und Forschung ng ©J.i!nann-Vcrl:,g 1976 ; v Occurrence of l3ittcr;raste after Roasting of Proteins I io q () Summary. Proteins of animal and plant origin (c•g. casein, zein, soyprotein, gliadin), heated to 260 C for 10 min. yield aqueous extracts of strong bitter taste. The thresholds t0,0005-0.008%) are in tho range of the value for chinin- hydrochloriclc (0.001°b) and are much IoNver than thresltolds for enzymatic protein hydrolyzates. Polysaccharidcs, hcatcd under identical conditions (e.g. ccllulose, start:it, agar, carragcrnc), don't yicld hitter Products. It is assumctl, that proteins arc important precursors for bitter compounds on roasting. Zusantntcnfassun;;. Tierische und pflanzlichc Protcine (u.a. Casein, Sojaprr- tcin, Zcin, Gliadin) liefern nach ll) min trockcncnt Erhitzen auf '00 C stark bittcre wii(1rit:c I:xtrakte. Die Schwcllcmwcrtc Iicecn mit 0,0tx15---0.00K""U int l;crcich drs fiir Chininh ~droclilorid anLCgchcttcn \tiltcht•crtcs von 0.001"0 ntnd c~uttiYclct~ich~int~ilc~cl~rllcmtcrtctt cntyntati~chcr 1'rotrinh~~lroty- catc. lJntcr (1cn c~lrichcn l;cclinrung.:n crhimc I'olysacch;tridc (u.a. Crllulosc, ---- L- 7 2 -~ *?- V f ff
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, Edrlorand Conference Chnirman - WILL1AM S. CAINt papcrs ii E}ic resuCcof a'canfcrarcr eatittcit Oarri: E.aluaciori; ODORS: EVALUATION, UTILILITIO\', AND CONTROL* ~'" .. . . - - : Part I. Functional Propcrtics of the Olfactor.r Systcni:'Psychot>liysic.t• Dimensional Salience of Odors. !ty 11owARn R. MosKoWtrz w.uD CLIFFORD L. . CtaerRS . ......................... . 1 , =;,.. Dyrtouatc Propertfri ot the Olfactoty Scsicm By ULF Arar•LtnJti 17 r C N • tion. and Control, held on O.ctobcr 1. 2. and 3, 1973.-in coopc•tation with thc American ' Society of Heating. Itcfrigerating, and Air•Conditiuning F.nbinccrs, Ncw York, :1.Y., and • ;, t6e AiF Yollutton Goutrot-.tis~.oc:i:tuws; Lriusburgh. Pa, ! Published by the NEId YORK ACAD •E:lY OF SCIT:NCES, ont remna ibution of the Tigil Pid Od \fid erve tocrcevcor•t/3 W - •• '' Quantitatis•e and Qualitative Analysis of Industrial Odors with Human Observers. rgnue.ytcuAbt S. C.ttn ..................... ................ 28
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i and Their Application in Chemistry, tiT~rlirinA Natural Science. and Editor-in-Chief 50330 7613 1 SMELL/LUCIFI:ItASE & LUCIFERINS/S:fELL, PItYSI(:AL CIIEMISTRY OT'/ . FER;dI:2JTATION, ItIUUSTRIAL/COENZYMES/EN'LYMES/TOXIC SU3STANCES/ QD 117 Ko 1977 I i i © :~C. ~! 11~111 )liL)1ul_ uu A Critical Survey of Proven Methods / ~.~ .1%74 O `•,' .1._ r~ • -...% I 0 ~-" Friedhelm Korte Academic Press New York • San Francisco • London Georg Thieme Publishers Stuttgart Maruzen Co., Ltd. Tokvo n c n n n n__~.-•~__-~~:g -` -- ,. ,.. .. - -- - Volume I1 Natural Compounds Part 2 Anti otics, itamins and Iormones 1977 d .
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/ . . .a i77VRe I t : ... TASTE/? New York iiimes 1976, 26 (Nov. 22, 1976) ... And What- It Is To Scientiscs By FOYCE MNSBERGER been devoted to indulging Vie hedon- ism of the taste buds, virtually nothing is knwen about how taste works on the chemical or biological levels. , hG §ense of taste may be man's r~~ ~t.most pampered but least under- stood sensory system. For all G-3 the culinary skills that have Decpite the best efforts of dozens of indepGident scienusts and a maior re- ' search c.enter devoted eaclusivciv to I stud,yint; taste and smell for the last ht •cars nobcxiv yct kno•vs for in- ti ~ i O g ) ex ctly why cavi;l t3s•tes likF ~avi~q c~n1ot ~:c ~ib t~er.,n aflf flobol_y really knrrrnvs why suear tastes which are vastly larger and more com- p;ex, that also taste sweet. Some pro- teins, ounce for ounce, are a thousand times sweeter than sugar. . As long as td4t'e'researchcrs"cdnnot say what it is t}:at makes a simple, one-chemical substance like sugar taste sweet, they remain very far from ex- plain:ng what gives a chef's dish, with its hundreds of natural and added substances, its particular flavor. Most foods are composed of scores of hun- dreds of natural chemicals and most dishes combine several such foods with, spices, each of which is composed of. many discreet chemical entities. Despite the millions of possible com- dfions of these flavors and the ob. Mtts~ fact that people can distinguish scores of flavors, even when they are I
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, 50330 7611 ~ ~~ ~ .-L_....~..~ y ... ~.. ~ Qp • ~ 456 ~ sllaFi~tk~V-Zb X__..<. ~ K { ! I{almus, Hzrls, 190G- The chemical st-iises in health and disease, by II. Kalinu, ~ and S. J. Itublrard. Sprin;field, Ill., Tl1o11118 111 PGO1 ~ ~ f)o p. illus. 24 cm. (American lecture serica, publication no. 3J-1. A monograph in .liuericnn lectures In livin; chemistry) . 1 Includes bibliography. 1 1 1 9 1 1.'i'aste, 2. Smell. z, IiuLbnrd, Sydney John, joint author. ~ ir.'1`itle. ~ Q1'ISG.1:~S 1fa ; ~ 15? a GO-73~3 j a , . ~ Library of Conyress cG1hG1
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/ i 50330 7624 i ~ 78 V Pf F Arter. Jour. Clin. %Iutr. 31(6)1f157-1067 (lunn 1Q7V"t-, I _L Neurophysiological mechanisms ofyj'aste'p 2. Cail Pfaffmann Symposium Sense of'T.AstP & Nutrition The sense of taste is that specific chemo- sensitivity of the oral cavity, located on the lingual surface, but also on the palate, epi- glottis, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus, which is normally stimulated by direct con- tact with chemical molecules or ions in solutions as they are taken into the mouth. Figure 1 shows the dorsal tongue of a child after drinking milk. Note the numerous taste papillae against the creamy back- ground. Most familiar are the taste sensa- tions of sweetness, sourness, bitterness, and saltiness, which early physiologists thought were the basic primary tastes with a corre- sponding receptor mechanism for each of these. Modern evidence, which I shall shortly review, has tended to verify this classical notion, but with some modifica- t ~ t th h ' 0 S n n t~n. c ~~ rr nx- nyveve aU" I ann tively to sugar and often learn many beha ioral tricks like "begging" to get sug merely at the sight of it (see Fig. 3). Tt latter is a learned instrumental respon based on the taste of sugar. But I shou ' remind you that all organisms are not to I' treated alike with regard to food prefe ences, especially where certain special fo( choices and available supply make the c ganism a one food specialist. The koa bear's almost unique reliance upon eacaly tus leaves for its diet is perhaps one of t: best known. However, by proper choice, is possible to find an animal model th reflects more closely some of the properti of human taste. Taste buds are comprised of modifi epithelial elements clustered together in harrrl•chanerl avvre¢rate ooc:nine tn .t I I ':
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1 50330 7633 ~ l SYNTHETIC SWEETENERS/MONELI.IN/PROTEINS--SWIiETENERS/ASPARTAME SACCHARIN/CYCLAMATES/ XYLITOL/TASTE/ ' TP 3Sh SWEETENE-RS AND 1978 , ~DENTAL CARIES (A Special Supplement to Feeding, Weight & Obesity Abstracts) Evaluation of available and potential new sweeteners as sugar substitutes in development of non-cariogenic foods and beverages. The correct manner in which to r,qfer to a paper from this publication is as follows: ! Author of paper, Title of paper ~~ Proceeding 'Sweeteners and Dental Caries' q~ Eds. Shaw,J.H. and G.G.Roussos. Sp. Supp. '3 +~0'40,430-3. Feeding, Weight & Obesity Abstracts, 1978 . . pp °---. 1978 -'QSata.( p 0 2
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/ i / . I ances in Rese~th1'T. Ce•n'ter4 Re orts'on 50330 7630 ~ ~ r ~r v oi. 2. no. 3, Fal)1978 1ICX MeF-D-316-80 Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development 'Changes invTaste andiSmel1 in Older Persons by Susan S. Schiffman, Ph.O. Providing food that tastes and smeUs good is an important factor in maintaining a good level of nutri- tion. However, it is not always a task easily or success- fuliy done where the older person is concerned, for the senses of taste and smell decline with increasing age. This report will summarize experiments that illustrate the age-related losses found in the taste and smeil systems and describe practical approaches that pn be used to improve the smeli and flavor oi foods provided for older persons.• . U 5 0 0 00 2 1 4 0 Tabie 1 Percentage of Subjects Correctly Identifying Each of the Blended Foods Food Substance Older Persons College Students Apple SS a1 Banana 24 41 Lemon 24 S2 Q Pear 33 41 V Pineapple -.37 70 Strawberry • 33 78 ,,. »
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t 50330 7634 .v W".... ..~......~:~'..~.'....i(.L....S .~.+v~.. i Lict pdro $?5.00 03-048000-36 l+MEEtK'A.*I SOCIIE'1'Y 27OR TI?STING AND MATERIALS 0 ~QP Edcrrd Lr C?P y73` COMPII ATION OF W. R. STAI;L ~ h:cl:ur.nic'.; & Co., Inc., B:.Itimorc, Md. ~ QDt)R ~.I~.TI~ I. - PLAiIOItit<NTS---Sc.IvSORY 'ELALUATICti/SG`Vi'SES AND Sk.YSATIO)\'/ TAiTE-'LTSTING/ SvOnsorcd by 4i+ ~IJT H LU:ES DATA r , _ ` Coa~nutteeE-I8on Sensory Evaluation cf Matctials and Prc:.ucSs , 11?dEF.1CN1V, SOC;ETY F(3R, TESTING AND MATERIALS &M DA!'A SERIIwS DS 48 1416 Race Street. Pi;itadeipiiia, Pa. I41C3 V..~. ~.~ _.. __.y... . :..., ' e4~..~~' i ?/O.r //o2 , ""~ S~o
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/ 50330 7645 ) / ME&LFAffPREXPASTE BIOLOGICAL VOLUME V I/ TASTE--CONGRESSES% QP We . ~ 8 11980 Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Olfaction and Taste and of the Fourth Congress of the European Chemoreception Research Organization EE1IEmm P og 11 Joint Meeting held at "de Leeuwenhorst" Congress Centre, Noordwijkerhout, the Netherlands, 22nd-25th July,1980 ~ Edited by ~ ~~ ~' H.~an_~@r S~ rre O ~ A^ 0 0
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I QP" 456 K Hahuuq, ilans, 1J0G- '1'he cheruical senses in he,tilh ;1ntt di:,ense, by II. 1ia]l,>>i- nntl .9. ,T. 11u1,,hnrc1. 5prinr;•fielcl, Ill., 7'}honia:; (1960, 95 p. illu>. 21 cm.• (:\uerlc+tn lerture crrles, pul.,!lcation na 3Ji: ~ mou„srahli fn Americnu le.rtures ln li~ iug chenil: lr~ ) Includes bihlio&rnphy. 1.'1'n-,Ae. °. Smell. r. Hubbard, Sydney John, joint author. u. 25tle. QP,15G.K?S 1060 - 152.3 C0- iSOS t Library of Oon„^ress lGlh5l . 0 5 Q0 (102 1 4 a0
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50330 7637 ~ 81 V We c1l (a ) 3 o I- 3o3 Txs Llaixaoecors 91:1981 ---a- ~ "HOW I DO IT"-HEAD AND NECK A Targeted Problem and Ite lution . AN OBJECTIVE APPROACH . SUBJECT E TESTING FOR SENSATION O ASTE AND MELL. S. THoarAS WESmmAN, M.D., . _. , .. .. .._ !. - Shrewsbury, N.J. If . . ,_ . . .l' . ~ t: ~.. . .. . . i ....~ ...- . r-M'.. ...... .. ~. ... As our society becomes Increasingly complex and the general population inore urbane, the medical/legal problems facing physicians today are be- coming progressively more sophisticated. Malingering is becoming an in- creasingly common ear, nose and throat problem.l•'. :,t..,":a., ..:.. •- As opposed to ose or ea ~`ng~#h ere are no objective tests for taste l ~ hAs beZn developed as an,objective approach ~wi~ t ~~ apnd s~e,ll (~Ch~fo tD~a stfbJectlve test (Table I) .
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~ 50330 7640 ~ ..:.w. i ' QP i 458 Zotterman. 1'rgve, ed. Ulfacti,)n ,incl taste; pr,tcceclinp, of t'.le fin•A internntion;;1 poqi,im held at the Wen r,e,•- ;rcli Cc-irtc•r, ;•~toelchulrn. )S.^ptenil,c rptenil,cr ]9(i.~. Oxford. New Yerh, tipicilx.iiu.ru Yublic;r tioas lli%•i~ion. Pet•"amrnl Pre::S, 19Ei:;. "t"a p. iiin.'.. p: rt. 24 10Ccu..cr-rra n Ce'..tk°.r IntLa,.nt!'v'nai sym)wslum seric-s, v. 1) ; y'mTx.:+Iuro arranged by the \lenner-Gren Cenier 1 oundRttoa. Include,,A blbllo,!raphles. 1. `anell-.lddre.:,cs, ezsnys, lectures. 2. Tnste-Addressea, essns-3 lectures. i. Wenuer-(7rcaska sa,nfundet. rr. lItle. -• (Ser!es) (Ll~ 1ri(i.Ili i Library of Coni;ress 1;,•?.4(18•? 63-1 2.,., , . __,..Y...:-_ - 1 S 0 5 0 0 tl t~ 2 1 4.
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50330 7641 , QP 458 w :K:;xtastc-•~ChetRical. cod'1.;i~-,-Patti t_ns. .~ OiKwcfiion z:rd toste; prac~•ca;lir,;a os c.;^_ firl,r: internationnt r y.~auiiu~ he"sd it thn Cen:er, StociahoYra, 5e.~trci'~e~' 1962. l1::!i Yo,:::, Sytc:poaiu~n 1'uLiicatiori: Div. , l't-trgr:.mo.t Pr<.ee, 196?. p. L11 ti~. , port. 2+ ctn. (G':_ ...: x-C~en Cr-.ntex 1.nt•cxr:Atic^a). sympo;;tzt spric-,n, t•. 1.) Syu-sooiunr r,rrrshzi:d by th^ Wenner-Gt•cYl Cs>nter . ,. , _. . , . _.... , ._ ..-~- . . . .-. ......,,..,.,r,.. ...~-~..+..~~r-•.. a-e.-~..~e,-.~w-~.,.-,.~..
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/ 50330 ?649 1 » Taste_..i.itex'eture review, v.ti. Annual review of psychology. v. 1- ( 1950-. 5-s Staulforcl, Calif., Annual Reviews. 23 cm. , ! Editor: v. 1-- C. Ir. Stone. 1. I'yJchuli~„J 1'enrpoolcs. r. Stune, Calvln Perry, 1842- cO 1;F 30.A ,G 150.58 G0-131-1: I LihrnrJ• of Coul;•.•ess iGli~21 .. - o- s: n... o. . n. 0 .24. .. t... .4 z. . 7
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1 50330 7618 1 77 vMo .a ...~. . . _ _~__ ... . .. - r.. . _..- . _i, % i.. a -s.. w e ?LI IG~Ji t 3a /-.3a .2 (~lcl /y7s ~ H®e,~,~ ,~la®a~~ 0c~r s~r~sos • o~', an~9.`S~~ ~ ~ . ~ "Used together they enable us to select the foods we•prcferr, and to enjoy them more fully." GRANT D. MORSE, Ph.D. Srtugertic~, N. Y. I Af }IY DOES ANYONE sometimes e prefer honey to any other sweet? • Volume for volume, honey (chiefly kvulose and dcxtrosc) is sweetcr than granulated sugar (sucrose). • Not only is honcy one of the sweet• • est of the swccts we consume, but it has ttistinGtive Itnvors• If the particular honey we arc consurnin• has been made by the bces from a ncctar with a flavor we usually prcfcr, another reason is prescnt for our liking it. . 1<SqstM hog~'s (/ave ltlract{4~(y ~a. tabtc'fl'rvotsi• Onb~cnr nr~nte.rn. .. i.t;', .. to a degree simultaneous and compte- mentary. Our sense of taste is believed by most authorities to limit us to four qualities -sweet, sour, bitter, and salt. Linnaeust listed . 11 basic tastes: sweet, sour• sharp, salty, bittcr, fatty, insipid, astringent, viscous, aqueous, and nawicous. Some writers have even add- ed sound as an auxiliary to this list, pointing out that the crunch of a food, such as p crac er ;dds to the total , 2sens~ of ~prc itiorrp( what we are "'calitA;• Tcxture dncc crem in n.t.I .nm... ~ ;., ~..~--- _ AIl substancec that we eat have vola• tile flavor compounds. The chemist strives to idcntity these volatile com- pounds--nftcn that he may imitate thcm in substitute WnJs or drinks• (%N'itness the rather guod imitation of original flavor in %ome artificially flavored drinks). The authorc of Flavor Rescareh tPrinciple.ankt 1•cchniques)s write: "Our perception uf the hasic ta-te qualities tesutts ftom a pmttern o( nervc acti.ity coming front many taste eelis• •" and '.Cnecific r.•.rmnr rrtla_rn. ...•..e .~••• t
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50 330 7638 k . Z. ~bonsm. Ustcre.-For~;ch. 159. 6i-72 (1975) . /~ ~~ „ . . cr mann, . Iwuhen J o `y +J ~' Originalarbeiten Zusammcnhanac zwischcn Struktur und Bittcracsclllnack bci Aminosauren und Pcptidcn - - - I. Aminosauren und verwandto Verbindungen i.n IIerbert Wicser und TIans-bicter Belitz* . c~ 5 an e atc otnroun s Sutnmary. About 60 amino acids, amino acid esters, N-acyl amino acids. amines, and other Relations between Structure and Bitter Taste of Amino Acids and ~cptides. r. Amino A'd dRl" dC ' d related compounds wcro tested for hitter tastc.l'he reco;,-nition thresholds are iii the range from ' ' 100 µ,1ToI/ml (L-2-amino butyric acid) to 0.8 µJfol/ml (bcn•r.amicle). Essential structur•al rcquire- ments for bitter compounds arc a polar (elcctrophilic) group and a hydrophobic one, %shic•h must bo arranged in a defined manncr. The results are summarized in a model «•hich shotss the zones of contact between bitter compound and receptor. Deutsche l+brschungsanstalt fiir Lebcnsmittelchemie, ,ltiinchen und Institut fur Lebensmittcl- h i T i d h h i a J[ii h Bttll U i V em n ~~/ , c c er ec sc en n vers nc t t cn ) ~% ( v~ Eingegangcn am 27. Diiitz 1975 0 S 0 0 0 0 2. ~ 4 ~' b
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i 50330 7644 , I ; positun 1 ublications 1)ivision, 1 er;;,unon Press t1JG7t viii, 535 p. illus.• port. 23 cm. (11'euner-Gren Center interus- tional sywposittm -~vrios, v. 6) TJeld in conjtmctlon witli (lie 23d Jnternationnl Yliystolopica'. Congrc-,-;!:, Includes biblIobt•aphie.q• 1. '1'aslo--Conscrv.-es. 2 E;utelt-Cuu~re~~ic. r. International ('on„resv of I'h.Vsiniogirnl Scien!•es. tt. 7'Itle, (Serirs) QPIi,G.II; 1967 ~ 15?.1'G'03 G7•-985n i Library of Congt•e~s 110; ,~ . . , ...... .. w,.. ,-.Y- ~o<-- • WITaAU;-;=congressea3, j Hayashi, Takashi, 1897 - ed. Olfaclion and tuste u; hroeeeclinf;s of the second inter- nntional symposittm held in Tokyo, Sehtember, 1965. ,, I'dited hyI-fay,tslti. i1;t ed.t. _Oxford, New York, Sym- ' '
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/ 50330 7647 S Society of Chemical Indt:stry, Londola. Overseas Section. • Molecular structure alid or);anoleptic quality; corrrprisint: papers read Rt a symposium organized by the Oversea~ Section held in Geliec.i, 2-3 Diay,10;i7. 7.ondon, \ew ] ork, Diamillan,1957. 124 p. illus. 22 cm. (S. C. I. monograph no. 1) Includes bibliograhLical refcrences. 1. Stereochi•mistry. 2. Odors. t. 'Pitle. (Serl;rs: Society o Clu•niicul Industt•y, London. S. C. I. monobral)h, uo. 1) 11J:7-~14( Tewn. Shkte (`oll, f.ILr.`. , for Ltbrray of Congrc•ss At -Q . S• . .0 Q• a. .~. 2• 4A -2- S. . .. . , . . .. .... ., . . .
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50330 7639 81 V Ya Cortical neurons responding to tactile, thermal an aste stimulations of the Brain Research, 221 (1981) 202-206 Elsevier/North-Holland Biomedical Press r rat's tongue TAKASHI YAMAMOTO, NORIYUKI YUYAMA and YOJIRO KAWAMURA (T. Y. and Y.K.) Department ojOral Physiology, Denral School, Osaka University, 4-3-48 Nakanoshi- ma, Kiraku, Osaka 530 and (N. Y.) Department of Oral Physiology, Kanagawa Dental College, 82 lnaoka-cho, Yokosuka 238, Japan Responses of 162 cortical neurons were recorded in rats in response to tactile,cold,warm and taste stimuli applied to the tongue surface. Lingual somatic and taste inputs were essentially non- overlapping. Cortical neurons sensitive to tactile and thermal stimulations were situated mainly in the dorsal and ventral halves of the lingual nerve projection area, respectively. Taste-sensitive neurons were located more ventral to those neurons, and were well within the chorda tympani projection area. Our previous studies7.8, using evoked potential methods in rats, have delineated the cortical projection area of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve (LN) and " the chorda tympani (CT), both of which innervate the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. Summarizing the results, direct LN and CT thalamocortical inputs terminate in two 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 1 7
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--',~"C ~.a. -r.,.........~..-...,...+........a .._ ...-. C~ 1 0,/ r . vo ......•:r ~ 9h9L OfEOS i
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5a330 7646 WasCe--L:t~~,~Lure.. Reviel: . .e..--:....:- _ • V=..7 i)t 1" .:..i:is%'.A~U.'iJ ` ~-:i:1) i':1 sZe: tt~'1~~.Sl:S:f1 hL.y 1'ol ~T:~S.e~t, ~ i ~.,ja '^'v 9 ~ ~ V^.: iOasly ':.aezictia Sr,c icity for Piia2ad ca.pliia, Tf'SL'".:Ag F'.±1d Fi :CC1'iiiY..3 C) , o s o ~0 0 2 ~ 4 2 6
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, r ' 50330 7623 ~ ~ ~-....- Ann. Rev. Psyrhol. ?_ Copyright © 1979 by Annual Ifeviews Inc. All rights reserved ~~ i ~'y " r= N+ UI~AL MECHANISMS AND/ 3o9 BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS O~+ 0 ~~ ; C. Pfaffna~rn, A1 Frank, and R. Norgren , ~~~. -~) 4 ~~,1 "( ~ ' ; , 1,~. ; - - . . .,,..... . The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10021 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN TIIE STUDY OF TASTE (by Carl l'fa0~mann) ...................................................................... ................. 264 Conclusions ................................................:...................................... ................. .... 291 Recent Cou~pilations ................... ........................ ................ ..................................:.. 29I PERIPIIERAL 1'ROCESSL' SS ...................................................................................... 291 Sensory Electrophysiology, Coding, and Uehavioral Discrimination ........................ 291 Rcctpror Ficlds and Single /'apil!a ............ . .... ...................................................... 299 Taste Prcferences and /fedonic Processes ....:.......„ .................................................. 302 CENTRAL ANATOMY AND YHYSIOLOGY OF TIIE GUSTATORY : SYSTEM .................................................................................................... .... 305 CENTRAL INVOLVEMENT IN COMPLEX GUSTATORY PHENOMENA .... .312 CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................................... ........ 317 C C:: The SugaR X'cccpror. :.~i.:;:i.,:~ .........:;.;.... ..:~..,.:~:..~..iJ.Y..i :...............-1, ..... 0 5 0 4a 0 2 ~4 o
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' i''~s `v7-q?t'r:--n'."[TLi"I pu:) z, 3yx:?.~sj( 3© uo 0•(-:i 'D £ wv T£7 d.L { ZS9L OEEOS
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TP ~~3 B :.Ta9•to~--Pf~y`s3o3.ogy.. - Burger, 1llfoits M. Das huch der arc)ulcll, V0n 'Alfons M. But•-cr. (Sch;;•c'1Z) I'silchclrtlckerei Jnk. Villigvr cie, 11,1,015. 3_'0 p. t;iblo:, :lia::es, 231'". ~ ti• lc?^ J 5 . ('olur card, tnow:teil on pl;ut•. AdNertisin;; n::ittrr : p. 313-3"_0. Anhau;t (P. _G.i-:;0f) :-%. l)a. kunscrvi-n-v:i, von dr. E. Bul:m.-; Ne t:alirungsuuttelfvhstofle, %-uu J. t.. 1. Fhtvoring• e~4sences. Iowa. l'niv. T.ibrary 1~ ~% for Libra:ry of Cun;;rc.ss r. Title. AC37-fi'_'3 . . .,r:^ *-.„j,... U a O 0 0 U 2 1 4 3 2
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i I 50330 160 s, NII I CLINICAL STAFF C4NhER ; NCE Ann. Intern. Med. 71(4)791-821(Oct. 196 -77 The Molecular Basis o aste and Its Disorders I=-, Moderator: 1tODl:KT 1. HENKIN, M.U., PH.U., /3elhesda, IS'lalylaltd; Discussants: • P. 1'. G. GltAZtAUEI, PH.D., Talahassee, Florida; and DAN F. BRADLEY, PH.D., 13rooklyn, New York 1 I St1,'%WtAliY Changes in taste acuity accompany various discasc prucc.scs and arc uscful in diagnosis. Lingual Icsiuns may dccrca.c acuity for snlt and swccl, maxillary dentures de- trcasc acuity for sour and bitter. P,iticnts with gouadal dysgcncsis aucl pacuduliypoparathyroiclism also cxhibit Jccrcascil acuity for sour and bitter. Palicnts lvilh type 1 familial dysautunomia (liilc,v- Day syndrome) and mauy palit•nts treated aith u-pcnicillamine exhibit dccrcascd ncnity for each quality, whereas tho.c with untrc:ltcd ndrenal cor- tical inaillicicncy c,thibit incroaard drtcctiou ncuity fur cn:h quality. 'fhe.e nluiormalitics have prn• vtdrd ,qtuc.~~for ~~h~arw)ol;i~l ~tic/initi,t~l ol t:~..~ k~culir.J~ lu.}~ nuA+~•u r l~~vnh i~liulStlf t o rn of tnslc buds. Fronl these data Iho taste process PIIYSIOLOGY OF TASTE • PHYSIOLOGICAL ANATOMY: NOR1tAL AND PAI7IOLOCIC CONDITIONS Tastc in man has traditionally been cun• sitlcrccl a function of thc tongue. On the tongue, taste has been conimonly associatecl witlt the function of various structures callcd utstc buds and thcir associated nctt• ral innervation which resiclc in larger lin- rpu.!.-, structures called papillac. Til;ure 1A `iIltlSir:ucs the basic atnatoutical uutlittc of the tOli(a1C I11 nAl•111:1l r11an nvnr laln
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i 50330 7643 ~ QP 456 Ca 1981 TASTE--CONGRESSES/SMELL--CONGRESSES/CHEMORECEPTION/ BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY--CONGRESSES/ THE NUTRITION ~ A Mono6raph Series Blochemistry Ea'ted by ROBERT H. CAGAN of Taste Veterane Administration Medical Center and MoneU Chemical Senae: Center and UnivenHy of Pennsylvania School of Medkipe and Olfaction Philadelphia, Pennaylvanb MORLEY R. KARE Noneu Chemical Senses Center ond University of Pennsylvania Philadclphta, Pennsylvania 1981 R I ACADEMIC PRESS A Sa6Hdtary of Harcoart Brace Jouanookh. Publishers New York London Toronto Sydney San Francisco +1• ~ \ FOUNDATION • ~ ~ .. .. . . . .
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/ ~ 50330 7659 } ~ QP ; 456 . Kainnls, Haii:,, 19UG- 'I'Le c•honlical FCnses in he.)lth and by I1. I•_a1mr,~ .uicl S. J. fluLbv•cL Sprin,,lieId, Ill., T1homas ilt)GOl p3 p. illns. 24 cn). (American lecture series. publication no. 3;31. A u)onogrnl)II ill AI)leriClil lectures in living che)nf:?try) Iucluilcs bihliobrni)liy. i 1.'.1'astc. 2. Smell. i. llubbard, Sydney John, jo!nt atithor. tr. Title. QP-1;;G.T:'?3 1960 ?.3 GU-i 8JS ~ Library oC Gonrcress 1(311w1 ~s0 0 0 02 1 437
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/ 50330 7651 } - QP 456 Am 1979 TASTE--TESTING--F00n/TASTE--PHYSIOLOGY/ FOOD--TASTE/FOOD--FLAVOR/" . FLAVORA.r1TS--CHEMISTRY/ FOOD--CHEMISTRY/ FISH/gHELLFISH/SENSES & SENSATION/ Food Taste Chemistry ~ ' James C. Boudreau, EDITOR I Univer.rity of Texa.r Hou.rton Based on a symposium A C S SYMPOSIUM SERI ES115 ,.. sponsorcd by the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry at the ACS/CSJ Chemicat Congress, ~ . Honolulu, Hawaii, ~ yf` . ~ t_1 ~ ~ 1979 6 , . 1 April 2- `~ AMERICAN CHEMICAI SOCIETY W A S H 1 N G T O N, D. C. • 1979 1 , 0 5 0. 0 n• p2 14 2 9 0 ,
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fj Z: a 1 :.Q0 ovs0 . 0~0 ~I•II-'Sq v 9'I7q sSa.1:'uoc) ao C1earyl'J=o3 !aUI GaS'.".~I(Il) (I •ou 'ttriw3ouw;t •! 'p 'S 'not,uo•I ':fa;snpnl ;u;>!wmq0 o S;at:,og :_sal.ra~j aI3IJ. '~ saul)p Z Sa;s~ntaqaooaa;j '[ . 'fiJJUO.~:)j2.i I11JIl((11:.(2ollcjtq SaplilJtll (T 'nu lt(i, a.ottola'I '~7 ;;) 'uw Z;Z •sn[tt '-IaGI `ur.ItiatalT7Q Ala~K 'lloptto'[ •'cnl `,f?av l.J.t() :AI? Sq ~l il.liilii.[n ItfT?i~0illltA i L' aL'. t)L'J.l S.iP(~ il(1 !1iSLldtuoJ ::iitlialb ol9(IJloIIL'a io I)U1: O.ll1lJn.l'as .l1:Iilaai°1v t,~arw`~+ sodQ.r.92o uop,lol '.£alsnpuJ Icanu,;IJ 30 .t;ataos d b . •u ...1+ aW.. ... -11L/l/.:: ~ 0S9l. OEEOS
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50330 7669 ~ /TASTE/ TASTE--PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE/ UD(.'+ZS/ Oi.FACTI0:1i , Transduction . Mechanisms QP 455 Eu in 1974 .. Chemoreception ^ ProceeVings of a symposium organized by the European Chemoreception Research Organization fo at the Royal Holloway College, Egham, Surrey, England. , 24th to 28th September 1973 Editor-in-Chief T. M. Poynder Editorial Panel L H. Bannister ; H. Bostock G. H. Dodd Information Retrieval Limited . London
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50330 7655 ~ . i TASTE--PHYSIOLOGY/ (1980) 239-260 188 Ser V Ae 'Apv, Cho m « ] ~ ' . , . . r ~ ' .\: 1 . . .~ _ 1 . . . ~M. ~ . ~.... .. . ' u4~-.. ~.• f~ + 3w A Surface Chemical Model of Salt, Acid, ~ j and "Water" Taste ~ j. A. DESIafONE, C. L. HECK, and S. Y. DESIMONE Departrnent of Physiology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University. Richmond, VA 23298 __ We show that certain phenomena demonst:ated by eleciro- physiological and psychophysical studies of taste reception En mammals can be given a unified surface chemical inter- pretation. Many investigators postulate that taste reception eommenees with a taste cell membrane conformational change which subsequently results in taste nerve stimula- tion. A role f or charged phospholipids in salt and acid taste iWjhasSbeen svggested. We prasent svsdenu based on studies of charged phospholipid monolayers that surfau
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vLc~i~ 50330 7656 ppoa s r -4 s4, o f viiq1 r41SEaTs --D,t~.4 cT.o4~ m,tfoetOKY R6aF?Tdlt ia,rct -• PHyB~oRs _.PNyl~ola~y~ or~y/AZ64cTl%N,, Jr- a ~I~SrRRGN/T jr r'Sr~ aA ST T AND QPyss'o.4 !97/ OLFACTION An International Symposium Geneva, June 1970 Sponsored by s. - Firmcnich et Cie 0 5 0 UEdn dOy 2 1 '`- 4 --,~ -4 - G. OHLOFF ArrDA. F. THOMAS
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otra 1 zouoosn 1 :w 5 ~sV4- pcro JOpo ~o vo j~vE~~ ( aAuy ~~ ~ ~auza wc ' • W p fi~ sa , Pa -lf1 n I f Z99L OEEOS - i
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_... <.., :'1'aste..,-psSrcholog3.cal principles. s Cl 5 ~ A t~ ~ . ~ ~ 4, S_ 3
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fr * t ' 110, 'V -0' .0.: S ..G: ~ ~.~:...~.~ ..r.._.....~.~....__..i...._.-.<~. ~_ ., ~......."ai~~•.«~t~.,.~. _ .~.___.4._.....'.~:...-.._._. ~ Ft J V,SCix ."•::?rj (I2.'L" `i xT , ,`' {' n) Tzl`z'L:i~J, ' 7;{,;a-A-;il ~ ~ aA b ! , i ; LS9L OEEOS i
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/ 50330 7667 i TASTE--TESTING--TECHNIQUEf TASTE-=pHY4ZI4l0r-Y! ` --- 81 V Ya ph1siotn¢v & Btharior, Vol. 26, pp. 721-723 19a1 Pergamon Press and Braist Research Publ. P[inted in the U.S.A. -- . w. A Simple Device Detecting Onset Timf of Taste Stimulationl TAKASHI YAMAMOTO,2 HIROMITSU TAKEBE AND YOJIRO KAWAMURA Department oJOral Physiology, Dental School, Osaka University, '~ 4-3-48 Nakanoshima, Kitaku, Osaka 530, Japan Received 14 June 1980 IYJ.. YAMAMOTO, T., H. TAKEBE AND Y. KAWAMURA. A simple device detecting onset time of taste stimulation PHYSIOL. BEHAV. 26(4) 721-723, 1981.-A simple piece of equipment is described for recording the accurate onset tin, of chemical stimulation applied to the tongue surface. The equipment consists of an infrared light emitting diode. . phototransistor for monitoring the stimulus onset, and solid state logic circuits for generating electric pulses at the mome- of stimulus onset. Onset time of taste stimulation 0 S c~0 0 0 zt44s
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50330 7673 ~ J v i ) I 1. s ) 1 DISSERTATIONS--BROWN UNIVERSITY/ SENSES AND SENSATION/ TASTE--PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE/ PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY/ EVIDENCE FOR NEURAL INHIBITION IN BITTERSWEET LIXT'JRF.S QP 456 La 1978 by Harry Thomas Lax2ess, Jr. B.A., Yale University, 1974 Sc.M., Brown University, 1976 TAesis :` Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the Degree of Doctor ot Philosophy in the Department of Psychology at P Brown Untvers~ty 19?8 ti 1 4 S ! 0 S A 4 ~ 0 2
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50330 7677 Taste=.-Psycholo~y; "v; rl6; `' Annual review of psychology. v. 1- 1950- Stanford, Calif., :1nnuR1 Reviews.' V. 23 Cm. Edttor ; v. 1- 0. P. Stone. 1. PFycholnl;y-Tenrbooks. IlF;0.116G Lihrary nf ('un;r~sc r. Stone, Calvin Perry, 1892- ed. 150.;,8 50-1II143 • El S.ao• t1 . 4•2. I 4 5 S. .
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50330 7676 4 FOOD--TA NUTRITIO INTERNAT TASTE PR QP 141 Wa 1981 5 o a , TE-TESTING/TASTE--PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE%SENSORY EVALUATION/ --CONGRESSES/EVOLUTION (HUMAN)/FOOD PREFERENCES/ ONAL ORGANIZATION FOR THE STUDY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT/ FERENCES--ONTOGENESISIGENETICS--BEHAVIORAL/DIET & DISEASE/ Food, Nutrition and Evolution Food as an Environmental Factor in the Genesis of Human Variability Edited by DWAIN N. WALCHER, M.D. Professor Emeritus The College of Human Development The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Currently The Indiana State Board of Health Indianapolis, Indiana NORMAN KRETCHMER, M.D., Ph.D. Director, The National Institute orChild Health and Human Development Bethesda, Maryland -; ~• ~~ ~~ON ~ iVI'ASS kbishin~ USA~ Inc. , New York 0 Paris * Barcelona 9 Mila .>Vte,.+~ - ia. . o:.. ~.. r
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50330 7671 ~i ~,5~ pr3ncip~.e:: -1 j K Halmns"I-Ians, t90G- ' ' 1 heil i ad di b It hL chemca sensesn healthnsease,y.anns aild S. J. Iliitil>;n•d. Spriip;(ield, III., Thomas il.9G01 95 p. 111us. 2-1 cm. (Americfln lecture series, publlcntion no. 39-}. ~ - A niouograhli in Awerican Ieetures lu liv in„ chcu)istry) i ; Includes bibliography. i I 1. Taste. 2. Sinell. 1. Iiuhhnrd, Sydney Tohn, joint author. rr. Til le. (11'•I:Ii.IC?fi 1GG0 ",~ 15 ~.:3 G0-7~G4 ~ Librnry of G,nl;resy 1alh.-i, , 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 49
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50330 7661 ~ i , I QP 456 L s ~~ste--i-nysio3.ogy. Little (Arthur D.) inc., Cambridge, Ma4s. . Flavor research and food acceptance; a survey of the scop~ of flavor and associated re:;earch, compiled from pape>.'s prn sented in a . scries of symposia given in 1956-1957. \e~ York, lteinhold Pub. Corp. (1958, vi, 391 p. i1lus., dinkrs., tabh~s. 24 c,u. Includes hihliographiey. 1. Flavor. 2. Food--Ana1ysis. '1'\15 11. L;,tl Lihr:uy of ('un;resa ~" fr11.0 7 •u ~.._~ 58--1?3~:'.
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9 b b 1z 0 U a 0 5 0 t; aa;~s~T~aY ?+:'a t'oTYqr . f,q pai;a ,xAa tnnjs;nc::_:45 •d 4%;yef ~?.131 !?J;.~kri~ iJR7 SGttaA;, ~'Y70~. 4i;)j0'z,,:JU~c, -.~ ::j'.:~-.7 ~J:dj~ ur;1 tC~ ft:iaT[tctivJ:lu :a aS~'r TlCtt: ilO-4:)E~ijO •pa 'va!,+uA, `uu-,ua2voz r i I 999L Of£OS i
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50330 7666 ~ ~ Y ,TASTE-+hHYSIOLdGY/SENSFS AND SENSE ORGANS/OLFACTION/ ANIMALS--PHYSIOLOCY/PIIYSIOLU:,Y --A.*IItfALS/ODORS /SrIELL/ TASTE AND SMFLL IN ~1...RT~.B!\A~'E~ - • PDDL A Ciba Foundation Sympo5ium J. & A. CHURCHILL ' ~~dited by ~' G. E. W. WOLSTENHOLME 104 GLOUCESTER PLACE. LOND( and _~ - 1970 . JULIE KNIGHT ~ yoy . Qp 458 Wo 1970 0 5 0 0 0 02 14 4 4
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, 50330 7663 SENSES AND SENSATION/HEARING/TASTE--EHYSIOLOGYISION/SPEECIi/ PSYCHOPHYSICS/ / QP 4Mo SENSATION 1974 ' AND MEASUREMENT Papers in Honor of S. S. Stevens Ldited by HO\VARD R. h1OSKOWITZ U.S. Army Natick Laboratories. Natick, ~11uss., U.S.A. : 4 BI3RTRAM SCHARF Northcastern Uni rer.sity, Boston, A1ass., U. S. A. - . JOSEI'I1 C. STEVENS lviut B. Pierce Fomrciaiioii Lubvrarory and Vale Uiuvrrsii.r. New iiunvi, Cvan., U..S.ii. D. R1?IDEI. PUBLISHING COMPANY Q S n0 (1 0 n.q1t1jzel'4T-jq)r.ijAND/ uos•ron=u:s.A.
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i 50330 7683 ~ .__._.____...._.`.._,..~.,.:~.__ _... . For 4 x 6 and punch carc.:: seo Dr. Fel l a.n C) . . . -.++~-.r..,.~...., .. fi...s...(), q ..). 0 .2 : J•. .^1.•Y
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11 50330 7660 j BFHAVTDRAT. SrTF'VrF/SFNSFS ANn SF.IvSATTnN/TAStTR---PfiYSTnT.nr;Y/DDORS--PSYr1tr1T,f)DY/ HF.ARTN1:/VTCTnV/PF.RCEpTTnN/1.F.ARNINTG, HIJ*tAN/MnTIVATTn*T/ BF 69'4 K1 1971 2 c, WOODWORTH & SCHLOSBERG'S EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Third Edition ~LORRIN AGRIGGS Brown University ,1. seventeen contributors HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON, Inc. -~ ~ N York ~ Chicago • San Francisco •' Atlanta • Dallas 3 xntrcal • Toronto • London • Sydney 0 50 0 n0 .2. I43 8 I
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?., 0 0 0 U S 0_ .TL1t-.l LaSLtA` "!Y! `'s-c•oo,1 ;.:4.; Z{' U61 ! ..... :,.,~.~,:.~x . L89L 0££OS .
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50330 7665 , - ,1 12:! St ODGRS--PSYCHOLOGY/OLPACTIOa/PSYCHOLOC.'Y, PHYSIOL0GICA:LESt•;r.I:I./ 1951 PSYCHOMETRIC MnTHOWZ/BEFIrsCOF.T?lL aCIENCE/'I'ASTE--.TESTI::G/_ PDDL MoTIVATION/SENSES• ANa SEt7SL ORGANS/'~~STE--PNXSIOLOC':rIPHYSIOLOC~Y/ Handbook of ~ EXPERlMENTAL. .~. PSYCHOLOGY !` "iw'Edited by S. S. STEVENS Professor of Psychotooy Girttla of the psychologicul laborotories Harvard Univ.rsity JOHN WILEY & SONS, 1NC. • NEW YCRK LONDON • SYDNEY a . •.
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! 73 V lie A QUESTION OF TASTE. "'TA'3Tl+:y-4ill,Y-.S3.ta.a1.Y:•'IJutrition & H. !3. Neath r t~A.[3.E., B.Pharan.. F.P.S., F.I.F.S.T. Flavou;s Technical Service Manager, f Bush Goake A!Ien ~ . ~ !Dl was origir,ally appfied to special cells which had been observed in the mouths of fishes. Early• research soon established that certain raised portions. distributed over the surface of the It was established way back in the middle of the last century that thv sensory organs responsible for our appreciation of taste, as distinct from that of flavour. are located on the tongue. Since then considerable research has been canied out into the structure and mechanisms involved. It h;:s long been recognised that the prime organs of taste are the taste buds. This name 50330 7658 Food Scienccs No:23 6-8 (1971) Thu taste buds Taste buds, tastc onions, taste beakers arc all names which havc been applied at one time or another to the collection of spccialiscd sensory cells found on the tongue. It is not diflicult to st:c N.•hy they are so called 'as they occur in groups shaped not unlike a brandy glass in which spindtc•shapcd cells arc bunched togetlier in• a circular capsule having a narrow opening or taste pore. '(Fig. 2.) This pore connects the inner surface of tlie taste bud to the outcr surface of thc tonguc. Each of these taste buds, and it is estimated that tlicre arc about 9,000 of them on the human tonguc; contain between fifteen and eighteen sensory cetls, roocther with other cells which may be either mcrcly suppor- : ting in function or may be, indeed, imm :turc taste tongue, the papillae as they became called, are cells. the site of the receptor organs and that those sreas At one time it was thought that sensory cells had of the tongue which do not bear the papillae are a minute filament at thcir free ends, but recent insensitive to the taste stimulus. reseacc_h usi.n,~ ~n,.e.l~tt o..t t~ii ,osc i?• t z st o« . ~ ~. O
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_ ~ _ ..aa~A:... ~.. . .... ~ ...~..- ~ _ . _ PSYCiiO?fETJ ICZST:S A;dD $rldSAxIONITrSTING/TASTE--TESTIN(;/ 50330 7674 .~:: .. .:.,,. _. ..,. BF 237 Ma . 1974 2 C. TASTF.--PSYCHOLOGTCAL PRIAiCI.PLE/VISION/ ~ : SENSORY PROCESSES The New Psychophysics ACADI:NIIC PIjII.SS New York and London 1979 A Subsidiary of 1larcourt Brace jocanocich, I'uLlishcrs ~ . .. .. . ~ . . . , . ~ r~1 . wrn o s rr ••o o o LANVIENCL E. MARKS John B• Ficrcc Foundation J,aLoratony and Department of Fsychology Yale Unicersity Ncw Ilaven, Connecticut ~.• . ~. . . .. , :~
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t , .::~-o--~ z;' - - "_q 0 t) 1). RI. 'Mac1:a)• • l I. I.. TcuLcr All 0 1Tand Uook r f tSel1 sol.y. Phy~iol,oay k.t Editorial Ik,ard II.Atdrattt • li.)nno • CY.Ii. 1-ocat•u:tciu 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 Vo1u111e IV ff 50330 7653 . e p £ditea br IUoyd 11t.19cidlir With 211 Figurca ~l(cmiral Scnscz • Part 1 ~Q~l f uc~.ioii Br ~J. E~ Amo_o~re•!f. C. J• (t et. • J. T. A..i.. • T. Fr.E<o J. C.rati • f:. C. CiNrland • P. P. C. Cr.aiadei • f:: 1: l:aivlini a It. A. Keclli~; • J. I.0laZnen - P. Slaelsod •[). C. Vouftoa lf. ll. )fo.ell • 11. Oumuu • T. S Parwes • S. F. Takasi • I). Tacker - B.1t. Weaael j Sp'inocr-\'crlap licrl?n • Ilcidclbc•rp • New York 1971
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r 50330 7678 } - r ~IsSrqR~N~r r ~~..-sr. ,M.c-. ST T~ AND Qo / z Of? SlTi4 Sr.F O~mRs -.Pf1/~aioLs~y~ d,tFflcTOKY PNyr~~4 ~x, s~9 sa/,asfE--P~rfio~c d6y~0~tF~crOe~, , a (pPHsB'o.~ . OLFACTION An International Symposium Geneva, June 1970 8. Sponsored by Firmenich et Cie ~ SQ~drr~db~2 1 456 G. OHLOFF ArrDA. F. THOMAS
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I , /ATES--TASTE/ 50330 ~ SENSES AND SENSATION/TASTE=iTLS9'ING~ALFACTION/CARBOHYDP.ATES--TASTE 7690 j At4IN0 ACIDS/PEPTIDES/PROTEI,IS/CHEMORECEPTION / QP 458 Be 1978 PDDL . M. G. J. BEETS International l7avors &c 'Fragrances (Europe), ' Hilversnnr, The Netherlands APPLIED SCIENCE PUBLISHERS LTD AiG ,r,~p . ./' l osoon~zl4 -b8 STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS IN HUMAN CHEM ORECEPTI ON LONDON ~C . £4ii iR-4 x.CIOl~ l
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P. I IS b 1 • Z"o• 0- 0 `SZa•1d c,sr`:V-`..YSd s .Actl vuop:•3'ftqncT cn-m6.,~Ix,g ';,a f ~~ 6 'k~'jo~neuaq a:,ua.ia;ox,~~: 0891 OEEOS . _,..-
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50330 7692 j -- ----_..._ .. __._~.. _.,...._ _ .._._..~. . ; ke , ~ Tasteatosting: BenptSson, Kjell PRIIdCIPLFS OF TASTE TESTINGj, by Kjell Ben~tssc and Fri4 lielm. Ins Walleryte3.n Lab. Cora:,i. 2 (No. 28) 171-80 ( Lb cember 1946).
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50330 7679 `~ ., L-jt, 11458 -,Z"dste--Stimulation-:-Prefereiice Behavior ~ I9e 1965 8145 1' :3c,rs 1=cY~r~utt Ftr.~ec~n r1:.~°~ Yark . 0 5 0 0 0 02 1 497
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xx • . _._ _. .. . _. ~ P,a3 Tasts;Aestirip a CI~:J..{-~ g 470 1GV . f I!~ Ito t.o i'i:'`;Si.:?:a20 ki_S `.~ „Ad'IV ( x:, : S ) . ~-,...z.. _..,,
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,.Taetp~Ac~,ti.iig QA~ :r.:~: ;':;';.- fo:' U~~ 270 Oty (:?:'A•':4' :c c• A tt~c~! s ~ „)•
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J 50330 7687 76 V As I TASTE--TESTING/ i l Product Management 1976 35-38(April, 1976) CAN THEY TAKE THE GUESS WORK OUT OF SENSORY TESTING? Yes, says one of a new breed of researchers claiming they can not only predict what the public will like or dislike- but exactly what Ingredients and what amounts will make the difference By Neal Ashby Howard \1os{:owitz, a diligent young Ph.D. uho ordinarily ap- proaches his work in consumer sensory research w•ith a zealot's fer.•or, was not looking fom,ard to his morning's work on a recent winter s day. "1 have to call this client," he explaincd, "and tell him that nothing his R&D has come up with can beat the compctition ---or c%,cn survive in the market- place. Thcy struck out, poor gu3s, If the client had only come to us earlicr, a e could have told him. . . 0 5 Q 0 0 A2 His voice trailed off despair- ingly. It is the contention of 1\tos- ~ kowitz, along with a whole new breed of probers into the public psyche, that the art of sensory testing has become a discipline, that such research has emerged Ths .ultia is a keelerce w.esr br oonsurrvr tarW asrrWss pakawa . ~.~., .... 5
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50330 ?664 ~ I Society of Chemical Industry, London. 02+erscczs Scction. • Molecular structure awd orl;aiioleptic quvility; comprisinc pap(,,rs I•ead at a symposium o);;anizecl by tho O~~er-ea Section hela in Geneva, 2-3 jiay, 1957. Londou, New 2 orh Macmillan, 1957. 124p. illus. 22 ctn. (S. C. I. tnonograph no, 1) lucludes biLliographical references. 1. Siereociiemistry. 2. odors. I. Title. (fieries: Societ}• o Chaiuical Industry, Loncion. S. C. I. monorirnp}t, tio. 1) }.. ~ QD 173.,5ut'y , 11157 ; ~ G41.a Iovrn. State Coll. LIl>t•. for l.:brnry of Cuubress tGtt A 53-11-1,
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50330 7697 C3r . .a.` , . ,,. :. , . L?y3z•, faUDrt. J. IN '1 ~~;~'i ~~;~'i'Z; „~~' ~ 'l0 b 'Z;„ ~•-:L.. "'~, by Al.bert J. Ii~~~~r and Philip P. Gr.:i3*, From: l!_1]er2tein L~tb~>, Corr~, 16: 303-1/, (.195: 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 7 5
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50330 7696 ~; TFate.= ;3t;ti»; I Byer, ALLer'c J. A corl-pariSOIl of thr• trian,;ular anci two-Sar..• :)ie ta.^>tc-tcst , ethcdo, }-,y ,?<lUert J- i3yer a:,d Uoro t?;y In: ;~ t]_lcr:,tni~l L•ib:,. Cor.,jl. .Lh:253-60 (1')5: .. ~. .-~....~. ~ .n.. ~,. ..;,~ . ~.-. :~ .. 7.:.~. .. , . . . . ... ..
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50330 7693 I 3:jr,- r K, t.: ~- Li/: , T, t i-,qyy} o a tl 0 0 fI 2 147 1
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50330 7689 , Ysal,?cs, Ssytllour. j",\l-,P,Y1:11Ci1Cttf1G'L ]II 2;lilYliCtlligy. l~rlN ~U.'K~ .ti~ti]1'111ti"'tlll rlnoJj aif1, 273 1, 1t'.2~? ecn. 1. I•flrketlug research. r. Title. HF5-115.2.133 T.I irrn ry of C,rJnt, re;s 658.4018 ,a512, _._._~~._ ~.-.... . ...:.,.. -0 5 0 0 0 0 2 14 6 7
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6 L~ I?: U U 0 U 5 0. ~.. ~~ ...~~_...__.~:.._ _. _ .. ! l ~ ~ ~ ~ f (! ' ~ E ! 'wo zC •d zl,T `tFn ~3;.Tok rtON •.zonB[3 C!a i •o•a r4 P f:- ~- !;f'}1 11--F IOLL 0££OS .
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50 330 7672 I • TASTE--PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE/,~ J trrnr:s:::.~ ~, 7lNJ - .4u,guit I `~ -' 1 ~C 701fracfiion and taste~dua1 systems r 78 V Ke E. B. Keverne 0 . .. .. ke. for sensory processing/ I i Recent obserratiuns oj'blit,dsiglrt' lmsr provided evidence fr)r subcartical Ancc.ssiqg oj risual inputs urer and uburc the acceptcd prnccssin,G in tlre risrral curte.r. ln tlii.s arlicle, Barry Kercnre cunsidcrs the criclence Jior tluul processing ur a ncucurtical as i+-cll as at a subcortical lercl jor the scn.sury inpurs J'runr the taste s~•stem as nroll ns from t/ie olfactory systeru. 7he ncocurtical prucessiu,q tnar prurn/e us n•ith our crcarHctic pleasures wbile the eniphasis tna)• be on sundral ralue jronr the subcortical processing. The ehemical senses have never received the dcgrce of scicntific attention paid to the other special senses, perhaps bccause man himself, being the sensory investigator, feels they are relativcly unimportant.'And yet, the predominant use of chemical com- _•~i_3~1, . ~,, form of quality coding which can bc repre- sented by the extent to which taste cuc• stinwlate the ncuronca in each of tt, four classes. This is often referred to as :. "labcllcd-linc" theory, as compared Hii; the "across-fibre-pattern" theory. tnali~ be~Q~'io has(~ cn~ r~~ scl~'' ~As ~vca b~'f:ttrman's earl work'. tjchavioural analysis tive e~olutRfnar~ign~liFanc2.' I3eR.fviodTS, tltc sp`'~ificll ol`Tastc nerve libre_., is not In psychophysical ternu, the acro<c be they fccding, sexual, maternal. or absolutc, which implies that neural coding ' fibre-pattcrn theory sugecsts that stimuln awareness. If such dual aspects of chcmo- scnsory function are established, then the chemical scnscs may be of more funda-- mcntal importance to man than merely adding to his sensual pleasures. muni:ation in many aspccts of mam- Dual tastc-proccssing
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50330 7694 ~ '9S-Ixdis te' ;fi.aqting. ' Eerfrp jls Ci' i?i:V:'SI:ULr- A: C Fat.t'ai ~F' ~,.. : j ! ' . rrt i OF .'~7.' 02 1 7 ALCCi:OI, a ORrx't1dTC t;C77; 0 -S .~~ 4.: o 0 -x. I...4n.7. 2
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i , 50330 7684 Advances iii food research. v. 1-ri New York, Academic Press,1J48-= rj Y. 21 c,u J. ).Qaors: V. 1--`i ]•:. .ll..llrnk, G. 1'. stew:,rt. t ~, \ntrlti~n Collectcd Avorks. 2. Food rese.u•ch-Collectc: Nrorks t, \1rnk, l:ntil \l;,rccl, 1iN11- ed. ~ %r'.• .. . 43-i SOS 641.10712 ( ~ . Llbrsu•y of Congrrss •-trilh7j 0 5 0 0 00. 2 1 4 6~
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50330 7700 j xx ~ C1 E" Tastv..testin,; _._ ~y.~.. _ ~_s..~....,:..:..,r.~ .,.. l zxvr.~~: oC aua~;,i~.r,~ c~ri i;atc3 cn;~rcc!.z: cl.n<I oi' r"' Ci. 1 111:1 •yt C.~ . .Q . ~ . , {l ' (~ ~ (j . ;~: , ~. . ~ . 7. . ~. . . . . . . . , . . _ . . .
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T 50330 7704 j ,. f ; ';-_ . . 1 rChemoreception tr I .; I . . •1 1 BEHAVIORAL SCIF.*1r,F/SF.NSES & SENSATION/TASTE-~TESTING OLFACTION~ QP 456 Preference Behaviour. ; ; Eu . 1479 and N- . -- .. . rProcee ings of a,symposium organised by the ropean Chemoreception Research Organization at "Het Meerdal", Horst, The Netherlands 15th to 17th May, 1979 Editor•in-Chief J. H.A. Kroeze Information Retrieval Limited London . R.Harper -ios r) oo o;z-i 4d 2-. . . t D.Land t 1!!
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50330 7698 P PERCEPTION, V. I--X/HUMAN INFORMATION PROCESSING, V. VIII, IX/ ODOR, V. X/ ' ~ 360 Q$YCHOLOGI(TIPNYS,IQLOGICA~VIYIOI_-X/SENSESVANDISENSATIONDIVG IHEZ~SMELLVIVIVIA/ Cd TASTE, V:fIII /NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF SMELL, V. VIA/ OLFACTION, V. VIA/VISION, V.III,V HEARING,7V.III/BIOPHYSICS OF TASTE, Vol. VIA/ TOBACCO--TASTE--TESTING, V. VIA, NOISE V. IV/PAIN, V. VIB/TOUCH, V.VIB/LANGUAGE & LANGUAGES, Vol. VII/SPEECH, V.VII/ FLAVOAANTS--SENSORY EVALUATION, V. X/ tiA\DI3OOK OF P1:RCEP77O`'f EDITORS: Ed«ard C. Carteretle and Aforlon P. Frledmart Department of Psychology ~ Volume 1: Historical and Philosophical Roots of Perception. 1974 University of California, Los Angeles tAs Angeles, California - Volume 11: Psychoph, sical Judgment and Measurement. 1974 vVolume III: Biology of Perceptual Systems. 1973 vh'olume IV: Hearing. 1978 rVolume V: Seeing. 1975 . Volume VIA: Tasting and Smelling. 1978 rVolume VIB: Feeling and Hurting. 1978 dVolume VII: Language and Speech. 1976 '~ Volume VIII: Perceptual Coding. 1978 .iVolume IX: Perceptual Processing. 1978 *o'Volume X: Perceptual Ecology. 1978 0 S t~ Q ~ 0 2 1 4 7 6
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,v-_... ....:L.~.... a. ,......~.. ._-....... : a.::r ~ - 50330 7670 ~ 75 V,ga ~TE+STR--PSYCf10LOGICAL PRTI~CIPLB/ . Arner. Toar. Psychlatry 131(11)1204-07(1974). ~ 7 Il ', ,i114'e Aversions in Man !t'i ANt; 1.. GAIttt :1\1) :1t.tt!•:It•f J. Srl'\I:aitt), M.b. METHOD h - 69b h l i • • d ' at ta.ctc arers su jects reti e t of ea A sun e,: ons ~1 nta}' ne urquired hr• a.vprcial kind oflearnin,Q that has 11Ou' -We studicd 696 subjects from si : differcnt populations, pre+iousl,v been drmonstrutrd clearl+ onlv in animal.c. ; '~_'//ranginS in age from early childhood to old age. Of the to- Gaurointc.tilir~a! illness h•os acsocialed +t~ith ucguisition of ,,, t ,~.M , _ . .. i .- .,.,,r »n r .... t . T4.., . ..1.'.. ...• ... -.. 1 , ', • ~,. ~11 -.~ {1~.~/ r'rV .~. IIIUIV.I• .Ill• >'.il ~.ll'J -~•X~~ r ~ei •in 4i' t fthe hj t O ' oj i i • . urrs pe cen nr r q n~ o su ec s. ers a+ food and illne.s.c was sufficient to produc e aveJStons 1Nat, lastrdfornianr}•ear.c. On.5 et ofaver.rions was ntost tomnron bet ween ages 6 and 12. xdten the pre+-alence rate reached 30 percent: it then fell steadil r to a lo w of 6 percent af er age 60. l he uuthors haiet'c that a better understanding of taste aversions ntc}• help improve conditinne1 aversion procedures in the treatment of ' olcoho.'isin and obesity. 'drawn from pupulations selected for intelligence and po- tcntial intcrest in the phenomenon, to enable us to maxi- mizc inforinatioa about taste aversions. They included 129 clcmentary school children, 72 secondary school stu- dents, 216 universitv undereraduates, 143 first-year medi-: cal students. 73 members of an adult education prograrri, and 63 university professors cmeriti. Subjc:c!s in four of the six groups were tested in their classrooms. No one refused to participate. ~ A two-page self-repurt questionnaire was administercd to all groups except the elementary school children. TASTE AVERSIONS ARE ATTRACTING increased attention whost" age necessitated a shortened oral form. The ques- for at least t++o reasons. Or.e is the renewed interest in tionnaire co+•ered fi+'e major topics: 1) demctigraphic in- C.Qn(~ttlont:lf.at'rl i t C fi r Ir~ li.c . 4t,;.~~t~.,..,I~n1.~f~n Sl1C)1 ~~.if41't c:Y.,.h:J~:ht.y,jl1({.1~;rinht.r~l -ttti?~ar•,f. ,,; ~/.
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i 50330 7713 . , . Gray, Philip P. SYSTT-N~.ITZC STUllY ~F TIiE lIiPLU :P~C : OF (1aID:~TIOII ON N:&!i FL:aJCiH, by P. I', Gray, Trwin S t;cne, ana Latirronce Atkin. From: 6].lerste;.t, Labs. C„~i~.~~. Lp 1$:-94 (1947) o s 0 0 0 a. 2 1 49 t
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50330 7702 .k'. ~ . }Tast6--Teating i+ 13ssr,;~r. L*.cG~c ~~ a t;~r~;t~ 4]~,laaaxrac:~ x96~) 2 Voa.a . ::'•)t:c+i.rat 7.a:ar9.t:ctr- fox CoeQ-'Jo rg l;- cQ1.1 n.i3earCl1 .. ."~ . .... . . . Q ..s ...o. .o ...n .4. 2.•-1. .~.. 3..0 . ,... .,..... . .. . .
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/ r 50330 7682 , FMI BAr.TOSHUx .,,'74 0 ALTERATION OF TASTE QUALITIES THROUCIi NATURAL PRODUCTS LINDA M, BARTOSHUK U.S. ARMY NATICK LABORATORIES NATICF:, MASSACHUSETTS R.pbauc.e by NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE Sprlnflt~l0. Ya 21151 ~ ',ee~ n~ ou ~mi~ it ry,# orFesr ~costs some 2 billion dollars a yea~r; 'Chei'ecahom~i~c ~inp~ta~ce~f 9 esE+arch devoted to maintaining the sensory Rua2tttes, the hightst nutritional standards; and wholesome-
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/ r I 50330 7720 ) f=+• `.~ = : :TgS tiE:`~ti6ut.lfl,- .3 liop?;ins, J.t4. `1'a s te pa ne l te s tihg. From: Cnn. Fooc3 Ind., June, 1953. 5 P•
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50330 7722 1 .: Tas-te-i-test,ing. s \. _ j . 0 5 0 0 0 0 2. 1 a 40
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Z 0 U 0 U S p. :ui • J " '[O T,T, TJ`l , ,iT~T uuT.' <<xCoH I 6LLL OEEOS
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'~~bi) 8s-I nr :ll svo t.~.roo~unwwQd sa ±.,~jro~ ~ v; a~sa a r~ti~ ;wojd q JaIsnuJ ~y~ ,~ ~v ~ odr~ !n ac~ wcu~. 6u ~ s~.la4~t~, uXapo~J d ,flty4 9 .;:J- T t*~ ~"a ~ j DuT~ xx
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, ,.. TE.S1E--T'i1.~~Ynst. I5rcr,, ~ . St? (_) 1.G4-73 (1>74) ._ }:.c MnF-)r-404-74 164 " : [J. Yrst. }3: cw. PROFILE A.Nh1.YSIS AND f'LAYGt'1~ I7iSCitIIN :1:.'.'4.:'1(}N %' BY J. I'. CLAPPFfaOti , e.s.....o...~. (Brewing Ittdustry Rescarc7. F'uund.etion, j%utfici:i, kedhill, Sarrcy) en V Rtttived 1'!h August, 1973 0~t.s w;,,fer The relativcs'merits of profile tasting and difference tasting are discussed. Profile nnalysis can reveal and characterize flavour differences that arc, not revealed by difference tasting using the triangular or three-glass test, even though the same people carry out both types of test. A multiple comparison test Is used in conjunction vAth profile analysis to revcal the size as well as the nature of perceived differences in flavour. This is exemplified by studies of the effect cf adding inc:re-asing ainounts of diacetyl to three different types of beer. It t;tay be necessary to considcr net just the presence of ir.dividual flavour notes but also their duration and order of perception in order to explaili the effects of flavour potentiators, such as cduanosine 5'-monophosphoric acid. Key words: ale, aroma, f.,auoasr, la;er, canuot c'.etF!ct any differences by instru- snerhod. mental analv,es, but a dificrence in flavour is 50330 7699 ~ 0 1 . ~ d S tl 0 0 0 2 1 4 7 7
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/ I l ) 50330 7716 BF 1954 ... TLt3LE:'=a:QStiXiE;'•' ' Guilford, Joy Paul, 1897- I'sychometric methods. 2d ed. New York, McGraw-Ilill, 1951. 507 p. 111us. ' 24 cm. ('McGraw-Ii111= sertes ln "pss•chotogy) 1. Psychomctricq. r. Title. # I31~ ;J.GS 195•I . 152.8 53-121- Llbrary of Congress .~ 115)
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/ 5L'(;~t~S--ST1'.l'CTLP1:/Sl;(:AT S 7 nST7"12TTC'tOStC:Ef';/ • . y, . ... ..St(':1FS---CHF,'iLSTP.Y/.. • Subar Stt L1CtltCC _ :lI1C~ Adv. Chcr1. Se (117) 25G=63 (1973) It,.S,. SIIALLT;\'13H-IiCrR .,1 ~ ~ . N~Lr)'r~rlf S~tc,;lrJci~llural )~15Criinriit St tion Corncil Ursity, Thc saporotrs- unit for su•cct t~tstc in srroars is the «-glycol nioicly in thc gcrtccltc confornwtion. Suottr succtncss is tli- minisltecl when the J;1 fcol unit has thc ecliJr.,•ed cortformation and an inlran:vlc'culur hi~clrngcn bond. Also if an 011 t,rc>up is dislrosccl to hJdrohcn bund elsr.tchcre in the molecule (thc ring a.ryt cn ato-n ), the ability of an R-t;l ycol nroirt y to elicit su:cct tu: tc is rlinrinislied. 11'hc-t a-gl fcol 011 grorri,s are in the anti conhurmcrtkon, fl-cy. nre ulrirurvntly-ton jar _.....,(ir t' li...1~ _apart 'fb cri~rsc srcce! tcr.ti:te. I:ciclcncc for the nboce cor-clu- sions is dcricca from stcrclics of cnrinus str,;crrs, model cout= lrourtds, and the mtrtrn•otutiore rcaction elnd !c.•uds to u"encrul concertecl l,r1dro~en bond nroclel for the initial chemistry of srVect tastc. -- -- ---, - , ~ . _ . _ _r . • - . ..........~.,...,....,.• . • : _ "-. ~.......---- . ~J S Q 4 in 0 2. 4 1 0
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/ I i.~._...._..... TITTER SUBS'PAP:CES/SI+TEETENERS/TASTE-TESTING/FLAVORANTS--CHEMIS'fRY/ 50330 7691 74 'III Be2 Zeitschrift fiir Ernahrungswissenschaft, Band 12, Heft 3/,°O-~',Jo ~ Aus dein Institut fur LebEnsmittelchenife der Techntschetl Un{versitat und der Det:tschen Forschu^gsanstaIt fur Lebensmittclche7nie Munchen ............ .. S!rnktur und Garschiuack siilicr und hit.crc: Vcrbincluu ;eu STRUCTURE AND TASTE OF S4TELT AND BITTER :;0;iP0UNDS. Von H.-h. F3elitz Mit 2 Abbildungen und 9 Tabellen ' 42996. DELrfZ, N.-D. tlnst. Let:ensmit'elchrn., Tech. Univ. 4. Jun( 1973) Muench., I uthst. 17, BCbJ \tuenchen 2, W. Ger.) arul;tur und Geach- mack snesser und bittcre- Verbt-0•sn¢en. (Structhire 2r,.7 tas!e of f.iS 1: ~i: 1:0- lr .CiiGlt des Die s wcc! tnd t.atcr rnr ~ cr.,: ,l z I 295. : -r rd. Ir ;;. L-r * lcr.j--\':^_tcal C4 .>•roucs furr..:n; a 60• riahrurgs- Lebensl ~pie {tiltta the requuer..er.ts of !hc ?rotcn d~nor-pr~wn receptor # aufn2hl sysce.m tcr sweet tar:in; camooc; !,. Strcctural prrul:uuces vh_ch eln fUr dt'n Ver2eh deviate (rrom ahis Lis:c t~ r,:aa ar..i resuN tn c:ferc: t oc~raes ef lhl Vo;I Ver- i t;w•eetness m soL,-ars, si:inu acids, di;eptice esters artd d:hydro- chmaCksCin- Sc}]iedt'.: chatcone ncot:esptrido:ides are dt.;cussed. Thl relaticroshup betaeen drUtl:e ; hydrophobi-:ity and side c:.a:ns a•idch causes varying drgrees of tter zurLIC~C- bitterncss in pept:des, d:gepcides, sc;zariprotein contplaes, citric itlhren. tiavanot:e glycostdes and fiavarticne hespcridosides, are a!so exptored. ' Wie zeigt, fehlt .v-n;..+'...w..-+..•.'v.~..-,..v...-.._...._..w....._.,.......-..... ...-.~-a+..- _.a.~-.r.~_..-~._~.+.+1++...iww•..1.~.l/f.a~anr...r~.nn•i^•rl.c•n..V[•r. -. . _.,. _ ,......
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50330 7726 i r TLi 9'tE--tt;stiiT1~; c, Johnston, Jams ;I., Jr. i'aYSIOL,.,:a~:C<'~L i~S.'=:CTS Cr `'" ..,ST~i1~ i. A 2hctr_^t,_.1'. *'.•Oet: Vn. J. S;:z., :I.S. (1`~55 )
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50330 7727 ~ K s 1 Kalnrns, Va r. s, t 9QFi- 'I'ht, clu,nr.r;i1 senses in ho:ilth aiul bv TI. 1•:al»ius ;tic(1 ;T. ,?. 1 i uld)cir(l. ~i» itl _(iclcl, ' 11,; 'I'liun;,ls t1JG0] P;. p. fi1u;. 2i cm. (Amorican lecture pub'::.ltimn no. 1 wu~: ; n in :~iuericnn l,~ctures fn liviu^ cl:eiuistry) Iucludes Libltot;nliliy. 1. 2. Sinell. I. Ilubbar(l, Sydney Johu, jo!ut author. rr.'iltle. 1960 ; ~ 152.3 C0-78g5 Y T.tLrary of Con~gress (G1,i51 0 5 0 0 0 a 1 1 5, 0 5
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i 50330 7731 . ~ LEAYIIF•RHEAD 17001) F7FSEARCII P•..S(1L•IATION TASTE--TESTIHG/SMELL/ODORS/ 76 V Le SFLECTED DIBLIOGRAPHY eovcrin9 data Input from 1973 to April, 1975 May 1975 No.2 EN ORY EVALUATION Registered Offices and Laboratories Randalls Road Leathcrhead Surrey KT22 7RY Tcicphone: Lcatherhead 76761 Telex: 929816 • 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 I 5 0 9 .
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I 50330 7706 ~ TASTE--TESTING/ ~ 81 YFi ~~ .Z~C. I sW-sfr e/96O GUSTATORY CHEMORECEPTION IN 141.4.'~': AIULTI- DISCIPLINARY ASPE-CTS Al\'D PERSPEC'ITVES ROLAND FISCHER. FRANCES GRIFFIN. and MARSHA A. ROCI:EY• The aim of this paper is to review certain multidisciplinary aspects of research on human taste performed in our laboratory, to relate our data to other ongoing research, and to discuss problems and trends that necessarily result from such an integration. 0ur_ particular slant has been to'look "at the human oral cavity as a pharmacological preparation in situ. We came to regard the gustatory response as a sensory expression of chemoreception, a feedback loop reflecting systemic (re)activity. Q~ 0 0 0 0 2 1 48 4
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i 50330 7724 1 81VIw I /,-l 1•P () _.-., TASTE--TESTING/ .33 05/7/U 8) Taste nerve fesponses and aversion to bitter-tasting compounds in the rat. Kazuo Iwasaki. Department of Neurobiology. Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neurosciences. F1uchu, Tokyo 183, Japan. I Effects of various bitter-tasting compounds on rat gustation were examined by recording integrated nerve responses to lingual stimulation from the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal(IXth) nerve, and by measuring rat's behavior to those substances using the two-bottle choice method. A difference in responses to bitter-tasting compounds was observed between the two nerves. Magnitudes of responses to 10mM solutions are in the order of MgCl2 > quinine > nicotine > glycyl-L-phenylalanine(GP) > =caffeine in tTie chorda tympani, while quinine > nicotine > MgCl2 > caffeine > GP in the IXth nerve. Threshold concegtration_j for relgction of quinine, nicotine and caffeine ate about 3x10 , 3x10 and 10 M, respectively. They are nearly the same as those for producing responses in the IXth nerve, but much lower than those in the chorda tym3ani. Although MgC12 pro~uced neural responses in the former at 3x10_1 and in the latter at 3x10 M, aversion to MgClZ was observed about 5x10 M. GP , which tastes bitter in hMans, did not induce aversion in the rat, although GP at about 3xlO M produced responses in the chorda tympani. When taste stimuli were applied to the tongue preadapted to quinine, , responsees to quinine and nicotine in the IXth nerve were markedly depressed, but those to MgCl and NaCl were not., These results indic.ate: i) Aversion to bitter solutians is attributed to information mainly carried by the IXth nerve, i) ~etffefjs p~ quinine, nicotine and caffeine ~ 0
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F b•17 I r- u u 0 U 5 0. ._...: .,i C_J f . _ .-, . , .,.. . ~ ~ SILL OFrOS
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i 50330 7730 81 V La TASTE--TESTING/ I ~1 C,~p. Y'M ~nd Phwitry Pwt~~q ~.UE1ll4 v~.w. (~rs. a Evidence for Neural Inhibition in Bittersweet Taste Mixtu es Harry T. Lawless Brown University Three lines of evidence from psychophysical experiments implied that mutual suppression of bitter and sweet tastes is due to neural inhibition rather than' chemical interactions in solution or competition of molecules for common re- ceptor site.. Removal of sweetness from bittersweet mixtures caused the hit- temeas to increase. This wu accomplished by adaptation to sucrose or by treatment with Gymnema syluestre, neither of which affect the concentration of sucrose on the tongue. Such increases in the bitterness of mixtures, inde- pendent of the concentration of the sweet masking substance, are difficult to reconcile with suppression by means of chemical interactions. Similar depen- dence of suppression on perceived intensity (and independence from n ncen- tration) was observed with mixtures of phenylthiucarbamide and sucnKe. Tasters of phenylthioarbamide showed stronger suppression of sweetness than nontasters. This result was also inconsistent with molecular interactions causing suppression, which would have resulted in the same degree of suppres- sion for the two groups. Instead, these findings support neural explanations of mixture suppression, such u antidromic inhibition or occlusion. Q S 0 0 0 02 1 5 0 6
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, 50330 7711 _ _._ .~,._._.` -..~.. ~._ _ __._._._>.:., - --~.~..w....r.._._..._-.._....--._.~. ~.r 81 V Go TASTE--TESTING/SENSORY EVALUATION/ ~ ~ Q!)!. I ITIvCIINIQUE OF IIONJ~-Y DEGUSTATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN OBJECTIVE NOTATION AND CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Tb ESTIMATE ITS QUALITY BY AN OI:GANOLLPTICAL ANALYSIS, M.LcoNA'ET G. IVACHE 'FRANCE All the people who like honey may do an organoleptical analysis.,, % , It is a degustation in the noble meaning of this word : as a response to the stimulations of this sweet food, the taster objectively interprets , his sensations from a qualitative and quantitative •point of view. The sensory examination 'is a genuine intelectual act requiring knowledge, concentration and training. It appeals to an exceptional but frail, gentle measuring instrument which is submitted to frequent disorders therefore • so unstable In responses : man. As far as techno'ogy is concerned, the sensory examination of honey is indispensable for the physical, chemical, biological and pollinic analyjes. These anal.yses__:upply very Important Q~;~ C 0 _ 0 ~. .,.~. .- ~ --.4 . ~ ~ t .
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TASTE--TESTING/ 50330 7718 , .1~ a~-3i Ciy~y~ . 81 V Ha2 THE MEASUREMENT F TASTE SENSITIVITY TO PHENY HIOUREA (P.T.C.) ' By H. HARRIS• and H. KALMUS Q'allon Labor'plory • . -, , . , INTRODIIOTION Fukuoka, 1936). ' . .. . . . , • _- - , ~•~ .. - . . Several methods have been used to classify people according to their taste sensitivity to pheny1- thiourea. Fox (1932), who first detected the great differences between people in this respect, used crystals of the substanoe, which he put on the tongue. In this way he was able to classify people into those who found the substance was bitter ('tasters') and those who did not ('non-tasters'). This method has been widely used in subsequent studies, for example, by Snyder (1932), Blakcelee &Salmon (1931), Riddle dc Wybar (1944), Kloepfer (1946) and others. Another method to distinguish between tasters and non-tasters which has been commonly applied has involved the use of filter-paper impregnated with phenylthiourea (e.g. Parr, 1934; 0500(1p2 1 4 9b
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50 330 7734 1 1 s;t8 ::: ,- , 0 -' , ., XX rta 0 ltarcusc, Sophie APYLYT',`{'.~ f>Oa. dP`i?, t:ii.1RT f,ri 3 F,t}z- .E_ ,;'._2 F~m: 316-13 (a.947) AN APPLZC ",'iIOid OF M, CO;dTRU CH<'Ri' ES-l'ti(?U TO T}iS OF FJi.`w', A p3per nresent^d at the 10th annual ra :etij:,r; of t1- Alnoric:-,n ~t:;tictic~l A^sociation, Washinzion, D. C,, ~ Dec. 2U, lilr4. t'jaS}llliL'V)7I, 1945. 3 p. 26 Cill. . . . .. . . _... _.- . ._ __- . -._ ... --..-.. .~.-~~~ .n, ..-TT~.T7-vr 0 5 0 0 0 0. 2
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TASTE--TESTINGl:Z ~ 81 V Fe , . . / Bio-urganic mecnamsms i : "? Ort Chemoreception'/ i ~ Z t ~ Lloyd N. Ferguson dS3ycQ1~5 : bt [s ~ California State University-Los Angeles, Los Anfleles, CA 90032 0 Guest molecules react with the normal biological constit- uents in at least six ways: (1) covalent bond formation, such as that done by the alkylating anticancer drugs and the car- cinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons; (2) chelation (1), the way in which dithiols interact in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning; (3) intercalation, the way proposed for certain cancer drugs such as adriamycin and the antibacterial acridine druRs; (4) antimetabolite action, which is really more than a reaction, being the therapeutic process exhibited by the an- tibacterial sulfa drugs and some of the anticancer drugs such as 5-fluorouracyl,and.~n Pt otresate- (5).gharge-transfer S ca(;pl~om,(Ir vfbichs5ost vidlAce Ucirt4lmstan(.ial, i.e., empirical correlations; and (6) chemoreception, the topic of /l.ia sr}irle V& __ /5001 scyamine is 15-20 times as potent "yd ecyamine. These differences may ba accounted fo Differences in distribution, owing to diffe isomer formation along the route to the re, reospecific interaction with the recept,or s bilities. In the latter case, there are at lea points between the active isomer and the re, of these is missing for the inactive isomer. A' s'
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, / 50330 7729 i TAS TE--TES T I.NG /rf EAS-U tU;rtEI1T--T E CI I N I Q L'E / ••-JOURNAL O('` EDUCATIO\AL MEASUtlI:MENT ' - i vOLUM (: t I, NO. I C,5~e~4, SPRING 1974 j i A SHORT-FORM MEASURE OF TIEI; EXPANDED ~: S L-'Y,rN-DIMENSIONAL S L:MA.NTIC S~'AC,L•.- •y.. . ~ r r . . . , .. . ~ . . . . : ; 1e n ~ - /Ve.'f f ./G (f . `fi ...•:,.:..::. ALLAN L. LaVO1E AND P. M. BF•NTLER' University ojCa!ifornia. Los i1 ngcles A short-form measure of an expanded seven-dimcnsional semantic di(Terential was dc,•eloped. The shorter scales were shown to correlate highly with the longer scales, and their internal consistencics were sufficiently high to warrant use in most educational settings. , 1 The semantic differcntial technique has been widely used in educational settings for such diverse purposes as program evaluation, attitude asscssmcnt, and self-esteem measurement. Traditionally, researchers have used the three dimensions of Evaluation (E), Potency (I'), and Activity (A). However, four additional dimcnsions have been identified (13entlcr & LaVoie, 1972): Density (numerous-sparsc), Orderliness (hap- hazard-sys(cniatic), Reality (authcntic-fakc) and Familiarity (commoni+l:,ce-exccp- tional) (DORF). These dimensions arc assessed by as many as 30 forced-choice items rer factor. For most applied purposes, this lonrer measure is too time consumin.-, both 7 i ' 4Sc~Q~U ~ I S0
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f '' ` . r. ;- t l ~ / ':~r allt k . ~~ ~` I ; ~ '~ . . , .-., . V- . I,f,e,r• ,V--• v F E N A R ~ . ~ sr:~. L. ~'~'`'~'-~~ .,~ , ~' ~~a 5 °J t' ~ + ~~ ~ FLAVUT '~'~ ~ JI~~'S EJitcJ,'ftan.latcd, anJ Itc~iscG by TIIO%tAS k:. YUltl k and I~ICOL6 DL•'LLA\CA C1R,(-G/:1GY Co•pa-ntiort Ardclr}•. Nrw )'rrk From the IutliTn lang.uat,c works of PROI-. ])lt. GIOVANNI ITINAROLI ojfouinrir SuGstonres r Sau.l1rs .f Crntrr jo Dirrr(or, 2 4 pU''~ crsity nJ:dita~~o. At,lnno. Italy IC, ' '7 8 I pu5lishcd by ~.~r rlil:~liCAL RA1I1Ri:R Co. 50330 7?09
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50330 7732. • `I'a stg::aL~It Little (Arthur D.) inc., Canabriclye, .1laas. Flavor research and food acceptance; a survey of the =cnl?~ of flavor and associated ree.earch, compiled from p:iper; pi2- sented in a series of symposia ;;iven in 195G--1:?u7. \ew Tor1:, l.einllold Pub. Coi p. 11J531 vi, 891 p. ilius., dlatiis., taLks. 21 cm. Includes bibliograpLies. 1. FInvur. 2. Food- :Analys(s. '1'\G.I l.L;;3 Libriu•y of Cun;;rcss / t;~ ~/.10,
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50330 7738 76 V Me TOBACCO--SMOKING--TASTE TIIRES;;IOLD--I:FFECT/TASTE--TESTINt;/ ., RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET 76 V Me Meiselman, H. L. (U. S. Army Natick Labs., Natick, Mass., U.rSZ) PSYCHOLOGY OF TASTE. Cereal Foods World 21 (No. 2) 52-58 (1976) (in English) ~ Mentions smoking. ~I~ uch of the rescarch in taste psychology has focused on the ~question of what qualities exist in taste. The issue of qualities and thcir !coding has dominatcd both +psychological and physiological rescarch in taste for some years. It has +also affectcd the approach to studies of taste intcnsity, because of the Ichoice of stimuli. In addition, interest hin the taste process withi n the context of catins and drinking has led to ~ continuing rescarch in events which ~ occur a; the rca:lt of continucd stumulation (aduptation). and ctrnts 1which occur as the result of mixine of ~difltrcnt stimuli. This bricf re%ie%%• ~.vill dcal with the issues of yualit% • and l intensity, and then with the issues of mixtures and adaptation. Sonie brief ( comments on the effects of age and ~smoking will be presented. 0~ 0 0~~~ t 5 1 6
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, µ.....-.s...~ ~'.~...~..~.~.++..>- ...~. _.~.~~~..~....._._...,....~._.~...~.~~ .-._. . .~.~.. ___• . . __....._.. _. _ ~....~.. _ ...._ _ . . _ . 50330 7708 ! 74 V Fo An individual differences analysis of , ~ ~ interdimensiojlal additivity ln percirptionA Prr•cchonhyrict IilllItidinlerisioJlal ScalL'1g'h G.ALFRED FOltS1'TIIJ- and RONALD E• S!!OR urtirersity of Ncwllantpshire, Durham. New llampthire 0J824 19 74. 1'or. !S, Au. 1. Sd.{•367 Comparatire judgments of the dissimilarity between schematic faces varying on 1, 4, 7, or 10 binary attributes were obtained under two instructional sets. Using the Tucker-Messick procedure, three sutqtroups of like-perceiving Ss were isolated and the nature of cue-utilization by each described. Perceptual independence of attributes was demonstrated both within and between instructional sets for Subtroup 1 anci within instructional sets for Subgroup 2. The Subgroup 3 results indicatcd an"•, interaction of the attributes. Data from the Shor cognitive elements test differentially characterized Subgroups 1 and 2. but did not uniquely characterize Ss requiring more complex models for the tombination of attributes. The study illustrates the possible usefulness of an individual differences spproach to the study of selectrve attention and tnformation processing. d, 2_ ~OK ~~o y F~r.phasi s.phasis by many perceptual theorists (e.g., Gibson, interdimensional additivi hypothesis for about half of 1966. 1969; Garner, 1970) that perception involves an his Ss. This further emphasized the need for an actt.e search for and selection of distir.etive features of a individual differences approach for a careful stimutus array has kd to a rapidly increasing litcraturc- examination of the modcl. on arocessinf; information frottt multidimensional Takinz into account these concerns, the present studv• r- r.w-F°•r~'+J~v~=~,f~sxt~ : At.tL ~Jf~ly1 l L9,G?.~,[~{~c :u,~l -r><cR ac. l~•¢Qu,ht .i ~a~a3iacx,Llf ~Lh'C -1n~ tlLlCltSl'Q4.~'7~ '
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0 50330 7737 I , I ,. , 1 \ TASTE--TESTINN- ; SENSORY PRnCr.SSES 1, 150-162 (1976) ~_ Temporal Properties of the Human Taste System' DONALD H. MCBUR\EY Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 Received May 17, 1976 M attempt to apply linear systems methods to the temporal properties of the human taste _• system is described. The percentage modulation in concentration required to detect a tluctu- ation in intensity was measured as a function of frequency of modulation. Both a sine-wave and a square-wave input were.used: The sensitivity of the taste system at its maximum• and ' also at the low frequencies, was greater than expected from previous sv ork based on classical methodology. The sensitivity of the taste system to the various qualities was• in decrcasing order, salty, sweet, sour• and bitter. The taste system is insensitive to frrquencies abuvc ~, about 5 1lz. Except for bitter, representatives of the various taste qualities yielded similai functions within qualities. Describing the spatial and temporal properties of a sensory system is an in• tant means of characterizing the system. Thus, we can say that the ear is prc nently a temporal frequency analyzer. The visual system, on the other han less sensitive to temnoral properties of the stimulus, but is very good at sV r i 0 ~ 0 0 0 0 freituetty 6-alylis. .9orcover, the temporal properties of a system provid ~ • - • ...,.t ......t..,.:,. _. . . _.... ,
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c Q._-..r.tT o ~ ^7' .. 1J ., . .- ~.n.,.. r:
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RELATIONSHIP OF CHEMICAL.ANO ORGIIf10LEPTIC MEASUAEM•EMTS ~ 5 41Q-n 0 2 DISSERTATIONS--NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY AT RALEIGH/ PEANUTS/SENSORY EVALUATION/TASTE--TESTING/AROMA/XKRY®RADCI8 FL.AVORANTS--TASTE-TESTING/ pr CHINTAHA OUPADISSAKOON ~ A thesis suDaitted to the Graduate Faculty of North Carolina State Universtqr at Raleigh in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor' of Philosophy OF RAN AND ROASTED PEANUTS DEPARTMENT CF FOOD SCILICE RALEIGH 1980
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' ,50330,7744 1 ' TASTE--TESTING/ 0 Candy and Snack Industry 1976, 28-33(1976) !9 p re in podtcUsthi , EJ© ;~-)_Cc~V0 Rj Op- by Howard R. Moskowitz lP~:'~ A[f~ ~~~'• ~A a 0 and Vincent Toscan r/ C~ tj ~ tl ~,Q t~y d t~ `J ~ P~ ~J o acce~~~~~~9~ p t•'t .~.?
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i - ,;t , -~-~----- --------------------r--._. 50330 7707 :fiAS1_`h-~-TEST-L'iG f ;' _ AKLD.ICAN PHILOSOP1nCGL QVARTLRLY l. Volumc t t, 1'umbcr 3, July 1974 q~ 1 y~°~ ~ 1% V F;<1 , .~ a+ VII. UNIVERSALIZABILITY AND JUDGMENTS OF 'i'ASTE/ . ~`JS . 0ifiHN rISHER CI/ ~E of the constantly recurring assumptions in languages, it can imply both criticism and pcr- O philosophical aesthetics is the hunch that, as ccption, standards and enthusiasm, subjcctive Edmund Burke put it, the standard of taste is like sensitivities, and objective order, and can apply the standard of reason, the same in all human both to those who know not only ,%•hat thcy like utatures. Whenever this sort of assumption is but a:so why they like it, and those who know only operative in evcn the most peripheral way, what ihe masses in their cul.ure like or choose. philosophers explore the possibility of developing There is nothing pejorative about labc!ing a ' ~ itt fki jdudltiid l thi some vgorous srucureor mangugmen, or, wor as mu-meannge soong ase mcanngs- :~ more impressive language, explore the logic of can be sorted and distinguished (then it becomes taste. There arc many puzzles associated with the "rich" not "ambiguous"). The test is a simple logic of taste, only one of which this paper will one: Do. the meanings lead to disputes? A look attempt to unravel.l at "taste" clearly shows that it has not been a lt is, I think, part of the heritage of the era of rich term but a muddled one, giving rise to hiloso iti~istic h that taste appcars so seldom numerous uarrcls es cciall in t 'te discussion y p p q , p y . --- --~• -----r-••-- n7/~ ~SQO0 .U2
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, t 50330 7742 i : . . ,. w.... 79 V Hi TASTE--TESTING• Z l.ebcnsm. Unlcrc-Forsch. 16I,151--I56 (1976) Gcdankcn zatn Qualifikattotltitn.>I(lstab (13Q) fiir Priif- personenat:hanti desTetradetitcstcs nach Renner ttt>;d 6Zii.nier Manfred Miller, t{cnricttc Schmidt• und Gcrhard Wildhrctt ~ Milchwicscn.chartlichcs Institut dcr Tcchnischcn Unisrrsitat Miinchcn in Wcihcnctcphan, O-RI)50 W'cihcnstephan V/T?toughts about the Quaiification of As,scssors for Srnsory Testing Summary. On the occasion of a storage test in order to cti•aluatc the tightncss of milk packing materials to rcrtiuating flavours by scnsory analysis the 'statistical method for judging the conccrn-Yt assrssors rccc~ntmcnctcd . by ROmcr and Renner was arltlicd. 1Vc gained the cxrcriencc, that this mrthod allows no statement about the assessor's sensory ability at all, hut merely fixcs ' his order of rrcccdcncc in a pancl as to his ahility to realicc sensory ditTerrnccs . in the scope of one slx.cial problcm. The mentioned statistical procedure cannot substitutc a selection of assessors aimed at the subject of the following , sensory analysis. , . . ~ 'F 05non-n 2 1 52 0
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~~ S I r t~ U 0 U S C. 0~r') Cv 06 f~7 I.+J h l1lS'.l . • ~. Tf-) lU~v "L .n ' r.~LIt~8.7!~w9•+b8y. r i( OSLL 0££OS
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i VARIAN!,'I:/TASTL-,'-TESTING1 ?1EASURI:*IEidT•--TECIINfQL',:/ ~ ~ r) Peceptual and hfolur Strllt, 1974, i0U, 279-282. Q I'ercepwal and Motor Si:ills li 1 •~.,.,.. 74 V He FIVE HORSI?D1fiN OF TI-iE ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE: A STUDY IN" JUDGisiGNTAL IiIASt LT•SLlli D1I?LAhfED We•Fgl,t sr.rte Uuirertity, Daytorr Sumurary-An analysis of variance procc•dure was applied to the tesults of the Dressaf;e eompetition at the 1972 Olympie Games to investigate two sourees of bias which euuld arise in human judgments. Analyscs showed signifi- cant eant differences in the average ratings of the competitors by the five jud&.,s in- dicating possible differences in jud;;mental standards. A significant interaction between country of competitor and judge was found when the results of the second round of performance by the Russian and \Vest German teams were com- pared. + Much controversy has centered around the 1972 Olympic games in 1\funich,, ranging from a criticism of the German police for their handling , of the murder of the Israeli athletes to the "bias" exhibited by judges in a variety of events where scores and medals were awarded on the basis of human judgments rather than on "objective" criteria such as heighr, distance or speed. Of particular interest to psychology are the various problems surrounding the use of human judgments in evaluating compctitors. It appears that the . ~ . O~04 0 0 0 .~ I y I I
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i , 50330 7710 1 tTASTR--TF..STTVr,/; ~r<rrru To »tr: cutrok, J. !'hrrrm: 1'hnrmrrc•, 1975. 30, 531 -3 A `-~ ' Lr•,TTrR TO THE EDITOR 78 v ~a Lipophilicity and bittcr tastc (1978) commcntcd on thc 'l.ow stcrcoapcciticity of (1978) is at vari;uicc with this conclu.ion. Thus although R. J. GARDN£R, Group R&D Laboratory, llarp La;cr Lrd., Afnrmr Park, nlron, ltarlrs GU34 2f'.S. U;K. . ... , , • In a reccnt communication, Schobcr, Itwvers ,F Smith 1•5 A apart. I lowcvcr, the work of Schober & others be of sibnificancc in tile perception of a bitter taste and, arc furthcr apart than the modct proposes. Obscrvatior•s perhaps, of flavours in gcneral. on the structures of bitter sucar analogucs (Birch & 1-ee, The range of compound types which induce the 1976) also do not support tile Kubota & Kubo (1969) perccption of bitterness in man is wide and includes model. One explanation fur this clifTerence lics in the : quinine taste rcceptors~ In tile ligh.t of thcir ob,crva- • thc. quinincs studied have appropriate a.ccptor and tionsiwould liketoraiscanumhcrof point,which may donor groups (quinucli.tine N and C9 hydrocyl), they - -1 alkaloids (Scholxr & others, 197R), amino acids and possibility that there is more than one type of receptor. peptidcs (rcvic++•cd by Guicoc & Solms, 1976), poly- The fact that many people cannot taste pL•cnylthio- phcnoliccompouncls (1(orowrtz.C Gcntili, 190, C;aki, carbamidc, btrt can tasto other bitter compounds, docs Kamiya.C Konishi, 1977), various compounds and their imply the cxi.tcnce of at least two bittcr receptor sites o . , .~ 1969; Atolyneux & Cc,lin,. 1969; Gicnapp ,C Schrodcr, Evcn if there are a numb^_r of different receptor site5,'' 1975)and tcrpcnes(Kubota & Kubo, 19G9). The physical the observation (Kubota .F Kuht,, 19ti')) that the pre- analo~!uci derived from Ilumnlrrs hipuAus L. (Whitcar (Price & flcsimonc 1977). proccsscs oecurring svhcn man pcrccivcs agivon taste scncc of an inrra-molccular hy-dro;en bond corrclatcs . (or odour) arc largely unknown, but, in general terms, with bitterness is puzzling from tile saructural pcint of , ~ some interaction behvicen the tastant and a receptor- view; i.e. such a bond has to be broken for interaction " site seems likcly. Although a'bittcr-sa,.itivc' prot i;t with the rcceptor sitc. Thc cncrgics involvcd arc not . .__ . . .. . . . , ... .. . ~ 0SQA0 0 2 1 4 578
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, 50330 7752 ! TqSTF-_TFSTT*7r./ 78 V Tn Tntprnattnnal f1r,,inizr.tinn fnr Stnndardi7attnn (TSn) Tntnrnatinnal StandaH, 5401/1 /Sensory analysis - Vocabulary - Part I First edition - 1977•07•01 Analyse sensorielle - VocabuiairA - Partie I Premidre ddition -1977-07-01 UDC/CDU 641 : 159.933/.934 : 001.4 Ref. No./Ref. no : ISO 5492/1-1977 (E/; Descriptors : sensory analysis, vocabutary/Descripteurt : analyse sensoriette. vocabutaire. Price based on 5 pp)es/Pria bas6 sur 5 0. 0 5 0 0 .0 0 2
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i i 50330 7717 } 81 V HA TASTk~'YLSTING/SENSkS AND SkNSATIONj Likes and dislikes, and preferences in man: methodological and other considerations Roland Harper Preferenca & Ch',~emorec1eption p• /.ZS-13C (yjf~ ?/ Department of Food Science. University of Reedin9. UK. Nedrnics has beacime a majcoc topic eonaerning man•s reacticn to taste ard odour stinuli. Attent.ion is limited here to the respnnse to model syatems, datirq bac9c to the 1420's rather than to actuai foods (meal oarpo- r8nts) . liawewer,, due- tloooint, is taken of the ext.ensiva questiQUuire i: i•;`sttHiea bf the a0peal of different foods by Peryan et al(1960). t+b sinqle eisaeu=s - hedanic response, prefete+nos, onnsunptl.an or wasts - sdequately oovers responses to foods. 8tudies in mcdal systems reveal .ans of the ispoctmyt factors rhidt siust be taken into ao=ait. 2bees inclu3e the nature of the particular stimulus, oonsistenc.y of resyxnge, threshol.d value stSaulus aonoentration, atd individual and qro.p differerces, sane biological atd saee lasrned, ineludilg ttnee essentially social in aciqin. Zlvae ard other asQects ea+m disaussed in taans o[ sel.cted Operumntal data on tastes aod adours.
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r 50330 7736 ~. 76 V Ma _Dtscfi. med. Wschr._Ql_I1976), 703-70g _ corg tcme Verlag, Stuttgart r , Unterschiedliche Geschmacksbewertung von Sffl3ungs- mitteln durch norm- und ubergewichtige Probanden A. Mathieu, H. Liebermeister, P. Orlik und M. W. Wagner Evangelistf+es Fliedner•Krankenhaus Neunkircften/Saar und Psydtologisches Institut der Univenirdt dcs Saarlandes Das Geschnlacksempfinden von 20 adiposen und 20 normalgewichtigen stationaren Patienten wurde anhand wdfsrigcr Losun;en von Saccharose und drei synthctischen Sii(sungsmittcln ~ctcstet. Die Probandcn niuSten Yon jeder LOSUng Zelln verscllledenC Geschmacl:squalltztcn bewerten. _.t1-,1•,-i fanden sich zum Teil hochsignifikante Unterschiede in der Differences in taste assessment of sja~~e tt by normal and os•er- wetg tt persons Taste assessment was tested in 20 obese and 20 normal-weight in-patients using watery s.olutions of saccharosc and three synthetic sweeteners. Each paticnt was asked to assess ren different taste qtialitics of each. solution on a' point scale. Thcre were highly significant differences bctwcen •.r the two groups of subjects. The difference was especially marked for the categories *syntnetic - l~ I , p-s n p n o 2 1 S I 4 .r .. , ..,.,. -.. -.;,- :.V" ,.-'`` TASTE--7ESTING/ aaxagt~ew, Nt.'f, 30. April 1976. 101. Jg. Mathiea u. a.: Cesdtmackswahrnehtnung fur 5uGungsmittcl von Fe:ricibipen _... . -
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50330 7620 I ~ ttt,c1ut'tl [3t:•tt; of Stt•Ci: a t71-sW/(uclrLku~c~~LC,c. XX MeC7-78 S.P. ,o Uic~ slrukiurcllc Gru[>ICltaa~- c des SiiB-GcSCI)[[t~iclcs [)itc Suchr n:,ch kahtricn:umcn Sii(.i%ttdfcn auf Sii[ikraftrztt .•.~rccncn" und auch Vcr- (I1. the dcn n5hrcntlcn tmd auclt sun.t allcrmcincrungcn iihcr Struktur/Gc- vnn der Luxu-sEc,cll,chaft mit tuicr- uhmackszu.:unntcnh:in~c in ntachcn 12J: itiunxhtcn [:iEcnschaftcn hclcttcn allhcr- I{in Autikiincer gcgcn das I'ILnrcnhrotcin gichrarhtcn Itohrzuckcr ersctvcn, nhcr krcurrcaLicrl mit %iclcn h.kanntrn. nichl glcichccitig dic von clen elcichrn Lcutcn im ntintlcsten struklurverttancltcn Siil.l- cnggckniipftcn \1a.nccn der %ula..unes- Suhstanren, 'untl rttar ausschlirl-lich nti( [x•dinvunrcn pa.vrrcn,ollcn. hat iu ncucn solchcn. Im Fcmhh:ucn-t2;iJiuimmtnt;tsSav [:rkcnntnisscn gcfiihrt. I)ic Siili.toilc ;tuf vt:rtriin~cn diese ntarkicrtcs, Thautnatin dcr 13a%is t•on Ar)I;unincn (1)ulrin, I-n- hrurortional ihrcr S6131. ral•I vuitt Antikiir- ['ru[xrxy-2-amino-4-nitruhcniul) odcr per. 1)icsc au,gcrcichnctc l)hrrcinstim- chturicrtcn Kohlcim:t.,cr>lcillcn (C'hhtru- nttutL I:il.it %crrnnlcn, (;t1.4 dic itauhts;ich- torm) sind wohl iihcrht+it, untl manchc Na- lichc anligcnc I)ctcnninantr im Thauntatin turstoffc ttic Lakriti haF.rn iu,tatkcn Nc- cin kunl'( ,rntativc ;s Strukturmcrkmal dcs bcngc.chntack. (-ytaatnal, Sarcharin. Sii[i-Rcichtur, of (len %unecnh;thillcn .Ash;trt;ttu (i-t -na~;ut)I t.-hhcnyl;tlan)I- ttic~lcr~ihl, man alst~ tlamit ciii LcithilJ fiir tncthy(c,tcr) und tl;n ;tu% dcut Ilittcrauff .tlic nottccndi~cu (irunccn untl ihrc r;iunt- dcr Grahcfruit.rhalc erwrnnrne, intcn.iv liche Lagc crhiilt. tunt sich mit tlir>cm iu xii[tc 1\'ruhc.rcriJin tlth~thtxh;tlron sind bintlcn. %u ttcn rca);icrtuntlcn Suhsl,tnir`n Ilicht rnchr oJ.•r noch nichl (tticJrr) atul• ecll`•j"rcn tuch~lic~ tlur~tuttil~rn Saccl-a- dcr Cilt/~S-LisIt~tlic ~jt(irQh.•,Qtu~~tti- 0 rtwl4l)rr:Uc, tlir :(ul• (~rund - post rc- gcn+chrncn;tfrik;tnkchrn I'riichtrn rxlrt- aunt". -- der AILIt.X-II)huthcw von A,)C L.i /`i7~)11~ (tal3t Sacch;trttsc, 1CCnn [hStiminlC ~ ~, ~ unJ r.u~ar um_.u hcsscr. ihrrr OI (-Grurpcn, tlic das,.l)'• des (ilukt)hhors durstcllcn. durch dcn hcsurcn II-liriickrn-Akicrtnr C'I cr- cclil sind 171. Uahri "inl elcichicitig; di¢ I.iliohltilic des CicNam(ntolckiils vcrstiirkt untl stmiit dit: Vcrlcilung 181 mischcn dem tta[trigcn 1\7ilicu untl dcm tirolihilcn Re- zchtor zugtmacn des Ict.tcrcn vrrschuhcn. 1)ic sii4fctitcn Chlw -Sacch:tro.cn sind 4.11. (~•Ot=Tclrachlorxucruse: ( IO(hnaI sii(tcr als )trhri.uckcr) wtd I t,G.6'-Trichluraucrusc (2000tn:tl siil}cr ;tts Ituhrzut:kcr) 1. I':nkcr, K.J.: Nature 271.493 (1978) 2.Ilout;h. C.A.M.. I:dttartl,un, J.A.: ibid. :71, 381 (I978) 3. Sltallcnhrrgcr, IZ.S., Acrcc, T.E.: ibid. 2/6. 4;t1) (1967) 4. Kicr, 1..11.: J. Plt:unt. Sci. 6/• 1394 (1972) (Auclt fiir dic (ic+chmack>tlu:tlit,it ,.hittrr•', micsici.lZ. the aus I'rhtiden und Amino.Su- rcn Icicht.ponlancnl~IrLcnJ.u I)ikctopilvr- a/inc Velkn, t%irJ rinr ;ut. 1\',i„cr>totf- ~. briickcn-l)nmorrn nwl _%F ............. ...
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, ..r...•_.~ , 50330 7746 ~ t .! , ;. { Amcricao ~bumnl of rspcholoq l~! 84, No. 3 (5;). Ci5?.) ' l7"-'t' r & -[ CG d- Trrr SWEETNESS AND PLEASANTNESS OF ~~GARS liownrd R. Moskowitz Pic,nrerirg ResrarcJ, Laboratory, U.S. Arn, y Natick Laboratories I slopc between .3 and.5. Nine ccpcriments were run to assess the relation between sweetness, pleasant- ness, and the cnncentratiuns of 43 sugars. A power function adequately related the snectness, S, of ninst sugars to lheir cuncrntration, C: S~ kC'•, 'where the intercept k is a measure of relative mectness. The avere ce es- poncnt is abonrt 1.3, and tire results sugust that the large ranF^ of relative swcetncss across sugars is cornelatc,l %%ith difFerences in molecular structure. The pleasantness of sugars was not monotonic with concentration but sys- tematically departed frcnn lincaritp at high concentrations. Pleasantness as a functiun of swcctnccs %%•as roughly lincar in log-log c•oordinatcs, with a p~nO0 ' 0 2 1 § 2 4 t,
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6 ~ . 4 . . ~ . ?t .. ~I ..~ . a. . . ~. . 0. 0 ", WOT -i-ajdr u,,td ~~;~ -° 4 vy~~ ~- ost~ pun .iopD jo voi ~.ro~;J3,antrl I fy S-? (.inLO .rauz+aW ~:~Aa~~se~-e~sey±* . 1 .. . . . ..Ct,;-.... f . - . _" ^_~ 1. ~ IhLL o££OS
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I St7-78 4.TASTE-=TESTING/'k, : 50330 7759 ~` S.P. Stanford Research Instititte, Business Intelligence ProRram (SRI) SENSORY EVALUATION OF 'C0MSUMF.R'PviODUCTS By Linda Nutley - ' 1976 Stanflord Research Institute r LongRange Planning Service
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l I r ~ 50330 7721 : I ; SERENDIPITY BEi'.RY/SYNTliETIC S(dEETI;NERS/.'OOD=-FLAVORANTS/TP.OI'ICAL PLANTS/ LICORICE/GLYCYRRIIIZIN/FLAVORANTS /TASTE--TESTINC'/FRUCTOSE /GLUCOSL--• IGOyE:RASE/ SYRUPS, CORN/SENSES AND SENSATIO`I/H0*lEY/,'rAPLE SYRUP/SACCTIARIN/I'ROTI:INS, PLA;vT/ TOXICOLOGY--FOOD FLAVORANTS/1tIRACLE FRUIT/.DIHYDROCHALCOVES/KATEMFE/ SYMPOSIIJ61: SWEETENERS 2 cEdited by Ceorge E. inslett, Ph.D. PDDL Chief, Cereal Properties 1 C. Laboratory, Northern Regiona! TP 370 In 1974 r ~ ,. ~ Research Laboratory, ARS, USDA, Peoria, Illinois QTDr,nT, L /' ... 1i - . ., v~ur• ~ lli• ~{'f TAHIE AV: r-U~ :.1, %Q0a -1 I;•ac ce: 'IpAny, 1: ic. ~ ~ ~1A C~i - "6 Yr~~.D t 7;2 - r t -.. . ... . ., .- •. A-. _ . _.. _ r,---~ _._ .. .._.-......._.•.._ . _-- • --..•.~.. _ .,-.--_ . _ ~ . - . ,. _ . .-....r-r.. ..,..- ~ . ,..... t - ...-~,- .~- - ,. Q~ l7 a n 0 2 1 4 99
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i 50330 7740 J 'CONSUMER PREFERENCE/TASTE--TESTING% 0D0RS--MEASUREMENT/OLFACTION/ ` ' L,'/r~-a -Jur-c Search No. 71 qNSORY EVALUATION/ I MeA2 -81 S.P, 1 I METHODS FOR W(ENSORY EVALUATIONS (RJR-81-22) ~ Prepared by Mary Jane Pugh July 27 1981 , -~ Files: I. Psychological Abstracts (1977 - June, 1981) II. FSTA (1969 - July, 1981) qd`~y0264 `~y : I• psychol ogical Abstracts ogical Abstracts II• Food Science and Technol ir~k.~ ~ t~ - ~I L ~.4'Ft 5 a
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50330 7 735 ~, -µPSYC1IQ*tETRICSCSENSI.S ANJ}_ SIaISAxION/TI:STING/TAS'}~E--.;fi~STING/ : ~ ~ w TAS'fE--PSYCIiOLOGICAL4I'RINCIPLE/VISION/ RE~~r50~ ~ Y P~~~ ~ r,. . . 6. ~-.4 ~ ,~ V-: The New Psychophysics LA.IVRENCE E. MARKS John B. I'ierca Foundation LaLoratonj and Department of Psychology Yale University Ncw Ifauen, Connecticut -----~ ~, ACADEMIC PRI:SS New York and I..otjdon 1974 A Su6sidiary of Ilarcourt Bracc jocanovicA, 1'uLlishcrs . ~Il ci ,PY
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t:._....,~:;.._..c:_...: _..~... z. ~...~.... ,* F, . . 0. .0 0. ..o .. S :.. ..... . _ ... ( hSLL OfEOS
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50330 7756 ,.,,..~. -Ta f;te..t.-:sting. 1 Society of Chemical Industry, London. 0ver.~e-fs Srot1on. Dlolecitlur stru"ture and on;cwoleptic. quality; compri>::);; p1pe1•5 read r,t a symposituii orgnni~c:1 by 111;3 0vei-t, Scctioii l;eld in (ieneva, °-.3 ll,iy, 1'J;7. l.ondoi), \ov 1 c:rl: Di„cmilla7l, M7. 121 p. )llus. 22 cm. (S. C. I. mono;rnl,h no. 1) Inclurles biblto;;ranhical references. 1. Stervoc•heniistry. 2. Odors. i. Title. (S(rrics: Societj o Chemical Industry, London. S. C. I. monograph, uv. 1) QI}17OM5G 1957 , ~ B41.G A ,riS-;l-li Imwa. State Coll. Libr. • for Library of Cougres At 4~oo no,:~ 1 63 4
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~- 30 7733 ~' 3 ;. i -`•-_------- --- PSYCHO*tETRIC MHODS/ TASTE--TESTING/ 50 t 74 V Ma RELATIONS L'I:'I'WI:EW FACTOR ANALYSIS r1wD t ~ •i , ":, are explained. Dfctric and nonmctric versions of both modcls are described in t l Tbe fundamental rclations brt.vicen muttidimensional scaling and factor analysis P,." krJyIi.J Grtftfiw MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING 3 1914. 1'd• tll, Ao• 1. SOS-S16 ~ ~ ROBEKT C. IhcCALLUb1 i Unirtrsit y o/ lllinois t terms of type of data analyzed, assumptions made, objectives, computational I procedures, geometric representations of data and solutions, and psycholo;ical meaning of results..«-hat is commonly taken to be a fundamental identity betw•ccn the metric versions of tl:e ta•o'modcts is shown to be merely the em- ployment of the same theorems. The strongest relations between the tech- niques are found to lie in the realm of individual differences models for multi- dimensional scaling. Several such models are presented and are shoua to represent the application of the logic of factor analysis to the substance of arultrdr.ncnsional scahng. ~ p w ,LD ,1 ~ rJ 7~ y methodologically. Some of the relations be- similarity betiveen pairs of objects. Torgerson :, tween them are elear, whereas others are (1955) described many different experir.tcntal j rather nebulous. This paper explores the par- procedures that have been proposed and em- tieular connections between them and by ployed to obtain measures oi perccived simi- so doing elariFies the gene,~al,,•~clCttion0 hiuS,.:..lf•~itu.a Two of the most widely use'd psychometric be such thin;s as physical objects, psycho- models, multidimensional scaling and factor physical stintuli, or abstract concepts. 'Most analysis, appear to be related lo^ically and often the data are estimates of the perceived t..~.r~~~-.~. - :.:. .-. . -. . , I
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50330 7757 • . ! I ! •.•• . . . t vYa1 ..., . ~ 50 Tasto:_+.osting.. ~ I.q . ..~ ..... RJ'U+`. .•a ..w^aIL1:'S a . '.~..~ d. Rj1 .. n ».~ ~~;.z~~ w, °~~ ry- ,..... .Q.• .$,. ~..:,0.. ~.. ~,: .~...,'... ~....~~'., ~
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?1 q U 0 C? 5 0. C) tZ?'i irs'_' =~+1 r ~:.. ~. f . s ilul I s a:l~'9-4 5gy . I h9LL OE£OS
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I , I _ .....- . . .~..___~ .., ...._..~, ~ 50330 7761 ' Q - . 1?3 St ODOaS---PSYCHOLOGY/OLFAC7I0N/PSYCiIOLOCY, PHYSIOr,GGICAL/S'~1rLI,J ' 1951 rrYCHO*iF.TRIC METiIODS/BERAVOF:TA~.~ ~. SCIE4CEIZ:~'i:h.w-7ES2Xhsn.+f Mt`TIVATION/SErISES-AtiD SENSE Ot;GI1NS/Tti..c'"l::--='FY.`'+IdLO.'.`Y/P'riYSI0LOG1/ PDDL HancliDodk of . ~ EXPERlMENTAL=' . 4~~ PsY.HOLOGY .~.:~s. fdited by „ S. S. STEVENS trof.uor of Psychoio9r Diredor cl th. Piycholoqicot lo5orotwies Horvard Univas?l JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC. • NEW YORK . 4 01 s - ' ,- .; • LONDON • SYDNEY ,,.,r,..,,.~ _....~...,,,,..r..._
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t 50330 ~77b`i ~ ...._.._ ,._~~.....v.... .... _..- _. _. =,~;<~_+__...__... ~ .._ . ~.._:1:.._..r.... _,. ._ -~.._...._..,...d..~ ...~.:.......::~.~.. Xx we2 I I - ~t.. . .. . . ..+.~.~.ai ~... .. ~1 i•.._>a.4~.). ('a... L•..a.l S'- 4. •,ij
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O O O O S O U S 0_ 4 r n-. tly 'pel;; OZu'•q `~~~~1 1 / i. .{•atf~'~ ;_'~:J:ty :~ct.";i.~.Y,~ ::1 ~`.l.kri <".v~ (i'i'ti ::t/ja ;wr,; .. ` . ~a._`•. ' ~'..~:~ ... •~~1.~~..~~ `..... i~.+ a.~_'.r.:,~'1~~ri~~ ;.' :ti~ s~~ i~~ ,j.a 9• •.--~~ t~.~y~r ..{ J ,j CI BhLL OEEOS "
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~ TS ~ F240 ~.'....•.,.... ~ .... ...._ .: . ._ .., r ..~.. . , .......viji.n ~:. • ,. . .
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, 50330 7768 .~ FOOD--NUTRITIQN/VITA.'iIN A/CERFAI, GRAIa/SE"1SOP,Y P>rRCEPTIOK/TASTE--TES--I ALCOHOLISM/FO:D••-:EGULATIOi7S:DIET A*~i) DiSF.ASE/STRFSS~ R S`iFT,L/ Nra`ion in  . rfi,~nsito®n ~ ` QP s 141 Wh 1978 Proceedings Western Hemisphere Nutrition Congress V Edited by Philip L. White, Sc.D. Director, Department of Foods & Nutrition American Medical Association and Nancy Selvey, R.D. Nutritionist, Department of Foods & Nutrition Am rican Medica1 Association
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{ ~ .;Yl ~. t } r: U't. t,:)^.1 u lt .. .. . . L.. ,'.. l V i.~ .ii:;..;J .... ..... ._ : , .. ,.,. _...._... t... .... ....._:~a-,/.'a1 ...~.~.r~..:.1'... z±.. ..i`~.:c r i.'.' , .....'...~_ • . ....a~s.'.... :,..~ ~.'V.,:l U._..Y.`„~i:.i'....u:,as~. . .-_ .'r'. . . t. ~;. . . •. .. , • ~. r.. . . ,.. .. .... ..... ~_..._ `.1`.a~.,_ . .. ..~....... ~... ~..~. ....•._a.. ~. .:. . .-. .. 'J.~ ..~.t ~~,.... _.......... ~_ ....~..t .... .. ~.t.yL7~t'b c~ttA al£ ux 1 , 99LL OEEOS
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1 S 5 •4207 upntg Q,:„- 7 C u 0 U S Q. O+lz'L • E ,:IT. ELLL OEEOS _ _ . - . ~.f..~ w
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50330 7753 J TASTE--TESTING/..` Dev. Food Sci. 1979, 2 (Proc. Int. Congr. Food Sci. Technology, 5th, 1978)360-6 81 V Sh c 3. Taste and Chemical Structure 3.1 Structural Basis of Taste Substances R. S. Sballenberger' During the past decade there have been remarkable developments in our knowledge-of the interrelation between structure and taste activity. Many of the taste-activity relationships that have evolved are centered about the unidimensional AH,B theory of sweet taste introduced by my- self and T. E. Acree') in 1967 and expanded by Kier=) in 1972 to include a third component. The third component now seems to be necessary for intense sweetness or whenever AH,B needs to be "activated" through a hydrophobic inter- action'). It is not, however, prerequisite for sweet taste whereas the AH,B nnit is prerequisite. Perhaps the most general approach to the relation between structure and taste quality is to consider the structural dimensions required of com- pounds needed to elicit the sensation. These are summarized in Table 1. The sour taste is primarily a function of the hvdroaen ion. Any substance 0 5 ~~0~0 z t.a~ ~
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.~+..I4~ . .. . . . .._ ~~....~..-~ ..~..+~~..~.•_Y.....~~•..~~.a.._._i__~,.~._ .~.._._.. _._. ._. .... ~~ ~ y ~ - ..__ 50330 7771 ) TASTE--TESTIHG--~0tGARFTTES7 , 73 V Ay CIGARETTES--TASTE-TESTItiG/ RJR CLASS NO. PAM.PHLI:T 73 V Ay Ay, J. ; Stur, D. (Metropolitan Food Inspection, Cheia. Anal. Inst., Budapest, }lung.) ELABO~;TION OF A "TASTE" POINT SCORING RATING FOP, CICARETTES. *(Degusztacios pontozorendszer kidolgozasa cigaretta biralathoz.)* Elelmiszervizsgalati Kc:.1em. 26 (No. 2) 105-109 (1970) (in Hungarian with Complete EnElish Translaticn) r ~ 4 f ^'~-.~.~...^ . . . . 0 5 0' 0 0 0 :2 1 5 4 9
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50330 7769 j I , 78 V Wr 127 Paper No. 15 C1)~iJ,y~,~7/-.7 3 ~~f'_ll 7y,z ~ r- - •, .. TASTE--TFS ' ~ TINGfy - t SENSORY TESTING AS A MANAGEMENT TOOL .'!~. . J.J. WREN Watney Mann & Truman Brewers Limitcd, Mortlake In the third paper of this Symposium Dr. Muller described his survey of the uses of sensory quality control in our industries and showed admirable restraint by not expressing a pcrsonai opinion about the findings. However, I would like to preface the present paper with three personal opinions. Generally I would like managers involved in quality control (i) to use more sensory testing. (ii) to use methods of sensory testing more appropriate to their needs and (iii) to recognise the excellent value-for-money that can be obtained from sensory testing. As this is the last paper in the Symposium I would like it to buikd a bridge leading back to work for those whose jobs are concerned with quality control. Howcver, I hope that it will also offer some useful information to those from research departments, because there is often a wide gap between what research papers say about sensory methods and what happens in everyday production. Just as the person in quality eontroheedsto I~arn6t~he riqF~t a~thods of sensory testing for a specific purpose, sAe f~*rso~n r sear nAs t6 develop approaches and methods that are truly retevant to everyday human situations.
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/ 50330 7772 cipretteS* TS ' 2240 ' S `" ri'ivr.; arid ritra. cr:a. lJ`1, ~ll.'.l.l~ ... ..0 .s .0..o..0 ..0.•2..i .S .: 5 .o... .
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: s 81 V Stl TASTE--TESTING ~ Appetite 1981, 2, 127-136 7-136 Age-related Changes in Flavor Perception D. A. STEVENS Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts ~ ~ d H T L AVVLESS an . . . U.S. Army Natick Research and Development Command \ . Three groups of subjects, aged 18-25 years (Young), 36-45 years (Middle) and 56-65 years (Old) judged the similarity of pairs of pureed fruits and vegetables and rated the pur6es on 10 attribute scales. Multidimensional scaling of the similarity judgments produced four-dimensional solutions for each age group. Dimensions associated with tactile and texture attributes were found for each group. An hedonic dimension was indicated for Young and Middle groups, but sweetness ratings correlated with that dimension only for the Young group. Intensity was an mpoLtant~ lmen ion or th. Old grot~p only. In general, the Young rated all the (odi is h~.iing mo bittR flav~r afsd sharpi:r character than did the older ones. As a control, subjects also rated the similarities of foods by names only. Analysis of iai' ' / A l i l: ........e .nai. . e ero ..a e 1... e... . f y~y -3 .
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/ w J 50330 7776'. ~ ~1 r•n• / ..V .., .,..-,, - ~1-MENTHOL/S[,IEETFNERS/FnOD--FLAVORANTS/r^LAVORANTS--MEASUREMENTS/ WESTVIEW SPECIAL STUDIES IN SC,CENCE AND TECHNOLOGY/ ~ TP 958 Ap 1978 ERlestviettv Siieciat Stcsdies 05 0 0 0 p ~n P^sc,T Wd Technol0gy FLAVOR,. ~~T d (~~ ~t!y.,~^, F•~ l ~v° ~ v. 4v .~1~ li o ~ J e~~~ ~. 9 G1 Gl L C n~~ ~ J ~ ~ IRC., PCOceeCiingS of the A~'tl~E~Y D. ~.ettle Gt ;var Cyral;,QSun, y '1977 Mn Apt i :l.dt : s
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50330 7'143 1 ~ t/ Pcrceptuat c,~ail~es in taste mixtures ~ "a----Perceptior~y P^vci;ooilv-lcs .11 257-2G2 (197~) , t ..,......,......,,.... ~ ..... arch T -nOrZtorv 6 / L_TSr:,fmy :`aUc:: L~tiaratoriesl a_cr,•'.•fass. 017G0 v ' J ) i/ ~ . cf r-r, "unblended•" or "c!ista.^.;;" tsste, in which the components alternnted in In Experiment 1 16 O; judged the attemptin,, to dosnin:tte the l;stc hercept. Su•ee. mixed k ich citLcr sour or l;itter taste intensity of both simple solutions blendccr in timost all proJ»r tions. The "flavor" of sw'eetrn.•ss in mixtures diffcred and mixtures by the techrtique of Itom that of sir.tple svr,ar stveetnes,, su,^,Qestiu- .. that the {,resence of a:econd rr.at:ritude estimation. In three ta.5te modifi.:d the quaitative aspect of sw.•ti.tste:.s.'I'he nw^nitude of r.h:rr;e in difterent sessions,qlucoseand fructose iweetncss quality d.•(`endcd ai>on the sugi~r being ratcd, and upon the quality were separatcly mixed v;ith tiaCl, and iniensity of the second, or rnodifyin;, taste. citric acid, and quinine sulfzte, - -• . . trsp.ctieeJY. Tab1e 1 presents the reduction ttias not equal for the two cumltonents, alti:ou;h tl:c over2l! (tota!} ' taste intensity of the r.uxture appeared to be aap ro::irnatety 50% of the sunt of Experiment 1 tlte inlensitics of the Lnmixcd components. ;M.ixtures of swelst and salt developed Intensity of T: ste 60 gave subjective judoments of t'^e- perceived nLgnitude. In each study stimulus solutions were prepared from reagent-gYade chemicals (either Fisher or Sigma Chemica! Corp.), mixed on a weight!volurne basis with distilled and deionized water. Glucose (dex=o-e) r Ttuee s4tdies were conducted to quantify fi»:rceptual changes that occur when and fructose were used as the sweet sapid chen+icals are tasted in rr:i::ture solutior.t.''he priraary effect when mixing substances, NaCI as the salty stimulus, sweetness (<~tucuse or iructo;.e) vritlr salt (NaCI), sour (citric acid), or bitter citric acid as the sour stimulus, and (quinine su9fate) was to reduce the intetLsity of each t.-ste in the mixture. The quu>;ne sulfate as the bitter stimulus. 1 oS 0 0 0 a ~ t5- 2
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50330 7778 FOOD--FLAVORANTS/ `Soc. Rev. 7(2)177-84(1978) 195-200;212-218 11, APPLICATION'OF RESEARCH FINDINGS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMMERCIAL FLAVOURINGS, by W, Schlegel IY. THE INFLIIENCE OF LEGISLATION ON RESEARCH IN FLAVOR CHEMISTRY, By, W. H, Nightingale ~ yZ., THE INFLUENCE OF FLAVOUR CHEMISTRY ON CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE, i.I uzo itlac. By R. Swindells ~,IL ,,,, ~~) .
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1 L- 50330 7775 DISSERTATIONS--I:ANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY/TASTE-'TESTING-~FLAVORI TASTE--TESTING--STATISTICAL *tETHODS/FLAVORANTS--r1EASURF.MF.NTI OBJECTIVE/ 77-26,023 AYPLFTiAIIQf; Qvrdolyn '`ctcl, 19;6- ~ ' STATISfICA!. Ar'7L?C?TIM' TO FIINVM PR;7PILE XX MeF-E-404-79 ' - AMYSIS AN) AN IMATn'E FROCTh,r.E FOR . ' /INALYZLNO A TrA-1i.1Y CIASSIFIC.UION. Xansas State University, Ph.D., 1977 Statistics , ~ Xerox University PJlicroflms, Nm,rc",M,cnrq,n4„06 `~ 05nOt10•2 15~3 .
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50330 7763 _s:_ a:;~:.:.!.._. ~... ..•...~-...._...... ._.. . . :s w~. B)=s1AtrURIAI. SCTI:INCE/ TASTE--TESTIfd(;/ 75 V St Multivariat:e Behavorial Research 9(4) 501-1.9 (19 74) /GE- tiDRALITY Or.It'IULTIDIIATrINSIUNAL REPF.DSLN'I`ATT_U\'S' . SxoRiAS R. s•rEwAr.T • Uni .•,.Lxsity ef C~)r L _ ~'g~''~~.`- ArSTr:ACT ,~15 Since multidimensional rcalinb is beinf; used for th,? dimensionalization 47 of an inctrnsingly broad variety nf object;, it is important to have techniw:cs for evaluating the resulting dimensions. The term "generality" is used to refcr to the deftree to which a dimensional representation for a set of objects can be used to account for bel;avior in a variet}• of tr.sks or situation.>. It is asserted that generality of a multidimensional cor,figgi:;atior, is its most impor- tant property and that the F;enerality of the results of an}• nultidime n,ional ::caling a:ta!y'sis is a rnattrr for entpiric::t . verification. ~ method usir.>; z factor analytic procedure in conjunction with multidimensional scaling t,o. Investigate generality is suggested and an example of its us•: is presentec:. Multidimensional scalino is a techiiique fo:• representino oh]ects ~ by points in a multidimensional spar.e. The analSsis is bmsed.-on 1Y:7 C f . - -. _ . . ... . . At. ~ . r. . . .. ._ . . . .. _ . . . ' _
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50330 7770 Little (Arthur D.) inc., Cambridge, 1llass. Flavor research 1nd foocl acceptance; mqurve.y of th^ : coh~ of flnl-oz• and associated research, comhileci froi.i papcr, pr0: sented in a serics of symEwsia given in 1:15u-195i. New Yorlc, licinhold Ptlb. Corp. I 1,1,531 vi, 391 p. illus., d(agrs., taUics. 2•4 cm. Includes bib]]o,rnnhies. 1. Flavor. 2. Fbod-Analysis. '1:1541.L58 ~ ~, , 611.072 55-12S2` Library of Contiress j . , _...._..-°- .-._ .,,,~--.....,.,.,... .. . 0 5 0 0 0 0. 2 15, 4_€3
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i 50330 7765 ~ ) .~....._ ~.~ S u..r.. _. _...~.,... ~_. .. ._..a:. _ . ~.~,.~ .... ~_...-.,is,.a.ea.w-.wa~sl,.. a[w ~.. .... ,.. , .,. . . Ti ~ •- ~,L~`~.!.•._ i..'... . ... .....'JL.:ae'L1..F..'.'..i~a :.. .~ ...~ ..~, ..~ :n: .~.. a....~.....~. .~a ..:~
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, , AMERICAN CBENICAL SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM SERIES/ FLAVORANTS--CHF.MISTRY7TASTE =TESTINC=-FLAVOR/SMET.T./ 79 III Be 50330 7777 Sweet and (3itter Ccn •ounds: S-tructurc! and Taste P.elat_ionship H:-D.` Qel itz, W. Chen, H. Jugpl, R. Treleano, H. Wieser; Institut fur Leberismittelch~en~i;:, der, Tec:hni.schen_,Uriiversitdt ' ~' t40nctien and Deutsche F orschunSsanstalt 1ur Lebensmittelchemie Nijnchen and _ J. Gasteiger, ht. t!arsili; Orc;anisch-Chemisches Institut der Technischen t,niversi tat P'aincf:en; Lichtenber5str:,i;e 4, Q-QO~Io Garching .. ts; tiwlr,~~_ _.: - . - F1 avour imprr ;s c ~si~s are conv:s;~ed by the :enses of s1e11 anl : , ,4 ...~ _..: ;-taste.' t10Sr';:WITZ (1) ,fil'ces thr fol lowin0 statwient 'regarding'the 40 , role played by thN,Y t.,-c senses: ^ "Smell is t`rri r:!.:t predr•r,inant in all;wing us to form an .... ~-, overall impression, h~~c the sense of taste plays an imGortant ,. _ . ., .
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/ 50330 7780 I MeA2-81 r / TASTE--TESTING--FLAVOR/SENSORY PERCEPTION/ S.P. Literature Search No. 7327 L CORRELATION'OFkMO ECULAR STRUCTURE WITH FLAVOR (RJR-81-42) File: Chemical Abstracts (1977 - November, 1981) 0 ® Prepared by Mary Jane Pugh December 7, 1981 A unit of the North Cerolina Department of Commerce I .,~._. 1F-( ( An Industrial Applications Center for the National Aeronautics and Spaoe Administration NA..71 \
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i WaJ+r.._. :..~r.:d./..:~.b._...._.......:-~i:.,.•~: _ M_. _ . sL'GARS---TAS'1'1:/sIdELTENE.'S/'PASTE ---TFSTIt:G/FRUCTOS;:/ ~~ _...,.. ~~u~ 7k V Mo -. . Perception b 'Psychophysics •7. 315-32(S~"-(1j-lT)7- IZdtio scales of sugar sweetness •. HOWARD R. MOSKOw7TZz •.. ; .. • n uNf vjrRim ~ rf~n Y.c R .. In a serfes of 10 experiments, groups of fudged the sK•eetr,ess of 16 sugars. The a,l1s suggest that, for all sugars except rnnosr, the intensiry ojrwKetness grows opoµYe function ojeoncentration, with exponent of a57td 1.3. The ielative Yetness of sugars xvs determined uung th njokviy end per cent by weight. With •!h rneas:ues, sucrose and fructose were e sweetest snarx 7he orda of the 7aining sugsrs in the swretntss hierarchy rs partly a function of the mearrrt of ncentrotion. The variobility of tire ignitude esrin-,ates of sweetness xcs ughly proportional to the stimutus :ticentration, supporting Webo i law intensities. The sensory ratio is not d'ueetly measured, a!though it could be measured by asking Os to estimate the relative magnitude of sweetness of sugars at the same eoncentration. This estimation procedure has proved effective in measuring sensory ratios. - . • The p:escnt study concerns the function relating sweetness to concentration of sup,ar and is designed to eompa:e the parameters of the function across different sugars. The sersory judaments of sweetness were obtained by mas--nitude estimation, a method in wnich Os assign numbers to stirnuli in, proportion to the perceived sweetness. The resulu of many sim0ar 7he sweetness of sugsn can be scaled ang two major dimensions: quality and Suyu Fa.•nDy Supr tensity little work appears to have been ' experiments on the growth of sensory intensity suggest that, for more thut two dozen perceptual continua, a power function. S='kln, relates sensoryintenaty, S, to physical intensity, 1. In 3og-log eoordinates, the power function becorrr.s a_I . line, log S= n log I+ log k, with slope a~! and intercept k. Much attention has been „ r directed to the exponent (slope n) of each "• eonti.~uum because it is a rtlativcly 119, invariant parameter across different , experiments. The exponent eharactcr.zes the transformation of stimulus ratios into sensory ratios and is independent of the absolute physical intensities of the stimulus and of the modulus of the scale chosen by 7abk 1 Stimutus Concrnt»doai I 2 3 Triou Glyc«of •200 lit if h diff i erences y y t e n qua >ne to quant nong sugars, other than a listing of the MW• 92'09 C3Hgp3 . 0.22 4.00 0.44 8.00 asa 4 16.00 1.90 ort obvious sensory effects. For example, Yentose Anb'mose •2.00 4.U0 8.00 I6.00 e sweetnest of glucose diffcrs matkedly M.w.150.13 0.13 027 0.54 1.13 _ . _ _ _ . .. _ _ ... , _.- ,.._ . . ...._.. , .,,, ..~.-~-.... _.. . ..~Rr.-••-~,.~. . ..-•-.,. . .---..-w.....~..,.--. .~ . ~ 0'S 0 0 6 .0 2 1 52 3 S 6 32.00 64.00 3.12 L.01 J : ,. 1 !
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/ BEHAVORIAL SC7.EtdCF/Tl1S'li:--TESTl'IcC; 75 V Sh Mul.tiv.Zriate EES:avorial I'cesearch 9(4)46Z-?7(i9i",) THFtk~ERCEPTI0IT OF POLITICIA~IS AI3U POLITICA.L ISSUES~;~;A_tTUL'1,ILI:1IE:tiSrC}NATa • SCALIIv G APPROACHY `J 0 RICHARll $HII~:IAR Colo . d~;:I_ t~~rsity ~~~~'-~cUS~CG°~`.5~~ ( AFSSTF.ACT The multidimensional scaling (AiDS) of both attitude statemeno and I+olitical eandid:ites in the snme multidimensional space wq3 c.onsidered to have several ramifications. First, the positioZ of the attitv6e state:nena would explicate the nature of the factorial structlire of po?iticians; second „ the underlying dimensions would demonstratc whether cvnt1i.';~tes r.:•e per- `' ceived in terms cf r-levant political dime nsio^s. Thi;d, the scalin:; .:u~Id reveal the extent of individual differences, cspecially those or,sed crr nolitic.:l affiliation;- and last, as a descriptive tool th: scr.lir.o is of i.^.terest ia i:s ._~~i. ern ndrMr` r cltbircts rr: mn iQ ht r ~1 t~ r ^ ' ~' 4 } . :, .,, ., _C .,. ,,. ., .. u:-''" '•r`:• } (~ lu . _
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050 I journal of E.Iwimrntal Psycld.n: Animal nehavior Pcoceses 1978, Yol. 4, Na 3, 267-275 -7'3VRe TASTF.--TESTI**(:=-rT,AVnD /_ Within-Compound Flavor Associations Robert A. Rescorla and Christopher L. Cunningham Yale University Two experiments used a flavor-aversion learning paradigm to detect the pres-, ence of associations within a compound of simultaneously presented flavor conditioned stimuli. Experiment 1 exposed rats to two two-element com- pounds, and then administered poison following.separatc presentation of one element of one compound. The animals were then given test exposures to the second element of each compound. Consumption of each element during this test refiected the poisoning history of the element with which it had pre-- viously been presented in compound. When one element of a compound had been poisoned, consumption of the other element was reduced. Experiment 2 employed a complementary design. After initial nonreinforced exposure, two two-element compounds were each followed by poison. Then one compound was extinguished and the rat given test exposures to the second element of each compound. Consumption of each clement during the test reflected the extinction history of the element with which it had previously been presented in eompound Both designs were such as to imply the occurrence of associa- tive learning, dependent upon Jte joint presentation of the elements in com- pound. These results suggest that with flavors there is substantial within- compound lcarning of associations among simultaneously presented stimuli. 0 t~ 02 1 5 b 5 r , ~
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50330 7791 } DISSERT~TIONS--UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND/ESSENCES AND E8SENTIAL OILS/ FLAVORANTS--ANALYSIS/ TASTE--TESTING-=FLAVOR--ANALYSIS/1 t 74-16,SS8 t . • TP BmNARCZYK, Anthony Allen, -1942- 95l3 I;e IDENI'IFICATIOy AXD tVA;.UATION OF TIE FLAVOR-SIMFIG1.\T CDtPOhETTS OF GIIMR FSSI:~II LaL OIL. ~ University of Maryland, Ph.D., 1973 Food Technology ~ ~-- --.~3-,'f.~r. University Microtilms, A XERaXCompany , Ann Arbor. Michigan 0 13 0 0 0 02 1S 6 9'
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50330 7793 I ~.~. . ~ Jp2 ;;yJasCe-'tesCiifg --FlavQr~=-Analyrsis. , ~ (1969) ,, ,~.. ~.. ...~~~~.\ f~w~~... ..'.;. .~ ..! . . . .,.!!• ... F.~Ji. .~t• ... .. . i.~_. a ._ ._ . ...t3 .. , . ,..,~.....bia ~..._<..4...1 .,..<._~_,.~.r 1~....~-.. . . i..~~.._..~~.~ I
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/ .:.;. :~.....,x ,t..~x.,... ... -,. .... ~..._., ._~ .r.._.......-~. ..~.;....-_._s:._ .. 50330 7758 ~ P"LAVORA.:4TS--Si::iS0:2'l I:yAiL'A.TION/SENSiS A1r7T SEN3ATICN/ ?'?USTE T'ESTING/ j~p 458 Sc T) ) 'j ~'Xj 1-t ~ 1''.dirtd !~ 973 1. W. H. STAHL ~ 1~I DOR AND TASTE cCormick& Co..Inc..B~itimore, Me- Q Spbraored Fy T Coa~r.tittee i-18 on HRESHOLD "V'A1JT.1ES DATA Sensory E% a:uation of Matcrials and Products ~MERICANSOCIGI'Y FOR, TESTING AND MATERIALS ~ DATA SERIFS DS d8 ~. ~ ~ lat pace $25.03 QS-W8Q00-36 AIvlERICAN SOCIEiY FOR TI:STING AND MA'i"ERIAL.S 1916 Racti; Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 1910; "0-- c• zi,,,z . - . , ri. . ~.. . . . - . . . .. - . . , ' ~ ' .--. - }~~* S. •I ' A l/ 5 4 : 3 . 6 /Ye,( L'` •/,//:
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/ r 50330 7789 1. .. TASTE--TESTING--FLAVOR/'' 77 V Se Proceedings, American Society of Brewing Chemists 32(2)60-64(1974) Practical Ideas in F-lavor Taste Testing J. L. SEIGEL and J. P. McRAE, Molson's Brewery Quebec Limited, and Z. VALY1, Moison Bretreries o Limited; Montreal, Quebec, Canada C omprehensive quality control of product characteristics as perceived by the consumer at large is a requisite today due to increased bre%sery operations and national brand markcting (17). Many of these characteristics are readily controllable by continuous minor adjustments in production. Some compounds responsible for odor and taste can be routinely measured by physical or chemical techniques. However, the large number of these compounds and the relatively unknown complexities of their interactions and contributions make flavor testing a mandatory component of product quality control (6). Although , major arivanccs have been and are presently being made in thc .a 500 0 0 2.1 5'h'7 `.. conglusions from test results when they are not i serious fault that must be avoided (3). This testing technique is used mainly by marketit consumer surveys: it is costly and requires a organization, preparation, and complex analysis o Difference Tests The more common type of test is the differcnce or test. There arc many variants of this gencral type ~ elemcnt is that each creates an arrangcmcnt of sampl a problem which the nanelist trir- +n ~~
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1 r t 50330 7779 TASTE--TESTING=-FLAVOR/ FL VOUR C ARAcr ~~ RIZATION;tBY TRAINED AND UNTRAINED ASSFSSORSj E ~fSALW . ~ a it5-?7 ~ <. 81 y~~ By J. F CLAPPERTON ~[ /,/ 3 (Brewing Research Foun ation, Nutfreid, Redhill, Surrey) v( Y---~. 13 AND J. R~Ptacorr, ' (Department ojFood Science and Nutrition, Unii'ersity of Strathclyde, Glasgow) Received 15 January 1979 , I E The flavours of four beers were characterized by four panels of assessors, us:ng -a flavour profiling system. One panel carried out duplicate assessments. The results showed that training and experience improved reproducibility and discrimination, without distorting the general pattern of flavour terms reported. On the basis of the flavour profiles, the assessors could be divided into novices, those with some experience, and experts. Thosee novices likely to be good asst:ssors could also be identified.. Key words: beer, Jlatour, sensory analysis, statistical and were assessed a second time by the members of panel 1. analysis. These results have been treated as a separate pancl assessment, bwROnucrtox denoted as panel 5. One assessor from panel 4 also carried out duplicate assessmcnts, giving a total of 124 assessments. This is the second of two papers dealing with the application of Sensory tesriug.-The beer flavours were assessed=-+ using principal components analysis to flavour characterization data the 40 descriptive terms shown in Table 1. Intensities of on beer. The first' described the application of this method of relevant terms were scored on a 3-point scale and assessors multivariate statistical analysis, and reported the results of a• were instructed to characterize the odour, flavour and after. study ofa32 ~ers~whi~{i w~e c#~aractsrized byJ"tra~ed,-~ flavour impressions of each beer separately. The four beer! [l,,} i1 ~ 1 - +' - .- _
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50330 7794 ; 4 .....- .., _,.-~ _.- . xx ....:Taste 1estin . Je2 ._ 8--~'lavor `---Analysis. (1969) I'iii.ilvi~:i~~iU: Ir:..7 iY.FLIVi\Ly-rlii ~d=? b2.^ V'[' . . . f ~ ,~., ..; ~ ..,. -~ .. .. .1 .~~ii.~....1. . I tf~-sreti:6:~G:1 'Ji aVVs~ ,T+u}'.y"i 1~n~f:2?:FiE'3 ~ . . ~ L~.; . 0. .0 .0 .. .)
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50330 7782 TASTE--TESTING--FLAVOR% Qp 456 Du 1974 A Mr17`TER oF TASTE ine and wine-tasting _: jack Durac ANDRE DEUTSCH 0 fs 0 0 0 0 2 1 5- 6
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50330 7790 } ~- ~ TASTE--TESTING--FLAVOR/ r~,~144 . 3e c~~ ,. _ ~ (ii V Tr ,_ . ~ N EFFECTIVE SCORING SYSTEM FOR SENSORY EVALUATION ; OF EXPERIMENTAL WiNES• A. Tromp and W. J. Conradie Oenotogical and Viticultural Research Institute, Stellenbosch, 7600 South Africa. Manuscript submitted October 3, 1978. Revised manuscript received June 4, 1979. Accepted for publication June 6, 1979. i A statistical evaluation was made of a balanced nine-category scoring system used to assess the quality of experimental wines for three consecutive years. The relatively small standard deviation found when wines were scored in duplicate was indicative of the effec- tiveness of the system, while the wide range of the scores obtained was sufficient to distinguish between wines in terms of quality. The tasters were also evalu- ABSTRACT ated statistically for both range of scores used and re- producibility. Six of the 19 tasters scored wines incon- sistently, and could therefore be eliminated. With the nine-category system, inexperienced tasters scored wines as well as experienced tasters. The system is easy to use and is recommended for evaluating young experimental wines. ' o a n o_~,:~_s ~--~-~_7 o
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Q [L . "~.~.i_, ±r ' } [•.' 'l''ZGE'T`._••j pI2q .r-..~ r• ... r... ...:. ry .• (696T) ~ Zar ~ _ XX ~. 1 S6LL OEEOS I
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TASTE--TESTING--F00D/TASTE--PHYSI0L0GY/ 50330 7798 1 F00D--TASTE/F00D--FLAVDR/" FLAVORANTS--CHEMISTRY/ - FOOD--CHEMISTRY/ FISH/BHELLFISH/SENSES & S;WSATION/ ~ Food Taste Chemis - ' 56 ~ Am 1979 : James C. Boudreau, EDITOR University of Texas-Houston Basedonasymposium A L S S Y M P O S I U M S E R t • spow=cd by the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY at the ACS/CSJ Chemical Congress, '/ WASHINGTON, D. C. 1979 .• 7~W!,4'-.,... . . .? , % Honolulu, Hawaii, April 2-6, 1979. 0 5 0 00 012 5 7 6 .:•k ,
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/ / 50330 '7g9 ..' I / -;r,-.Taste==testfn.---Fond:~ TP 370 r LtS ~ r:.11'i~•F~J A. Naartl:~~e~ ~. Ci.'.::<:7lZq~ )CJ: Q i'::'t P4~~i :Ci4?:?C'.'e z:;i :x .cic:5 ir'G ~ ~ .i'5J u r ~ C2 (].:.5o•-^a l~f'f::%~.eLI i' j'G•C3:3 Ci4`SI i0'i.':: . . , ..;..v*~~ --. r 0 w/ 0 0 0 02 1 5 7 7
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, "F.+~i , ~4 ...-_,.__...__~..~..~.;...,._. _ .~. ,I~`. ~- /.~,~,~',I..,.~~I ~` .7.w. . ~d j+~..+o1AAf .00 .. ~~=~ 37611110 t~~``: ~ 4Vt~~. ~ F , ', ~.f.l~+~f~: )HOELLti;, :ticodc+rc T?il1i~~, 19<<3- t ~~.`~l M:!:TC?.L :.'(ai,YSIS OF Ci::ICJRD GFJIPE ESSENCE ~ ~~ /~ YELA7~A 10 CC.ICO::D G::,u^E FIJIYOR. • •S R Food 7cc1u,olc•EY Kichiran S.aic U,tiver5ity, Fh.D., 1.971 . ,.. . Univeraity MicroSilmK. A )J f;0?;Conipany, , Ann Arr-.,r,l4ichigan C~~lt~dY~.U~G4L '44-f.f.o 50330 7786 , , 4SUp(lG2 1 56 4
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i , t .,,......~... . •._ _ -:...,•,~.,.,.....::. -- -, : . 74 ySt = T.4STE--=TESTING/SUCRUSE/ SUGARS--TASTE/ " • 50330 ~cnsor~ scates of taste intensity ,.. • S.S.MT.W- N$= NAXYyf2D UNIYCRSITY ' d'ercc;rt:ion & Esvchorhysics 6 302=3Q8:-(i969) • 77+esubfecthY intensity of taste was scaled by the method of magnitude estirnation in v,,hich Os assigned numbers to designate b4e apparent srrer.Z:h ojstiasr.lus cor.rcntiarrons. Substances used were sucrose. dextrose. rnaltose, jructose, saccharin, Sucaryl, sodium chloride, end quinine sulfate. For aqueous solutions oj each substence. tsste ir:ter.sity was found to incrcase as a power function of concentration by weight. Some approximate exponcnts w:•rc: sucrose. 1.3; sodium chloride. 1.4: quinine suljate, 1.0. Tae rrsgnir.cde scale for sunose xns compared with the category scale obtained by a commonly used rating Frocedure. Tf.e category scale turned out to be highly nonlinw. During the past decade several separate studies have been made In thls laboratory in order to continue the pioneering efforts of l;ube-Center who used a direct scaiing procedure (fractionation) to determine the relation between stimulus concentration and the arparent streni.h of the resulting tastc. An important outcome of the early work was the a•ell•known gust scaie (BeebeCenter & Waddell, 1959). Improvements in method have been made frorn time to ti.^r_, and it has been found that a procedure based on some form of di;ect r.iagiitude estimation has advantages over the one based cn ftationation. bioa of the following studies were studeni exereses designed to explore one or another aspect of the gustato.y sense. The fust magnitude estimations of taste 7762 ~ i ~ .~ 1 i ; i~teos;t e t; i d d tt l di fD x wr out un ono cau e et e mc rs _. ._._..,..-..^..,_.._.P-..._,~ ,,.~,,~,~„ a-cWcand aatt~stullv eallrd ~tLChrrrzfsetJhettisr~r!i vxst ~ 50 0 0 0 2 1 5 4" 0 presented to the 0 at room temperature, one at x time, in small "shot" glasses containing about 4 cc. The order was irregular, usually a different order of concentrations for each 0. The 0 sippcd the solution, tasted it, spit it out, and made his numetical estimate of the apparent intensity. lle then rinsed out his mouth and prepared for the next stimulus. The instructions given the 0 were modeled on the following: Your task is to judge the strength or intensity of a series of tastes. Sip the solution, hold it in your mouth for a few uconds, spit it out, and make your judgrnent. Then rinse your mouth. The first solution is the standard, whose intensity cve shall call 10. Please estimate the telathe intensity of the successive tastes. To each taste assign a number that is proportional to its intensity as you experience it. The question is, if the standard is called 10, what would you call the other solutions? Usr whatever numbers seem appropriate: ftactions, decimals, or whole numbers. Thus, if a taste seems 7 tines as strong as the standard, call it 70; if half as strong, call it 5; if a 20th as stror•.g, call it O.S, etc. There is no upper or lower limit to the n•.rmbors you may use. The task is to make the numbcn proportional to the taste intensity. The standard was usually a concentration neu the nvddle of the rano , on a log scale. It was presented only at the beginning of
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I / r ft 50330 7761 4 J, 77 V Da. ___::- -• .____._.._.- _-- _--_ __. . _ __. .. . ~._.. ODOLOuY/.. PROFILE SENSORY EVALUATION Ocy6::OCOLATE .: .• . . . . . .. . .:••.~~?~ . , . N. DAGET j oZK6/ WIsl-. bit. Cr. "c'.ocoo:4 Choc.Poo ; - .• • 't . ' PP319 - CM74 1 f S Nestl'e Products'Technical Assistance Co. Ltd.. . ~ _ , . . . P.esearoh.b DevelOpnzn£'Department .La Tour-de-Peilz/Schweiz. .. , • . , .. - "I Introduction , • . • . . . . . . . ' . • . . • . . • . . . The profile technique developped in the laboratories of. Arthur D. L i t t 1 e Inc. in 1950 (1) and applied since to the eva-• luation of various food products and cosmetics has been adapted• ~ 0 E; fc(y tile &aJ,Aatton!jof&ocga and chocolate -products. , -,•~+~:.•- . - ,~... . :. ..ti; . ~ TASTE--TESTING--=FT.AVOR/_TASTE--TF. STINr.--MET
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/ r 50330 7809 ~ . ,, FOOD--SENSORY EVALUATION/FOOD--QUAI.ITY CONTROL/SENSES AND SENSATION/ TASTE--TESTIIVG--FOOD/FOOD--ODORS--SENSORY EVALUATION/FISH/riEAT PRODUCTS/ CONFECTIONERY/ QP 456 In 1977 SENSORY QUALITY CONTROL : PRACTICAL APPROACHES IN FOOD AND DRINKkODUCTION PROCEEDINGS OF A JOINT SYMPOSIUM HELD IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ASTON 6 -- 7 JANUARY 1977 INStITUTE OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 105-111, Euston Street, London NW1 2EU THE FOOD GROUP (SENSORY PANEL) THE SOCIETY OF CHEMICAL INDUSTRY 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 '14 Oelyra~e Sqt7are, London SW1X 8PS _ 61
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! .,, ;...~ , ~ ... .. . . . . . ..:........_ : TASTE-:-TESTING--,-FOOD/ ~ LVYT•Edition 4 « 456 1.Q ~ ~:1~sory ~i.~%.~3~ ®~1 sa. to 3L' ® ®l.l Ge 1977 PDDL .0-••. A Sensory Workshop ln col aboration wit1i J. Soims H.J. Roth M. Vaisey Genser 1977 H. Moskowitz ~ , 7 ~ r Forster Verlafi AG / Forster Publishing Ltd., Ottikerstrasse 59,8033 Zurich / Switzerland ` • ~ .05~AQO2 5 8 3 50330 7805 ~ : I .:: t ,:;..
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50330 7784 , J. Acta Aliment. Pol. 2(3)113-32(1976) 78 V He ~ASTE--TESTINC-==FLAVOR/1! . TIII: INrGUI;NCU OF NEW ACIILCVI;III;NTS IN6;NSORY ANALYSIS ON SUL'Jt;CTIVL GUSTOITC:R.Y AND ~ OLI'ACTO:IIL'i'ILY J. r(errmau~ Section for the Economy of Food Resources and Technology of I'oodstuffs, L'iochcm, Istry and Reaction Kinetics of Foodstuffs, Humboldt University, Berlin, GDR 9 i The sensory analysis of flavours of many foodstuffs such as coffee bread and meat, the aroma of which forms a multicomponent system, doe: not enable either to synthetize the original aroma br blendir-~' pure a com. ' ponents or, still less, to make quantitative estimations despite presenth, availahle modern analytical methods which enable to determine individua components both, qualitatively and quantitatively. -This is connected oi the one hand with the problem of key substances and geheral impressior ' of sensual response and on the other with the influence, compensating additive and intensifying of individual components over one another. When confining oneself, however, to the dependence of the sensua ' response intensity (N) upon concentration (S) of a flavour agent or pressuri (p) of an aro~' atir.,e s~bstn ce vapour e.g. of saccharose or hexanol in (o Q~ Q a~teifa w~ater`soltRion or else in (or over) aa foodstuff having as for the res '- ' Its composition and reactic,n -»•I--
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50330 7785 I / 1. . J. LEAnN:NG At O(•tOTlVATION 7, 173-Ili3 (1976) TASTE---TESTING--FLAVOR$ The Establishment of Flavor-Flavor Associations Using a Sensory Preconditioning Training Procedure MICIIAr-.I. J. LAVIN St. Currcn•c•rtrrrrc• Uirirersirv In Experiment I, rats drank two distinct (luvurs in sequence clurint; prccunditiuning: dwinc Uaining, the second of these flavors w;ts paired lkith a loxin. l)uring tcsting. there was un avcrsion tel the flavoi not dircctly pairccl with the toxin. In Experiment ?.Ih¢timc intcrv;ll hchvcen the th% o tlavtlr.(ll, 3, q,;lilil?7.cc) in the preconditioning pha.c was varied: learning uccurrcd only if thc flavors wcrc scllar:rtcd by 9,cc or I,... 1=\r.rimctu 3, usi+lg a 60•scc interaimulus interval also did not rc\cal le;lrnint;. Thc,c rc>ult% rclc;d that the tcntpIlral crldicut for n;tvt,r-navur associative Icvnin;t is similar to cunvcntion;il audio-visual sensurv prcccl^ditiuning dcla% gradicnr% and diffrrcnt from thu.c obtained in Ilavor- tnciri1tiie r%il.•r.!rr•w. The re.nt1C arP itisfllCCCiI iii tC1111% of IhClr crtUC;II 0 5 A Q 0 02 IS 6 3
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50330 7803 ) . . ~ . . . ...~ . ;... ...~c FOOD--CONSU:IER PREFEP.ENCES/ PRODUCT DEVELOPt'iF.NT/ mASTE--TISTI:~'G-=FOCD~ MANUI~ACTURE AND TRADE/ FOOD-- rfANAG EriE N T--PIARI: ET I NG / A1AN AG ENSE N T-- P LAN N I NG / _. _... .... ...._.. . ..- -,,.. ,. .. IID 69 t i'-:-=Nurnber ~~ Markoting (or Executives Series 1968 J,tr PDJL 'I 4* ~, U ~ ~ ~~ ~; W~ ~ Editod by:1. 0. Eastlack, Jr. lack Tinker & Partners fa k ~ P,ltya ~ . .. . . ~, kv a.,. . yo/ ....._.... ~_..,._._ ..._.,. . . ~..•,..,. - ...... .. ~..,~:..,- ... - _.~ ,.. ._..,... ~ ~ ... ...,.. _~.~.• ~,. .__.. . I ~~ I osnoa o2 ,
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50330 7802 ~ TAS'PP-=-2Ej TINC~~FpOD/.FOOD--SENSORY EVALUATION/. ' . I `3 V Ca I l I The lorcn:al oJ Ceueral 1 syclrelogy, 1973, SJ, 27-qG. '1,/ ,,' / 1= ESTABLISHMENT AND 1NIODIFICATION OF FOOD AND TASTI; i'-'- PRE'hERE\'CES: EFFECTS OF EXPERIENCE* I ~- . . Department of Psychology, Dliorni UnurerJiry PATRICK J. CAYRITTA,` 'M.1URICE J. AIoORE, AND TIIOM:1s R. RnSSITcR SU JI JIARY I'.estrictino an animai's diet early in life to a sinole food or flavor secvci to enllance the preference value of that substance later in life. A pri»:acy effect is most clearly found in precocial species, such as the domestic chicken; re- s s sults for late maturin;; species is less certain. As for changes in food Prefcr- ` ences, a chief concern is n•ith the iclationship bet~ceen the kinds of cues in- volved in the aversiNc conditioning of food preferences. A theory of slr~,uclres relevance indicates thc likelihood of t;ustatory-olfactor}• cues becoming aver- sively conditioned to gastrointestinal discomfort, and auditory-visual cues to pain from electric shnck. This sug;ests that learned associations-at Lpast ' for the rat-are fncilitatecl by a naturally occurring compatibility betv:cen exleroceptive events, such as color and shoclc, and behcec•n othr_r events
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i 50330 7804 " .. ~---~-_______.-. --- y __.--~------- -._. ~ c,( i4 '':':TASTE--TESTING--FOOD/ :~4 3MSORY FJlALUATIONe A LINK BETGIEEN FOOD RFSEARCH AND FOOD ACCF.PTANCE RFSEARCH! J.E.R. Fri.iters, Spelderholt Institute meat, Heekbergen The Netherlands. , for'Poultry INTRODUCPION Researchers from various disciplines are working in the area of ' J sensory eva- luation of foodstuffs. One can find there amongst others statisticians, physio- logists, chemists, home economists, dieticians, food technologists and psycho- logists. If on grounds of this varied range one expects that sensory evaluation of foods and beverages is a field in which basic concepts and methodologies of the various disciplines support and complete each other he is mistaken. The o inte- Research, Processing Depart- '' www~
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0 - 4' • r-, =. . TASTE--TESTING--FLAVOR--ANALYSIS/FOOD--FLAVOR/FOOD~-ODORS--SENSORY EVALUATION/ ORANGE JUICE/APPLE JVICE/ODORS--CHEMISTRY/ QP 456 Sc 1977 Flavor Quality: Objective Measurement Richard A. Scanlan~ EDITOR Oregon State Univerrity . A SYMPOSIUM'SpONSORE9 BY THE DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY AT THE 172nd MEETING OF.THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., .% SEPT 1 1976 ., ACS SYMPOSIUM SERIE S 51 AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY WASHINGTON. D. C. 5977 050.0 0 021 575 Alf ,'Iq"~
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/ I 50330 7800 { . 78 Purc G Rppl. Chem., Vol. 49, pp. 1667 - 1671, Pergamon Press, 1977. Printed in Crest V Ba COI:TRIBUTION'OF SMOKE C0:-iPOUKDS TO SGNS01.'tY, BACTERIOSTATIC AtiD AN1'IOXIDATIVE EFFECTS IN SMOKED FOODS Nina Bary3ko-Pikiclna purpose and should be considered prim.lrily as a flavouring operation. Britain. Institute of Food and Nutrition, Warsaw, Poland Smoking ac: one of the preservation methoJs for food has its centuries-old history. Powiever, intacrderafood technology the smoke-curing or smoke flavouring process has changed its main ~•.. ln this lecture attention will be focused mainly on the sensory effects of smoke ccr,pounds and methodsfor their measurcment, with only a brief review of bacteriostatic and antioridative as- pects. CONTRIBUTION TO SENSORY EFFECTS lki Wood smoke formed by pyrolysis of wood constituents is a very complex aggregate. Up to now, more than 300 subst.rnces h.1vc been isolated and identified (14) - r.iany of them have alsn been quantitativcly determined. All of them - or at least, their great part - can be considered as j'~' te ~al~ cny~ bu l~s ~ t fl {vou ~nE7fe~ in smoked products. According to recent know- ~ldF~•h,:1~A1:: W4c ~inl~ re.R,n>:f}~leor cevelopiut; the typical, desirable aroma of smoked Eoodq (9, 1'l, 13, 22, 23, 27), especially those phenols of inediwn boil n3 point (12, 27).
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/ I ! 50330 1813 DISSF.RTATI(1NS--KANSAS STATE LTNIVI:RSITY/ nRN'fAf+~ARII'S/ TASTF-lTFSTIN(:--F00D/ 71-2s,s27 TASTE/ ~ UJlI, Clark Kei-Lock, 1903- COHPARATIYE STUDIES OF HUMAN SAJ,IVA CONSTITUENTS AND CHEHOCEPTOR RESPONSE IN TASTE. Kansas State Univeristy, Ph.D., 1971 siochemistry rood Science Program Department of Biochemistry University Micro(ilms, A XERO(Conpany , Ann Arbor, Michigan i . . ' ~ . . . ~ , . . d 5 A Q(l Q 2 I 5 9 j . 0 1,
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- 1 50330 7815 } f J 2 testin~'r~'c~o.d. ~ T (19G9)-. . t. ~ . ~ . . . . .. .. .- - .. s..,. ... .. c~ c , . . . _ . . ... ~ . . .. . . -. .. . ~ . . . . . .. . . . .. ~ _ ~ . . . .. . . . _ i; . a a , .. i . ., . . . ~ .. I .. - a.: . .,. . , .. , i.. .. . . . .. . ~ ....... .1 ....• u . ..a.~..L i15::~!`A.,..1.% `: .,.... . ... • .,vh ....J ...>-_ • -«.......,. ....0 ~. U s o p n p2 1 y 9 3
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1 ( I 50330 7814 ~ FOOD--SENSORY EVALUATION/FOOD--FLAVORANTS/FLAVORA*ITS--ANALYSIS/ FLAVORANTS--SENSORY EVALUATION/ODORS--FOOD--SF.NSORY EVALUATION/ TASTE--TESTING--F00D/; QP 458 In 1975 .u,.. '~~L jl ~~` ~ , y,,, 1 ~ AROMA RESEARCH Proceedings of thev(nternationai 7Symposium on Aroma Research . held at tihe Central (nstitute for Nutrition and Food Research TNO, Zeist, the Netherlands, May 26-29, 1975 3/b i#vor ) ~ •ditors: H. Maarse and P.J. Groenen a~~ I j 2 3 ~ : ~Q {Yag gin~ii 9 ~ ~. ' (:entre for Auicultural Publishing and Documentation
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, FLl!VORANTS-`=SENS0RY' EVALUATION/AROrLA/TASTk--TESTING--FLAVOR--ANAI,YSIS/- - - ~--- J I d our. n , Brew. 80(2)164-73(1974) ~~ 74 V Cl .. !~'pROFILl; l r~ t, SIS AND IrLA.VOUR DISCRIAIINATION J~l- ,. : ~ 0 S" - "• - DY J. I}. 4'1.8YYJiJ(jVa ~ =: :i : ' ~ rtmi~ro In ~tstr ! ) ` _ ~ ~~ ~arclr~r•.:dahou, }Vrrl rclcl• ~ L'y~tn) t~ .~ . R~. 1. , d l 21L e M71 •. • I i ' The relative merits of profile tasting and difference tasting aro discussed. Profilo analysis can reveal and characterize flavour differences that are not revealed by difference tasting using the triangular or three-glass test, even though the same people carry out both types of test. !`, tnult Uplo comparison test Is used'in conjunction with profile analysis to reveal the size as well as th3 nature of perceived differences in flavour. This is exemplified by studies of ~ the effect of adding increasing amounts of diacetyl to three different types of f-. i Key words: ale, aroma, flavour, lager, cannot detect any differences by instru- trrelhod. mental analyses, but a differenca in P.avour is revealcd by a diffcrencc t4ste-tcst. The INyR( )UCTION Whole int•cstigation is repeated uith the s•,rne . beer. It may be necessary to consider not just the presence of individual flavour notes but also their duration and order of perception in order to explain the offects of flavour potentiators, such as guanosino 5'-monophosphoric acid. _J 16% ~ 4
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i 50330 7816 ~ ;;-..- Jet, .~. ~~~aarvtt.gxt ~.J~ ~, 1T .~L~ yY ,`~ f'4i TO 1.(1fa Si ::aO?.~,`l< I
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i , 50330 7820 j . ~ ~ 1 ~ f i ; t ~ ~ ~~~P "iS 4,18~ 4,18~ iEs ti3 x R. ..:.. ~ f;3.lI Boo::,Y 181 P::pl>.~"l 0 5 0 0 n 0. ~ 1S. 9 8
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i Fromhisreviewof 2Sstudies 50330 7751 =TRSTII~G/ `- of sensory prefcrenTeST~• : ~. _,.. : .: ..i .. , , ... . ... :~ . ." . Professor Seaton distills . Richard Seaton five reasons ... ' Why Ratings A.re Better Than Comparisons ~: Jour. of Advertising Research 14 (1) 45-48 (1974) 3 . . t1\~C~tY„\'~'~l\\°.\\~CC~I'•C11\'.\C\ ~\,,j1VC•\\\\~C \\\G1`~ V'~RCC~1V cR (~~\t\S\\ , -: r ~` ~ - ~ _ ~ \ „CG~U\h\3Y1C\~.L\~' ' +' V, { L~`(tr\v: „~,C~\C\ ;t\ ,C~ L\\\~lt'\\7 • n c , - ~ Cs.:•\\\m\~.\CO\-N,\:C When problems of sensory differences appraise all samples, then for any num- ences for 12 matched pairs of different [; -atnd preferences are discussed, issues ber of samples greater than two, the foods, Pilgrim and Wood (1955) con- ~ about rxtlrodology typically emerge.. '~number of separate trials required will trasted the paired comparison method F - --~~.~ _.._" . ._. __ Peryam (1958), for example, lists sev- be n in the single.stimul_us rating scale with ratings on a nine interval hedonic en different techniques for establishing approach and (n1) in the paired eom- scale. They found both methods equal- txnsory discriminations between sam- parison approach. For example, if one ly sensitive, irrespective of the degree ples of foods. Not included is the were appraising eight experimental of preference differences. In another tingle-stimulus rating scale method, treatments of a product or package, experiment by Edwards and Thurstone observers testin all the ossible 28 (1956) e 250 ldiers both (! f b i i i d i g p . sorn so nce to e an nappropr • t was oun s ) I ate measure of discrimination (Peryam pairs would be engaged in 56 expo- rated and (2) selected by the paired and Pilgrim, 1958; 1957). • sures while observers using a single- comparison method some 20 foods. ~ ,..,,.r.._„VVha rnncrrui~measur.emtnt nf a!., ,, s!Imulu~rrt~ng_;.;ale.appra,is~/_methoq Successive interval ratings of sin IMg e~~ i . . : f~ ... .~....~.,,,,~..-.._.--.~-ct+.-....-.w~ f.. 0tl. 2. I 5. 2 9 ~.
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/ 50330 7810 . TP 0170 . FOOn--qENS0RY ESrAT.'ATIO*I/S`'ET.L/TASTF.--TECTINTr---F(lOn/l TASTE--T}'STI*.r.-- ATISTICAL `tETHnPS/ L•i CANADA 'JFPART' , OF AOP,ICULTURE, Pl'RLICATIOr7.1284/ C . __.._._ ._ . PpD~ METHODS FOR SENSORY EVALUATION OF FOOD C. ELIZABETH LARMOND Food Research Institute, Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa CANADA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 14(ctl
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. . . . .. .... .. _ .. .. .... ,. . . . . . . ....Z j .6. .S . • V I 7 U U • - d,. fj . S. , •0 epr,u,oo ~.. .) 'ar.d3JO o.-,.narnzTsOV ;o 2t~zrjjxwda0 upvxra cvE-ad L5 Lnf,'t ti^Z*r tel:~~~a~'rC~r1~ a.311~~i2.'lfjisrfi~ YC1 ~Y7a::f"~~.1'J(~G?~4 v~:~.l1Y!")~ ~ Cn,•. 7 d ( 618L OEEOS
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. .f ... ... .. .... . . . t. . ... .. . ~.. .~. i.. .I..,. Z 0....X) © v ~ ..~ .. . :*..-:....i. ~...c+..~.r..w...~...~_ - ., w. r..+._:...«..~ ~.. _~..._..~..._..~...,..«......~..._.. O _ ~ r~~tr'1fiCA:j:~J.ti~; Cy ~jy[ ~StaH. ! SZSL 0££OS i r
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, D\SORY EVALUATION OF FOODS I3Y SCORI`G* R. MszTCTY and F. VRSi (Receivca August 1, 1974) The fundamental problerns related to syxtNms of sensory evaluatioi~ by scoring are the following: - selection of the appropriate quality chKractet•istics, - setting up the scurin,u scale, - weighting the individual quality charucteristics. The last of the problems is of particular unportance. A 1>rerequisite of developing the mathematical inodel of evaluatiun by scorin^ i+ the ( leteizniaatiun. of the weighting factors. This tnu~• be achieved by utilizing iliscriruinance anah:wi ~: A scoring system based on values obtained by discriniinance anmlvsis apreary to be suitable for the development of an evaluations.•ktrm more rali' 'ble and exact than ccu•lier one3, as shown in tests carried out W~ith bottled peachc•s and moreUo cherries, as well as canned peas. 0 0 0 0 8 9 TASTE--TF.ST INC-->!'RTHOnOLOCY /TASTE--TESTING--F00b/ S1iT:LL / ODORS--FOOD--SENSORY EVALUATION/ Arfa .4l~rn.nf<tri~~: T'of. ,f [Il,~~~, •3l1-3~$ (19i.i ) 77 V. Lal. "T'VHTJ.NG OF QUALITY CHARAC'1'ERIST]:CS IN TIl D Lv . ~ -.•
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1 50330 7818 1 c. . ~ FOOJEVALUATIU:I/ J TP CONSUMER TESTING/ 370 Kr 1973 2 c. TEXTURE MEASUREMENTS PDDL OF FOODS PSYCHOPHYSICAL FUNDAMENTALS: SENSORY, MECHANICAL. AND CHEMICAL PROCEDURES, AND THEIR INTERRELATIONSHIPS Edited by AMIHUD KRAMER (Prokssor of Food Science) Unirertiry o/Marylortd, College Park, Maryland and ALINA S. SZCZESNIAK (Senior Research Specia!ist) General Foodr Corporarioe, IVhire Plainr, New York in collaboration with selected authorities on the physiology, anatomy, chemistry, rheology and psychology of texture assessment of food ~ D.REIDEL PUBLISHING COMPANY DORORECHT-HOLLAVD/BOSTON-U.S.A. 7'k ~ .,.nr . . . - , .~.. . . . . , .. ~'. . . . . r: . . . . .--- ft.; . , t~ ~. ~ 0 0 0 2 ' t 5 9 6 ;
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50330 7822 } TASTF--TESTING--FrMn/ 78 V Pi Ntrtr. & Food Science 1473(5-))4-7 According to a recent report the relative importance of the pri.:e of food is increasing, which, it is claimed, could lead to the consumer becoming more selective and placing greater importance on the fla.our of foodt. Flavour may be defined as "the sensations caused by, and those properties of, any substance taken into the mouth which stimulates one or both of the senses of taste and smell and/or also the pain, tactile and temperature receptors in the mouth". The chemical nature of volatile components responsible for aroma and the physical characteristics responsible for the texture of food have been extensively investigated using instrumental methods of analysis. These methods tell us little about the perception of these attributes by the human senses, although current research designed to correlate sensory analysis and Instrumental methods is leading towards a better understanding of the complex concepts of flavour and texture~. . . . Some aspects of sensory analysis and- consumer surveys by Barry Pr son Msc, Department of Food Science, - Queen Elizabeth College . A tasting panel member assesses frozen strawberries at Long Ashtoa Research Station information of preference based on these emotional influences. When the human senses are used as an analytical instrument the tests are referred to as 'objective'. Sensory analyses of this type are usually performed in a laboratory and are used to determine whether a detectable difference exists between samples or to construct a picture of the overall flavour characteris- tics of a food using methods of descriptive analysis.~ The different tests most frequently used in the study of food are the paired comparison, the triangle and the duo•trio tests. When the paired comparison test is used the assessor is asked to determine whether a difference exists between a pair of samples. In the trianvk test three coded samples are oresenred +w,,,~ 0 S 0 0 _0 0 2 1 6 0 0
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I 50330 7806 ~ r TASTE--TESTYNC,--F00D/ 4Jiii zt ~ ~ ~ i r [ ~ [tu.'cLy 1 ( 1l ,t L •V1 ~ The Paper ~ 4( ~ _~- (~ ~~,'~ ~ ~._.: ~ ~ ~~ o j~~ /17~11 :1~.1 ATHCNS -- 'A .ntcrirtn eulture sup- poris c:rt,un juJement; of for.d with \\hirh mc,st rcohlc tencd to a;;rcc. Ev- crVonc likc;-icc crr;tnt simply hecau,e it's ",:uoJ.,. and almost ttny chilcd will rc~Po~nJ to spinach with a tortured cxhrc;;,imn and words like "u,th." Whtu cxactl~• ntakes •1 p,ttticul;tr 0 ft~~l ~~cl ~ hAl:' tS%iyJ3aV 4t•c cx- hcrt.•t;.:: nt\riaus uf subcOa:ciOus srn- PAct: F-ouR cxplaini I'uw.rs. "\\ ill investigate thc comhomcnt: of tl;tvor and odor cl,:- mcnts thcmsrlve. and then rcintc thcm to scnxttion:.uch as hitt.r or 5wcrt." Some foods are known to contlin morc than 500 Ilavur ur tacte sub- stancr.. A ttloss;try of more than 800 descriptive food tcrms is h.in~~ drawn upon to cltara;icrizc the odor (if foods and tltc variutts individual "notes."
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/ I 50330 7796 - - ..+....4'rt• - - ~ Qp.. _. . . . . . . . . . _. ... . - 456 °,zTaste=-tost3ng~~F]avor--Anal.ysiser 3 L Little (Arthur D.) inc., Cwnbriclge, rltass. • 1 '` ` Fl~ti'Ta sur~•e resenlch and food r cce tance of the sco e i y ; a, p r p of fl,ivor and associated resenrch, compil..d from papeis pre- sented in a series of symposia giren in 195G-1357. \ew 4 .York, Reinhold Pilb. Corp. ~19581 vt, 301 p. fllus., dtagrs., tables. 24 cm. Includes Vil)]loorn])11ICs. 1. Flavor. 2. Food-Aualysls. TX5,11.LG8 ; •~ 641.072 GS-12823 Library of Congress ,10 i .. . ._ .. . .. . . Q. 5 -a: 0, . tti 0. 2.. .F .S.. l q. . . . j. .,...
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• ~. : ~ . \ ~..I . n. ..• •~. ..J i•'. f ~ . •./../ . .f,.. ~l_. . Q... .. . .. . . . .-.v~ (/~ •~ ~ylP+r_,,) - I T Jd !v!r ! ot) F OLc u.L I LO@L OEEOS , I
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. . ._ . ._ ..~ . .. . . . . . .. . . . . _ ... _ _ _ __ _.. . _ , _._ ... _- ~1_.._~.u .__a.a_~~_ ._..~_....~~~5__~.~ .a.~r~a...a... DISSERTATIONS--NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVF.RSITY/TOBACCO--SMOKE--PHYSICAL PROPERTI TOBACCO--St40Y.E--TASTE/TOBACCO--Sr.nKE--ODOR/TASTE--TF.STING-~-METHODOLOGY1 TASTE--TESTING--TOBACCCy,'CIGARETT::S--TASTE-TESTING/ TS 2240 Ab F..TR CLASS NO. TEXTBOOK TS 2240 Ab 1974 1974 Abdallah, F. M. (N. C. State Univ., Raleigh, 'N. C., U. S.) SENSORY TESTING OF CIGARETTE SMOKE. PANEL SELECTION, TRAINING, A:~D USE. ' N. C. Raleigh 191 p. (1974) (in Ph. D. Thesis State Univ. N C , , , , . . "~ English) *I974, No. 11, W 4458* *d* . Tobacco aral sis: y . ..~ ..--.. . --'.,...,... ,........,... .-~.,.. . .. . ...,, .,- __~ ,, _....-. .. .............--......~,R..,-.:, •...,..~---~-,._.. _.~T....~-_..~.-.. w.-_ . _. . . . . . . ~ T ~ 50330 ?826 1 U S EI 0 c~ t3 ~2 ~ 6 0 4
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5 6 S 1~: A U 0 U 5 Q• %37kl r:o;w3 11l " (2961) :Z"7i ~Z:~:i~ [7~7<< :. 1 AO3 f.T.; e a 7';r.:rl'~:• l"^.. R-`."'-r'~.~nG vt n...-r F. ;S .~C.I ..~i.`._ . ±.~: i~J.~,.»J . a•~ .: .:.~•:'w.::~ c .:~•J..e._~~.'tt (696T) Z ar .. ~~_. xx ( L t BL OEf OS I ~
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! 50330 7788 ( ? : • . a -- _ TAS E--~ S~T,,I~ ;~ { . YYr ~) G;L : L~ ::2t, ' ~J , ;i ~ „ ' I , , t :2G _P7_ J OukJUn;.v_ ~+_~+ r Susltn SchHfmin mJof F'•SychiiUy j~ Qe 4 Multidimensional scaling (MDS) is a uccful mnthcm:tticar tool whiclt alloiex us tn spati:llly represent thc similaritica in flavor of products by a CD\ \Durl~am1 N: "flavor m:1p:r-4fi urdcr to u.r \tt~1% procedures. all we n.:d i. .1 set ut "distnncc-likc" number.- fou cvam- ~ plc. crpcrimcntcti iudgcncnt. .,I .iiui- ~ laritv in tl:cvon cct~tccn prudt;ct• ' recovers t'~c undcrlv ing .tr:,rt-rre. i that is, a map of the citics in pro{lrr rclatium.hip to one anotacr. t acrc is i 'CopyNghlc 19~GAmer~ca•+.1s:x+ahora/Ce•r.d Chrm•srs. Inc 3340 Pilol Knob R•,ao . P,+~i, MN 55121. Aa r•phrs rasr.veA 27 -7ocx , i:D N e . 5 40 0 0 2 1 5 6 4Q, 11 ,1 tt Products judgcd alniil:ir in tlator are # arranged by \11~S psoccducr, nr,lr ', each othcr in (hc resultant sI~,rcc or ~ map;productsjudt:rdtobr(fi.\imilar ~ • '""~ • are rositlonCd d+stnnl from ollt' ~ ~il.~I~IdFme~t50c~1al5 Ca aing:• another. An _ cxample frupl gc~~.rah11~ , ~ ~ ~E.~~~~ ~~~a illu.tr:ltcs hu~t ~1F)ti ttorl.s. if ~11)1 ... ~ /-1 C/.~ Y proccdures arc apPiictf ~r :tll,•,% 2 to ~, ~easure ~-.Qav®`~ ' combinatit,ns of c'i<tancc. brt..(rn E f~/~ ~- , 10 U.S. cltics.lhr:;n:;l..:>ar:
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50330 7834 ~ xx .~ .Te2 ~"Ta~te"`,teatiu~--I~~Chodrsk~tgy: .~{. 19G9 ,,. _ ( ) ~ ..i ~.r .~..~:..~.. ~ ._ .. ........... . ,._ .... ..'~ . . ~ _ ~, . ~-_.. . ...,,, ......~.>-,•v . ...1.~ ,. ; r.: i~'>.... .<~1 .... ...~~~... u , ... ~ .,<.. ,. , ~> .,. : ..f+ D . 0 soo0 0.21 s 12
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50330 7829 J SENSORY RESPO.IISE/ ::... ......: ..... ':TASTR---TESTTNG--METHODOLOCY/OXPEP.IMI?NTAL DI;SIGtI/ t/L3t•1I11ERSITY or wISCONSIN Tcchnical Report No. 33 tvSudison, Wisconsin july, 1964 ,7IIVBo "An Xntro:}uction to Rcspnsel6u` face Afiethodolagy" by G. E. P. v6r, Contract No. 1:0'IR 1202 (17) tioool4-754-0562, q 0 . 4Orlr,iinally prcparcd for Intcrnr,tional Encyclopedia of thc Socia j&,J_mrxs,• reproduced by per riiisslon oi the Crowell-C;ollier Cc 0 S 0.0 0 0 2 1 6 0 7 t.oAe.al Lr NATIONAL 7ECFi1ICAl INEORM/,11ON . S[RVICE us o...n-r .1 c.-.c. .. .. .. ,~~.~
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i , 50330 7783 Ot t•at,e,i",nlt,, rS,tt..ti.gY: Aaimal Itehavwr Procrsses I 2r-1ras TAPO !9» vol . i. T ' o .... ..--VV E--TFSTINGFLA nT . .73VFu ` ~ l li S I' i i F +'l ensory rect~llt t lt~; t~ tnl avols I Witll a Furnnalilt-Produced Secliul>Ii, Need indicated that the rats strongly preferred the unflavored sug;tr solution over ~ the unflavored salt solution. "I'hcn thc admini.trcttion of a fornuilin injection produced a strong sodium necd. Preference tcsts subscqticnt tn'the formaliu injection showed that the rab preferred the salt .olutiom over tile sugar and also strongly prcfcrrcd the •nlt-associcttrd flavor nvcr the su;;:tr-as.ociatcd flavor. L•'xlmriiucnt 2 used a Ic.s 1wtL•ttablc• salt sulutiun aml a utorc highly 1>vtlatable aul;:ir solutiom. 'fhc rats .trimc;l}• prcft•rrt•d tile un11:ivun•d xut;ar solution over tile salt sulutiuu at the end uf the trainint; pcriod. tiuh.cyucol to the soclium-nccd-procluciu;; furmalin injcctimi. tile rats >till preferred the sugar over the salt• but strunl;ly preferred the salt-associntcil 11avor over the . sugar-associ:Urd ilavur. It was thu: shown in 1?xlKrimcnt 2 that a condi- tiuneYl prcfrrcncc for a comditiimrd ainwlus ficrurri•t1 withuut a.,.niL•tr prcf- 0 Sa 0 erenc~c fo~hc t'ncot~itiu~'cd .=imulu.. '. Owen K. I~udini Univcr,ity of California, Lus Ant;clcs The training phasc of two experiments consiacil of pairing II:«urs mixcct together in solution. A sugar solution was paircd with one :rbitrarv. flavur ' (almond or Lanana), while a salt solution was lhlired with the alternative , flavor, in order to provide rats with the opportimity to acyuirc flavor a.so- ;' ciations. In l:xperimcnt•1, a prcfrrcncc test at tile end uf tile h;tining phase
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... ...~ ~ 9 O . ~ ~.....~ ..,~,..~. ..~.. .Q..., : t'~rrfl pu3 t. 5~~~,I:: • at z !7 '* s:3o.3 3o.uor:±rirlxlcr3 La aaa~yw;~:~~ :~t~raL=i w ~~3 AwTaa, uooT-r-.qana . . _ rE z.h`dr{T16paiyyai~ TO ~'OZQL oCFOs ~
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i 50330 7812 ~ i ~ A-C7_A ALIAtF,N7`A1itA:_ I'OLONICA ` ~ yor.. Ic tixvr, I.o. a 133-1q3 ItADOSLAV LAS'LTITY FEHF.NC i1nsl i, n 77 -V La3 'TASTI:-=TESTING--FOOll/ ~ SENSORY EVALUTION OF rOOA QUALITY BY SCORING .. Tnstitute of Biochemistry and I'ood Technology, Technical University, Budapest, -: : - . . . . Hungary 1976 ': .... . -.,,. ; . . _ ., .~ . After presenting the mathematical model of the evaluation method ^ based on scoring, discrirninalnry analysis was applied for determination :...: .. •_ of weighting factors necessary for simrilation. \ The application of the method is dernon$trated on examples. .ts ' ~ ^. _ • ' . . .. . . ..., _ .. .. ~ . Besides nutrient and active at;ent content, the value of foods is signifi- cantly influenced by their palatability. • ~. lata ili~•- y v~ue s utmost importance In evaluating the ~~ ~.--.D~..~j5_~i 1r ~ ~ l~;
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, 50330 7837 I , CONSUMER PREFERENCE/TASTE--TESTING--METHODOLOGY/ Tbt lou..a! ./ Saia/ Pfyc/ioloyy, 1963, 61, 327-334. ATTITUDE CONTENT, INTENSITY, AND THE NEUTRAL POINT ON A LIKERT SCALE• 1 YaRdnbill Uiriviriity S. S. I1oAtoR1TA j A. PURPOSB A commonly used procedure of measuring attitudes is the Likert tech- nique of attitude-scale construction (6). Briefly, in a Likert sale the re- spondent is presented with a f et ol attitude statements on a sale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Responses to each statement are ' given integral weights and an individual's score on the scale consists of the 0 5ruqAofAese~vei~itedAitem'eeo(~s. ~Ien~ Likert's procedure is frequently re~e'rre o as the method of summated ratings (2, 3).
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t',~ .~.~'~~•."as...w.~... ~.. _. ...... ._.. y61 Li"'i^.Xl~z) 'Jll - 0 (:, .. ... (•lts''"s Pt:~,~ tj :.'ii~e.~>i: I'I 6"::..iJ7lta11.:5 si ~t ~ (69GY) ZOr ~ux3s~~~.a~spj;S:. :CX
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: ; Editcd by J. R Price SECO\ll EDITION L/IC1I1i:A\ STATC: l'N1VLiISITY Q11d• ; B. S. Sch.ivesgert or CALIFO:L\u. uAVIS .~ 11. r~:FAIAN ,1ND COMP,tNY ~ . -- SAN 1 tU'+CI%'(.O ; 50330 7823 61 J ! ef ' Irllj~` a'~2{•~ ~ THE SCIENCE OF AND MEA~ ~' h~~.~UCTS - '
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50330 7801 fOJq i`r~r~•'::Lf~'"'r'~*, } • 4WA~•.1/•vayc ~ . f~,•pC/ls7, Mrs/,'fi .,~ , r . r-Q.V / .4,~ v s~~ ~~ re , ~ R . .~..:..~....v~..z ~-~~-~. Poo~ 1G ~ . -Aa v ~ A ~4 'A A-2-/ j ,. ~ C ~ Vl~ T '1.~'N :~,SS AND S W E E i T E T\T 1-H , 1"' , ~ ~ , ( ).Ui:liON /.' ~ L'd;ic•d Gti t G. G. 131RC11, 1_,. F. GKI:I:N u»ci C. 13. COULSON ~ APPLIEll S:'I1:NC:I: I'UI3LISIII:I;S LTD ~ ~1.1;442 ~ I-i ,
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I r CONSUMER PREFERENCE/TASTEh=TESTINGx METHODOLOGY~. 50330 7833 j .. - - . , t ; 81 V Ja . _.~..:~_... Three-Point Likert Scales_Are Good Enough JACOB JACOBY and MICHAEL & MATELL• ; The basic question about any given rating instrument 'k whether or not it has an optimum number of response i t ' 1 • Jacob Jacoby is Associate Professor of Psychology, Purdue (Tnivenity, and Michael S. Matelt is Staff Psycbometrician, horydale Technical Center, Procter and Gamble Co., Cincin- - t I categories or at least a number beyond which there is nc further improvement in discrimination between the ratec items. Determining the optimum response categories i! especially important in constructing the ubiquitous Lik- ert-rype scale [13), which is often used in coUecting at- titudinal and image data in marketing and public opinior research. Too few response categories result in toc 49s f,61 i asoa~o2 Journol oj.llarkering Research, Vol. VIII (November 1971), 4y3-SO(
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50330 7824 AvG: S>:rr.1977 4- 79 V Vi .: I'HAN QUANG VI-NH and R,.Ii.. GONZALES Graduate student and Assistant Professor, respectively, Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, U.P. at Los B3nos, College, Laguna. CESC. No. 3394 Received for publication 12 Scptember 1977. r I ,CxAS7l~~-:tTESMa-:~-z PooD,( wan UUSi-iqZ?a SENSORY RESPONSES FROM GRGUf'S OF JUDGES OFVARYING SEPtiSORY TRAINING UNDER TWO TESTING CONDITIONS Three groups of judges, namely, trained, semi-ttained and untrained, evaluated Cmnkfurter samples for flavor, tendemess, juiciness and general aqeeptabuitv, using a 7-point hedonic scale under two different conditions: a) the judges were not Informed on the poaabi7ity that the treatments may or may not ba the same; b) the judges were to!d that the treatments may or may not be IL%e same. Results indicated that qualification (training) of judges was the most Important factor which caused signiucant (P<.01) effect on sensory ratings. The ratings of the trained group of judges apparently were not affected by different test conditions. Thus, fo* more reliable and meanindul results, a trained panel is preferred. Effects of treatments and test conditions may not ~ be statistically revealed dn~ to ys~c~ ncp~and/or ind:-vidual weakneasesof 0 S ju&es Qth t~ryi>o quid~ificalioni U. Weaknesses and strengths of the different groups of judges reievant to obtainine Letter ~nsor.~ r~n,tt~ rro •t< <f;~..»~.t a--- vt'. t .~ r• # t;)~ lLltla~L.,. 3i(, W
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/ , 50330 7832 ~ iLC•r a / k !A rnr"Q~L' C~ vor.. rr xxvr, xo. 3 a?3.; :z3 rj - trs 78 V Ba ~. TASTE -TESTING :-METHODOLO(;Y/ I - RECENT PROGI~.I;SS IN S1:NSORY METHODS (Summary of the lecture) Institute of Food and Nutrition, Warsaw. Po!and The methocis used in sensory analysis have as a task an indirect meas- ttrement of stimuli influencing our senses-stimuli, which reflect par- ticular properties of food products or other items being the object of i evaluation. '1'l;is kindd of evaluations combine the elements of individual psychological and physinlog'.cal response on objectively existing stimuli. For this reason, sensory methods are treated as particular applicatiori'of. ,; psychological methods and m.easurements or more precisely. ps.•chometric methods. 'Mcst data concerning this ty pe of measurement techni.jueS ::nd also of techniques of interpretation of results can be focnd in specialistic psychological journals. \Ianv ser.sor~. methods have been adap:ed from the methods used in psycl:owctry. Sensory analysis has to its d-1sposal a broad range of varicus mcas- ~ s(~ A. 0 'ttGmr`~t ilcthOds. a)eOnding on the type of t:+sk of sensory evaluation, , such method amon1,; available ones shall Ue..chosen, which can fulfill the . .. .... .:.....t ...,.;++ n.,n ch•.11 onrlerSSand to 1
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50330 7850 i teibacti~o~~~'fithodo2op''_',. .. . . .. . t` ..~ -.. .i'.._ . , ,r.d ~.. .; ~ .._~~..,.. . . .t,... .. SF`.t. ~~.
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I 50330 7851 I ~ xx - J ; Cr ; 1 ~ ~ , i ea testin ,~.pra~tic~l app13 cations, Grny, Phillip P Modern taste testing from the vievrpoint of the master brewer. . D:or;: !-Jn.lJ.erstein Laboxatories Com.^1Lni.ce.tions ,12: 21~7-5g (1953 ) •
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50330 78uE UICTI0:1?1P.IES--C!IEMICAL/CIiEMISTRY, ANAI.YTIC--COLLF.CTED WORI:S/AIR--ANALYSIS,V.:L, INSTRL7tENTS AND INSTRUMENTATION, V.1,2,3/ALKALOIDS--DETEPI`iINATION,V.4,10,19/ AI,t;}{I,yUM,V.5/BAKERw PRODUCTS, V.6/TOBACCO--CIIEMISTRY,V.10/ TOBACCO-ANALYTICAL METIIODS,V. 10, 1y/TOBACCO--SMOKE--ANALYSIS--L.4BORATORY METHODS,V.10/ FLUOItOCARBONS,V.13/ION EXCHANGE RESINS,V.15/SENSES AND SENSATION,V.17/ TASTE--TESTING.--METH0D0IAGY,3l..'17/PYRIDINE AND DERIVATIVES, V. 17/SiTGARS. -ANALYSIS, V.18/ _W_A_TER---Al7ALYSI'S,V.19/YEAST,V.19/PESTICIDES--DETERMINATION,V. 19/ REg ENCYCLOPEDIA OF JiJDUSTRIA DQANALYSIS. Vols,,l-20(including indea) TP Edited by Foster`'Dee"• nell and Clifforrr.-ffilton 9 Sn. 1966-1974 Interscience Publishers New York A division of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. `' c,l . • <<.G .. .l 0 a 0 0 0 0 2 I6. 2 4~-~--.
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r / 50330 7839 ~ 0 i 7 V L TASTE--TESTING--METHODOLOGY /d 7 a . JLVSUk1' 1, 227-237 (1977) The/ Pleasantness of Mixtures in Taste andr01faction~' , + ' HAKRY T. LAWLF.SS Wultev S. Uunrer l.uburcuury of Psye•hulc,gy. Box 183J, lirnnvc Unirersrty, Pruvidcnre. Khudt Islund 02912 - .« '4 Received November 15, 1976 Human subjects rated Ihe perceived intensity and pleasantness of taste mixtures (suc- rose-quinine) and odor mixtures (lcmon-heptanal or pyridine-lavender). The components of the mixture wcre judged as less intcnse when miNed than whc4 judged alone. A multiple regression indicated that the pleasantness of a mixture can be piedicted from a v:eighted additive function of the pleasantness values of the component sensations. Pleasantness values of the components had to be estimated from their plcasantness-irrlen%it,v functions. because the perceived inten.itics of the components change when the components are combined. Weighting coefficients for the linear regressions were greater for the unpleasant components. especially in the odor mixtures. The pleasantness of a single odorous compound or a single taste quality has bcen shown to vary with sunjective intensity (Doty, 1975; Henion, 1971; Kocher & Fisher, 1969, 111oskowitz, 1971). The hedonic value of pleasant substances is. in Sperftalon Wt0d t4sh;j-1cd6un4ion7)f subjective intensity. Unpleasant sub- stances, in general, increase lincarlv in unpleasantness as intensity rises. 04GCac
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S 0 9 w~~iJ"u La~r..1a ?; 0 U 0 0 S 0. 106 tiea4 ~i_!? r ' •3"~ TIjL`:?: ~;f. ~~ :%:~~z :,}~'i:'f..l.'-•'io;; r'ui~ `., .... _ ~:3 E .. . . . .. k Z . ~ ^ . '•. G ~, h - . • 3 .~, c~+•:3:i:Pt?J.~f+i.;{ ~u:>',' •i( ~C~~~.ii~~~ 2 ,T.l is. r.~ ~ . i"~~+~ FY:~ii;:~c':.5~- ;'•r~? . -, "t 'r-.'T`i::it.'y ~~.:~tt:;r ~ ~ ~. tt• ~•.}.i;~i,~....;i :.~ :r':~ fr~:(:' .:i j ': ~tt.~ ~. ,,. UtrY ~~•~,~`.J ..tf r`!Si" .`.~i * T` ~' . , ~ ,. ,.+~.. • '~k` i~d ,.nii,~~.:~•.•.i'! ~•..-?.~:Jd..:.J "a1l,.S: •1~wtl~:J i•a~ ~i.~tJ.i~.~~.,....'._'~'1 L r.,yP';.tc•':l•i: ~ii:: i:i`;s;i:i? :~©`r C~t;~'•^:;~ Z'.'.. ... • ( :a r•. ~t~~. ZQQd tuV tttt : ~1CSOj~poTlaa7ji avti , ( cze~ o£F Os !
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i 50330 78 I ~ ., . i . f i ~ t 1 f : .. f t Q 0 . : .a 6.1 C-Ur. Co~oo.+ C1tioc - '~so' . fp 319 - W s CI417.a.~ 0DOL0~Y/.. TASTE--TESTING--FT.AVDR/TASTE--TF.STINr--MET'i 77 V Da PROFILE SENSORY EVALUATION OFyC~aOCOLATE N: DAGET . Research.& Development Department La Tour-de-Peilz/Schweiz. Zntroduction . The profile technique developped in the laboratories of Arthur D. L i t t 1 e Inc. in 1950 (1) and applied since to the eva- luation of various food products and cosmetics has been adapted- ~ .~ f& Me 6va~~a*oa~of&o&oa and chocolate.~products. , . ' ~~sr71~r..~-L •Nestl'e Products'Technical Assistance Co. Ltd.
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/ I 50330 7838 ~ . .. . . . . '" . . .:~a:".: :tY.`.:~•1.:._ - - -. _ . ..... __.... _ TASTE--TESTINC--FETHOnOLOCY/TASTE--TESTINC--FOOD/S1tELL/ ODORS--FOOD--S);NSORY EVALUATION/ Arfn AGm•nhnin; j'rL 4(1). »n 4-11-3,i3 (19i•i ) , -rt ~ r,... . . ~i/ . . ... . ... .. , . -'~77 V. Lal. W]:R fiTJNG OF QUALITY CH ARAC'1'I;RTSTI:CS IN TJ-] E ` SFNSORY EVALUATION OF FOODS I3Y SCORT`'G*", ~ R. L .ksz•rcTY and F. (Receivecl August 1, 1974) - The fundamental problrms relate!1 to symNms of Ken.gnry evaluation by scoring are the following: - selection of the appropriata qitality characteristics, - settinc up the scoring scnies - weighting the individual quality chaitacteristics: , The last, of the prol,lF-ina is of particular unportanre. A prerequisite ot developing the mathematical model of evaluation by scoring i+ the rletelntinatiuit•; of the weighting factot•s. This may be ac•hievecl by utili•r.ing tii3criruinance tursil.wia: A scoring, system hased on values obtirinrrl by discrintinam;•+ anulv-is appears to he suitable for the tlevelopnent of an evaluation s.'strm tnore reli;tblr and exact than cKrlier ones, as sltor~•n in tests carried out .cith bottled praehcs and morello cherries, as .r•ell as canned peas. . 5 0 0 0 02 1 b' 6
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r 50330 7842 } M13/IA 7'1a'IINI('Al, l1(1AN'I'!•:1tl.Y`Vl)l,_ JJ_NU_1..11172 _m.~4 78 V Mo -TASTE---TLSTIriG--METHODOLOGY/ ""` .Sensory Measurement: The -Rational Assessment of Private, Sensory Experience •- Its Use, Limitations ABSTRACT and Prospects This paper presents a hroad spectrum of experimental results in psychophysics, the science that relates censory perception to physical measurements. For the first time, psychologists, fnncJ scicntists and applications cnginccrs ~~ (/~,YvA6~Gi fa d„~ R. (it(©si\~ ~v 1~ can take subjective mcasures, and relate them to I~I~ysical ~' ~ (1 \I l~, variations hy mcnninrful and aclionable equations Such cquntions~permit preciictions atwut expected sensory re- •ponses to product modifications. They can guide the product derilopir~~ pt~' izi1f tl~ pr~1 uct' to &hi~ 0 maximal serisor~ ach~titaF~l~e, b~ ii1' millTmizfng cost-io- tt.nrL1ro f{.n nr.vlnrf nf en nrrn~.fnl.ln enncn.v Inunl - - --
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l ~ 50330 7849 . 77 V I•,'o ' TAST$--TESTINre--tIT:TrinnoT.Ot;Y p> SIOMF.TnICS •33, :;1-39 arc I i . I Combination of a Preference Pattern with the Triangle Taste Test WAYNE A. WOODWARD and WILLIAM R. SCHUCANY Department of Statistics, Southern 'Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275, U.S.A. I i :.r- A "'~ ~~Gll ^---- Summary When dealing with the problem of obtaining information concerning consumer preferences for two competing brands of a product, one would like to assume that the consumers sampled can actually distinguish between the two brands. Often this is not the case and we have combined the standard triangle test of sensory perception with a preference test in order to obtain injor- mation concerning the consumers' ability to distinguish between the two brands. Assuming an underlying multinonnial distribution, the maximum likelihood estimators (.llLts) of the condi- tional probability that a person prefers brand A given that he can discriminate between the two products is then obtained. The estimator obtained is a ratio of linear combinations of observed multinomial proportions. The variability of this estimator is assessed by means of the jackl:niJe statistic, the asymptotic variance oJthe JILE, and Monte Carlo studies. Application oJthe results obtained to taste tests involving two brands of potato chips is discussed. _ osoo0 o21 6.24 11
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/ 50330 7844 u.n.oKt rk~iirs.rx 1,2Q4-21trJ,977) ~ . -; - - OLFACTION/ TASTE--TESTINC••• Meticdo/0q4;/ - - f 77-v rtu. • /Mutual Action of Taste and Olfaction1 "Ct.Atke MuKrtn•, Wtt.t.tAM S. CAIN. ANU LtNUA M. I3nk•rosttut: -~~ Jehd B. Picrct Furundarion Laborurorv unc! Yqlc•,.SSbuul uj Medic•inr. Ncw llurrn, Connerricur fNM3/9 I Received August 27, 1976 pends more on odor than on taste (e.g., Christman, 1971: Geldard, 1972; intensities'of the unmixed components: An examination of how subjectt~appurtioned theit :. judgments into the categories udor and taste revealed the existence of taste-smell confu- sions. Subjects ascribed little odor magnitude to solutions containing only s4.xlium saccharin. but ascribed considerable taste magnitude to solutions containing only ethyl hutyrate. •fhe taste ascribed (o ethyl butyrate was not due exclusively to its action on gustation since. when the nostrils were closed. as much as 80% of the "taste" disappeared. Subjects seem to resolve ambiguity regarding the locus of mutual olfactory -taste stimulation in favor of taste. Textbooks on sensory processes commonly claim that the flavor of food de- Subjects estimated the intensity of various concentrations of an odorant (ethyl butyr,ttet, a tastant (sodium saccharin). and mixtures of the two. The question of primary interest was whether the perceived intensity of the odor-taste mixtures would be equal to, greatcr than, or less than the intensities of the unmixed components. The outcome approximated simple additivity: The intensity of the mixtures was only slighily 14ss than the sum of the perceived 0 tl 0`~' i a. ,~ .
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/ --~--- --~'. 50330 7841 ~ ~ TAST~, : ~'ESTT2:G- -M>;TIiODOLOGY/ ` ~~ VOL. 11 JOCVI, No. 3 ALIIdEN:ARi.: 1145 -~;. PRACTICAL A PPLtCABiLZ'TY OF I'rarlLE PdETIIaD . . ~t:' ~ . . . . .. _ ,.. . Fachabteilung Nahrwlgsgutcr des ASMW, DDR r . 0 PaLONICA 197R PAI. ltfO1 NAR Some aspects of practical application and ]imitations of sensory profiling mcthott i!n qual:ty control have been discusscA ott the example of black-currant nectars sensory qw-lity. They included: proper training program for judLes, uniformity of the conditions wcd exact proc;•diirc of testing and determination of over-all sensory char.cteristics basing on single ev:lluated flavour notes. For the latest the statistical procedure of determina tion of cuatribution coetficients has been proposed. ' ~;:.~, . .. . m~thn~i1~~ it•.~ Tha vrofi',v 0 5 0 0 ~ d 6 i t,......,..,,....~ ,....4:__ ,
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/ r 50330 7858 j I ~'as•Le=~sta:~~-r~y~t3nc~ca~. ,t+~-ck~c•as. ..Y " . .1 • . .. ~.\..... .~ ' xJ ~ ~ .q...«-Y.yTl~a..~....~.. -..e."V . 0 5 0 0 0. 0 2-1 6 3 .6
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i : ..:..:...:~.~..,:.~. u.,~:,... .~. ~ ... ~.~,_~ . : „ . : 50330 7831 l: TASTE- TF,S'TING---HETi:OrTASTE--TESTI',k.G--TOD : RJR CLASS. NO. Pp.MLET 73 XI Gr~ ~. Gre enberg, A.; Collins, S. ~ , (Do yle Dane Bernbach, Inc.) ~ PAI RED CO`•S`t'ARISON' TASTE TESTS: SO;E FOOD FOR THOUGHT. ~ Jou r. Mkt. Res. 3, 76-80 (Feb. 1966) (in English) i *Ke words:* Qentions cigarettes. ~ y , i > i ~ I T t i s E ~ / . ~ t ' *1973, No. 21, 11 8952* *d* ~ y 'fo acco medicine: i ; . . j. , , .....s+v.w. . ..r.i~tw...-rw.r..M:..f, ,_,_ .... ...~...~..:...~...:..~..a'...Je'..eli'.1aaJU.J..t...t~.a4.s..a.~r.f.M.~aa.~.,.4..~..~..:.;._r.L..>.r ~.. . ~......r~ . -~... .. -. .« ~.. «.._.~._TM ~ o....--°.-.~.........~,~ -.... . . . . . . . . .. ~.T..«.+w~.....-• a•w.:aw . t~we.ra+i+...+..+..+~,cm.-....-.~... . . . ,^Y n~ Q (? f) 02 1 6: 4 9 ;, :
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, . _. . .. . .. , . . ..,., .. ... . .~,. , .~. 9. . ~.., .~. U .0. . 0 ~ .~., .~... . . ~ . ~1.t~G:y Sr°i: li2i1 Ai~e.ia.t^i a~,Ti la L X>:~3 .,..•.. t: ;ut~;: ~.~.;,.~ . (6961) Zor . •--- . . . . -,... -. . - .: I SfBL OEEOS •
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x 50330 7848 ~`~? • ,TAST):--TESTING-=METHOnOLOGY/. ~ 78 V Wo - Con:binatiotz of a Preference Pattern tcith the Triangle Taste Test WA1NNC.t1. WOODWARD and WILLIAM R. SCHUCANY Department of $tntistic~A, Southenl \fethodi: t t niver:ity, Dallas, Texa.< i:>'2i i, li..`. A. I;tO)IETRIC3 .i•i, ; ~ arcl Summary 117ien dealing with the problem of obtaining information concerning'consunler preferences for tu•o competing brands of a product. one Irolrld like to assume that the consumers sampled can actually dislinyuis/a between the tro brands. Often this is not the case and u•e /iace combined (At standard triangle test of sensory perception with a preference test in order to obtain ilifor- rnation concerning the conslunera' ability to distinguish betu•een the tleo brands. assuming an underlying urultinomial distribution, the nlarimuul likelihood estilnators (.lll.ls) of the condi- tional probability that a person prefers brand .1 given that he can discriminate bctu•een the tu•o products is tl,cn obtained. The estinlator obtained is a ratio of linear eombinations of observed multinonlial proportions. Tl,e variability of this estimator is assessed by means of the Jackknife statistic. the asymptotic variance of the .1!/,E, and Monte Carlo studies..-I pplication of the results obtained to tnste tests involving tu•o brands of potato chips is discussed. 0 5 0 0 n (l 2 1 6 2 6
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~ 50330 7855 ~ CORRELATION/ DATA--INTERPRETATION AND CORRELATION/ FOOD--SENSORY EVALUATION/ 1•ATISTICAL T~IETHOD. SENSES AND SENSATION/S*ELL/AROMA/TASTE-+-TESTING--S FLAVORANTS--SENSORY EVALUATION/STATISTICAL ANALYSIS/ 45$ AmCORRELATING SENSORY 1976 OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENTS 2 c. NEW METHODS FOR ANSWERING OLD PROBLEMS-, A symposium sponsored by ASTM Committee E-18 on Sensory Evaluation 7 of Materials and Products AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND MATERIALS rbacco Philadelpia, Pa., 11-12 Nov. 1974 ASTM SPECIAL TECHNICAL PUBLICATION 594 Uoskowitz editors rs and H R w P J J , , . . o_ e , . _...y.,~ ~ .. _,..:._.,....__ AMERICAN SOC!ETY FOR TESTING AND MATERIALS (Y916 Rae Itre®t, PVila3eIphia, Pa. 19103
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r ` • . ' - . e .~- . . , 50330 7808 L TASTE--TESTING--FOOD/ Neue 11lcl.llolleu der Be- und Auswertunb sensoriscller 1 Eigcnschaftcn von l..eLellsnlitteln und dcr Bcreclsnuna ihrer Vcraullerun~en 10. ,llitt. Die tpantitative tltt'Illlctl'iSellc BCst1111nIlttla des Bt'StI'i111111I1~~~C1'ilC11eS im -1pfelsaft llncl -konzentrat lu>,tl sciut: Ab11;in~i~I.cit von clcr BcstralillulTsclosis' 76 V He NEW riETHODS FOR EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS OF ORGANOLEPTIC QUALITIES OF • FOODSTUFFS AND FORECAST OF THEIR CHANCES 10. QUANITATIVE TITRIr1ETRIC DETERrtINATION OF IRRADIATION FLAVOR IN APPLE JUICE AND CONCENTRATE AND IT'S DEPEIr'DENCE ON RADIATION DOSE. : ; J. l1eRe>IrxX, S7. GkIGORO\'.{ und l.. GtttGOKOt•:INrtt• Inclhods for the et•aluation 11141 the rtnalt•sisof organoleptic qualitic: of foodstuffs and for the furccast of their clian,cs. 1'art X. 'J'he quantitative tilrimetric drtennination of the irrldiution fl:1x•our iu apple juicc mnd roncrntrcrtc :nnl its t!cpendcnre ; on the radiation dose Irradiation flavour in apple juire ontl contrntratc which is uiainh• attributablc, accordin;~ to oair previous studi.s, to tctrahydrofnran ('rliF) th;It may Iw quantiLativc•ly detrrtninc<I by mcans of the so-called mercury acctatc nicthoil. This is llosi•.1 on the fact thut thr nmount of a q"o wlutiun of ~ mercury art•t::tt• neutlerl for rcmot•iu-1 tho 7•IIF oJour is pr0hortioral tu the •17It" concrnlrnliun LTsinl; thia wrthod, the amotmts of Tl IF produt•cil by varinus l;annna ractiation doscs (varying from t o.6a to 2.55 \Ircon I Lc ~lrto Miinc titNnit lricall% •, l'alcul:~tinns .huwctl that the 77iN cunc~•n- : ~ a S tjtti ~ ~ t (lInc s •~~•i h tl raJ . in1 ncr. 7'hu., the minimum r:Idiatian dhKt•+ at mhich the ' irrculialion fl:wour is fir;t urr.oh•i•il (thlt•shu1-I of Ix•rctt•ntionl tnax• lx calcldntrd raadilv. '1'ha nn r-
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I t 50330 7847 L r , _• . .; , . . 1~ . -- + .~ 78 V Fo .,~ ; , TASTE--TESTIZ'ry--"tETtinn0LOGYI . _ Airu. Tcchuol. Agrrc., rg77. 26 (4), 373-4I8• -2, . . Prdsentation synthetique de dlverses m6thodes d'analyse : ,_. de donnees fournies par un jury de degustateurs,l hr~ ,),~ R'I'OJfASSt)NI; et C. I'J,A\TZl'• " l~ . Sun'ey o( llrc ntcthods o/ analysis o/ laste Poucl r1Rla ~ Tn this paper a surcey of the methods of analysis of taste panel data is given. With only ; one Variable Fricilntau'c t%co-a•oy vatianre analysis is cun:plclcd nitlt some spccific tcsts: utnltih:e cotnparisws, prctizcQ oriicr; the liuks h.ttceeit the various statistics are sliottn. 1l'ilL seveial A variahles, a lut of clas,ical methrnls of ntulti:liutensional analysis are pruposed to take into iiil occount the entire iuiormatiuu; Lrside principal cuu:pnucnls analysis, corrc.pundence :maly,is, c:utor.ical variate :walc,is sonte incthu:ls such ns procusteau :wal;•;is, priucipal cuurdiuate ' l l:e unpurtance is f;it•cn unalysls are d:>crsbcd :o c+)mhl-•tr thc .chole set uf st:tlisticai tools. to siuiilarity and di: si:n~luit} 1,^_twccn metlrods to give to the user the pux;ibilily to chc,O.c the best uttthal well titlc•tl to his o:t•rt probleut. _ ~ . i
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50330 7866 ~ .... _ ....`....~_...~.r..~~..-.a....~._..4......._. ~.. . . ,.,.,-, , ,.. ~ .... _. , .., . ,.. . ,. . . .... . . ~ ~2a3te.~t9S~i~Ag--St.~xt~,~tical.m®thods, ~ Hopkins, J. W. S0M,E' ST.:TIS"iIC.1L ASPECTS OF FL1iVU:~ a.Ill aRO1L1 TZi`i'I;.G, Frm: Si;;tistics and i„~n B:icJ.o-v. Amos, Iowa, 1954. n ~ 5 0 0 0 _..I. 2 ~ 4 4
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/ I 74 V Mc - - , . ,, . .3, TASTE--TESTING- rtLTIlODOhOGY/ ' : .:. . • . • , . On the/form of psychometric functions for taste) Etr~ McFADDEN and d ROBERTB. SKINNER, JR. .~ ~ t ~ UAijTi T7871. r+•rsryoexos..ju sraczos - - 3~ I ~.,~ Y 0 Psychometric furict ons were determined for' the discrimination of weak solutions of quinine hydrochior?de or of h drochloric acid from distilled water. The slopes of these functions were compared with those of some functions previously determined for sodium chloride and for sucrose. In general, the functions for QIICI were the least steep and those for NaCI were thc most steep, but the differences were not great. Thus, it appears that the psychometric functions for these different taste qualities have• substantially the same fonn, even though absolute sensitivity varies over several orders of magnitude. ~ As part of a previous experiment (~tcFadden, Barr, & measures of stimulus strength are more appropriate than Young, 1971), we obtained psychometric functions for are linear measures. Of course; in the absence of a the discrimination of weak solutions of ;~aCl or of logarithmic unit of ineasure, the same effect can be• sucrose froni distilled water. The data were obtained achieved by usin; a linear measure scaled' ~ • .. with a foreed•ehoice technique, and they were plotted as logarithmically. Hsd we done this with our presious percentage of correct decisions against concentration in data, the NaCI functions would have been only slightl,v 'C' millimoles, scaled linearly. 1Vhcn so plotted, the more steep than the sucrose functions, an outcome n~ure ~.: .~,~.~,~,~,,tuncJiocu_fac,h 1Cl wcr•c abos~t 10 tic~cs more stce~an in linc with data from othcr modalitics• I lcrc wc :+-•liwn 0 S' 0 0 ~'t~ .,Q 2 -1 ~ rception ~& P~cl~ , w
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50330 7852 i ~.Taste- te sting, ~ acev~ew. . t.-. ._... ... ..Vti .~._...-! n •. .y O ... .. 1•. • ... _..... kJ...~., Q. .~• ~. .p.. 2A. , 6... 3: •Q. .. .... . . .
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/ ; .•..._...__......_ -:1- - •.3_ '''raate-t~at~--Statast.ical, ~~ t;iads . , Guilford, Joy Paul, 1S97- Psychonictric niethods, by J. 1'. Guilford ... 1st ed. \e.• 1 ork and London, McGraw-Hill book company, ino,, 1936 xr1, 5G(i p. incl. 2 Illus., ports., dingrs. 2.3} cm. (llal/-tittc McGraw-Hill publications In psychology, J. F. liaslilell ... consultill; editor) "References" at end of each chapter. 1. Psychology, Physiological. 2. Mental trsts. i. Title. 131 11.G8 ~~ , [ 1;:1.11,;8] 15 2.$ 3G--2117 Lilirm•y of Con;ross `~ ifi3ez2i -t~
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/ I r NIVERSITY/TASTE--TESTIi1G--FLAVOR/ 50330 7857 ~ DISSERTATIOidS--KANSAS STATE U )TASTE-,-TESTIyG-~~-STATISTICAL''.'METHOD~S/FLAVORANTS--MEASURFatF,NTj OBJECTIVE/ . - _ . . ....,.....,.-...I..:..C..hr._..ti... .. ,. .... « 7~ .,,, XX MeF-E-404-79 1 . ' /IN'U.YZII\G A TrA-XaY CLLSSIFICATIQN. 316 ,elt oyc aa /!6'er' `<" ? Q50Q~~'2 ~lfP'LE&tUQ1; G~t~ndoiyn Neul, 1956- ' STATISTICA.: AP?LIGTICN 'IU FI~'.tin PRrJPILE AAiALYSIS A.O AN ITL•~,rtTI1'H FPoCmiTtE FOR xarLSas State University, Ph.D., 1977 Statistics I Xerox University Niicrofi(ms, N+„koor.u,cnrq&n 4e,os 6 3 5 .
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, i f VKo 56isor}-6psychologica2 asipe6r.s: . e{C1 `?r•. Y. T) . .. L.~ • i ~ . l y anr .. ~n
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5033Q 7859 , . ...t.... 3- ..ae _.. i~ . .._.. { <: r ...1 ~•: .•,.l .~ r. ." ~.....~.. .
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/ I r l 50330 7864 V, Gr3 =~~fes:e:.testi,~a--5tati,~ti~ca~ :we 4hods S Gil d;;ei.^.'in~ r., 1'O : A crxper.:,:n at, '~nr,-ira f;"'"T' s ~' ~v .n¢1 "::.j. . ~ t .... +:.y..+....::.(. xaJ»1? (I 1~',{) • ., U S tl A 7! 0. 2 1 b 4 2
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i 50330 7861 73VBr STATISTICAL METHOPS/ , `T ASTB--TE4TING-STATISTICAL :K£'i'lYaD9/ Riometr3cs 9 22-38 (1953) SOME STATIS'TICAL IM, HODS IN TASTE TESTING AN D QUALITY J:VALUATION ``'°' R.AtcH AiiArt IiaLDi.Er The Yiryinia Agricu;tural Lzpcrimo3t Slation . Yirginia Polytcchnic ln:Iitute Blatl.•sLusQ, ti'irgini.i I.INTRODUCT:ON ; 1.1 Introductory Rcmarks. methoc;s, the mc.:!:c.*n: tical .statiscician, on the other. The difficulty is accentuated by the general lack of mathematical training for the • agricultuMl sciences and the sometimes aloofness of the statistician. .,,n++,P.,-t;,-n.t has tended to vublish his research 050 0n0~z 1 6 3 9 _~ The title suggested for this paper is a general one and the discussion uhich follows is necessarily of a rather broad nature. There is a definite fle ^~ f c "' r 2m^r0\'c :1 ..c:T: a:.~.:f." t"'c: n uh~. u.Gr tti .~bdtl'tsl VN V~.Y.metheds, in this case the food technologist, the home economist and the hor ticulturist, orn the one hand and the manufacturer of statistical
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50330 7868 ~ / 276 K ~ ^t88Le=-tasting--Stat ESrt.iCa3, IIletnoda. I{empthorne, Oscar, ed. Stntistics and mathematics in biology, edited by OSca Kemptliorne (and othersl Ames, Iowa State Collvro Pres iz, G32 p. illus. 24em. PaPerQ ]nrsented at the htostutistics conferc•nce held at Iolca Stat Collece in June nnd.1ult•, 1952. I3 i hl iography : 1). 573-G14. I. 'MathemutirU statistics. 2. Biology. T. Title. Rn'21'i r.K 3 311.2 Lihriu•y of CongresH
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, 50330 7870 FDOP--SENSnRY F.VA1. TATIn*1/Sr•F•LL/TASTT'--TFSTINn--FnDn/ TASTE--T}STI*1r'.-- ATISTICAT. METHMS/ CANADA DFPART* , OF ACPICULTURE, PTTr,LICATIDN 1284/ Ppp~ METHODS FORAENSORY EVALUATION OF FOOD 3c. ELIZABETH LARMOND Food Research Institute, Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa CANADA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 190 V I~~ ~ ~V~+ . 0 s0 o~o21648 ,Y'
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/ 50330 7856 ` i BF Annual x•cvicw of psycliolo; y. v. 1- % 1:150- ' «nford, Calif., AnnuRl Revio«~s. _ !~-~~• ( v. 23 cm. . .. . l.ditor: v. 1- C. P. Stoue. 1. I's~~Lulo:y-Terirboulcs. r. Stone, Calvin I'ecry, 1S92- I3r ;0A5G -N ) 150.58 14 L:brary of Congress ' I ."1 li22) . 0 S 0 0 0 0 2 b3 q ec: 50-131-1- -.-...-s-.,n..,. -.,., ?i.>....a
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i 50330 7862 73 V Br STATISTICAL METN4DS/TAS-TE-t"STIIC(',-'tS'CA?IS'I•t~`-AL '-l'lETI,*4D'.I~/ • RANh Al\TALYSI S 41' I~TC .1IPLETE BLOCK DESIGNS BY RALPH ALL \' BRADLEY AND MILTON E. TERRY* Virginia Agricuhural Experiment Station of the Virginirs Polyteehnie Instituti ' L THE METHOD OF PAIRED COMPARISONS - - 1. INTRODIICTION The analysis of experiments involving paired comparisons has receiv4id considerablo atiten- k tion in statistical met!iodology. Thurstone (1927) Jias considered the problem on the assump- tions that a linear variate is involved and that perceptible differences exist among the items presented for comparison. 11fore recentl3, Mosteller (1951a,b) has elaborated upon Thur- stone's :nethod and, having postulated a sensation continuum over which sensations are jointly normally di:ari butcd, has developed a X= test following transformation of the observed variates. Kendall & Babinoton Sn;ith (19-i0) proposed a method of analysis for paired comparisons , which does not depend on assumptions of a linear variate or cf aormality, and the procedure may be described as a comhinatori;:l rine tcst._Thev form a enPff,rient nf ac*ro-omrnt7u.•htr}L__... 'Biometrika 39 324-45 (I952) os0 0 0 0 ;z 1 6 40
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50330 7873 ~ TaS'Ga-t4v-UAg-.-St&~'ail3t3.C.a1a ffi8t}1JCZs, ~.. ". .• .. . .'.)~..._ .. ~.. ,•. 0~i tl ~1 ~l 02 1 o S
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50330 7871 1 6 L Litt'.e («rthur D.) inc., C,cmbridge, dluse. FIxw".• rascnrch and food acce.ptauicc; a s,irvcy of tlio sr,"K of flavor aml zsvociatcd r<<~;u•clt, coinpil,A froln pap.~rs 1)ic- seatecl in :t series of symposia "given irl \e;: l'ork, R-inhnld Pub. Corp. jli.,5g1 vl, 3')1 p. lilus., dinl;rs., lubh5. 2f cm. Includes Llblio;;rapnies. 1. P'Invor. 2, FooQ-Annlysiv. T15f1.1.55 641.072 58-1~ 3?.; LiLrary of Con;;rr.us' J ~5~k10i . 0 5 0 00 0 2 1 0 4 9
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50330 7853 To Ja ste~-tA st~.ng`-Raview.. :4 Terz•ys : J~?. ~T f•~ ~~; WT ,t r,., r l.i.'i4 ~'::,rA `~~ t•1.1.L trf,:~ u! •~Si ~.~~ . t,'1.~,.~:~ t~.i,~..`; i~ BM~ic'lc,yr and r,JA,3 L. -xtvi3,, F'h,ltc-,tat f~i~c:Qa Foo3 'xRachttol4;Yq fi onQ z ~ b.~ I
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50330 7875 Vx To ; , e `. '~~ . . . . _.. ... .: .. .. . . _. _„i.~_ ~.i' . .. ,. - .. C) .A'•'.:
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. P. $ 91. 1..? ,..U. U.'u•IiY 5••1p• i%.-h._'...Si a•j.i.aAe.r•..W.:..:ai..i......... ~+i.~•i.~...:. i:'.:........ -..~... a.:4.r.:..re_:J.4.... ~...~a.:.~i~.....a..~.a_\'.~a............ .... p~.. ~:..~... i taci.JrJ:~C.w t~V LAIa`-n%cll.-t:S •tj tsanbTuqaay--2 u-a YO A 1 9L8L OfIEOS ~
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r ! I 50330 7860 ~~ National Food Research Institine, South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Rcscarch, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa) (Received Alay 6, 1976; Accepted August 9, 1976; !wt 412) C Newton Blakesley , . o S: A eontputer progranune in FORTRAN is described to aid in the statistical evaGtation aforganoleptic panel results The progrrrn peronns an analysis based on the nonparanutric Friedmnn hre rank statisrics/ur a two-way classificatinn. If an orerrdl diljer, rt established for tnultiple sarnples at the chosen level of significance, the l+rograrnrne performs a series of Friedrnmr t.•sts r sanple pairs to determine which samples are statisrically dif~erent. The I•'riednra,r rank starisfic nrcrlrud is nrore applicable 1h'e analysis of Jara fronr nrart urganoleptic panel tcstt/or difference than the nwn comrmonly used paruuretric anno•sis rarirr methods. Introduction Sensory evaluation by conCumer and/or laboratory pancls is an important and widcsprcad practice in both food rescarch and industry•. Pancls are commonly employed to dctenninc the acceptahility of a new product or the effect of a pruccct ehangc. Such chan~cs could include additjon of a ncw . ~ 1) ,.:,TASTE--TESTING--STATISTICAL }4ETFiOS/ ~ An Aid to Statistical Evaluations of Organoleptic Panel Results . • This paper describes a computer programme in FORTF prepared to analyse organolcptic panel results using Friedman rank statistic mcthod. Programme ()cticrip/ion and 1,ogic :;;-`6 'i''M~'?''~ :1~ . . . _ . ;±a I 8. 4n 0 2 1 6..3
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I b9 iz- U••0 •nu- s0 s.3~.?..'.`~.ai:.....~c_-..~..~...~~.:a.s .i.::~..._...._.:__.«...:.i..-su.._~ urc 'IvaZ.t:S1..~17Y ~ E99L OEEOS , ~ , i
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,_1...=: 50330 7867 ) ..~.....~,..~.~~- -:> I~ov I CSIRO Aust. Div. Fd Res. Tech. Pop. No..40, 1.-73 (1974)~ ~ FOOD--TASTE-TESTINC/TASTE--TESTING--STATISTICAL'METHODS/.- The Validity and Usefulness of Subjective Scales with Special Reference to Food A. !fo ward Division of Food Research, CSIRO, P.O. Box 12, Cannon Hill, Qld. 4170 This paper sets out to examine the poscibility of validating subjective scales of magnitude and alw of difference in magnitude. Methods of utilizing the latter scales in the study of the multidimensional nature of properties are also cramined. The basis of a statistical test of the v,rlidity of ratio scales obtained by paired ratio e.timation is discussed and its limitations in practice cxarnincd for a series of properties including lcrgth, strength of flavour of sapid solutions, difference in length, distance in hvo<limensional space and difference in flavour intensity. Statistical and graphical procedures are devcloped for studying the niture of any lack of validity. l.imitation of repertoire of ratio responses available to individuals is shown to limit the applic- ability of the statistiwl test to ;roup means in many cases. Even with the simplest tasks there is some statistical evidence for lack of validity, but the relation of the resulting subjective scale val-,es to their physical counterparts and the line:u relation betwecn scale values obtained with studies of both ma,nitude and difference in magnitude indicate the usc- fulncss of the scales. os0 0 0 oz 1 64s ,
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i r 50330 7845 1 1 MfiASTE ='T);STING MFTHODOLQGY/ 1 . .uli.a+.._...... e~1..'S-Jni.'~ . 5.... . ..a. . J. Inst. Drcw., July-August, 1977, Vol. 83, pp. 244-2` 78 V Pa -'- ' SENSORY QUANTIFICATION OF I3ITTERNESS AND FLAVOUR OF B1:Ek DURING STORAGE* •BY R. M. PANGOORN, M. J. LswIs, ANn L. S..TANNO$• (Food Science & Technology, University of Calijornia, Davis, California, 95616, USA) . . ~ Recelved 14 Decainber 1976 Sensory techniques were utilized to measure bitterness and degree of liking for commerci; lagers, and to quantify aroma and flavour qualities of two sets of experimental lagers. Significar negative correlations were obtained between sensory bitterness and degree of liking for 17 corr morcial beers, by inexperienced as well as by trained judges. Sensory bitterness was positeve; correlated with BU values, with both measurements negatively correlated with beer ago. In exper mental lagers, BU values decreased with increasing time and tomporaturo of storage, but sonsoc bitterness, as determined by trained judges, decreased only with storage time. Increases in malt ethanol, and skunky aromas with time of storage were accompanied by decreases in hoppy, must and wot cardboard aromas. Bakod aroma increased sharply with increasing storage temperatur In a second set of experimental lagers varying in pH (3-7, 4-2, or 4-6) and/or headspace gas, sourne! was markedly affected by pH whereas baked flavour was significantly stronger in beers with 02 thr In those with C02 headspace. The data are discussed in terms of differences between analytic and consumer-type sensory testing, and in terms of changes in aroma and flavour attributable to is, GC-acid content, pH, headspace gas, and time and temperature of storage. Key®ordSi ar~i za, Qer, &voia seary ~ethmis, !Ira;& five days. Bottle codes were recorded and samples from i lasting. same lot were used t'er cenenrv anatv4v an.i fnr hsirf...,- ' i
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r 50330 7869 1 ! 0 81 V Kr I -` TASTE--TESTING=-STATISTICAL METHODS/ SENSORY EVALUATION/ -. „ Af,l~ -4 A NON-PARAMETRIC RANKING METHOD FOR THE ' STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF SENSORY DATA• ` AMIHUD KRAMER University ojMaryland, College Park, Md., U.S.A. and G. KAHAN, D. COOPER, and A. PAPAVASILIOU McCormick Company, Inc.. Balrimore, Md., U.S.A. `0 S () OI tI Abstract. Sensory data are rarely normally distributed and should, therefore, be statistically analyzed by non-parametric techniques. A computer program was devised for generating tabular data by which up to twenty samples can be compared following evaluation by as many as seventy-fire panelists. When sjbmples are initially ranked, rank sums for each sample may be compared to appropriate entries in the table direaly, if 1ay values are assigned by panelists, the technique is still useful, but the Olue~ust~'irst Ki co rte/ to ranks.
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50330 7879 ; - J ~as te--tes t ing-~-Techniqt~e,; ~ ` . :~ ~ '.,;."";' ,S;F;._.:u. ;tc.•!:fl. G•;'Ozt.CwQ•`3!1 Qw Ve;1.'tt JtSica pi'ou'.'•:a + r •+ ..., r++.
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50330 7872 i , :-'I'at3te-testink--Statiti ticA.]. methcr3 s. 4 QA 11icNemar, Quinn, 1900- • 276 Psycholo;icnl statistics. 2d ed. New York,lti'iley t°1955 M 408 p. illus. 22 cnt. (A Wiley publication In psychology) 1. StntlsUca. i.'l ltle. IL12J.\123 1955 (- -~ 311.2 G5-G320 Ltbrary of Congress ~ ~ [20,
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50330 ?883 }, ~_ TASTE -T.gSTING--TECHNIQUEj TASTE--PNYSIQLOGY! _ 81 V Ya Phcsiolorv & Brhavior. Vol. 26. pp. 721_723 19E1. Pergamon Press and Brain Research Publ. Yrinted in the U.S.A. A Simple Device Detecting Onset Timc of Taste Stimulationi TAKASHI YAMAMOTO,= HIROMITSU TAKEBE AND YOJIRO KAWAMURA Department of Oral Physiology, Dental School, Osaka University, • 4-3-48 Nakanoshima, Kitaku, Osaka 530, Japan Received 14 June 1980 YAMAMOTO, T., H. TAKEBE AND Y. KAWAMURA. A simple device detecting onset time of taste stimulation PHYSIOL. BEHAV.16(4) 721-723,1981.-A simple piece of equipment is described for recording the accurate onset titr of chemical stimulation applied to the tongue surface. The equipment consists of an infrared light emitting diode, ; phototransiitor for monitoring the stimulus onset, and solid state logic circuits for generating electric pulses at the mome: of stimulus onset. Onset time of taste stimulation 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 16 6 1
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~: ,. 4_: :~.~ ,...... : ...,. . t. _._._~.._.,.ti ~~.J ~... _._:..~._~.~...~~_..~.. .....-:. ~~~..~ ~ ".f+ L.~.Ia,•J C'. M F...~ i ..s ~..:rwY r ..... rv..v ,}....... ....... ..-. ._ ... . ~ ' . . ~ ~ . - ....... •.S_• ...._ -"l~ rJ ~. '(6961) Zaf t xx . . . ' . 1 . . ' . : : . . . . , !a~ r.•..r. 1 ~ 0 L8L OEEOS
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w 50330 7887 ~_...X __.__~-_{__. _..._...__._.._..._:. ~ ...._ ...~..._.. _........__... ~ Frl ;'Taat~'t~ating .:. `roUacco. ~.i'xY4e r"Rm !~:%t~ p,, r y ) ~ .~.i,;'3 `4-,. :'>,, " r% r ~S 0 0 0 Q 2 ~ 6 65
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/ ,.:ac.. :.:. .~»._~___.__.... ..y .~~_.__„. . .- -_ _ .~..__ .... _..,__~•-__ _.,....._~~ r._... ~...,,~..~o". .........ea DISSERTATIONS--NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY/TOBACCO--SMOKE--PHYSICAL PROPEP.TI TOBACCO--SI•iOKE--TASTE/TOBACCO--SMOKE--ODOR/TASTE--TF:STING--METHODOLOGY/ TASTE--TESTING--TOBACCV ,'CICARETTES--TASTE-TF.STING/ 1974 Abdallah, F. M. TS 2240 Ab P.3R CLASS NO. TEXTBOOK TS 2240 Ab 1974 (N. C. State Univ., Raleigh, N. C., U. S.) SENSORY TESTING OF CIGARETTE SMOKE. PANEL SELECTION, TRAINING, AND USE. N. C. State Univ., Ph. D. Thesis, Raleigh, N. C., 191 p. (1974) (in English) *1974, No. 11, W 4458* *d* Tobacco analysis: _R .,..' _ -,., ..-, .... .- _ .r._. J t 0 5 Q;' 0 0 0 2 .r,.,,,r_,.....~.~..~-,.~...,...,........y,..,..._-.-•.~.r.~.~...~..~..-.....,~.,.,..-~.~- . . . ~, 66 2 I 50330 788y
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/ 50330 7886 -:-Ta ste--testing,•-~ob~ ccor .. • ~ . . ' . . ~Ci: _]w! 1 II TJ::yCcQ~ tG1,YCtJ7:'f ~ ' 1 ;~t7• 1:l1a J~+I~'3CJ~1(3~?:Zu I
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I / i .50330 7821 1 _.erwrr....._a.-~....a._. ......-.... -..~._....-..:..4..........._.. ..._.../_.._-...._...-_.~._.....-,~..._~_... s._..._ :~c_<-.r r.., .... .~.~.....+. ,;,., ~ .: _... _._ - 7 ° ,~70 M2 - ~oyQ- cZA4.o ~ 1? -7 .. ~~Z , ~ .-. - -. ~ - ---~ . ~ ; W'- • ~~ . ~w;' 0 ~. -. MJ.1~ SP, !,,o(rris Clen, 1940- lr~~%~^Q ~+t 'I ! Itif'LUE!:CE OF T}:l: CF.C4TH Oi ;V.YCF•F0?'HILIC }~'{CF:OORGA:7IS'~S G?7 THE CI.A~'Git AND SEIWCTeD ~CHl:P:ICP.L Or CIiICKTr't7 HEhT. f.°-3 •1 The Ohio State University, Ph.D., 1971 I rood rechnolo,!y ) Uni~•ersity tSicrotih, s, A i;EP,CL(Company, Ann Rsbui, ? Sichigan _., 0 S (l Q a 0 z 1 1~.~.._~1 ..~.. . .. __ .~...___ ._ . _ -____._._......__ ~
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50330 7899 ~ I-Taste: tosting--Tobacco srnoking--x:1'f'eGt ...,,,,,.: ....,,r -. ~ - . . ••-- . , ,. ... . `i . ~, .. _,r .. .. d,t..-;. U!~ ~ 0 0 0 ~ 1 b 7 7
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50330 7874 "~A s~~~f+e~t1 ng~=Ststistical mdthods..,, T~•Tl'f•tv.1r~ ~'..:'•Ir,.1.1•! i1'. I ^ f•Y•~ Y^. r..n1 :f 1(.:•iTt.:yl -.,~. 'i,~ .~1t11 t~ „P~ T•~ (~'~.~;~ • r`~ ."~~ .,I^..~f."i1.1 (` ~~- C~T;`f iiJt:i•.J V. t. .. . ~~ i':~~ 2...•~ .) .'1l.'.Z •a.~,t~. .t^a i ; L• . ; CI •r ^. _.. ~...,_t ~:...t~t ~ 1 . Lt.l.~i ~_ Li i i. i:. i.a! tio ~`~w<.~+t• T'ia0vil~ti:•L:'ti frC:'t= }':."A 9 if 7 :.~'- ~ r~'•'~' 1 (.~ .. . -...".r..:....<~.--. -. ._.-.enr'1.,.-,.~...-.~,.-._..~--•T.-..,.,P-f~rITT~••••'.!"^~.q'T"'..~"r{' a 'S, n •a ..a. 0 . 2• '1•..6. .5 •2
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/ 50330 7891 } ..~ .._. ~ ~~. .y: .i.. ..re~7..r..rr.~r.. „ ,...~.e• ....~ .. .... Cat; ~'. ` ..,. . ~~j<.!i., . .~..... • ...... ~.. ••~ , 0 S tl 0 0 a 2 1~6 9
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/ 1 50330 7896 TASTE--.TESTING--TOBACCO SMOKEI .... • . VI Ta3-78 RJR CLASS N0. PAXPHLET VI Ta3-78 Mo11er..N. \euchatel Switz.) s Rennies s Teb (F b i , , que ac ~ a r "BLIND PRODUCT TESTS" FOR CIGARETTES IN THE RESEARCH DEPARTMENT OF PHItIP MORRIS (FABRIQUES TABACS RENNIES) EUROPE IN NEUCHATEL, SWITZERLAND. , .. . *(Cigaretten - Produkttest.)* Quester Tabak-Kolloquium, 20th, paper, 1 p. Orleans, Fr. (May 1978) (in German) - Abstract only.available. Discusses the blind product test used by Philip Morris in testing new cigarette in comparison with one or.more competitive brands. In the tests, the brand names of the cigarettes are covered with a broad strip of paper so as not to influence the test panner. . S () 0 Q 0 2 ,
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50330 7843 ~ ls . 'T s41c--Ts4 iN~_- ~'~ba~cd T S . ; ar ~~:'eTezf•ar5-='I~~~~iodole Te3~~«~ _... . . . . .. . ?, efbo.sl ~,~i g~c.co--,l~N.tor e v~~k~yi iar. - ~ ~ 1, 1,5'4 '' 4 7 P.JP. CLASS ::0. T}:':'fI;Oni: TS 22140 Mq 1li Q J blt:ncLer.b,sch, (Scrvice d': M0oitation Industriellc Tabacs Allur:cttcs, Paris, Fr.^ncc) T C'"ACCO t:Lr.:•,L'::TS 1'UR T:::: rLAE-n1::':'1'i.(1:•: OF A M?1:'f ' ~;) ';:,.17T:•:G Sk:;;SORl' P}; ;C::P'TIO;:s. *(La Ucgi-st,xticn Dcs Tabacs. E14scnL's Pour L'i:laboration !1'Uuc n'Au.:lysc Urs Pcrceptions Se:l,oricll.cs)* `;cr~•icc• c't':;;~:o: tTndustr~~rllc Tab,~cs A11umettes. P,~riE, Fr:~nr~•; 111 h. (1;'Gg) (in }'rench, Er.4glish t r~:;sl;:ti.on in Pr~~i>,Zr: tic~) ~Kc~~Yords^; sr;o:inr ` r,:r7cls . • ' ~( '~ E9M Owy~ - .~y ,~' ''~( • 4' •L v} a~ f il ~' ~~ ~ ~ri ,!b ~ .j t 7L1'cG, !',y~',.-CWG7{ M'iv"~d !!.c ~; •aj - ~
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/ Y- / r 50330 7881 1 79 V Le 1 ~ TASTE-=TESTING--TECILYIQUE/, ADRIENNE LLHRER We Drank Wine, We Talked, wnd a Good Time : WasHadl3yAll A numoer of perplexinc issues which underlie studies of how people tue words have never been adequately investigated. First of all, speakers' vocabularies continue grouing throu;hout their lives. This is not just a matter of adding new phonological forms paired with meanin gs, but also of learning new senses of phonological forms already in the reprrtoire. A speaker who knows twelve senses of hot has a better vocabulary, in some relevant :ence, than someone who only knows one sense. That is, the speaker who knows that hot :an be applied to wounds, radioactive material, spicy flavors, athletic performances, current qews items, eood luck, knows more than one who understands hot to mean only 'high temperature'. A second perplexing problem is that mmny words in the lexicon are s,7alar terms, such as guuJ, kot, sitarp. or j,1s1. These term- imply norms, but speakers rarely make the norms explicit and listeners rfflydsk r t,temSNVlreaF,a sentence such as John is fatter calls 1'-
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/ 50330 7894 / Vo +~Ta ste -lt 'e s ting-~ i-Toba c co,-t. e, 11 , aY•J. Cj T?P t~!`)+a:: ~ .t' ' -. ..., .. . .. . ~... . r .•. . .. _ . .. . . ..... ,- . .. _. t. ..v ...,'.Jw. .:>J Cl 5 Cl 0 n ~~ ~; t 6 72
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. .. . . . . .:• . A' si '.g ' I ?: ().U ~ 0 .. ~ S. . ~ . . C:) uZ „ •S/ (•l) qz°G ,nb Aao.v.~;; l3-c r:ym;z~ l at'~-. ^ t r ..' • q (6961) ~.;~~.~anb~uy~~~~-8ux3sa~=a3sgxz~« Z~C xx j o99L oefos , I .
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50330 7905 ~ r a a1 3 r. -.. . . .: ,, _,. r.. .., i .r
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/ / 50330 7888 r' CC()--Z:!(E*fI(;A0L C(l% iYOS?2'I'J:r'.r - ~ 73 VIZ;. 6? TCII,tCCO---I33.LIr'llLNGS/TOIeACCO--TASTP.-•''P~TIL;i~/TAS~E~-TESTLNr--'itili.4GCC~ 1:JF i CL '1 0 P H L1' % i ~ . ., ., . . i. _ . L, : Y I ro .~ Georgi.ev, S. ; Todorinov, S. ;Yai: d jiyan, 1":. ; Tsonev *(»o affil.)a ~ MA1'ttI:?•VJJ:CAL 1!CPF.1. OF CIG'.iRLTTE BLE`'I)S. Nar!cr.. Tr., i'issh. Inst. f:hrr~nit•. 'Jkuso.a Prom., Plovdiv 18 (Pt. 1) 33-45 (1971) (in Bulgarian with Cotr.plcte EnZlish Translation) ~ *11_73, No. 14, W 5745* *lm* ?'otilrs*:co manufacture: _•._,,.,.. ..~-.-•:.~.y..--- ..,..- . ._.. ~..^...._. , . ' . . . . ~ . ~* p S tl Q t1 "0 2 1 6 6 6
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i , 50330 7903 ~ T1LSTE--TESTI:IG-L-TORACCtr S.M:CING-EI'MT/ 73 RP3 RJR CL,~SS NO. PA:•T"i'i-iLET 73 X Ya Panvborn, R. :f. ; Trabue, I. :d. j (University Calif., Dap. Food Sci. Technol., Davis, Calif., U. S.) ' GUSTATORY RF.SPOtiSES DURING PERIODS OF CONTROLLED AND AD LIB CIGARETTE S::OKI:1G. Perception Psychophylics 1, 139-144 (1973) (in English) t *1973, No. 7, W 2805* *1m* Tobacco medic;^e: --~ _ .---- - - --~-- -__T-.: =:.:=~--~.~--~ --- -- ~_.._ ,, TCiFiACL`C-SPiOKIP.G--OLFACTORY ACUITY/TU3ACC0--S;(OKINt;--P1iYSTOLUGY 1,A1D PSYCHULCGY/ • 0 5t) 0 {J 0 2 1 6 8 1
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50330 7890 I 1 ~.~-Toste;-tostina--Tobacco. ,- - _... _~~ .. ...:~.':. . _... -~~~--- .. Cl . . ,. .. . . fj . ~'J (a Q • •(~. . (). ~. . • ~. .. .d. 6 , 13
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- ' . _ . , 50330 7877 1 TASTEP..TESTIN6--TRCiiNIqUE/ 73 V~Gr ~ ~OUP.I\TESS A:1TD LITTER>'ES~C0ITUSIO\S OVER DGEIIEI TS f QUENCES OF TASTE JtI ' r:.T. p.yC~,at. tie;~. s-I, i. pr s / ~ prtinlnjin Oreat Britain ~_ A. .lf: GP~EGSONANn A. . H. BAiER 7- iVew Zealand 'D!phrtmenl o Psychology, UniLorsily of Canlerbury;AChristchztrch l are interpreted in torms of a cosino model of qualitative confusions. ., • . . Confusions between bttterness and acidity tn tho percep on ot threo taste etunuli - quininy sulphate, citrio acid and di.aodium•5'-guan;•lato-a-ere e:camined over the near-threshold range in 45 subja:tx, using an oxtcndcd a3cendinR series procedure and intensity ratio estima- tions. Individual difforencos, and tho effects-of reforence information, were marked. The results It has been noted, both anecdotally and in controlled experiments, that substances which predominantly elicit sour sensations may frequently be described as 'bitter', and that substances which are tS Tically bitter, such as quinine or caffeine compounds, may also sometimes be perceived as 'sour'. This situation is briefly called acid-bitter confusion; it can be most readily demonstrated by using solutions in the near- threshold concentration rtinae and is found in any large quasi-random sample of . human tasters. The confusion is relative in the sense that there is not such a hi,h probability of pairwiso confusion between other taste qualities over the saute A _•, - . _ ,~..... .... , .r-,.. -~.,..,,.. . .... ,. .. ,--..,~..x .,~ ....,...„....~ ~.. ~ .. . ~ .. .. -.- . • _ . . . . . -..~-r- ,....,..,.,-...-•---..~....-... , . _ .. . . . : ~ ,,.. . 0 S. p Q 0.0 2 1 6 S5 ~ , .
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50330 7895 , t i.•: 1, ~ 2240 F Ta stcrtiq- .19 tfr,l F:: . :+.~~:_ . .._. t I - .. • . a'., , 0 S 0 Q • •1 V. 6 7..3
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50330 7882 I To ste--ts s t9.ng,-:-Te c4aique.6 ~t ri"~... yy~!~r-~~n .A.f~3 ~....t~•. r F•, ,,r . L;:Ea I,. t`1 v :.s. ';t 1~i Q1ft F'liJ~ i'~C~lEl.12C'.` tj ~ra i~ 5 0 0 ~~. ~ 16_ 6, 0
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• 50330 7906 ~ 11 11 . l Z Life Sciences Vol. 10, Part 1, pp. 361-370. 1971. rinte in reat ritain ORAL EFFECTS OF HYDROLYTIC «NZYMES ON 77:V Gi .:~ Perganwn Press ASTE ACUITY IN MAN ' E. L. Giroux and R. I. Henkin Section of Neuroendocrinology, Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Heart and Lung Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20014 (Received 27 August 1970; In final form 8 February 1971) SUMMARY EFFECTS of oral exposure to various hydrolytic enzymes on subjective taste.re= sponses and detection and recongition thresholds for four taste qualities were, measured in nornal volunteers. Polypeptide bond-rupturing enzymes decreased' ' subjective taste acuity and increased detection and recognition thresholds for four taste qualities from one to twelve hours. Lipases, peptidases, ribo- nuclease and polysaccharidases had no effect on taste acuity. These findings suggest that protein exposed to the oral environm-nt is involved in an event common to the appreciation of all four taste aualities. Recent studies have shown that thiols and metal ions are involved in regulation of taste acuity, including each of four taste qualities (1,2).' `Thes'•sttTdies'led'#o a; hypbthesis that protein ("gate-keeper" protein) which
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6 L a ~~; ~ U Q VS 0- °I'o4uo.xnD °ano p T , : ~ 'X 2t •.~ ~ tl ~q • tt PTuu.?y Ctt~ayrli:rX L;i L~jrati vY ra.J L1vv :~'.:z .ra..t.•~ltJd~?7;~,ite.1 ~~ 'AtUL:.i;1 QttV'[(X" .. . . 9~'h{ 1061 0££OS
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i i ! 50330 7902 (' ..- • • . . i F. V TOBACCO--SMOKING--TASTE THRESHOLD--EFFECT/ PIi*EL+YLTHIOCARBAMIDE(P.T,C.)/ TASTE--TESTING--TOBACCO SMOKING--EFFECT/' 77 V Ma .- _.- RJR CLASS NO. PAITHLET 77 V Ma Ziaxia, C.; Cosseddu, C. G,; Vona, G.; Floris, G. (Inst. Anthropological Sci., Univ. Cagliari, Italy; Inst. Anthropolo,r,ica: Sci., Univ. Sassari, Italy) THE SE::SITIVITY TO P.T.C. IN 541 SARDINIA.NS. Jour. Huraan Evolution 4(vo. 4) 281-86 (1975) (in English) 711e sfnSlllvity of J{I 1:Irllilll.ln3 of INII)r scirs to IY.1'.C. was caamincd ') using the cowpletc H.rrris & K.ham mclhrnl. ~ 1L1 thc samplc cxamuicd suu s,gudic.lnr dilfclcnres an dre haas of scst ~ or age were noted. E%rn smc.ling Jid not srcm to Lave a dnruuinant influence on thc suunivlly to Lut this ws csnrniurd only I ~ iudic.tivcly. . ' Sulwlividing the subjects etamincd on the hasis of the area fr.rm which Ihc came rcvcalcd sl wh nt dilfer:ucu Ixt». n two of ILe tlu e b , y cs c . c J i arcu c.amined____ __----- ' 0 S 0 0 0 0 2 1 6 a 0
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z e 9 1 ? U U 0 0 5 0 vulapIYd ' f! 'Pi Pufl onc;ray, •il -Y •uao(23ued 'H '-j ZQ `~'lY::ni1S `d,H"ii`: ClPV ;i:0;1;Sfi `~;Ct!J °yi •g 't1: oq:ia~d r I?d I X TL~ J ~ b06L 0£EOS i
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/ r 50330 7913 e 81 V Hy Learning 6 Behavtor 9 ; 121. 281-286 (j9tO. , The insensitivity of sche ule-induced polydipsia to conditioned aste aversions:~ Effect of amount c6nsumed during conditioning RICHARD L. HYSON and JULIE L. SICKEL The American University, Washington, D.C. 20016 PAUL J. KULKOSKY Edward W. Bourne Behavioral Research Laboratory, Cornell Medical Center White Plains, New York 10605 ANTHONY L. RILEY TheAmerican University, Washington, D.C. 20016 In Experiment 1, animals poisoned following schedule-induced or prandial-induced saccharin consumption subsequently showed identical aversions to saccharin when tested under water deprivation. In Experiment 2, animals conditioned to avoid saccharin to similar levels under water deprivation were differentially affected when saccharin was subsequently presented on the baselines of schedule-induced and prandial-induced drinking. Together, these data indicate that the differential effects observed on schedule-induced and prandial•induced drinking when animals are noigoned followinv rn„a„mntion under these two schedules do not reflect the differ- 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 6 9 1
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I I , J %__ ~-___4 IRCS MED SCI-BIOCHE l' r' c' nce e st Dentist and Oral Biolu : Dru MetaLolism and Toxicolo ; Pharmaculo Psychology and Psychiatry, 9 429-430 (1981) LEARNEDI ASTE AVERSION IN RATS AS A F NCTION OF DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION REGIMEN OF THIUM CHLORIDE r . P. Cappeliez Division ojPsychology, Calgary General Hospital, 841, Centre Avenue East, Calgary, Alberta, T2E OA1, Canada Paper received: 6th Aprd, 1981 The hypothesis that changes in rats' behavior observed after lithium administration may be entirely explained by po- tential toxic effects, rather than by a specific action on behavioral mechanisms, is a much debated issue (1, 2, 3),. AI- though this hypothesis encounters serious difficulties In accounting for the various demonstrated behavioral effects of lithium in rats (4, 5), attempts to test It directly, such as through the use of the conditioned taste aversion paradigm, arc still of value. l.ithium, in doses ranging from 0.30 to 3.00 mEq/kg, after both single and repeated daily administrations, , produces conditioned taste aversions to various novel-tasting fluids in rats (6, 7). Single administration of doses lower ,, , than 0.30 mEq/kg is not associated with significant aversion (6), while the effect of repeated administration of such low doses has not yet been tested. While decreases in activity, which could be considered logical correlates of toxicity, have regularly been reported with 1.50 mEq/kg liCl (4), increases in activity have been demonstrated with 0.15 mEq/kg (11) It appeared therefore interesting to compare levels of potential taste aversions induced by 0.15 and 1.50 mEq/kg LiCI, both after single and repeated administrations. (~ C~ (~ 0 0 0 2 1 6 8 9 50330 7911 .
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/ i .. . .s..<..~_~ , .,. . _ ., .. . ..,> ,~.,-.. 50330 7898 ~ -rMACCt)--SP90KING=--'tA5'CE 17nSFiOLD( - ' ^ „ FHYL•ALCOHGLlw AND'SENSATION/E 74 X Ma`TASTE--TTSTIIr'G=TOB'ACCn St1OKINC7Sr.NSES RJR CLASS N0. PA2-THLET 74 X Ma Martin, S.; Pangborn, R. M. (Univ. Calif., Davis, Calif., U. S.) A NOTE ON RESPONSES TO ETHYL ALCOHOL BEFORE AND AFTER SMOKING. - • Perception Psychophysics 8,-169-70 (1970) (in English) *1974, No. 9, W 3419* *d* Tobacco medicine: 0 S 0 00 . 0 ;2 ~ 6 7 6 .
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) 50330 7915 SeHAVIORAL AND NEURAL BIOLOGY 32, 277-281 (M) . . 6176 MA136 P 277 LAS! PS BEHAV NEURAL BIpL RAPID COM UNICATION Shock Facilitation o aste Aversion earning' PHILLIP S. LASITER AND J. JAY BRAUN Department ojPsychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85281 A marked interaction is demonstrated between two classes of unconditioned stimuli (UCSs), illness and footshock, that were compounded in a taste aversion learning procedure. Both acquisition and resistance to extinction were greatly facilitated by training with a compound shock and illness UCS despite the ob- servation that the shock UCS was not an effective aversive UCS when used alone in this training situation: Shock alone resulted in increased, not decreased, consumption of the taste solution with which it was paired. 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 6 9 3
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/ r 50330 7897 CIGARS--S;•+OKE/ CIGARETTES--QI1fJ.ITY E6'ALf?ATION/ TOBACCO--SMOKE--QL'ALIT'i EVAL(J:1'iI0:1/ ....,...~:.-.... -fESTIN^.- ToBAC:O''StiOKINC/TOBACCO E--ANALYSIS/ VY To-•73 T0J3ACC0--SMOKE--CIIEMICAL COIMPp~S,I~ N'~,~~ f R~i, 1(.~:.fSS 10. PA?,PIILET VI To-13 c . f ~ t t ~ s t Carcf nogetc. ' ].:i3) (in Brunnemann, K. D. ; I1offoann, D. ; t.ynder, E. L. (American Health Fo;uid., 23aylor Dana Inst. "is. Preven., Div. Envf ron. Epic'emioi.,::ew York, i:.Y., U. S•) STUDIES ON THE "I`HAL.'._iIi,ITY" OF CIGrJ:EITF A;:D CIGAR SMOKE. Tobacco Chem. Res. Cor.f., 27 th, paper, Winston-Salem, N. C.. Enhlistc) *Keywords:k T::•I, smoke, constituent; carbon u:cr.a::ide, smoke, constituent; carbon dio: ide, sr:ol:,, constituent; hydrogen cyanide, smoke, constituent; acetaldehyde, siwoke, const.tu_nt; acrolein, smoke, cunstituent; 2tuncnia, sr.:oke, constitueat; hydrogen ion concei:tration:; smoke, constituent; nicotinc, sToke, constit.uent; 2 5 .~ . . . . .,'S~ ~ _..f: O s o.4 n c~ ~ 1~ 75 (Oct. 3-5,
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50330 7916 Animal Learning & Behavior _ 1981. 9121. 287-290 ..-...~~ i... __.x.____ ._ . _ . The interaction of conditioned~ ste aaversion~ 81 V R~ I and schedule-induced polydipsia: Availability of alternative behaviors .ANTHONY L. RILEY, DAVID B. PEELE, and KATHY D. RICHARD TheAmerican University, Washington, D.C. 20016 E3018 LY989 P 287 RILE AL ANLM LEARN BLHAV and PAUL J. KULKOSKY Edward W Bourne Behavioral Research Laboratory Cornell Medical Center, White Plains, New York 10605 Animals poisoned following exposure to saccharin subsequently avoided the schedule-induced consumption of saccharin: While this suppression was transient for subjects who had access only to the saccharin solution during the free-food presentations, recovery of schedule-inducgd saccharin consumption was significantly retarded for subjects who had concurrent access tc saccharin and a running wheeL It has been suggested that the transient suppression of schedule induced polydipsia by conditioned taste aversions results from the pellet-induced tendency to drink within the schedule-induced polydipsia procedure. That access to the running wheel re- duces schedule-induced polydipsia in general and prolongs the suppression of schedule-induced polydipsia by taste aversions supports this view. o s o o 0 0 2 1 6 9 4 0 ,
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I . i 50330 7914 1 '--- _ . 81 V In aviourAnalysis Lrrersyl (1981) 199-206 INGR DK BEHAV ANAL LETT c Elsevter/North•Holla Biomedical Pres+ 00/- 8176 LX219 P 19! CONDITIONEDJT~5TEAVERSION IN GENETICALLY OBESE(ob/ob)MICE DONALD K. INGRAMr - Gerontology Research Center. Notional Institute on Aging, Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, MD 21224. U.S.A. ~ (Received 4 November 1980) (Accepted 14 Februarv 1981) The strength of a conditioned taste aversion was compared between female C57BL/6J mice with a homozygous recessive genetic trait producing severe obesity (ob/ob) and normal weight controls that were either homozygous or heterozygous for ob (+/?). Following 3 days on a 23.5-h water deprivation schedule, all mice received a one-trial conditioning procedure pairing 30-min access to 0.1% saccharin with a 0.5 ml injection of either 0.3 M lithium chloride or 0.15 M saline. When tested 48 hours later, mice that received the lithium chloride injections exhibited saccharin aversions relative to the saccharin consumption of saline injected controls. However, the conditioned aversions of obese mice were much stronger than recorded for normal mice. When provided continuous access to saccharin and water, the normal weight mice showed extinction of the conditioned aversion within I week; whereas, the obese mice maintained strong saccharin aversions for well over ~ 4 weeks. The results of this experiment support those of previous studies reporting hyp~ err ctivi y t taste sti uli;er finickiness, associated with obesity. A S (l 0 ~ ~ 0 ~ Kev words: obesitv: mice; lithium chloride; taste aveision; saccharin.
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/ 0 0 '7 S_7L 80 8ulletin of the Psychononric Soci. ty 1975, Vol. S (3). 219-220 Effect of aniount of solution drunk d~.~~..~:Y...w.-;. • .~~ ~ . . .. on ta-s°t+e-aversiearning : S}a;cG 'Yt ~,,. ; . IGCL ItOND and WAYNE lIARLAND School oj8chavioural Scicnccs, Macquarie University Nortll Rydc, N.S. IV. 2113, Australia Three groups of rats drank differing amounts (0, 2, or 5 ml) of a:25% saccharin solution just prior to injection of .3M LiCI. In subsequent two-bottle preference tests, the group which drank 5 ml displayed a stronfier aversion to the saccharin than the group drinking 2 ml, which differed in turn from the group drinking 0 nil. These results confirm a previous finding that thenatrength of an animal's aversion is,a dircct,funclion.qf the amount it consumed prior to poisoning. " Rats will learn to avoid a distinctly flavored solution animals were given repeated extinction tests as if their initial exposure to that solution is associated measure of aversion strength. with poisoning. This finding is of special interest because it demonstrates the ability of rats to learn an association METHOD desp . ite . long delays . betwec.n the.CS (taste) and the US . . . . . . C..67....I. ....1 A .......~... . .. . . .. . . ~ 5 0 0 tl 0 2 16 8 8 the -50330 7910
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I -,TASTE AND NICOTINE --'--, see Dr. Thomas Peffetti for literature review and also 77 XII Re S. P, 0 S Cl 0(l 0 2 1 7 0 6 50330 7928 ;
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6 69 Ie ta 0 U U 5 Q 6`: o a~ (5 c~~l ; ~, . l. ~i••aj, a~*)*~w ~. ,.., L.; ,,.,.`.. u.Tr ~ LZ6L 0EE0S l
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, Ti)I3~CC0-~'t'EwTJJ-~'ESTIhCi•TASTE*yTE.STINC•.--10?3ACC0::5MOl0IN('.K-ttFF.hC T~- 50330 7900 i :..i~ 74vri ItJx CLASS NO. PAMPIILI:i' 74 V FY ~ Fikentscher, R.; Roseburg, B.; Hrtnson, J. ' (M..~rtin-Lut•her Univ. Ha11e-Wittenberg, Klin. Poliklit•.ik Hals--Nasp.n_ Ohren-Krankheitcn) EVALUATION OF QUA.'vTITATIVE TASTE TEST BY ADEQUATE STIMULI. *(Die Bewertung einer quantitativen Geschmackspruf.ung mit adeauaten Reizen.)* Monatsschrift Ohrenheilkunde Laryngorhinologie 107 (No. 5) 208-17 (May 1973) (in German with English sutnmary) *Keywords:* smoking. Evaluation of a quantit4tivc taste test by adequate stimuli r` . •. ~~ This is to report on the pcrformance and evaluation of a.quantitativc taste test by ; i adequate stimuli. Four graduated dilutions of each: sugar, citric, acid, sodium chloride and quinine arc applied for the taste proof. 1 hey are put on thc tongue by means of a' little stick. The rela:ion between expense and exactness is more favourable than in ; comparison with other methods. In 140 normal persons (10 male and 10 female within ; the.1'°-7'h decade of age) the gustation for the four. essential a-ualities related on age, sexj ~ distribution and smoking customs sverc examined. Resulting from this it was stated, that I the gustatory sensitivity decreases continuously with increasing age; it is significantly `; ... - greater in women than in men beyond about the 4. decade. We could find the taste ,. .' ~ S . . _ : . .. . •. . - ~ ~ !: U .,,^f ,l U •J to. 4 1. ,/ f 0
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~ :r1. C.Jcnw ~ 503j(1 7893 l•hnccalToI•, ct.--..Sn1~~~.-- ~ltA cc.--Sn,ahc-• ~-~ ,~ ~ j"S -~!i Gi : '.>~'/ 0~ ~lJGT01CY f' ~ C Cr'i <•'/Z L.4 ~=% /'y Srt~~~~T~sl~-~~Hyfd,ry'~fa,~ ciPD•rS - ~ ~~S!`•:' - Ti.rt ie 3 S ~' GUS f A I ~ ~ NI A Nl D OLFACTION An Inlcrnnlionnl S,i•nposi;un Gcnc•rn, A/ne 1970 :r il Spoi,sorcd by Firmcnich ct Cic G. OI-lI•01= F.~Nu A. F. Tl-IOI~•IAS
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i I 81 V Za 50330 7919 y Regeneration of aste Buds After Reinnervation of a Denervated Tongue Papilla hv a Normally 0 8176 MB785 P 309-/~- Nongustatory Nerve IALE AA CO ANDREW A. ZALEWSKI Laboratory o(Neurochemistry, National Institute ol tveurotogu;al and Communicatiue Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department ojHealth and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20205 e ABSTRACT Taste buds degenerate and disappear after transection of their sensory nerve supply, and they differentiate anew from epithelial cells (e.g., lingual) following regeneration of sensory but not motor or autonomic axons. A controversy exists as to whether only gustatory sensory nerves can cause buds to reform or whether any sensory nerve can perform this function. This issue arose because the results of cross-innervation studies revealed a specificity whereas grafting data demonstrated a nonspecificity. A retest of specificity in the cross-reinnervation situation was performed by reinnervating the denervated vallate papilla of adult rat tongue with a sensory branch of the vagus nerve that is not normally gustatory. It was found that taste buds disappeared and remained lost from acutely and chronically denervated papilla. However, some buds were found 90-100 days after reinnervation by the normally nongustatory vagus nerve branch. Transection of the regenerated vagus nerve resulted in the loss of in- nervation and the degeneration of taste buds from reinnervated papilla indicating that this nerve had supported buds. These results show that a normally nontrus- p S Q 0 n 02 1 6 9 7
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r I FLAVORANTS--FOOD/ FOOD SCIENCE, A SERIES MONOGRAPHS , VOL.7/ DIARY PRODUCTS/SOY PRODUCTS/FLAVOR ENHANCERS/ f ~ FOOD--ANALYSIS/COCOAI BEVERAGES/TASTE ENHANCERS/ ASerie:otMonoaraans ~ . ~ TP ~ 958 ! Te # 1981 Flavor Research RECENT ADVANCES 50330 7923 . ~ V' 7 Editors . STEVEN R. TANNENBAUM . PIETER WALSTRA 'partment ojNutdtlon and Food Seknoe Department oJFood Seknoe .IbsneFween Institute ojTeehnoloo Wqeninsen As.ltultunl Unfverstty -' aerbfdre, Matsecltutetn . fW jeNnsen, 77u Nethedande EDITED BY Roy Teranishi and Robert A. Flath Western Regional Research Center Agricullural Research Seroiu U.S. Deparbnent o/Agritulfrre Berkeley California Hiroshi Sugisawa Kagatoa University .. Mikitho, Kagawa-ken, Japan MARCEL DEKKER, INC. New York and Basel [(t (! -. . ~ a1:+Y' ~I - r1 ari _ . . 1 L FOOD SCIENCE 0 S0 0 0 0 2 '1 70 1
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i 50330 7912 s- MELATONIN AND MELANOCYTE-STMULVING HORNiONE (MSH) DO NOT PRODUCE CONDITIONEDWA STE AVERSIONX -4 . Pharmacology; Psychology and Psychiatry, 9, 437 (1981) Cs1 IRCS .Sfen_l S,ciense: Biocs istrv: Dentistry and Oral Biology; Drug Metabolism and Toxicology; Nervous System; 81 V Go, Peter Golus, Rob McGee and Maurice G. King Department of Psychdlogy, The University of Newcastle, N.S.W. 2308, Australia ~.• Paper received : 13th' April, l9gf , Many psychoactive substances have been found to produce conditioned taste aversions. Among these are stimulants such as amphetamine and some of its congeners; anticholinergic drugs such as scopolamine; hallucinogens such as mes- caline and various CNS depressants compounds including barbiturate ethanol and morphine (see 1). Recently, the con- vulsant drug metrazol has been added to this list (2). For a number of years we have been studying the effects of the peptide melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and the Indoleamine melatonin within a number of behavioral paradigms (e.g. 3P4, S5-6). GonDeri>Q thhthe2 subitanAls neQ onQ produce behavioral but profound neurochemical effects we questioned whether they may not also produce taste aversions. This was the aim of the present study.
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/ I ArtG1sol NI-t. ynt 2~IY7Y. ~r 56t ir, Se~/ ~ 79) ~~.mon t'rnc Lrd Pnntcd m Grcal antnin I 7 XX MeF- -316-80 SHORT COMMUNICATION TAS1`If ,1~,~t0fT.Y' A D TWP(3§fff6W^M ,Jens (TT G. G. BIRCH and A. RAY `0 National College of Food Technology, University of Reading. St George's Avenue, Wtybridge, Surrey KT13 ODE, England Summary-Ingestion of l0 g glucose (50 ml of 20 per cent solution) neither increased the concentration of glucose significantly in saliva nor changed the threshold values of either glucose (sweet) or quinine sulphate (bitter) 30 min after ingestion. Ingestion of 50 g of glucose (250ml of 20 per cent solution) significantly raised the glucose of saliva but did not alter the threshold values after 30 min or even after 5 min. This suggests that a suprathreshold level of glucose does not influence the threshold of bitter or sweet tastes and establishes that existing threshold procedures, employing successive tastings of increasing concentrations and a short water rinse between each tasting, are adequate in experiments designed to determine taste effects after alterations in composition of saliva. . 05 c1iAn ;0 2 1 6 t 8•7 . : `/' ^ 1 eff a4 . ,~ 50330 7909 ~
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r 50330 7929 I AX ~ Pa 1-.3`ij -l'Urn,, R. : `. . . .. . 'rAST::, a1)-*•-:b~, r,YD :~: DTsl.r:l:'fAI`:r1ATO:1 Br.VOR,~i.'~. f'at!) tSi~l`T~1': StiJ::F.IiC+, by R. :I. part^i~c:.°n, 1. H. 'iz.chue t;n6 N. ;3. PlM.•:Qlaa P27rccjaz:i.;1:1, P::rc;:hOphyulr.^. 2 (RO. 11) 5"y°~•~~2 (1967) y ~ U y tl 00 0 2 1 7 Q 7 ..
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J ! . 50330 7gg2 )' ~ ~W ltiL f . s~e.=%'csi.N :.g n'1cf~odald /TO~vcc.•• 5 ~/Oc~83'S/ 7"oba~ l~ac~.oN . Sfe.--Tts~~'N~~S,~o.k~'N -}esfs e~~.o.~l S . T~ bacea t~+ -- fe~tor , ~/•ON.~....._ / ~ Slka ` r.JR CLASS :;o. T?:' .:•r?;oo,': TS 22:o Mu19G9 . . 1•h:ncbcnhrch, G. ~, A (Scr~icc~ d':':;1>1oi.:ation Industri.c+llc Tabacs A11uncttcs, }'; ris, Fr :ncc) i0?;ACCO 'll:S:1::G. ELi:,i:':TS 1'OR Tl::.' I:LALOIL":T.if.~:•; OF A":1":?'0:) Fi~;; ,.:::~'.1ZT:•:G *(La Uegi-ctatf.on DeF Tabacs. 2:1c:-1;cnL•s Pour n'1ai.:lyse ]:rs Pcrceptions Sc:j,oriell.cs)* 111 ~ L'i:laborot:ion n'Unc :at'uc:r. ii]CjL•SL'r'il'llc Taba?c3 Allillll.°ttco. Piri,',, Fr:!!lf'P: p. (1;'L9) (ir. Fr.•ench, En-1ish~;1ish t-r..ns?,: . ti.on in ~F~<<}1VorCS-~ sr;o:inr r,:nels. ~91~~06~~ o1, / f ~ ~~ ~ vN-•~Qi6t{ /y1't .G~.. ~ - ~ - -
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~0330 7936 I FOOD iTA NUTRi JO INTERNAT TASTE PR QP 141 Wa 1981 TE-TESTING/TASTE--PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE/SENSORY EVALUATION/ --CONGRESSESAVOLUTION (HUMAN)/FOOD PREFERENCES/ ONAL ORGANIZATION FOR THE STUDY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT/ ERENCES--ONTOGENESISIGENETICS--BEHAVIORAL/DIET & DISEASEV ~ Food, Nutzition and Evolution Food as an Environmental Factor in the Genesis of Human Variability Edited by DWAIN N. WALCHER, M.D. Professor Emeritus The Coll:!yeof Human Development The Pe. vania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Currently 7be Indiana State Board of Health Indianapolis, Indiana NORMAN KRETCHMER, M.D., Ph.D. 0. 1 Director, The National Institute otChild Health and Human Development Bethesda, Maryland S 0 0 ')Jfi aAASJN Mishin$' USA, Inc. New York* Paris* BarceInna e Mil.
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r ,s_..._.._.... - - TASTE--TESTING/ 81 V Iw I . s --- 50330 7927 ~- /~~~ 3.~ ~ /~,9~J 8) TeAta_:aarw Aespflrie!l-tna'itv!'tsiW'Eb'bittez,.taating •ooapounds.aa.•thft -liL ratarKaxuo Iwasaki. Department of Neurobiology. Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neurosciences. ruchu, Tokyo 183, Japan. Effects of various bitter-tasting compounds on rat gustation were examined by recording integrated nerve responses to lingual stimulation from the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal(IXth) nerve, and by measuring rat's behavior to those substances using the two-bottle choice method. A difference in responses to bitter-tasting compounds was observed between the two nerves. Magnitudes of responses to 10mM solutions are in the order of MgCl > quinine > nicotine > glycyl-L-phenylalanine(GP) > caffeine in ae chorda tympani, while quinine ;P, nicotine > MgC12 > caffeine > GP in the IXth nerve. Threshold concegtration_t for rejgction of quinine, nicotine and caffeine ate about 3x10 , 3x10 and 10 M, respectively. They are nearly the same as those for producing responses in the IXth nerve, but much lower than those in the chorda tym3 ani. Although MgClZ pro$uced neural responses in the former at 3x10_!~ and in the latter at 3x10 M, aversion to MgClZ was observed about SxlO M. GP , which tastes bitter in hnans, did not induce aversion in the rat, although GP at about 3x10 M produced responses in the chorda tympani. When taste stimuli were applied to the tongue preadapted to quinine, , responsees to quinine and nicotine in the IXth nerve were markedly depressed, but those to MgCl and NaCl were not. These results indicpte: i) Aversion to bitter solutihs is attributed to information mainly carried by the IXth nerve, ii eff cts f quinine, nicotine and caffeine .~ .0 __.,. .~.._.Z.... ... . . . _ .~...-. _ -.. q....__,.+. _.-+T ....- . . .. ' . _. M _ . . .
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! 50330 7934 81 V Wr I . ; .,.8018 da718 P 848 fs~. raiG AL 1981 AN J CLIN NUTRjYCS3C~ Experimental inc depletion and altered perception for NaCI in young adult malesh,2 _ Ann Larsen Wright,a 1DI~S., Janet C. King,' Ph.D., Marion Taylor Baer,a 1N~S., Ph.-D., and L. Jay Crlrons Ph.C A ~ . _... : v.,. . ABSTRACT Taste perception for saltiness and bitterness was tested in ftve young men while , fed a basal (15 mg Zn/day) and zinc depletion (0.25 mg Zn/day) diet and in three young men during zinc repletion. The perceived intensity of five NaCI solutions ranging from 0 to 600 mM and five urea solutions also ranging from 0 to 600 mM were rated on a 17-point scale. The intensity ratings for the 75 and 150 mM NaCI solutions were significantly lower (p < 0.05) during depletion than during the basal period; intensity ratings for 300 and 600 mM NaCI solutions did not change significantly. Bitterness perception was not altered with zinc depletion. The changes in perceived ' intensity that occurred were not related to parotid salivary zinc concentration, percentage change ig~plas zi~ ith eple~ n, the ~gth of time required for depletion. The results suggest that p~ A O zirk de~etiorf7nay ~)ter ihe tase perception of some moderately salty solutions. Am. !. Clin. Nurr. 34: 848-852, 198 L ,
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50330 7935 V St SENSORY EVALUATION/ $ ( V-sf ~ ; perceptrvel.a! Motor Skillr,1980, 31, 871•877. © Percepry[1 and Motor Skills 1980 r i OBESITY, COMPATIBILITY, AND AASTE PREFERENCE .` r. u r RICHARD B. STALIING AND WILUAM SDBOTOWICZ' Br~dley UnTverfity ._ ..i...[ . .- [.i.~. i...atG.6A.•~. ._...tc. . Sammsry.-Ratings and proportions of two cookies eaten by obese and normal-weight individuals were affected by the requirement that subjects eat .with their nonpreferred hands. Subjects were run in blocks either before or after dinner; it was only before dinner that strong preferences between the two cookies emerged. Normal weight subjects ate approximately equal propor- dons of the two cookies when using preferred hands but strongly favored the cashew cookie when using their nonpreferted hands. Obese subjects ate more of the cashew cookie when using the preferred hands but more of the oatmeal cookie when using nonpreferred hands. Also, subjects were given fiaitious in- formation about previous subjects' preferences between the cookies. Only the normal ones were affected by this information; the obese subjects ate more of the cashew cookie regardless of the "external" cue about other subjects' prefer- awes. i.nt,. .n-F . % _.......'- ' _.L :..L _...... •1.. nivc. A 5 A 0 a 02 1 7 13 .
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, 50330 7933 .:...~:~_ ~ AycAolo~iwl adbU. ` Copyrijlt"19ii by t6c Americ.n PsychobSiql Anociation. Inc. 1ltl, yd 90, No. 1. 4 3 - 7 3 j 0037-2909/d1/9001-0043s00.73 . ,... ~ T, 81 VCo :'~•, 31`C Development o~ste P .erceytlon in n Humans: ,- ~ Sensitivity and Prefernce roughout the Life Span ---- Beverly J. Cowart National Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland ?he literature relating to the development of taste sensitivity and preference in i ltumans is critically reviewed. Characterization of the sensitivities and prefer- ences of children and the elderly, relative to those of young adults, is of both theoretical and practical importance. Nonetheless, the former age groups have been neglected in psychophysical investigations. There is a need to employ mea- surement techniques that are minimally affected by developmental changes in attention, motivation, and other nonsensory factors. In addition, increased in- vestigative effort should be directed toward the study of possible developmental changes in suprathreshold perception. Finally, preferences for taste qualities should not be characterized in terms of averaged, positive or negative responses. Ytather, individual functions relating degree of preference to tastant concentration should be examined. 'rJ 0 Q n U 2 1 1 1-
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/ I I t < ,50330 7932 ~ ^tAS'?19+"P.nm,vT`''~`t' ~ 6 Hopkins, J, W. TAST F Pr:':VM TaMPG, From: C.,-in, Food Is~., June, ].953. 5p: ar, . , . _,. \. ~ - . . ._. . . . ~ ..-.,-•--.-^.~.- . .._. ,.r, .,.,,,..,. 0 S\/ 4 0 0 ;~ • 1 7 1 0
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~ 50330 7940 1 81 V Oa AXONAL TRANSPORT MAINTAINS ASTE RESPONSES ` '~ 8176 NF743 P OAKL 8 289-qi BRUCE OAKLEY, JOYCE S. CHU and LEE B. JONES 8RA jN RES 9AL tZ) L(gW Division ojBiological Seiences, Neuroscience Laboratory Building, The University ojMichigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109 (U.S.A.) i ~ (Accepted February 12th,1981) R Transection of the gerbil's IXth nerve causes gustatory action potentials to decline in 1-6 h; the rate of decline is a linear function of the length of the nerve stump ~ remaining attached to the tonguela. To test the implication that taste discharge , mechanisms depend upon axonal transport in the IXth nerve, we injected 40 nl of [3H]leucine into the petrosal ganglion of one IXth nerve of the gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus. Subsequent liquid scintillation counting of the petrosal ganglion, IXth nerve segments, and representative areas of the tongue indicated that labeled materials were transported down the IXth nerve primarily to the vallate and ipsilateral foliate tast~e papillae of e tQnguy A sigrcant impairment of axonal transport and a ~ S nsu antt~l d~lin su4nm~ted I~Cth erve taste responses occurred within 2-3 h after colchicine was applied to the IXth nerve trunk between the tonttne and the „Ptrnta1
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i 50330 1920 TASTE--TESTINGJ Dev. Food Sci. 1979, 2 (Proc. Int. Congr. Food Sci. Technology, 5th, 1978)360-6 81 V Sh 3.1 Structural Basis of Taste Substances It. S. Shallenberger' During the past decade there have been remarkable developments in our knowledge of the interrelation between structure and taste activity. Many of the taste-activity relationships that have evolved are centered about the unidimensional AH,B theory of sweet taste introduced by my- self and T. E. Acree') in 1967 and expanded by Kier') in 1972 to include a third component. The third component now seems to be necessary for intense sweetness or whenever AH,B needs to be "activated" through a hydrophobic inter- action'>. It is not, however, prerequisite for sweet taste whereas the AH,B unit is prerequisite. Perhaps the most general approach to the relation between structure and taste quality is to consider the structural dimensions required of com- pounds needed to elicit the sensation. These are summarized in Table 1. The sour taste is primarily a function of,the hvdro¢en ion. Any substance J.-6 9 8 os~o~0 2
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i 50330 7937 , Reseo.ch in Nursing and Heolth, 1980• 3, 11-17 •. i ~ 31~-:Yc .-•. XX MeF- -316-80 . • 3a! . : Taste ~Prefet ces ~6f I~ifaait~'f~r . , . y etenea Foods' -biweetened orUnswe eHle, , ~ Marie S. Brown and Carol C. Grunfeld /I 111 -1 J01r. This is o report of research on whether or not the addition of sugar to foods consumed • by bobies early in their feeding significantly alters later preference for sweetened or un- sweetened foods. Twenty control babies were fed regular baby food (which already has `~ - sweetened and unsweetened food were scored according to parental interpretation of : their preferences and occording to how much food they consumed. Neither group was , found to prefer sweetened or unsweetened food. This finding is in contradiction of other studies and common lay and clinical views thot infants prefer sweetened foods. It would seem that if babies do not prefer sweet foods, there is certainly no reason to odd sugar to ' oommercial products. _ groups were then studied during a 4•week period in which they were randomly assigned .. to four different sequences of sweetened and unsweetened food. Their reactions to additional sugar) for the first 3 months of their solid-food feeding experience; 20 ex- perimentol babies were fed a diet with no added sugar for a similar time period. The two . I 0 S 010..0 0 2 1 71 5
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i 50330 7947 ? TASTE--1'HYSIOLOCY/SENSF.S AND SENSE ORGANS/OLFACTION/ ANIMALS--PHYSIOLOCY/PIiYSIOLOGY--ANIMALS/ODORS/S~tELL/ QP 458 Wo 1970 TTSI~~j~'- ~f~ A Ciba Foundation S•m osi~m PD p DL ~' J- & A. CHURCHILL d b ` `~Edi y te G. E. W. WOLSTENHOLME 104 GLOUCESTER PL ACE, LONDC and 1970 _ JULIE KNIGHT 0~ w ;L O 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 7 2 5
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i , 50330 7944 1 .a - . . t I!F4tW. slG) 411 , ,~ , h V Le .t ~ .4 • ~ 1 ~ i / e tor Letters to t , /. s~A, G. • Cossennv, G. ~LOR~s 8,. GY~loxn Sex Differences in~Tast ensi*tivity for PTC • b ~ .r-- 6 Repl by: In a recent article, Ma.~cia et al. (1973) concludecroern eaZysis of their data that the observed sex differences for PTC tasting in Sardinians should be assigned to chance "in agreement with the literature about this subject" and they referred to a paper I published some years ago (Leguebe, 1963). , I am afraid my demonstration was not clear enough or not sufficiently convincing since on the contrary I suggested that all the results published before 1961 proved the Figure l.
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50330 7942 } I Cameron, Alexandlc•rThalna3, 1832-1017. The taste s3nso n;td the irolhtivo sweetnes3 of su ;ars ar. othe.r sttiCCt h1111;;ift1+C._i. New York, Sugar IiCz^arch Fol3Ild: 6011,1947. 72 h. Illus.. diagrA. 23 cm. (Sugar Re9earch Foundntiou. Sc ,entitic report series, no. 9) "I '131b1iogrnphy: p. tZT-70: 1. Tnste.' 2. Uugarc. (Series) QP456.C3 612.£i7 Ltbrary ef (7uni;res3 151 4E-117: _~,.~.r....-...r> - .. I ~ S n 0 l/ ~1. ~ 1 7,;~ 0
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r _. _....e.:.... _...... :.s,r. _._~.:.._... AFTER•DINNER TALK A -A Ann. N. (TAS~E;lLLUSlO~. SO~fIx~~S~:~`.S'~'RA~t`IOti`t3 Y. Acad. Science,,237279-85(1974) / . Linda \f. Bartosliuk john U. Pierce forrndation ~' _Ntux Haren, Connecticut 06519 LTN ntl Dc1slrTmtrrt of flxt1f_,uiafbevWt PrrblJr Hvqtrri atr'('nit r~it) Srhqi~l v/ Me•d eint ".AHoi.en' 4- Z~7 JC 7 6 G-1 9 t One very important difference between taste and olfaction relates to the num- ber of elementary sensations that can be classified. In olfaction, niany different odor qualities have been proposed as potential primaries, but in taste the typical primary qualities arc usually said to be sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. There has bcen and still is considerable controversy over whether these taste qualities are really primaries and, in fact, even abdilt`whethtt` t'fie concept of "primary" is a viable one.t In the light of this, some taste investigators have come to follow a.- somewhat different strategy in studying taste quality. Instead of concentrating on finding 211 primaries. they have turned to studying the functional properties of sweet, sour, salty, and bitter. The conclusions from this line of research are star• tling. To a remarkable extent, these four taste qualities operate independently of one another. For erample, adaptation to a substance of one tlual:tv t!«reascs sensitivity to all other substances with that quality.•with the exception of some bitter substances;=-+ but adaptation to one quality does not affect the perceptioa of any other yualitirs.s That is. cro.s-adafstation is highly specific to the percei.cd c turc Produtc nr~: iiu rliticr. tuality ~tt a~lr~ rtiu, r mi , s uf dilferent ~ualities do no t w~+ . ~ ~ ,.. • ll ~7 Tl1 l  kmn XX MeF-E-404-75
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~ 50330 7946 76.V Sc ......... ........ ,.. FOOD--TASTE-TESTING/ Cerontol. 15(5)56(1975) Section on Psychological and Social Sciences TAST$=ANQ_.$Mhir sCHANGES-"W `,FOODS "- DURING 'THE' -AGIHG =PROCESSs .*':~ ,t . /TASTE AND SMELL C1iA,yGES OF FOODS DURING TIIE'AGING PROCESS~LSS. Schiffman.WCtW for the Stu° of f .i Dur am~~N Ms~ical tr t,'~UniJ ` ~ i At present little is known about, the changes Identification and hedonic ratings of the food s. cantly poorer at identification compared to young subjects. Amplification of foods with artificial flavors for aged subjects improved ur ng e ag ng p e . p p oc ~ this study was to determine the relative sen- sitivities and ratings of foods on sem, ntic differeNtial scales for two groups of subjectss aged normal weight (mean age = 73 yrs) and young normal weight (mean age = 20 yrs). The foods were blended to eliminate textural cues. The subjects were blindfolded and given a container of blended food at 160°F to smell and taste. Aged subjects were signifi- . {. In gustatory or olfactory properties of food ss The ur ose of i r d i t1 MA ...: ~.., : 0 5 0 00 0 2.1 7 24
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50330 7908 1 4 J . e PediaL Rea. 6: 868-874 (19)2) )'Po6eusia zinc nutrition j ~. 6 . .. . 1 • .. ~.r . "° H& ., Low Levds of _inc- in ` Hair, Anorexia, Poor Growth . ~ - Hair -<raef[kmentt- ~ . . lkpartmcnt of Pediavics. Unkenny of Cvlorado Medical C<ntcr, Dcnvcr, Colorado, USA • Concentrations of zinc in hair were determined for 338 apparently normal subjects living in Denver with ages ranging from 0•-90 years. :~fean conccntrations of zinc in hair were: neonates (25) 174 t 8(1 sest); 3 months-4 years (93) 88 :1-- 5; 4-17 j°ean (132) 153 + 5,'and 17-tOt•ears (88J 180 •+ 4. Ten children more than 4 yeaSs of age had levels of zinc in hair of less than 70 ppm. Scvrn of thcse ten children had a history of poor appetite and eight had heights on or below the 10th pcrcantilef tlte high incidence of low growth jxrccnti!cs was not rsplicable on a familial basis.lra;te ~ ,QlCuitX%% `as tested in six of these children, and five had n•idence of objective hypogeusia.~ After supplementing the diet with small quantities of zinc, taste acuity was normalizcd in each of these children and levels of zinc tn hau Hxreased. Spaufaciow The correlation between low levels of zinc in hair, anoresia, and low growth per- eentiles in these children indicates that poor appetite and growth, in addition to the ~po~'rsia;) iay'~ave l~cen; ttri ~a~tt.~ble to zinc deficiency. The low mean concen- fr5tiotl of ziStc in 6nirtdf iints`fitd children under 4 years of aSe indicates that stores of zinc iu the body Inay be low in this age gruup• -• and Hypogeusia in Children K. 'M1CHAEL NAS1b1oCEtttl, CAROLYN HAUBIDCE, MARGARET JACOIIS, AND J. DAV1D BAU1r - N I
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I 50330 ?'924 4 i International Journal of Obesity (1980) 4, 203-212. XX MeF= 316-81 ~.TaSte~hd'd6nidnrid*tlire~h(3ldswirn -obesi; Robert MALCOLM*, Patrick Mahlen O'NEIL*t, Amy A. HIRSCH*, Hal S. CURREY* and George MOSKOWITZ •Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 171 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina, USA (t Also: Veterans Administration Hospital, Charleston, •, South Carolina) Summary Previous invc$tigations of the relation of.taste to obesity have focused on sweet taste, with inconclusive results. This study compared adult-onset obese, juvenile-onset obese, and never-obese females on sensitivity and hedonic (preference) responses to sweet, salty, sour, and bitter solutions. On no taste did the groups differ on detection or recognition thresholds or on hedonic ratings of supra-threshold concentrations. Two patterns of individual hedonic responses to increasing concentrations were identified with supra-threshold sucrose solutions, as in previous work, but not with the other solutions. There were no reliable relations across tastes on detection or recognition thresholds or supra-threshold hedonic ratings. Hedonic ratings of the lowest (below OetotioA thttsheAd) doncjntrQioQ of each taste solution were examined as .
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t 50330 7943 ~ 0 81 V Ch LA SENSIBILITE GUSTATIVE A LA THIOURtE CHEZ LES BERBtRES CHAOUTAS DE L'AURES (BOUZINA, ALGME) 8260 MH 131 P 61 •, CHAM MC Par ANTHROPOLOG hE (Pa,2,, MARIE-CuUDE CHAMLA• et Fw+rt4;otsE DEMOULIN•" ~.G19-lG3z /. _ . . . . . .,._ , . ...._.,.._ . . 4~;;ri _ . . . - MuntE. - L'ftude de la sensibilitE gustative 1 la thiourEe chez un tchantillon de ~Y? 273 hommes et 235 femmes Chaoulas AgEs de 1g 1 67 ans, a montrE : des changements avec 1'9ge chez les hommes mais non chez les femmes ; une difference sexuelle hautement significative, les femmes Etant plus sensibles que les hommes 1 la thiourEe ; une frEquence de non goflteurs chez le ommes Chaoulas analogue 1 la majoritE des series masculines europEennes ; une frE ence de non goOteuses chez les femmes Chaoulas plus faible que • chez les series fEmin' es europEennes. -Cl Abstroct. - aste sensitivity fortifhiourea among Berbers Chaoulas of Aures (Bouzina, Algeria). - A study of taste sensitivity for thiourea in a sample of 273 males and 235 females Chaoulas 18 to 67 years of age showed : changings according to age among males but not among females ; a sexual difference highly significant, females being more sensible than males ;# fr uenc~ o~,~on tasters among Chaoula men analogous to s m4brit¢~of ~uro~an,~ak~popitlatioeLs; ~ frequency of non tasters among Chaoula wocben Tbwer` than among European female series.
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r 50330 7917 ~ . XX MeC7 -78 S.P. on tlie role of olfactiorCin •.rt. . - . ~ a - ~ .s ...r • .. Y ...V ~: arning .. aste awers~or~ c 0) LIZ t llullrlirn oj Ihc 1'srcl,orronric .S'oricr.i 1977, 1'ol. 10 (S). JrIL~O-j 1ZUI31:1tT A1)I;lt Deporlnrc'nt ojl'sj•rhiulrr', Univrrsllv!>f !l o('A('slcrSchuol oJAlrcliciin, and Denrivrr, Rochesre'r, Nrro l'c,rk 14642 • A tastc aversion was intluced by tlic sint;le or multiplc pairing of saccharin untl ntethntrexatc. In one experiment thr presence of saccharin in the envirunmcnt of cundl.ioned aniinnls prio[ to the test trials resulted in an attenuation of the aversion. that is, faciiitated extinctir,n uf tile conditioned reshonuv. In a second experirnent the consuwnption of plain water by conciitioned aninistls was sit;nilicantly reduced when animals were tested in the hm;;cnce of other animals lhat were providcrl with saccharin, thc CS solution.'1'he data suf;t;est that primcrY titiinulus generalization in the for`m of olfactory cues c:ul influence the m,tnilestatioii of -tasic a%,crsion behavior by decreasing the tnal;nitudrr of the avoidance response or by decreasing the con- suniption of fluid by control animals. The rat is capable of acquiring an aversion to a novel, distinctively flavored Jtinkinb solution on the basis of a single pairing of the distinctivc tastc with any of scvcral toxic agents. The rat's aLility to form an association bchvccn an odor and toxicosis is less certain. Several reports (Domjan, 1973; (illcla & Koelling, 19G71 !_or( (q, I:~lifi~..~3ratp, 1`~'l); V vct`, C6"Icl9d. ~ l3oot~.(, 1')G4; Suha'~.•, acri~ cs, . C'horrvcr, 1971 ; Taukulis, I97•1) sulyest tltat odor crvcrsions r•an he , A/not manifestation of tastc aversion behavior. As such, thcst observations arc relevant to the design and execution oi studies of taste aversion learning. MCTI IOI) naU:r conccrning thc rotr of olfaction in Iaaw avrniun Ic,,rn inlt were extractcd frum two rst+rrimcnt. Je.it;ncJ fur a Jiflvr cnl purposc and inv.llving scvcrrt. diftcrcntially Irc;rrc.f pruup .,~ .........~. ...... .. _
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50330 7945 81 V Ch LA SENSIBILITt GUSTATIVE A LA THIOURtE CHEZ LES BERB$RES CHAOUYAS DE L'AUR$S (BOUZINA, ALG$RIE) 8260 MH 131 P 61 - CHAM MC par ANTHROPOLOGIE(k MARIE-CLAUDE CHAMLA• et FttANSoISE DEMOULIN•' ' ., U (q,(fgrU) ~ - v1y-/G3y + RisurrlE. - L'Etude de la sensibilitE gustative 1 Ia thiourEe chez un Echantillon de 273 hommes et 235 femmes ChaouTas 9gEs de 18 A 67 ans, a montrE : des changements avec I'9ge chez les hommes mais non chez les femmes ; une diffErence sexuelle hautement significative, les femmes Etant plus sensibles que les hommes 1 la thiourfe ; une frEquence de non goilteurs chez le ommes Chaoutas analogue 1 la majoritE des sEries masculines europEennes ; une frE ence de non goOteuses chez les femmes Chaoulas plus faible que • chez les series fEmin}eies europEennes. IF yr:Krc : w r.._. ,. v ... . . ., . . . . - .: .... " ' rs C6aoaftts , ot Aarea (Eon:fna; , Absl~act. ~'aste seesitlvHy tot~fhlonrea amoeg $erbe Algerla). - A study of taste sensitivity for thiourea in a sample of 273 males and 235 females Chaouias 18 to 67 years of age showed : changings according to age among males but not among females ; a sexual difference highly significant, females being more sensible than males ; a freq ency of ~ on. sters among ChaouTa men analogous to O 5majority('+pf Etlrod~egn tb~ale ~opu}fatiot~; a~frequency of non tasters among ChaouYa wohttn ibWer 1f1an hhtot{i European female series.
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I . 50330 7949 . TS 2240 Ma 1971 { TOBACCO--ECONOuICS/TOBACCO--HISTORY---REVIEW/ TOBACCO--LEG?S'L.ATION/TOBACCO--ALLOTAfENT/ Harvard University--7issertations/ --•.- _ . . .; . _,.. . ._. . . _ ~'rs.aa..:r.. a.s+r . 1972 TEYTBOOn TS 2240 Ma SS N0 . RJR CLA , Minn, C. K. (!larvard Ur.ijr., Cambrid ;e, Mass., U. S. ) TASTEVr•T£CHN(1LOGY T'fE-COVEF*fE:vT:•,a<TkIE C.;SE,.OF,;;03ACC0,, Harvard Univ., Ph.D. Thesis, 219 p. (Feb. 1971) (in English) Q a(l tl 0 0 2 1 7 2 7 .^w,.r:^!^„A~t-^ , .. . .. ._
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PhytloMgy d Brhavior. Vol. 24, pp. 601-f,03. Pergamon Press and Brain Rese:uch Publ., 1960. Printed in the U.S.A. 50330 7930 ~ XX MeF-D-316-80 ~ - - -- -Taste~--and -Qlfaction: ::.Independe~lce -ws#fi . ~ .-. , ~ I - tInteract~an CLAIRE MURPHY' AND WILLIAM S. CAIN John B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory and Yale School of Medicine, New Haven. CT 06519 Received 18 June 1979 MURPHY, C. AND W. S. CAIN: Taste and nlfactiun: Independence rs internction. PHYSIOL. BEHAV: 2i/3) 601-605, 1980.-Twenty persons sipped and judged overall perceived magnitude. odor magnitude, and taste magnitude of various concentrations of the odorant citral, the tastants sodium chloride and•sucrose, and odorant-tastant combinatioos: In a second experiment, the same twenty persons sniffed and judged perceived odor magnitude for the same set of stimuli. The Investigation probed two primary questions: Does the apparent harmony of an olfactory-taste mixture dictate the degree ot additivity in that mixture? Does harmony of the components influence the production of any taste-smell confusion? The data from both the harmonious mixture (citral and sucrose) and the dissonant mixture tcitral and NaCI) imply absence of sensory inhibition or facilitation between taste and olfaction. Nevenbcless. both types of mixtures led to substantial tute-smell confusion whereby olfactory stimulation evoked sensations of taste. Taste Olfaction Additivity ~ U~ 5 0f ©, n n ;y--- i- . . .
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i I 50330 7926 } . , , . 79 V Mol . 'ZtESEARCH-NOTE l1 T AS7~ JN?~~SITY A$ fi`I UVCT10\'`Z3'F`"~S'~1~I1'I.US ' 4.COIYCEVTRkTI()N -XD'SC1L,V,J:.N"2`xISCOSITI H91M1r*RI) R. hfOSKO\t'1TZ j ' ~ Pionnrin4 Res.•arc6 Laboratory, U.S. itnny 1Vatick Lobarotorits, 1ut,ck, .lfass., U S.A. kveb. aod PHIPPS ARABiE-- Laborotoq• o/Psychopbysies, ,Iarrard Unit•ersiry, Cm,rb,.dqe, -I,oss., U.S..4. Abstraet. The method of magnitude estimation was used to determine hc+w siscosities impl:;ed by sodium earboa)methyIccllulose atiect the taste intensities of various am;er,tra:iors of ;iucuse..itric aeid, sodium chloride and quinine sulfate. For almost all le%els of con;entration acress t~e four substances, an increase in the .iscosity of the aqueous solvent produced dec:rases in taste inteatu.. A power function with a negative slope was chosen to d:scribe the relation Fe:Aeen the apcarent viscosity (,; in centipoises) and the taste intensity (T): Tskt'-,, where ~r varied hh%een 0.05 an.t 0.20. The relation between the concentration of the sapid chemi:al ar,E the taste in;cnsity, in most instances, also conformed to a powe: function, although some deviations occurred at tow stimulus -- Q 7 lJ ~ `1 0 . 2 1 7 0 4
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i ~ 50330 7907 I i 77 V Ile t {, Jour. Amer. Med. Assoc.. 2.17., 434-40(1971) ;jINC/TRACE-.M.ETALS/ Idiopathic Hypogeusia With . ,;CCPPER/NICKEL/ Dysgeusia, , Hyposmia, and Dysosmia A New Syndrome Robert I. Henkin, MD, PhD; Paul J. Schechter, MD, PhD; Robert lloye, MD; and Carl F. T. Mattern, MD I a Thirty-five patients with decredsed t'aste atuity.(hypogeusia) and decreased olfactoryacuity (f(yposmia) with or withcut perverted taste (dysgeusia) and pervertedtsmeli (dysosmia) had elevated median detection and recognition thresholds for the taste of salt, sweet, sour, and bitter, and abnormal forced scaling of taste qualities. Electron micrographs of taste receptors showed pathological changes in the taste buds of these patients. No apparent cause could be found for this disturbing and unpleasant symptom complex. These abnormalities appear to comprise a new syndrome which we have termed idiopathic hypogeusia with dysgeusia, hyposmia, and dysosmia. a persistent foul odor in the naso- pharynx, which also could not be relieved; and vertigo, hearing Joss, loss of libido, and unexplained hy- pertension. The patients presented themselves to us because we were, to their knowledge, the only group inter- ested and concerned with the clin- ical study of taste abnorrnalities in rnan, in general, these patients in- itially contacted their local physi- aste and smell are sensory of several disease states.r" Tn addi• cian after the appearance of these Tmpt)aliti~ wh~s_ intli~ns ~ tiobwe have recently fqund a lar;,e ~ symptoms: They were u;u3lly told „ _ • nq
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~- 50330 7957 ~ V ~, By ! Byer, Alb^rt J. A COP-1PARISOYJ OF THE T1tIANGUL ~R AND Tr10-SAt:PL: TA3T'.-T ;~;T M:HOD3, by AlLert J. Byer. and Dorothy t.Lrar.ls, In: l~Jal].er_,t.^.i.n Labs, Cnm;i ~6 .: 253--G0 (10153i C-) Q 5 0 (~ t~ 0 2 1 7 3 5
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i I ~ ~ 50330 7922 . _ L L. . . . . . .. ~ . .. . . - ~~.-- S I TE DYSFUNCTION%SALIVA/ L V Sh ~{TAS Gustin concentration changes relative to salivw3 yiinc and taste in humans : - Proc. NatL Acad. Sci. USA (sinc defidency/xinc treatment/taste dysfanctlon/salivary proteins/parotid saliva) 'Vol. 78,1Vo. s, pp. 3867-3871. `tiini'' 198 1 Sciences ALLAN R. SHATZMAN AND ROBERT L HENIQN Center for Molendar Nutritioa and Sensory Disorden, Georgetown University Medial Center, Washinaton, D.C. I0007 Communicated by Ceorge K. Davis, February 9,1981 ABSTRACT Biochemical characteristics of gustin, the major zinc protein in human parotid saliva, are similar whether the pro- tein is isolated from subjects with normal taste acuity or from pa- tients with hypogeusia (who may have as little as 1/bth as much parotid saliva gustin as normal subjects do). Zinc concentration in fraction lI of parotid saliva, the fraction in which gustin is found on Sephadex C-150 or Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography, is proportional to the gustin content of saliva and is decreased in patients with lower than normal total parotid saliva zinc. The quantity and spectrophotometric indices of all other protein frac- tions isolated from patients by these column chromatographic techniques did not differ from those of normals. One patient with - proven hypogeusia and low concentrations of zinc in total parotid sal•iva and fraction II, after 9 days of treatment with exogenous zinc, showed a 150% increase in fraction H zinc and a concomitant iocrease iq pppqrent ~sti~eve{c; these cha~ ges Wrecejed ~e return of nbhmallbste nctl~n 1~se a/ta dEmon~trate4ha tdkt treatment can affect both taste and gustin copcentrations in 0 .cence, fraction V by relatively high levels of protein without zinc or fluorescence, and fraction VI by two major peaks, the first characterized by high reladve fluorescence, the second, pri- marily by absorbance at 280 nm. Fraction II was characterizf d by a high level of protein and zinc, the major protein being a carbohydrate-eontaining protein previously noted by others (13-18). This glycoprotein constitutes 92% of the protein in this fraction (3); 80% of its amino acid composition is proline, gh•cine, and glutamic acid, and it is essentially devoid of aromatic amino acids; it stains pink-violet with Coomassie brilliant blue ' iW after gel electrophoresis; and it has a molecular weight of ap- proximately 34,000 (3). This glycoprotein is, in reality, a family of glycoproteins; it is also found in smaller amounts in fractions AI and V, and it makes up about 75-8096 of the total parotid saliva protein. Physiologically, it appears to be bound to gustin in parotid saliva (2), suggesting that this complex may be the functtan.t active form for taste bud growth and nutrition.
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:X- ? 0 u 0 v S 0 ,, _ . ~:•~ ,. .. . ~ , _ . _ .. _. . ., .. ,.. .: . ..... u....-_.... i.~ wr.~....a~.~... ..4..s..! ..~.. , •'" ~ - . ... . ..... f •~ifl=•.7•rY~S7sli, ~ ~ bS6L OEEOS
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50330 7956 )3e 3 -, -- '~s4C~4ffl~!'~~d,.'!R'-R!+Ifl?~±^ii~faa.:ye.:~~kS'ts;.;:.1~fy~~:~.:~.:Y~rs+.ls.wi.;.. '.7•it'--.• iT OF T1' i r . ' ' ~ " S .:.( ).'~ .~. .. ~il . L~~ b.:.~. ....~.:. • 'I ...J.~J lJ 0~.~ 4 ~~ 2 I l3_ 4
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! 50330 7948 .:. • ~' C RUS FRUITS/ * ' f henolic Compounds,.544-57k, Academic CEAPTER 14 Relations between thevfasj - Phenolic (no date) and Structtire-of some .~~-* lycosides ,. . . . . . . • ItonFn.T :1i. IfoRowrrz Fruitand VegetaLleChemislry IeiLoratory,t Pasadena,Cali/ornia, U.S.A. Press, 11 , I. Chomicnl Propcrties of tho Principai Flnvnnono Clycosidca in Citrus 646 A. lIesperidin-'I'ho Structuro of Rutinoso . 646 B. Noolusporidin . . . . . . 540 C. Naringin-'Tho Structuro of Ncohceporidono . . . . 660. . ~ .. ,... rri r ~ . Biochemistry ~ . .' 78 III .Ho °z6 \ .
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50330 7959 ~ i t~...._. -._ _ . ~ . Fi, . . . -.. , ... .,.. . - . . . ' .. . -. ~,'.. . ,. .. : __. .: , :~i. ... .'...... . ~". .. . ~ .: 4. . a, v 0 5 tl 0~ Q"~ I~. ~ 7
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r 1 50330 7963 ~ V' Gr3 ~ _ .._...._. .~_._.._._..__.__._~.~ ___.....f._...~~._.r...,.,~.,~.._. . . ..~f: . ..~i~ . . ~.~~ . _.._.~„~ 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 7~3 t
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I RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET 75 X Mc 50330 1960 ~, McBurney, D. H.; Moskat, L. J. ~ (Univ. Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa., U. S.) -TASTE THRESHOLDS IN COLLEGE-AGE SMOKERS AND NONSMOKERS..f Aerception Psychophys. 18 (No. 27 71-73 (1975) (in English) , 0~ 0 0 0 0 2 I 7:3 8
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f l) r i 9ma 4 .2- ~'r~~/ •w~:~a~.J~GR~., j - ~-- _ , . ta, r I_ . 71-29,42II ',tA1HON, Lawerence Wendell, 1941- CfIATf:CT.ERI?1,Ti0:! OF SOO!'.E F" Q,YOR PRItiCIPLES 0£ :hEASC`J T PPLRS . f~ 8 . North Cz+-vlina ScAte Univer3ity at Raleigh, Fh.D., 1J70 Chcmistiy, biolobical University Micro;:lms, A XEf=Company, Ann Arbor, Michigan ' --} . .. 50330 7952 j G 5 0 0 0 02 1 % 3 0
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I 50330 7968 , 'lirj)l L11 ~ ~ ._,~.._. UbFil li: VEF5'PA! ;li:G DFS AROI`:AF:'.ST;I~I:?~S rTS TAFACu. (I:r.rrover:ent of Aroira Content of Totk-Acco), Reprirt fr. om: Tabak (USSR) L8 (No. 1) 32-34 (1957), ..r. w~
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l 50330 7938 ~ . 0 1 q 79VKu . i 0l2 05'OQ0 1 --- - -- . .. He. Pcrccpnnd orr,l clfutor S(illf, 19:3, 4~, 279•?3fi. C(` i'crceptual and 1•futur S1.ills j97: .r-- ; jADfrS T. KUZNICKI 7 Gc Prucrcr G GautOlc Cn.= Su»rr+r,rry-Tarlicr psychophysical research on single human fungiform raste papillae cnmployeel a procc.lure sy,,hi,cli linnitr.l su6iccti to selcaidg4inly:one tastc to Jc;ctibe the scnsaiiuns thcy cxprricnccJ. 'fhat procrJu«• prrcludcs the possibility of dctcrmining; %chcthcr single papillac can mcdiatc aimplcx tastes, i.e., tastes contistinF uf morc than onc sensation cxpcricnccd simultancously. By using highly traincJ subjects a nd alluwin}t thun frcc•Jum to Jc'scrilx all sensa- tiuns simultaneously elicited by a t;is•cn taste stimulus, single papilla ta ie profiles wcrr obtainc•d. !t is suqgc'stcd that f)btaining tastc prufilc•s may incrc•ase thc utility of sinytc papitlac as mwlc'Is for study of thc tastc systcm. fr.:..~ ~,r 1: 1J.:irr„u R,1 5tn~;Fc littnan ~itngi~orm t;tstc papillac usually nic.liate more than ong ta! scnsatian wltt:n chcmically stitnul:ttcd ( I larpcr. Jay, & Erickson, 1966; T1 Cutchmn & Saunders, 1)12; I3c:alcr & Smith, 1975; Kuznicki & AtcCucchc( 1978) aalthough there has been an exception whc•rc jtihillac were rcpor,td taste spc•cific (von 13elcesy, 1966). In these studies suhjects ~i'cre rt:strictec) selecting only one of four eomtaonly used taste labels (salty, sour, sweet, bitte to describe each scnsation. 1n one casc (vun [3cl:c•sy, 1966) subjects apparcni natnccd the stimctlus rather than the scnsaticm. Wcen larger arcas of the tong atc atitnuLucd, suhjccts are aftc•tt ailowccl to judge alt tastcs that are siml t:cvt~y ltcsc6 in the stimultts (Smith & 1•tclfurncy, l')ls9; Atcisrlman 1 alpcrn, 1970, ittcliurncy , llartuxhttk. 1c)7i; Atctttirncr 1k Shtrk. 19711- (t:ar;
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l I . ..r.- . _. . . , ... ...~ i..a _.•..y..l.,.... _~ ._ ,. .-~".:.+.~+..._... ~...•.~.-.-•`~..~:w~ •.~. _ ... . a r~wul o/ Com~umfire anl P+tHi.dopical P~Khot~pd 1974. Yvl. %o, tirw 1, 47-SO i Rats form stronger aversions to solutions that are either more concentrated or more novel than other soluuons. It is proposed that the data can be rein- terpreted in terms oi just one of these factors, novelty, since the more con- tentrated solution is also ordinarily-more novel. When rats are poisoned after drinking 2 concentrations of the same solute, rats reared on Rater ac- quire aversions mainly to the more concentrated solution, but rats reared oa & stilll more concentrated solution acquire aversions mainly to the less concentrated solution, Nvhich ior them is moee novel. .y TASTEr&a LIE\ CE-iDEPE\ lla • Oti RIYOVE LTi';T:.40T ~~ 3R I\ CT `J[i` ~`~ IIE Rt4kT' JAMES W. I:aL.A.T' Duke Un{versity When a rat is made ill witbin several hours after drinkino a novel solution, it acquires a strong aversion to the taste of that solution (Garcia, Ervin, .(: Koelling, 1960; see review by Rozin & Kalat, 1971). Kalat and Rozin (1970) reported that, under equivalent conditions, rats form ^ -vo, s~.cns._.t2_somn, novell solutions many differences between milk and grape juice other than palatability. Sutker found that rats with initially higher preferences for saccharin showed a larger decrease in saccharin preference after a saceharin-ill- ness pairing. However, these rats did not ,.ho« a louer preference for saccharin, and it could easily be that rats with initially u S~ Q tl Q 2 l, 1 ~ 9
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0 0~ o 5 bZ f z a () i.::.~ :~ ~ _ ~: ~.~ ~ a.,.::, :..W. ~.<.,:~_~~ . ... . ._. ~ .. ~~.._•..._>._ ._ ~......,...__ :. _ ... .,..._. . ~ / ~ ~. ~../ _ , . . ::i ., _..._ _....:~ ;. .. .. .~ .., . _ ~ ~. ;':-- '•`"~z- S ., . .....~.....-• ~ . .~, -._~.,,.- .., . . . . , , . - . i~~ l gj, f ~. , O L96L OEEOS
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ISh7 i (1968) ,j - 1 ~ ,~,1, 3.r.,x:oucl:£, T. ..,_. ~i 6'~r;l•• ~'[S 3 .a~:~,.... J L~y y_7, s5.5-?50 (3?61)
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i 7965 ~ 0 PERCEPTION, V. I--X/HUMAN INFORMATION PROCESSING, V. VIII, IX/ ODOR, V. X/ 5033 360 TASTE--TESTING, VOL. VIA/VISION, V. III, V, VIII, IX/CODING THEORY, V.VIII/ Ca PSYCHOLOGI(, PHY41Ql,OGICAL, V. I--X/SENSES AND SENSATION, V. I--X/SMELL, V.YIA/ TASTE, Vx,III /NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF SMELL, V. VIA/ OLFACTION, V. VIA/VISION, V.III,V HEARING,UIII/BIOPHYSICS OF TASTE, Vol. VIA/ TOBACCO--TASTE--TESTING, V. VIA, NOISE V. IV/PAIN V. VIB/TOUCH, V.VIB/LANGUAGE & LANGUAGES, Vol. VII/SPEECH, V.VII/ FLAVOkANTS--SENSOkY EVALUATION, V. X/ HA\D13OOK OF PERCEPTIO:V f EDITORS: Edward C. Carreretre and Aforlon P. Friedman Department of Psychology University of California, Los Angeles ~ Volume 1: Historical and Philosophical Roots of Perception. 1974 Los ,qnseles, California ' - Volume 11: Psychophysical Judgment and Measurement. 1974 1/Volumc III: Biology of Perceptual Systems. 1973 ` ./Volume IV: Hearing. 1978 ,~ +/Volume V: Seeing. 1975 ~ Volume VIA: Tastifig 86d'Srneiling4i978 ~/Volume VIB: Feeling and Hurting. 1978 VVolume VII: Language and Speech. 1976 "" Volume VIII: Perceptual Coding. 1978 VVolume IX: Perceptual Processing. 1978 */Volume X: Perceptual Ecology. 1978 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 17 4 3 0
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50330 7961 8rYNi 6176 LR883 P 1257 NILS B J DENT RES kQ, (iNSZa) t (9f1) Vol. 60(B) NOF 53 0 eOla f1Altctw 8 t/1LSS0'1 , A-K HOLM, and R SJtlSTRtlli. Odont. MuTCy, University of Ueel, Unei, Sweden In this pilot study recognition thresholds were determined for sweet and, as a control, for salty, sour and bitter taste. Preferences for sweet taste were determined in some of the subjects. The subjects (Ss) were 26 persons, 15 years old. 12 (7 , 5 d) with low and 11 (6 Q, 8 d) with high preval~nce of dental caries. The iverage OHFS in the two groups were 1.5 (Range: 0-4) and 26.9 (R: 19-39) respectively. Recognition thresholds were determined for solu- tions of sucrose, sodium chloride, citric acid and quinine hydrochloride. The concentrations increa- sed with a factor rt in 9 steps and ranged from 1.95 to 31.3 edi/1, 0.9-15.6. 0.06-0.98 and 0.00049 -0.0078 respectively. A'full-eauth•technique was used. 10 .1 of a solu- tion was served in clean glass beakers. Between tests the Ss rinsed their mouths with filtered, deionized water, which also was used as blanks. All taste solutions and blanks were presented in random order and in increasing concentrations, using a modified method of limit. In the preference test four solutions of sucrose (.1S, .30, .60 and 1.20 M) were presented randomly and the 14 Ss who performed this test were asked to indicate the preferred solution. A significant difference in threshold values bet- ween the two caries prevalence groups could not be found for any of the four taste qualities. The pre- ference test showed no differences between groups tither. Ifo obvious correlation between threshold values and preferences for sucrose could be established. -T6iL-F7hrii *WrM0 L1' a~ e~ T5 yNr . -., ..-..,.,... __ __ .... --- - 0 5 0 4 ~ o z! 1257
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, .50330 7953 ~ , TASTE_TESTING/TOBACCO--S.40KING--TASTE TIIFES1i0LD--EFFECT/ 73 x Pu SENSES AND SENSATION/ RJR CLASS NO. 73 X I'u i Pursell, E. D. ; Sanders, R. E. ; Haude, R. Ii. (Univcrsity Akron, Akron, Ohio, U. S. ) SI:i:S1TI~'ITY TO ~-C;OSE IN S'.IC~KF:RS At~I) hO~.Si•IOKIa'.S: A CO,IPAIZISO:; OF TSD ~ Ai2J PF.RC!?`:T Ci`"fii;C1 AtL~~SUi'.~.;ar _ ~itvti.l•i R3.r- 'S E:.Vil:a: •
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i , 50330 7972 ~ ~ ;TS 12240 • ~He ~ 1 1 .~ I tlerttdon, efvrni: 1llelvilt. WilIiui:i'1'atluinl rtid tlto culturo of tnb:x.zv, by !a. MR-1-rit I-Ierndon. h,clt:dino- a.far-;ziius reprin+ of ?1u Listn:ical ,iat prRCtlcB.l c.Cay on t1i~S ctliturtl fli1d co:amt'i'CjJ (%1 .•^.uaCt_n, b: Williar:i 'I';ithaui. C•~artil GuLlca, i'la., TTUive.r: i,,y 0i ;a.iam Prnss 119Gn1 zv, ,lb: p. illtts. 2r cm. 10.00 1. ToUnoc•q• x. 'i'athw;t, Wil;laai, t7SJ-1913. An 1llatnti - c}it sn• practlcal c:s+y ou liio cu.lure und cuwwerce o[ tobacr.o. ar. Tttte. SB/i3.1I47 f > 633'.71 G9-1913. SBti b'7tC.'1-107-~J ~~ ) DL•1ro Litn•a;y of Cur,p-es:+ t;'1 l~ ~ ~~ 5 0 d~ n 0 0
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1 50330 7983 ~ ~Z ; 695 ~ Ta ~ 1953 I _ Stuclies in coordinate indexing, by 111or•tiuier 'I';rulfe anr3 as- ociales, tll'aslrin~;tonr llucumentation Incorporate~l, 1953. 110 p. 22 ci n. Bibliorr,rphical footnotes. 1. Indexiug; T. Title. Z695.9.T3S , 029.5 53-4043 Library of Consress t-~ 1151 • 0 5 0 0 0 02 1 7 6 1
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?, iU U 0 U s 0 I ..^,~..~ I ~ 9L6L p££05
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/ 50330 7982 ~j _._. ._... ~._....... ...__.• ~ ... - -..._~.~:d.~.~:...y:.,,,d. ' t. author. , ~r- _~,,,,:,1 Kanninen, William H. 1',anufacturir.g processes for solub].e coffee. by Wi11iam 11. Yanninen, and Stephen E. Taub. 1954. F'ror.m: Coffee and Tca Industries, 1954. _ 0•• 5 .0 •. 0 0' 0• 2 t 7 6 •Q .
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50330 7979 1 ..._r.~~..,_...,....~._....:~.~,._ ~:~.~s. _._~_.~._ _.._._..__...~~~_._ W._.._..._ _......._........,.,,.~,:_...._.... TT c Be s~~ Beadle, G. ti•i. Genetic control of' bic chemicul re--;ctions in Neurospora, by G. ?•1. ^eadle and E. L. Tatum. Fro;r: Nat. Acac. Sci. Proc. 27: /9-?,-Q6 (1--,l,1 .0 S.. 0. -0... 0 ..0. 2~1. 7 5. 7
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, I l.o.;~_~.~o._....._.. . _,.... .. . _ _ _ __~.:._.. .:..._... ~..._ ... __ _~~. __Y._.... ~.. _,_.._.,._...._. ~ ~ ..a,.,. _.._~., _... _ .. ,.,. _ _ _.~ . _ 50330 7971 XX NeF-D-=-74 NOPl-SUCROSE SWEETENERS• . Tate'& Lyle, Ltd.,.Annual Report, 1972,.pp 17-18. . - tri-ao• . , . :. Research Centre -. _. ._. . I . 21 1•tincin i ane 8 • ~ London, rC 311 .7 QY, England . i „ OBJECTIVES ....._ _._ . - _ ~~....__._.. Whi!e sucrose remains the natural sweetener of choice, with a linear* iucrease :nd world demand far exceeding that of any alternative, very little is known ai;out the fundamental basis for its sweetness. Apart from the synthetic sweeteners, none of which has been satisfactorily proved to be free from toxic side effects, a number of suoar substitutes, such as glucose, isomerose 1, fructose, sorbitol, xylitol (from wood) 2, lactitol (from milk) 3, maltitol (from starch) 4, glycerrhizin (from liquorice) 5, D-viboquercitol (from acorns) 9,and the sweet proteins_btonellin (from Serendipity..Berrv) 6,_ a~0 0 0 7 4 9 . • CN2pH
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~ 50330 7974 RJR CLASS NO. TEXTBOOK TS 2240 Dc Landesanstalt Tabakbau Tabakforschung Forchheim Karlsrulie, Ger. PUBLICATIONS OF THE GCRIUI.N TOBACCO R1:Sl:ARCIi STATION, FORCN11k;ttd NEAR I:ARLSRUHC, GER.: , _ _ , tigk6itiab~eric~iti2iirid"~f~73 ttnd: yeroffent~.~C~ri~enVe ;'Uex:-Deutsche= Tabakbau' , r1973: )* _ ,. .. .. Landesanstalt Tabakbau Tabakforschung Fotchheim Karlsruhe, Ger, TatiBkei.tsbericht 1973 and 1.973, 152 p. (1973) (in German) *1975, No. 7, t•l 2478* *d* Tobacco analysis (agriculture): 0 5 0 0 0 02 1 7 5 2
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.. I ..5 1' I, ?, 0 U 0 U- S p i+i~.6~ 'n. ____ y_.....__.......~.. p p. d ~' i{1CIC.1..~:SVIl~aT~7' d 4 •r'•a 7.Z •rr.T~: •:;~ a 'G96T `1;caTj Yt~'xSnI 30 1,72-rO:j.On1L11 dr:lY«,,1t j-l fr,a •(:!stlpt ~7y I"'jT-117-ri Sq i.X;>'~-;:ZJ r lia 1>:J j1'.:);:j i::x'3 `(t:.7 ~ aaj, p:ad~ uxaZc~ iloa T.>~ ~L'p~ji1.7L1i . ~ fL6L OffOS
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l / XX MeF-D-316-79 -TASTE`Z'fiRRSHOL''D"VAMt9 Dd'f Reiz- und -Erkennungsschwellenwert f iir 50 330 79 58 = Metallverbindungen in verschiedenen Prufinedien R.Zacharias und 11.Tuurihr . 1rAmm.-Wn.. r:trrhad. 1'. te .II /14741 R.Zacharias: Bundcsforschungsanstalt fiir F:rnahrung. Institut fiir ffauswirtschaft. Gart>Lnar.13. 7000 Stuttgart-70. fluhtnhcim tGrtmuny) 9/i ti.Tuorila: Staatliches Technisches Forscbung:rrmrum. Lahcttaturiwn fiir Letk•nsrnittclforschung fliologinkuja 1, " SF-flZ1t(/ E.peso 15 (Finnlansl) (Eingegangcn 2. August 1975, Angenornmen 2R. S'eptember 1978; lssv 550) Taste threchold .alues for melullic .afes in different mcslia i7re aim o% tite present .study ssvls •o determine tNe artrennn and recognition thresholds f or "mrtallic" faste in various test media. Ferrous sulplmtl K•ac ehn.sen as a nroelel.cubsuulce since an aquenus solution o/tleic compound crrrrespondrd seell to the opinions about metallic tnste as expressed by individual .servory judges. Detection and recognition thresholds were determined in n•eter, orange juice, and milk. On the basis of statistical anals•sis the following detection thredeold svere loturd: 3 mg Fe/l in ss•aYr. 15 ing Fei7 in orange juice. and I mg Fe/1 in milk. The snfues jound /or the recognition threshold were: :0 mg Fe/l in water, 66 ntg Fe/1 in orangeluice. and 30 mg Fetl in milk. The individual panel members showed a wide range o/sensiriviry to the mndel compound in the three te.ct media. This means that tht ability of art indiridrral judge to detect metallic taste should be tested nor nnlv with aqurnus .snlurions hut also with Joodsruj/c. In actual yractice, the lestrrd coruentrations of iron should, however. give an indication of the presence oja metallic ojJ-tasre in eaus where the iron concerurarion is known.
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50330 7981 / The Dangers of Aerosorays 'S?tn,Luel, J: :Toub, M,.D,.;;;,~ x 0 5 0 0 n U2 1 7 5 9 J / ,...._..w 6 _
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ps,c I 7 a u o o s o. k- - •c;2 -'ooZr T•r-p;-ra^1pT.: ~ ra~ic~d ESG l~,, aTtaS :'utzaaax~'u. j Vftioa3O~t:; x~+-r~ ~?:i TitV-hu;c;)a;i t7tit~?, 2:~:f 4:-,2: ;r~r~ uirciXt : t: qoat~ f Q;'X tc0?:LVli;lt;:•iJ 2ICA •SJ.I,2'J'IC C,:d S:I,')7.113ff ~S1;2IC!~7A~11~ qcso:a• `u7G,Tt= ( 096L oEEOS , i i
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/ 50330 7939 ) lY. • .. 0 I i SENSO.y raocESSt•a 3. 157-182 (1979) ; " XX MeF-316-80 "-' Tasfe ~'"uaiify"~if~erence""s'"G"vif~iin~".tti~'"Sw"~et~and Sa(t -..rX *rawcgtegb"rtes ~ ~ U JAMEST. KU'LNICKIt tK 7iD~~. The Pruclrr 4 Crrarhlr Cwnpanr: ~Yi~rruJ lli1117'rch tirul CrrNrr;• F,Yrrx/ c fs Dirfsiun. Cini•inmNi (jluu aS'~J -- ~ Y ~tlur~trliJ Pn~trnnirj IqrJ C'inc•innut~ Uhin !S??J Taste stimuli can generally be classifred as sadty, sour, sweet, and bitter: Stimuli withi each of these categories can be further perceptually Ji.tin8ui.heJ by the prestnce of tastt in addition to that characteristic of the category. For example. potassium chloride t:rste bitter as well ars salty. hut is generally cFrssifeJ aawnE salry stimuli. This ti•ork examineJ 0 relationship between these additional siJe t:rstes anJ judgments of taste quality Jiflrrtncc within aweet and salty taste categories. Subjects were asked to estimate the magnitude i sweet or sarlty quality dill•erences between pairs of primarily sweet or sa1tY stimuli: The were instructed to ignore all other taste. anJ perceptual attributes present in the stimul Intensity estimates ol•all tastes present in the stimuli w•ere alsu uht:~ined. By equatinF stimu for nun8u.tatory sensations and manipuk,ting .ide ta.tts by using mixtures, it was found Ih: ju4tgeJ quality JilTerencec within the sweet and salty categories were systemxically relate to the prc.ence and intensity uf side tastes. It was concluJcJ th:~t subjects wert incapahlee selectively attenJint: to individual tastes in eomplez stimuli. These results might he experte ir taste quality is an ensemble of a few categories which tenJ to blend perceptually becaus of space-time coherence of the sensations. 0 sa•a6 0 2t?17 I AN1~ '~ 63S?o5c U NANCY ASI-($AUGH
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50330 7950 ~ s:r... r7e1 Th.r:,n. w7x. v•t Iti ~~ ?x~ 9_1 ~ /XInS.79G7•7xilxU1.0?x4So±W 0 .Id I'nmc:1 m Grcal-(twa'in ~ 'TVL '..~ t 1~ r ~(~'/ ~.-- 3lb 79 V Co Extcnsiop-of the*stc•tcst 'analoVc as an unobtrusive e titcasurc of preference for alcohol ' GPrard ~ V.14 t? NoPS 7 (Receired 23 January 1978) $-Pc-PhUl A• 111 Pr~ ~~'Q • MA r'- K 2. 5 0 i3 E LL. ,~,?~, Summary-The utility of the tastc-test analogue for obtaining an unobtru;l~~c measure of prcfer- encc for alcohol was examined. Thirty-two male undcreradualcs participated in each of two taste-rating tasks. In each task, subjects wcrG presented 'Aith tv.o beakers containing beverages they were to rate. Although one container was labeled "Alcohol", and the other was labeled "Orangc Juice", both actually containcd only orange juice. Subiccts rated the beverages ditfrr- /640Z-21 ently on 53".; of the dimensions for which ratines were compbaed. Purthermorc, subjects csti- mated that they had consumed an avcrage of over t!,rc'c ounces of alcohol in the combined taste tests. Wider use of the analoguc preference test may havc siEniticrtnt value in the study of the determinants of human alcohol drinking behavior. Currcnt behavioral modcls of alcohol uw conceptualirc drinking as a discrimin:ltcd operant and, thus, focus on drinking and the events preceding and followinf drinking behavior (`liller, 1976: Sobell, Sobcll and Sheahan. 1976). Since behavioral approaches focus on the drinlit:; rc~ponsc, it is Imrortant to devclop reliable and valid behavioral measures of drinl,ing. \farlatt (1973) hal noted that such methods can be appiied to three .spects of bch.:nioral aprroachcs to the study of alcohol usc: assessment of drinking ratcs and pattcrns, assessment of Irc:;tmcnt ctfectivcncss, and assessment of the dctclminants of drinkine hcha~ior. TNo features common to a number of studies investie:uin;t the detcrmin ;nts of drinking behavior (e.g., 1•1illcr and tirnrn. 1972: fiigFins and 1lurlatt, 1973. 1975; \4arlatt. nemmin_r, :uld Reid. 1973: Caudill and Marlatt. 1975: Marlatt, Kosturn and Lang. 14.'5: :1sn, 1977: Cooper. Watencou:.e and Sobcll, 1977: 11c:..lricks and Cooper. 1977) are that thcp have been conducted in laboratory and in each case drinking bchavior was the dependent s,uiable. When alcohol consumption is the dchcnJcnt variable in such arltficial sctfi.ngs.~undp~tru~e tn6sur;~1\'clyt;er u~. 196( of ry~lisu{~ption is prcfcrrcd. since awarcness hy a subjcct th~fhis c un un bcl me~tr( ma) nge~r :/~cactise response which may render thc caperi- mental procedures unrcliable. To preNcnt such reactivity front occurring, a ta.tc•test analogue procedure Ir
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/ 50330 7987 J QP 8 601 )?nzyine teclinolol;y il)N•j II?iu•y T,lt;lacr, rit n. Nev: Z'orl,. T J. Wiley un.d sons, inr.; London, Cltatmi ;n and II;il1, 1t;, t 1(9-13t vt1, 27.5 p. ]llus., dirtrrs. 22 em. '•lteferences' at end of each chapter. 1. l:nrytnes. 2. Fet•tnentation, 3. Chemi=try, '1'echnical. 4, Chen:- IsU•y, Orgrtntc. r. '1'ltle. 3'Y21S.i?5T ; 661 4-1-_?2 Library of Coneress ~ l tu52i22t . ~.., ~.,,.. )1 . 0 S. 0 0 0 02 1 7, 6., S
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~~ 50330 7988 ~~~._ :. ...:.._...1.~K_.. ..,~ _, ~....` __.__ XX iSer=R'--403-73 . t : ....,......_.'-rw~at~a.*a..~-.r~r. •.~..-...-.,n.. ..^--~-,..--,.•.,,..,..l,.."-.-....-...~....~..a.-~~ .,.....-,1,-~,..~..-,:.._~..~-~.~,.,................ ., ~e----~+-.,.....-...... ~ ....-.... .. I . Jour. of Advertising Research 12 (6)35-37(1972) WHAT IS MEASURED BY CONCEPT TESTING? often concept, execution, and coa.mur.icatien are . measured instead When managers think oiily new product ideas are measured; By :X.4wara ,~. Tauber, ; ~
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-.i ~.,c...:..,..,r:.v ....:. ;._ . {:.f.~'.~ +. ., y In RusSian os~ona.~ i ~~a
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50330 7985 , i,rrc I, ic rerei~rc ~\'iac:- MARKETING RESP.ARCH/ HF 5415 Am 1977 PDDL ,[. •'~,. ulliversi t1+ of sou li -ern calci7orn:a -1 f ` p • ~ ,- 0~ f~ 0 ~ A~ 1 7 cE-n~~:soil cor~pany T ~ A A A d/I/!Gf)l(- dN I A A A 0 tlr- Tl'n1 f:`_ AM. nr-% i A Tir"~n
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50 330 7989 ~ / i ---- ~ Z 695 Ta 1953 Teclmical services in libraries: acquisitions, cat;ilo--in,i classification, binding, pLoto~raphic reproduction, en(l cit culation operations, by 1lfaurice. F. '1'auber and associate> Now York, Columbia University Press, 195.1 I°19:i31 xvi, 4S7 p. dlegra. 2-4 cm. (Columbla University studies In 1il,rir service, no. i ) Bibliographical references included In "Notes" (p. i4141-4P,3) 1. Library science. 7. 2`itle. (Series) ZG6;;:1'23 1954 025 5 t-1Q3•: Llbrnry of Gon~,~res.v ` 1301
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50330 7990 ~ vz- Tag l~f ,~.r. y^.~..~~_..<< 1 ~, CAt,L:S~~13 Y `1:'a t~ ~,r4t n 1`~ZI IP+":::3i:::3 `4 'r~3 :.°•~•1 ' a%'•.':^.@ Ell t:.. ;~i., It ~:;.)y .~f ) .~:~r.:"~.i• C)
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, e "~*~ . &.. ~? ;~14? r .. ., %a 4'.yS, r lemperatun• controlled watcr b:itl~t Taste and. w a ter taste ~ 34 C. 'I'hcy were presented to thc 50330 7962 ~ r 7l ' • -11 anterior dorsal tongue surface by ~ravity flov: A pair of sprin~ I~ad~ tl . ~~ ll SIX COIt1~30UC1C S ~r O .y or IlI~l1~ . ~ f`t ~ - f ~ -~~~ ~f ll/ v I -1 i- DONAI.D It. McRU1tNI;Yt and THOMAS R. SHICKIt t%U_niversity oi Yittsburgh;:Pittsburgh, Ya. 15213 asle profiles were obtained for 26 compounds I fter adaptation to distilled water and also for aater after adaptation to each of the 2G compounds. Lach of the four "basic tastes" was induced in water by adaptation to certain of the compounds. Compounds having similar tastes did not neces•carily have sirnilar watcr tastes. The results imply a peripheral locus of the water taste mechanism(s). It has been known for many years some of the findings of the previous that adaptation to ccrtsin compounds experiment (Bogart and McBurney, see causes water to have particular tastes McBurney, 1969) pose problems to an and enhances the taste of particular opponent process theory for taste. compounds. Thus, water tastes sour Although it was possible to produce after adatrtation to sweet compounds each of the four "basic tastes" as >ind the )'~ 13~tten~ty of sou corn,j~ou ds is wa er ta tes, it wps noted that not all increaslfil os0k, c13'irhey~jancj,Z co~npcnd4 p&duced the same F:affrnann (1964) showed that water intensity of water tastes when they had a r.our-bitlcr taslc aftcr ac`apeation were rnrtched for intensity of their clamps actualcd by a Iever provideel practically instantaneous switching between stimuli (Bogart, 1969). Solutions All solutions were made in distillcci water of reagent grade chernical, except for commercial sucrose. The 2t compounds are listed in Table 1..Thc5 had previously been scaled so thatthc overall taste intensity of each matchec that of 0.1 M NaCI. They werc selected on the basis of ability tc produce a water taste in the previou: experiments and in pilot work. N( attempt was made to have equa numbrrs of representatives of the fou tastes- Procedhtre Each of the compounds was scale< after water adaotation. and water wa
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I )•!:~, tlili ~:~ftl!1:1: :{I~I+ (~Lil!t:l{n'I 1:1!I~11(t'il~l~i!Itlfll~~'!!~1~',~~~il~ li(il it•'tdila011 Ih' ~X{ Illi':)(i~:. •i~~~ :ti ~)r:l. ';:II!Illtat . Food Progress_2_ (S.).1_(.Sept.~Oct.._~~4~._._.__. ~ 72 xx1~,- - 73- 5. • ~C~'L'~I~~~~;;:i ~~%~~:D~aY..t3- Sellec~t~~~ .1. S('11O1,1?1, /jrifi.ch Food llarurjnclnrisrg Industries Rescarch Associalion, r cuNrcrlrcud 1n un earlier issue of this journal Dr T. R. Gorrnlcy described the i~i ]ro><~anc~~~nrl~on`c~m~t rod~of 11N•4 cx4uaP.0n. The (' I ~ •'\.:~-:a~' , . _./..- r` t. This tyhc. of hanel is very useful when the or to detcrmi,-te whether the flavours of two different. They are trained to examine carefu-C, of samples put before them in a paired or triar: record whether the samples taste different to tl the result from this type of panel cannot be extrapolated to the general public, since the tr:. the tasters renders their opinions more analp lecc rernrsr•ntntive of the - I t - --- ^^•+cll*•-rr 50330 74cu . N ~ ~
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IF ; 50330 7970 ) x Ta2 ~..._...__ __y.. _... _._w... .~...~~.~.:~~:r .c'RR CE,~J' C; FLG-I;iP.1 a`•.,iYS:CCS•A:rS t~pF IJ :':SIiJe'~;a38 by Chax?es 1. xtt,3 and •±. F. i-Sedo Auaoc. 5? (:'o0 1~ 1~7~~>c3 (1965) O 0 5 0 0 0 02 1 ! 4 8
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50330 8001
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/ I l L.~I ) Dlit. - T S. s A Clinical Analysis of" •Eiglitccn Cascs Jt:RONtE 1j. SIrAPIRO, M.D. AXD C/Cj,A..WXI4."!~J~TF,t>t.n., F.C.C.P." Af/Omt, Florida 1; ITDllF.X DF.hTIr I\ STATUS ASTIrMATI- ~ cus is not unu<ua1, despite adti•anccs •in management. This c.•cnt has hccn the subject of scvcral rcccnt articlcs.'-' . }3ccauu of this continuing mortality, a rc%•ic«• was madc of recent rccords in a large municipal hospital to detect, if po;ei- hlc, anv common fcaturcs among L•ttal cas- . es of bronchial asthma with the hope that proportions parallcl thosc in the hoKl)i .1 admksions irn v gcncral at Jaci;.son 'Mcntor:.l Hospital. Age and length n/ a1Jn<l.•s: One 'd'r_a:=: occurred before the age of fi.•e and 13 a~- tcr the asc of 35 ycars. Fourtccn had hro::- chial ashthma for o%•cr tcn vears, with tl:c longest for 40 vcars. Many had had recu:- rcnt hospitalization for a5thmatic epivodc<. 0 5 il 0n 02 1 7 4 7 Dcath in Status Astht»vicus:
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/ 50330 7993 l f I ~~~utomeriaq~.~ t ~ ~ 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 I.
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i 50330 7997 i . ,. .a -76 s PHLET VI R .p. e9 VI Re -76' RJR CLASS N0. PAM 9 S.P., - Kann, J., Kalve, R.; Paalme, T. (Polytechnical Inst., Dep. Chem., Tallinn, Estonia, USSR)• DETERMINATICN OF NITROUS GASES IN S2•,OKE. IARC Sci. Publ. 9, 180-182 (1975) (in English) *Kepiordst* nitregen dioxide, smoke, constituent; nitrogen monoxide, smoke, constituent. . 0 5 0'0 a 02 1 1 7 5
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i 50330 7995 ~ ~~STiytcr,i~z~~ ~tri~' uY.~t~'riS~yci i c' CGrpounds~.. . -• -. .-.. . - - _...... .,y,.~ .. . --• .. . , +....+.r..w..w. -:.,,.a.p.....~-5•
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i ~ 50330 7931 ~'--- .. XX MeF-E-404-74 ) Tech. Q. Mast. Brew. Assoc. Amer. 11(2) 94-99 (1974) SESSION l. TASTE PANEL METIIODS , . '~'~este~Panet~et~hods~~~ma I By Margery A. Einstein Flavor Research Specialist w.3 : Rainier Brewino Comoanv. Seattle• vlashinatoa SINTESIS 4P_'_0_ La impresiSn de sabor en et consumidor es un factor muy prueba efectiva requiere un proarama agresivo disenado irsportante en Ia seleccidn de una cerveza. De ahf que es •saoy importante que se estimen objelivamente lodns )ns aspeclos del sabor del producto. Estos datoe sobre el sabor K relacion.•m d"pues con Ia reaccion del consurnidor reediante un programa comprensivo de prueba sensorial. - El proposito de todas las pruebas sensoriales debe estar daramente definido. Tanto Ia seleccibn del tipo de catador tamo la tknica de la prueba dependen del objetivo de Ia aisma. Un error al seleccionar la tecnica apropiada o el Bpo correcto de catadores puede ocasionar que se obtengan iesultados inv3lidos o completamente cnaanosos. Una para obtener datos de muchv fuentes humanas. Estas fuentes deber3n incluir catadorea tanto enlrenadoa coroo no entrcnados. Los catadores no entrenados pronto seran experimenlados, formando otra fuents de datoa. Un proFrama comprensivo de pruebas sensoriale proveer3 utiles datos sobre el sabor para 1a evaluacion de malerias primas, de nuevos o modi6cados productos, de variaciones en el proceso, de uniformidad del producto, de tiempo de vida y de productos competitivos. Estos datos se pueden combinar con datoa a6nes para guiarse al tomar decisiones sobre el sabor del producto. Theultimate goal of a good flavor evaluation program tul, practical flavor data. The principal functions of the ir to a asure that the customers are ofterec: a line of prod- flavor testing program include: ~ s~ets ~Jith the best possible flavor. To achieve this goal, 1. The evaluation of product uniformity and stab: lity the p:oduct must have the broadest appeal and yet be (e.g. weekly checks of production, shelf•life lest-
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1 , 50330 7918 JJ1/ 75 V,,,~a TASTE-PSYCHOLOGICAL PRI?~CIPLE/ . Aaer. Jour. Psyclriat:ry 131(11)1204-07(1974) 1 114 4 ~~ ~ !tY J%1f•: l.. GAIttt AXI) :11.ItE(iT J. SftIN1::1tib. 1t.!). PvtETKOrJ 0 A survet• of 646 subjeets revealed that tacte aversions ', may he acquired hti• a special kind nJlearning that has t~' ~' '`ye studied 696 subjects from six diTerent populations, pre~•ioudt~ been deni~~RCtrated clearl~' onh• in onimal.c. 4~rangin5 in age from early childhood to old age. Of the to- Gastrointcstincrl illncss xa.c ac.cociatcd s.ith acquisition oj t• I 476 I' '')20 f I arens it~ns in 87 percent of the subjects. One pairing of ~ food and illness was sufficient to produce at•ersions tha j lastcd jor man r• }'e arT. Onset ojaversions was most common bet ween qqes 6 and 12, when the pre~•alence rate reached 30 percen:: it then jcNsteadil t- to e lo r: of 6 peicc.u after age 60. The authors believe that a better understanding ojta.ste aversions nrny help impros•e conditioned aversion procedures in the treatnrent of ' alcol+olisnt and obesi:r. a, were ma es ano _ ema es. fhe subJects were 'drawn from populations selected for intelligence and po- tential interest in the phenomenon, to enable us to maxi- mize information about taste aversions. They included 129 elementary school children, 72 secondary school ctu- dents, 216 uni%•ersity underoraduates, 143 first-year mcdi-.: cal students, 73 members of an adult education prograrn, and 63 university professors eme~riti. Subjects in four of the six groups were tested in their classrooms. No one refused to participate. A two-page self-report questionnaire was administered to all groups except the elementary school children. TASTE AVERSIONS ARE ATTRACTING increased attention wlrose,* age necessitated a shortened oral form. The ques- for at least two reasons. One is the rer.eu•ed interest in tionnaire covered fit•e major topics: )) dcrnographir in- _, cOn<titir)nf.(~_:Q rSi~.l}t~:rp~LYj)~.[~I nrfnl:cafl~~0.~4 •.fl.•.-~.fr~nlall(1n,5Ltf~aS~l~C i,'{.~1Pj~ht,an~_farrob~ a1.:.r1.,^.a.-w{!> .. . - . . ' ' r . ~ N. ~ , . ~~ i
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J ! QD 453 We - 1971 50330 7994 IV, V. ; . Vol•.II, " ,..Vo1.III, =.Vo3 .IX,Pt.1, 1Fo1.JfIV: - r• , - - ; ISOMERIZATION/TAUTO.*tFRTSM/pHOTOSY:~'THESIS/ PHOTOCHF.MISTRY/ _ CHEKSTRY, Od:GANIC--LAfiORATORY TECHNIQUES Vo1.I,PC. IA,IB,IIA,IIB,IIIA-: TECHNiQUES OF CHEMISTRY ~~ . .. .. - ' GLENN H. BROWN DWOTOCHROMISM WiLEY-INTERSCIENCC A DIVISION OF )OHN WILEY & SONS, INC. hewYork • London • Sydney • Twonto Regents Profesur of Chemistry Kerrt State University ~ Kent, Ohio .-..: ..~. >•. z - .. .~ 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 7 72
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, , 50330 7991 T JpURNAL oP APPL//Il P11YL1oLQOY Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1975. Prinlyd is U.S.A. 7z0R,&-'Ir sp. A theory of aerosol deposition ~ in the human respiratory tract `1): 'B: ~VAULBPDAND C. P. YU Dtparlment of Engintering Science, Aerospace Engineering and Nuclear Engineering, Statt University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14?14 TAULBEE, 1). B., A,o C. 1'. Yu. A theory of aerosol deposition in the depths in the lung varies with a) the physical properties human res/.dratory tract. J. Appl. 1'hysiol. 38(l): 77-85. 1975.- aerosol particles such as size, shape, mass, and charge, The deposition of inhaled aerosol particles in the human respira- the breathing conditions including tidal volume, frequcnc tory tract is due to the mechanisms of inertia impaction, Brownian and breathing pattern, and c) the physiological conditio! diffusion, and gravitational settling. A theory is developed to pre- such as residual capacity and airway structure which vari dict the particle deposition and its distribution in human respira- tory tract for any breathing condition. A convection-difTusion from subject to subject. Rigorous determination of depoi equation for the particle concentration with a loss term is used to tion requires a complete knowledge of the airflow pattei describe the transport and de osition of articles. I this qua ion in the lung, which is very complex and yet not fully undc ' 9 s 0 S oo 00 2'1 f~
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i z 699 Ke ..., :t, A. :''.:C.ii.i?axC INM?'?MIGIN. V.rVv`D:.It;G, by .. ICcmak ttlkd 0. •...~}~n a .. ~S. J.~;~ . '.~ 353 vf"'~ :. „ :!a a ~07::~}, ZaL`. W:a!jtl~fi;"~fl
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50330 7999 ) ..+c:..r. ,. _..c.. ~ ~~.. c,.,.._ ...... ........ _. ...~i ....n _i.^. l. . . ...~iiG.(/......J .:i .. r.. ~f . ... [ .. /. 11 1 . . .. ^' i.:.y ! 7 .,....... ,. .... ~~....Yd~ ~! L•a , ...,.;:a::~ $• i;. a. . .....~ ~ ~V e,'q A"ft"1 ~ 0 .. ... .. ~:;.,..~1~: t~d .~~....~U~:1~.~..1:... .. . .. . ~ tl 0 ~ p:~ i7 7_ 7
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/ • 50330 7998 j .t- ~~ _/J1 RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET VI Re9-77 s.p. K J Ta 0: ;K1 R ; Paalme T Iann,.. ;uts,-Yave,.,. *(no affil.)* , MEASUREMENT OF THE NITROGEN OXIDES IN CIGARETTE SMOKE. abstract Tr..Tallin. Politekh. Inst. 367, 79-83 (1974) (in Polish with English ~~SU55Prl *Keywords:* ttitrogen dioxide, sraoke, constituent. I - The nitroue gases are possible precursors of nitros - 6 -, aminee, the toxic and cancerogenic properties of which are ` well-known. .l , tttt• ~ The emoke of 10 different cigarettes have•been etu- I died. 1' It was found that the emoke of some cigarettes consists ; of 160 to 310 micrograms of nitrogen dioxide per•cigarette. The rrater-eoluble nitrate content of a cigarette and ~ the nitrogen dioxide concentration in the emoke produced ' by it are generally proportionally related.._ r.r. 0 5 0 0 (l 0 .~ ~ 17 6
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S-o ~-0 vaaC (~~,~~Y) (OL6I) 8oo III ~ 0008 Of£OS I
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/ r / 50330.7996 ) I QD TI~~'~~T'4IVIERISNI- 400 Ad ~ , ": • . ~ -~.~. .~ 197,6 . , • d~"~`~ER© ~~ES ( -Advances iii Heterocyclic CheJiustry Jupplemeilt 1 Edited by A. R. KATRITZKY and A. J. BOULTON I JOSA ELGUERO and CLAUDE MARZIN Qtpsrtnernt dt C6imie Organiyue Vniwn6d dr Lngluda uantlenin, Fttntt ALAN R. VATRITZKY Acadcmic Prcss . Ncw York • San Pnncisco/~ London • 1976 Sc6oe1 ef CJumiral S/itna. Unirtrtitr ef Fart Anglf. NotwiuM. E+Rgfand PAOLO LINDA bfm. di CI lmirs pgenia Univtuit] di Amgia Pttrgty,ralr A fubidi.ry urlfan:wrt Uru. Jovaeo.irb, Pubfi,hta 0 S 0 0 0 0, 2 1 1 7 4
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..... •`.~KSS'~_-r-. . . . -''- ~. r.. 50330 7986 f . ' MARKETING RESEARCFI/ ' ~ ' Business Norizons 17 (3) 22-26-CI'T77+) • Islp 3-74 How MGar ke tRe search Discourages Majbr Innovation In market research on new products, early attitudes or behav:or of consumers-are assumed to be valid predictors of adoption be- havior. For innovative products, this assumption may be invalid. Zdmard hL Tauber is a jacnltp mrmber in .oerketing in the Graduate School of Business at the Uni:e.sity oJSouthern G!ijornia. The accelerating introduction of new prod- ucts has received widesprcid attention in business literature. Less recognized, however, is the important issue of whether changes in the quality of innovations have kept pace. . Where are the innovations for this quarter- century to compare with electricity, frozen food, television, or the automobile? With some notable exceptions, many of today's consumer produ s t~ lon to generic cate- „~-~, >rI By definition, discontinuous innovations can significantly change our lives. At the extremc, these innovations create a new generic category. Highly continuous innova- tions, on the other hand, are simply new brands in an existirig category and readily fit established patterns of consumption behavior. . Critics associated with the consumerism movement frequently charge that most so- ealled ne%.• products introduced ky the major companies are actually minor variations or "me-too" items. Business should be con- eerned about the quality of innovation. not a
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5033p 7975 -Wr 1A 47- A' 1S fl *' p'7°s-r71i' 1973) ' k K' h' A7 705-711 (19- ik aga u a~s i , , Nippon Noge (-)-Carvone 0 Pseudomonas ovalis, 6-1 M kFJfA M.R e,% ix (*lix"&**AT lisil10 it!r##) 80 III No' K 1bCA (-to 1) . PH *0 48$6A8 B * y! Conversion of by Pseudoonas ovalis, Strain 6-1 (licrobial Conversion of Orpenes Part XIII) By Yoshiaki NOMA and GhGj1~jrl1rt'S6li1trq Department of Agricu/tural Chemistry, College of AQriculture, University of Osaka Prejeeture, Sakai (1) ., As a part of the.aeries on the microbial conversion of terpenes, the conversion of (-)-carvone by a newly isolated microorganism, Pseudomonas ovalis, strain 6-1, has been extensively investigated.. . (-)-Grvone is easily reduced to give (+)-dihydrocarvone, (+)-isodihydrocarvone, (+)-neodihydrourveol, (-)-dihydrocarveol, (+)-isodibydrocarveol, and (+)-neoisodihy- (~ S n car ~jol D the. ~actio of his act~e~ia ; (+)-dihydrocarvone and (-)-dihydrocarveol *+ ll ~ th~ ~naj praEUCts~ I I `+ , . The metabolic pathways are also discussed. (Received June 8, 1973)
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f T11~.7'I~'.?.:'rl~It><i-'~'Ettil~6«=St~l't'y'~T1~A>t:=!'t>~'fNODS/,~t~: 50330 7955 I PSYCIIOPfi:TRIC'1i CTlil DS/ I LINi !1It PROGRA.IIMING TPC,II\'IQULS .rS--ouo1ts7rRtK.I--VOL, 3s, r:o. s TOR. MULTIDIMENSIONAL Air'AL'1'SIS .` sst•Tfatnr:n, 1973 multidimcnsior~al attribute space. The individual is modelled as possessing v. SRI:IIYASAA ~.,~ . .. . ..i . _. TIIE QNIVERSITY OF ROCIIESTER "tJ LLAN D. SIIOCiER • _' • ( 3 U1~r4RSITY OF PITTSBIIRGII) f ~-: . ~ minimizes this me1sure over all possible solutions. The approach is fully noumetric, extremely flexible, and uses paired comparison judgments directly. ~ 7~w.:.wt,.!+twMar.µ...a,~aL.f~1-;W~,.Fl1nC:.r. lrtl'~,4~ . bt preference judgments with regard to a set ot stimuli prespecified in a Or, PRLF'LRL\'CRS~ 3a'I-Gy ~ ~ This paper offers a new methodology for analyzing individual differences sn "ideal point" denotin~ his most preferred stimulus location in this space and a set of weights c.•hich revesl the relative saliences of the attributes. He prefers those stimuli t~hich are "closer" to his ideal point (in terms of a ; weighted Euclidean distance measure). A linear programming model is Proposed for "external analysis" i.e., estimation of the coordinates of his tadeal point and the a-ei;hts (involved in the Luclidean distance mc:tsure) by analyztng hi3 paired comnarison preference judgments on a set of stimuli, pre- tdpectficd by their coordinate loc9tioas in tLe multidirnensional space. A mcasure of "poorness of fit" is developed and the linear programming model ~c~4h a z 1 7
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50330 7977 1 _ . . 44 Y?, s+S 1'U, D= 48...50, 1970) 2Z~0' - ,2 ~,~.. c.~. ;/ .3, u 7- % ; f~ ; A~ 4 q t`I" 0 p 1Lr. 3-Alkyl-2-cyclopenten-2-ol-l-one o)u fR #4) : ~ g1 f3 44~=8A 13 q :2- Syntheses of Cyclotene and Its Related Compounds Syntheses of 3-Alkyl-2-cyclopenten-2-ol-l-one By Kennosuke TONARI, Itsuo ICtlMOTO, Iliroo UEOA and C~i"#TW DeQarlmer~its~o/ Agriculturol Chemislry, College of Agricnllure. Universily of Osaka Prejeclure, Sakai 0-5 0 0 002 175 a An excellent synthetic method of c}•cletene homologue has been established. Reaction . .~ ~~~ Pthvl acrvlate in the prezcnce of sodium hydride gave
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50330 8008 ~ _ , a ._,__:_ _.. ~,._.....~...r..~..___.._. ..~... ~ I Sb7 ,~ ,~ . . . . Q. .~. .~. .Q, 0. U 2. A. . .7 3,, .~.. . . . , . . .: .
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50330 8003 Journal ojblofecular Catalysis, 6(1979) 57 - 69 © Elsevier Sequoia S.A., Lausanne - Printed in the Netherlands • ~ a ENZYMATIC ISOMERIZATION KINETICS OF D-CLUCOSE TO D-FRUCTOSE Up°Zd1 7 8 1 GAIL A. MCKAY' and ~itC'WR);hlG`L ~ ~`AjVLA~iIDES'.>~ Department ojChemical F,ngineering, Illinois Institute ojTechnotogy, Chicago, Ill. 6061 (U.S.A.) (Received October 18, 1978) An investigation into the kinetics of the enzymatic isomerization of D-glucose to D-fructose, employing spectrophotometric technidues, is des- cribed. It is shown that the free solution enzymatic catr•lytic reaction is coupled with the two mutarotation reactions of D-glucose (a, Q-D-gluco- pyranose simple mutarotation) and D-fructose (a, Q-D-fnic:topyranose muta rotation and interconversion with a, O-D-fructofuranose mutarotation). Plausible reaction schemes are suggested and two simplified cases are'em- ployed to interpret the data. Experimental evidence presented herein and . previously reported by Schray and Rose appear to indicate that the isomer3 is stereospecific to a-D-glucopyranose. The enzymatic interconversion follo, D'Jichaelis-Menten kinetics and values of the rate coefficients are presented. Arrhenius temperature dependency is indicated for all rate constants over the temperature range 50 - 80 °C, and energies of activation values are
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50330 8011 ~ VIII -Tax ~aid rigarettes r.e:novEd, in. }>ilJ.ious-__ ~ pr .-..1952 to 1957: .# C~.t; xetce ca°, t;, in tho I:n~.;,~v Si ~ ~~ i;y a 9ji^56j J~jp ~. •-... • w/~4~ ........ ..... ~.~....~ _a>•..q- Osa0n0 2'.ilay
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9 9 l. I z 000U coTV.10f'i.aQa V:I.xndWu 'It?ti'n':1 ?;.``i:'fi : "Jt. 1ECI-pET30,ai.:03 G:~SO&iu aA~:yri3:7.~ t• S :::~ n--:-sMey: a+e,t, F f I { O108 OEEOS
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1 . 50330 8007 ~ ~• '` " : ' j ". A" To } B6 0 5.0 0 0 02 " i`.C1:~"~~i'S~" " ~ltts-I\,I~.'te~,- Tnbacco Z'ax eounciZ, F.icllZmarnci, Va,. T'dE TAX F?U12UnN ON TOBACCO. LizsTC~^.(CAL ~_C'•":'l-ITT.:ilez0a-VaT.. i. Tcs}auc4o T.;,3; Gou.zci2 ?.Jlpp t."1 E6 ~otdcri y(1rX ON )y oNC r'4 5EE TS 7. 8 5
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.. . n ~ . ~. 1. ZrI -U. .U. 0 () 'Fi. •Q.• . , .-,...._•._ - - C:.' 'JV 1 ~ t: .ar•'T Le ±rlrTr`5 ~ :. ~~ lI l:~ ` i 1 f+ ,a v. a., I j': : a c«L~:i4 ~'~7 rti 1 T ~d~ -•-• i7:.Tj .:a.. .._...-.. .,_.:. ZooB o£E05
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50330 8009 ~ . . 72 XI , ,. t (1977) (in ~ L . . . ..._ . .. _ . ~i -77 s T 72 XI R * .p. e2 ?PHLE Re 77 S.P. RJR CLASS N0. PA A?illhiser, R. R. v0hilip Morr.is Inc., New York, N. Y., U. S.) TAX HIhE,ON CIGARETTES IS OPPOSEQ:j Morris, Philip Inc. (Millhiser, R. R.) News Release, New York, N. Y. English) *Abstr. in: Richmond Times Dispatch, 1977, p. 6 (Aug. 20, 1977) Richmond News Leader, 1"A lcgislative-subcommittcc was told yesterday that It ~should be very careful of ~killing, or even ruffling the ~ feathers of, the goose that lays the golden eggs that help feed i the statc's economy. Appearing before a House ; Iinance subcommittce study- --fn-g_tobacco taxation tn 1977, p. 6 (Aug. 19, 1977) ,;Virginia,~ Ross~ R, Millhiscr,- ' presidcnt of Phflip T4a'rTis' i, Inc., des ibed for the lcgislatorsanumberof bcncfits derivcd from bcingla low- ; cibarettc-tax state.M ^ and 0 ~ n Q la 0 2 1 I 3 7
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~ 2240 +.o 1973 , i "i'CJA:a~U-- i:COfiOriI CS / l OL'l~CCO--; :4?~ i~TION--U . S./TC' Ai:C0--1I T S TORY •/ CICAM.TrES--xAXaa J • ' RJR f.LASS 110. TEXTBOOK TS 2<^4,ii 'yo Tobacco Tax Council, Ric.timor.d, V.n., U. S. THE.TAX,h,1~.R}3~;A~.,tI,'~~T322s~V,GCi~.%?r~«~il~~Tt1RXC1~I;"=Cbrt~T~A1'IOK•_ 19~3; Tobacco Tax Council, Vol. 8, 141 p. (1973) (in L•'ngil.sh) W 4,I I I 111t.,(,-) 0 > /97I i „ - *1974, No. 13, W 5600* *d* Tobacco economLcs: , . ._, .-..^~......... ..~.-.-,....,,......-...-.. . - -s---^---+. .. . --•...--..w,:,.~....,.i~v:'~-•.1-aa-e--....,...-....~,..r~.-.-.:-..~.--y....x ...... . ..~.. 0 a q 0 ~ Q 2 17. 8 4 50330 8006
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Z 6 j te 0 0 0 0 s 0.. t , ?: -i'0 s;1lcdn•1 a:Lxj:zoDu-q .KjsnOTxrj3 VIji Tl'f"''X:20 T1,':T. 'S,n1?.7.llOSaa L14}ati:,aij.20D y;x.Zj,:u VATI*.1Js:tia I ~ ht08 0£EOS I
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1 50330 8013 j TAXATION/ PRICE WATERHOUSE INFORMATION GUIDE/ ; This guide is one of a series on business HJ CORPORATE conditions in the countries in which 5653 Price Waterhouse firms have offices or "a TA X ES carry out work and is based on the 1981 latest available information from these ARCHER WORLDWIDE New York, New York 10020 Telephone: (212) 974-0600 ~' SUMMARY Telex: 666105 UW and 238924 PWINY UR International Telecopier: (212) 974-0616 This guide on Corporate Taxes-A Worldwide Summary supersedes the guide dated October 1980. ~ offices. Thts gutde is published by the ~ Price Waterhouse Center for Transnation< 71 Taxation located at the following addres: A New York 10 Rockefeller Plaza , e 1973.1975.1978.1978.1990.1962 Price Weterhoutse Pnnted in U.S.A. 0c; 0 0 0 0 2 1 7 9 1 ;r~
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50330 8004 XI M~ -77 RJR CLASS .i0. PM1PUI,d'T XiMC,~- 77 s.p. ~ P.cynolds, R. J. Industries Incorporated, Winston-Salem, ;7. C., U. S. TN~'ACCUU~TA!i2 `p{?~ITIO:~:;`AVhYL1tB>~I~.~ P.eyno].ds, R. J. Ind., Inc., News Release, Winston-Salem, N. C. (1977; ' (in English) *Abstr. in: Richmond TiMes-DispatA,. 1!177, p. D-10) _- ....__ __........_... ...._..._..___, ~ Pv.;ition avail.;hle in Corlorate Tax ~ Defairtment. Arpli(-nt should have ~ degree in Accountinb or Business ~ ~ldministration with three 1'ears cor- porate or other t ax expericnce. Ex- ~ cellcnt employ~e benefits provrsjm. •. 0 S o Q~ ~ 2. , Mar. 13, 1977)*
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50330 8012 l RJR CLASS N0. PAr4'IILCT VIII Me3•-7G s.p Wall Street Journal W~a11~t o U~'i:'IL7 5 .....~;:..~. -~<.k,.~ , p. 1(Dec. 10, 1975) ~in Tng D a, Q 0 (l 0 2 1 7 9 0
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0 , ..6u:cuoxaJ,-s' , I so8 { 7:'Uu o05 0 . ,..,. .. -. . , , ~' ~ LZ08 OCEOS
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t I -80 Chest 77(2)289-90 (1980) IX Re 2 S.P. Peripherat Lung Function and ! l Spirometry in Male Smokers and Exsmokers' ~ Neil B. Prfde, M.D.; BQA?:q-iqffra<!; MD.;+ ' Moloolm a. Benan, MD.; l)iana Sunter, B.Sc.; Anthony Manreil, M.D.; Cbarkt M. FTetg1,er, M.D.; and Richerd Peto, MSc.•• .The poor prognosic associated with gross reductions of the forced expiratory volume in one seoond (FEV,) is established,+ but the pro~nostic signi6canoe of a mar- ginal reduction fn FEV, is uncertain, because it is not known if loss of auway function is reasonably steady and predictable over the years in most smokers destined to de~.elop airlow ob~vction. We ifm to obtain wnoe informatioa on this b+nw oontinuieg follow-up of inen 50330 7978 We are also studying whether the use of tests of pe- ripheral Iung function can aid in the interpretation of a marginally low FEV,! Our approach is sim~la.r to that discussed by Knudson and colleagues' at this meeting, but it will take many years of follow-up to establish the true predictive value of abnormaL'ties in these tests. Therefore, we will only describe two sub-studies in which we have follow-up data over four to six years. In 1972, McCarthy and colleagues' published their studies of closing volume (CV) using the argon bolus technique. We restudied 16 of the middle-aged smokers and 14 of the nonsmokers after an interval of five to,six years; although initially there were large di$erenoes'~in mes~n values of CV/vital capacity (VC) between smok- ers and non-smokers (smokers 21.0 percent, nonsmokers 10.0 percent), these differences had not widened after five or six years more of smoking (smokers 22.4 pencent, nonsmokers 11.9 percent) even though cigarette oon- suioiption in the smokers continued at an average of 28 cigarettes a day and their FEV, fell by an average of 30 m~i'year. reu nfted iut nfted in. West Lo~doa fn 1981.s We already how tbst .ome of tbeae men & tZaw xrry consistent troods ovrs many years, partiauLr}y if ineasunxnaats are made after we of braoc~odilator drugs, but we cannot ! yet answer the key question as to what proportion of ~ susceptible smokers show potentially predictable cbanges and what proportion follow an q ~ 0 1 " ra ~y ° ~' e~.~ ~ ~.
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/ I r 50330 8021 .... . .. . - . _ . ........" - _ ,..., - SMOKING AND 1IEALTII/TOBACCO--SMO1:IrC--IIEALTII EFFECT/ 72 XI Re2-77 S.P. Mi1_1R2; E. RJR CLASS ,2:0. PAA:PIILET 72 aine Sur. Iiealth, Dep. liur.ia nian Serv. •!Sain Lung Assoc. TAXES, CIClIRF.TTES AND THE IIF.ALTH OrI"7E CITIZENS!' Jour. Maine Med. 68 (No. 2) 58-62 (107) .(In EnSlish) ' Maine can be reasonably assured that any sub- ~stantial increase in the State cigarette tax will have two effects. First, there will be an increase in the net tax revenue collected. Second, there will be a drop t in per capita sales, or at least a slowing down etTect ~ on per capita sales, which are now reaching all time ` ~ 0..- 0_ -0--0- x _'1_ . 7.. 9 `9 XI Rc2-77 s.p. I Maine) ,
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/ I 50330 8026 } I+'eatherly, Henry Ira, 1£03-- Taxononic tc•rminolo;;y of the hi~;her pla~.~ts. ~nes, Io~•, State College Press E°1JaI1 s,100 p. 20 cm. Bibliography: p.105-1G0. 1. Botuny-Dictionartes. 2. Botany-Dictionaries-Latin. 3. Latin lanbuagN--])ictiontu•les--l:nblish. i. Title. (,,,Ta1.F•1 550.3 50-1217 .~ Library of Cungress ~ 15i,z7i 304
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I , T0BACC0--SMOKINC--ANTI-SMOKING CAMPAIGN/ 50330 8023 ~ TOBACCO--GERMANY/ XI. Mel-78 _ _ ... . ~_ :.. .._ - : : _. . . _ ._• S'p• ,_.. .. ItJR CLASS.NO. PAMPHLET XI Mel-78 s.p. Handelsblatt • CHEWING GUM INSTEAD OF PUFFING IN THE TAXI. * (Im ~ Handelsblatt, 1978, p. not given (Feb. 27, 1978) (In German with English abstract) ~ The taxi drivers in Dusseldorf have joined taxi drivers from other cities, such as Munich, Cologne, and Essen, to hand out chewing gum to its customers. .The chewing gum is supplied cost free by a pharmaceutical manufacturer as an anti- .. smoking drug. The result of the campaign is yet unknown. fM •7 .I• 0 l! 0 2 1 a 0 1
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b6 1 1 z 0 U o 0 S o at.'..:=:as _ s ~. ... - ... ~..c.. s..~.._<. L. _._...1..._':_..., k i. ~~r-;, ct^t:i 'uxo~ ~:~~I 0023c3 4;7 S;GI IX~ ~l ~y± S"I:IxS23 . iiS~ C;1.1~~ J... ~i.1 a:~(::1d II:~ ~~c:~t•1`F,~.a ~.~w:!~:7 y •;L{i.' !iS~'DG'ai:f.':'({ ~Y~I~L:0:5i sc)x 8~a fYP~:tO~ '° svcgyq:$;i, ._ : - . ....7..~:+a..~.-v7^^'nT•.r.".-~. . . .. ~ 9L08 OfEOS
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XX MeF-E-404-74 ~ -- w_ -.-~_a _ ~ ~ Cld: B A1~ y..anaes an G :~~~~~~~~~y~~~~ . 'C ~ -Tech. Quart. Master Drew. Assoc. Amer. 17.(1)17-20 (1974) ~ ABSTRACT , SIt:TESIS In order that flavor testing can be of the greatest signifi- Con objeto de que las pruchas de sabor puedan lener Ia canue,all of the mrmbers of the panel should not only have mayor si.-nificancia, todos los raiembros del p:.nel drber3n a sease of beer quality, but in addition, they must also have kner no solaruente un sentido do la calidad do la cerveza, • great sensitivity fully developed by training, and a great sino que debcran toner tambirn una gran sciLibilidad cu:n- eapacdty to diQerentiate the most important components pletamente desa[rollada a base de entrenamientu, y una Cran eaPacidad para diferenciar los eomponentes mis irn• which are related to the odor and taste of beer. portantes que estan relacionados con el olor y el guslo de The sensitivity of potential jud.-es should be carefully ex- la cerveza. amined by subjecting them to organoleptic tests of nearly 30 La aensibilidad de los eatatlures potenciales debe do ex- oomponents and eva:uating the results in dccordance with aminarso cuidadoszmente, sorncticndolos a pruebae organ- tt simple statistical method. ol6pticas con cerca do 30 conipuestos y despucs evaluar los Theauthors give a detailed description of the procedure resultados de acuerdo con un simple metodo estadistico. they employ to select expert judges for Flavor Pro81e. Los autores dan una descripcion detallarla del procedi- miento quo emplearon para scleccion:rr catadores expertos INTRODUCTI ON The Flavor Test of beer, which includes the sirnul- taneous sensations of olfactory and taste senses, is the most valuable indication to be used in quality control, provided it is performed in accordance with the scientific rnefhod. "Flavor tests" are erroneously but oorrunonly known as "Taste tests," since flavor is correctly do- para el perfil del sabor. The Flavor Profile test, first described by Cairncross and Sjostriim;') is quite sopr.tisticated, since it is Wsed on the careful description and evaluation of different taste and odor sensations. It is evident that the Flavor Profile will afford meaningful results only if "expert" judges, whose sensitivity und ability to duplicate their findings have been previously evaluated, are selected for Z!i:l tL i \ - 1 ~ ~ r I
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' 50330 8028 QK 83 G Grebg; John Richard. '1'ho langpinge off tesonomy ; 1n ahplication oi symbol' loh c to the study of classi(icatory systesns. _~c~` Yor] Colutnbia. University Press,1954. ix, 70 p. 21 cm. (Cohambin bicenteanial e0ittons .+nd Studies) Jilbliography: p. 1G91-70. \ 1. Methodology. i. TItIq. (Series) Bll2.11.GG8 112 51-J3! `~ . Library of Congress 173 4~ tl Q r1 0 2 1 8 0 6
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r 8005 50330 RJR CLASS NO. PAPi1'HLET 72 X1 Re2-77 Sunday Telegraph TAX f300ST< FOR I:ING-SUE C1CARETTES~;~ Sunday Telegraph, 1977, p. not given (Nov. 20, 1977) (in English) 72 XI Re2-77 S.P. i(11 / ~1i pricr• trar amunl; Ihc i ufarlnr'cl:.: ~ t•igarctlc 111,11 'is dcli•clopinu into a %%ar of ; "'ords. l.&.t %trck G,rn•ra. ; llolhmons infnrntrd the tctail ~ .tradc by Icttt•r of its tn t• sv I pricc struclurt• lo mrr•t t h c i ~lax chani;es rclatiq to rioar• ; citcs, tt!tich contc mio furce i at lltc slart of 1a7U - - --~-.---_.. 0 1.3 () 0 () 0 12' r At pirscnt tev is siitl )ar6cly Leud on t%ci;;ht. 'fhis tv i 11 rhy +~t. /I'iom Janurry 1, rlnly t~ill be b.tsrd un cnd product Lt.cs con. i si•Fnt; of r<prcilic IoLarro tix ~ o( fJ prr l,f)PU iig.ucllt•i ttru•I d;ucd plus nn ad ~.ilnrrm t.iv nf ~ 30 .c ot Ihc rccuinn.cndrd scll- : in^,p t•riccf and ~1Juc edJtd ~luinging ISritain intu linC t~ilh 1 thc rcs l nf Ihr h.I;.C• / ` . s.11. .
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i I , So3 30 8033 j S 83 - -jtaxorc+my. ^ Savory, Theodore Horace, 1896- Naming the living world, an introduction to t principles of biological nomencIature. New Yo: Wiley [19621 128 p. 21 cm. ~ 5 n o no 2 1 8 1 1
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I , 50330 8020 1 _ a ~ . : TA . 2IFr/ _ 75 I Un4-75 DRAWIiACK. U. S." Department of the Treasury A Duty P,efund on Certain Exports =_ . Customs Service ' Historicalty the word "drawback" has W2shington, D.C. 20229 1974 '. denoted a situation in which a duty or tax, . .'- lawfully collected, is refunded or remitted, = wholly or partially, because of a particular use -. (2)'.:- ~f both imported merchandise and.. .`~ " domestic merchandise of the same kin d made of the commodity on which the duty or and quality are used to manufacture tax was collected. ''. '':• : •articles some of which are e t d xpor ,, e Drawback was initially authorized by the then drawback not exceeding 99 per- '" f rsi tariff f t h U i d S in i ac n o e t te tates 1789 . #-nnt of the d hi * h id h y w u c was pa on t .e •. :. J Since then it has been part of the law, although: i ort h di bi i d h an mp merc se e s payae on t e from time to time the conditions under vyhich exports. It is immaterial whether the it is payable have changed. 't'~~ u.6-1 ~~ ~ imported merchandise or the ~ ~tual a ~e Th e rationale for drawb ack h s alwb n edomestic merchandise of the same kind to encourage American commerce or manu-.••. and lit d i th d qua y was use n e exporte 'facturing, or both. It permits the American .'' ' artic(es This rovision in th C k d p e o e ma es . ~• manufacturer to compete in foreign markets it po~ible for firms to obtain drawback ' without the handicap of including in his costs; ~~,~,ithout the expense of maintaining -~ and consequently in his sales price, the dut.y ,. separate inventories for imported and . _ ._ - - ~_.~ .. ___.. _ . . ~•. . ~... . ' _ , 0 S0 0 () 0 2 1 / 9 a
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. 50330 8036 )) I I QO 245 .ylaxotway =-' Y Todd, Sir Alexender R 1907- ed. Perspectives in organic chemistry. New Yerkp Interscier,;,e Publishers, 1956. x. 527 p. col. poot. 24 cm. Published on the occasion of the 70th birthday of. Sir Robert Robinson, September 13, 1;56. Includes bibliogr~phies. Contents-- See ~nain entry. ..--t..l.. _... _ --~ . ,r.~-.--_.~.T......-~-rv...,+....r.T . n, 0S) 0 0 0 0 2 18 1 4
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4 . 50330 8029 ~ T.INr:EAN SOCIETY SY`iPOSTi1'f SERIFS, ATU"fB1:R 7/ •'1LKALCi?1S-•-^1XNTS/ SY%NOSIU't ON TI?F. BIOLOGY AND TAXONOMY OF THE SC1.4NACEAITE, held at Birmingham • University, July 13--17, 1976 SOLANACEAE/NICOTIANA/T0g11CC(1--rLAV0NOIDS/TOBACCO•• DTTERPET'ES/ TOBACCO--ALKALOIOS--BIOSYNTHESIS/ . . . .~ . . 7. i . . . . . _ . . . . TS • ~ RJR CLASS NO. TEXTBOOK_TS 2240 Ha 1979 ?.241 Hawkes J G• Lester R N• Skeldin A D . Tia (Univ, Birmingham/ Dep, Plant Biol., Ct. Brit.) . 1979 THE BIOLOGY ANDITAXONOMY~OF THE SOLANACEAE. ~, Academic''Press, Inc., London, Ct. Brit., 738 p. (1979) (in English) ~•This volume is based on an international symposium on the Biology and ~ Taxonomy of the Solanaceae which was organiled by the stafi'of the Departn;ent j of Plant Biology at the University of Birmingham, U.K., and which took place from 13th to 17th July 1976. It was jointly sponsored by the Linncan Society of ? London and the Dcpartmcnt of Plant Biology of the University of Birmingham., . o S 0-0 n 0•2 I a 0 7
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I Swain, T ed. Chemical plant taxonomy. London, Ness York, Aca- demic Press, 1963. 543 p. Illus. 24 cm. 1. Botanical chemistry. 2. Botany-Cls."lficatlon. i. Title. , : . QI;;8G5.a97 ~ ~ 581.19 63-14491 1 .~ Library of Congress 1T-11 a 1 9
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; 50330 8030 } 2$xo6r,Y.. T.nternstion:1 Ua3,an of Pure md Appliad E'h-ssdat DiVisiQII c?eg . oTg2di1iC L`r,•'r=l.<l$Fy tfild me Str7G34iA}1 tdmCtm=1 Cu=xL•G*a for Ca,::wi::try TtIF CZQ11STRY 0? MiWIMI. PRCOUC?°S, VIDL. 4 1967 213 t9g6a ?'.utturcrortha Laadcn 0 9.0 0 n U.2 t
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.50330,8032 ~ :;TAXONOMY/BIOLOGY, ENVIRONrfENTAL/AI,GAE/WATER--POLLUTION/ QL KEYS TO WATER QUALITY INDICATIVE ORGANISMS 345 Pa 1975 OF THE Edited by Fred K. Parrish V v SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Georgia State College Atlanta, Georgia (Second Edition) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research & Development Environmental Monitoring & Support Laboratory BIOLOGICAL METHODS BRANCH QUATIC BIOLOGY SECTION `INCINNATI. OHIO 45268 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 $ I 0 ....lfIA'ti
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. 50330 8039 ) , ,. ; QK 83 H ,~Texfl cwmy--Bo ta ny. : I licCV-P "•zuez•, R- Ch'u":4'i:+XO~:~J ,.t!: DER PFi<,FC~.E~'o vo 1J62- Lix::hause: V:.rlc~ Eas:'•1 u,:d Stuttgart O +s.M7 raR~!TYw..r+~^fT.~1~w1i•+ o s n o n o 2 1 8 1 7
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f Pennak, Robert William. Colle;;iato dictionary of zoo.ogy. New York, Ronald Press Co. t10G•h vi, 583 p. 213 c+.u. 1. ?.oolot;y-Dtctionsries. i. Title. QL9.PI- 0 590.3 Library of Congress (51 V'-ir)JJL
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I P~ t p 1 ? : () . .~:..a.t~.'....._. .... ~ •ata yz •ci J.R •ii%FT '~'iol,tLM+0a 43.7TUOIu~ ouo.:z:Z oui': osne4ulauatlou ZVoTUa'~o9 • G©audzoS Zr.aT: orZoTq xo uoTUn TUuorquu,zC}tq ~ Oh08 OEEOS
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50330 8037 , QK 1 .~4~~xarW~y-b ti~n.t ~+t 4iY.t> <~ Ala'!'aYlL`.*$ fca v, Ia . l01iS!~QlZ~ i'~r::f Yft!'1+ Ar.tt~.'ti?#C P_rr<TiAe, - Vp ~~~Ui.o C~I1Y~ G~Z e/ (~~It~ x'ao i EF CF~e ^ `. , L+P ~ wn 0 50 o~0 0 z1 8
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f 50330 8031 ~ 75 1I Lo MICROBIOLOGY/ Me th®ds f or jumerica1 . Tax®n®mny..:._.,, SuLcomn~tec on \unterical Taxonomy Taxonomy Committee American Society for Nlicrohiologv ~~ W. R. Lockhart and John Liston, Editors American Society for 1licrobiolo~.• - ACb t 1970 . . ....,...-~..» -..---..y.M..,.-_._ ~. _ . _ .~.,. ._ _.~ _ .-.....~,r.....~~~._.___._-. .._._. ~..._ _.. ,- 0 S 0 0 0 o2 1 8 0 9
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i I 50330 8035 ) S 0 S0 a .0 0 z.~ ~3 ~;....:_.... Symposium on Botanical Nomenclature and T?tonon.;-, L'irecht, 19!18. Botanical nomenclnture and taxonomy; a symposiwn or Sci, ;;ce gnniicd by the lnternationnl Union of Biological with support of UTNESCO, at Utrecht, the Netherl,md;. June 14-19, 1918. h:ditcd by J. J.anjoun. WSI.h a smi~l~ie- ment to the International rules of botnnical noinenclsture embodying the alterations m^de at the Sixth ~iirternationa' Botanical Congress, Amsterd: m, 1935, compiled by T. A Sprague. iWaltham, A[a,,s., Chronica i3ot:enica, Co., 1030 vli, 87 p. group port., fnc:9ms. 26 cm. (Ynternationnl Unioa o! Biological Sciences. Series li: Colloquia, i,o. 2) (^^ ftiuntinued on neit card) 3
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, 50330 8043 ~ v..i.-_~..c~...::1~LS.`..i'ca~~i«!_..~s~_..~......_.._.~_......~ _..a...l._...,....~~~..-.a_.~4f.ii.>. Ttxbnomyy Q Featherly, He nry Ira, 18J3- 173 Tasonomic ternii~iolo;;y of the higher plaiits. Ames, IoNvu F State College Press t°1JG41 z,1Q0 p. 20 cm. I;iblioarnphs: p.1C5-166. 1. I;otan3-Dict[onaries. 2. Botany-lllctlonaries-Latin, 3. LatIr lanpuage-Dicttnnarles-Endllsh, r. Title. Qli9.F4 ~ 580.3 53-A`?1 7c. ~~J Library of Congress (55a7l ...._. ~ .~ _.,,~ ,~..- _. . 4. o~ ~ o n a~ f~ z I
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I 50330 8015 72 XI Re -77 TOi;ACCO--CREAT T3RITAIP+/ RJR CLASS N0. PAMPHLET 72 XI Re2-77 s.p. S.P. 2 Sunday Telegraph, London , ~ f English) r t TAXATION IS A HEALTH RAZARD'1`0 TOBACCO INDUSTRY IN GREAT BRITAIN4 Sunday Telegraph, London, 1977, P. not given (around Apr. 3, 1977) (in ' ~n the one band it needs the t revenue they provide. In the last financial year, it is estimated that the various taxes and duties on cigarettes and tobacco pro- vided the F.achequer with over 0000 millinn. On top of this ' should be added V.A.T. Rut, while the taz is ivckome; the Government has now firmly recognised that cigarettes are a heallh hazard. It wants to dis• cnura fie pcople from smoking„ especially the hig h nicotine and l tar hraiwt.; it wrinls to redure afxmcijrship; on the nthef.}~ and ; it atill nceds_the ~noncv.J 0 Ss tl o O tl 2 ~•I 9 3
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oor ~r:~0 naso- I •::3+`~!a'`~,.a~a-ar.f e..'~..w,1.+.. .. - .. _ .....~.. ... , ............ __...~ .. -~ . E;3T,!j `!~?a 'ttn•^vj y «r 3 e « • •-...c . G s ~ :-~...•, .a i • jT ~ ZZ08 OE£OS • I
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50330 8046 ~ ;Taxonomy Eund nomenclnture of fl:ngf'. Qit Bisby, Guy Richard, 18S9- 603 An introluction to the t:txonomy aucl nomcnclaturr ot B Fungi. i2t-Ided.l hew; Surl•ey,X ul ~a1, Mycologic;il I1i- st.itute, WRx 1953 ConunonUe4lth vil, 117 p. 19 cm. °Reforencos" : p. I0f3--110. 1. Funbi. i. Title. California. Univ. Libr; for LiUra:y of Congress .-~ (fr A 4S-3C)cl: o s o 0 o o 2 1 8 2 4
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) P_i I~ P JJy , 50330 8018 ~'-e : e- a l~ ~ ~J" ~ r~ ~ x ,'a r ~~-a a 71),p ~ Y ~ > ~ , ~-' . T; ~,~~~ }: AIND D:G~rvk~i ;STI C, Q'j ER A,1: GNS by L,+mrrcncc ,j. I;ckstro1i1 lfcmbcr of thc Colitlcrtic•u[, New Xcn ); ttltd J1iaSsacliilsetts Bars Rc1•25cc1 T]1i1•cj )'.dilj(}ll 1972 Volu-n:Le 1 4 Z ' ` Clnrl; 1Zum-dirnin Comprmy Ltd. Sagc T1i1) Puhlishera, Inc. -0,A_ - ~. !U~` aV« 9orj~ A)l,cutv , ticK• York ^ -r •. ~-
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50330 8045 1, I 1 1. . J, ia~:04~U~Yf gy. .y, ,.., 1 ~ ,O.;+ c 1:~ na ...:t....F.r.:.,..~1.... 4~ V.A K:S.~ 7, r C) s ~l r. ~ Q o Q
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.,- 50330 803u )^ .,,.:.~~, ~,~s. ..............~: N U M E R I CA L+n`AXO N O M 1(s A BERIES OF BOOKB IN BIOLO(iY QK Sn 1973 "-...,.-.,,..,. THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE E~ ~~ OF NUMERICAL CLASSIFICATION Peter H. A. Sneigith NOW.K {,MNVt11f111' Oi 1!K[fTU--~'_ ~ ~r I Robert R. Sokal iTATf lMMAY1Y Or M!M YqIR AT iTONr MOO[ W. H. FREEMAN AND COMPANY B.n Francisco r aso,0 0 012 1 6 iEJ3 f
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REF HB ACRONYMS/ABBREVIATIONS/U. S. REGULATORY AGENCIES/Cn`L"tODITIES :KARY.ET/ 1 MONEY AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS/BANK. & OT}1ER FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS/ .~ D=f `TARES/WAGES--U. S./PRODUCTIVITY/PRICE DATA/ECONOMIC INDICATOrS/ -•---1979. NATIONAL Prc~~u~T~tD,..h;c0*26./i~~AtATIn;~A~~.BtJSI~,cs..~..~~TA~iAb-64atR~R~Scat,;~c ADVERTISIVG/TOBACCO-=ADVERTISING/ 09 " 790" . o~'~~• -ones~~~r~,~'n ALMANAC D DOW JON)JS-IRWIr1 Homcwood,111inois ~ , . ~ :...-..~.....~.....w ,._.,.-. ~~...._.. , ~. 60430 Edited by SUMNER N. LEVINE State Unicersity of New York at Stony Brook and Editor Financial Analyst's Handbook Executive Editor Caroline Levine 0 5(lQ0 0 2 1 7 9S
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I 50330 8055 , F,-o' .. ~. .. . . , e-81`s.p. Microscope 8, 47- (1980) Hexametapiosp~iate Pretreatment of Insulation Samples for Microscopical Identification of Fibrous Constituents ~ ' ,and l. S. Bloom Divislon of Loborat es an e d , New York State Department ojHeolth, Albany. New York 12201 . ~ . ~ - . osc~a~0 a , bstractcitit~~ fle ittlntlatioo of fibers in insulating materials by optical microscopy, plaster and other cementitious agents can be removed by .
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50330 8049 _ . ' III u2-79 ATMOSPHERIC OZONE MEASUREMENTS MADE S'p' - FROM B-747 AIRLINERS: SPRING 1975 by P. D. Falconer, 'J: D. Holdeman, and X.*_:5~ajilbrp X Lewis Research Center - - - j~ 7 , 7~ 3 0 6' 7 9 Cleveland, Ohio 44135 • NASA TIA X-73G75 Tr= CHrjs (: AL -- TECHNICAL PAPER presented at the ' N A S A , M E-: M 0 r~'AN 0 U 6'Ji Joint Symposium on Atmospheric Ozone cosponsored,by the International. Association of,Meteorolo;y and Atmospheric Physics, the World Meteorological Organi- zation, and the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy Dresden, German Democratic Republic, August 9-17, 1976 ~ 1 8~ 7. A S a0 n 0 I I
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i 50330 8051 ~ ; .Ju x;~~,,k~ti~r~ jt al ~ QD Frary, Francis Cow1cs, 1881- 63 63 Laboratory ?(-rlass blowinl*, hltblished forlnel•1}, luxler t11 ~ F title of Laboratory m,intlal of 'glass blowing, by Francis C Frary ... Cyt•i1 S. Taylor ... Jluuus David Edwards ... 2~ ed., rev. and en1. New '1 ork letc.) McGraw-Hill book co)» paliy, inc., 1928. x, 116 p. 1nc1. front., lllus. 21 cm. 1. Glass blowin;g, and working. i. Taylur, Cyril Stead, ]SS7- joint authm•. tr. A:dwnrds, Juuius ll4ivid, 15JO- Joint nulhor. QUC)3.G5F8 192Q ~-~ 28-11,i9 ~ Library of Congress l5^_t7I
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, 50330 80' ~ ,- /SMOKING HABITS--RELINQUISHING/ 79. XI Un4. ~,,._... F . : : t , RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET 79 XI Un~ U. S. IntF_rnal -12evenue Service, Washington, D. C., U. S. -+iTAXPAY.,Ra;I,USE .;S~lnf;I,i1G HABIT •A~'VU':DSDUCTIO:(.,4 U. S. Internal Itevttue Service, News P•elearte, Wash., D. C. (1979) EnBlish) *Abstr. in: Jour. Taxation 50 (5) p. 312, (May, • In fwmul:1tin" itV rchly, thc Sc•rvicc i ; points to tlic case iasw rcquircments that have evolved as a ncccs.ary prc•condi- ' tion for a mcdical-rclatcd cxhcnsc to be : considcrcd dcductibic: (1) the taxpaycr, ~ ~ must show thc ptcscnt cxiacncc or hn. ; mincnt prubability of a mcntal or l,hysi• ` cal diwasc, dcfcct, or illnrs.; and, (2) ; thc cahcnsc must be for Eouds or scrv- iccs dircctly ot• proxitnatcly rclatcd •to i tht cliagncrnis, cure, ntitiF:uiun, trcat- • --mcnt, or prcvcntiou of thc di,casc. , 0 (l2 t 8 25 1979) * (in
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50330 8050 ~,..~.~,,.,.:_-...,,:...,.~...:.~.,...:..~.-.~;.~_.. .._„--= ._... I Id -73 S.t'. National Acad. of Sciences-National Research Council Publication (783)132-143 (1960) PRODUCTIVITY AND ~J.ZEATIVITY OF SCIENTISTS ~.,. AT Ah,` AIR FORCE RESEARCH CEhI1'ER1 Calvirr4W-iiiqLtYior:;,;~Will.iam R. Smith, and Brewster Ghisclin University of Utah Jn the history of science it is interesting to note that one of the last topics on which the scientific method was focused was man himself. The present study attempts to apply the scientific method to the men who work in science, namely, the scientists. Or, stated more broadly, this project attempts to apply the scientific method on the scientific method. In view of the vast cxpenditures on science and the critical importance of scientific progress in the world ioday, it seur7is wisu iu invesi at least a minute percentage of the total finances and effort in sciences_ . 0~ n n n n~ ~ ~~~
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/ 50330 e064 IMINES/CARBO:CAMIDE SALT CHE`iISTRY/AMIDES/MIDINIiRi SALTS / PYRIDINIUM SALTS/ ADVANCES IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY:Methods and Rcsults , QD Editor 251 Ad 1979 Iminium Salts in Organic Chemistr Part 2 Edited by H. Bbl-iNiE JOHN WILEY & SONS New York • London • Sydney o Toronto 0 S o4 00 218 4 ;t
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50330 8058 ) U. S. bF;i)t. of AS:iC., :,i ?:sC. n^8. Sexv t`r:sC«n tl::iIi.-!z2tin'? Res, and ..~~. Div. flUJ'iY,I1 t 1N DI:7; D FRJ I{ALS1 (C. 3. Dept. af Aaric., A:2S--7G--'t7}. Fih; 1150 26 p. , t1ILony, Calif. a...-........_ ~,.'. p.-.,,,., F., a .„ ~~0 0 0 0 2 18 3 b;
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r 8 1 ?1 0 0 0 0 S p c> -41TUD 4{LCic,jv 'd ST Agri iuI•i • EI}L /1 ~~S •9?y
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. 50330 8061 ~ 0 . QD 251 Ad 1976 Organic Chemistry Part 1 Edited by . ~ VH. BOHME Universitat Marburg/Lahn, Germany . VH. G. VIEHE ' Universitd de Louvain, Belgium 1 I . ''ADVANCES IN ORGANIC CHEl11ISTRY: Methods end Results E.:J'r,,iSTAYI:oR;: editor 01 minium'Salts in An IntcrscicnceO Publication JOHN WILE1' & SONS New York • London • Sydney Ui S cl Q 0 02 1 8 3 9 ,. ~:i~~•iii. . Toronto
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, h~:.e 6~ . 1., J h~ , ~. 0s~...c a fYl7;~Q~ ~i?J•~ ° a ~ ~ ! ~ / f `07 O~4t,;,E, . . " ~ ~a.l'~'F/j!r`~/' r •%!?w hhs' . ~-~ ~'aj:j~.~,,t4 J70-4/14 c c / i I ~ L~f.lJ1'/1 T AXI1\1 i: UC" 0 ' / , W~ SOURCI;1300K y~ ' , / l•J • ' fl >rne "e ~•uicJt• to 'rutlrc~rif t(i~'c• l c ~ . ~ ~ . I t . a.Le r V cxp:yta, :utJ rortstrlt:ut(a . ~ . ~ by .' / ]ZOl' j\flLi l'.1: VUI,t; IM li 2 rY ~ ~ 1 !' 9 7 VoLCtM E,- i 1971 . . 50330 g019
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s 50330 8060 ) .. • RA 445 1 Ha ;'1979 , , *1 HEALTH CARE/LIFESTYLES/ALCOHOL ABUSE/ DRUG ABUSE/ BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE/TOB~',~--SMOKING--PSYCliOLOGY/ EJU . COMPLIANCE IN HEALTHCARE Edited by R. Brian Haynes, ,~R.Ml)(AO~Taylpt% and David L. Sackett THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY PRESS BALTIMORE AND LONDON ~ . ' ~ ~ . . , • .I 0 5ap n a'~ t 8 30 t
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i / 50330 8062 } ....,_.,_ , QB 400 We 1973 Y!{E CItE1tISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC iaMnn~ ARNOLD : BENZACRIDINES/ d . J A_ S~_RIES, OF ~t~AwPH~, V• ~1 ~..~.. WEISSfSERGER and EDIYARD>Cc^°TA YI,pR,,.,y, Fditors ACRIDINES 7. Edlted ar R. M. Acheson 7'6e Depertment of Biocbemirtry t .d 76e Queew's Celle;e k 1 . floit•ertity of O.%rd • SECOND EDITION 1NTERSCIL:NCE PUBLISHERS U dirisio+ ef JOIIN WILEY A- SONS NEW YOltK • LONDON • SYDNEY • TORONTO 0 S 13 0 0 Q 2 1 ~ 4 0 : . .._.w. . ..._,~..~~......,.. . ~..-__. ,~_.__., .. .. ...._ ..._... . .. -~- ~ ~- -~- .~. „<.._. w .
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i 50330 8038 t , Ta' .i r+I\ T\• -. \! r 1 ~,• LI s: sSt+F ::Cil .,.'~ I1... Fr!4T,~u c:y~in. ATfC'a~ t r hr• Y A ~D7 -i > LI~~P':5','l ~'c~L?EU,(;ICALr,r,r:gsS^,iv`'- . 51rt. i-1 „-.LTOLA'Y-~2''?OI'4TIC I Sp!f . ~ a . . .l.,.... . - - • POT!RY--tiJP1IG'",r4TAX(.;:a:Y" Eb:A::Y/ GC~~:`?;{S!T'F'J•t7)"T'•%:•'••IoP.% ~~ iIC:~ / . ' CCOLCr_.-! CE:i':?ICS f3I0LGCICl.L . , •. i. US o 1i 1• _ : ~ j ' .: ' •• ~ ::. • . . ..i. .. .. . . .. ., ,. , . • ~ dL= B:[0_ LOCICA.L LITERATURE :.. , , . -- EDITORS :i `' R: T. Bottle. Ii.S:- Ph.D.. r.R.i.G, bf.I.Int.Sc. :••Ledarer in PGysiccl Clumis:ry, Unircni:y o/ BraE/ord • IL V. Wyatt. BS(--, Ph.D.. F.I.Biol. fer la bfic.obiolo;y. UnAaslry ol srcd/ord A?trHnN BOOKS '" I SOURCES ' CORVATIO~ i . • FOR R(-SEARCr] AND DF•VELOPME.VT ~...,•...~, ... .-~~~-.-~•.-. ~ .. ,- .. ..-. ..- -*~. .. ..~.r A series under the General Y:ditoruip o[ ~' . % btLInt S( : LC Ph F F Sc D ttl P B T _ • , . . . ~ , e, . o . ,... . ., :. sad MA F GA - . • ..,r. •• . : .. . , .: . t? 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 8 1 6
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50330 8059 } ! '1;I i Cr,, *MM6"vmvif .~ftt ~kM. ~ (1963) C:Aver, .7. K. Uf.'i;ta:."vaXC D:pF,UG"MRIC S~.'UnTF,;.S IN iM C"LLULCSE FL'LP WlLx`:'t SYSL;::3, by J. K. CrwvNr and D. L. Taylorw. .. , a . . CQin.o11aa2eG Fapar Vliti. T-rant. Sym-• C=?~widge, Rne1 1965 (Mn. 1) 445-472 (1965) ~. S O O~ tl 0 2 ~~3 3T
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50330 8052 ~ . Agricultural and Food Chemistrv, American Chemical Society 1)iv., meetinrs, Athens, Greece on June 27-29, 1978 and Anaheim, California on Mar. 13-17, 19780 paper rresented at XX ?feC 5-78 ' CUUOA' SUBSTTTU`rION s•.P. Willi Grab Walter Brug.ger 4MDQ=k2-TAylQr!!-- Givaudan DUbendorf Ltd Dubendor f I would like to presenzrsome thoughts related to the question why and how cocoa could be substituted. After a short survey of the history, I will review the composition of cocoa and chocolate and I shall define the properties of the different•constituents with respect to their function and their contribut- 0 Sn(.to(~thA jtjrqhpqioj3 o.3-c(coa. Possible sub- stitutes will be discussed in the same way .. • + I ---_... i_.. A-L... Fl-...r...r nnA j*{'Q.
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f 50330 8065 ~ i 7M CHEMIS'TRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS A SERIES OF MONOGRAPHS.) V. 30 ARNOLD WEISSBERGER AND"95W)MMULOR i QD ; 400 ,i1SOQUINOLINES We i 1981 Edited by PART ONE ~ Guenter Grethe C1IEMICAL RFSEARCl1 DEPARIMEXT AN RYIERSC7fiNCE ® PUBIJCATION ; HOFFMAM41-LA l<OCliE, QdC. JOHN WILEY & SONS ~ WrtEY. NEyy JMEY NEW YORK • CHICHESTER • BRISBANE • TORONTO " ~ ; 0 SO0 iOl 0 21 843 `~.ti v _~~.1-
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r ! r 50330 8025 ~2pXI RE2-80, RTR CIASS NO. PAMPHLET 72 XI Re2-80 s.p. . Riarris, J. E. 068-sachuaetts Inst. of Tech., Mass. °-?AXINC TAR ' 111fD >IIICOTI1fE I . o.v n smokers fail to perceive the bealth costs of ar cigare e smo g._ Consumer auspeiception of health con-1 Ipbarette use. Within this framework, I focus] sequences is often invoked to justify govern- ment intervention in cigarette smoking. Rather than debating this issue here, I address a more practical problem. Suppose ~ that government intervention is warranted by such misperceptions. What then is the most appropriate corrective action? Amer. Econ. Rev. 70 (3) 300-311 (1980) (in English) General Hospital) Ion the administratively simple case where different uniform tax rates apply to cip-ette brands whose tar and nicotine contents ex- ceed or faA below a specified cutoff value. The main regulatory design question - is: Yhat should determine our choice of these ~ two tax rates and the cutoff value of tar and nicotine? T'he empirical answer below rective action-the taxation of cigarettes' strikingly illustrates how biological and according to their tar and nicotine contents. ; eoonomic facts interrelate in the formula- I set up a benefit-cost framework in wbich' fion of a discriminating public policy d tt ki ' t In particular, I analyze one form of cor- ~t~° . -9 4s,, 0 o.,0n A 2
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(50330 8066 YC[.IC CO:1POl.'Nt?S GRAPI{S ) 1%n/..Zr D\VAItD C. TAti'1.OtL t1~0 !.~ " ..,. • _~ I s . .~ ~.- CY-1 1/l C ° "v `° / / 7a'ti. INDOLES PART ~'~. T ONI Edited by William J. 11joulihan kw-a Sandoz-14't, ndci, Inc. Research and Det.•lopmcnt Division Hanover, A'e w Jersey 0 5 0 U.00 2 1 34 4 I
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50330 8056 1 ..~.. ~._L...: i.,i..r~--. M Un~ ~~''~arA II . DePt. oF q9 rie. ) /~ r; e. I~es. Se~. j Wes+ern I.ti1i.2Li~ion ~es. qnd Dev'Jo REsEAiPea FQ2, BErrEe ga4LI rI YN D~L~ ED T~Uirs - APereoTs. (_u, s. ,pept, jq~o _ry, Oa! i-P, C), os o o o o 2 ~ U 3 4
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50330 8068 1 .1r.....r...r+..r...r~A.- _ _ .~ ._....~..-1.~r..l~~.. QD 400 We 1972 OXEPINS/.THIEPINS/ , ' . -.r. ~ . . • ..a...r_ ~.a , . S~EYEN-I1IEMBERED EaitedbY HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS CONTAINING Andre Rosowsky O X Y G E N A N D S U L F U R %nWLDRIN'S CANCER RESEARCH FOU?4DATION, DOJTON, HAISACHUSET27 This ts the t»•enty-sixth colu,ne ia the series THE CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS ~ SERIES OF MONOGRAPHS VA ,7 (,. ARNOLD WEISSBERGER and EDWARD C: TAYI.OR'" ...___.r...-....~ - ~ F.diton WILEY-INTERSCIENCE A di.isloc of . r JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC. ' jVE!~ YPRK,• LqtiDON • SYDNEY • TORONTO 4 i'.
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50330 8073 ) THE CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS - 1 . ;• WEISSBERGER and ER`,,.;i91 R dilorS E BENZOPYRAN/ ARNOLD QD CHROMENES, 405 1977 /CHROMANONES, ,~ AND~/C HROMOI~TES I Bdited by I G. P: 0hS (Gwynn Pennant Ellis) jA SERIES OF MONOGRAPHS ~VOj„ 31 - ` I UNIVERSITY OF WALES INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, CARDIFF, UNITED KINGDOM AN INTERSCIENCE ® PUBLICATION 1 f JOHN WILEY & SONS NEW YORK • LONDON • SYDNEY •TORONTO 0 0 I i I'/
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~ 50330 8024 ~ . • . : 72 XI ReZ-77 S,P, R )R CLASS N0 , . New York Times TAAR New York Times, 1977, p.-A-26 (Junc 24, lbespite Rite improbability ot mismar•agin; so cfeac an • opportunity for revenue. New York State has found- a . way to make a cigarelte tax fail. Moved by pura greed. the state has raised the tax on cigarettes so high-23 eents a pack for state and city-that half the srnokers In New York City buy bootlea,ed ci;;arettes, usually . without P.no•,vino it. The money that s!:ould flow as tax payment to Q vernment goes instead into the pockets of weli•orga}rtized criminals and their truck•drivino col- • - ~; . . -... . ~ ._.. PMIPIILET 72 XI Re2-77 s.p. 1977) (in English) t t i . a50 00 0 2 I ~0.•x.
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50330 8044 . BACTERIt1r=N0~iF.NCLATURE--T.NTERi`iATIONAL 'CODE/ QR 11 In 1975 ~ yBACTERIOLOGICAL CODE ~ 1976 Revision . Societies cand Statittes of the International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology and ~, Statutes of the Bacteriology Section r of r Theitn:ernatiana! Association of A/licrubioiogic~t Approved by the Judicial Commission of the Internattonat eommtttee on Sysleutalic Bact:.riolo;ry, the International Committec on Systcniatic 13acteriolugy, the International Association of AIkrobiological Societies, and the Plenaty Session of the 1.st Intcrnntional Congress of Bacterioio.,,*y, S 1 Jerusnlcnt, Israel, September 1973 d T'~y S'T. Lat'ACE, P. Ii. A. SitiEAT(I, E. F. L1:SSEL,~ I-2 `Et'i8 r• wss•`rn. ''~ . i v tt n SK1'.R~tAN. '-!. P. R. SEELIGCIL, and ~Y. A. C[AI~I. TAXONO?ft PLANTS--TERMfNOL• OGY/ ' tnterriationat Code of Nonienclature of Bacteria Published for the International Association of 1lfierobioto.-icit Socictics by the Atneriwn Society for ,lt ia obiology Washington, D.C. 1975
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TIIE C EMISTRY ) ~ A SERIeS oF MONOGRAPIis ARNOLD WEISSBERGER .nd Ediror: .,.. .::...pyRI DIN E 400 We -_..-------AND ITS DERIVATIVES SUPPLEMENT Ed1ed a'' ' R. A. Abramovitch PA RT O N E~'r•f~, unlvtrsrty ofAlcbmr~ ' AN INTERSCIF.NCE® PUBLICATION yP4•-I/ JOHN WILEY & SONS NEW YORK . LONDON . SYDNEY . TORONTO 0 5 ~ 0 (l 02 ! 18 4 ~
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! f e 50330 8071 .~ . . .. , ~ : .. THE CHEMISTRY OF IIETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS ~. A SERIES OF MONOGRAPNS ) VU''2y ARNOLD WEIS3BERCER end PlT1P1"A~3tt~~+FA1°i:0ft Editors B. ~~~..i 1`I L'..i ® Y t./l~\A1~ L.J . .~, •AHIVIED MUSTAFA CHEIOSTRY DVARTMENT CAIRO UNIYERSITY . JO[IN WILEY & SONS NEW YORK • LONDON • SYDNEY • TORONTO f 4 s 0 0 f1 0 2. 1 8 4 9
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503311 aol3 ) HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS--NITROGEN CONTAINING/ THE CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDSj Vak - -3 7 A SERIES OF MONOGRAPHS ARNOLD WEISSBERGER aad t~y! .., , ; _;~'~ ~~,R.A Editors QD 400 We 1981 ARIAZtJLES 1,2,4 Carroll Temple, Jr. , SOl7(NERN RESEARCH INST(NIE BIRI.IINGHAM, A1ABAMA Edited by - John A. Moatgoriiej AN INTERSCIENCE a PUBUCATION JOHN WILEY & SONS sovrHEwv REsF..RCH iNSTmrI>: NEW YORK. CHICHESTER. BRISBANE. TORONTO BIRININGHAM. ALABAMA 0SO4 0 0 2 1 8 5 5
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, _a:..:,...~.:.::.,..~.,....,.a.r,..ar_sx~~.,...,r..A........._....~.,....~......-.....~_...~._ _ - - - -- -.~.-.....~ -" 50330 8048 .~. ; . .:_ - , •U-) . , ~... 1 , 1 . 4 . Part 1-Feadspacc Gas Analysis byAA.-taytw, B.Sc., S.M. Low Temperature Research Station, Cambridge ttt>r compesition of tlte gaseous atmosphere in a food containcr determines, to a great extent, the storage pra, erOes of the food. Consequently, measurement of the nature and quantitics -of cas comprizing the in- ternal atrnosp hcrc is essential in undcrstandin; the behaviour of a pack:,gcd food. The technidue for removal of samples varics acco;ding to the nature of the container. Many gas sampling probes are commercially available for re- moviti, samples from the headspace of metal cans ;' or slmlfar ri,-id relntainers. The voluma of the head- 1p'lrc` Ctrl bo c'alc'Ul:ilcd from tt:e Cli::n^c In I,C rrt'C• p~ l) ~1 ll Q f. ~ fo XX ;~IeF-k- 4b-73 Food Process Packag. 33 227-29(1964) ( n7l INXa 10 rb' i crr;~111 El ~`.--,,°~`-'- ~ ~ . column cannot be used where carbon dioxide is to be detcrnlined positively, since this gas is absorbed irreversibly by molecular sieves. Carbon dioxide can, however, be separated from oxygen and nitrogen by a short column of silica gcl.'-' In practice a dual column system is used with or:e detector after the first silica Fel column, and another after the second molecular siM column; the first detects the carbon dioxide while the second indicates the remaining bacs. Suitahle arranf;ement of the dimensions of the colurnns results in a continuous trace from the two (1et"C1(lrs.`• , 3 2 6
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50_330. .8081 ' : QD 400 Ta 1974 ' NITROGEN OXIDES/SYNTIiESIS, ORGANIC/ MR-CIP'2S ®f E"etemdr'lic cl:a•a 1S9TV by ERMWqdyW**- ACS Film Courses Princeton University American Chemical Society 0 5 0 0 0 02 1 a 5 9 ,; ,
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50330 8076 } - - 4 "'.'------- ~Y~~~~Y~. . ~ VITAMIN E/CHROMAN/ --- nP ! ... = THE CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC : COMPOUNDS j Ua4e 3/0 772 El 1981 aA SERIES OF MONOGRAPHS ARNOLD WEISSBERGER aad It ~~ .,~.- -.,.~_.~..~._. Edited by _ . G. P. EUis /CHROMANS AND "~ JTOCOPHERQLS V ~ I. M. Lockhart '.oC LuMr>f.D SreCIAi, GwSes, LONDON. UNITED KINGDOM YTF:RSCIENCE° PUBLJCATION DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY IVERSfIY OF WALES INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CARDIFF, UNITED KINGDOM ~ N WILEY & SONS 0 ~0 0 ~0 2 I i'ORj . GHICNF.STER . BRISBANE . TORONTO
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.,........-_-~.._....-....~, ........... ~ ,. . .. .,..__.....: _-_.-__._..__~..~_..~...........----~---.__.._..~__...•.. 50330 8079 HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDSJ og THE PYRAZINES We 1982 G. B. Barlin THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY CANBERRA AN INTERSCIENCE® PUBLICATION JOHN WILEY & SONS NEW YORK 0 ~HICHESTER ~ BRISBANE *TORONTO *SINGAPORE r THE!C/HEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS A SERIES OF MONOGRAPHS ARNOLD WEISSBERGER AND E~`WMC* ~ 3~,~L' c Bditort ~ . -......-- -.. -- L~ - -~- I Q~ 0 0 0 02 1 8 5 7
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• 50330 8072 ~ 0 . . a - ,...._......... ,.:.. ;;.. .`_ 0 :.~_... ~: J HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUPIDS/ THE CHE`tISTRY OF iiP:TER(1CYCLIC C(1NPOL''P1DS, A SERIES OF M0rI0GRAPHS, VO~L 30/ QD 400 We 1977 SPEC.I.AL,.TOPICS _IN HETERO CYCLIC CHEMISTRY Edited by Arnold Weissberger Research Laboratories Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, New York Edward C., Taylor4 Princeton University PAinceton, New Jersey I O _ C n Q AnINi; RS~ENJE®PUBL~ AT~ N 0 I „~ ll' lJ V JOHN WILEY& SONS
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50330 8082 ) x ....~....,~..~:.,....:_:.;:.~~.~ a A SURVh'1' Or. HE.4L2ii EDUCP:TrOtd rM I•fedicnz 0£fi.cex 1.9u3, 156-57 (Mazch 1.5, 1963) 0 0 5 0 0 n 0 2 1 8 6 0
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50330 8078 } HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS/ QD "'E `"EMMM" °"'M"°" "` `° 400 ~~.3 A SERIFS OF MONOGRAPHS 9 fTRIAZOLES: 1,2,3. We / ' 1980 AaNOW WFtSSSettcFJe .d NMM.P#W Editors K. T6omas Finley rr.n wavmm or waw ro.c .sOck.o.r. W[W Yo.a C ww urIsAsac+cs m .usucwnon JOHN WILEY & SONS New York • Clichester • Brisb.ne • Toeo.to A~ 5 Q 4 tl A 2 1- ~3 5 b ~ 1 , Volume Editor John A. Montgomery .ovrn.An .nucr .arrnm sNs+ce....u.,r.
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/ i 50330 8054 ~• R. J. LENAHAN, J. A. THOMAS, S~St~?Z'!4 "IM7t7O'D. L. CAL1., A:•v D. I. I'ADGERG XX MeF -b-M-73 Consumer Reactinn to Nutritional Labels on kood Products The Jour. of Consur±er.Affairs 7 (1) 1-12 (1973) In order to ctesigi the most useful instruments off consumer protection, it is necessary to understand how consumers perceive and use such instruments. Often, basic consumer rights are con- sidered more extensively in the design of consumer protection policies than basie patterns of consumer behavior and motivation. We are more likely to make information on labels complete as viewed by tiie expert than useful in the normal behavior of the consumer. lhis study is devoted to discovering how consumers perceive nutritional labels on focd products. It dra%vs conclusions about thcir meaniuo and usefulness to consumers. c~.f..nutri,•i~~~Js~ntc~vt.«~;. stated._at..tt~ti 1~'l:ite. ~I~~~ue ~onf:<r~nc~sz~_ Reccutly, there has been nluch pressure from consumer groups and . -uf icial sour::s alil:e-to require disclosure of nutritional facts about food products by the food industry. The case for labelinb foods on the basis 0 5 Cl 0 n 0 2 1 8 3 2
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50330 8053 ~ . , 1 AIR--POLLUTION--ANALYSIS/CNEMISTRY, ANALYTIC--QUANTITATIVE/ CHEMISTRY, ORGAIDIC--ANALYTIC/BIOLOGICAL C1IEMISTRY--ANALYSIS/URINE--ANALYSIS/ BLOOD--ANALYSIS/ _ 1Q~ NIOSH rv~~14UAL 1977 ANALYTICAL METHODS :.. z~SE COND EDITION ...., . PaYt I NICSII Monitoring Methods Part II Staudards CoIt,~letioll Program Validated Methods Part II Standards . ~` ~/e I . ~ ~ ~ • / Completion PI'ogran1 Valcdated Methods Ye l.3 (,R . • „•~•y~~~~~--a~, /.+V~A Y~j1-%?f~X; " Manual Coordinator U.S. D1TARTD11?NT OF IiEALTII, I:DUCATION, AND WELFARE 0 0 () () Z. I , ~ ~'ub)~c Nealth Service / Center for llisease Control
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50330 8085 ~ 71 VII Tal i ,w :ua~-;,~r T0:~~:CCO PROUCSCD A~'1X~33T F~'s~: 8'Y BF:Iia'.•'xM A-14Z) QTll1:P. :"llt?:3IMM$ Pttytvps•iaol. E:0 (tto. 4) $7v-y9 (aaYO~ :.; ,,..~...,,_ 1; 6. ~. 0 5. cl 00 2 1 8
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50330 8087 ~ ~ rtc4 t?s '}:~ t, t•~.{~: f .i. ~ r: [.~W.k,~'i i , i. LnF I Q 5 ~ 0 0 0 2 1 8 6 5
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i I 50330 8074 , n . HE CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS SERIES OF MONOGRAPIIS J ARNOLll EISSBGRGER and JAj9WfM Editors QD 400 We 1977,/yf~2 VQUINOLINES = g.,T s GurnosvJoncs Edited by DEPARTh1ENT OF CHEMISTRY UA7\'ERSITY OF KEELB STAFfORDSHIRE AN 1NTERSCIENCE® PUDLICATION r 10 JOHN WILEY & SONS LONDON • NEW YORK • SYDNEY • TORONTO
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?: Q U 0 U a 0 CJ (0L5y) So-m (v -p;;) 0 ' jo1q2vdojtiqA vu;t Lcop:Y,j. 'S 'J A f 9809 0£fOS
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/ 50330 8080 ! PYRIDINE SYSTEM/PYRIDABINE SYETEM/PYRIMIDINE SYSTEM/PYRAZINE SYSTEM/ TRIAZINE SYSTEMS/ NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY/HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS--SPECTI?A/ GENERAL IIETEROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY SERIES Edited by &, Arnold Weissberger QC 451 Ba 1973 NMR S-Ir"ECT~.A OF S I ~-~~.~ ~~~,rinE.~.~.0 CYkC, L E ` T. J. BATfERIiAA1 Deparlment of Afedical Chenmishy John Cru•tin Sclrool of A:cdicul Research The Australian A'ational Uuieersity, Canberra. A \\'ilc}•-Intcrscicnce Publication JOHN \\'1LEY S SONS, 11'eu' I'ork . Lonr/on . S)'druy . Toran1o 0 5 0 A . \f, 0 2
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f QD 400 We TFIB CIIEhtISTRY OF ldrJ1~'C'~~ 1973 t+f' A SERIES OF MOt:OGRAP ARNOLD WEISSBERGER asd ~riD11I~iAilwQy:a~1Yi,QP~, ~ Editors C k) ND EhjSE D P~.'~'~~vA 7INES 50330 8069 , INCLUDING CINNOLINES AND PHTHALAZINES. EAittd bJ• Raymond N. C:cstlc 0 D: re.:TY.C1tT OF CHiMIS7RY 6UIGlIAM tOUN6 V'+IVERS(1T YROVO. ULU: J O i7 WVi I r. EY f• S O IV S, NEVl YORK • I,ONILION • SYDNF.Y • •FOICONTU
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50330 8067 0 0 LIC CUl11POV1\DS lNl ARD C. TAYLOR .. ._ i . _ _ . . ~ Tl w4 1 ,~ ,~ ~ ljD01r•G Campovnds, A Soci~es-of e . y . rr , INDOLES TART TWO EJired b y N'i!(ianl ,I. i Ioolihan R,ieu.rA.,~l l):rrl..Ornra M.qle. H+o-nn, A..Jrru~ CONTRIaVTOa/ dM•rrr o/CArw>w~ Sn.J..I C'.iuniry I Xent Ru.S Gn.Sl. lnrrn.r. ./ Jwk+.L~ ' ArHw,G.wjw L R. Smi11 f>t.a. K.drk C+. Hn,va.rn C.. t.~.+.rk LMmain Sr.L.+U• dtprd IK~•rh4Mr. 1'r} . ]I, 7loclef ! Ckn'nFIAa•,.oc.vlrW /trunrckDIN>W anAr A(i Gt6, S.iltnfaw/ ' ~ 'L ~ O a `A 0 1/ O 1 1 r?lz}a~$ C. .TJy1Ori , Ronald J. Party James C. Poaen raars_i _-><.a ~•- y-s _ _ r_ isat-ars:v'a. 1%lCt'•d,aTF:RSCII{IVC6 J0/i.r H ILI:Y 4 FlrNs.INC. • NEA' YLR\ • LUNDOY • 1
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L 98 1e 0 u0 u 5 0 ..~.. t... r.._. N t?;1''^.YlI n + t'. YJ { .:. -_ l 6g0B Of f0S
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. \ 0 . . 78 VII Ag-78 S.P. 'L2- U) 3 5 -- 3 ~ <,.Ki -I'd ) Race 3 of Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae John L Mcintyrc antf] ~ --IF 50330 8084 ~: ~ Assistant Plant Pathologist and Plant Pathologist,The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station,New Haven, CT 06504, and Windsor, CT 06095, respcctively. The authors thank S. Rich for allowing the use of unpublished data from transmission electron microscope observations of zoospores. We also acknowledge the excellent technical assistance of M. Reisncr and f3. Wooding. ' Accepted for publication 15 July 1977. MC INTYRE, J. L., and G. S. TAYLOR. 1978. Race 3 of Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianac. Phytopathology 68:35-38. ABSTRACT Conneeticut (CT) isolates of Phrroplrrhoraparasirica var. nltotianae cause typical black shank symptoms on tobacco and have similar morphology to isolates of races 0 and I. It differs, however, in that the symptom response of the differential tobacco A'icoriana nesophila to CT is similar to that caused by race I, but on cultivar 1071 the symptom response is similar to that caused by race 0. Tobacco cultivar A23, which is resistant to race 2, is susceptible to CT, and cultivar L8 is moderately susceptible to CT. After 5 days of growth in liquid culture, the dry weight of CT mycelia is 50%, less than that of races 0 or l. Races 0 or I cause the pH o( culture broth to change from 7.2 to about 5.3 but in broth cultures of CTpll remains essentially unchanged. On an agar medium containing sucrose and 2,3,5-triphem•I tctrazolium chloride (TTZ), the T1'Z is reduced by races Oand I but not by CT. Isolates of CT qualify as a new race, race 3, of P. parasirira var. nfrorianae. 0 5 0 0 n 0 2 1 8 6 2-
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='~~: ~. _. , . . ~., RJR CLASS NO. TEXTBOOK RC b81-Ta 1981 50330 8102 ( AWARENESS AND KNOWLEDGE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK FACTORS IN TWO ADJACENT ETHNICALLY AND SOCIOECONOMICALLY DIFFERE"NT COMMUNITIES. ~ Masters thesis, Central Michigan University. 1981 University MicrofilMs International.Ann Arbor, MI.81.(IN : ENG.) ISN = 2895 0 S0 0 0 0 x~8 8 o
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50330 8075 1 , •__-----. QUINOXALINES/CHEMISTRY, HETEROCYCLIC/HETEROCYCLIC COMPOiP.VOS/ CONDENSATION FRODL'CTS(CHEMIS T RY) l THE CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC CO'rIPOU:VnS, A SERIES OI•' '_40NOCRA?HS~ Editors : Arnold :deissberHer & "MM„`~'~2 W' V~~, 35 QD 400 We 1979 CONBENSED /PYRAZII~TES ~ G. W. II. Cheeseman DIpAR7Ai1«VT OF CI{F1.11STRY. QUISN E1.IZAIIFTH COL.[;GR VNIVEFSltY OF LOIv'WN R. F. f:c;o[cson JANSSFN PHARMACEITl1CAL LID. AN INTERSCIENCE ® PURLICATION . 0 5 0 0 0 (l 2 q I1i JOHN «'ILEY & SOtiS ~A NEW YO(tK • CIIICIfiES'IF.R • BRISBANE •TOROtiTO dS3
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t 50330 8088 _gL_, J)ul - 7ssP , l_ /' i( : • , > >,, a; T/IR JOUNNAL tlr P11.\nMAtY/t./Ml' A\U I•.rPCNIMK\TAL T111:RAPI:I:T1l'Y Vol. 192. \'-,. I Copyright 0 1973 by The K'illiunls & N'ilkins Co. Prinf.d in U.S.A. 13 Dcs Z,-7SrS.jo. . -- CAlil)IOVASCUL:III CFFI:CTS OF ACU'I'I. :1ND C11RO1'IC INIIALA'1'IO.tirS OF FLUOROCARBON 12 IN RABBITS f3'EOItCI*9 J:'TAYLO,F;,•IW AND ROBERT T. DREW Pharmacology Branch, Natiortnl In,,titlitc of F.Itvirunmcrttal llealth Scicttccs, Research Trianplc 1'ark, North Carolina Accepted for publication August 3, 1974 ABSTRACT 0 TAYLOIt, Gt:ottcF.1. WA\D IZOIIF.RT T. DRE\Y: Clydiov;tscular effects of acute and chronic inh;ilations of fluorocarbon 12 in rabbits. J. Yhartnacol. Exp. Thcr. 192: 120-135,1975. ; 0 500 0,0'2'1 866
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, 50330 8093 ) VI Re9-78 S.P• r L't !m.•13ioL lntcractions, 19 (1977) 133-142 __ i V Isevier/North-1lolland Scientific 1'ublishers Ltd. /LIPOSOLUBILITY AS AN ASPI:CT OF NITROSAMINI: r t GEORGE M. SINGER, H, ~~`~..~~1....E'~~~-~9It *' and WILLIAM LIJINSKY - .....~..--- .~.W Chemical Carcinogenesis Program, Fredrick Cancer Research Center, Frederick, Md. 2 0 1-, .-...., CARCINOGLNICITY;:,QUANTITATIVC CORRELATIONS AND QUALITATIVR OBSI;RVATIONSj~+** ~ ~ I ~ 17 1 (U.S.A.). ~ (Received October 2Gth, 1976) (Revision received July 26th, 1977) . • (Accepted August 29th, 1977) Carcinogenicity data for -a number of nitrosamines have been examined for possible structure-activity correlations with liposolubility by the method of Hansch. Correlations were found in two cases which support a previous • mechanistic suggestion and which also suggest a possible difference between the action of nitrosopiperidines and dinitrosopiperazines in inducing olfac- tory carcinomas. No correlations were found for non-cyclic nitrosaminer. O 5 0 0 OIN41012CTION B 7
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50330 @094 { J1 . ( ed. Physical measurentents in gas dDn,unics atldd combustioi. E ditors: pt. 1. R. 1l'. Ladenburg; pt. 2.13. Lewis, P. N. Pe;t-k: II. S. Taylor. IIlugh 'I'a}•lor, volttme editor) Princeton N. J., Princeton University Presc,19.i1. xvi, 578 p. Illus. 25 cuw. (High speed aerodynnt>,ics •and je propulsion, v. 9) Contributions by various authors. Includes biblto~;raphies. 1. Phystcal measuremeuta. 2. Gas flow. 3. Combu9tior.. i Lnflenburg. 1:udolf Walter, 18S2- ed. ir. Taylor, Huah Stott ~ 1800- ed. (Series) TL573.1152 vo1.9 533 54-1312 Library of Cougress 8 7 2 i55x101
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~ 50330 8070 QD 400 we 1973 i THE CHERIISTRY OF HGTEROCYCL(C COMPOI'.NDS~ V,;t $ ~'f f A SERIES OF MONOGRAPHS ARNOLD WEISS¢ERGER and EO~'1USMV--~.r"~ .. jftVjjx Editort " PYRIDAZINES x Edited by Raymond N. Castle Drpartmrnf aJChtmitrry BrighaM Young UnirtrNt,r Pioto, Utah AN R.TE/lSCIENCEx PUBLICATION JOHN WILEY .C SONS NEW YORK • LONDON • SYDNEY • TORONTO s , . . . . R..... ..r,~ . R... 0 5 0 0. 0 0 2 1 8 4 8
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1 50330 8096 ) : . VI Re9-76 / S.P. . Ni trv wdvvvvv~'oiisr~ivin, vvtn.v v owv vwvv'ro~,tiwi.'w~`i,~ v noffi vv'w~ v~.Mi:w' Sub:aitted to : . .,. i J: Am..Vet. Med. Assoc. D.V.2•1. , Ph.D., G. 1•f. Sir•g,cr, Ph.D. , and W. Lijinsky, Ph.D. From the CarcinoRencsis i roSres:, Biolor„y Division,;: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Rid,-,e, Tennessee 37830 ~ Research supported ,jointly b;; the NationEl Cancer Institute and the Ener~;v Rcsearch nad DeveloFi~ent Mjninistration under contract with Union Carbide Corporation. '•' • , FIDTIC[ • ' ~Tif Irpnl •N pHnnrJ A% an .nuunl r.nrA u ~j ~ ' yvn-rrcd Pr e l' RJ \r . 1:,, imrn~ntM1 r ~ ~ Q~ / "7 t~.f In t.•1 ~.•. ~ .~~1•• • ~• . , • . . . 1 a li
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I A 50330 8101 ) NICOTINE--PHAR.MACOLOGY / 80 X Ta , , . , . RJR CLASS N0. PAriPH:,LT 80 X ~~ . (Albert Einstein Coll. Med., Bronx, N. Y., U, S.) . EARLY BOTANISTS AND THE INTRODUCTION OF DRUG SPECIES. _Bull,_ N,.Y. Adad. Med. 55 (No. 7)684-99-(1979). (in English) ~ The history of tnedicinc hasT~ccn inextricably mixed with he history ot ~ botany. Folk medicines in Northern Europe and the Americas were ~ widely used without any understanding of the active pharmacological ~ principles. Physicians prescribed both indigenous and foreign drugs based only on patients' symptoms and sometimes fanciful notions about physiol- i ogy. Withering was an accomplished botanist who introduced digitalis i after recognizing that it was the only active ingredient of a complex , mixture. Simultaneous improvement in scientific communication due to ' Linnaeus' classification and in the understanding of human physiology ~ allowed some progress to be made. It was not until late in the 19th century f and early 20th century that drugs were introduced based on improved ( kn^ owledge of the chemistry and pharmacology of plant materials. Ta
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I f ICANCER RESEARCH 36. 1968-1990. June 19761 ` 50330 8092 I The Effect of Substituents on the Carcinogenicity of N-Nitrosopyrrolidine in Sprague-Dawley Rats' ~ ~~: . - . . . . ~ , ,.Vi Re9-79 S.P. _ William Lijinsky and Ff.a"~97-tttyloq Caicino9enasis ProQram. Biology Oivrslon, Oak Ridge National laboratoty, Oak Ridge. Tennessee 37830 SUMMARY I NMR' and mass spectrometry confirmed showed the absence of significant impun 2,5-Dimethyl-N-nitrosopyrrolidine. 2, dine (Aldrich Chemical Co., Milwaukee. mole) was dissolved in acetic acid (70 r Sodium nitrite (50 g) was added, and tr lowed to stand for 3 hr at room tempe yellow oil was separated and combined tract of the aqueous layer (2 x 100 ml). was washed with water (50 ml), dried (a, and evaporated in a stream of nitrogen residual oil distilled at a constant tempe to give 37 g (83%) of the nitroso compou mm); UV,„„ (H:O) 342 nm (c 86). The NMR and mass spectra of the co, sistent with the assigned structure and si - nr einni/iraM irnnurainc N-Nitrosopyrrolidine and two of its derivatives were pre- pared and fed in drinking water to Sprague-Dawley rats to compare the effects of substituents on the carcinogenicity of the N-nitrosopyrrolidine molecule. 3.4-Dichloro-N-nitro- sopyrrolidine induced esophageal tumors in 13 of 14 ani- mals. olfactory carcinomas in 4, and a hepatocellular tumor In 1. All animals that received this compound were dead at 55 weeks after the start of the experiment: N-Nitrosopyrroli- dine induced hepatocellular tumors in 26 of 29 animals and induced 1 olfactory carcinoma. Not all animals in this group were dead until 104 weeks of the experiment. 2.5-Dimethyl- N-nitrosopyrrolidine induced only 2 hepatocellular tumors 51 Z%) ar&aljj Ttjj n-*thf sU*tit7ioViminished the liver carcinogenicity. while the /3 chlorine substitution at- ' thu aennhani.e anri nrsntlv
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M ~,..^ 4'iq Vol. 5`.c, No. 5--1'1.•~1\'1' 1)ISI•:~1(S1: li 1•:P~~It'1•1:R--1lay 1975 .~r , l.itcrattu•c VII ~n ~C__:__lll•'.l\'fIC'!1L C'O\'}'ROl.'ROl. OP '1'Oli11C'('C) lifJ1C'1 ~:~: S1I,1NK 1`: C'_O`:}`: ~'~~~f$7 % A.1. I\•lillcr,• and J. L. Alclntyrc Deparlrncnl of Pianl Patholohy, Tl:c Cannccticcrt At;ricultcir;tl l:xpcritncnt Stntion, 1'.O. }iox 110s, Ncn• llavcrS! "50-L r lilin( ; aclcirr.s:,: first .. luaiyr ~•1..11 cl ~„_i nc ~ ~>\1 ~~ L o~ t ai:uK~.rcut OG(1~~ yr 5/~n~~'~~7p/~~4 'p ~`yb Al3STRACT Crowth of 1'}ytophthora harasitic.r .•ar. nicotianlc, the causal organism of black shank cliscas,~ of toLacco, %vas inhibitcdin Otrob•y soil fumigants onll' whcn lhc)' con- tainccl clrlorphicrin or meth' y1 isotl:iouanat('h In the field, fall appl'tcation at 30 gallons pcP"sicl'c •t1f'a r'c of'1; :(:=2liclilb'rdp-iftipcnc'anrl '1; ?-(lich1lrrol>ropanc• i mctliy1 iso- thiocyanc:(e MD-A}1:1C:i), DD plus 15;"~ or 30 o c:hloropicrin, 40^,o ethylene dibromide (l:f)13) plus l5°io chloropicrin, and 3G?a }.U13 plus 30io chloropicrin rcduccd thc inci- T 0 S A 0 ~ 02 1 8 6 1 , • .` 50330 8083 '~
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I , . 'E3y R. F3rown, M. L Jacobs, and WT3~17WPor=' . ' / - 50330 8090 ~ A SURVEY OF THE MIdST RFC':ivT Ar3FLtCATf QNS ~ ~ . . . i OF - e- Sparksourd '~ a ~ '' ^ (([ ~ /~ /\r~ f~ mass sl`r `/ ~/ V iA V/~,7a e~. 1 ma~ • _ y ••••••...~~~ PARK St)UkCE MASS SPECTROMETRY is a tech- graphite moderator, for which it was important to ~ niquc which is a,uite widcly used for the deter- know the concentration of elements of hich neutron m'r,a!ion of trace and ultratrace elements in a capture cross section, and semiconductor materials, vari;ty of materials. 'lhe technique was first investi- for which certain trace clemezts afPect the electrical gat^.d by l:emoster' in 1935, but little work of an properties of devices. : ir.v:s;idational nnturc was carried out until Gorman, Much of the work carried out on comracrcially )o^cc, and Hipple= revived interest in the method produced spark source mass spectrometers, which in 1951. Hanna}•' repotted further work in 1954, appeared in the middle or late 50's, was centered and at that time it became apparent that this was a on these two analytical problems; however, the field technique of large potcntial. At that time tlicre was of application now has widened considerablv. oSnonoz18 6 a
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50330 8108 ,ic:nm-an, C. G. Tau Oi' LCjii:Li SUCT.Loa T,M,.'':, F. : IUr,;.nPT:2 LItCN'.:;'S, L•; C. C. .7o:3ar;oa, and L. R. '.tLylQr Lam. Cppl. D3o?. 43, 51-62 (1955) 8 3 6 .
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_ . . . • ._ . I I . , - Q. - .•-- -- . . --....~. F. <07 p~ .~~ 1959 .fv^}'-a j'ie. :E,- S +~iC:;,i3 a a'r.niC. YCf$:t V, u 9 o ,s.r.,s;-,•...,..,,..-.-..r,...., ,............;Z.;,.-.: _.,'.r.
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U U.a U a d_ 0 (cyl::0) vj:I..T~s k3 swxt"itrl r~y x (
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11 50330 8104 r ~ ~ T~ .. Economic Botany 5, 255-273(1951) l6 ~' Guayule ~~i Al>,tericci~a Source of I~rcLUer ';' ~~ Introduction es. Guaiyute (Parthcnit~ne argen- Species. ~ onf th Cuiul~~~~itac, the 330 orld t•ears thn fntil!!! (~rayl ~e ue t liavc clapsed wh~i:c rcl~rc- since di:cc/verv nf tlie \cw World b}• that vast family of plants c~hi- :'entative~ are found tlirout;liout the Rurntir+:rn c•vnlurer~_ h•:~:lr•:~~icnliavc Chc ticnu~ Pal'tJlcnfifnt, inclu~lin~ ~~'urld. tnliserl nn tlin eirti:r A :~t nr+ ~~• hlnnt+ from ti .lrull.v u_.. t l ~] .. ~ l t• •tr' An~ njj; l 1C1'!c 1~ N(lt9tnr•~c fn•»nt'•or• 1 P.L•6 ( L~1RC •!1f'(• .. tIIC Over three million acres of marginal farm land in the United States are capable of producing guayu/e rubber. Use of existing strains on these lands would produce 200,004 long tons of natural rubber pei year. Plant breeding and process research could raise this to at least 300,000 long tons, or about half of our annual consump- tion of natural rubber. . %: ~ -.~..,k.,; f~ ~. •-KE>\'~L'I'H 1.~ . T:~11.OR . - ' ' ' t
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50330 8113 0 S[l 0 El 0 2 Best, Charles Herbert, 1899-- The physiological basis of medical prac:tic3; a text in ap- plied physioloUy, by Charles lierbert Best and Norman Burke Taylor. Gth ed. ]3altimore, Williams & WilL-ipms, 1955. 1357 p. illus. 2G em. 1. Physiology. z. Taylor, Norman 13urke.183:>- Jotnt author. rr. Title. t,,1P34.B51 1955 ~~ 012 55--5071 ~ l J 2 Library of Congress 100111 o) _ . ....._-..,.,_~..-...-.<,.......-,-,.- ~..~,c~,.-}
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i . United States Industrial Environmental Research Environmental Protection Laboratory ~ I I MeAl -$ t gency Cincinnati OH 45268 S P . . I ! and Development laboratories to pro- i ~}de -Fstatg of- he-~~t 1see~h and ~ S ~S p t~ve~dpm~ht r~gar~ing asbestos and asbestos-like minerals. Research and Development EPA-600/S7-81-032 May 1981 J P oject Summary Asbestos/Asbestiform Research in EPA ORD ~~. Lisa S. Kohn and A~~~1~oY., ~ x •,.; .,..... ~a: This report suromarizes the current the workpiace, or from exposure to effects of the EPA Office of Research contaminants in land, air or water) by the sharing of information and the development of consistent regulatory policy._ This report is intended to up- efirt. Foe,. ~....,._.__. - •
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/ 50330 8120 8-48-80 76 I Ma-$~AASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES: CONTRASTS BETWEEN THE GRENVILLE AND APPALACHIAN PROVINCES I iqwa;3;e':'laytar~ M. Nafi Toksoz, Michael P. Chaplin Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences INDUSTRIAL LIAISON PROGRAM I S. Taylor, M. Toksoz, M. Chaplin ~ <'0 (0 0 Q~0 2)1 8'.9 4 ~, DISTRIBUTED FOR INTERNAL USE E MEMBER COMPANIES ONLY. MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED.
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50330 8107 J ~0, ~:CA~-2~ , 0 5 0 0o 02 1 d 8 5
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---._.,.,-...~...~- Qj"V f,-, k~pw. b-).. 78 XI Ad1-79 S.P. i 50330 8105 rq-1z) rnpyv~ . Advertising and the Aggregate Consumption Function By I,£g'j'ER-~ ~TAYLOR;AfD DANIEL `VEISERBS* \ The economic effects of advertising have been a much studied and hotly de- bated topic for a number of years. By now, there is fairly general agreement that, in!er QIia, advertising is important as a barrier- to-entry (see Joe Bain, NVilliam Cornanor and Thomas A. Wilson, Leonard Weiss) and that advertising does succeed in shif t- inp demand for individual products (see Neil Borden, \icholas Kaldor, Robert Dorfman and Peter Steiner, Lester Telser U ~ n (1Q~i2)~:r~iart,~'al~la),~,utj~hcrq is little agreement as to"t~ie effect of auverf isino on sumption at the expense of szvino. But as to what the causal mechanism underlying this is, we unfortunately cannot say. It may be that advertising . :tually succecds in altering tastes a la Galbraitii, but ~hen again it may be that advertising is simPly serving to bring new goods and services to the attention of consumers. As already noted, our analysis concen- trates on the effects of wdvertisino in the aggregate, and is conducted in the frame- work of the state-adjustment model of 1Icndrik Houthakker and Lester Taylor, ~e onnlinrl tn ~nnrrnatr rnncimmtinn T--nl_
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) 50330 8119 .•. . . . a.. . . ~ •1 '~ t I^ t ..N . ._~r . ... . ' • ...t. ~ ... . .,.. , .... 0 S 0 0 0 0 2 1 13 9 7
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, _. . . -.:'_ .._.__ , __-....-..._.....,-= 50330 8109 ~~ ~ .1 1114 lnorgairic Chcntiat'r},, Vol. 16, No. S, 1977 ///d- rl W. M. Coleinan and L. T. Ta~'lor t ti '~ ' C ib f h D f Ch i on r u on rom t cpartmcnt o stry, c cm i i i ' olytechn n a i c Institute and State University; 131acksburg, Virginia 24061 / 78 Iii t^o2 , Virg Oxygenation Studies of .vanganese(II) Complexes Con(aining r inear Pentaderttate Ligands W. M. COLEMAN and UIEW1•~Y,t$$S01 . .~ . • . . Received July 8. 1916 - A1C604862 T\'fanEancsc(I1) complexcs incorporating linear pcntadcntate 02N3 ligands have bccn s),nthcsizcd and characterized. The reactivity of thcse materials in a varictv of solvents with inolecular oxygen suggests that several types of oxidation proeesses` may be occurring. The rate of 02 uptake is a function of the substitucnt on the central nitrogen donor as well as the substitucnt on the salicylaldchyde aromatie ring. Evidence is presented to show that irreversible oxidation of Mn(11) to %!n(I11) occurs along with oxidation of the ligand. Two compound; of formulask•In(5-NOrSALDYT)(Oli) and Mn(5-NOrSALMcDPT)(G11) are isolated from their oxygenation reactions and characterized.. t I 0 Q 5 tl O Q o2' 1 8 8 7
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9\z R 1z 0 U d 0 S 0 Om) I,sMLL (v 'oT:) sa S©na : t7~fi~ 'rI A'i Ei45'cf Lr~~~L~! Fi~~:.3 ~•c t~d ~t'1 ~,'Rt~~v.n ~Y t131:,i p L~~ •.. ~ ac.dr L>e~. a• ivul ixY 1 8608 0£E0S
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50330 8095 } ..._...,...~._ti_..:.:.~.:..,~.._...r_,....,.....;.:..~:,::.:-----. _........~_.........__~.~ • ~...~.....~ ~ ~ GA ,%.~~9 453 A treatise on physical chemistry; a co-operative effort by ~ T group of physical chemists. 3d ed. ... Edited by Hugh : Taylor ... and Satnuel Glasstone ... New York, ll. Va Nostrand company, inc.,1942-- si ~ .2v. txbles, dlagrs. 23} cm. 1111 G)NTFNT9: T. 1. Atomistics and thermodynamics.-v. 2. States ~ ~ matter. 1. Chemistry, Physical and theoretical. 1S8T- jolut ed. . QD-153.'1'32 641 Library o[ Congress~'' ~ tr5,3dli t:~-- .- - _ t. Glasstone, Samu( 42-8391 rc 050 0 0 ~~i$7 3
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50330 8110 81 V SW i r BEHIORAL AND NEURAL BIOLOGY 30. 343-349 (1980) /The Operant Assessment ofste Discrimination / '~ 6~~" ~~ ~ t.' H. SC(~TT SWARTZWELDER, ~1~7ACX~Qi~DAVID B. PEELE. `• JOHN P. MASTROPAOLO, •BURTON M. SLOTNICK, AND'ANTHONY L. RILEYI Department ojPsychology, The American University - --- --fYcs.iifiXi7in. D. C. 2006 The present report represents a new technique for the assessment of taste discrimination in rats. Rats were trained to lick a three-tube configuration for the presentation of a 0.01-cc taste stimulus. Following the sampling of a specific taste (S°), rats were further required to make 20 additional licks for a 0.05-cc tap water reinforcer. Following the sampling of a second taste (S°). licking was not rein- forced. Rats acquired this discrimination in an average of 200 S° and 200 S' trials. This technique can be used to determine taste discrimination without the con- founds of taste and position biases noted in earlier work on taste discrimination and should prove useful in studies of taste psychophysics.
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i 50330 8122 . r..~ _ _.. .:;._a_:.:.:_ _... ,_ W._.. _. __w. _ Y_..._. .:..•. ~..~.,....:.... i. .a _~ . jt f: Barber, Iiervey Hubbard, 1885-. . Semimicro qualitative analysis lb,yl IIervey Ilubbard I3lrber and 1'. Ivan Taylor. Rev. ed. New York, I-Iarper 11953, 401 p. lilus. 23 cm. (Harper's chemistry series) 1. Chemistry, Annlytic-Qunlitativr., 2. Chemistry, Inorganic. t. Taylor, Thomas Ivan, 10t)0- joint author. n. Title. QD98.I33 1953 ~ ~ 544 ~ Library of Coneress 1101 53-4410 T 0 S 0 0 n 0 2 1 9 0 0;
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f r 50330 8100 ;f/lTff4 t»ir s..010 fJ ~ CL /Ti '~l T~ Y.S. uEM, . o• 4.Oyw• 1. ('U1+1.1( Al Nl~ (1N HF.1'URT 1(!. 2. (ws'a Arert.aiue 3. Reciptrnm'. Ar.v..„•n N<., 018LIQGRAMHIC D.~TA SHEFt NBSIR 75-97 i b TIT4F. AND ti1jN11fI.L S. Nuhlreatia. 11.ite Development of Solid State Samplers for Work January'197G Atn•,ospheres : t-Phosphine : VIrrr(,><min,t utF.nr,Arr.N, •~ ~ . . . . . . • ,' ' . j, NT(WR(~) .. „.••. D. Nec(.4minR l)rltan. ltrpart N..• ~iernar(1 Greifer and John~•~t. "'~aylor)' t. :NhUNM1N(i (>HtiANILAT1UDl NAMt ANU A!)DRESS • . , 10. 1'wlcat/rr.k/surk lMiit K... `'`NAT/ONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS C4T^^"~'4 ~' DErART/•IENT OF COMMERCE Nn. MASNINGTONi D.C. 20234 ~ 1 iT. SN-nsvrinR OrRoni.:.eiot Namr anJ Cumplete Address (Strret, City, Ste(s. Z/P) 13. Type u( Rt•pcxt k i'rrnt1 • ~ S• (:uvcrcJ National Institute for Occupational Safety F, Health Summary Report Division of Laboratories and Criteria Development '4- S- ! . ~onsotinR ARrnry l:oJr Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 • ., .. • Investigations to find suitable solid-state sorber materials for phosphine in work atmospheres at the ppm level are described. The best sorber to date is silver.nitrate-impregnated silica gel. Same (~li ic~ 1t~ es remain tQ be overcome before a procedure for determining th~arA6urff . o~ p~osi~~i~1e idscAbq can be reconmended. ~ Air analysis; air sampling; gas analysis; industrial hvriene;M jT
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/ j r - f_ ...:-_...a:.A:.. .. __.__.........c.._Sar....... .<.. . 50330 8114 1 4 i . : ,: 0--:i_..;:.; Normi E. HLEsrER, f.owri R. Srmas. a~m'V QC~`i'c~TA'~T~ : th IVERS I7Y oF GAL IFOWJIA, QIVERSIDE _". KI VERSI CE. CAl.I FC.,-V[ A For Presentation at the 66th Annual Meeting of the t._._._-_2 ._ } . _ riiI ruiiuuun %.Wiuvi AaaucIauvn Chicago, Illinois , .'.June24•28,1973' ~ ..~- . . , . -~,.........-.- . .....c-,,...._.-~.~--.~ .~~-,... ... ~.-T -+--. ~ - C23 -.r... .. , ~ ~ •,y ... _ .~ (iuoROCJMas iv THE lM IkicaF3 EASIN ff'13-315 J 9 2
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f 1 -+ .w.~......+:~L.d i..:`a.-:'....i•ia.:1i~...._-,:..~~......~..r~--..: u~.'J.~.;. - ..r.:..:~n«.. _'-.~....a2i.<s:-~ zI Ta4 N . r~•• ~.t c^z.a- Ri~.~ lvc~t~qr r.(~ T ~ .. 1 O ~ ~.\•...t.•..-t .1. J:~... .A uS.. 14.'.+ l:.V •:~trL.S l.V.~ • TIir F.i:pera Str°.tltCIl n,.lRus;: ? ~:•3 a~ ,~. . Unf :°• G+ ~:;:rzi~.~:'s~cy, ..;:racu3:t~xzYl I;xp>rx. •~.^LiI~ .+' , t .. . . F' . . ,•.4 _ . , - ~~a . ~ .- - .-.~•.,~.r:.'ft-~+^.""f'^.r^:>s+. r~^aet- .... . . .. . . _ . . ..'°~+.w•w•rw-,."a?',.~[.,R!!*!c~.: O ~ •I ~I { 1 ~ ~ ~ V lJ ~
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=~~:3*M5111VIA a 4 '
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i 50330 8103 I 4 " t a xxi I rieB -'l6 .S.P. - . 9 --~-•.... . .~~ ~ . ~/~-- .362 Europcan Association for the Study of the Uver (116) 189. Prc-Symptomatlc Dctcctlon of,Qvcr Changes ln Vtnyl Ch'.oride lionumcr Norkcrs D.IN.l. IYillians, K„I.Jk.Yl'oploi,jL R. Gossley, P.Al. Smirh and B.1V. Duck British 1'etrolcum Chemicals International Ltd, Penarth, tXpaRmcnt of Nuclear Medicine - Ultrasound, Royal htarsden Hospital, Suttor, Department of Mcdicine, Uandough Hospitai, Pcnar:h, Welsh National School of Medicine, CaiditT, and Occupational tlcalth Unit, Iiritish Petroleum Rcscarch Centre, Sunbury . Recognition of vinyl chloride monomer as hcpatotoxic led to a survey of .:orkcrs to determine whether chanrcs had becn induced by past exposurc and to cvaluatc standard liver function tests as monitors of early liver abnormalities. Standard liver function tests acre found unreliable in the population at r;sk. Of 487 workers examincd, 102 (20.9%) had abnormalitics on initial testing, but on?y two «ere finally shown to hasc p3rtal hypertension; both had been first identified throu^h thrombo- .tydopaenia, having normai LNT's. : he remainder were either normal on rcpcat testing or had minor changes attributablc to alcohol (10 cases) or Gilbert's disease (6 casc,). Of 112 tontrols, 44 (23°:) had initial test abnormalities. Therefore, a test sample of 19 %%ork^rs, with a range of exposures, were examined blind by Grey Scale Ultrasonography. 4 with mininial or no cxposure vc,e contirmcd as n.ormal, and I I ef the r.mr.indcr had abnormali- ties consisting of an cnl ;rgcd portal scin in 7 instan.ccs, splenorugaly in 8 and chant cs in hepatic texture in 7. 6 of these 1 l ca~cs ha+d previously been comidered normal. %Vrc concL,dc that Grey S:alc tatrasonography has many advantaces over otandard methods for scrcening a•orkcrs rxpos:d to hc fatotoxic chcmicals. ~ .~ ~ „ lJ ]9~Quat~iiat:dlf nf 1'.flianol'Tlln!tr,attcn in Afan
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6Zle 0FOS '.
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1 t 1~ .50330 8128 _ _._.: ...~ .. ._ . ~....• ~. . . Taylor °Ins•trum2iit- Cmpe.ni.es. ~ New York atate Vocational and Pra•r,t.ieaal Arwg Associatioii< Instruments and process control. (Prepared in the Cnr- riculum Laboratory at Cornell University in cooperntim with the Taylor Instrument Companies. N; ew York• I)ellnar Publishers,1945I M3 p. illus., dlaqrs. 28 cm. 1. Automatlc control. 2. Servomechnnlsms. r. Cornell Un1Ner sfty. Currlculi.m Laborntory. Ir. Tnylor Iustrument Companle- ut. TltleJ iv.'i'it:c: 1'roceay controL A A8-2GiF i P:noc1: Prntt Irrce L1br. for T.1Lrnry ot Cony;ress In5N3i 4~ ~ 0 n 0 2 1 9 0 6
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50330 81z4 ) .G~ Sidgwick, Nevil Vincent, 1873- I 3J5 The organic chemistry of nitrocgen, by N. V. Sidgwick . Ne%r edition, revised and rewritten by '1'. W. J. '1'aylor .. and Wilson Baker ... Oxford,'1'he Clarendon 7ress,1937. , xis, 590 p., 11. diagrs. 25} cm. First editlon, 1910. Bibliogrnphleal foot•notes. "Errata" : 1 leaf tnserted nfter p. viit. .. 1. Nltrol;en. 2. Chen.ilstry, Organic. t. Taylor, Thomas «'esto . Johns, 1895- tt. 11Uker, Wilson. nt. Tith,. QD181.X1S5 547.8 37---1471 J Lib 2 ~ rary of Congresg t5tk 2i 0 5 (l 0 0 0 2 1 9 02
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/ 50330 8123 l QD 251 R WFU r lod%ffl' ~~ ,"~. , ~ ~ ~ Richter, Victor von, 1841-1f,91. Organic chemistiy; or, Chemistry of the cA rbon con;- pounds, by Victo.rr von Richter; edited by Prof. Richard Anschiitz and Dr. Fritz Reindel ... Amsterdam, Elsevier; New York city, Nordemann publishing co. inc. t1334;-•'-'-?. =~-v' fllus., dlnFra. 221 c:n. Vo1. 2 has title: The chewlatry of the carbon compounds, by Victor von Ittchter; edited by the lnto Prof. Richard Anecl:Gtz ... Vols.1- : Rt3 od. Vol. 1 printed tn Oreat Britain; vol. 2 printed In Dermany, (:oNTENTS.-t. Chemistry of the allnhatlc xertes; ueWly translated and revised from the 12th (lermnn edition (after the h•nnslntton of the 2nd English edition by Percy F.. Splelmann ...) by F.ric New. march Allott:-tt. The altcycllc compounds cnd nutur:il products; . Et~onttmred on'neztcArdl ~ 0 152N21 41- 554 t1 ~ u 4 a a 2 9 0
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/ 50330 8126 QD 416 Ta p~Lot,... CYG'LGFr.'4fIXOID TFr,kE:?E nE1ZT<NrATIM, 901. 2, by t?. i. Taylor and A. It. t3attexaby ryr..1w..~s<.1r.rc y..Ynt-....nn.. i.1-' A!n?...•..7 ll..l1.~L.onln' ~ ` {`~I r V...<'...r...I w'• y.1. Ser5.eo c£ E:ono;~raphs) 1969 mc:rcel DAlcer, Inc. 432 NsgF•s Now YoYk O .~ !I 0 0 0 2 / 9 y 4..
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6 t?~ 0 U U U S Q •(` •r,t 6{jtyztn nnraaTstn.v ov ~ - d•.~ly ....... s OLbY (utbi) Z30W ~ Zf l8 OEfOS
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r 50330 81'1S ~ I I Pa ~ TP 968 Parker, Robert Sydney Richard. Adhesion and ;tc?hesices, by R. S. R. Parker and P. Ta.- lor. t1st ed.t Oxford. New York, Per-nmon Press (1966, ct, 142 p. illus. 20 cm. Bibllograph; : p. 139. 1. Adhesion. 2. Adhestaes. r. Taylor, P., folnt author. rr. Tltle. TPIMg.P3? 1966 1 GG8.:1 GG--1R81R Idbrary of Congress 0~'J 0 0 n 0 ~ t~ 9~
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:,.. t .r bi+,.; .. ~ ~. a.~ ~,.,. SECOND EDITION METCALF & EDD1', UNC. Revised b~ ~Eoxz~E,~~~ro_a,~NQ Professor of Civil Enancrring "` University of CaGfornia. Davis . ----•r--- , McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY ~ New York St. Louis San Francisco Auckland Bogoti Dusseldorf I ann bur ~do4U10 1~dri~ ~xk $ontreal New Delhi Panama 0 ~ a P~ , b3o f• Sillgapo£e ~ydnq Tokyo Toronto ;
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t 5p330 8116- ' ~ /eAac ars 1 thna~r. Vd. 18, q+. )1V to )M t'ii~ifnoe Pres 1 1 rTn~Tn ral Bnum w 30 IZ Ey-80 S.P. ~...L..ru....w.. ) EFFECTS OF INDUCED ELATION-DEPRESSION ON THE ACCESSIBILITY OF MEMORIES OF HAPPY AND UNHAPPY EXPERIENCES JOHN D. TEAsDAiE•, Roofe't'TwcaR and SARAH J. FOoAxrv Department of Psychiatry. University of Oxford. England lReceivtd 11 December 1979) Summary-Etated and depressed moods were induced in student volunteers on separate occasions. On each occasion they retrieved past real-life experiences associated to stimulus words presented. Subjects subsequently rated the experiences for happiness-unhappiness and pleasantness-unpleasantness on a third occasion in a neutral mood state. Extremely unhappy memories were significantly more likely to be retrieved in the depressed mood than in the elated mood. Extremely happy memories were significantly more likely to be retrieved in the elated mood than in the depressed mood. Measures of latency of retrieval showed a significant inter- action between mood state and type of mcmory. The results confirm the generality of previous findings in suggesting an eBect of mood state on the accessibility of different types of cognition. The results are considered in relation to mood as a context in contextual-specific encoding and retrieval, and in rqlatioa2to rr~qdels And treatment of clinical conditions. o s a Q n 4 IG ' y`f f+
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50330 8139 , / yHISTAMINE TOXICITY FROM VEISH PRODUCI'iS/: SULFHYDRYL AND DISULFIDE GROUPS INvf4EATS/HONEY/TEA/F00D --IRRADIATION/ TP 370 Ad 1978 ADVANCES IN FOOD RESEARCH Edited by C. 0. CHICHESTER The Nutrition Foundation. Inc. New York, New York and University ojRhode Island n~...__ o. i. ~.i... a 1978 ACADEMIC PRESS New York San Francisco A Subsidiary of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Publishcrs 0 London VOLUME 2
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~ 50330~ 81 38 ~ DRUG ADDICTION/CANADA/SMOKING AND HEALTH/ L.........~ 80 X Ad jrC0FFEE, AA,= AND ME, AND DRUGS ADDICTION IlESEARCH FOUNDATION 33 Russell Street Toronto. Conodo MSS ZSt t 0 5 n t3 0 0 2 Ceq.ipr. 1900 AkMabm.w Dtio Ada~ Rx..cn r'ouw~% ta.afts K. v..Anp Inr..d w C.w. 9 1 b
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/ . 50330 8121 SaA2 :i r' ~~, ~? M r p EVtl .7 n ~•-r~•r' r~. ir~ v IZS:hv~..4 ~`~h'S Vi1.; ..ii.•E....~:J ~.t:b~tL.c~l JL1~a. vss CtI;.LMr;i? by Lva J,., SaslZi:Y.•f ao tJe Tay3o:: e Je l;L•'.Altil VtL^m,:1 Z:,':'.13Ji4d U s ` 0 5 0 O o 0 2 ~39, 9-.
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r a U, 0 U 5 q i%7€ 59,51 aJ •.ZV~lltTy • ll T.iuY.? °.I • V ° (S v0J %+'•S'li`!j .c7.C1 ~ tLs•hts-al'r~:;da7 • V 00 011 eUC• =4 J ,. . [ 7 : •_+ :i'-J i•*+. . LLLS OEEOS i i
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I 50330 8140 ' I ~ VEGETABLES/CEREAL GRAINS/FUNGI--FOOD/FRUIT/HERBS/SPICES/ s TEAICOFFEE/COCOA/ BOTANY/ i ' F. BIANCHINI and F. CORBETTA , . , . . .. .. THE FRUI'I'S"CIF THE E.A.IP ~ 1. 'I'H 0 rt Trenslated from the Italian bp Itatia and Alberto Mancinelli I Illustrations by MARILENA PISTOIA ~ Introduction by MAURICE MESSEGUt ~ ~ CASS ELL • LONDON , G a A O 0~` 0 , • . . .
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50330 8133 ~ ±TDE--F!e~~bolism 3 . ~~'C1(yy T. V, 0l? iidS~L"TICI~?C ft:S1.AIJR,.'l. FAiS 0:' Xk"r:a93.`X;D CYIN RAFi]3J:1S, by B.e'•;2ry ) Ta Ga ;F. C. Catterdo-m; F. E. Guttt,Le ::3d R. L. Rnbb. (N. C. .^,taro L'niv. at Re:1cf.ga, Tobusco Pxprtint Sariea, No. 191) Reprl^ted f,:rn: Jr,uY. taar. Food Chcm. 11 355--359 1965) _ t •- . . ...,-....,.. ,...-~...... _ _•.- ~.~, ....~.,.,c,-.-.- Q~0 0 0 0 2 1 9 1
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, oLo [Ta~ 6'' ~~S c~zx Losr;} L:~xo3f n OU r.d ~, ~LCc,y{'~', n Q,G~ "a JS.Tf?'*iCiT ~ ttOl:jA£~^ (U`~. ~.FJ iT « .u:GiQ.17~;L07 k1.1H ~~~i~.t O~~CJaw Lj-~C a«cfe:I jo Moa r~.oZc~~~a pvLiCi::.auam2,; *OT.TCZjuS ':! ".1 Pue F.mwg °t) °,L Sq sa:~i~,~t 1G"'iS 0.T. JM:.?2~4 }-:OLT:? 3,L'd:1 GiIl1 :d1Pd,Iti'J1:11 vs;11;. yO3JVSO:. ::0 SMIx`M-W TtI2::::53 GJ1V Siilt, .1 0 aj, db;aM4U tog IL1 ~ .... ~ , r I ~ b£l9 0££OS i
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i 50330 8144 ~' 'F ~ 456 i 11 tiarIer, Campbell R l i I . Te1 mnnufacturo. London, New York, Oxford Universit3 Pm~~s,19G3. . 12U p. illus. 21 cm. (Oxford troplcal handbooks) 1: Tea. r. Tit1G TPG50.iI3 663.04 63-4G56 ' ~. • Lfbrnry of Uongmis.9 I2j V"' ;y-~t.~ . 0 5 o0 0 02 1 9 zz
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. 50330 8149 COCONUT/SPICES/GINGER/CARDAMOM/TEA/COFFEE/COCOA/ESSENCES & ESSENTIAL OILS/ AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH/ PROCEEDINGS OF THE FIRST NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON PLANTATION CROPS \ r SB 369 Na 1973 December 8-9, 1972 Trivandrum, K fala, India E~ITO R N. M• Nayar y . p w OU `0RNAL, ~ OF PLANTATION C ROPS r VOLUME I ( , ' 1973 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 9 2 7 i ~ ~ SUPPLEMENT)
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, 50330 8097 JOURNAL OF CHCIIICAL PHYSICS ~ VOLUNL 16. NUMBER S 76 III Rel-76 The Solubility ofWater ater in Hydrocaibons S . P . CL1\6 G CLACK.. t:OnGF. G. tORIS,.. AND b t~~~F,= •_ MAY. lfia FrieB Cbeuiicot La6orefory, Prirrcrlar ilui:rnify, Princelon, Nrw lnrey • (Received 1'ebruary 12,1948) i The method in M•hi:h tritium oxide acts as a tracer in the determtnation of water solubility in Aydrocarbons has been usrd for the measurement of the solubility of water in a number of lparaffinic, olefinic, and diolefinic hydrocarbons. The effect of temperature, pressure, size of t Lydrocarbon mulecule, and the constitutive factors have been studied. Solubilities..ere deter- mined in the temperature range from S' to 30'C at pressures from I to 6 atmospheres, T HE method which is based upon the use of tritium oxide as a tracer in the determina- tion of minute amounts of water has previously been tested in the measurement of the solubility of water in benzene.' The same method has now been further applied to the determination of the solubility of water in a series of paraffinic, ote6nic, and diolefinic hydrocarbons. For the lower hydrocarbons, a brass apparatus and a slightly different experimenta? technique were utilized. The all-metal system is shown in Fig. 1. ~ The saturator C was charged by cooling it with liquid air while the chamber was connected to the hydrocarbon supply cylinder, H. Since the sample could not be observed during saturation, it was necessary to follow carefully .he proved technique employed in the glass systent. The sampling device in Fiv..1 cnncict.,ri r,f a xmall hr2ca r•v!i.+a.r . EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE 1. Radioactive Water - ~ . 0~ 0 0 0 0:~ I~3 T S t I 11
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/ 50330 8141 I TP r 958 Dr FOOD--FLAyORANTS/ODOR/CITRUS FRUITS/ * I . t., .. .. . PHF.ROMO'VES '/ AROMA AND TASTE SUBSTANCES/ COFFEE/TEAYBRANDY/BXvr:xAGhS/ ' Geruch- und Geschmacksoffe t 1975 P.nDL InternaEionales~'_ymposium aus Anlag des inhundertjahrigen 13estehens der Firma aarmann & Reimer GmbH, Holzminden • 2. bis 4. Oktober 1974, Bad Pyrmont Herausgegeben von Prof. Dr. F. DrawerL, Technische Universitat Miinchen VERLAG HANS CARL NCJRNBERG 1975 I . 'o5 0 0 i o. At . &&g,-
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, . 50330 8118 --.~''iK.. •--:.a:.:c_._-. . . ..:....._ _. ....Sli~r~_.. •..-..at1i:_.3.,....-1~.'~a....:....r ~.l.~ ..:d~.:..,._.... ._.. .-.~ ~• 73 III Rel-77 S.P. Re . Surv. Circ.(U.S.)726125-146(1975) Assessment of eothermal Resources of the United States-1975 ~ Assessment of Onshore Geopressured-Geothermal Resources in the Northern Gulf of h9exico Basin By S. S. Papadoputos, R. H. Wallace, Jr., J. B. Wesselman, and R. E. Taylor.4r . ~ Gcuprrs.iur.d zunc.s ill 1.hu iturthet•it (lulf of Mexico butiitt uro l:nuwn to ovetu• in '1'r.rtiury s+edinu•ntti lx•tu•atL :ut urvu (if over 27ti, 50(/ kin=, extentlinl; ftoiit tlie liiu (iratnilc ill 'I'oxu, ttot•1.1t- enstwurd to the vicinit,v „f tlu+ nwiilll of Iltv. Pearl Mver ill iAuiiSi:uiu und fr01ii tlic luii(lwut•1l boun(iury Of l.o(TiIt' ;;rutvth fuultinf; sctut.ht-u,t- Wut•tl to Ilue. tAhn+ of thu ('unl iiuvnht) tilit-lf (St•e fig. 15). 1)urinl; tlic cuuisu of Illiti study, it wns fuwul that f,multres.,ucrd runes ocrur ul.u ill un- runpyr(Is (`~tu~•au,t~c,~tw+nk ~t~~l~•(;yitf~ t~{~ 1'erli;uy saji`tu~•ltt, uu,l esl~~n,lint;.fiul.lu•r iuluttd . ----. .. .. .,••• ~ . . , . .......... . tltut• titnc, Jutu•S (1969, 11970) and 11'ullucu (1970) huvo diticus.v'd will ut.tt+iupted to cepluilt sttl,- sut•fucu l,liy,icul cundition, Iliut. cuiiibinu to ht•u- (luce gcc~lttc~,~nt+tl-gcotl~crtuul rVS0•voit:'. Several nliuly-sey uf llit- Irutcntiul tu,o of gcoprt•.surcd- gcuthet•iuul energy fur elcct.rit+ul -lwwet• };rnentt iun unil tstiniult•, uf 0141 inugnitutle nf thu t•csunt•t•u Iutva IK•on l)rV,(MtNl (I'ariuif;iluiu, 1;tia; 1lcrriit, 1973; 11'ilson wtll uthet•,, 1974; 1)iu•luuu, 1;174; 1[yct•y and uthen, 1l/7•I; nurfnuut uud I:chle, 197-1; Iluuus und olhcn,, 1975). 1Jjtliku otltcr.~rc~t.ltt~ru~ul uirus that aro 1vitiR
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G.S. UL:1`i'1F.'li•:i::2T OF KEALTIi, E1llUCATION 9d0 t•lEL FAR}:, FOOD A'~Tl) DRUG AD:II?IISTPJMO.v/ I 3~ • DRUGS--REGULATIONS/ ' Drug eontrol-Governmentai re ulation g X~ MeF-D-~- - ' ~ Thu~.4edcral.rood and Dr.u(y Adliiinistration , ~ .. - in tlie United-Statcs,"`Born ~tnd bred in crises ~ g: ~ ~ m- ZV,~;}Zuss"`~~~~~df'~~ "`^ Int..Jour. Clin. Pharnacol.7(2-3)156-62(1973) 1 ~~ cra V Clinical Phar~ mic_o_lbg~•-ToxicRl~Sy C7c~~rcr, Philadclphia~C~en ral Hos~tal i 3/Pf/7L~rE[~~ /y /'l7 /9~rc~ . ' The first drugs took the form of plants and . niacologic progress, significant contribu- •herbs. Cathartics arc botanically uliic~uitous tions %ti•erc madc during the 17th century. .d and were undoubtcdly discovered quite Thuillcr accuratcly observed that fungus screndipitously. Narcotics and soporifics infcctcd grain was responsiblcfor gan~;rcnc ha~•e been used since the beginning of rcc- of the extremities. I-Iarvey's classic charac- ordcd tim;. Thc dipl)ir,g of darts and ar- . tcrization of~thccirculation cleared the way •, rows into stupefying and paralyzing chctni- for Boyle's work on the effectiveness of ccr- ~ ~ eals is a wdl documented ancient practice, tain dru;;s by the intravenous route. Still . h } -. .w.r.^.-•M-.v.~+l'...:--+........~..~,...-...-.. . . .i-.~,+-.~.R._•~+w~r•Flre.t.~,..r..1....-.~......'-..-~s+-.....~.,a~,.yw.--+~a :.w.•....~..-...r•'*r.s,-.....r•.+-.a...+.....w~-.........wd-r. roducts of ferin:nt::tion ha%•c occupicd it ~~•as not unti11909 tl1at J:hrlich's s and •ntl:c•sis 50330 8127 . 0~ c~ 0 o 0 z. 19 0 5
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50 330 8150 l TP 370 No l'aotth, Cr..-21M:.~s~:Fl:L *,r-t"::Z PAMVE3, U. S . , 1969 1969 217 Pages roy p... . a s...»~t. • S.t • w .~.....~y ....n, () v..r.~~.. a.i ~ s 0 0 0 0 2 1 9 2 S
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, • ` ' ,~,,~~~ ~ ~ ~^`"_~12~i~_,~~)~7f~n . " 50330 8137 ~:~_. . (C. ~ / - X.WF Rej OY i 77 Ii Er * .. ~ ou'c~~ r~ nelv 1w1'ethod~'or -ihe ~. ~~--~r ~ ' '..iA W+w Deterinintztig,~~of•th~Y~=leat ~~eststat~ce,of .. r .~y ~/1'~ioroorganis~ns ;h;;. ~ a B. Erdts!eck and R. F3eumer' ..:.,. Processing Denartment, Spelderholt lnstitute for Poultry Research, t3eekbergon (Tha Netherlands) A new'rnethod for defermining !;ie hcat-resistanco of micro•organisms, the T.D.T.-pouch (Thermal Qoath Time) or xnvelono method, is describ:rl. 71;o hc:ating-up timn of the T.D.1:-poych compares favour,bll with the conventional T.U.T.-tube. The suitability for moasuring tho hoat-rosistancu of micro organisms !s shown for Salmon,ella in sugared whole o,clJ. Inlroductlon ExpPriniental T.D.1:-tuhas For the dnt(-~rfTlln.'lo n of 1~• (1r ]}(~1II11~}~ S(~(;n~Ifl(~ T,aLnn m~+,ln (.mm ~.rlinnv.r nl..nn pinre non~ In (h~p ~J 5 0 0 " /~'J ' ~/J i/ ~F•/, ~ f
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/ 50330 @155 . : PLANTS--CULTIVATED--IIISTORY/BOTANY/TROPICAL FRUITS/CEREAL GRAINS/ FBUIT/TEA/VEGETABLES/IIERBS/SPICES/TOBACCO--I4GRICULTURE/CITRUS--FRUIT' TOBACCO--GENETICS/ Evolution of Crop Plants SB Edited by 71 Si 1976 Scotland Longman London and New York N. W. Sirninonds ScD AICTA rRSE.FIBiol Scottish Plant Breeding Station Pentlandficld Roslin Midlothian • .` E 0~ 0 4 ~ 0 P. ~~3 3
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~aooc~~a :;CJ 1 . 0,0 r1.i C () r H 9 0 dD" E . ... r Lh l9 OEEOS
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50330 8159 , .. #UNIDO Guides to Information Sources No. 28 XX Re~=79 INFORMATION SOURCES S.P. • / . /. /07E i COFFEE, COCOA AND SPICES INDUSTRY UNITL•'D NATIONS INDUSTRIAL DLVLLOP1fI.hr ORGANIZATION Vienna UNITED NATIONS , New York, 1977 7 C~ T&_ . ..' c.-+~ Q S 0 0 0 0 2 1 J/ 9 3 7 y.xtis-c..
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50330 8156 ~ TP 370 i Th Thorner, a. T:. kUOD BIVE::ACr'., SLRVZCE VANilBOOK: A CO:f°LF:I'? GiiiuS TO R0T ADD COLD SOPT UKL'..KS, by td. E. 'iho.ner, and J. J. HarzbarD. 1970 318 pagcn AVI Publ+ahitzS Co., 1?nc. Slestport, Ccnn. -: . . -.. . 1-. 0 ES 0 0 0 0 ;Z 1 9
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, ~`t">aoa r4tirS z"rF'[o.zc~ ci-}-xcii so'3-~<1 L ~ >;I::<foc0 85{)T CS uiST mrt 4u hc~~~1 "-cxied jp '(ci1:.s €ilol:Tr.yo0 °et."qj^0 "3 ^,; pcau ~zmcQ *0 ax Sq :r4,; J;?i;~C2tii I-iOri:{ 3,r.M QtIV ST.IIlLItdA'lIi 2a..-T..iiw 2UOOVZIO.. .C?0 CIt1V ;~'Qxa -•o "L ~dxt~r~og .tw•. -- ~r~uavso 9E t8 OEEOS
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. i III -Ni .76 , 50330 8125 ` l : , The Synthesis of 1,4-Diketones Atjst J Chem 1976 24 339-56 . . ., , , Surachai Nimgirawath, Ernest Ritchie and iY Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Sydney, N.S.W. 2006. ., . Abstract : . Recent methods for the synthesis of 1,4-dikctones are briefly reviewed. Zinc and phenacyl bromide in dimethoxycthane afl•orded 1,4-diphenylbutane-1,4-dione in moder- ate yield, but other solvents or metals examined gave no or a lower yield. The route is unsatisfactory for aliphatic 1,4-dikctones. ~ Attempts to use'levulinyl chloride to acylatc olefins or acetylenes were fruitless. Routes involving aldol condensations of hexane-2,5-dione or its monoacetal had very restricted success, as did those depending on the halo,-enolysis of acyl derivatives of phenacylmalonic ester. A fairly general route to 1,4-diketones was found in the sequence: valine to N-acylvaline to oxazol- 5-one to Michael addition product with an a,fl-unsaturated ketone followed by alkaline hydrolysis. The Michacl addition is not regiospecific and valine derivatives may also be isolatcd. Yields of 1,4- diketoncs are only moderate but the synthesis is quick and convenient. 0 5 0 0 0 0.2 1.9 0 3
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I 50330 81y6 ~ Food'Chem. 4(2)9M106 (Apri1, 1979) • ~ + 76 II Re2-79 S.P. o / ' THE OLATILE CONSTITUENTS OF)T•EA / . • ~ r 7r+,pic•ul Prorlurr.c lnxlirulr, 56 62 4n~ra btr~ Rl/rJ, Lnrrdnn IIY'I.1' 8/.('. (;rrur Brirnia ..riw,.KU G E Il v (Rertirat: 4 1inuary, 1978) .aRTTR.aC'T • : This /rupc•r rc•ric•crs !hc' c•hcvui.slrt• u/'r/rc• rrrlulilc• cunsliluc•nls ir/'hlurk /ru n•il/l.y,rc,iul rr/i•rrru•c• lu !hc•ir uri~•in urullhc inJluc nrr u/ c liruulc•, cliJjivc•nc•c•s hc / u c cvt c ul/ir ur.c ~urcl pruc•c•s.cing urr their runrlrusiliun. This Lr/'urmrrliun is di.cc•ussrrl n•ilh !hc• uhjrcv u/f ussc•s.%irrg nce irr~r irr irhic•/r .wrru• u/'/hr rululilc• c•untpnrurrL~• ulli•cl llu• /luc•r,ur u/•Iru. t • Alh•nliun is drenrn lu gups in prc•.vc•nl krran•!i•(&c•. . 0 5 t1 0 ~ 0 2 1 9 2 4
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50330 8164 1 1 f::Tea--Ct,emistry. ]~ HarlQr, Campbell It Tcainann f^cture. Lordon, New York, Oxford IIniversit, Press,19G3. 126 p. tllns. 21 cm. (Oxford t.rop!enl iinndbooks) 1.Zea. I.TIUe. TPG50.1I3 Library of OongrF9 GG3.04 63-4656 12, n~'11*,.~.,. 4~ o 0 0 0 2 ~, 9 a 2
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50330 8143 ) Ref Q :Ten, 123 Ha 1:ia~'?i a"}Uml IiP. LeEoR2v'S271i~.1,C:.'cPf~3~ C:~tEtl !T, S't. 13 G:>- r! T; : pxingar-VtZa4R P1c:•a Yarh Cl) - - - - _ ___._ _.--_ - - -- - ----. - : " .:~. ~ 0 S0 0 t) ~1 :2 1 'rl 2, ~
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l 1 50330 8160 ) ~ TP 370 J We -,y f) r>0)- a Weuzman, C. LISTS t2F VOLAi71.E CC~,'PC1Ji3DS Xtl FOOD, 2-nd ud. , hq C. Wccaman and S. vaa S-6-vaten. 1969 %y p48ea Centxal Inatitute for Nethrri;ulda NcaC.ritfcn and Yacd Recearch . O s U S 0 U~ 0 2 I 9 3a , ,
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i i COTTON/KF.NAF/OKP.A/tI[7T'rtEG/CLOVF:S/pinento/CUAVA/FLAVICA_rPA:PASSION FRUIT/ PASSION FRUIT/PEPPEF./SESAME/LIME/COh'FEF:,lI.E*tON/GRAPEFRUIT/ORANGE/TOMATO/ EGG-PLA.'3T/POTATO/COLA: NITIDA:KOLA/COCOA/TEA/J11TE/RAMIE/CALABASH/PGnGRANATE/ TOBACCO--BOTANY•/COCA/ QK 495 Pu . 1968 mcotyiet,•lons 2 2 C : , . . y . . I--_--._--- -_ _ __- . . J. W. PURSEGLOVE PDDL ! Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology 1 C. ~ University of the \Vest Indies I ...'f..... w.~....~'.~ ~-... , Triaidad JOHN WILEY AND SONS, INC. UTROPICAL CROPS I idBW YOIiK I ~•.. , _ i ~y~~, F• .: ~ 9 3. 2 50330 8154 ;
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50 330 8135 ~ VI Nol ~E=='lbba:ee'6"PQaticideis: '~uxth ::c-oiir:~ St3tv Coll©Cey Ib3tiCidO Re+s:-:us Labor°ata.°qA Ci;ocLtstry D3nartrrx:nt ir;;".^l•C-1 ?7E ft2SID'J FS FO'.1ND IN TO?".Ci;.C SA;dr"FS TF.i:EN; :`1CM 4+,9rtEH0USE FLOCit.S It3 1cv57. 1r~r;`:'tyF~do N.• C"ta to Co21oCo,, :apt, of Agr. Chom. L'aptd (1~i5'r` C/ o S~~ 4 n 0 2 1 9 1~
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1 50330 8142 ) r ~~:.>.. .~~.i, ...,x.:a•.:_....~....._.._ <_..:.>:,~.~.: ~_J..._. ~:.:.-s~.s. _..r..m.~..,..~..~..:..~ v. us. c . ~ Includes blUlio~raphtes. ,t±°'8t1 ~'~t.~.5.'°~ i. Encyclopedia of chemical technology, edited by I'.aymond E Il`irk and Donald F. Othmer. _Lssistant editors: Janet D Scott and Anthony Standen. New Torl:, Interscience En- cyclopedia l19~17- CoN~reNTS.-v. 1. A to Anthrlu~tdes.-v. 2. Antbrone to carUon-arc.- v. 3. Carbon (cont'd) to cinchophen.-v. 4. Cineolo to destrose.-v. 5. Di- to esplosi~•es.-v. 6. Esplosires (cont'd) to furfi,ral.-v. 7. Fur- naces to tolite.-v. 8. Iou ezcbange to metal platin~.--v. !1. :11et:+l sur- fnce treatment to peniclllln.--v. 10. Pentacene to polymethine dyes.- v. 11. Yolyols to rutln. 1. Chemistry, Technical-llictionarles. z. Kirk, Raymond Eller 1890- ed. TY9.7:G3 ~ ~ ~ 660.3 48-234 rev' Library of Congress tr3-ida101 i11 27 m p 5 t~ 0 0 0 2 1 9 2 0'
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50330 8165 -xea--Ctzemic~l, coa~po3itioa.` s Hailer, Campbell R Tea manufacture. l:ondon, New York, Oxford Universitx Prnss,1963. 126 p. fuus. 21 cm. (Oxford tropical handbooks) 1. Tea. r. Tfttp- TP650.Ii3 663.94 63-;kG56 ' Library of Uongres.g `~ 12, ...,«-r..-.:....»...r..._.-.-.~.-.... ..r_..~_ r ...._..... .-......-.r as0 0 0 0 2 1 9 4 3
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50330 8157 ~ SB RICE/SORGIiUr{/A:ILLET/IMAIZE/BEANS/VEGETABLES/CASSAVA/SWEET POTATO/YAMS/TARO/ TOMATOES/PI::'PERS/BANAt:A.S/hfAr?GOS/ORANG~CITRUS FRUITS/COCONUT/COFFEE/CACAO/ '.`~EA/COTTON/JUTL/KENAF/SPICES/SUGARCAN UBBER/VANILLA/CARDATiOM/PEPPERS/ I 111 UNITED NATIONS FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, Rome, Un F.40 Agricultural Studies No. 93 1974 1974 ' HANTUBaUI~,, Uk PLANT INTRODUCTION IN TROPICAL .IZOPS Editcd by J. Lr6v Plant Production ancl Protection Division FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OP TIiF. UNITED NATIONS RObI1i 1974 / p 5 tl 0(1 Q 2 1 93 5
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I ~ . 50330 8731 Jjot;nanc,t Gojtrapcr.oil af:areasEtct rayrt • Compfcs ren;:us de 1`Acadtsmie hutgare des Sctences " 9'. . v - -~3=XV Re-73: . Tottre ll, I\7~'3; 7~ ^' ~. , " . ~ COi iFOSI'f IOia 0F -UULURIAN CLI;RI' SAGE 011. - CHt~Sf1I ~~`a" 17 19G8 ~...` on ecem er , J . - - _,- . ( r, n., C orkinating in the Mediterranean region. Usually it is cultivated as a bien- ' r<$:~'-TchaTb;djievq p. Ivanov, V. hiarinov; V. Stayanova .. Chr'rnte organlque , .. - . , - .. ,- Clary sage (Salvirr sclnrea tarn. Labralae) is a•valuable aromatic plant nial or triennial. Its green part and, in particular, its blossoms contain es- 4 sago oil. After 1932 • th:: USSR appeared on the world• market as an import- senfial oil xvl:ich is isolated- by Means of steam distillation. •1'he oil has a ple2sant odoar and is utilized in perfwnery, medicine and the food industry. .In the course of many years France was the sole producer of clwry il ' t f thi ' d ~ expor er s o o - ant prodncer an t.. In Bulgaria this plant has been cultivated since about 1923, when it - was introduced in a private experimental Jield -near '-I.arlovo. -lip --lo •1-340 minor surceeded in obtainin uantities of this oil d ~ f il q g . ucers ea pro y a or -~ Later its production was almost cotnpletely abandoned. ' '. ' . • . ' . ' :\' . . . . . ' . . . - . . . . . . . . . . / 0 S(l, 0 0 0 2 19 0 9
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50330 8153.~.... . FOOD--FLAVORANTS/FRUIT/CITRUS FT.AVORS/VEGETABLES--ESSENCES AND ESSENTIAL OILS/ DAIRY PRODUCTS--FLAVORS/BREAD--FLAVORS/MEAT--FLAVORS/COFFEE/COCOA/TEA/~I POPCORN/NUTS/ONION FLAVOR/GARLIC/FLAVORANI'$---FOOD/FLAVORANTS--CIiEMISTRY/ SAUCES/SOY SAUCE/TqBACCO FLAVORED CANDY/CIiEWING GUM/SWEETENERS/PA'TENTS G9c-i-) ~ OD TECHNOLOGY REVIEW NO. 32. T? 370 FOOD FLAVORING . 1976 PI IoCEV'SEV PDDL , Nicholas D. Pintauro . i r 0 : 5 0 0 U 0 ;Z NOYE.c DATA CORPORATION Park Ridge. New Jorsey London. England ' . 1976 9
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~ Z p ;..-,.Tea--Aehydratior* 3 370 No ~ IC... _1 ~ TP t.i Lt;~raaF~di':i .}C-L0_ .~..,~..•~.+ . . . 0 5 0 0 002 1 9 4 4
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TP .37n Or 1977 PDDT. Enzymes in Food and/$everage Processing A ~ C- S. YM P.o S i U I14,`5 E R 1 E s __, _4 S RnRFRT P. rnUT.n, edttor AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY WA3HINGTON. 0. C. 1977 Robert L. Ory, EDITOR Southern Regional Research Center Allen J. St. Angelo, EDITOR Soufhern Regional Re.rearc~i Center y/mposium sponsored by the ~~ _A'•..•.~.~Wfx>4~iL. :-+FJN1M- ivision o ~Agricultural and Food Chemistry at -the 172nd Meeting of the American Chemical Society, San Francisco, 4 5 Q A 0 q 2 1 9 r2 4, Calif., Aug. 30-31, 1976 I 50330 8151 F0nn--Fvs.yqES/CTTP11S FRTTTTS/TF,A/COFFFE/nAIRY PRnnttrTS/ ENZY4F.S--IMM4RTT,T7.ED/FRUTTS/VEr.F.TARI.RS/PF.A!JUTS /SnYRRA'V/ ;,~3 ( vcw-~
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50 330 8167 , " ,flea, ~-Dehydration.• SOlutJl .a -cA I'4k I'S.r'str(s, H: 19?0. ZQ s j+. Al7LSfi. i,3 CT1. 4- i r 0 S 0 0 0 0 2 1 9 45
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, 50330 8163 ) TP 370 Ad Advances in food research. v. 1-/j New York, Academic Press, 1948-3~f-9,C 17v. 24 cm. .2 e. ef V, Il .2 e. oi' J. 3 3c, c~ v. ~~ C) rc1 0 5 0 0 0 02 1 9 4 1
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I U5* 0 Q0 0 ~ Te.~ ; Abibl.~,0~z~aghy. :r=~ ?. ~-, • Tl• n 7 !) l. 1 LY7.rCf ~7 ~: .. . : a:.. . :..w ' 9 3 9 ~ ril i.H~'~,.o ~:.
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/ 50330 8168 1 QP 601 A Advances in enzymoloay und related subjects ... .oL z- - -- 1941-` t New York, Interscience publishers inc.,1941-~ ~ . i.i v. Illus., tables, dlagrs. 23} cm. }sditors : 1J-11•- F. F. Nord, C. H. Werkman. Bibliography at end of uch monograph. 1. Enzynies. 2. 1'hotosynthesis. i. Nord, Friedrich Franz, 1SS9- ed. 7I. «'erkman, Chester Iiamlin, 1893- ed. QP601.A1A3 ( ) 612.0151 41-9212 J.ibr:u y vf Cungress 1;',3u21 I 9 4 6:
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50330 8172 , U 456 H . ~ ~~.. . . -- -T.- :,:.. <.;._~«~,. _.. ._..,., .,.......,.......,.. - ........,_.....~.k~.f:.~... ,_, ~..~~., r.,.aC.:... Hsrler, Campbell R. Tea manufacture. London, New York, Oxford University Press, 1963. 126 p. illus. 21 cm. (Oxford tropical handbooks) O U 5 Q 0 0 0 2 1. y~ Q
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0~~ i ~:0 u 00s 0 O / r +aM wnu..e~.r.f J, u .__...... .. w „ Z 9 L 8 0 E E 0 S
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r 0 U 0 0s 0 oe pup uaq jo LSAllfstIltaP.:tfe oxduaco zo iw ,-.c;,i, u,Ti3 ~' '~ildoosoaoRiw.e$y~- LLLB OEE05
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, 50330 8152 'top Fc le. aAol=jr~elz 'cs line Making. Second Edition l,prd Metabolism I Food Engineering• n .od Processing o/ Food Preservation. Third •w Food Product Devebpment atNhon Kid ProcessIng Fc,od Engmeering id Milk Products id.,stry. Third Ed tron ocess.ng Products : Onerauons. Vols. 1• 2. and 3 nd Des-gn 'or the Food Industry. Third tnird Edition Nutrition gy and Engmeering GV ;er Tecnnotogy vat /or Food Canners and i.,. 1 -- D e q • 7,11 "© Pe /17l r'_ N r1 ~ • i) ® T~~i;~~i~VI "L - 3H S by CARL S. PEDERSON, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Bacteriology, Cornell University and New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York os0 0 0 0~~g3 o ~
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! r ! 50330 8145 /~fc,~--A,flt4 Ysr~~.c~ONO,41je, FRE4 LGo.a-/CvF~F6 X'"b,'~/O~il1y . ~ i L c~2 v~Ti ~E s s~RI -,~ q~' .tl,~'.G ,~"s / r' A~~ y ~ t Xw~1 yrs c-• D,e6~t,w/ c~ c2 y 0Ay ir!9,v f l~st R y ~ ~ ~ T.4 Tiv.r/~f~r.a~~flRy, T.oTw-rPsJD fi!~Qi / ~q71 ' Modern Food Analysis F. Leslie Hart, A.M. Director, Boston District U.S. Food and Drug Administration (retired ) and Harr Johnstone Fisher Ph D y , . . 0 5o 0 0 0 2 ~9 2Cl3mist Emeritus The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
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xs 6 i rovoc~.sa C) •d £$-C ai. s I srY3•(~~`t`3iP1 dt1~Y1~a~StA :$ tu T uUtiyi~r80t. ..
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l 50330 8169 ~ Cp 456 H • Tep-=Fermentation.' ~; ~ IIarler, Campbell R Teea mnnufecture. r,ondon, New York, Oxford LTniverSity Press,19G3. 126 p. illus. 21 cm, (Oxford troptcal handbooks) 1. Tea. z. Title. TP650.113 663.91 G3--iG5r ' Llbrary of Oongrens ` t21 o s 0 0 0 0 2 1 9 4 I.
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0 ~ Cf' ..uLmA-.aj -~.CLURr 456 ~. Ifarler, Campbell R Tea, rnanufactureu r.ondon, New York, Oxford University Press,10G3. 12G p. tllus. 21 cm. (Oxford tropical handbooks) 1. Tea. 1. Title. TPG50.I13 603.94 G3J185G ; Library of Clongrces A 4 5 Q(~ tl t~ ~ 19 5 5
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! 50330 8148 ) 76 II Re2-76 S.P. Julia F: 1lortou, Director, Morton Collectanea, Uuiversity of Viatni, Coral Gablcs, Florida Presented at the Arnrrican Socicty ot' p{rannaco.,nrrsy and Aeademy of Pharnl.rceutlcal Scicncr: Section on Pharraiacogno!ty and Natural Products Joint 1leetinQ, l,'niversity of Illinois, Aug. 6, 197 l. My study of folk remedies during more than eight years of intcrniittent field work in the Netherland; Antilles, coastal South Carolina and northwe;tcrn Venezuela has revealed a seeming link Lchwecn gastric cancer and excessive intake of tannin-riclt Irlant decoctions. Many of such Lrews were originally rccorti• mended by old-time pharrnaci.,ts or physicians for the relief of specific ailments but have come to be regarded as tonics or as beverages, and are taken frequently or even daily, cspcvially by people of a low economic level. }lavia~ ob:cn•ed the very sad consequences ap- parently resulting from thesc practices, I view the growing popularitv of so-called "herb teas" among the A~ ricata pu ~rc ~ h,~ iot'pjcort~rn. 1'hct~ ore~ "herb,~-'of c71ur t, i. 0oSel4 usl'il, for th~ tiatcrrals f IS Bull. Morris Arbor 26(2)24-30(June, 1975) THERE A „-, scssing active constituents affecting one or more or- gans of the body. They are not necessarily suitable for daily beverage use. Even ordinar,v or "true" tea (Cnmellia sinensis Kuntze) was taken only for medicinal purposes wIren first introduced into I:nbland and we now have rea- son to believe that its widespread adoption as a bevcragc and the excessive con•umption of unclifuted tea, with its recognited tannin content, may account for Itirh rates of gastric cancer in certain populations. Dr. Gerhard Ilaneveld, lookin,r back into the mcdical history of Ilolland, has found that the higlt ineicirnce of csopltapal cancer in that country during the 1lith and 19th Centuries coincided with ovcrindulgence in tea, and the disease drastically declined wlten coffee became the national beverage. Among the world's great tea drinkers arc the Turkrnen of central Asia, among whont esophaveal cancer is common. (Tlre BritiAh drink tea with rnilk which binds the tannin; the Uutclt, theTurkmen and Orientals do not.) Last October, Dr. Mitsuo Scpi, 'residcnt of Nlizuho College, reported to the Japan Cancer Conrres, that, following the tanninicancer SAFER~fiEA? f -
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, i 50330 8186 ~ 78 111 RE2-80 Submission t. the S• P• Committee of Enquiry into , The Teaehing of Mathemarics in Sehool , under the Chairmanship of Dr W. H. Cockcroft, made jointly by the } ..;,. Royal Statistical Society A Teaching Statistics Suppi and the September 1979 Institute of Statisticians 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 9 b4
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50330 8176. i Nippon Nogei Kagaku Kaishi 48 445-450 (1974) 71 II Re-81 s.p. (Att flt 480. X a $. p. 4as-4so, 1974' i~J~ifi 3 7 s -riT ~ T . * A a (A4a*3RJKR*) 16%%1 49* 2A228 3t 4 h Changes in Activity of ~henylalanine Ammonia-lyase in By Kiyoshi IWASA Q 5 V jO `J A-a-obs)1-.ed9thatr4tea 1'eaves ibad biYber pDenylal;nine ammonia-lyase (PAL) . activity, lower tyrosine aromonia-ivase aeti.ite. and m A#r.wt.h1. 4~-A 1.daM~d^t y. , . f Nalionel Rsseareh Inslilnte of Tia, 11!anaya, Shisuoka-lien
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i 50330 8183 COMPUTERS--PROGRAMMING/MATIiEMATICS--ANALYSIS/PROBABILITY/ STATISTICAL ANALY$IS/ QA 276 Ph 1976 PDDL `,4tEACNL*'' S YM/4NUAL'i forA ~'`OPERATIONS =RESEARCH.',;~ =P,RLNCI,~,1,ES; /~ND,,;PRACTI C6 OPERATIONS RESEARCH: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE DEPARTMENT osooc~a2 1 DON T. PHILLIPS ~. OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINE(iRING TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY COLLEGE STATION, TFXAS A. RAVINDRAN JAMES J. SOLBERG SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING PURDUE UNIVERSITY WEST LAFAYETTE, INDIANA JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC. NEW YORK LONDON SYDNEY TORONTO n b: .1 ,~... . ,. .
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rou.oaso TiO'stlow `x`~ :xV uaV ca3ud m ' DuX ' eta'fiAOx3ZH 4aTaIvA7Ufi 89bT (d9bC `s~oaus 'R 'ud f.S0saATUSl onpand) SG~OJ ~'?3~~1Sk:CYJ 1104 tCN'a's~.~e~(t SHX gw*,HIliRs"laH 7101.1 Sit1M+`ilza:°:I XL0
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/ r XI CoI -81 S.P. J \ RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET XI-Col-81 s.p. own Wil~amson Tobacco Corporation,-Louisville, Ky., U. S.) FA SING THE PAIN OF PIANT CLOSURE: THE'$ROWN & WILLIAMSON EXPERIENCE. Management Rev. p. 23-27 (Apr. 1981) (in English) Closing a plant can be a"no-win" situation for top executives - no matter what you do, you are criticized. Here is how Brown & Williamson handled this delicate task. 0- "..S-,..10 _ a (170 2 - i
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` .1 t. ~ 66t8 0£EOS , .., ~9Pro~IN~ ;...
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50330 8099 ( ~~. HEADSPACE TECHNIQUES/CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS--GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY, , ° ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING/WASTE WATER--ANALYSIS/ -r - Qr4ct+pK ''0~3?~f~'~>~It "r~ •r. .: ''~r'3' y ' ~y.a o.nnuntal::'5cien`•~ce tusd.~sttc~fi ~ ~uurnatfo~' ~nvir ~ S'"" : ~ rl~~ ' , . . $ : .~I Me~- r~.fvrri"nwTat~vT'~t ortr~:r~ ,cUn .A . S R- iAVI\a4a.i~ a(1~. F7\.aL.l.\.i l111L/ * ~ '. Frt~ ~ }~~ ~ , ~,,3 d K ~ cra ~~ Nttasbei !, ~980 t ~~-~ 1~1a}. ~~SC ~ ~ ~ t.":• ~!~"" , sr-s }~; ! vbkx :+- 7 y t T 3-Spec(e! IsiW~ on Prvirers tn Priority Polh.tant,, njLy A E l ~ va n uation of Pa tort Affectin th Mi r t oi c Q e croext ac yy. of Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbentene and o•Xylene into 1K _ Pentane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ~ . ..::: r . . . Laboratory. Zianalernent In Methods Development ... A E Thr . . un, K. E. Simmonr, and !. E. Oberholtzer •~' py141i C lackion, M. Miller, and D. R. Ruzhnec Application of Current Methods for Metals Determination Estimated Application of Gas Chromatographic in Wastewaters from the OrQanics/Plaatics Industry . t Headapace AnttlysJs to pfiority lollutinta .......... C. S. .'Nonteith and J• E. Gebhart k'. F. Cok•en and R. K. Raynes • Analytical Problem Solving with Verification Samples Experimental Application of Gas Chromatographic Interference Reduction Options ........ • , • , Headspace Analysis to Priority Pollutants .•.• ..•... C. Ja, .~;ton, R. Pavlick, H. Scholtz, and D. R. Ruihneck • G. R. Umbreit and R. L. Grob '? Approach to Quality Assurance/Quality Control In the Priority Potlutant Analytes of Industrial Nastewaters Organic Chemicals Industry Monitoring Program .:,,•., Using a Microextraction Approach ....... , , A W. yottzclaw and M. D. Neptune " ' !. W. Rhoadez and C. P. Nulton MARCEL DEKKER, INC. New York and Basel y s Q 0 6 'a 2 ont' ut ~ts t this journal ars published tzee ot charse
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i 50330 8190 ) XX~ MeD2 k:Etif'. C:',7=i'I'J:~x 011 1:1L'.. I l: ~ Nat{tjt'tiR Iii.(3t:4:y r-4, .d7.L-SGf .6T<'~.a a~~ ~.1- ~:'vi.-'C• * ) CD .. 0~ n o t1 Q2 1 9 6 8
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/ / r ! . . . . ~ . . . . ._,. .s.::~....~,.__. _..........._.. _.... .- ._.~..;,......_... _..____.._.. 50330 8170 ~ . ` TP ~ 370 ,rTea~germ~:~tation~ Pi. x, f1O ~} 1-- /vI Pintc{uro, HichAlr.,s. 5ptt:b1.z tea pi'tic:ucCiaz pxuCeFGES, ~'ArL. C'o:p. 18s p. i.1.~.taa. ?.3 0 0 ao 0 0 0~~ y A
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, 50330 8200 Ps opharmacologia (Bcrl.) 43, 293-295 (1975) -:%' by Springcr-Vcrlag 1975 80 II Ey-81 S.P. I c.,--. -k1 Chlorpromazine Effects on Brain Activity - I (Contingent Negative Variation) and Reaction Time in Normal Women * VM~ '! •JONATHAN O. COLE•••, and JUNE SAVIGNANO-BOWMAN ,, Laboratory of Neuropsychology, Boston State Hospital and Department of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine Received April 8, 1975; Final Version June 11, 1975 Abstract. Electrical brain activity (contingent negative varia- reduced CNV 2 and 3 hrs post-drug and slowed RT 3 hrs tion or CNV) and psychomotor behavior (reaction time or post-drug. CNV amplitude appears to be an accurate indicator RT) were measured after 50 mg of chlorpromazine (CPZ) of drug-produced changes in alertness. or placebo were given orally to 28 normal women. CPZ Key N»rds: Chlorpromazine - CNV - Reaction Time. Q~ 0 0 n p 2 1 9 1 _...~.... ~ . .. _ ~.~,u..+.... .......,..-. - ,._ • ... ~~ . ~ ,
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, , 50330 8193 ) MtSS~noJ ~~ ~~ i1LLC,al~c c~ G (~ - %~ Q Bush, George Pollock, 1892- ed. 180 Tesmworl: in research, edited by George P. Bush ,u;t B Lowell I I. lIflttery. Foreword by Ilon ard A. :1leyerhoii Washin ;tort, Atnerican University Press t1S1531 xti, 191 p. tllus. 24 cm. "Adapted froin the proceedings of the't'hird Institute on Adminis tratlon of Scientific Research and 1)cvelohment, presented at Wash ington, D. C. by the Anmrican Lniversity witit the eooperatioo of th; IKntional Research Council and the American A.Csociation fi,r tlr Advancement of Science." Bihliographicalfootnotes. 1. Research. r. Iinttery, Lowell Harold, 191C- joint ed. n Institute on Administration of Scientific lle:earch and Developweut 3d, American Univensity, Washiubton, D. C., 1051. in. TiKe. Q150.11113S2 ~ 507.2 53- DM Library oPNon4xess, t53j7t :. . 0 5 0 Q ~ 0 2 1 y 7 U* . . - , .
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50330 8189 ~ I d&49w"'wVwI*j Ccti T'rco Co].legn ?3,aca:.uersr, Caoncil., Inc. D.1.11EcrTV?1 07 COMUZVt: L Iets{iW~'.1::. 1+'F/.• !%a?J t 1965-67 1965 03 Fa;c.s F EmmyI'.Ti:asa Y 0~ 0 0 0 0 2 t• 9 6_ 7 ::•
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50330 8198 i j Arch. II Mel4l-78 S. P: q ,i Ind. Hyg. 20420-8(1959) / a r ~~<<tion of r~lclcl>ty~des in Polluted AtinosI>,herc I~1c.I~t'~f'~c All(I Combustion hl'oduCtS JEROME F. THOMAS, Ph.O.t EIDON N. SANBORN, J%W4RQ,W-iRBEENtjsac.D., Borkeley, Coli/. Introduction Owing chie(ly -U, the cxtrentely small c„nccntralions in which alclchydcs occur in nutduur IoIlutcd rttntosphcres, thcrc is a nntcd lack of analytical mcthnds applicablc tn stscertainin}; the prescnce of inclividtetl . . . . . M.S.! MITSUGI MUKAI, B.S., and 0. F; 0 0 t1 02 1 9 7 6 - ular wcil;ht. A sccon<1 dcrivativc, h unitlttc j,rnpcrtics, is ohtainctl by n moilifyin}; the first. J;oth sets of c14 tivcx can be separated readily by tnca fractional suLlimatinn. Idrntiticntinn ( dividual contpnunds is accnrnplisho rIn.eica) ntcthnds. , .{, 0
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~ 80 I I Ey-81 l S, P. ~~. .~._.~_____ . ... ... _._ . ' ./ . E/ectroencephaloaraphv and Clinical lrophvsiolorv. 1981. 51: 470-476 _ © Elsevier/N th•Holland Scientific Publishers, Ltd. EFFECTS OFyCAFFEINE ON RESTING EEG AND RESPONSE TO SINE WAVE MODULATED LIGHT VICKI E. POLLOCK ~; !Tj=",, JOHN STERN and JAN VOLA 11lfssouri Institute oJPsychiotry, St. Louis, Mo. (U.S.A.) (Accepted for publication: January 14, 1981) the 10-13 c/sec band and decreased power in both increased (Ashton et al. 1974) and Caffeine is one of the most widely used stimulants (Gilbert 1976). Generally, central nervous system stimulants increase amounts of beta and decrease amounts of theta and alpha activity of spontaneous EEG in man (Fink 1968). The reported effects of caffeine on resting EEG include reduced amplitude (Goldstein et al. 1963), inorease of delta activ- ity (Clubley et al. 1979), increased power in ~ , the 5.5--9.5 c/sec band (Sulc et al. 1974). decreased (Janssen et al. 1978) contingent ~_Such, divergent _ results may_partially be negative variation (CNV) amplitudes have . . . ... 0. 0 0 0 2 1 974 elicits a withdrawal syndrome in persons who consume high amounts of this substance (White et al. 1980). We attempted to examine high and low quantity caffeine users under conditions of continued use and withdrawal. Research on caffeine has also yielded con- tradictory findings in the study of evoked brain activity. At comparable time periods :' after administration of 300 mg of caffeine
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~50330~8181 ~ 1 PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES/DICTIONARIES--PORTUGUESE-ENGLISHf ENGLISH LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--PORTUGUESE/ Q 210 Fe 1976 9CvGLSPOR1UGVE S ~- 2 Vols: PORTUGUES-INCLES & i POR P.E JULIO ALBINO FERREIRA ,e:,,;I 1.a r ' 0~'(10 0 C) 21 TIIC `I'TAClIE[t AT I[0}I ' DIClONAIilO NOVA EI11(;AU Rcvistn e mell~nrada PELO DR. ARMANDO DE MORAIS - •pn Protcssor do Liceu de Alexnndre ttercutano - Poara I J9 5 9 1976
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7: 9 6 1? 0 0 0 0 S 0 '5Y •2;1'd') vpOtc*.r") ~`i<1iSC ri cy ;fJ XUy 3jtU(4o(j litl~'~Sri~'I:~ V1wiT fhl,, iI i:v 'A 's~ 'tl-MlslVH dri0nVu- "ao. (A2i1+'iv'ri~i5-"iVtt3~t'9)" ZVef,I X '11-11v-'-,-e . . ' . - .~ ~ '.y.~ .. . ~ . ~ . ~ ne te oEEOs , I
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l 50330 8179 JOaoMrrr SCIENCE ~ MARKETING RESEARC~{/ , t, Febrv.r7. 1971 1~.11 Na e s . . rXu ~ BRAND PREFERLNC); SCA~~ USING L.IBORAT fd S TO PREDICT~CONSUtiiER BRAND PURCIIASES* 79 V Pe - ~ EDGAIt PESSEN1IEItt„PHILIP BURGERt,i ANrvDOUGLAS TIGERT•*tt ~ ?,aboratory measures oftkirand preferences and survey measures of demographic, media ezpoeure, attitudinal, activity and opinion characteristics of individual con- aamers hsve been combined to predict brand purchases in the market. Brands ine the tooth paste, liquid household cleaner and cake mix product categories were employed in a set of laboratory experiments. Preference scales derived from the experiments are used in three separate models to predict the subject's purchases recorded in seren months of diary data. The behavioral implications and predictive power of the soodels are interesting from both theoretical and applied points of view. Labaratory experiments in marketing have increased in number and sophistica;'on dUringthe past decade. Their appeal lies principally in the high degree of control over eztraneous variables which can be attained and the speed with which large amounts ~ of data may be accumulated at modest cost. The limitations of the techniques are Iargely asaociated with the difficulties encountered in translating consumer behavior c, laboratory experiments into predictions of behavior in the market place. The re- uarrh reported here exploits many of lhe advantages of labvratory experiments and relates ~t ripltslo aluaIwnsSnerbrand piirchase decisions. For each subject, predictio7ta >zm made of the relative frequency oJ brand purchase and the quantily of the brand pur- Ansed. Tve mnior vrouns of indenPndent variAhles wera concumer hrand nrPfPrPnen
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50330 8178 _ - -7QC MeF-C-Z4Z-14 . , . - . U.S. Department of Agriculture -Foreign Agriculturaj Service • Washington, D.C ~~ . ' FOREIGti AGRICULTURE CIRCULAR-T9l'M9MVYCES RECORD 19 :3 WORLD TEA CROP EXPEC T ED- FTS:A 3-73 WORLD TRADE SET A \EW, RECORD IN 1972 October 1973 Summary sharplv- fa;lin; to 9.900 tons from 15.937 tocs- in World tea production (exc:;tdins the Pcople's Re- 1971. The L;nited States also received less tea. with public of China) for 1973 is fortcist at a record 1.22 exporci faltir.: :2 percent to only 7.100 tons. tniltion metric tonc, an increa;e of 2.6 percent over Ho..evrr, shipT:nts :o the Netherlands jumped to the bumper 1972 harvest of 1.19 miliion. World pro- 1'.t'QO tons from only 2,461 tons the ; e:.r hefore. duction continues to expand at a t»ter rare than that Lar_er exports were also recorded to Ez_sp(, West for consumption at•.d tea prices have remained at rela- G:rm--:v. Pe:and. and Tunisia. tivcly low levels. Indii's der:,estic consumption of tea continues to World tea eiports (incluuir•: estimves for the eXo=n•1. Cansurnaion in 11972 Mas estimated at People's Republic of China) durir_; 1972 totaled a 2?6.07,00 t.ns. up nearly 5 percent over 1971 uusage of record 683.000 tons, up 2.4 pcrce!it over 1971 ship- ~'-=S•G)^ tons. ments. Exports from A,ian pra.tuc:rs were almost un- A Izrar crop is also being harvested by Sri [_;inl-a changed from a-year-earlitr le•-els of about 532=00:1 tCzylo:.t this year. Production is expected to be tons. However, african zxportq :uc-e:,sed by '_3 per- sli:et••%tiaa the 1972 out:urn of ::3.400 tan:. - . • ~ 0 0 ~ ~a o 0 " 0-;~ 1 9
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50330 8210 ~ t vtr Ch N. A. Pp. lL4io:Yo-1. ' ' 2.i8•-2 i k :=?c ;) -.rt+~-+s~:~ra~ .r,r...• 0~ n n El 02 ! 98 7.
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i FyDi.l2AI. FOOD, DRIJG, AND COf>.tI.TIC ACT/HAZARDOUS SULSTANCIsS ACT/lII1.X A(',1:/ PACKAGING AND LABELING ACT/POISON PR.T:VENTION PACKAGING ACT/FLAMM 1ABLE F,'LBr^,ICS At;T/ FABRICS A(.~T/CIGARETTi? LABELIN(; ANI) ADVF.RTISIN(-, ACT/ CONSLQ~EI'. PRODUCT S!!I'F.TY ACT/ ,1EA:•"INPOR'£ATI(3R ACT/FEDT:P.AI. CAUSTIC POISON ACT/CAUSTIC POISON ACT/ FOOD--LAW AIvD LI:GISLATION--U.S./LAl•fS AND LEGISLATIO:I/TOBAC(:O--ADVERT7SING TOBACCO--LECISLATION/ TP U.S. COhGRI':SS, 93--ra ,~.'s°q.;forr-- 3i0 Un ~ 93d Congress ~ JOINT COMMITTEE PI:INT 3y73 lst Sess:on ~ VOLiS,ur, II FItGPAKFD FOR TI(E USE OF THE FOOD, DRUG, AND RELATED LAW U'S•HOUSE COMMITTEE ON IINTERSTATE AN: INCLUDING : ~ FOREIGN COMMERCE I''I:DERAL FOOD, I)r.UG. AND COSNIF.TIC ACT . AND TIIE CO:ITROLLL'D SL'BSTA*:Cl:a ACTS " U..S.SEINTATE, COMPUITTEE ON LABOR AND j\TIRCOTIC ADDICT REII A,RILITATION ACT OF 1966 FEDERAI. HAzA:CI)ouS Sr>;sTANcFS Acr ' PUBLIC `j%ELFAPE FAIR'PACKAGING AND LALrLIYG ACT . MARCH 1973 POISON PP.EVFNTION PACIiaGING ACP " 1''LAtifMAELE FAERICS ACT Printed for the use of tl:e Iiouse Conunittce on Interstate and Forei FEDERAL CIGARETTE L AEL'LING AND Ai7\'EP~TISING ACT Commerce and the Senate Conuni•ttce on Labor and Public \VeifarCONSUM ER PRODUCT S.aFETY ACT TEA IDIPUI:TATION ACT ••• hlh ACT U.S. GovF.RIrr1E~iT PIUNTIXG OFFICE r. hTlhr. I1t,n1;I:n1, Iul'OR_Tllh I'+ILLE UILLEU i1ZILIi"_ 8B-a•3 WASHINCTON : 1973 +EDF:F.ALCAUSTIC PO ,O: l A _ -~..-. ~c 50330 5175 COi+1PILATION OF SELECTED PUBLIC HrALTH LAWS I.
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50330 8209 ) .. . ~ ~... . ~... f ..,..: ~: ~, .. : ~. ~..... TE4sliIQICAL,- WALVA=C0NFF.R-MCE, Tenth Proceed ir.gs Reno, Nevada, July 11, 1968 .i r U. S. Dept. ot Agci.culwLtrc, hyxlcultuxeI ZZesea-.c(3 SeZviL'e TKU::-NYCA1, ALt,ALr•A CO-iVeRr•.i:cr•., Tenth Proceedin;s, Rczso, hc:vada, July 11, 1968 ).968 122 Pages . U. S. Dept. of !t ,t lr.ulture, Ar;ric!ilrural L'.caeavch ac:zvAces 0S 0 0 0 02 1 9 3 6
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/ 50330 8191 I .A v TOBACCO--MARKETING/CIGARETTES---VENbING MACHINES/ 77 gI Ve RJR CLASS NO. PA2•fPHLET 77 XI Ve. Vending Times, TEAM• EFFORT,AIDING CIGARPET .VENDING .vIABILITY1 . Vending Times, 1977, p. 1 (July 1977) (in English) _ -bpcrators, suppliers ~ and-trade a.csociations are team- ing up to maintain the viability ' of cigarct vending, which has been battling high taxes, anti- 'tobacco activists, and bootleg- I ging in key industrial states. . w ,p'_ S 0 .~~.~•~._.._.......~_. - ,.~__ }
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r QD 50330 8204 81 Ko ! 1964 'rRI;ATISi:0N ANALY'rICAl:. CIIM',Ix;i~~~:~f Edited by I.M.Kolthoff, PART II Philip J. Elving wis•h' the assistance of Ernest B. Sandell . ANALYTICAL C[IEMISTRF Or •I•x.L ELEMENTS SECTION A Systclnatic Anatytical Chemistry of th(~ Elelnents . . . i VOLUME 6 rBERYLLIU`I • v6AD •~IOFsIU~i I.;°r>'RSCr.r:NCr, w17t.xSlIr:1?,S, NEW YOi'.I:•-LONDON ANDITANTALUilI rACTIi•:IU.NI,,ASTA'I'INI:,-,~RAN- ' CIU:1t,th(?LCNIUM, ANDXRQ'I'AC- 'I'INIUM AUTHORS OF VOLUME 6 JAJIES W. COUllLE $. tiTASLEY MEL7CK T. W. GIt•tSERT, Jti. C. W. SCHSYE\ZFESER, JR. BILYF. KALl,\tA\?t JACUII.;$pLET D. It. F. KJELLGIiEY I 9 at
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8 V ~ I.r. Q u U U 5 0 O * v.~::~~'..~ iwLt~.Z 1{) i '}1 'Ii ` l[ZQ OE~OS l
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50330 8187
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50330 8185 J TP 370 Me 1975 PDDL 0 R a Nnp';,'4 f-NR-:id.°LCM~A_V:, 0 :rR >S~:<r Daniel Melnick, Ph.D., 1974 Department of Chemistry Florida Atlantic University Boca Raton, Florida Updated and Revised,.1975 THE NUTRITION FOUNDATION, INC. Office of Education and Public Affairs 888 Seventeenth Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 I y 6 3 0 5 0 0 0 0 2
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r l 50330 8194 ~oand of ADn«m.t iR,cDolo~, 979, vot. aa, No. 3. 2.a-2s7 Differential Effects of Induced Modd on' Retrieval of Pleasar !80 II Ey-80 , S.P. ~ : and Unpleasant Events From Episodic Memory JoliWW'"T ea3dale~and Sarah J. Fogarty Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, England ~. This study examined the effect of depressed mood on the accessibility of inem- ories of past real-life experiences of a pleasant or unpleasant nature. By means of a mood induction procedure, student subjects were made happy on one occa- sion and depressed on another. The two mood states differed significantly on self-report, speech-rate, and recall-latency measures. Stimulus words to which subjects had to associate past pleasant or unpleasant experiences were presented in each mood condition. Latency of retrieval was measured. Time to retrieve pleasant memories, relative to time to retrieve unpleasant memories, was sig- nificantly longer when subjects were depressed than when they were happy, suggesting a differential effect of mood on the accessibility of these two types of memory. The results are considered in relation to state-dependent learning and activation of memories, and their implications for models and treatment of depression are discussed. It is suggested that cognitive models of depression need to be extended to include a reciprocal relation between thought content p 5 ~ 0 and depressed mood. ~a;a 1 972
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r r ~.1u.'~w....wJ..+w.-...-:isa'._-:.::~++..-....._....:.~«.a..~......-.,...:-LL~s. .. . .,yj._'" _ ,._~.. ... .~._. . . . ASTM SPECIAL TECHNICAL PUBLfCATION 548 ~ ~ AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND MATERIALS f .1916 Race Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 } TECmClAL A~A~ : . Rf~C S~ vvrffl ~tEXIBL~ ~QRRf~R R A symposium sponsored by Committee F-2 on Flexible Barrier Materials and Committee D- 10 on Packaging AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND MATERIALS ~Rutqers University,.fJew Brunswick, NJ _ _ ' -- - - - - - ' - _._.... .~. ._ _._. 0 ra 0 0 07 0 ;Z " 1 9 8 4
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,~./c II .C/CAD.dIL'.f/.,.: . R i.h• CCTiF1 /SCANlli L~ ~.ti/~ ~ T~ Ix Cn ..PPF.:~.VER/GOLU~ / 7 Ir.R i/lTTRI L..A1~TI1~.t~;L~i/.TIT~L~IYL.i/ qD 7.IP.CO`ILi?~1/11AFNIiiI•1/VA:~iADIL':i/I.IOBIh? 1iADIL':i/I.IOBIh?1 (CO1.1^-tT3IiTP1) /!`ANTALLR•i/CHR)!•ttti:li/~tOLYL'l)F;iI':t/ 151 Sn ZITNC;S; };iI/•tA.i:GANF,SF.f TEQINIfTtLlfiS/ILii?'+2t'iiJ1F0'Zf CU31Ai:/i`i1Ci:FL'IRLTIi1 NIlJA1/T:tiOUlli~i/ 1973 PALLAiiIlR1/OS'r1IL~i/Yi IUILTti/PLAi It:L:"i/ COMPREHENSIVE INORGANICCHEMISTRY Vcnilzle3 Cu, Ag, ALI Volume 3. Group II3, Group 1113, Group IIIA, Group IVA. Group VA, Group VIA, Zn, Cd, Ii;; Group V11A, Groun VIII . j Sc, Y, La ~ EDITORIAL BOARD {TI, Zr, Iif ~V,Nb,Ta J. C. B.kILAR jR., Urbana PubJisi,ed by . _ ;Cr, Mo, t,! ~. H. J. E-MELtUS, F.RS., Cambrictge PERGAMON PRESS Mn,Tc, Re SIR RONALD NYHOLM, F.R.S., London Fe, Co, Ni Erchcsi:e Dir:ributors in tht I; -esterK NemiRU, Rh, Pd A. F. TROTINI WN-DICiCENSON, Cardff COMPENDIt:M PUBLISHERSdS, Ir, Y'' (Frecurire Editor) /~n : . f , ~ N . ...• , . _ 0 S 0 -0~ p 2 1 98 0 W-r
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50330 8195 C w 1 r- -- --_-.._ . ar#er. ar~. ~ 74,rrpv. Yd. Ia, pp. J)9 to N6 -F•9P ~~ Hirpinoe Prcu i 1 TiniaaTn rui Bnwn 4 30 II Ey-80 S.P. EFFECTS OF INDUCED ELATION-DEPRESSION ON THE ACCESSIBILITY OF MEMORIES OF - HAPPY AND UNHAPPY EXPERIENCES i*OH1V W TBA§DAIEII, ROBERT TAYLOR and SARAH I. FOGARTY Department of Psychiatry. University of Oxford. England lReceitrd 11 December 1979) Summary-Elated and depressed moods were induced in student volunteers on separate occasions. On each occasion they retrieved past real-life experiences associated to stimulus words presented. Subjects subsequently rated the experiences for happiness-unhappiness and pleasantness-unpteasantness on a third occasion in a neutral mood state. Extremely unhappy memories were significantly more likely to be retrieved in the depressed mood than in the elated mood. Extremely happy memories were significantly more likely to be retrieved in the elated mood than in the depressed mood. Measures of latency of retrieval showed a significant inter- action between mood state and type of memory. The results confirm the generality of previous findings in suggesting an effect of mood state on the accessibility of different types of cognition. The results are considered in relation to mood as a context in conteztual-specifie encoding and retrieval, and in rdati~n tordel} anbtreatment of clinical conditions. 0 0 / d o s 0 0
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/ . -_._ ._.....~..~...:.:.•..... ... ~.-.r..c......i ~~~~. .~_ ........va..~..z.x_... ~:.5:~+rY.a_:.~ .. 75 VIII Gi 50 330 8192 TOT,ACCO--PtAC1I IN^RY / RJR CLASS NO. PAMY11LE1a 75 VIII Gi Cillesrie, W. Y.; Wysowski, C. li. (iirowrt Louisville, tiy., U. S. ) ..~,-w ~~~~~,10~ Ind. Eng. 6(1Vo, 8) 26-29 (1974) (in English) *Note 4f f iliation* and the possibility of one fixer hav- __ ~;~tn- 1 ing a~rorkload si~ zificantly diffcr- In exploring the effccts of tc. ~ ent from the others alrva s exists. tvorl: (~n rnultimachinc assign-' S tncnts, it is imp(~rt:rrtt to tcmpcr In addition, the transit time in- thc advarrtagrs of this apprtrrcit `%'olvcd in walking ixtwcen dis- ,\ h'ttfl pOsSi!)1(; (IIs;1(1\':liltagcs. In ~ tantly spaced machincs may pros'e. ~ Gr(rup . assi};nr»cnts, lrcrs<rnalits to be a Ilancilcap• Ho~~•Cvcr, the po- , ; conflicts rrn :trisr hrt~~ce n~~nrkers i tential savings in machine inter- 1 fcrcncc arst makes an inspection of group assignrnents a nccessitv € in .+ppli(:ahlc industri:tl situations. ~ ' _ .,.. .a_. J•Y........._ .._ _ _~., _.. _ .i~>r *1974, No. 24, t•, 9300-k *d* Tob3cco r:ianufactu_-e: I ~ ' A i
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50330 82 II`iPLOYMENT OPPORTl3NITIES/_ g_-v (/., . .) ,2,ra-5(~Y ~~ /_ ~/`I'I~') t _ 78 I Ca '1 -----, U PDATE ON VC)-/-'~G 1 by David C. Craig Ttacher hducatiort: ~ ~ Unit,cnity of Tcnneisce- . Knoxville, TN The shortage of vocational aSriculture teachers has stabilized on a national basis. The ,hortat;c hat occuried for at least thittccn years. A A'ational Stud), of tltc Supply and Dcmand for 7•caclicrs of i'orotional Agtirulture in I'JiT suggests sonic reasons for the short supply of teachers (see Table f). First, the total numbcr o( Sccondary teaching positions has continued to rise at a rate of five to six Ix•rcent per year since 197•1. The ttumbcr of post secondary positions has increased at a rate of 10 percent per )-ear. Second, the record number of new college graduates cntcring tcach'nG (1,063) was not cnouglt to fill vacancics and ncwly crcatrd positions. Third, the rcgular uunmcr was steady at 10.3 percent in 1977. A fourtlt reason is that onh• about 60 pcr- Y '* F`11!"t A :~%14•v ° .,,a- . ~ ~ > A S~fl Ul' ~ / This Vo-Ag Tcachcr Supplv/Uctuand Study (initiatc, by Dr. 11'ooc(ur4a[-thc Ohio State Unis•cr>itv and c^atinuc by Dr. C,raig in 1971) becomes morc valuable each vrzr I trends in the profcs>ion unfold. Each year dfit.i are collccm in August by mailed quc.tionnairc conccrning tcachcr sup ply/dctnand facts from 30 states and Pucrto l:ico and mot, tltan 80 institutious that prepare vo-aq teat•hcts. 1\ ittt ; ncar 100 pcrccnt tY•tw•n, d;ua arc tabulatcd, suninmal izce' a final rclx>rt is publishcd (scc title on pagc I) and circu Iatcd to participating agricultural cduc;uots in the statc and tcachcr prcllarution institutiona. This tcLttivcl.; low cos study is financed by the :\gricultwal Edw•atiun Di%isiun o tha AV.\ and the \'TF. 1)cpartmcnt at the Univcqity o Tcnnc.scc, Knoxville. The tnajor hurposc of the study was to identi!v na tional changes and hcnds in vo-ag teacher supply and dc tn:utd. The ohjcctisc data from participatinR st;ucs ctm trachcr cdut•ation imtitutions are used by aGriculhua l cdu 0 soa0 0 2 1 9 40
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xw,i. 50330 8213 _~ ECOIrO~tIC DEVFLOPMENT/ . . . ~ xC 60 Po 1972 , PDDL ...., .. . TECHNOLOGY RUT~-icRFORD A•1. POATS for DEVELOPING NATIONS NewDirections for US.p!4nfcel Assutcru4a,- THE BROOKINCS INSTITUTION WasJtington, D.C. N ''1,,.....t '01 ,`.-a .9.9 .0
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50330 8212 ~ " F . . : S.P ~ ~ VI ReG,-81 / r ~ I 0 5 (l 0 tl 0 2 1 9 8 9 n.~1 tETORT DO( UMENTAT/0N L a•o•• », ` "~80"'• ~`.•.~" N• .ACC _ , 2 27 8 9 ana.waMw taebstlal Arstin.nt~`P;,itfk T~sport "Qqlttr7t aa...wowa ifflc!/~V,~t,,~#s0..~VoiUti ta ~itro*eh' Dleaid!"+ e. ..a,'=r._ s. AAM.M & M«wna w. R.8 Q.1kins, il.D. Keller. R.a. tanesc. R.A. Macrina O•m Y.*Mw JYw» W MMw la /YMtVtMUMM WW /N. Inntitute cf Cat Technology 3424 S. State St. tt. c«+..ara «a..M(e) n.. 0lcago, IL 60616 = 5010-352-0062 ON lL Ur*Wna O.pwirtw %.." w.M... • IL rAe .t a.prt a M..r C.+ane C h I tit t R Final as ns esearc u e 10 Y. 35th St. la ww~u.r. ww» !a Mwn.n al-ft Jw -«tW The purpose of the study was to eveluace the technical basis for a new environmental standard published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency governing short ters exposure to nitrogen oxides.
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, 2M `80 T I Ey-$1 S P X?T cctrocncPphalo~eraphy and Clinical 11'curo h 976. 41 : 277-286 50330 8 ~. ~ ~lEt-sevier ScientiCc u is ine omoanv. Amsterdam -Printed in The CONTINGENT NEGATIVE VARIATION AND THE DISTRACTION-AROUSAL HYPOTHESIS * JUNE SAVIGNANO•BOWMAN *et and DEBBIE MEINBRESSE Laboratory ojNeuropsychology, Boston State Hospital, Boston, Mass. 02124; and Department ojPsychiatry, 7Ljts University School ojMedicine, Boston, Mass. (U.S.A.) (Accepted for publication: January 29, 1976) f Contingent negative variation (CNV) is an' event-related electrical brain potential that appears between the occurrence of two suc- cessive stimuli, such as in a constant-foreperiod reaction-time experiment where one stimulus is a preparatory stimulus for response to the other (Walter et al. 1964). For example, when a light flash (first stimulus or Sl) is followed in 1.5 sec by a continuous tone (second stimulus or S2), which is terminated by a motor response (key-press), CNV appears 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 1 970 et limited to when S2 (shock) and extraneot stimuli (music) were in different sense mo( alities. In two studies involving cognitive activitii as distraction, subjects were requiied 1 remember four letters presented in the Sl-,4 interval (Tecce and Scheff 1969) or perfor mental arithmetic (adding sevens) (Tecce ar Hamilton 1973). In these situations involvir divided attention sets (one set to prepare h processing information in S2 and the other s
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50330 8205 ) QD 117 Ko 1976 L erivatives COPPF.R/ S ILVT:R/GOLD/ Z I1`iC/CAD"tIU*f/"iP.RCURY/ SCAPIDTUM/YTTP.IIJ:•1/LANTIIANIDP.S/XCTINTnF.S / TITANIUPt/ZIRCONIUPf/11AFNIUM/VANADIL114/NIOBILTMt/TANTALUrf/CIIROMIUM/Pf01.YBDr:NITI~f/T1iNGST1?N/ MANGANESF./TECHNBTItSM/R1IENIUM/ IRON'• /RUT1iENIUDt/OS*?IUM/COBALT/RIIODIUPt/ IRIDIUM/i1ICKEL/ PALLADIUM/PLATINUM/ METALS/SYNTIIESES/FERROCENE/ : METHODICUM CHI~fICUM A:.Critical Survey of Proven Methods Editor-in-Chief • and Their Application in Chemistry, Natural Science, and Medicine . Friedhelm Korte M . ; Volume 8 Preparation of Edited by /~ . n5~ ~tlon Metal Kur, N~edenzu Tra,; . =:_-:1 Hans Zimmer . , Academic Press • New York . London • San Francisco 1976 a 1SICWCU, ~. ./I TCA Georg Thieme Publishers Stuttg, t 0 50 0 0 0 2 t~~~
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50330 8216 ~ FINISHES A.yD COATINGS/PACKACING--FIL`1S AND LA'•iZNATES/ POLYMERS AND POLY:IERI?.ATION--FILMS/ ,flb. TP 986 Te 1978 ARCHER - EXTRUSION COATING OF - ~L PAPER AND PAPERBOARD APE R Y P INCLUDING SUPPLEMENTS 1, 2 and 3 Prepared by the Extrusion Coating Committee of the • _ Paper Synthetics Division 1st Printing, 1973 Reprinted with Supplements, 1978 TECHNICA ~ • ~SO _C.IATtO,N OF:THE~~ - PU~~~~~~~'~'~J~~'S~'~'~Y"X'~ ONE DUNWOODY PARK, ATLANTA,'GA 30338 0 S 0 0 n fI 2 1 g 9 3 , , .:.:_,.: ~ /'j-c !•- .~,.../'"
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~..,.... 11; Ft. ~... ~•,.,, . , :iCti AND G!:C1.yE~f:7:.G,.yE~f:7:.G xhF':I .aU 640 pp. (1947) r5
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I 50330 8219 I ~ TS ~ 1105 T nr Nt}f`.y l~.°.~~~..1. <L. ~.•~~p . n -f .:4 pe O 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 19 9 6
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50330 8206 } RADIOISOTOPES--INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION/TOBACCO--MANUFACTURE AND TRADE--TF.CIiNOLOGY/ 76 VIII -Ts ,.. .• RJR CLASS N0. PAMPNLET 76 VIII Ts Tantikatew_ N_ P_t KaraveorQaa_ A. C.- • , * " ' * ~ . . (no affil.) DEVELOPMENT OF A RADIOISOTOPICAL TRACING METHOD TO FOLLOW THE FLOW OF CUT TOBACCO DURING ITS MANUFACTURE. _Tobacco Science, Registration No, 1028 (1976) (in English) . :- *Keywords:* 99technetit=-.t. tobacco. additive. = "".* s:." ~ r . ~ • .. . • ... - . . , : _ • a .. • ~ ~. : .' . ..i".. f . , 0 S cl 0 C1 Q~ 1 9 8 3 . .. , ..~ • .
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50330 8225 ;~.~t~4~-_ a "'0 IR-F;, _ , Ay •rEt'b;~IC?:. EVALUATION 0P Y-LITaOLSN tAixs (TF?PI SFMcir.1 icchaical ::,,nAociBtion Fen_,lication No. 6)
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50330 8218 ~sT-Srn A "1109 F\('• c~'WA Poper Iuduntry tlonogrsph Scriea ?io. 21) ZfECdftCZ PiILPIr:G t•mUAL (Tac:hnir.al k~~o~A.~xiott o c PeIln and 19f 0 TA.PPI :r .. .. :.• 183 PugeB New York Y'\•,.~~.~•~',!~°~~7f'~M1'O' .'.rT vy~.`r
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50330 8228 ..~C% ,-f TESTTt?.^a G? AX FS:•'S (T:.F'r: Noaograph SorieS No. 19G3 TAP?Z 26) 18? FAyos 2;t:;r York ~ s o o n 0 z z u 0 S , I ,
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/ Abah,~Mmgbnr-U"ft.-Afi4t.a3.~i`:.~nd;.~` •1GF~.r.1w'\ .yyiSL~Li(7 nJ~U,i1/lYAS • • . ASl9OCii,tio:1 OT t'ctj.n I1Qf! Paper rtidu~~ry l4aAO~rap~ r,--jb •%~.. es 110. lgSo 235 Paocs TAPPI I:eIWI York 0 ... . ,._. ..... .~__; C _..~ Q 20) ,
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L ~wa ~~~.,,:.O_. ::~±~ ".1 SYtifi'r~:IC ~.I`ID PR"TRIN 4AI3ESIV?S FQR PAP?R CQATzN(: (TA.p7I t:caograPii Seric3 No. 22) 1961 * 272 Pages TAPPI •.1 New York 0 i •. 2 ~f (~ Q .4 G~ ~
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)t2oa BDrj :.. ssllooa z£T IdavS • 8S6'[ (6T 'oEd Eapog qdvs8ocioN ctx3sr,F.uZ xadad :•-- .~ pua djnd 3o uoy3eTaossV Tga;uqoas).. :' ~ t. SZmarv ri MIIITv'0'I 2mdYa , I- t-vkv-m~4 I- ~ 50ZT: , ~k a+tii.n.• . L Z Z 8 0 E E 0 S i
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R 0 0Z e U U 0 0 5 Q I .:: 'tZ ) % 7 ~y r t~x : ~ ~EZe oEeos
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r 50330 8202 0 ..;e.._-... •......+................, .«...._ EBRUARY 1972 ' Psychol~ical Bulletin VOL. 77, No. 2 C"'. ~ t a 80 II Ey-81 S.P. CONTINGENT NEGATIVE VARIATION PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN .D 0 F.E .L`:V DY TcZH1i.;.'.L 11ORAI CNV) AND sANti1a[t 2 9 ly/L Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General No`pil'j" ~U?j~;z f3 ~,`c Contingent negative variation (CNV) ia a slow, surface-negative electrical brain wave. The basic experimental paradigm for generating CNV Is like that of a constant-foreperiod reaction time task and involves the presentation of a warning stimulus (S,) followed by an Imperative stimulus (S,), to which motor response is usually required. CNV appears within the S,-S, interval as a negative shift In the electroencephalogram (EEG) base line that averages approximately 20 miaovolts (µv). Interpretations of CNV findings have in- volved the psychologial processes of expectancy, conation, motivation, and attention. A t.vo-process tbeoretial model Is proposed to account for CNV results: Magnitude of CNV Is positively and monotonically related to attention and nonmonotonically (inverted U) related to arousal level. CNV is also as- wdated with other kinds of electropbysiological activity, notably autonomic functions and slow cerebral potentials that accompany voluntary motor move- ~ Q~ Aj~tbougy CDiF bearly a cerebral phenomenon, eye movements can 1/ y lutorVlta n(easu ent. It is concluded that CNV Is an electrical phe- nomenon of the human brain that Is related chiefly to attention and arousal . -- functions.
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~_,.,.....-.-._.. Urn'T STt'ENG'a`4 IU PAPM A.'~D PAPL~',r-AtR D (Tecrenical basaciation of the Pulp snd Paper industry, Z:caogrcph SeYfos No. 29)
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/ .4 4JZ. ' - ~ 'cTigUriood C~~ ~ 776ad:~ I tv n~~lu9 ~txy s :~; ~l .~., I'IG21'cI:TED'CQ~.TL4G~PPACRSSE5 FOR Pt.pF,I; a;n EoAPD (TaPPx Monograph Series No. 28) 1964 219 Pages UPPI New Y ork ~ J , r t ~ . 0o n . o u 0u ; . .
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50330 8226 ..N i •= a I ` r Ave , . . . . "'w' a .. .~ ~r..;.`,r.r - i _ .. ...._ ............._..... uYp : , :.d PNpa: Itaiu~ L 'r=r n ~ 1L'1"d TESTING CG;d: rw\'CL, Pick- C>r,~;re:,3 Kotel, C::'.c49o, I7Lliooi3, SeDt. 26-29, 1967 , 3.yci7 Tp~ PI ~.• ; ~.40 pages New York n I
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-. 50330 8208 .r _-'REFRIGE-RATION~ • .: XX MeF-F¢WIP-74 FMF REVZEW, April 1973, pp ti,7,,9,10 . ... .• • ~. .. .. . S•n • r ~'o r~~~~''l~~~~ '~ ~ r rr . +~w~ .n ..+r .a d. ».. .,...rv vr. w• r t.r - G ~ ~ ~ -t h. a vw'-C, -o 14 IrChea i n.4~ . The 60s tvere, and no one doubts';he 70s will prove to be bocm years for trozen (oods, with a mar;cet vaiue oi £350 m'iiion being expectea by 1980 swhile ten years ago rm,e, stood at cnly £60 miliion. This tremenCo::s 5ro:vth llas been made possible by technical de:•e!oorner••Is both in the lre.^zing process and+ tnroc:.;haa: t:ie -Cc!d Cha~n', No:v, with risirg costs, CnsJr':,g th^_ hc:lselv:;e !s presc^:cd ::i:" a .".cy:: ~U41IIY ~.rvuuci ttilite MOSI FROZEV FOOD processors started in the busir.ess I using horizontal plate frosters but the expansicn of the industry and its changing dcmands of product prescntation have encouraged devc!opment to other methods, of frcezins. • • What is exptcted of a freezer? Basically it is to frcez: the product in a conditiurn su::ab!e for presentation for s.11e, tp a specified temperature below -13'C (0'1`) as fast as pcs.ibtc (.'i•:c minutcs will do for most Nrnduas) i keeping the price dwun is Ito sma!I erder. In this ar•d ai a cost acceptab!e to the set!in, price structarc. i T eafttrE, Ff :F f,cviwl to0.:s nt !!:O ;,3test Main consideration is that the frcczin, :r_thod sho~~J _~r^E~'.'i 1.7.1eMZlI1f~ i rF1C_.at~tl~.~r.n~....•..-.m ~•- ' GIeVe!C'p 11CnI r Ifl, ~..a..-<c••.-..•.--. , - ... . . . . .~ . . . . , ' . c~ 5 0 4 c~ 0- 2 t y:8 5 :s 'r
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. / I I TECNNICAL REPORT DATA /M :M IAJ /NVLI. f11Ma U.I lllf h'1-.,/f •lll.l/f .IMNMf I//Itr •'~ EPAA60~ r0/4-79-057 S. . ~[Clr•LVi 1 McEftiOr.NO. J '.ikt a%.. i. .71i '! /t[rOwt OAil CAIteRAttoN D~iF TEdplt st~T1111Cr6~,~~y~/ 4OR:TpE _SeDtem~er_.1379 . E ~~ ,~„~ ,, ,,,, E rlwrOwMINO0A3AN1IAT10NCOOE ~ iTWS , it Wt stf V/.f' l . 7 abT~Ow•f1 , .IEwrOwMINO,OwOAN12AT1ON wEPOwT NO. Richard J. Paur, ESRL/RTP Frank F. McElroy, EMSL/RTP LI(AIJRVI~:..7•11iAV12AT/:\..A4EANDAOOwlf3 10.rpOGwAM L M N NO. ' Qual i ty Assurance Division lADBDD Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory . N . . U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Research Trian le Park, NC 27711 ~7. frONSOwINS AG[\Cr NAL.L ANO AOOwtff /i. TYPE Or 11[rOMT AND IE1110 D COVE11E0 Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory Final Office of Research and Cevelopment ~~•frONS0/11N6 AGENCrCOOE U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ozone~nal er R search Trian le Park t4C 21711 EPA 600/08 Yz ,s.wtrLLViNtA.,rrotLS Air pollutton Ozone standards Measurement UV photometry Technical Assistance Document Technical assis Calibration I.AES A.,cf • Air pollution monitoring dotument In February, 1979, EPA revised certain parts of the ambient air pollution monitoring regulations (40 CFR Part 50, Appendix D) to specify a new procedure for calibration of ambient ozone analyzers. The new procedure is based on ultraviolet (UV) absorption photometry, and specifies in detail the UV photometer, other apparatus, and the procedure necessary for establishing quasi-primary ozone concen- tration standards derived from the known absorption coefficient of ozone at 254 nm. This Technical Assistance Document is intended to provide information and assistance to State monitoring agencies and other organizations which must use the new procedure to calibrate ambient ozone analyzers. The first section of the • document is a discussion of absorption photometry, with emphasis on the transmittance measurement and measurement errors. Section 2 provides step-by-step explanatory in~qrmat~'pn anQ ady ce yed e pa agraph of the procedure. Section 3 discusses and severe erational characteristics i~ si~n and o }fi i ~l ~ dr l , p ie e s/spep c y, n ter UY'{hot o commercially available models. . . . ~l - ... - . , , :, \ tance
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50330 8247 ' TS 1109 Te ARCHER PAPER LOADING MATERIALS Technical Association of Pulp and Paper Industry 1958 TAPPI 132 Pages New York osc~0 0 0 :~ 2 0 2 4
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b r u z~ u u 0 u 5 0 .y..~...:.a~t..n,ra.s...;~:ra..--- ..,..._,;,s~.s,...:,,..:...~.... . . . .ft ..:...,_,,. ~ .~ ~:.:~..~. Itzi,x V-m dCrkl 3ct,~ jo norl°1}oaosV miut;o-ey «d OY °L'~~V:?S:ItI tI~~~StrL~~S Iddvx _- ~ . 0;r, ( LEZB 0£EOS ~
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r 50330 8232 ~ , 1080 patents. ! -- l?(.,i '70 T v New York, 'Teclmical Association of tho fPulp and Papo Industry. ~7 v. 23cm. annual. I'revlously Issued annually tn the society's Technical assoQlatioi papers and in the 1'aper trade Journal. Title varies: 1031, liibliorraphy of paper making and United State: patents on paper making and related subJects.-1s)3 -37. Iiihliogrstph; of pulp and ptper tuaking and United States patents on paper makin; , and related SubJccts.--1J,iS-11, Pulp and papertnaking, bibliograph; j and United States patents. ~ Title i2u slilne. Ia:S1-ha: 13iitliography ot hnpcrnta)!ing and U. F patents (varicasli;;htly) i nr-d Paper 1'ulp and paper manufacture biblio;r:tphy nnd 'Jnited State. (E~mitlntted-on-nc~t cntvi). 32-1S23Q' 15 ~t :56t~3t o S t~ 4 tl t~ ~2 0 0 9-
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r r 50330 8233 ) ,suc. u M' o1. v .,., Routa.ne Control :`.ethods. Loosele,f. o s n o ~0i % 2 u 1
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~ . ~ ~ . . . ~ . • ~ - . . . 50330 8217 ~ 1978 / ~ ~ tNTERNAT tONAl. CO~EXTRUSION 968 Te TRAINING SEMINAR ~ 1973 • JUNE 6-8 * SEMINAR NOTE; AxcxER . HOTEL OKURA INTER-CONTINENTAL. AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS TECHNICACASSLSCATIbN fSt=THE #e PU(.P;<ANC- PAPFR INOUSTRY t•A ~ ONE DUNWOODY PARK. ATLANTA, GA. 30338 Telephone (404) 394-6130 TWX 810-757-0145 oCopyright 1978 By TAPPI : if v f f1.f, r t' 1~ U . , If4 ..
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I r _.~ar.._...,.a.._.,... .........~_~.,...r. _..-. _... TLCIiIi'LCiu, iiS 5CCI1`.TZC;1 UP 'Tli.: 'r'13Lk' FLtiD PAPER INUUS:I:Y YEAM;7IK 1966-ti7, 6e-613, 68-69, 69-70 , 70-- 171 29&G-1970 TAl"2I 4 coz$. Kew :'ark ` . . ,~,..r. ~ ..--. o.sao~a~2o~s ,
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50330 8241 / TS 1109 T pulp and paper industry. New York, 1950- Tcchni.mlzAssoc;.ation--of,:ahe Pul.p and PaNF:r In- ,.-ow.dt.tstrYr= .K:.>,, Testing methods, reeommended practices, snec: fications of the technical association of the Looseleaf. 30 cm. j.. .% _ ~ dx C~.~C~& :1... . •
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) 50330 8236 / TS , , . „ -.Ir, i' o!1. ;: , 1109 _- .o.. r \ t . t 41~ I,\ ~,`.. ; ., T t, ~ . : j ::. ...:! e ..:~., .1!%... ~L 1tT:Jil .? t t.. .. •i • -..t;~.is!,J: No. 17. Starch and starch products in papar coating. No. 18. 'r,'ater technology in the pulp,,.and paper industry. /-, 6 i .w. ) ./ l 1t' ¢~y/i~.,e . / -... A./Y , _,-- • - ~ / w • ce- 0
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i , 50330 8249 ) TS 1109 Te ARCHER Technical Association of Pulp and Paper Industry MECHANIC4:.PULPING MANUAL _ ....~,.,.~,.n-. (Technical Association"'of PuTp"and'Paper-:1ndustrq : Monograph"Se=1ea°19(s: -11, 1960 183 pages TAPPI: New York o s 0 0 0 0 ;2 2 0 2 6
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1963 TAPp7 207 Psgea New York ~ ~ > ~ 0 t1 ~ ~-~ 1 y . .9 .q : ib9tA t re ~ ~ 4~~ .-- ~ !Tf cn&1 a P,8-.k,~"- F66 ~tct~-r~~~C~D~. _ ~~ ~ ~'4 ~:... (t"PZ Spcaal TWchnica2 A.9: ociazion Fubltcaaon No, c) i \
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S~ ~ o z z 0 U 0 a 5=0 ?~iYY Ja{30r~ £~6Y Aj ft--%WW-Il++- „-~ta~ft+~..P~3~~c..~'l.I4tR~a+~a=s~1~~~ ~~~Il~<<I~±fR~4b~Af: Z 6011 sZ 6£Z8 OEEOS
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oz~ouousp-•- ..,,.~.. O ~~'i IM L':rrl ... .. , .. a~ . . . . .. . _ .. . .~'. ~+~. ~Jl aL . .. _:; ..~: ~ ~~` ' . .. . . sj 60Tt 5W ( SEZB OEEOS ,
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i , r 50330 8242 J . . .• ~ t ^~et'. Q .. Year book, containing lists of members arrancre 14~p alphabetically and geographically. TL~, NewYork,`1919- t1- •`•(1 ,57•~~ l Pv. 23°"' q6a.•63,15C, 3-1 At head of title: Technical association of the pulp and paper indcstr Lists of members may also be found in "Paper," official journal of t: 8ssociation. ~ Library of Coiit;ress TSit>f3t1.T25 t2t l9- 1$91l t 0 soo0 0 :2 2 o 1 9'
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L ~ a z?, 0 u o U 5 0 w.......+...s...r.:...aa..- , I , •s10,41q5 'aqgQ Zdd1lii Sao-alcio21 Z 6oTt I . . :. . . . , . . t~o~ . . _ . _ . ~ OAZB OEEOS 0
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l t 50330 8250 J TS 1105 St ARCHER Stannett, V. ._ .PERMEABILITY,OP.PLASTIC PILMS AND M. Szvarc, R,._L. Bhar&ava, J.A, Meyers and C.E. Rogers COATEH PAPER TO GASES AND VAPORS, by V. Stannett, i'~~y.~ ~ .1 1962 TAPPI 105 Pages New York 0 S 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 7
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50330 8244 XI ReA 10 w tha -Fu1r 'aii~3 ~upcr Industrys.~~l~~.Annual T:ee.tinE, t.racts.. , MEETIhGS - SCHEDULE Leaflets 0 S ~ 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 1
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50330 8259 ~ Ref HD Lu T.;.hit:, .._ .. .,.. .._ 0 saoo a2 2 U .3 6*
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, S , :'ij~I;r'S-=!L1Td~'F~:CT(?It1:/?'1'LT'. ?'A<I"1G A";n TrAD':/ _CELLULOSE/ ... l: TS 1]09 Te 1973 CA Report No. 52 1973 NVN-VVV V fi/ Pl.A/ ,1FIBERPULPING P'R0G€'*ESS REPO R.T NO. 4 1970--Progress Report No. 1 issued as CA 1M-Progress Report No. 2 issued as CA 1972-Progress Report No. 3 issued as CA Report 34 Report 40 F;epoit 43 50330 8230 Featuring Industrial Experiences and - Problems Involved in the Cooking,',Nashing Screening, and Cleaning Operations in Non-Wood Plant Fiber Pulp. itiliiis-', and Progress Reports on Kenaf Pulping 7i:Gt-iNtCAE°:ASSOf.'.CATtON:'CiF7#iE . ;['ULP AW~VA•PEftINDUSIR'If4 ONE DUNWOODY PARK, ATLANTA•, GA. 30341 I ~S 0 0 r) C~ 2 2 U 0
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50330 8252 ~ Tappl~e-Spa'elaV;Technicar. Assdc:= Pub l. No, 9 Techr. ;crl Aseor,intxon of k'Ulp tind Pa,r.; r Indanfxy CXhC?71u1'TION, AND STORAGE Gc ttiU:3:.';iIViS. (A':)jiiAs ir•;C{.L:l "ZtE:iilicC.l Ao.^'cc. pl:bl.• 'No. 3) 1955 5t~ ~~. :v3t: xOI':: Q~ A A o 42 2 0 2 9
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50330 8251 Technical Aaocciatioa of fihc Pulo and Paper Inds%strr - WF'i` STRa-IGi'F' IU PAPER A.D PAPE~'.ErJl~ (Tec~a4cA1~~lss~cigCion o#.-~:~a PuIp and :Satias ;tto. 29) 1965 159 Pages TAPPI Hew Yczk --:~.~.~;......
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/ I f I 50330 8248 ) I TS 1109 Te ARCHER Technical Association of Pulp and Paper Industry PAPER COATING PIGMENTS (Techiiical~ s•~M.rf lWnograpti Series l~o: "~0) 1P :an~ ~ Paper- Iadustry ~ 235 pages TAPPI New York 1958 os00no;z2o2s
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0 v 5 0 .W sE`: r':I t,, A ~.ta. Y •(~V'1 6 r+ ~..r+y',;7 fT rr'~ rr~!T ~SZB OEfOS
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/ ! I ~ 50330 8255 ~~ . ~ .,...__ ISSN: 0308-4191 XXII MeB9-79 S.P. (3ad Edition 1976) (P(JC ) ~/ YIr1yL CHLORIDE AND POLYVINYL CiLORIDE HEALTH RISKS P Compiled by J.R.A. Walker Much attention has been focussed on the cancer risks and other hazards. 6,~,,ciated epeoduch and in use 1974 PVC. up bu1~1975pwhichsmaa be of a,m~r of general PaP Publis P J Y Y lnterest to ~ese~e~M19S1spe~alipassn separatelY; span the period 1 Y 1975. TThe list is in two parts: raRes 1-6 were first issued in November 1974, while Part 2 (beginning on ` page 7) updates and expands the original selection, Arran.~..-~=~t The items have been separated into a number of broad areas of interest according to their main theme.
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50330 8266 ~ I Manufacturin.- Chemists' Association. Technical data on plastics. Wasbinbton,1J52. vii, 1S4 p. illus. 29 cm. Bibliography: p. 177-178. 1. Plastics. r. Title. '1'A455.P511i3 r *GGS.41 G3-S2'. Library of Conp;ress n 0 n A 22 0 43 A
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-n1:az.?, cau..ou.Sn ;xo,l~ Fsaj1 'STGA V Aacrox Q16'[--,96I GL-69 `Cn-09 `Fq-Aq `.Cg-9965 ,~.. ~ ,. . ~ Ci'i 1 uud "NLL ao fi`JIZ%'!;?CES`3 ~Ca3e"puX aodwd puv dTna 0143 30 aoTjvpoc[r~ jaaTuy3ax .~,=~r~ F~~3~:'sAr.rS9zt~&.~`-l~zsl~lfi~6l~tfTtt~~ :t:~tS?t~K ThT ~ Esze oEEOs , . , i w
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/ r ~ ' [Y - da ; #'sapG N PULP A_~~D P :Pu~ Fy~IJ~ kP,iY,~956 AHb trtz~D s;.VA?a pAT MITAs 1955-1956 195 4 9ols, TE.PPZ New York 0 . . .. . . . ~ . .. - .. , --~-~--~-..-.,,... . , .. ~ ~ % . .... _ /- . ~ ~ o s0 0 n o z:~=Uo
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i 50330 8234 } ~ .....•:,, . _t . _~.,,.. ~~I .._. . .._ iTe4 • (1ne~ .?.a:JJ o l / o r4 2 O ' '
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50330 8243 a Te 4,tTectmfcaa~Associatfon-of-a the:hulp., and.-saser ,,ZndustYy-.-i3iirect,ory,-,~~'ie~~bers ~~ Techricca lsssociari.on oi the Pulp ai:d Pagor Iadt kar.acy TECIItdsCr3". JZ.SJCIErl.'ZG~i OI' T1.E PL~'LP tati2 FAnr.c, INDUST1a YEAI'tEdO,;~ 1966-67, tii-G5, 6!3-uy, 69-70 J 96G-I970 T!}Yl'I . --x: , .-,- -.. ,,.,- ...,.-- - 1 0 5 0 0 0 0 2R 0 20 4 Voia. Kew Yo: k ,
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! 1 Acetate Tow for cYgarette Filters ` Q ()EAS,.*rA2CF+Q.IID3L FRODUCTS, INC., Kingsport, Tennessee EASTIdAN CNEM1CAL INTER!1ATIOt.AL A.G., Zug, Switzerland EASThSAr1 CNEhfICaL Ir1TER-AMERICt.N LTD.. KinPsoort- Ten,nesve'
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~ , . ) 50330 8262 - ; Q Langford, Reginald A ed. .210 Technical and commercial dictionary, edited by R. A. L Langford nnd 1L.11r. Aeberhard. New York, Chemical Pilb. Co. t19; 21 ~ 3 v. In 1 (1024, xvi p.) 22 cm. Each vol. has special t. p. only; v. tlt (with t. p. in I:n;;lish) : rnr- Iish, French, and German; v. 121 (with t p. In French) : French, Ger man, and Lnglish; Y. 13, (with t. p. ln Gernian) : German, English, nn( French. 1. Technology-Dictiona:les-Polyglut. 2. Connnerce-Dlctionar Ies-I'olyglot. r. Acberhnrd, It. W., joint ed. u. Title. nt. Title Dictionnaire technique et commercial. iv. TItle: 1VurterUuch der Tech liik und des Ilnndels. T10.L25 1952 ~~ 603 52-`?05•' . Library of Congress 1201 . ~....~...e.......^7*sv~y~..~.. 0S0 0 no 22. 03..9. .
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0 U 0 0 5 0 C) T' . .. . ( t•. .,i. . . _~. . . .. i 1 .~~:~ . 1 l . . .. . ... . .. . , .. . . _ ` .•~ .a . 'uunY 'II .{., - .-~ .: ~ 9SZQ OEEOS
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1 50330 8197 } Modern Converter 17(5)33-35(1973) XX MeF -1I-711-73 TLExo PRESS REVIhIa ~ Kidd~r Press Dits;on The •"stack-type" press is one in ' N•hic.h the color units are arran;cd Moo.c$usir,tss Fcrnts vcrtically,-:or stacked-up one above 77icre 2re basically three typcs of thc other. The general configuration presscs in use--central impression,• is for the printin~ section to be com- stack, and in-line cauipment. The posed of two stacks of cithcr two or . presses tlat are most commonly used, three colors in each stack, dependind and the ones that we arc mosi familiar on v.hcthcr it is a four-color or six- a7th, are tlse stack-type presses and the , color press. In general, the material central impression cylinder presses. Mill run vertically from top to bottom At this poirtt, I'll just mention that through one stack, and then reverse an "in-litu" press is one in which the its direction and go bottom to top, in material flows from an unwind stand the second stack %vith final drying throu,h an rnfced unit to thc printing stations, which are arranged in tandem, Kith one eoaor following directly be- hind the other, and then, from the color units to an outfccd section, to the rcwind- In this type of application, the ink can b: dried complettly be- tween each color station, or partially dried bet..-ecn colors with a final dryer after'the last color. wone large diameter, centrally located . - . . i . . - ~ U` 5 0 0 0 0, 2 1. y.7 5 } accomplished after the'printing of all colors and before rewinding. A "central impression cylinder" press is much thr santc as a stack- type press, except that the color unit in a stack press will have its own in- dividual impression cylinder, H•hcteas, in a central impression cylinder press, r the color units are grouped around In general, a central impression cyl- indcr press will be best whcn running tatensible films. When I say it will be best, I mean from a rcristcr stand- point only. A Ccntral impression cyl- indcr press will maintain hctter register on lifihtwcicltt cztcnsiblc fi!ms than will a stack-type or in-line press. The primary reason for this is that the material is supported by th; imp rc. sion cylinder through all colors. with no chan:c for any slight tension varia. tions, or in between dr)'crs to iuf:ucnca and affect thc web travel. 'Ilre stacl:-typc presscs, hmt•cvcr, do ' have their place anti can do a very•,- acecptablc joh, on certain classifi;.a= tions of extensible films and on more stable materials such as cellophanes, acetatcs, papers of various grades. There are some grades of papers for which a central impression cyl- indcr press is completely impracticaal.
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TOB:1Cl:Cj--P,l?~~I ;!Jai,ST:~--"fObACCU; TS TOBACCO--MANUFACTURE AND TRE.DI.-=-TEClIldO].0!"-Yj7'OBaCCO--TEh?.'aT'%,i'IG 221oC1 Di TOBACCO--QUALTTY CON7.';tOL/TOBACCO--PACKACIN: /TO13!'.CCO--SC{u,z;E-•-A~;i,LYSIS/ 1973 T013t.CC0--ISUI?aIING PROI'E'r.'TIES--DETr?L*tiNATION/ ° RJR CLASS NO. TE};T]t00K TS 2240 I)i 1973 Dikker, G. L. ; Dorokhov, P. K. ; Skiba, G. M. *(no 3~t~FlC~?t1R$410»AQT4ACCp_,Rf.QAlJCTS` . Pishchevaya Pr.o:•:yshlenno :t, `Iosaow, 221 I). (1973) (in Russian - Table of Contents-translated -into English) ~. ,F. .....;.-.,...~,..,..•,~... .r .r----a-n-.-r- 0 S 0 0 0'0 2 2 U:i 7
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r Vt Re -79t • 50330 8261 ) RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET, VI Re9-79 S. P. 9 Scherer, G. - - S.p, > *(Verband Cigarettenindustrie, Hamburg, Germany) '!3'E~~~'~61~FtL•'NT$ G THE`~LLS.~ TIQ~i~~°1~:~C}iMII~T."~~ 'kiAT r10R$ ~ A~~~1~ 1979)-in German. ' See ref. by F. Schmidt below.•, - - - :~ RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET VI Verband Cigarettenindustrie, Hamburg, Germany, memo, 2 pp. (June 20,' Re9 79 S. P. . *(Univ. Mannheim, Director Research Inst. Preventive Oncology, Clini cal Dept., Germany) * • ~ ENVIRONMENTAL NITROSAMINES COME PREDOMINANTLY FROM TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND NOT FROM BEER. . Schmidt, F. . , I Univ. Mannheim, News Release, (Schmidt, F.) Germany (1979) (in Cermz *Abstr. in: Arztl. Praxis, 1979, (No. 48) pp. 2258-59, (June 16;`197 The amount of nitrosamines in tobacco smoke is much higher than in food products and beer. The lion's share of nitrosamines is not taken up in the consumption of food products and beer but in smoking the . , I ; ~Heidelberg studies found a maximum of 68 ppBt nitrosamines in beer. Ho mann t- -t~--t ~, un~ 88.6, p~- n-,~{ tr sonornicotine in dry tobacco leaves. '---~}~ ~ - -~~ -- --- ~ r
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i 50330 8279 1 r ~1{~f 1149 <Te aLRechni-c'sl"rEdtl7eetion-u.,i,SiiA.~568aruooicsz ;:>. Techr,icxan e4Z ucation yearbook. 1963/64-- Ann Arbor, b1ic1l., I'rakken Publications. v. tllus. 30 cm. 1. Technlcnl educntion-U. S.-Yearbooks. 2. TecbniclAns 1n tndus- try-U. S.-Yearbooks. I . T73.T4 tt - , 63-22652 L(brnry of Congress ~ -' 16801 050 0 0.0 2 2 d 5,-b" ,
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, , 50330 8267 210% 1:972 Comui. Dott. Iug. GI!)RG10 MAROLLI FUIiGA COII\INI cic dlrottcrc FIAT D1Z° 0 MARM0 FEC~,TICO '~`E ~r =, ~~~i : ~~y.-.,~.~`~~~~.'~~:CS~~A~~Y-~.}-- IENGLX.tiII-ITILLIA\T IT.,:LIA.N-EtiGLI.SII _ wi.th sc~n.,rate.il.lt.,;lr~.~10115 : 11b:C111A 1•:DI%lO\L•' )C1\')al;T.\ ): A\I['LI:1TA F. L?,~ 1M4NlN'ILIl EDI'1'OIIL - FIRE1GE - ..__ __. >._.._.. «. ..-._...__~~~..~:.. . ~.._~. w _ ... .._....._,..._...,.,.. DICTIONARIES, TECIINICAL--LANGUAG:/11ICTIONARII•:S--ITALIAid- ENGLISti/ DICTIONARIES--T:NCLISH-ITALIAN/ENGLISII LANGUAGE--. DICTIONARIES-ITALIA,N/ ITALW LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--ENGLISII/ , . . ~.~~on0 2 2044
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141 Te 1973 TAPPI Atlanta, Georgia ~9~2-1 _-....r...,. ki . r " % ~..-------•-~--- ---^-r -. . ;r - . . - . .;~ .
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/ e 50330 8276 ` III Du2-79. S.P. Author: Interessengcxneinschaft Aerosole e.V., Frankfurt/Main, Gernkany (Geiman Association for Aerosol Interests) f Z`itle: A2 ~ ~ I 'YS ~ Pf#~ 'tA :~U90I; '~ ALSO - A RE17ID9 OF 'l7Ds' SCIUri'IFIC STATUS OF 11IF Q?AIVT:. }IYPC'IEI:SIS. Inaorm-~~~icr~an ttber..cliaWissenschaft a :30. - 1a n. :4 .4. 4 -* --._._ K _.. .
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Gv?~uiU.t :35.•..::.....::~-.v:'S~ :.~ ~ 0~ 0 0tl 0 ,~ ~ t~ 2~
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t~~zzcuoci .so . 0 T fial't~.i[-F15ia: c?S •V •y ow#ftibRr t OLZB OCE05
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i I 50330 8271 NdQ!lwai~'ii~s-~lTS'd~J~$!K!!'~!':G`J!'~^~c~Etr.r.4Cr ?~~k2&ar.~L~dt~~{~y~': ~~ ~~rR~~C~tiS. ~ Le Magnen, Jacques. Voclbullire techniquo des cnracteres organoleptiques et do ]a denustation des produits alimentzires, par J. Lo Mab en, avec 1a. collaboration do M. Braudeau iet al.l Paris, Centro national do la recherclio scientifique,13G2. 86 p. 24 cm. (Les Cablers techniques du Centre nltf(mal do coordination des dludes et recherches sur Ia nutrltion et I'nlimenta- tlon, 11) Cover title. 1. hbod-Terwinology. i. Title. (Serfe:j: France. Centre na• tional do com•dinattou des Ftudes et recherches sur la nutritton et 1'ulimet) tntfou. CahterF technlques, 11) T1341.I'J36 no.11 64-55174 Library of Congre4s 0 5 0 0 0 02 2 0 4 8
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, r 1 50330 8264 • . -f F-icr--IOzi,---N~f \if=/f =LUOi~UCA(:QON ISSUE III Du2 76 ASHRAE Jour.18(8)23-24(1976) S.P. I i i- TECNNICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR REFRIGERATION AND ~1IR ".COb'DITIONING.~ H.O.SPAUSCNUS Fellow ASFlHAE iN 1930 Thomas Midgley and lAlbert Henne published a paper recommending the use of fluoro- halo derivatives of aliphatic hydrocarbons as ideal refrigerating agents.' The open- fng sentences in their cla5sir•.c paper defined the required pro- perties of refrigerants, and these ret,airements are as valid today as they were forty-six years ago: "It is essential that a medium lor mechanical relrigeration be .stable anongci•cq~ros{,~e ~nd 0 possess s t~~lr7Z vJ{Ior ~/es re characterrstics. These may be halocarbons as working fluids in vapor compression refrigeration and air-conditioning machines. The unique properties of these materials led to their use for other purposes as :vcll. By 1973 the worldwide halocarbon pro- duction exceeded two billion lbs. A breakout of fluorocarbon hCG je as refri"~.~ilu:it.ri -rid tVr cther uses is given in Fig. 1.2•' About 90~10 of the total produc- tion is comprised of R-11 (CC13F), R-12 (CC1zF2) and R-22 (CHC1Fz). Howover, quantities usc;d tor refrigeration and air- ~con,¢iti~~inmg~ I'irposes are el~wel ; ulout 35% of the total R-12, less than 10% of the •-, ,' r) ,, t,n.i r,harN G7^,o of the will diffuse into the upper at• mosphere and, in a series of complex photochemically initiated reactions, deplete the ozone layer. Inipairment of the ozone shield is thought to in- crease the potential fer skin can- cer and to have far- reaching ef- (ects on global climate and _- -weather paiieins. This hypothesis has received wide at- tention from scientific journa!s, newspapers and popular magazines. Notwithstanding the fact that the hypothetical hazard derives frorn world-wide produc- tion and use of halocarbons, proposals have been made to ban or restrict suspect fluorocar- bons at the r;tatn nnr+ -r4-1 IT-
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50330 8287 T Wi-7R 'nrth mrotinn CtrntP Irniv~rGitv nt Rm1.Pt~- ' h, S.P. T). N. 'Till T.ihrirv, Thr Te-chnical Tnfnrm'Itinn CAnter 1'Pr11*1TCA1:^T?~IFnP*tATTO*1 SFRVTrFq FOR NnRT11 r,12OT,TVA T'V'.'1T1STRY (T'4~f1R'41TI(1N FOR MMUSTRY, PRCCRA*1 AND S1:RVtrF.S) 1979 RatPigh, Vorth CArotina os~0 n o;~20$4 4
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~'~i `69d :Tea %~lcehfh. Technical Agsociation of Pulp ar.d Paper Induutry (2vPI Spcciel Tcct-.nical :.soociation PuDiicat:on }Io. 6) 161 Pa1as 1969 MPI New York i . : i -.,~....,..,,.},~,.,*-.,,..»..,,s, ;...... .-..,..r~...~.. ,... . . . _ . . . . . 50330 8281
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50330 8273 , GERI`fA.J LA~lGUAGE--DICTIO:;AR!J:S=-i:NGI,LSILl•~: •, !. 1 b'I • •7 .. . .. • TS~i`Z'I1NhtT1G~~~'`lSICTIfi~,11Tt2'~S==GEF1~iA~\~CTIONIIRIES---E.~hT1.1 .,ET'F,IN Q Et~GItiJ:EP.I`~~,--DICTIO:'.;I;II;~ ~ .. ,. _ ENGLISH-GCF;f11iAN : by Ilig. FiUDOL( WALTHEfR ~ ~.. . Contatning about 35,003 lechn(cal terms PERGANfON PRESS OXFORD•NEW YORh•TORONTU• SYDNc:Y • BE,AUNSCIiWEIG o ~ n o n o 2 2 05 0
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-,- _ ~-~.-..v- ^^-,------,-.--- ._-._- ^- - _ 50330 - - 8294 ) RJR CLASS NO. TEXTBOOK QA 76 Te 1982 Fort Lee, NJ. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: A NEW TOOL FOR PLANNERS IN INDUSTRY AND BUSINESS. Technical Insights, Inc..Fort Lee; NJ.S?.(IN : ENG,) ISN = 3750 ~ 5 0 0 n 0 2 2 0 7 1
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/ t 50330 8282 } - r 7s".Z' !,4n 14 , (11u f P~'1` F? 11, ,wr~ t Ft~ ~" /r~~q~- fEs~' r i ~ '~~' ] • ! '~ ~' `i,I V:r ii. tE a~ LS/'.~:r ~.'~.rs~r..+.. . . F, -~ O © f ~..~.~~c a1 ~~•4 pi 4l n, re*-. !A NATIONAL [3UREAU OF STANDARDS, u.S. DEPARTMENT Q:' EOMM.r-.IiCty H.'.vlason and Iris M. Lloyd Editors 0 s Q Q 00,22059
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50330 8265 I _._ .. ~ -- ..~ .,.........::.... ..,d.,,>v..~.. Electroen.eFhalogra h. and Clini:al %europh>siolop• 3/ C19,71) .~r u~s mg Compam. Amsterdam - rinte in ta . etherlands 80 II Ey-81 flT EcH`It xl"TC .ow.TYOVS S.P. J. HA\LEY. W. R. ADEY. I. R. Z%VEIZIG A\D R. T. K.4,DO Sipace Biologr Laboratory, Brain Resxarch Institute. Cnirersin- of California. Los Angt/es. Calif. 90024 1 C.S.A.i t Accepted for publication: July 31. 1970) An electrode-amplifier harness has been designed and It is now essentially a bathing cap configuration with developed in this laboratory under theaegisof the \ational snap-in electrodes, requires one or 2 mtin to don. and no : Aeronautics and Space Administration for monitoring adjustments are needed afterwards (Fig. 1). There are the EEG of astronauts in awake and sleep states during no etcessive pressure points, and it is comfortable to • space missions. The harness has special features w-hich ww in difficult emironments for long periods. The onl. E recommend its use in a wide range of clinical and be- special preparation necessary is the appliation of electrode t luvioralappliqtions.ItalloNsacquisitionofphl lLiologial gel in minimal amounts. The harness thus has marked dtiy froqr,phy#isralt~ctive,fttbjeQs o1} nop4intt~krena advantages for investigator and subject over current "3 b~ EEG E~, ~~G Cstid bJ~bd-pressure senson are methods, whose limitatiaas include tedious application . ,.,,~,. ..- x.,.. ... ..A -._. _._ -.. . _ . . , , _
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50330 8278 1 . :t .,.s,.._ - i. -.............w.~~~~.....~...+~._._. _ ___ - .~r~._.._.~.-....~..-...~..~.~.~_«...~.«1ai..~.y i 15 22/,0 x n7.I`tOlUr,:r!l, 11. 1 :ii l.~e ~:~liL i)t.i.•J.1U .~.:.,..~:~. . _ . . . . ~ .. .. . ~•/ 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 5 Y
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~, 50330 8283 l .. ~ , ,hw'3l.7R~T TICA Conference, Drexel In.stittrte of Tech,nalogy, 1961. Teclinic;il inf,)rmltion center a~Imillistr;cticm. F,ditea by Arthur W. 1:1iss. «Tashinrton, Spartan Boolcs, 19G~.; ' vi, 171 p. lllus. 2-l,cpw. .((D:exel Institute science seriesj) Sponsored by the Drexel Institute of Technology; Inforwatiou SCienc_e Dept. Includes bibliographies, X 1. Technology--Inforiaation serrices. i. Eli1S, Arthur W., ed. rr. Drexel Institute of Technology, Fhilndelphia. Information Sci- ence Dept. ia. Title. ZG75.T3T2 Library of Congress 0 s 0 0 0• 0 2 20 4 026.6 6"61-19 '~J ~63fiS~
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I 50330 8277 N : / ~ ... .. ~ .a t I Worn Rrv-arrA Volrpp. 233 to?60. PcrRamon Press 1974. Printed in Great Britain. ' . 1CAE,' REYlC1j Al R SO\tLNDU B. NlA1U\1DAR Applicd Chemical-C•nginccring Scction, Nuclear [ncineering Department, [hasco Setvices Incorporated 2 Rector Strect, 1cw York, NY. U.S.A. and Olls J. Si'ROUL Dcpartmcnt of Civil 1?ngincering. University of Maine, 351 Aubcrt Hall. Orono, Maine, U.S.A. 0 (Rccciccd 14 May 1973) q Ozonation of water and a•astewater is not a recently practised technique. In fact, the :tpplication of ozone can be traced hack as c;irly as mid-ninetcrnth century. Ozone has long been used to disinfect potable ~~ ater in particular. t, lth0gh oe an1icy ~on oj oz~c fQq di~fecti~n purln,tes %%as ntorc hol~ul.trZ'llan ilorlali In'~,: hcpinninti of aatcr disinfcrtit~n, ozonatior, failed to marizcd the results of oxidation by ozone in water trcatmcnt as follows: (a) Removal of colour, whether caused by iron and manganese or by pcaty matter. (b) L•limination of tastes and odours. including those which may occur duq to the presence of ehlorophenolic subitlnccs. (c) Rcmoval of I+csticidcs and other organic matcr- ~...t.:..:.,.._ ,.,,.
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50330 I)FP.A'RZ7ic'~~~sr#1iJ;6tY>~4i~rikhA~~~~4~1lC~U~Sp'liYtft# ~ 8263 XX MeC5-78 S.P. T `^) iJT''• .T 1r~ .~ a .! .,~ ~ ~..r ~1~ ,~ ~-,•r-T -'~ !~~'~ ~.,•..; 1 '~ `!~~ti~; T9'' tx 1' T-"a Pi~ r..J AL ~ lJ~ R./ ~tJ ~ i.: Ja ~ 1 d~ '~t.F ~lY iJ /:: ~v t. i i:. j 41 'v i~r : r. A . ~~~ ~',T~~!~~~~ ~ :t:..t'j \ .-,F P~~~.~ I~d =,~~~':~~,.~: ~~ P 0 T ~ Iki L ~~ ~ ~ ;•~ r: I~ ~ , .i~ kru xu. j ...:aw_ r, v s ..::A ,. A N :~ A 1`4 1 TVA* by 13ou,~ G. U1~SPt"" Emeritus 1'rofes9or of !'hurmechlogy, r icc+ical 1=aculty, University of Pretoria, I'r;torla •Praentld in tbbrevinted fofm tt the Congre» of the Soulh African i'{tetm.t:otu.-lcnl'snctety, held nt thc Clunycni ltotel, Uurbun, (ru: 1976-10-1$ to 1976-10-20 •$t'reaent Addresr botunicrl Kcmnrch Institute, Nriratc Hug XI01, I'rcturin ISBN 0 621 03641 5 Afnhllnnz~rurtlYn 11k+ltr~i lIc ~SotAh ~(/litrr 6y~ffie DIMrr19enr of Axrirtdrtrral 1rc•hnrrnl rervk,rs, 1'rr•turla and uhlo'n,uhhftwn thr D(reclur. Divtrlun ojArrlcufrurra htPurrnaNon, I'rh•urc GrK XMI, Prrrurld
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; 50330 8293 . . / ' REF Q 150 Te 1972 INFORMIRTION SOURCES/ , TTA tniormation Services Company ' An Affiliate of litchnology Transfer Associates, Inc. -ANO PATE~TS ~:'~ 07 (1912 EDITION) 4 West 4th Avenue San Mateo, California 94402 (415) 343-3270 r
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TS 1109 T . TECHNICA~: `INFORMATION 'SHEETS'. TOchrr!Ce3 J'.SZOcius:len of ~~ is::cp aad rs; ek• TEQ3:iXCFi? Cl'w::i.~.ie . ,-t6, dt& 0 5 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 6. 6
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No . _ . ~~=~ucl"rYw&::umatu, (1969) u,;y North Caoollna State Univeraitp atc Rulcacgh, D. H. H{ ll Iatbraxy, Tho eec:an3aal Intoxmatioa Conter TeCHt3YCAL rN; Ul~~`L~'t{~~l S.F.RY''OS T'r7R ?iOF~'Y'I~2 CAr`3i,I2dEi TtiD00T: 1 ~969 4 YaSea Welgh, North C.zrolfzew 0 -kV os~oc~a 2 20~; . , r.- - .-.~.r.~ ~.. . ' :J
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z 5ozr0 u 0 0 s o •...., ..~.,,~r~..... ~... •1 U SosCd ,Z tcoY:1viaad;xuX jva}tc~.~;~?.i. iN.4f.,a L96t '2I3.Ie:GQIH 30 IdOZYWI'TSLi1'I 'uospnot.l 'il PtciA (OL6T) 90M I (oeza ofFOs r ! -`
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.50330 8275 .-vv 5 :........ . ........: .s:.:r.~ w.:xi/~: Fa ~_. , .~ . ~.:,.~ . r..~ < _.,:.::~. ..•>..._.. _ v _,- ,. .,.. ;i+J 7~t:" 1.,~•~ rr~, e 1~,YTTr,. C~.:-:~ vi ~::; :~.tt;!. '_~.;•. , ,.. . ._ ., ~. ,; ;~. :~1lwe i!'r f/• -tid`!. PTl4 b. itirra•3 i • _ . , • •>u v , ~ JL:~`y *~'~v 5. p'J • l e ~e tl'( 1 t•L~.'t.:r` ~1 ~'C tn Ta•. C•.,;..._ n^ ., e r .~ . ~ C, " ~ y.4 •~ i 1',' i3 i. ....•,;:.ilU ~ l ll,?L:ti "Cil7A(: ))~ S3'C'; ]i`S T) ~ v lii.e,` ::c:.-liti'tift? Ui . ..et~.!:IJ • 1 _ • "-'- r..~-~• _.s°-'c.+ - ~~ :..-.... ~ -. : r~ 0 S 0 0 0 0 22 0 •-7 2 ,' . . . . . . r•)4';w„ .+-...--~-+^~~°-~+Trf71~w'S•R~TC"l1. ,
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50330 8295 See also Librar:ie s O • . ~ . .. .,.,,......-.-,. ,._... ..~.,~.,,,~,..,,~,.~.. 2 2 U 7
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RUSSL^.iI LANGUAGF.--TECNNICAL RUSSIAN/RIJSSIAN LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--POLYGLOT/ FRENCH LeU;fiUAGF:--DICTIONAFII:S--POLYGL01'/GERtfAN LA*1GLTAGE--DICTIONARIES--FOLYt;I,OT/ ENGLISH Lh?1GUAGE--DICTIONARIES--GERNAN/ENGLISH LANGtIAGE--DIC.TIONARIES---FRENCII/ ENGLISII LAhGUAGF.--DICTIONARIES--RUSSIATlt/ENGLISIi LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--POL1'GIAT/ DICTIONARIES--GEP.t,f1W/DICTIONARIES--FRL•'NCH/DICTIONARIES--RUI;SIAN/ ranzos DICTIONARIES--POLYGLOT--TECIINOLOGY/ Q 210 Su I 1973 9 TLCHNIK-ZYIIRTERBUCH p~'~~,~"~~ ~~.,~ 3 Vols. Englisch YOL.1., A.,M ~ DeUtSCh VOL:2 'N-Z F vOL.I REGISTER Russisch Von Dipl: btatb. Rall Sube r_.v und Prot. Dr. rer. nat. habiL Giinther Eisenretch Mit etwa 75000 Fact,begri!(en M VEB VERLAG TECIINIK BERLIN a a 0 0 0 () - 2 2 0.4 9. ' 50330 8272 . i
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I ~iCechr~.ic~l librarics.. , ~ Z Hilligan,Aiargaret P ed. H Libraries for research and industry: planning and eqtiip- ment. A project of the Science-Technologgy Division, Spe- cial Libraries Association. New York 119551 58 p. llhis., plans. 28 cm. (Special Libraries Association. DSono- graph no. 1) "Based on a program on library nlanninh and equipment that the Scienco-Technolot;y Division presented at the 44th annual meeting of the Shccial Llbrnries Association at Cincinnati, Ohio,.May 1G-21, Z.9:74.r1 1libllography : p. 50-w3. 1. T(Thntcul librnries. 2. Industrial nrt libraries. r. Shecial Libraries Association. Science-Techuulugy Group. II. Title. ries) ZG75.T3II5 ~ ~ 022 G5-10530 Library o! Congress 1101 . . , .'w•v.•[ .lot.....~r.....--..-..--•.•.'... r',-. - .. ..~,.+~i.:.....v.~c~.~..~ ~...~.w.a~.T!'F.p..~., 0 s0 4 c~ c~ 2 2 U ~~
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50330 8290 } T3chniccl ?.asac~Atijc.u oi the kAqp o-;Aa 2t;per w'atam zCiu-~wl Replaces 2'APPI Data Sheets I • ~~oonQ2. 2u67,.
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50330 8285 j Tc " • ~`~~ ..- . .Y _ . . . . 678 t~~ 24 .4C T??::tlf21Le? Q.r^, !!u~(3 Z'~~UZ1~.3 '~(+ 4)y r, ::~;;;, Sr::,d•tczn ~ •-: ; .77 ~""~~.aqrr+nr.c, o~ A 0 ~ rt ~ 2 0 6 2
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/ i 50330 8288 ~ .wTechnical,Tnformatioxi Sheets .* SEE ALSO , TAPPI Data Sheets -?.`i`'.'sr 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 6 5:
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50330 8303 j 5t 7 ~t~~ic~i ;~`(1965) C.)
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, , _,.~ t.ls ~ 50330 8 ~ 268 DICTIONARIES--POLYGLOT--TECHN0L0GY/LANGUAGES--DICTIONARIES/ Q 210 Mo 1970 i !. T9C9KIC11L`~'31I4CTI0NAR1F TECHNIK-1Yt7RTER BUCH ~ d9EC2ROSCOPY---SWTRAL ANALYSIS Spektroskopie - Spektralanalyse English English Gernan - Deutsch French Fransais ~~ Russian _ ~rc,~a ----_f - Espanol Cesky Polski Magyar hmusgegeben Spanish Czech. Polish '! Hungarian . `_ .. ton Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Heinrich Moritz : ;,, , . tand Prot. Dr. Tibor Torok VEB VERLAG TECHNIK BERLIN
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,..:..,_.~_._~... ,.. ._......._..........s._._;,:.._..:..~.:.Y.w...._ RA 976 ~T~chni cal. J.Jbxatiear~~:~:~ ~ Me rE})IG.AL P=^J? LIBRARY SCYh;NGE E.d,A-?iEtdATICtd PEV'I,E4J B40Y., Vol. 1, E,r,iyeri by Af.ary k'au].F.ae Grc*~orio 196-9 261 Pages N-~-ej3cek Lnam;nation Noca York PubAisnin?, Co;ap;n; , Im. ..... ~:.~:~ _ ..~.__...._:..' : ,w....;
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50330 8302 ~ Z 675 Sp 1951 I I i „~1t~.#~C~;~~~3R~1~~ESS G r:~t~Jt~pQRGANIZA' gIO:~ Special Libraries Association, Science- Technology Group. Technical libraries: their organization and management. Lucille Jackson, editor. New York, Special Libraries Association [1951j 202 p. illus. 24 cm. a~ a Q n a 2 2 a7 9
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/ .50330 9284 ) Published by S f ' " "S ~I G ~.Q +~CA L I 614'aPUCATeCNIS"' OF ERDA SYMPO IUT4 SERIES NO. 42/ENVIRONMENTAL tIEALT}I/ METALS--TO ICOT.OGY/WATER--POLLUTION/TRACE ELEMENTS/ AIR--POLLU ION--1•1ETALS/ METALS IN EM ENTR0,19NIENT RA 1231 Dr 1977 CONF-7 50929 c~1 c~ ifI it or i tatton Ccn~er . Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Hanford Life Adriiltristratia 'cienccs Symposium at Richland, 1Vashington, , . .. . ,.,,,. .. I I Scptembcr 29-Octobcr 1, 1975 0 S ~ A~ 0 2 Z . 1 . . • 1977 Sponsored by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories . " - and _ - Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research Energy Research and Development Administration IIarvey Drucker Pyyijond E. Wildung Chairmen
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! l ~- - =.~.~....~..~.......~....~.,~.,,~:~r....~..~ R~F 150 Gu 1972 GUIDE TO AMERICAN SCIENTtFlC 50330 8274 TEX"TILES/TR?~'~ISPQRTATIO:F/SOCIAL SCIENCES--IPiFOF*iATIt1N SOtiRCFS/F}TORTS/A~'IATIG`;/ RESEARCH--DIRECTCRIES/ PLASTICS--DIRECTORIES/PACI:AGINIfi--INFOR1SATI0:1 SOURC':S/ FISHING INDUSTFY/MANUF?.CTURERS/LIBRAP.Y SCIEi1CE/F00D--PROCESSING/ErU?LOYMENT/ EDUCATION--INFOtZ.*iATION SOURCES/DIRECTORIES--POLLUTION CONTROL/DENTISTRY/ ADVERTISING--DIRECTORIE.S/ENGINEERING--INFOR.xlATION SOURCES/ MARKETING--INFORMATIO.d SOIIRCCS/ACP.ICULTURE--DIRECTORIES/BflOI:S--BIBLIOGRApHY/ SOCIETIES, SCIENTIFIC--DIRECTOKIES/BIGG::.e1PiIIES--DII2F.CTORIES/POLLUTION/ CONVENTIONS/CO.%SPUTERS--BIBLIOGP.APHIES/T:tADE ASSOCIATIONS/ INFORMATION SOURCES--DIRECTORIES/BIBLIOGRAPHY--DIRECTORIES--INFORMATION SOURCE: CHEMICALS--MANUFACTURE AND TRADE--DIRECTORIES/MEDICINE--LITERATURE INFORMATIO.N; AND:~+~c~~~~ Editor: BERNARD KLEIN irst Edition - t B. KLEIN PU:3LICATIONS, INC. Rye, New York , ;,
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i , 50330 8313 I COMPUTERS/ QA 76 S 1981 TECHNICAL SSC Pub TIJP-1 Second Printing: January 198 ® Copyright by Synertek Systems Corporation 150 South Wolfe Road Sunnyvale, California 94086 o s 0 0 0 o 2 2 0 9 0
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- -",.~.y,..r.._+::i.....w:..s~.~...,.....~.::.:r.i.t.i:...t.n....-..~.,~".~.:y.:..al..s:a..v.~: - .r..,.,..~..._.~c.. i._._.. ._ _-- - __• _:..:_..._...__.. .._..... .. _ . _:-_.. FTI0N 1/ CRI PERIODICALS . INFORMATION, TECIiNICAL--SYSTEM DES INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS/ f fu / , ~. ~ f;,, i~ ;~ i~' ~! (G ~J ~ ~~ ...( `."~. ~AT ~~~ L~~~~:.. u u R75 ° ~-;~~~:~:~~..~~ ~ ~~`~~ ~ ;.~~. VOLUME 3, NUMBER 1, 1974 ISSN 0046-9378 ' . 50330 8292 j INI:BCC 3(1) 1-83 THE U.S.S.R. SCIENTIFIC AND T~CttNlC~'i.`~lCil=`Ot~~'v11lTl~JJf~t"S`YSTEM~'A U.S. VIEti1+-- Report of the U.S. Participants in the U.S./U.S.S.R. Symposium . , on Scientific and Tcchnical Information, Hclcl in Moscow, June 18-30, .1973 Washington Office of Science Information Service National Science Foundation October 1973 I-. - (197 )
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50330 8309 ~ 39 '1'echnische 1lrssunhen bei biaschinenuiltersnchunyen up G zur ]ietricbskontrollc. 7., i:eubenrb. AuO. 13erlin, Shringe 195~. ~ "'TeclinicaI' me>3vu:m3a~s. ; ~ CaC Grtmberg, Anton, 1575- 445 p. illus. 2-t cm. 1. :1lechantcal eubtueering. 2. 3lensuratloa. i. Title. '1'J153.G'( 1953 821.017 54-1~51 Llbrary of Congress J t^_) • . , -.. -. . . . _ . -_ .. . .. . . . .. , .ra-"T..~_..~w .7F,'K~M..ib ! .500 n n2208. b
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/ TNCt3NT~A~,'' 50330 8314 ) z 688 Un The lina Cha re n~" 1975 National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20014 0 s0A0 0 2 2091
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/ 50330 8299 .,:, Y Tc~tinf:,c4 l . :;;..~._ibrsries~~ W:. , .. M~- . , .. . , .. Steif:er-•fra;, Eleanor F., Compilc:b VIERII:A;1 LUM,faCtY DfIZEGT0Fl'Y, 3.96$-b4, A ChfrrSSLfiF.T:I3 LIST L?9 Y.EBR4I':IES IN T1iE V:'UTF.!) S7l'AV3 AND Z:Au'Lt'e.L1A blITfi PEP.SO.•iiIC.I. A2rD STI.TISTTCAIL al',T A. 26th ed. 1968 1072. P2gess R. a. Eautccx Ca+pany 2dey York r~ , I n 5 a Qno o 2 2. 0 71,6
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t GERMAN LAPIGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--ENGLISH/DICTIONARIES--TECHNOLOGY/ ENGLISH LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--GERMAN/DICTIONARIES--ENGLISIi-GERAiANI DICTIONARIES--GERMAN-ENGLISH/ ' 210 Q Wa TECHNICAL-='bY•CT '1:ONARY, • -+ . ' ~ •.. 1973 J,A -:aiL•::l TECHNIK•WDRTERBUCH ~ _ .... }at .... :., •.,.;. . . • • POLYTECHNICAL DICTIONARY :: ;.;'. ; Polytechnisches Worterbuch Volum~s , - • Deutsch•Englisch Engiisch-Deutsc5 Gezrnan-English ,~pglish-German .. :-: ~-..,...:~ t . ... •,:1.dfrir i : i. . ,..~ • •.v. Herausgegeben von Ing. RudollZYalthet MIt etwa 100000 Wortstellen AL Zwelte, durcLgesehene AuQage . 2nd Revised Edition. `VEB VERLAG TECHNIK BERLIN
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. 50330 8304 T,LUS 4J~gL~bz19 6 L.1,:1 .rili•4a' X:li:. V~f-~t~~ttx~~ ... ...2. J.r.:r 44 P..S1:$ DC::C;_ctl und Shen, x:xc. 21mr: YnY:c .!7•"r.N 0s no na 2 20 3 1
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/ 50330 8298 t 3 Z ~~I'e~nriical`r13.brarles:" 675 Sp 1951 SpecipI Libraries Association. Scicnce-2'echnology Group: Technical libraries: their organization and mans~eme7it. Lucille Jackson, editor. \ew York, Special Libraries Asso- ciation ~19u1j 202 p. lllus. 2-! cm. 1. TecLnlral 1lbrarics. i. Jackson, Lucilic, cd. r^ ~ 7.G75.'i'~t~ Ul ~~ 026.5 51•-553G rcv : LlLrary of f.vii;;rrs; jr"u_u"151 0 5 0 A~1 0 2 2 0 7 S
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. 50330 8300 l 7S 1 "- .. .... 4 . : i• J7)1111 Strauss, Lucille (Jackson) 1J03- ~ Scient.ific and tecllnical libraries: their olrnat:iz,ttion ,ut( t administration tby'1 Lucille J. Strauss, Irene M. Stricb i tand] Albert<< L. Brown. New 1 orlc, Litersciec~ce Puu lish~•rs I1;)G4t xi, 398 p. Illus. 24 cm. (Library science and documentation: , series of texts and ulonogrUphs, v. 4) Revision of Technical libr:cries: their organization and manage ment, by the Scienrn-'1'echnology Division, Special Librnries Assocln tion puhl(shed lu 1951. ~ Includes hlblios;rnphtes. 1. Sclentiflc librarics. 2. 'Technicnl libraries. r. Specinl Lt brnrfes Associntion. Cclenrc"'fechnnlogy I)ivision. 'Lbchnlcal II . , braries. ii. Title. (Series) Library of Congress tt)-]t ZC75.T3S8 026.5 ~, . o~ i~ a n o ~ 2 0 7 7
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/ i 50330 8311 New York, April 4-9, 1976 (A collection of papers given at this meeting are in this pamphlet) N,y:TI1L' L).Al'H R" I NDUSTRX. 1 .:1r. :U1.xThD - S`1'I+,TE 76 III Am John C. Wollwage and Roy P. Whitney The Institute of Paper Chemistry, Appleton, Wisconsin In recent years, staff inembers at The institute of Paper Chem- istry hav e engaged periodically in attempts to assesss the future needs of the pulp and paper industry of the United States, in orderr that our research programs might be better planned and im- plemented. This exercise has undoubtedly gone forward at essen- . ~ OS~Qnt~2 2U8 ~
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50330 8315 .i ENERGY/FINISHES AND COATINGS/ , I TP TECHNICWPOE00 986 r RADIATION CURED COATINGS 1z~ . Na '1"ELECTROCOATING 4f f P• 1976 +f WATER-BOR'VE COATINGS qz ~ • ; ARCHER r HIGIi SOLID9 C0P1TINC:S t tQ~. V POWDER COATINGS !66 e f, „ ~' Presented at the ~ Chemical Coatings Conference ~ ' Cincinnati, Ohio • April 21,22,23, 1976 Publ ished by the Chemical Coatings Division National Point & Coatings Association, Inc. Washington, D.C. 20005 Copyright 1976, National Paint & Coatings lLssociation, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. I P,) /!v. 4! .'r,. 0 5 0 0>~ ~l z'2 U 92 . .. . . ..._---- - ( .
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. . . . . • . ~ . .L _ . -_- _ 0 . a 1ma7 c~- ' . ; 50330 83 • ...._....._..--•-_-'-.~.__•--- _ r .~. . . .._ . 6-r.ew 44 i `, t , ru~11ic{lti. ' ta6.J-'i.J L . i ng ~•J.. 3:it: . . . ....e+.. 0~ ~ Q t~ o 2 2 U 11 2
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50330 8254 III Me -79 4TpWC.~'~'~'(rO~'~f#.6"ff~~`'~54 9 S.P. ,rAwSTYRFNC,'OXIDE-~, INOGENESI5_ 41QASSAYS rQF llv,lf~ ~gkU;ce - ...- .. ._ _ . U.S. Depsrtnent-of-Hea•lth;-€dmat-ion,r-and-Welfare- National Institutes.of. Health .. National Cancer Institute Bethesda, Maryland 20205 FOR RELEASE IN A.M. PAPERS Friday, September 21, 1979 Further Information: MELVA h'EBER HARRIET PAGE KENNEDY (301) 496-6641 .~. Bioassay Results in Brief: Long-term animal tests of styrene and beta- nitrostyrene have yielded no evidence of cancer-causing activity (carcinogenicity) in rats or mice of either sex. The two industrial QSheTicaas ;ffe jjse2 iT2maiDin3pehystyrene plastics, resins and synthetic r»hhnr ~ntt1-ni tv~nct~-ro~~n v.rnc r.,~*.,.7 ..~- ., tn ............~ ..,.~... ;.... ...
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50330 8317 , 1 Q Zimmerman, Oswald Theodore, 190.i- 123 Scien+,i6c and technical abbreviations, si ;ns aud symbols. Z by 0. '1'. '/,i»iniernwn and Irvin I'.avinu. 2d ed. Dover, N. I1., Inclustrial Research Service,1J18. xiv, 541 p. 22 cm. 1. Science-:lbbreviattons. 2. Tecluiolog3•-Abbre.viations. r. La- vine, Irvin, 1902- jolut autltor. (y170.Z5 1949 ~ 501.48 49---1!1 1aS" `(_..~ Library of Conoress I51x2l f U~0 0 n 0 22- 0 9, 4. . .
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/ 50330 8312 ~ /~-AS.GT.(ti rs" T;'ti CJ 0~ R Q o o :~ 2 0 t3 9 : ,
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, 50330 8307 ) I 1 : 1 56 m 98 AIR--POLLUTION--PARTICLE--DETERMINATION/ TECHNICAL REPOKT DATA • /I'l. n.r rrm/ Irr.urrrm.n un rA.• r... nr M lurr r.naplrrmr) #IA~Nr G~ ~ 0 1 E r . -. 6_0_0/7-_78-__3 PA U • J. TIfL6 •lN0 5U1111TLE S. REPOR T OATE . , Technical Manual• /+tSwvqg, ,~1~?%ent aA~; Iahods, _Ma_rch 1978 "'!"hT. . - 6. PERFORMING ORGANl1A TION COOE for Particulate ampl~ng in dustria~ Process Streams ~ ~s _ 7. AVTr.ORISI - 8. PERFORMING ORGANI2ATION REPORT W: B• Smith, P• R. Cavanaugh, and R, R. Wilson 9 PERFORAIING ORO•1NIZ.aTION NAME AND AOORESS Southern Research•Institute , 10. PRC.GRAM EIEMENT NO. EHE624 2000 Ninth Avenue, South 11.CONTRACT/GRANrNO. Birmingham, Alabama 35205 68-02-2131, T. D• 10904A 17. SPONSORING AGENCY NAME AND ADDRESS Office of Research and Development EPA 13. TYPE OF REPORT AND PERIOO COVE Task Final; 2/77-1178 , Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory ' 11• SYONSORING AGENCY CODE Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 EPA/600/13 1s.SUPPLEMI.NTARY NOTES IERL-RTP project officer is D. Bruce Harris, Mail Drop 62, 919/541-2557. 16.ABSTRACT The manual lists and describes the instruments an ec niques t a are available for measuring the concentration or size distribution of particles suspenc in process streams. The standard, official, well established methods are descril as well as some experimental methods and prototype instruments. To the extent - , . - ( nzzua4. ., .
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50330 8306 s HFMTSTRY, ANAT.YTTr.--nUANTTTATTVF./ EPA-600 7-77-143 ~. TITLE AND 6UeT(TIE~• -_ • tt. R[~ORT pAT6 Technieal Maxiua~ for the Analyeis oly ue~s,:;;;~ D3cember 1977 ~ 6. P6RFORM(NO OROANIZA t10N COOB . ). AUTHOR(S) . PBRFORMINp ORGANIZATION HEPORT Ni L. N. Dava.dson, W. J. Lyman, D. Shooter, and . ;; J. R Valentine O.PERFORMINO OR4AN12ATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT NO. • Arthur D. Little, Inc. EHB529 Acorn Park 1. c T1G ANT N. Cambridge, Massachusetts '02140 . 68-02-2150, T.D. 20602 12.SPONSORING AGEIJCY NAME AND ADDRESS 13. TYPE OF REPORT AND PERIOD COVEREI Office of Research and Development EPA' Final• 12 76-12/77 , SPONSORI ENCY C Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory 14. NG AG ODE Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 EPA/600/13 l 1S.SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES ~'RL-RTP project officer is Larry D. Johnson, Mail Drop 62, 919/541-2 557. t AesT~Cr 1 he manual is for use as a guide in research projects concerned with fuel combustion. Basically, it describes and discusses standard methods of sampling and analysfs~~for-a ~r~.r~tyl-pf ~,ydr~oc*bm~h fulels~ The analyses covered are those of prime concern'fo t~ie com ustion enainPnr? nn aitAmnf ia '+,o.i4 f~ .+~.~e-~ -11 L`_` -~- r
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{ 50330 8310 ) --....,... w,...~:.._..._..._ , • ~:. .. w:.,.,:..~.,.~.,.~.;. CHEMISTRY, A^tALYTIC/ METALLURGY/ -:~.T~CI l I C.:~I:~~~~ ~`~' ~I 4 D ~ .:~~ . f k 0 0 : TOTAL ISSUE, TEa THOUSAND. ,.~E1 N E1 LY. ALBERT H. LOW, B.S. Grad.att of Efats. lest::wtt of Technoloq.v; /ormtrly CAitf Assa•rer, United Stalet lfent, Utnrtr; forme.ly Ltiotf Ghtmnst, tiouon omi CoJorodo )mt/tiny {I'orhs, ArpAttmber o/ tenotncan CLtrntca! Sact:ty; .ttcmbtr of 5vcitty o/ CAt•mtcal lr.Jrt:r}; Sltmbtr o% tt'ettonr ittnciution of Teclhntco! Chtmists and Aferaarryuts; tetmber of esr.n of Von Jhuts .nd Low, Uenc:et, etc., ttc. ~ ElG1IT11 EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED . • rE\V YORK JOHN WILEY & SONS, Ixc. Lo,\Doti: CII aP\1:1N S: HALL, LI:.aTED 2 20 8. t
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50330 8322 /REFRIGERATION AND REFRIGERATION MACHINERY/ TA Tef16ical/fublishing Companyj 403 VPLAN ,T YENGINEERIN(:, HEATING, AItZ, CONDITIONING 6 VENTILATING. Te 1976 vBRRAND PREFERENCE STUDY. i976 ARCHER 1976 Technical_Publishing Company 0 500 0 02 2 0 9 9
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r II MeA -79 S.P. 1 SI:1S HREE Y EAR STUDY 0~I ~STAT~ ICS APlD ~VIfiO:F:E:TAL FACTORS IN VfiEALTIi ~t~i+~itlrlE~ogeoss~t~~er~t~~~ ~ Preparcd For • TIIE~'lJ.S. ENERGY RESEARCN AND DEVI:T.OPi•1l:NT AW1LaISTRATIOY UNDGR CONTRACT NO. EY-7G-S-02-2£374 /SIAM INSTITUTE FOR MILTHEMATICS AND SOCIETY rIZ."jt SOCfCTY POR INOU."iTfilAL AND /\PPLI[(7 M/\TML:MATICS • ,. December 1977 A n9..6
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0~z 0 U U U 5. p n 9g0,1.VT muooc7 ~c~o~~d~s~ya.lo0 ap .4a uo7.4TxDrIooo a-p unjqz1s,;a-e^.xp • df1 uCj g jUT • °a`1oi1.T119 Gl it7ll CU 8~•a.~aYYtsa:~ taoi W yIQo"U'la 1 V Df, XtXi J I X1'a YC1Y'u- /o Pu.l -Xl); U0 t? V" !•U4M0 `xsa~uqaa~,;~~d ,r)17. ~' "1000 u&9~77 9 aT r ~~ 10E8 0£fOS
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80 III Te ~ '~OPERATION MANUAL 50330 8320 ~ for the L7echnicon Instruments Corporation ~ TECHNICON BLOCK DIGESTOR Models BD-20 and BD-40 TECHNICAL-PURI,ICATION_.No. TA4-0323•1 AUGUST 1977 This publication supercedes Technical Publication No. TA4-032300 dated June 1974 and May 1975, and, No. TA4d323-10 dated September 1975. i ~'.nr+a M.. r.e /,;.%.!.. ~~7.. .. p S ~ Q tI 0 2 2 0 97
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.~~-.w.`.......a..,....._....~...~...r.+.....r....,,.... ,...........,r..~...w.r..+-.tL'.~...~a~_._~.........,.~.+....... ....,....~...v. ._._.~............~~..w.. i , ;~ ~'~cI nica1~-Pa pers , ~ I11eF OF'I'HE~BURE'AU"'OFSf'OR'I',~FISf-iEEIES-ANIi? a~,~ 26. Tests of ~ ~ itamin Supplements and Formula Changes 71 in the Abernathy Salmon Diet, 196cS-67 By Laurie G. Fowler and Joe L. Banks 27. Influence of Corn Oil and Beef Tallow on Growth of Channel Catfish By Harry K. Dupree 50330 8316 ~ . 0 5~ 4 n r~ 2 2 0 93
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50330 8328 .,_ Rhodes, Fred 1xoSf man, IeSO- ... '1'eclniical report writinh, by Fred II, Rliodes ... I st c"i New York nnd London, \Sc(iraw-Hill book company, inc. 19-11. x, 125 p: 1nc1. illas., tables, dtagrs. 231 cm. (Chetnical enuineerln, series ) "References" : p. 120-121. 1. Report writing. 2. Engfneering. 'PE1475.R5 ~1 620.09 41--2494 Library of Cor,gress t52g=1i --. _. , : ..: . - . - . -. - . -- ~~+....... US n ~0 S . . ,
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50330 8321 , T;~.:.11Y1j.Q:3l j)UUl).C.lt].rJnss. 4.-- T Baker, Clifford. 11 Technical publications, lheir purpose, preparation, and B procluct.ion. New York,14 iley, 1956. 302 p. Illus. 23 an. . , , ,.. . .. , . . , , . . , ~ ~ , . , 1. TechnIcal wrltinti. 2. PublIshers and pub.isWng. x. T1tle. T11.B3 1955a (''\ r308.0°v 029.6 65-12631 j Llbrury of Congress ~--) 13h ,..... .,, ...P ~,.n, .. 0 0 ~) a ~ 2 0 9 8. -
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S l 50330 8327 ~ ;iX :•toF-C-114-73 i)y ; 2 C. ; PDDL 3 1 C. Norman E. Harris Donald E. 4tiestcott Alice 1. M^y'=r Abdul R. Rahsnan 3iaC • Project reierence: 728017..12 Series: FL-172 Food Laboratory U. S. ARMY NATICK LABORATORIES Natick, Massachusetts 01760 October 1972 c. ~'~~. ; zo 3 ~- . _,. ,...~...•_._ _......-,.-- ~~u~ ~ Q . co 0 o-t o b91vf s ., o" 0 0 0 0 z-2 1 04
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50330 8331 ~ ~ TOBACCO--SMOKING--HEALTH EFFECT/SMOKING AND HEALTH/ ADDICTION/TOBACCO--SMOKING--PSYCHOLOGY/' ,dAY cc4'41. ~~ 81 X Kr YNATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE 'YTECHINICAL'REVIEW n CIGARETTE SMOKING,AS AN DICTION t . ~ Thursday and-Friday, August 23 and 24, 1979 IFINAL REPORT ' Moderators: ' Norman A. xrasnegor, Ph.D. , Pierre F. Renault, ?l.D. Macro Systems, Inc. September 18, 1979 This report summarizes the Technical Review on Cigarette Smoking as an Addiction that took place on Thursday and Friday, August 23 and 24, 19?9. This tjUk jorff rffeWig~was sp4ns1 rej by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), -Division of Research,•.Gto evaluatiie the scientific, evidence that exists for
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r l ~ 50330 8337 l , Last Date A. MEASURING AND SAMPLING of Issue Basic Density of Wood (see also A.8) ....... :..... .......:.................................................... Weighing, Sampling and Testing Wood Pulp for Moisture (see also A.9) .............. Sampling Paper and Paperboard for Testing ............................................................ Conditioning Paper or Paperboard for Testing ......................................................... Sampling Chemical Pulps in the Pulp Mill for Chemical Testing .......................... Flow Measurements of White-Waters and Wastes ................................................... Water Removal Test for Newsprint Paper Machines ............................................... Basic Density of Wood ................................................................................................ Total Dry Weight of Wood Pulp in Bales .................................................................. A.1 A.2 A.3 A.4 A.5 A.6 A.7 A.8 A.9 Nov., '64 Oct., '40 June, '73 June, '73 June, '73 Nov., '67 Sept., '69 Nov., '64 June, '73 0 S cl A.(1 02. 2 i. 1• 4 0 1June, 1976 TECHNICALwSECT1ON..e ' C A N A MA MR.LfL". N D;RA PEF-t4;A SS QC! ATlD tw .STANDARD METHODS ~ >
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50330 8335 ~ , TS 1080 C xn~s.t i n~ :' . . , . . . _. ), . ~c'w..c.w.,t o s o 0 0 0 2 2 1 z
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r I 50330 8291 T P~." Lk:~JespT^1: OL'11.".'Itl::~ STO::.,kCzF, AI•:i1 PE1.'RIi::VALI ' 715 Hc, F'A"' r,W"L" xdi,! RFtAi.Y kD' ,'I?4T~'STRaTION/ P~~ ::O IId.4'Or+L4TI0T;/ ~"t'~'iT:.? YT~:J I* G.R:~T BRl'T.AT~/• . ]q?2 , ._ ~ pAI't?t{'i`S--GI~A~ HF?TATJ~ ' ' TE (! ! _. - .. ._ F r--t ; -,- /1 CUIDE TO Pr11•ENT Si F.CIFICATIONS. STANDARDS AND 9ECFIIvICAL• I'cEPORTS LITERATUR£ . c SECONf) EDITION IIY ; BTP,NAP.•U HOUGHTON MA FLA SF.NIO~. IF.CTURER IN 1tiFOR\tATION WURK ~ U'PAkTMt:NT OF LIpkAKY AAtU INFORMATION STUOfES 14VEKPUJ:. PULYIi:CHNiC LINNET BOOKS & CLIVE BINGLEY 0 5 n 0 fl 0 2 2 0 6 8
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i ~ I 50330 8343 11 •03 46th AVEWUE LONG ISLAND CITY. N. Y. 11101 : TEL:212i937•4606 f ' . A 5elcctc;d List 05 0 0 0 02 2 1 2 0
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l%. ''2ba •techn~c~l'~report.~ Weil, Benjamin Henry, 1916- ced. '1'he tecl»ucal report; its preparatiou, processing, and u.e in indttstry and government. Contributing autltors: Jacl: Barsha, iancl othersi New York, Reinhold Pub. Corp., 1J;r1. xii, 485'p: Iliu4. 24 'em, . I . ; ; , , . Based on "ten papers ... presented In September, 19,53, before the Division of Chemical Literature of the American Chcuilcal Society In n'Symposium on the research report, its functiona, preparation, distribution, nnd u.se."' Includes hihlionraphies. 1. RePort writbiri. 2. Technical writing. 3. Docuuienlation. r. Title. '1'11.1V4 651.78 ` 5 # 90S 1 Library of Com;ress - J 123j O •I 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0
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. 50330 8333 j foscen Canadian Pul p and Papor Association TECHtii'ICAL 5'j.'CTIUIi, C.'T ~DItiIi PULP AND PAPER nSSCC:Cf1TICTI, U5r.I'UL 1E'i'fiCA~. July 1958 Canadian Atlp and laper A;;sociation 0 0 5 n 0 0 o2 2 1
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TI:CHNOLOGY--BIBLIOGRAPHY/TF:CIiKICAL SOCIETIES--U.S./SCIENCE--BIBLIOGRAPHY/ SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES--U.S•/SOCIETIES,SCIEt:TIFIC--PUBLICATIONS/ BOOKS--BIBLIOGRAPHY/PITBLICATIONS/PERIODICALS--INFORMATION SOURCES/ REF z 1215 Ky 1974 t Sdentfic,Technical1 and Engineering 50330 6342 Sodeties Publications' in Print 1974-1975 Simmons College James M. Kyed Head, Engineering Libraries Massachusetts Institute of Technology James M. Matarazzo Associate Professor School of Library Science I • • t . t 1 R. R. BOWKER COMPANY New York & London 1974 A Xerox Education Company XEROX ~~ 0 0 2 2 1 1 • r i
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!t 7, h 0 0 U.5 0 AWV ':r1•L.14.' Yi...~•cLr~....s.+...~.. ..v1.~6.:.............~4~-_ _ _ .... . _...._...r..r~~-....•.F... +..r. .. u:.v..~..,._~...~.r. ~.... . . . .. . '.~ t ~ .i s ~f ....:.ti..w...... .~....~. Jt . :_ i~ . .~ i? ll' ~~;:7 et~yi ,. . _>.
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50330 8330 ) ...+ti~...~J.._ . -..-_..4.-.:.ffw~.~....~..c~._~.r...w.a..n._. r-xsw~ Peurce, Jesse A. 'recllnic_,1 research in packaging. . •:, . Fr.-r _: C n• Fccka~;9~-• Au[;. 1q51 ~ a 1 1 0 5 0 0 n 02 2 1 0 7
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50330 8344 ~ ft STANDARD D I STR I BI;T I ON FORMAT •p". TEC1i3s I.ChI: SPEC 1 F iCAT I0NS . cSSR• REVISED Inlernational Star;-iard Book Number: 8412-016-4 Library of (:c)nc3ress Numbur: 78123387 C~Copyright 1971 by theber i can Chemi ca I Soc i ety` el~,y".44,,.1 11557Si>:teenth Street, N. W. Wash i r^,ton, D. C. 20C3b :Z
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I z 7: d U U 0 S, 0 TU-3Zt~~of•, "g jc,sy p.f.•NJJr-,,•Y CMUVr(i li'J.t.rT ll ' r Mi'l ` ±liu .~ 1'C l'I''I(.C,1,tTa 0 60T.T S x .
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, 50330 8348 DICTIONARIES--MARKETING+•-ENGLISH-GERMAN/ DICTIONARIES--MARKETING--GERMAN-ENGLISII/. , Q 210 Be 1976 Authors: Dr. U Wolfgz Bearchcll-Uisch V/MARKCTING DICTIONAItY ~ „4..Tcchiucal7crma in_%lj){kcting, ~ Bearche~.~~ ~ipmunication ~ arles A. i ng K. A. Disch Englixh-Gcrman • 1976 Edition ' MARKG'17NG JOURNAL HAMBURG KRITERiON VERLAG AG ZURICIi . i .- 0 S 0 A.~ A z 2 1• :~ 5
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50330 8332 ~ i Q 210 S StyclinotY, Alexej, 1S?11- Tecliuisches Russisch; Lehr- und Nacl.sclilahebuclh de: russischen Sprache nuf technischem Gebiet. 3..Aull. Essen W. Girardet,1952 [°19-11, 201 p. 1lltis. 22 cm. 1. Rncsian lr1nbuage'--Technlcal Russtan. i. Title. I'G2120:1'4S8 1952 52-41041 ; Library of Conl;re.s-, I31 asnonp;zz
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50330 8345 Hawley, Gessner Goodrich, 19.0;i- Tcchnical speller, compiled by Gessnex• G. Hawley nnc ,ll,lice ll". Irawley. New York, Reinhold Pub. Corp., 1,955,41 146- p. 20 cm. -k ~i ~I;a j 1. Spellers. r. IIawley, Alice NV., Jotnt author. rt. -Title. ' c.- ~~17 S PP1114G.II33 428.1 55-11714 ; ~ Library of Congre;y MI10, .~..... ~.._ / o~oon~s~z2 1 2 2
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f 4CCUnlTr elnst/fieAiioe, oF THI1 RAGZ C'a;:. L'nr..«,l a dh-- 1'i C 1 Ci-ii -,,.1.; i:r-- i VT l'.•j P r'+C w • RtNU1,T nUr:EE1t ~" TZ-CJ`JT :.CGC-Lr'.IaH HO. 4. TITLE (ura dubNU.) Technical r.eport Cs. Perceptiona of Iderahip St:y1-a: Superior and s r~ ° Subordinate Ite c • ptions of P.,;czcion-t•i::king ' b .e,-,h~vior 7. f.uTHOF:(e; ~ Arthur C. Jap t.,nd Victor H, Vroma 6• riaro::~r:;a Qr:cAir.i~~7/;fI;~ r.ni? SIATlONAL TECfi\'.iAL F I ~ ' t r1:1ION 5[2: - ICE ' If Yaie U i i n vers t ~ ~ US D.p.nT.nl ol Co_n-.vc• School of OrSani.:at{.on vi:c: .~..~.•.v4#cmen_ Nc:w lt.-3. en, CON1'I:OLLIf:G OFFlCiC K:a4t~ c.flD AUDh`...: E:ertD r:::: : J:uCttorrS T3MiTtr: Cc`".''1.N:TING frUIRM b. i2:'Cll'IICNT'x CAT Ai,OO kUNOCR ) o: ;= •'" ;:;:~~.ea"'•? ~ t:r:;aP. r.r•::oj ccr, rt si~ L !'J:•.C UHIY tiUWUMft3 2r'a-17 7--93s OrZani:;ationzl "r:ifacCivcu~~;.re Reee2rCh PIt,vc..nlbGr ].u, 1974 Pro;;rtms, Office uf Naval l:~ser:z'ch ~S, ~ju~ Arlj.n;ton, 22217 - - e'~/ , .-r,~---• ~-_._.~,..- --,..._.~,...._._.._..^.....~.~._-.... ....._...~....r._~._ ......_ . .~.. ..... ~. 50330 8324 0 - S Q O ~0 2 2 1 0 1 .
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:t.r I x?, 0 0 0 0 S 0 &oaas rctI t K~:q"JzTTa s~:~;;ct £ _ ° tT;'tfSf T ~: . c LLr c~.ad~r~ ~'.~ w77 ~f..r 7nn rJ i:1 ~~~ r.~i, J {~ T~ j~'a)it . ~ Lh£8 0££OS
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..,. .......,.. 50330 8341 SeientiGe and teclinical societies of the United States and Canada. ilsti-",' ed. 1ti'ashinaton, \nlioual .Lcaclem~• of Scicnces, National Research Council, 1927--i -; v.. 26:cin. The lsl-5th ed. issued as Bullctin of the National Research Council (Q11.NLxJ2) ; Cth- ed. rs its Publication 369 Title varies: ]st -5th ed., Handbook ot scaentific nud technical societies and instit« tions of the United States and Canada. Canadian sectlon compiled by the National Research Council, Canada. 1. 11. S.•--lA•arue:l UnAllalions nnd socletles. 2. Caiuad;i----1.!•arr.ed institutions nnd Socictl..s. 3. '1'ccluifrnl societicw. i. Nntion,il Ite- search Cmmc1l. ir. Nattunnl Itc%vurch Council, Canada. l5erics: Nutimial lN•srareh ('ounrtl. lhilletin. Sari(N: Nuliuunl L',s.r.u•ch Council. 1'ut,iicatlun fiGJ ~(!tc.t) AS15.I13 GOG.27 ~ Library of Coni;re5i ` ~ 15JrGfb1s301 . . ... ~.,.,.,.... ..-- ~ ..-. 0 5 0 0 0 02 2 1 8
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50330 8350 ~ I Te3 ..~ ., , :. .. _ .. . _ .r , ;, ~j-aT ;..D .~. ~.,.. Aii~T rr:~'ta~~i~:;. k ~V. ai na n o2 2 1 2 7
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XXII Pa-74 SUBJECT INDEX' TO TECFtN~,CAL;~~tEP:0I~1`S ~dF~tU~pA~K~GINQ ~YNSfi~~UTE ~~:S :A71 ~ S.P. - - • - 29.74 •SUPPLEMENT.•• :, Cove-ring:•-reports .,avai-lablc, o•f. .pap,ers,. p.r, cse.nted ,~'.Aa .• .. technical - ' the 197.3' PI/USA Annual 'National Pzckaging Forun4 and at oth.erl meetings October 1973--March 1974. TRE PACY.AGING INSTITUTE, U':S.A. 342 Madison Avenue --_hew York. N. Y. •t0017 ... . ;- . •_ . :^.. •,. ~..- . ... . . . _ ..
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50330 8326 4 RJR CLASS N0. Pk%fP}:LF:T V111 *:c1-13 .i (in' Molin$ Machine Company Liwited, London, Creat Britain (M-nifns Mach. Co. Ltd., Publ. vo. B3 Tk). :3a2fns Mach. Co. Ltd. , English) London, Ct. Brit., Issue 1, 22 P• (hctt. 6, 1972) \ *2973, No. 7, W 2924* *lm* Tobacco manufa;;ture: .~ti~+ns~w+ri~rtla.._~.+.+.-._.-.ry_.•w 0 . 5 4A0 0 ` 2 2 1 0 3 0
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/ See also Authorship--ITandbooks p nzrzuals, etc. Rucsian 1anLzlarc---'fechriical. iZllss].arl o55 0 0 -n.az2.i
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i r ! ~,,~~}~,~,fi~~~t~f~i~i:~xtiqE~:+sFiS~~J~'s~Ui ~7r'~'~; ~[+'~' ! ~ ! T Katz, I>iyma n I>C ~ 359 Technical sketching and visualization for engineers, i11us. ~ K by the author...New 1 ork, 3facmillzn i o., l i%49. ~ 263 p. [Ilns: 26 cm. ~ ' i ,._......_._. ,. , _ 1.11fehcauhal draw Ing. z. Title. T35~J.K3 i 744.42 0-1100•1• 2 ?,, I
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. 50330 8355 ) T ~?IFfCR'~i+IRe~ T Turner, RufusP ~ .Techiucal 'writer'S & editor's stylehoo)c, by Rufus P. Turner. tlst cd., Lidianapolis. H. 1\'. Sams (1964, °03 i.. 23 cro. (IA FioH•ard \W. Sams photofact publicatlon, TR'II-1) Bibliography: p. 181-184. I 1. Techuicnl writing. i. Title. T11.'1'8 80N.0G6 GI -25a4~i f ~. Library of Congress s~ (31 .. r ~ .-vs. . .~. .. ....~ . M~. .. - ._ .r . . ... . .. ~iYs~..v 0 15 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 3 2
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50330 8351 }. l ~. 1{ " 113-T:.i 1 ('j 2 2, 1 2,8-
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/ 50330 8352 "I TECHNUr1D~,S,~ SURVEY .;. The survey is based on patents covering selected topics included in Central Patents Index and World Patents Index during the period Weeks X20--X32, 1976. (D 1976 DERWENT PUBLIC.4TIONS LTD. Rochdate House 128 Theobalds Road London WC1X 8RP England LJ1Z. V% VV .I V I U a tl 0(l 0 2• 2 r,
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/ 50330 8358 ~ '! .CSdw:mi y.' ~~. `__n„. T 11 Baker, Clifford. . Technical publications, their purpose, preparation, and production. New York, Wiley, 1955. 802 p. 111m 23 cm. 1. Techntcnl writing. 2. Publlsher8 and publlsbhig. z.'tytle. T11.I13 19J5ib *808.08 029.6 G5-1wu31 ; Library of Cungreas 130, 0 S () 0 0 0 .2 2 1 :1 5
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50330 8359 ) 171 ~ Y „,-Techui.caL writtug-, IBo Eotitxy, G. A. WAivAT161 V1',,::iUrJ QUc1:.i.TY IA"i J1Ai 'TFl.tC c'tESEP•RCt1 (II) : T1;,t: PAPER EXP7~(?3'~();3. T~ttptlct Scf. Soc. 20 (No„ 3) 195-206 (1970) --4r.,~, U 5~ 0 (l. 0 ~ 2 136
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50330 6349 ~ ~ Q j210 i Po "'RMIRICAN Cr~~'1/~rltt'1iiSli ._9`.r7 637 i'aUSo /:': { hd::i.e N. i..
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50330 8360 j "Tecrnical wr3tinp Conference of Biolo,-,iml Editors. Committee on. Form arc St ylc. St~'l_e Inan-a_l_ Ifor biological 4our!?als .) itj; lished for the Conference of Biological I:ditors by tlle llmer ican Institute of Biological Sciences t°19G01 02 p. illus. 24 cm. 1. I'rinting, 1'nacttcat•-Style manuals. Tcclinical wclting. r. Title. Z2G0.G.135 CG t'V ~ 574.0149 G0-15Ir;3 ~ Ltlir:u•y of Cungresq tC1s1Gt 0 S0 0 0 C1 '~ 2 1 :3 7
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/ I l 50330 8340 "TECHNICAL SOCIETIES/TRADE ASSOCIATIONS/ •IBLIOGRAFMIC DATA 1 Nj,S S1~417 PB G 11 ~.I '^ 11 G REF SMEET ' "!.J ~J~t' Q r/TLh: AND 1U111'll'I.h I 146 Ch • 1975 Directory of United States Standardization Activities AUl'l1OR(S) Sophie J. Chunas, Editor ERt'ORMING ORGANIZATION NAMF. ANU ADDRESS /IrSr IL.S. NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOARDSr"dtt ' S. Publiearuwr Uate Noaiember 1975 {. Performing Orjsnizetion l:o,/e B. Perlwmins OrAan. Report No. t 10. Pruject/Task/o'ork Unit Nu. - . DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 1 P b. t 288 11I~ Contract/Grant No. on l eau u ta t MASNINGTON D C 20291 Supersedes Muee ./. KEY WORDS (ais to twalve enrriee; a/p!5abetical order; tapitalise only the first latler of tha first key word unless a proper naata; aeparated by semicolons) COdes/ consensus systan; Directoryt Federal GoMernnent-Std7Yard ization; industry standards activities; national standards activites; recamended prac- tices; specification~s~s~standardization activities; standards; states--standardization activities; test I~t7AJlls. wM.M.~. w.- t.,4^ ~ Thfs Directory serves as a guide to standardization activites in the United States. it supersedes a Directory of the same title, issued in 1967, a.s National Bureau of Stan- dards Miscellaneous Publication 288. Included in the Directory are s»ries of the standardization activites of trade associations, technical and other professional soci- eties representing industry and oannercer and state and„Federal goverrrmnts. For the first t.ime this Directory eavers nonenaineering and nonindustry organizations. SP 417 contains current descriptive suam>aries of more than 580 organi23ticins. ono;z- 2 1 , . S c.= L-*'A
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50330 8318 s ....r..<_-.....-,... ~ .. _....~ _ -.it : .;.~ -.._ __.,e.-~ .. ----._ __...r...,........~,.-~.,..y.,.•~ti:..:. ZC ,~t1~ ~cfsrii~e]z ~~e~ottclxtidns_ '€or;Ki~€riwrll ='t' t¢ Colloquium on Technical Preconditions for Retrieval Cen~ ter Operations, I'hflndclphia, C.olloquiutn on '.['ecl,nical Precollditions for Retricval Cen- ter Operations; tprOceeclingrsl edited by lienjantin F. Cheyd- leur. Wasltinhton, Spartan Books, 19G5. t•i, l50 p. illus. 2•1 cm. Cover title: '1'echnk•:+l lmeconditions for retrieval center onerntions, "Siwnsored by the Siwciul lnterest Croup on Infornration Retrieval of ACM and the 1loore School of Electrical riugiLecrilla, ITnieersits of I'ewusSlV,1n[n." Ineluues bibliot;rnphirs. 1. luformntion strrrnc!e and rett•ie,al systems-Conr;rr•.c;•r~s. 2. In- fot•tnaiion i. CheydIvtn•, Ven,Lruriu 1"., ctil. tt. Assuciutlon for Cocutiutinl; \lncLinery. Sietrinl lnterest (-ronp on In- formatlon C:eh•Ieviii. ` III. L'eunsylvania. Uatvorsity. \t(x)re tichuml of laectrlcal ~, I:nginrerll:i;. w.'lltle: 1'ecfirical ,,trce- , . Conditions for retricvul ; <.i+ntet• olrCrations. '/.G99.(_;;,H 1964 02f1.7 65-1941 Library y of Cunbress 17-1j 0 S t~ Q~ ~;~ 2 0 9 S'
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50330 8338 2 695 ' Ta ~ 1953 ~~t~'9~14~~1~'~7i.~8`: a Tauber, Maurice Faicohn, 1908- ed. Tecluiical services in libraries: ncquisitions, catalo;;in(r . clnssification, binding, photographic reproduction, and cir- culntion operations, by Maurice F. Tauber and associates. New York, Coltunbin University Press, 195•1 [°1953t xvi, 487 p. dingrs. 24 cm. (Coluinbta University studies In librnr~ service, no. 7) 131Lliograpltlcul refcrence:; included ]n "Notes" (p. i41, -i1-t03) 1. Library sctence. z. Tltle. (Series) 'LC05.'r28 1964 025 G4-1"03~?i t ) Library of CJonl,•rrrts t30) 0 sa00 0 2 2 ~ ~ S
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T Nelson, Joseph Ra;eIgn. 11 Writing the technical report. 3d ed. New York, Aic~ N Graw-Ilill, 1952. 856 p. 24 cm. 1. Techn!cal wri!ing. T11.N4 1952 620.09 Llbrary of Congress ~. J i12; 52-6546 : U5 70?Ia~~ 1 4
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50330 8361 ~ . I , osa T 1 Da 1979 I ~ . .._ - - REPORT WItITIPiG/TI':CItNICAL"~WRITING/WRITING/ ROBERT A. DAY {"" ~. ~i~.,D.~~ ~ (J~U PRESSTM 325 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, he11n5}'lvania 19106 / ~ ~2 1 3 IP%~4 \ .. ,- i. 71 i ' ~~~~~~ A .b ~~ ~T .. :
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/ T Santmyers, Selby S 11 Practical report writing. Scranton, International Texi S boon Co. (1950) v111, 118 p. illus. 24 cm. 1. Report wr:ttng. PE 1478.S8 : 651.78 50-58C j ( Library of Congresa ..,..... t51n5, 2 2 1 4_ ~.
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} ~ ~;`~hTecliiiical xri~iii~ 50330 6 368 , 1~. Iierekes, Frank, 1896- Report preparation, including correspoti(lence nnd tcch- nical writing tvy, I+rank Kerekes ,andl Robley 1Vinfrey. 2d ed. Ames, Iowa State College Press 11951) xiv, 448 p. lihtg. (part col.) 29 cm. First published In 1948 under title: Manual of report preparation. 13ibliographs : p. 401-403. 1. Report writing. r. Winfrey, Robley, ]S~!- Joint author. ir. Title. •PT1478.Ii4 1961 6651.78 51-9903 Library of Congress 152iz101
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50330 8357 REPORT t+1RI'PING/T~CNWICAL _WRITING/WRITING/ of Papers in .American Chemical Society Publications AMERiCAN CNEMICAI. SOCIETY WASHINGTON, D. C. o S n 4 n o2 2 t 3 4 1970 / ~ <c cl.._ I t
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f 50330 6367 j I Ka3 ~T~ChniCaZt tit~citing. ~ KRt.^.oif, S. C;_AitIi i I:S ISt::r 25 p. tl:a:icna? I:c.rr.•r;::utlcn F-cd S^c:4e 1'.d:ninictr: tinz, :1r1L1 °It;.`hniC1A! fr!iUl';RctiO:: ViV!.A:^ll, Wa^..tSiS l.t'tgt'7n o~ n Q n t~ 2 2 4 4
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, 50330 8369 ~ / . : ----- ...._.~.~...___~_ .._.._~:_...._...r. . ..__ .....~.,Y:-. - -°....a,~.~ ~... .. Tacwcti ~:;~tritf ng.: Kobe, Kenneth A. Cheudcka engineering reports, a report pres- ented to stuuents in chemicLl en;ir.eerine, Aus- tin, Texas, University of Texas, 1951. • 69 p. 29 cm. E) i 0 s \I Qo q 2 2 1 4 6
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50330 8366 }. ,; 'ttiYfixe=v-titin* Jtshn-;oas, Ti?Gttvis Perry, 1J?22- Analytical writing; a handaooic for busiticss ca1 writers, by Thotnus P. Johnson. llst ed., IIa.rper &- Row t°19GSj 2-ta p. 22 cm. Biblfogral>hy: p. 2.'i3--234. attd teCluti- Nu« .'ori, 1. Technical %vr(ting. 2. Commercial correspor,dence. t. Titl;. T11.J57 80u.OGG GG--lOG~~ Library of Congress rCGf-lj . 0 s o v n 02 2 1 4 3'.
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50330 83` IZNAGEMENT OFtiRESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT A vfECHNOLOGY-BASEDtiiNNOVATION. Industrial Liaison Program Symposium, Massachusetts Institue of Technology 76 I Ma-78 ~vec. 9, 1975, Kresge Auditorium ~/MOTIVATING SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS By Ra1phvKatz iVSER NEEDS AND I:VDUSTRIAL INjWATION By Eric von-lTippel Won ~E~}I<NICAL°VENTURE'STRATF.GIES~By Edward B. 1,Roberts VC0:0tUNICATION IN SCIENCE AND TECHhOLG%^.Y By Thomas J. 'Allen ~ ORPORATE/RbD INTERFACE MANAGEMENT By Dr. William H.-Gruber ~ .~ NNOVATION IN INDUSTR~IAL ORGANIZATIONS By Ja~nes M.~Utterback ~,' t} S o Qn Q2 2 13 1
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50330 8374 { Turner, Bufus P Technical writer's Rs editor's stylebook, by Rufus P. Turner. l1st ecl., Indianapolis, I-I. «'. Sains (19G41 208 p. 23 cm. (,A IIo«-nrd W. Sams gbototact puiil!catlont TR Ei-1) Bibliography; p. 181-184. 1. Technical writing. r, Title. ~, T11.T8 0 808.066 6-1-25043 Library of Congress A l7 5 0 Q tl 0 2 2. 1S.,
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, 50330 8346 II MeA2-81 s.P. LAND CULTIVATION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES: STATE-OF-THE-ART STUDY • EPA-600/2-78-140a August 1978 Volume I by Tan Phung. Larry Barker, David'Ross, and David Bauer SCS Engineers Long Beach, California 90807 Contract No. 68-03-2435 Project Officer Robert E. Landreth Solid and Hazardous Research Waste Division Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory Cincinnati. Ohio 45268 MUNICIPAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY (y U- 16[• r KL~LNK6t1 11nU YC~clNrncn~ 0 rj 0 0 w ~ U. E RONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CINCINNATI, OHIO .45268 r- L
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~~-.. : . . . : _ _:'--~ USN) NDIlMMi 73N3t3S ?YNDIZYl;. (rJ3) MNM WIIJ3I0Va 1YiN3riN0ilIAN3 _ . ' (SWIS) ILYIYiN AI37/Ol3Yd.• 'tYLN's'iNDVtAN3 QNY Sa1tS11YlS . ND JLttUs f ~ ~ ~ ; f - _ 6[6T 1Sl1~f1Y r..<......_ 3~ UN 1I ' x I 3 tFin_. to J~-& t5 Y - h w ~•f'w'AeslydAl 4!`a81~Ml1'~F,'inY~y'i.hr •Y•A ."~1MMw4+p~A!iPoM'br"r?t't2YlAt"R~'WY'!E i I ~1J+^ ~2l11r.'YL.f!Ya 71 1 .,~'; .~ V ~ . + j . _ . , . . . I/-. . .. _ . . - . . . - ~.G:3aslsS,r -XSt~tit I~ xt1Kt rt~y X~w~ 40 stWn~ Ir)ttvtir3xtvtit - .-. . ~..., -. _, . . .. -.. -`~".4 ~K'~ -R ..:f.. . .... . . . .._... _ .• . .. ~-.--...._.... . e , SZ£8 OEEOS i
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50330 8362 ~ aectinrc aT°'url.ticl~g ., Dederich, Roiucrt M Communi:ation of technical informi;tion. \cw York Chemonomics, °1952. 210 p. 21 cm. 1. Tc(hnical wrtting. 2. Report writing. r. Title. , T11.D35 ""\ 651.78 5r-8511 ; Library of Cunoress -i7) o~0 0 0. 0 2 2. 4 4 9 ~j
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50330 8353 . ,_ i t TOBACCO---LIPIDS/TOBACCO--RIPENING/TOBACCO--CHEMICAL COMPOSITION/ TUBACCO--FATTY ACIDS/o - " .. ~ _..~~-. ....7.1 VI Bi • . . . .. ~ ^ ~ RJR CLASS NO. PAPSPIILET 77 VI Bi L'1.ac::, P.; Gruiz, 1:.; l:ollo, J. ('iechnicnl <tlniv. .aiudupest;~VInst. . AGr.r Ch~~,},~t~i~p~~~,~.<<~J1~4n~ A S''Ull~' OI~ TOBACCO LIPIDS. PT. I. Cll:~'ICE:S IN TEfl: ).fPI' TOP,ACCO LF.AM IPl T11E COUR SE OF VI:CETi1TIVF UE:VE:E.UE't`1t;N1 OF THE E'LAiT. Acta :11im;:ntari;i 5(ao. 4) 403-23 (1976) (in English) *Key:yords:* fatty acids, green, constituent; ~ lipids, neutral, green, constituent; glycolipids, green, constituent; phosphatidyl scrine, green, constituent; , sterolE;lycc,sidas, E;rcen, constituent; triglycerides, green, constituent; vu:: esters, Lreen,.constituent. 0 5 ~ 0 0 0 2 2 1 3 U
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r 50330 8373 ~ T =: TecKnicaY ~wxitit~g•4 1 1 Ti Tichy, Henrietta J 1l112- IaI'ective writin(r for en,a,lnCers , 111Anilrel'S, If. J. Tichy. New 1ork,lCile.y t1'J66, xcii, 337 p. tlius. 24 cm. I;ii,liographical footnotes. scientists 1. Engl[.~h Liu;tu;ige-Rhetnrlc. t.'.l`itle. l'I?1 t08;1':, ~ ,~ 808.06 66--2106? Library of Conl;ress JJ~ 1(D7171 U S n 0 n 0 2 2 1 5 0
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Sp330 8364 °I T 11 TochniEai=: uritirlg. ..-x F , ~ ~s~ S'~ ~,..~.. ~ ~ ro:z ci~ ~ t ;...,. r S..S21~J ll..~ J !'+rl..:ilAJP ~.:.?1~~• ~ t .~:z C;~z pa <I~°,r Yoa•.: \J U 5 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 41
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:z17 1 z?" 0 0 0 () 50 .r._...:~. ~~_.___~... ~.w_....~... __.~~. ~. ,.~..~_ . ~ . ic,~.tlCia`) ~a t'~ti 8;57 V :Li.T~'`f ltflV `}i °Ii IvilAoLloii ! -l- S9cS OE£oS
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atrizzo~vusa •JuA;IPUA :cva r'NVDJ gl 8S6T xm4zv,):*gft st M, 41? rz~,c:~n CaMi t.b\ii (1V Au aFUYC!altts7. S.JiC:.o'.F^:5.,.( l'Jd,GI`JYt)'.~ 7ii iL::~ 7l.WTlr; X.iS }:0:4 SQ%~~'Clii'4~:Y Sup:nl Q.Y. S:';;Tl aZtii ~~ fSoTc,oqa-j" pau aoc!QFO- xoj lTounoo V 2U'Fa fi JK °Tt ~~ui~~ai:-6~;,:. .. . . . .7. . ~ _ _ '~c.. .~ , ~ F9£8 0££OS
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50330 8379 ) 'Rc.•f iQ 11149 ITe , i Ann Arbor,ll'[ich., Prakkett I'ubiications. V. tllus: 30 cm. 1. Technical education-U. S.-Yearbooks. 2. Techntctaus In tedus- try-U. S.-Yearbooks. I '.C73.T4 ,, 63-22652 Library of Congress ~ ' iG8d31 05 0 0 00 2 2. 1 5_ b
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i I 50330 8375 J ~ I ~. _ ,a4...,....~...rt.~.~....., -.,-rV~L ~.. - ~... _ T 11 W , TQChII].CU1. :;yii;2tiY1~.'. V Weil, Benjam.in Henry, 1916- ed. The technical report; its preparation, processing, and uee in industry and novernment. Contributing authors: J:.tck Bartiatl Iauld othersl New York, Reinhold Pub. Corp., 1954. xfi, 9&5 p. 111us. 24 cm. Based on "ten papers ... presented tn September, 1J53, before the Division of Chvinicnl Literntare of the American Chciulcal :,ocicty 1n a'Symhosiuni oil the research report, Its functions, preparatton, dlstributiuu, mnl use."' Includes bibllogrnphles. 1. Report m-ltinl;. 2. Tecliulcul wrlting, 3. Docwncutntloum x. Title. Tll.jV1 G5L7s 54ao51 Library of ('ongiess 1231 a~ n 0~ 0 2 2 1
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r f 50330 8376 .N,.:.. ..,e CJ . 05 0 0 00 2 P. i a 3
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50330 8371 } Rhode.s„ Fred HoPfman, 1889-- ... '1'echnical report writin~, by Fred H. hhotles ... 1st e~l New York and London, McGraw-Hill book company, inc. 1011. r, 123 p. incl. lllus., tables, dlagrs. 23J cm, (Cheuiical engineerint series) "•References" : p, 120-121. 1. Report wrlttng. 2. F.nglneering, l Pl''.147Ci.li5 620.09 41-2494- Llbrary of Congress 1G2g=11 ~~ 0 0 0 0~t 2 I~
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50330 8385 ) / i Ref IQ l149 1,Te ~ . 1 . . r• . llius. 30 cm. . . . 1.'1'echnical editcattou--U. S.--Yeartwok.9. 2. xechntcians In Indus- try--U. S.-Yearbooks. I _ >1•wa+" _.._.,..._.._.~...._ .._._ k .....-.._._,.......-..,._:~_.~•.,~:~~..M: rTecfiniciAns in"Indus trp-,U.~_S. :--:Yearboals, & Technician education yearbook. 1963/64- Ann Arbor, Diich., Prakken Publications. T73: C4 63--22652 Llbrnrs of Ccmgre,4s ~ ) iaSd3, 0 5 0 0 na 2 2 1 6 2
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i 50330 . ~ _--TechniciAns~ fn='7nduat:fip~==~tP~ :-5:~'tafn~~iP' 8384 ~ ~. ; Teg `i'cch:iiciar, cducntion yearbook. I0,G3; 61-- ~ Ann Arbor, :4t?ch., I'rnkken 1'ublications. ~ v. Illus. 30 cm. i i ~ 1 1 1. Technlcnl education-U. S.-Yearbooks. 2 Technicians In Indus- 1 try-U. S.-Yearbooks. ~ I ~ 'Ti'3: T4 63-22G52 f~ ~ t ~ 4 Libcary of Congress ~ iG8d3l ~~n a n 0 2 2 1 6t
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50330 8378 , 76 XI Re-78 S.P. RJR CLASS NO. PAMPHLET 76 XI Re-78 s.p. l l•fakehan, !(. (Philip t;orris, Richmond, Va., U.S.) DR. HEL."UT WAKEHAM OF PHILIP MORRIS, P.ICHNOND, VA., GIVES SCIE:'ITIFIC LECTURE AT CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF VENEZUELA I.N CARACAS ON THE "CONITROL" OF TAR AND NICOTINE Iil CIGARETTES AND SF',OKE C~lEt,1ISTRY RESEARCH AT PHILIP MORRIS. . *( Tectti cas~de~ fon t•ro.>r<de~~ki coti naP~~? ~utt~fir~lif~tss~i~a~i 110~) * Helmut Uakeham (Philip Morris), neris release, Caracas, Venezuela (Mar. 1978) - in Spanish *Abstr. in: Universal 1978, n.p. (Mar. 19, 1978) and Panora;:a 1973, n.p. (:tar. 19, .1978)* *Keywords:* Nicotine, smoke, constituent; tar, smoke, constituent. I osoao~z2iss
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i 50330 8390 f ~ 80 III,Te i - 4 , "'OPERATION MANUAL for the ~ TECHNICON BLOCK DIGESTOR Models BD-20 and BD-40 TECHNICAL PUBLICATION No. TA4-0323-' AUGUST 1977 This publication supercedes Technical Publication No. TA4032340 dated June 1974 and May 1975 and, No. TA40323-10 dated September 1975. \ ~'..r.... w. r.a ~~ _ ~.,.__....._ E'CtitJ I f:.-. 0 5 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 6 7
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50330 8382 } 1 . 33 CHEMICAL Am 1972 i SAFETY MEASi1RES/. TECHN®LOGY REVISED EDI T ION GUIDEBOOK FOR CHEM{CAL' ECHNICIANS by the ChemTeC Project Writing Team , Edited by . Robert L. Pc:wuk, Prujcci Direcior Kenneth Chapman and Wade H. Ponder, Associate Project Directors CHEMICAL TECHNICI CURRICULUM PROJECT Q S Q() OA Drojat 2 tlEAAiergin Chemical Society F„nrieA hv the National Science Foundation
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i 50330 8396 ~ ~2n ~ 75 YTechiiicon Symncsa.4a,.-196S ,, ' Au r ~ JNvgf7n, L•s•Ot1tirK T., Jr.; cW. Zri tir:7il:aTiC.r,L CliVI92SM, T-13C1D3xt:"'! S't2T4SIA 3 Sb5 1~a~t! 1:?bfi. 1966, 1.4'67 722 lPsFes lIerii^.d Y::.c:. tdaw York C)
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i , 50330 8383 . , Q 123 St 1976 0 i . a. CHDIISTRY, TECHNICAL--HANOBOOKS/ Handhbak for c Checr~o~a L/'~ecG~a~o~~ ~mns HOWARD J. STRAUSS, Ph.D. Director, Market and Technology Development, Gould Inc. ' Edited by " • ~ MILTON KAUFMAN President, Electronic Writers and Editors, Inc. McGRAW-HIIL BOOK COMPANY N.w York St. louls San Francisco Auckland Dussoldort Johannesbury Kuala lumpur London Moxico Montroa) N.w D.Ihi Panama Parls $bo Paulo Sin9oporo frdn.r Tok o Toronto y 0~ 0 p 0 A2~ 2 1 6 O
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p 5 1 z r U U 0 05 0 0 1,' (uZe ii a ; . ~ LLfB OEEOS
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l 50330 8387 / r ~ Z l '~CONN? U JU5 - U(Uua A series ol monographs and textbooks, V't< 3/ EDITOR Morton K. Schwartz , NICOTINE--DETERKINATION/TOBACCO--NITROGF.N/ KJFLDAIIL NITROGEN DETERMINATION(TOIiACCO) WITH TECHNICON DIGESTOR/TECHNtCON AUTOANALYZER/~ CHEMISTRY, ANALYTIC--TECHNICON AUTOANALYZER I 0 osaooo~~z2 ~&IN/CAL AND B/OCHEM/CAL ANALYSIS {' THEORY AND PRACTICE William B. Furman National Center lor Diu9 Analysis Food and Diug Adminisrrawn SL Louis, trissowJ with a chapter on THEORETICAL ASPECTS by i//. H. C. Walker McMastarWUrorsity MedWCentia HamiJton, Ontario •
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0 r:s- - t 0 - II-MeA -77 S P • bontinuous Monitoring of Ambient Atmospheres . ,- With the iTechnicon AutoAnalyzer . ~ ROLAND S. YUNGHANS and WILLIAM A. MUNROE • 50330 8388 ~ a The New Jersey State Department of Health, Air Sanitation Program, in 1964, received authoriza- tion to design, construct and operate a compre- hensive air monitoring system. The system is to be capable of measuring and recording levels of cer- tain gases and particulates in the outdoor ambient atmosphere. The principal objectives of the air monitoring project arc: 1: To assemble data upon which technical judg- ment can be based with respect to the need for control and; or the type of regulatory action necessary to abate air pollution. 2. To provide a measured baseline and prevailing ~ baf)grcfpd j~pairt~t w:Rch ~utu~ ctSges in the nature and degree of air pollution can be assessed. i for future flexibility in the event air contaminants other than those initially selected were to be mon- itored. Following studies of commercially available an- al'ytical systems, it was concluded that the Tech- nicon AutoAnalyzer offers promising application in the continuous measurement of sulfur dioxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide. oxidants and alde- hydes. Experimental laboratory work has resulted in the employment, in the measuring of certain substances, of straight-forward microanalytical chemistry with a history of proven reliability. For aldehyde. research work was undertaken to revise or modify existing rnethods. • Considerable effort was expended in attempting to automate methods for measuring atmospherie aldehydes. During December 1953, when metro- - f, " -, " ~' - ,, r- /
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50330 8395 ~ .Qn 131 .Te 1973 DP.l1GS--ANALYSIS/CIIE:tISTRY, ANALYTIC/ . . Volume 9 Advances ' , . '. . in ~1~.1tc~a~ed :inten~~aF* Cong ress=, /97;z,- . 1973, Dfediad Incorporated, P.O. Box 417, Tarrytown, New York 10591 /Gj ~AroY 3CSr' Pharmaceutical Sciences 1972 leehuRcorl
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I r ~ ...1...~.a...a.~~~a::,:..~. ~.~.._ _c.~...r......... ......a._s. ~ ..~ ........+s,t ~~..•a: . •s~- -- . - ~. 50330 .. .......... _ ........ f._~~. ___ ` 8394 CHEMISTRY, ANALYTIC ATATER, INDUSTRIAL--ANALYSIS/ WASTE WATER--ANALYSIS/POLLLT'I'ION CONTROL/ CHEMISTRY, ANALYTIC--TRACE ELEMENTS/ AIR--FOLLUTION/ QD 131 Te 1973 Advances . ~ . ~ 1 ;t:. ~v~ iu~ l-1nc-ai.~~ 19i~ Te&~o~, v, ~.J,y~,, e x~~~'ong Volume 8 ~Congresvmm--,~ nvironmentaf Quality 1973,11fediad Incorporated, P.O. Box 417, Tarrytown, New York 10591 z 0 5 c~ A.2 0 t~ ~2. 7 .
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CIiP.PUISTRY--CONCI~F.SSFS/CONGRFSSES/C1IFTSISTRY , ANALYTIC/SPFCTP.OANALY ;IS/ AIR--ANALYSI SAMi F.Y.--ANALY S I S/?tE1'AI,S--ANALYS I S/ SOI LS--ANALYS I S/DKUGS-•- ANALYS I S/ PESTICIDES--DETEP.:`fINATION/ALi:ALOIDS--ANALYSIS/INSTRTTctI:NTS A'.in INSTRU"4ENTAlION/ BPECTROSCOPY--FLUOR3iSCENCE/ATO,`1IC FLL'ORFSCEIICF. SPECTROSCOPY/ ~f'- ; '1t~~' . vs ~ 4n 131 Te ~~' 2 r~, 197 W tj 0 S C~ 0 (1 0 2 2 1 6 9 Volume II- 1969 Volume II- 1970 Industrial 'Analysis ., 50330 8392
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TECHNIQUE OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY SEE ALSO TECHNIQUES OF CHEMISTRY 50330 8412 U S 0 0 0 0 2 2 18 9
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i 50330 8389 1 , . . CHE'•tISTRY, ANALYTIC--AUTOMTIC/CHEMISTRY--CO?,ff'L'TERS/ -TECHNICON_`AUT0XNALYZER W TOBACCO--SNtOKE--AVALYSIS/S`tOKING QD 75 Fo 1979 2 C. National Physical Laboratory, Teddington ~ and P. B. STOCKWELL Superintendent, Research and Special Services, Laboratory of the Government Chemist, London TOPICS IN AUTOUgTIC ' CHEMICAL ANALYSIS - 1 Editors: J. K. FOREMAN Deputy Director, ELLIS HORWOOD LLtitITED Publishers Chichester Halsted Press: a division of New York -Clilchester - Brisbane - TQronto 6j{'v . a`&.it-c~ oe- 14 0 5t1-0002 2 1 6 fi a Sw" _/ JOHN WILEY & SONS ~-.7 41t" All~ ~LaCI
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/ / r 50330 8393 QD { CIII's*tISTRY, A.''ALYTIC/`tILI:--ANALYSISI`iILK-'BACTrRIOLCGY' ~ ` 131973e SF.ROLOGY/fiL00U/ 'j • L4,e-Jj ~ ~~ vCA" k-JCJ Volume 7 . . . • !H / ~ e~ U~~~ rFood, Dairy, and Agricu{tur ~,~ ~'~ ~,~ ~ 1972 Technteonv~terinary Prof iling /~c~ . ..,i~ .,~~ Ir~terrla~to~~al~ ' I - ~:ongress ~~~~ 1-2_,~ -1y7 Z 1973, biediad Incorporated, P.O. Box 417, Tarrytown, New York 10591 ~c~~Iq ----Rx------
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w 50330 8386 ~ ; . l . { 423 Sh CHBTO:STRY, -ORGANIC--LABORAxS.`BY Chemicai ~T-•&9hn[vWvWtWt*IIV"b rrC'e,-MxTfd*0ck°IF00: ~'..r ~ . . . , ' GCP.SHON' J. SEUGAR, e.s., M.A., Ph.D. Etter CLvnty Collqr, \'nrark RONALD A. Sta:GAR, e.s., M.o. ' St. Vincents Nooyital and 1lcdical Ccntcr of J'eco Yo.k, Ytw York N.2: ~ LAwaeeiCE BAUr,o.Ara, ..s., D.o.s. New York (lniccrsity, Stawol of Dcntistry, New 2ork, ..1: _ " . ' i. .- . • .. ... _ ._ ._. McGraw-HID Dook Company v.,o Yo.t: st. tnr+. See Ffaurtu+a Diua.l.tnr' j.JWnnlaLu.~ /C.ala L.nwpn . . fow.fi.n Vnicv Votitrrat .\'ru• 1ar17J lanunn Rb de /anti.o s4yrywa Sydney rwonto ..rr.-y•...-r .. • ~ ~ . . . .~ • •. . ~ ..yi' • . . . . ... .
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.. Y =.T ,91 50330 8398 ~ QK 865 R 6zr~"7i'Pt`=- ` Rawlins, Thomas 1:Isworth, 18G5-- VkV-'"~ Technics oi pl.uit lustoclieniistry and virolo~y (byl T. E Ruwlins <<ind) William \T.'i'al:alilshi. Millbiae, Calif., Na tional Press. (1952, 125 p. illus. 23 cm. Includes bibliogrUphy. 1. I'l-vnts---CLeinical analysis. 2. Viruses. i. Title. . („lhSGu.R31 581.192 52-3718 1 ~ ~ i531c51 Library of Congress . _ .. _..., -,.._.._., .-_- _.._ ,.......«... .~.....,..,P-.,.. 0 S 0 0 o t1 2 R 1 7S
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James C. Lamb, !!l, Warren C. Wesfgarth, Jimmy L. Fogers, and August P. Vernimmen 'J'he purpose of this papcr is to each constituent may require unrca- dcscribe cyuipmcnt vaid techniques sonable ef:ort.,md expense unless rcla- n•Lich have proven valuable for yuicl:ly tively quick tcstin- procedures can be obtainiua important inforrnation on used to obtain preliminary information. biolo-iral trcatability of industrial Sevcral typcs of oxygen nt.ilization . 0 5 0 0 n 0 2 .Z ~ 8 S 50330 8408 ~
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.:. Mcdiad Inc. T.O.Bux417 Tarrytown, N.Y. 10591 I ~ ~dd 0 5 4 4~,,~r',~A 1d+ 6 8 Volume -1l ~, ,/Clinical and rHospital Management Symposia
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i , , 50330 8381 ` ~ FIRE SAFETY/RADIATION, IONIZING--SAFETY MEASURES/COMPRESSED CASES/ GASES/NOTEBOOKS/LABORATORIES--SAFF,TY MEASURES/SAFETY GUIDES/ ~ . , 123 Pc 197 5 CHEMICAL " E.TECHNOLOGY . ; HANDBOOK Guidebook for Industrial Chemical Technolobists , by the and Technicians ~ \1'ritiub Tcauu Gi~ tlic Chemical TccLuician Ctu•ricultun Prujcct edited by .~ lloLcrt L. Pccsok, Project Director I KcnnetlE ChalttuaTt and «'aJc 1L P~~ndcr, e1 ssnr.inlp 1~rOfCCI ~lreclors AMERICAN CHEMICAL fOC1ETY / o S tl 0 tl "a -2 ~ WASHINGTON. D. C. 1975 .S 8
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I 50330 8380 I Un0 3 Si. ~.>ri}w.w ~ .~`." cc£.u a; Y..-:~02 1 lILl if.j1i•:i.i1i~J r - ~_ . ... , . ...r. ..:. : , ~ ~ - . . . . . . .... .., . .. . . . . .. - . ~~+.... 0 a n0 n0 ~~ I S 7
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b L iz e 0 U 0 0 5 0 '0957 (?V r,96T tt7S7~1~:if.^ NX • pe `• • xC ` • a, P:.rUea7 s3xS ,9961 ;`IBxs04:r.tS. uoO Tuy13ay L6£B OEEOS
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/ r ...-..a ..w:.:~.u..........~us...~..ar»s.v.. .........,.+.srrr'.Si+V.~..s.1._....•.s.+:...i~a~.•..-.......~,._.~...•..-.............ti.i:;rw.. ...:L;d...= .~ . . +. 50330 8407 EI:ECTROCHEMISTRY/CEIEMISTRY;" ORGf.NI•C-•-Sl'NTMESIS`/ . QD TECHNIQUES OF CHEMISTRY F&I reeay ` 453 We -Xl NORMAN L. WEINBERG C02) Superv;sor Re-.rarchCeocer 1974-11rj VOLUME V PART I L ~ , ~~ s pp ,~ Hooker Chtmical and Ylastics Corpo:ation l • '' { ( rr ( ~ ~ G dl d 4 M~rQ , ~7~ a ran an s ,New Y3rk - ` .t-~:. ~ , ~ - A40i . ELEGTRQORGAMC4SYNTHESlT A WIIEY•:MERSCIENCE PUBLICATION JOHN \YILEY & SONS New York • London • Sydney • Toronto
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Ti • ~ 50330 8400 !r- -.......~-- ~i~ . _ DICTIONARIES--POLYCLOT--TECHNOLOGY/LANGUAGES--DICTIONARIES/ Q 210 Mo 1970 TECHNICAL DICTIONARY i ss an_pyccxxtt Magyar Rungarian --_.j ~- - ' _ TECHNIK=iY1DRTERBUCfI _ ---._.._ - . -- , -•--r 3,ECTROSCOPY---Sp RAL ANALYSIS Spektroskopie - Spektralanalyse English English Espanol Spanish German - Deutsch Cesky Czech. ------_ _ . r ` French Frangais Potski Polish , .~ r-~ ' . " h b erausgege en ' -ton Dipl.dng. Dr.HeInrich Moritz and ProLDr.Tibor Torok VEB VERLAG TECHNIK BERLIN
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50330 8416 ~ QD 453 W ~.:..a~:i.`.t.:=..........~..w.W..-s...~.~....r.~..:..~~r...~.s..%..:a:... - _ _- .uscaiYa'~..~a,.... ~eet~r:iquelvf.::Orgar~f c _.Chcrr~igtr•y, Voj., 1.IIR ~ C 7:1:ZI.--hlAM C F:I:CM'raGRAPH"f . (iechaiq:;2 oZ ar ,i:aic Cilscta.tstxy, Vol. XII.) 3(1167 7S8 x,: gco Iutcracfiencw (ti,lloy) t," York 0 S~ o n ~~t 2 1 9~
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/ 50330 8399 ) , ,c~-. ..... ~~ . .j _ .-._-_~.._.. ..._... _ .._ -,•.._.._ . Landolt, I'lans Heinrich, 1831-1910. Zahlenwerte und F'unlctionen aus Physik, Chemie, Astronc ~ nue, Geophysik und Technik; in Gemeinschaft mit J. Bartel iet al.l und unter vorbereitender 3iitwirl:ung von J. D'an tet al.l hrsg. von.,Arnold Eucken. 6. aufl. Berlin, Sprinbe: 1950- v. dIngre., tablcs. 28 cm. At hnnd o4 title: T,nndolt--TitSrncteln. Previonsly publlahcil undcr title: I'hyslhallech cheiulsdre Tabelle: 7ncludca blhltograhlrlc,r. , [-- --: r : .. ~ - . (Continued on next card ) ,33r55k1l 51-=1Gt Q 5 A 0 0 0 2 2 1 7 6
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i 50330 8403 ~ s: r s' RJR CLASS NO. PAMPNLliT 751~& LaI : ~ Behavior Therapy ~, 547-49~(1915) (in English) Lando, H. A. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, Iowa, U. S.) MEASURE:IENT AND T •~HNIQUE INr;QVATIONS. f *1975, No. 22, W 7876* *d* ~ Tobacco analysis (medicine): Ml::ra.....~.:.wa.v..c .. ... .~.......... ~ ~..L. .. . ..r...r . . .. . tJ Yt:V.i.:L~ ..- ..t.hx .rsl.w . . f 0 S (l Q 0 0 2 2
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fiU3STAN LANCUAGE---TECIiNICAL RUSSIAN/RUSSI!`-14 LF,NGUAGE--]JICT.COI4 AIiIF.S- -•I'OLYCLOT/ FRYNCII Lt%:,.C,Ul:CE--DICTIONARIF.S---PULYGLOT/(:I:RMAN i.ANGBACI'---DICTION,,'RIES---P(1]:i ;L01/ EidGLISII -LANGL?1GL--DICTIONAP.IES--GEI'JiA11/I:RGLISH LANGUAGE--1lICTIO/~ARIES--FRF_*s4Ai/ ENGLISt{ L'+NGUAGE--D7 f:TIO;VARIES--RL'SSIAN/ENGLISII LANGUAc;E--DICTIONAItILS--POLYGLOT/ DICTIONARIES--GI:,RP:A:N /Dl" CPIOiVARIES--FP.rNCI/D1 CTI,F?hRI ES--Rt1S S I PJ'l/ Q 210 Su 1973 3 Vols. DI CTIONARIES--POLl'GLO'f--TSCI{'i':OL'JGY/ / TECIINICA.T, DI.CTIONAi;Y, PHYSICS 0 - { ~. v0"-' REGIS TEi\ rIaf!'l.OSiSU: . .. .,6 En~;If.s~ uoL. i-. *:7 .; vDt::2 Deutsch RussiscL Von Dipl.-Math. Raif Sube ..s, und ProL Dr.rer. eat. habiL Giiataer Eisenreich biit etwa 75000 Fachhegriltea VEIi VERLAG TECIiNIK BEI:T.IN I .,. . ,.. , _.-,._... .r _~.. _._ . _. .........--. - . --- -, _..._ .-.-.,,,_~.,_.,. ... ., _,~•~.~_.,._. , . , . .,.-.. -.,...-..... - r 0 5 0 0 n 0 2 2 1 ! 9 . 50330 8u02
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/ GERMAN LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--ENGLISH/DICTIOPJARIES--TECIINOLOCY/ ENGLISH LANGUAGE--DICTIONARIES--GERIKAN/DICTIONARIES--E.NGLISH-GERPtA.vl DICTIONARIES--GERMAN-ENGLISH/ Q 210 Wa 1973 TECHNICAL• DICTIONARY, - • T~CNNII~:Wt'3RTERBUCH ~ ,.t ; I , .;~,. . R . ~ POLYTECHNICAL DICTIONARY . , .. , . _,. ~ . ~-. - ® Polytechnisches Worterbuch . ~ . _. i . . _~.. . .. . . . . Z Va Iu me5 :-. Deutsch•Englisch E°glisch-Deutsdi ;:Geinuan-English ' .; Eriglish-German F!1 :n.° a Herausgegeben von Ing. RudoU Walther .._ . . _._._ . .~ . + hyt etwa tOO 001} WortsteUen ~' , Zvretle. durcbgesehene Autlage . 2nd Revised Edition. ' VEB VERLAG TECHNIK BERLIN
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50330 8404 ) ~ idicro_ ~ f.i1in ;:o. 102 ~~~tW 1 1~~~~z ::.: _:, ..... ., O
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r 50330 84ja ~ QD 453 We 1965 ~ I,CE ~, I,SZ U F,o Fw+rue0 R 0 ~~Y Yo,ume IY &STILLATION Second Completely Revised and Augmented Edition Editors t E. S. PERRY and A. WEISSQERGER Authors i C. S. CARLSOrr C. H. DEA4 J. G NECxEn D. E. ORGE:v E. S. PE1tnY 1965 AxCtiUll AN"D ELizASEiH RosE J. STEWALIT A. S. Trmri F. E. WIcciA»s T. J. WILLIAMS INTERSCIENCE PUBLISHERS a division of John R'ilcy & Sons, 0 5 0 0 0 0 .22A 9 JNI' York • London • Sydney 4 ~ . - :i ti1.a CHEMISTRY, ORGANIC--LABORATORY TECHNIQUES/
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! r 50330 8410 1 r„~.~ 81 V Go TASTE--TESTING/SENSORY EVALUATION/ ~ 1 .~01) lG ~l-9 (/9 X) I 011 ~ LTECIiNIQV~~I~ IIQAY DEPUS ~~~ TI0~1A1~1~ 1I? O~MENT ~ OF AN:OBJI:CTIVE~NOTAZ'ION ll CLASSICICA~'~Ol~`SI;STEHV ,4Q.,USTIMATE ITS ',:$UALITY~IZl} 'AtV``6ItGh14OLCPTIGAtr.;ANALYSISIF M.`GONNET G. jVACNE 'FRANCE All the people who like honey may do an organoleptical analysis. It is a degustation in the noble meaning of this word : as a response to the stimulations of this sweet •food, the taster objectively interprets his sensations from a qualitative and quantitative -point of view. The sensory examination 'is a genuine intelectual act requiring knowledge, concentration and training. It appeals •to an exeeptionall but frail, gentle measuring instrument which is submitted to frequent disorders therefore so unstable in responses : man. As far as techno'ogy is concerned, the sensory examination of honey is indispensable for the physical, chemical, biological ar~d pollinic anal ses. These analyses .:upply very important 2_ig~--- ,...:: ': -..
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r 50330 8 411 I "~ ~Yourrrnl oJ Microscopy, Vol. 99. Pt 1, .Seprrrnhcr 1973, pp. 2 i-2S. ~ 13 I I Re-73 S.P. Jzcceictd 1•wmrary Iz373- -"~~ ~ ~ by W. J. CoUsiNs, Physics and Engineering Laboratory, Private L'ag, Lower Hutt, New Zealand SUMMARY 1 I. Sectioning of charcoal is extremely difficult since the knife usually shatters the • section into minute fragments. In order to prevent such shattering it is necessary ' to both infiltrate the charcoal with a hard wax and to support the section during cutting with adhesive cellulose tape. _ During volcanic activity lahars or showers of hot ash often overwhelm and carbon- ize small trees and shrubs. The resulting charcoal is extrcmcly durable and may survive unchanged for decades, or'es•en centuries until it is exposed by erosion of the surrounding soil. Because the anatomical structure of the wood retnains largely intact during the carbonization process it is theoretically possible, to identify the species of tree from %-:hich a particular block of charcoal was formed. This in turn can provide information on the climatic conditions prevailing at the time of carbonization. Because of its extrcmcly brittle nature charcoal cannot be sectioned satis- factorily by m:ans of normal techniques. Any attempt to cut it with a knife reiu!ts, M~ l1 0 0 0 2 1 1 8 8
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6 6 ~~ 7 0 u0 v s a _... ... .~~:.~.~... ._~.~.~~...r..~.~.. ~~...~~_.. .... . ..~.~ _~.W. ~ ... _,.. . ~~~ ~ .~._. _. ~ ZZbB OEfOS
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50330 8429 ), TECHNIQUES OF CHEMISTRY SEE ALSO TECHNIQUE OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 0~0 0~0 2 22Qb
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50330 8415 , ~ _ ._...~._W:..._~. ...... ~ r ._..~..__ _.~_..-_..~ _~ __._ __ _._._. .... .. ~. _.__ ~_~~ .~ ......_.:.. ..~~. _.._.~. ; ..~.......: ~.. PECTROSCOPY-,--MOL-ECt'i.-~1R/PLECTRO~fixC--SPFCTP,A/-- ../S ~- - "" W 4 e 53 S / 1968 PECTROSCOPY --FLUORESCENCE EMISSIO,i SPECTPCOSCOPY/ ~.; j1EMICAL APPLICATIONS OF Sl'ERTIIOSC®PY Second Completely Revised and .lugme.ted Edition Editor W. AiTsr p~T~y AulLoce of Part I / : RALPH S. IIECKER A. B. F. DtTMCAlY F. A. DiATSEN D. R. SCOTT i463 W WEST . . IATERSCIE.\CE PUBLISUEF?S aT6 i of j~~/,Ly-+• ~i'iky SSuus,;~ewYoelc•Lonaoa•°yaney•Toroato ~
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..~.~..,n,.. .:;. ~..... r._.~..~. _,__....._~;...~,._..,. ,,..._..~.~~_ ....__~::,~~.~--...~.._..:,i_~~..... ~ . 50330 8418 ~~ QD 453 We 1969 . "SPRCTR45COPY--ORGANIC CUMPOUNDS/ CRN'IQIFF. F t1RCA,A[Lfo -~Ai ) Edlrors: P. A. Leermalur. A. Weisaberger . AM ORGANIC 1THOTOCH.E.iIIISTRY A. LAMOLA J. TU1tH0 rritA thaQters by - C. A. Leermakert and T. R. Eraas 1969 LITERSCIf.NCE PUt[.ISIIERS • ai%uion of Jo6u Wiley anu Soos, New York • Loadoo • Sydney • Toronto ~ JMUY ~TRANSFER 06 ~ 0 ~ f1 2 2 1 9 S
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rs! i zcouo u so .,..:r.~w4.........r......::xS..~>.ww:.... . ......+a~.. ~..., r . ... ...X•~ ... ., e.:.~.,......n.-.._.~. ..... .r ~.....r.,..~.... 1, •1 .. l\ 1".1 t. w.1 i'awi r`~cl•..~ : a o a OS'~ ~t~ .~r..~r.•.r. ~:~ Y .....,~~..1., :.e~ ...: . .'`: l.. rv,t..r.i ~l t 1 p f vi ~j-'(1eT ~• }'+ u~~'~:((j • z.J ts.3~.L~~t~..~i.~:.. J av:. 9.F~ _t:.:.,.,.. 't . f • -.-. (OLbT) SOhB 0££OS
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.. _.... ~- .. _-.... . . a~.:::~.~.:....~,-...+.•. _ ._._ _. . _ 74 II As .._.......s:. . ._ _. ..,.. ..~...... _.. ._...~_, r. 50330 8420 SEEDS/ ' TEC14NlM2- ~OF-?URITY-Y'ANAIA;YSIS ,= , )I Emma F. Sirrine arid A. WiniFred Anderson 11950 - No. ao.~l . Cont_nbu~ ioa,~o. ~ioa,~o the Nandhook on Seed '"estiny, prepared by r- /L t/o cJ-. I G . .,: the Association of Official Seed Analysts. Published by Canada Department of Qgricutture. Distributed by the Queen's Printer, Ottawa, Canada. I 10 cents
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Iz 70 l1 U 0 5 f,) O Yrtu I ~rf;7'w:7•,:~ ~.JV..•Ji ZT `` 9961 T n 7II I 90b8 0E£0S i
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50330 8419 Lawsorl, Dons-,las F '1'ho teclhnirluo of photomicro; raphy. Ne;v York, Mac- millsin, 1900 ii. e. 1961, 250 p. ilhc. 23 cm. Includcs L1Wiotirapby. ' 1. I'hotojulcro;;rapUy. 0,1-1251.i.33 778.315 Library of qonli-res9 ~ 130, .a---..-..-- _ _ _ . . . . ..... .... ... .... .__- -- c0-11c52 I ~. ~,....~.-„-...~.. ., 0 S~ 0 n. 0 2 2. 1 9.
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U, U. U t~ 5 U. .{ ..~..'.r3~s,:a~r..~.:....=..~~. :.:~- - .__ . ._.......;.....,_.~ ,._............;_....._~-.~._...,,.. .._ _..:y...:.. .^.+)L-ug:) saajalib "pas:4Uty,j £96I a.-sqwaldas 14I1,t t3.XI"32isX%%tr lI;?•31(.~S?2l .C,.SIWM:) £96z PUF.• /1T ~~~ n~ ,1'~t.`dC~~ 01, r ~.>~c:u:Y..~~^~za~t.t,.-3:,:<n•~r.tiT,rf.;r IA ~ SZbB OEEOS
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-- --` /TOBACCO--LABELLED, LIOUIFLCCp(j / TOBACCO--RESEARCH--PHILIP MORRIS TORACCO O`N C ANY/ TOBACCO--MANUFACTURE ~ TRADE--TECHNOLOGY/ ••78 •VI Je RJR CLASS NO. PA1rT~LET. 78 VI Je R. W., Jr.; Newman, R. H.; Segura, G.; Bass, R. T. =1^ilip Morris Res. Cent., Richmond, Va., U. S.) Described is a visual tobacco tracer technique that also has a quantitative assay capability. Tobacco is labelled ' with a•"commercial'scintillator solutio