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Philip Morris

Manufacturing Center Orientation Manual

Date: Aug 1987 (est.)
Length: 123 pages
2051630515-2051630635
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Author
Crabtree, P.L.
Crewe, A.M.
Type
MANU, MANUAL, HANDBOOK, CATALOGUE
CHAR, CHART, GRAPH, TABLE, MAPS
Area
GORMAN,ANNE/CENTRAL FILES
Site
M205
Request
Stmn/R2-039
Named Organization
1984 Summer Olympics
28th Session of the United Nations Gener
40th Street Pedestrian Mall + Beer Garde
7 Up
7 Up Bottling
7 Up Canada
7 Up Intl
Abal Hnos
Agros
American Financial Group
American Safety Razor
American Tupakka
Animal Byproducts Imports + Export
Armstrong Coated Products
Armstrong Products
Asr
Atw
Austria Tabakwerke
Austrian State Tobacco Monopoly
Benson + Hedges Canada
Building Maintenance Group
Burma Vita
Ca Tabacalera Nacional
Cab
Canadian Tobacofina
Carolina Okeefe
Cassandra Trading
Cbs Reports
Cental Ny Bottle
Central Engineering Preventive Maintenan
Central Engineering Utilities Group
Central Group
Cerveceria Bohemia
Ceskoslovensky Tabakovy Prumysl
Chemical Group
Chevalier Du Merite Commercial Et Indust
China Natl Native Produce
Cia Colombiana De Tabaco
Cigarrera Nacional
Clark Bros Chewing Gum
Clark Gum
Clemson Univ
College of Agriculture + Life Sciences
Commerce
Companhia De Fumos Santa Cruz
Continental Equity Investments
Continental Tobacco
Corporate Products Comm
De Ranch Foundation
Dohanzipari Vallaltok Trostje + Monimpex
Dun
Eger Tobacco Factory
Employee Relations Org
Executive Comm
Fabrika Duvana
Federal Tobacco
Field + Stream
Financial World Magazine
Flavor Tree Food Products
Forbes Magazine
Formosa Spring Brewery
French Tobacco Monopoly
Ftr, Fabriques De Tabac Reunies S.A.
Garanis Petrides
German Democratic Republic
Godfrey Phillips
Godfrey Phillips India
Godfrey Phillips New Zealand
Great Moments in the History of Tennis
Grunebaum
Hong Kong Tobacco
I Love Lucy
Industria Montaya
Industrial Research Magazine
Information Services Org
Izaak Walton League of America
Japan Tobacco
Koch Convertograph
Koch Label
Kwara Tobacco
La Altense
La Tabacalera Mexicana
Lake Mission Viejo
Lasuerte Cigar + Cigarette Factory
Lig, Liggett
Light Industries
Lightfoot
Lindeman Holdings
Lowenbrau
Manufactura De Tobacos Imparciales
Manufactura De Tobacos Particular Vf Gri
Manufacture De Tabacs De Lquest Africain
Massalin Particulares
Mc Plant Industrial Engineering Group
Mechanical Group
Mid Continental Bottlers
Miller
Miller Brewing
Milprint
Milprint + Nicolet Paper
Mission Viejo
Mission Viejo Realty Group
Monopoli Di Strato
Natl Assn of Black Journalists
Natl Company for Exterior Commerce
Natl Football League
Nbc
NC State Univ
Nicolet Paper
Ny Based Business Comm
Office Management + Equipment Magazine
or Freeze Dry Foods
Oxnard Lemon
Packaging Inst
Papastratos Cigarette Mfg
Philip Morris Country Music Show
Plainwell Paper
Plant Industrial Engineering Group
Polymer Chemie
Polymer Industries
Premier Tobacco
Proveedora Ecuatoriana Sa Ecuador
Republic of Cyprus
Rothmans Intl
Rothmans of Pall Mall Malaysia
Rothmans of Pall Mall Singapore
Ruder Finn
Salt Public
San Pellegrino
Schweppes France
Security + Control Group
Sieta
Societe Ivoirienne Des Tabac
Societe J Bastos De Laffrique Centrale
Soviet Tobacco Industry
State Comm
State Development Bank
Stephano Bros
Superior Tobacco
Support Groups
Surtech Coating
Systems Architecture Development Group
T Thomas Fortune
Tabacalera Andina
Tabacalera Centroamericana
Tabacalera De El Salvador
Tabacalera Intl
Tabacalera Nacional
Tabaquiera Ep
Taylor Group
Tex + Jinx Preview
TIRC, Tobacco Industry Research Comm
Tobacco Technology Group
Tobacconist + Importer of Fine Seegars
Trinidad Tobago
Univ of Ky
Univ of Tn Inst of Agriculture
Universal Beverage
Universal Foods
Ussr Council Ministers for Science + Tec
Utilities Group
Va Polytechnic Inst + State Univ
Vvb Tabakindustrie
Warner Jenkinson
Weltab
Wi Tissue Mills
Wikolin Polymer Chemie
Wr Grace
Yale Univ
Zpt
Named Person
Benson, R.
Brinkmann, M.
Chalkley, O.H.
Cullman, H.
Cullman, J.F. III
Dallolio
Eckmeyer, G.
Ellis, R.M.
Emerson, R.
Ghirardi
Goldsmith, C.H.
Grigg, C.L.
Grunebaum, J.
Hedges, W.
Jimenes, E.L.
Jones, K.
King Edward Vii
Lyon, A.E.
Massalin, C.
Maxwell, H.
Mccomas, O.P.
Mccoy, W.D., J.R.
Mckitterick, L.B.
Miller, F.
Millhiser, R.R.
Mollins
Morris, L.
Morris, M.
Murphy, J.A.
Player, J.
R, F.D., J.R.
Scandia
Schenkel, C.
Stefan, F.M.
Surgeon General
Thompson, W.C.
Thorkilsen, H.
Weissman, G.
Xxjohnny
Young, M.B.
Document File
2051630513/2051630636/153 Eo665 Employee Dev & Training Ter M-C Orientation Manual
Master ID
2051630515/0635

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Stmn/Produced
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PARE, PARENT
Date Loaded
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Brand
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Cambridge
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vma12a00

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Page 1: vma12a00
MANUFACTURING CENTER ORIENTATION MANUAL \
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TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction Welcome History Organization Charts/Description of Departments Orientation and Training/START Glossary of Terms Benef its In General Becoming a Part
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INTRODUCTION 2051630517
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INTRODUCTION Precision is one major reason for the quality of Philip Morris products. Another, equally important, is the dedication and skill of the men and women who are the participants in, and the producer of, our success. These employees are the brains and muscle of the organization. How effective they are is demonstrated by how fast we have grown. During the decade begun in 1957 we more than doubled in size. No matter how sophisticated our equipment, only people can account for such outstanding progress. Daily they demonstrate a craftsman's concern in doing their jobs well and in finding ways of doing them better. Many of the mechanical improvements at which visitors to our plants marvel were devised by men and women who operate our equipment. Our employees take pride in working for Philip Morris. They join us early, demonstrate their skills and learn new ones, and stay. This gives our company a stability which we count as a most important asset. No matter how rapidly our technology evolves, we know that the dependable Philip Morris workforce is there, ready and able, to make it work for the good of the company. Since the introduction of its Marlboro brand in 1955, Philip Morris has risen rapidly to its present position in the cigarette industry. If the Company is to continue its mercurial climb in the future, we must begin preparing now. Philip Morris is recruiting and developing its leadership for the 1980's and 1990's today. You are an important part of the planning being done for the future growth of the Company. Philip Morris is counting on you to provide the leadership needed in the future. The orientation and training program you are entering has as its chief objec- tive the production of the best prepared supervision possible. It is toward this end that you will be working over the next several months. You, as a member of this program, thus have a special kind of opportunity for growth. You were hired because the Company has a need for your talents and a belief in your potential backed by your indication of the self-motivation to grow and contribute. We are looking forward to a long, rewarding, challenging and exciting rela- tionship with you. We feel, not immodestly, that we have the finest place to work in the world. We are happy you have chosen to join the team. We feel it will be good for you and the Company, too. For the new supervisor who puts forth the effort and then contributes that little something extra, the rewards of a job well done will be forthcoming. We encourage you to use your creativity, initiative and your natural inquisi- tiveness toward the end of achieving a most satisfying work experience here at Philip Morris.
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WELCOME `~U~ ~6-3 0519,
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WSLCOHE - to the Manufacturing Center Training Department. You are now a very important part of Philip Morris, Inc. On behalf of the Company and the Manufacturing Center Management Staff, we extend to you a hearty welcome. During your training period, the job responsibilities may sometimes seem overwhelming, and things will seem tough, however, there are people who want and will help you get adjusted to your new job. We sincerely believe you are going to enjoy your work here more than you can possibly realize. Our company is the biggest and best of its kind in the world, and that's something for you to be proud of. We work as a team, and not as individuals, and everybody in your department wants you to achieve your goals. So congratulations, and our best wishes. There are lots of others who wanted your job. I know you feel challenged - and will give your best. AMC/mep welcome
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HTSTORY
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PHILIP MORRIS HISTORY HIGHLIGHTS 1847 - Philip Morris Esq. opens a shop on Bond Street in London 1855 - Frederic Miller opens a brewery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1902 - Philip Morris & Co., Ltd. is incorporated in New York by Gustav Eckmeyer 1919 - A new firm, owned by American stockholders, acquires the U.S. Philip Morris company and incorporates in Virginia under the name of Philip Morris & Co., Ltd. Inc. 1929 - C. L. Grigg markets "Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda," later renamed 7UP 1929 - Philip Morris begins manufacturing its own cigarettes by purchasing a factory in Richmond 1933 - Johnny calls for Philip Morris for the first time in the Hotel New Yorker lobby 1954 - Benson & Hedges merges with Philip Morris 1954 - Philip Morris (Australia) Ltd. is set up a first major affiliate outside the U.S. 1955 - Overseas division set up at Philip Morris 1955 - Philip Morris Incorporated becomes the company's corporate name 1955 - Marlboro introduced nationally in flip-top box with cork-tipped "selectrate" filter 1957 - Milprint and Nicolet Paper Co. acquired 1967 - Corporate structure of Philip Morris reorganized to create Philip Morris Incorporated and three operating companies: Philip Morris Domestic (renamed Philip Morris U.S.A. in 1968), Philip Morris International, and Philip Morris Industrial 1970 - Philip Morris effects whole ownership of Miller Brewing Company 1972 - Philip Morris acquires 100% of Mission Viejo Company 1978 - The Seven-Up Company becomes the sixth Philip Morris operating company 1978 - Philip Morris buys the international cigarette business of the Liggett Group Inc. 1981 - Philip Morris Incorporated announces the acquisition of shares and bonds of Rothmans International PLC as an investment in that company 1984 - Philip Morris announces consolidate operating revenues increased 6.5% to $13.8 billion 20100523
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PHILIP MORRIS HISTORY 1847 - Philip Morris Esq., Tobacconist and Importer of Fine Seegars, opens a shop on Bond Street in London 1854 - Philip Morris makes his first cigarettes 1855 - Frederic Miller, a young German braumeister, opens a brewery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1870 - 22 New Bond Street, London headquarters, begins to produce Philip Morris Cambrid e and Philip Morris Oxford Blues (later called Oxford Ovals and Philip Morris Blues 1873 - 13 Bond Street, London - Richard Benson and William Hedges open shop 1873 - Philip Morris dies - widow Margaret and brother Leopold Morris carry on cigarette trade 1877 - Players Navy Cut cigarettes acquired by John Player 1879 - Melachrino cigarettes first marketed 1880 - Leopold Morris buys out Margaret Morris's interest in the business 1885 - Leopold joins with Joseph Grunebaum to establish Philip Morris & company and Grunebaum, Ltd. 1885 - Blues, Cambridge, Derby, Unis, Marlborough (the ladies' favorite) are marketed 1887 - Leopold and Grunebaum dissolved their partnership. Company becomes Philip Morris & Co., Ltd. 1894 - Company is reorganized in 1894 as William Curtis Thompson and his family assume a majority interest 1899 - Benson & Hedges opens New York branch at 288 Fifth Avenue 1900 - Benson & Hedges moves to 314 Fifth Avenue, New York 1901 - Philip Morris & Co., Ltd. by royal warrant is appointed tobacconist for King Edward VII 1902 - Philip Morris & Co., Ltd. is incorporated in New York, 110-122 Broad Street, by Gustav Eckmeyer, who had been sole agent for Philip Morris in the U.S. since 1872, importing and selling the English-made cigarettes 1905 - Right to manufacture and vend all Philip Morris brands in Canada is granted by Thompson's firm to the New York company ZZ 1907 - The New York firm is reorganized_and moves to 4020 West Broadway. Benson & Hedges o moves to 435 Fifth Avenue cJr N 1917 - Philip Morris moves to 72 Fifth Avenue C~ C CJ? ~
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-2- 1918 - English Ovals becomes the first blend of domestic leaf presented by Philip Morris. These cigarettes are priced at 20 for $.30 1919 - The Philip Morris coronet logo is introduced 1919 - A new firm, owned by American stockholders, acquires the U.S. Philip Morris company and incorporates in Virginia under name of Philip Morris & co., Ltd., Inc. 1920 - The first Philip Morris Annual Report is published 1922 - Philip Morris-International Corp. is organized; introduces Players 1923 - Revelation is introduced by Continental Tobacco Co., a major competitor 1924 - Philip Morris becomes exclusive agent for Rameses 1924 - Philip Morris moves to 44 West 18th Street 1924 - Unfiltered Marlboro is introduced and Stephano cigarettes 1924 - Reuben M. Ellis becomes President of Philip Morris 1926 - A series of Marlboro ads showing a feminine hand promotes that cigarette for women 1926 - Philip Morris-International Corp. dissolved 1928 - Philip Morris begins to make regular dividend payments 1928 - Benson & Hedges is sold to an American financial group 1929 - Stephano Bros. ceases manufacture of Philip Morris brands 1929 - Philip Morris begins manufacturing its own cigarettes by purchasing a factory in Richmond 1929 - Philip Morris and Continental Tobacco Co. are both located at 119 Fifth Avenue 1929 - Reuben M. Ellis and Leonard B. McKitterick take control of Philip Morris 1929 - C. L. Grigg markets "Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda," later renamed 7UP 1930 - Ivory-tipped Marlboro introduced 1930 - "Battle of the Brands" continues as Continental Tobacco Co.'s Paul Jones becomes first of the 10 cent brands 1930 - Alfred E. Lyon joins Philip Morris from Europe and becomes West Coast representative 1931 - Benson & Hedges's Parliament (plain and cork tip) and Virginia Rounds are 1932 - Parliament becomes the first cigarette with a domestic (burley) and Turkish leaf introduced filter mouthpiece made from a blend 1933 - Philip Morris English Blend in the brown pack is introduced of 441
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-3- 1933 - Johnny calls for Philip Morris for the first time in the Hotel New Yorker lobby 1933 - Johnny is introduced on radio (NBC) for the first time on April 17 1933 - Leonard B. McKitterick becomes President of Philip Morris 1934 - Paul Jones is made with a cork tip. Cigarette Time, an ivory-tipped mentholated cigarette, is introduced 1934 - Philip Morris buys the assets of Continental Tobacco Co. 1936 - Otway Hebron Chalkley becomes President; Alfred E. Lyon, Executive Vice President 1938 - First offering of Philip Morris preferred stock placed on market 1940 - Country Doctor smoking tobacco added by Philip Morris 1944 - Philip Morris buys Axton-Fisher plant and facilities in Louisville, Kentucky (with this deal Philip Morris acquired Fleetwoods and Spud) 1945 - Otway Chalkley becomes Chairman of the Board; Alfred E. Lyon becomes President of Philip Morris 1946 - 0. Parker McComas joins Philip Morris as Vice President 1948 - "No cigarette hangover" campaign and nose test campaign begin for Philip Morris brand 1949 - Philip Morris sponsors its first television show - "Tex and Jinx Preview" 1949 - Alfred E. Lyon becomes Chairman of the Board; 0. Parker McComas, President 1950 - Philip Morris moves to 100 Park Avenue - awarded "Office of the Office Management and Equipment magazine Year" citation from 1951 - Philip Morris sponsors the "I Love Lucy" show 1952 - New plant is opened in Louisville, Kentucky 1953 - Tobacco Industry Research Committee formed at the suggestion of 0. Parker McComas 1953 - Philip Morris sponsors "So You Want to Lead a Band" program 1954 - Benson & Hedges merges with Philip Morris 1954 - Philip Morris introduces "snap-open pack" 1954 - Philip Morris (Australia) Ltd. is set up as first major affiliate outside the U.S. 1954 - Marlboro test-marketed as a full-flavored man's cigarette 1955 - Philip Morris replaces its brown pack with a red and white package 1955 - Overseas division set up at Philip Morris
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-4- 1955 - Philip Morris profit-sharing plan introduced to U.S. employees 1955 - Marlboro goes national and is introduced in flip-top box with cork-tipped se~lectrate" filter. Response was so enthusiastic that the supply did not catch up with the demand until April 1955 - License agreement signed with a LaSuerte Cigar and Cigarette Factory, the Philippines 1956 - License agreement signed with Tabacalera Nacional SA, Panama 1956 - License agreement signed with C.A. Tabacalera Nacional, Venezuela 1956 - King-size Philip Morris in a soft package is converted to long-size Philip Morris in a flip-top box 1956 - Parliament introduced in blue, gold and white flip-top box 1956 - Filter Spud introduced in flip-top box 1956 - Philip Morris sponsors "The Philip Morris Country Music Show" 1956 - Marlboro becomes first national sponsor of National Football League telecast 1957 - Milprint and Nicolet Paper Co. acquired. Acquisition represents Philip Morris's first diversification outside the tobacco business 1957 - License agreement signed with Fabriques de Tabac Reunies, SA, Switzerland for manu- facturing of Marlboro 1957 - Marlboro in the flip-top box introduced in England and Australia 1957 - Revelation and Bond Street packaged in flexible pouches 1957 - Philip Morris receives the Packaging Institute's Corporate Award 1957 - Joseph F. Cullman 3rd becomes President of Philip Morris Incorporated 1958 - Johnny celebrates his 25th Anniversary with Philip Morris 1958 - Parliament introduced as a popular-priced cigarette in the high filtration field. It is offered in a flip-top box or soft pack 1958 - Marlboro introduced in soft pack 1958 - Marlboro re-engineered to improve filtration 1958 - Polymer Industries, Inc. acquired 1958 - Benson &*Hedges (Canada) Ltd. acquired as Philip Morris affiliate - 1959 - Research Center in Richmond dedicated to 0. Parker McComas 1959 - C.A. Tabacalera Nacional, licensee in Venezuela since 1956, becomes first Latin American affiliate
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1 1959 - Alpine introduced -5- 1960 1960 - Philip Morris Commander introduced on mark VIII machine 1960 - Philip Morris Regular changed to match the Commander pack 1960 - A New slide and shell package design successfully introduced for Benson & Hedges, the largest selling premium-priced cigarette in America 1960 - Philip Morris, Marlboro, Alpine, and Parliament manufactured in Venezuela by C.A. Tabacalera Nacional 1960 - Marlboro soft pack introduced in Germany under new manufacturing agreement with Martin Brinkmann A.G. 1960 - Marlboro and Philip Morris marketed in the Philippines 1960 - A.S.R. Products Corporate acquired 1960 - Philip Morris sponsors "CBS Reports" 1960 - George Weissman appointed Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Philip Morris Overseas 1961 - Philip Morris Overseas renamed Philip Morris International 1961 - License agreement signed with Hong Kong Tobacco Company 1961 - Philip Morris (brown pack) introduced in Hong Kong 1961 - Pal Premium blade introduced: Gem Premium single edge blade introduced 1961 - Philip Morris signs license agreement with SEITA, French Tobacco monopoly, for manu- facture and distribution of Parliament 1962 - License agreement signed with Amer Tupakka Oy, Finland 1962 - Benson & Hedges (Canada) Ltd. and Canadian Tobacofina Ltd. merge 1962 - "Marlboro Country" ad slogan is introduced in selected markets 1962 - Pal stainless injector razor introduces new line 1962 - License agreement signed with Monopoli di Stato, Italy 1962 - La Altense, later renamed Tobacalera Centroamericana, S.A., Guatemala, becomes an affiliate 1963 - "Marlboro Country" -advertising campaign makes its national debut 1963 - Philip Morris announces it will construct an Operations Center in Richmond, Virginia 1963 - Burma-Vita Company acquired 2051630528
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-6- February 1963 - Paxton test marketed in Fresno, California, and Tulsa, Oklahoma February 1963 - Sarato a test marketed in Hartford, Connecticut, and Sacramento, C ai a February 1963 - Personna stainless steel double edge razor blades introduced by American Safety Razor Company March 1963 - Pal stainless steel razor is shown at Buenos Aires' Museum of Modern Art and Louvre Museum in Paris March 1963 - License agreement signed with Austria Tabakwerke AG for manufacture and distribution of Marlboro March 21 1963 - Joseph F. Cullman 3rd receives Cross of Chevalier du Merite Commercial et Industriel from French Government April 1963 - Pal stainless steel injector blades introduced April 1963 - Clark Bros. Chewing Gum Company acquired April 1963 - Philip Morris holds its first Derby Festival in Louisville, Kentucky April 24 1963 - Philip Morris Inc. receives President's "E" Award from FDR, Jr., Under Secretary of Commerce 1963 - Paxton test marketed in New England and Middle Atlantic States, Ohio and Hawaii June 1963 - Pal and Personna stainless steel blades launched nationally June 1963 - Paxton goes national in all 50 states September 1963 - Philip Morris makes tennis film narrated by Chris Schenkel and Roy Emerson September 1963 - Saratoga test marketed in Seattle, Washington September 1963 - Field and Stream pipe tobacco introduced September 1963 - Paxton introduced in Puerto Rico September 1963 - Multifilter introduced in Humiflex plastic package October 1963 - Alpine coupon redemption program instituted December 1963 - King-size English Ovals marketed December 1963 - Fabriques de Tabac Reunies, S.A., Switzerland, becomes first Philip ~ Morris cigarette manufacturing affiliate on the continent of Europe O ~ January 1964 - Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health is issued ~--~ ~ ~
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IV -7- January 1964 - Johnny marks his 30th Anniversary February 1964 - Agreement signed with Ruder & Finn, public relations firm March 1964 - Philip Morris Multifilter with a charcoal filter introduced April 1964 - Galaxy cigarettes introduced with redemption coupon April 1964 - Philip Morris dedicates the first building of the Operations Center in Richmond, Virginia May 1964 - Benson & Hedges Little Filter cigars introduced July 1964 - Parliament comes out with charcoal filter September 1964 - Premier of "Great Moments in the History of Tennis" January 1965 - Marlboro production begins in France under a licensing agreement signed with SEITA, the French tobacco monopoly January 1965 - Self-imposed cigarette advertising code goes into effect by which the companies, voluntarily and individually, agree not to promote cigarette! to young people and to avoid implying smoking has health benefits or is essential to social prominence April 1965 - "Teaberry Shuffle" ads promote Clark's Gum May 1965 - Philip Morris de Puerto Rico becomes an affiliate 1965 - Milprint, Inc. Nicolet Paper Co., and Polymer Industries, Inc. combine to from the Industrial Products Division, predecessor of Philip Morris Industrial. Fred M. Stefan named President of the new division. November 1965 - Harold Thorkilsen appointed President of A.S.R. December 1965 - Gemini space food packaging developed by Milprtnt January 1966 - Federal Cigarette Labeling Act goes into effect, requiring cigarette companies to include on all packages the words "Caution: Cigarette Smoking May Be Hazardous To Your Health" January 1966 - Hugh Cullman elected Executive Vice President of Philip Morris April 1966 - Marlboro Menthol cigarettes introduced May 2 1966 - Joseph F. Cullman 3rd named to Tobacco Hall of Fame June 1966 - License agreement signed with Superior Tobacco Company, N.V., Netherlands Antilles September 1966 - Massalin y Celasco S.A.C.e.I. joins Philip Morris Latin American opera- tions as affiliate in Argentina 205i63053p
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-8- September 1966 - Benson & Hedges 100's--menthol and regular--introduced nationally January 1 1967 - Corporate structure of Philip Morris reorganized to create Philip Morris Incorporated and three operating companies: Philip Morris Domestic, Philip Morris International, and Philip Morris Industrial - Joseph F. Cuilman 3rd appointed Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Philip Morris Incorporated - George Weissman appointed President and Chief Operating Officer of Philip Morris Incorporated - Hugh Cullman appointed President of Philip Morris International - Fred M. Stefan appointed President of Philip Morris Industrial - Ross R. Millhiser appointed President of Philip Morris Domestic April 1967 - Kwara Tobacco Company of Ilorin, Nigeria, becomes Philip Morris affi- liate (later renamed Philip Morris Nigeria Ltd.) June 1967 - Marlboro 100's launched nationally in the Gold Pack September 1967 - Marlboro 100's introduced in the flip-top box January 1968 - Philip Morris Domestic changes its name to Philip Morris U.S.A. February 1968 - Koch Convertograph Co. acquired by Philip Morris Industrial. Renamed Koch Label Co. 1968 - Virginia Slims test-marketed in San Francisco August 1968 - Philip Morris acquires Godfrey Phillips Ltd., a British holding com- pany, thereby obtaining interests in Godfrey Phillips India, Ltd., Premier Tobacco Industries Ltd., Pakistan, and Godfrey Phillips New Zealand (later renamed Philip Morris (New Zealand) Ltd.) September 1968 - Virginia Slims marketed nationally January 1969 - Philip Morris Incorporated reports that operating revenues for 1968 exceeded $1 billion for the first time February 1969 - Philip Morris Holland B.V. joins network of international affiliates May 1969 - License agreement signed for manufacture of cigarettes in Bolivia May 1969 - Philip Morris Sweden AB created as an affiliate June 1969 - Philip Morris acquires 53% ownership of Miller Brewing Co. from W. R.j'Z Grace & Co. 0 C3T July 1969 - E. Leon Jimenes, C. por A., becomes Philip Morris affiliate in the Dominican Republic ~' C W ~_6
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-9- October 1969 - License agreement signed with Fabrika Duvana Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, for the manufacture of Marlboro January 1970 - Philip Morris U.S. distributorship of Flavor Tree Food Products (Kit Kat, Coffee Crisp, etc.) terminated February 1970 - Marlboro 100's Red Pack test marketed in Seattle and Spokane, Washington March 1970 - Philip Morris GmbH started up as affiliate in West Germany June 1970 - Philip Morris effects whole ownership of Miller Brewing by purchasing August 1970 outstanding 47% of stock from De Rance Foundation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin - Face Guard razor blades test-marketed September 1970 - First Virginia Slims tennis tournament takes place in Houston, Texas October 1970 - Marlboro 100's (ventilated filter) introduced 1970 - Parliament 80/85 charcoal filter marketed December 1970 - Plainwell Paper Co., Inc. acquired by Philip Morris Industrial 1970 - Proveedora Ecuatoriana S.A., Ecuador, formed as a marketing affiliate 1970 - Cigarette companies voluntarily agree to display "tar"-nicotine data in all advertising January 2 1971 - Cigarette TV and radio advertising ban goes into effect February 1971 - Personna '74 tungsten steel blade (distributed nationally) May 1971 - Contact signed in Spain for the purchase of companies which later beco- -mes affiliates Philip Morris Espana, S.A., and Philip Morris Iberica, S.A. June 1971 - Armstrong Coated Products acquire by Philip Morris Industrial September 1971 - John A. Murphy elected Chief Executive Officer of Miller Brewing Company October 1971 - License agreement signed with Cia Colombiana de Tabaco, Colombia November 1971 - Philip Morris France S.A., marketing affiliate, established November 1971 - Weltab S.A., Belgium becomes a Philip Morris affiliate 1971 - Lindeman (Holdings) Ltd., wine company, becomes subsidiary of Philip O Morris (Australia) Ltd. P.T. Philip Morris Indonesia set up as an ~ affiliate t--~ r-. ~ W ~
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-10- i i l d i h l h nc e garette manufacturers requ red to u ea warnings on all t ianuary 1972 - C advertising, direct mail, and point-of-sale material ! 1972 - Marlboro Lights introduced 1972 - Face Guard expands to national distribution 1972 - Tabacalera Nacional, S.A. of Panama, a licensee since 1956, becomes a Philip Morris affiliate 1972 - Parliament 100's with charcoal filter goes national 1972 - Personna floating head razor (injector) goes on the market Aprii 1972 - Philip Morris celebrates its 125th anniversary August 1972 - Flicker Ladies' Shaver introduced in test markets September 1972 - Philip Morris acquires 100% of Mission Viejo Company, a community deve- lopment and home building firm December 1972 - License agreement signed with Japan Tobacco and Salt Public Corp. and Federal Tobacco Ltd., Trinidad and Tobago, for the manufacture of Marlboro December 1972 - Wikolin Polymer Chemie GmbH, Germany, acquired by Philip Morris Industrial December 1972 - Marlboro ends the year as the world's best-selling cigarette January 1973 - Philip Morris Incorporated's 1972 operating revenues surpass $2 billion for the first time March 1973 - The new Richmond Manufacturing Center makes its first cigarettes Apri-1 1973 - Personna Double II razor with twin double-edge blades introduced April 1973 - Lightfoot Company, soap manufacturers, dissolved April 1973 - Clark Gum Company sold April 26 1973 - The Research Center Tower in Richmond is dedicated 1973 - Mrs. Margaret B. Young, member of Philip Morris Board of Directors, is appointed U.S. delegate to the 28th session of the United Nations General Assembly May 1973 - The CAB orders commercial airlines to separate smokers and nonsmokers May 1973 - Tabacalera Andina, S.A., established as a manufacturing affiliate in •t-NZ Ecuador G~ C~? May 1973 - Surtech Coating Co., formed by Philip Morris Industrial ~ C~z W
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July September 1973 - First Marlboro Cup race is won by Secretariat 1973 - License agreement signed with Agros, the National Company for Exterior Commerce, and ZPT, the Polish cigarette industry, for the manufacture and marketing of Marlboro October 1 1973 - George Weissman named Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors - Ross R. Millhiser elected President of Philip Morris Incorporated - Clifford H. Goldsmith elected President of Philip Morris U.S.A. 1973 - Miller announces plans for a $16 million aluminum can plant in Milwaukee, Wisconsin January 1974 - Miller announces record sales for 1973, moving it from seventh to fifth place in the industry. Plans $70 million brewery in Fulton, N.Y. February 1974 - Philip Morris announces joint venture in Brazil with the State Development Bank of the Sate of Parana in forming Philip Morris Brasileira S.A. de Cigarros March 1974 - Philip Morris Incorporated signs five-year scientific and technical cooperative agreement with the State Committee of the U.S.S.R. Council of Ministers for Science and Technology March 1974 - License agreements signed with Rothmans of Pall Mall (Malaysia) BHD and Rothmans of Pall Mall (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. 1974 - Philip Morris International, "luxury" premium-priced brand, launched in Europe June 1974 - License agreement signed with Papastratos Cigarette Manufacturing Company, Greece July 1974 - Mexican Affiliate Cigarrera Nacional S.A. merges with La Tabacalera Mexicana, S.A. de C.V.O. 1974 - Richmond Research Center Tower named "Laboratory of the Year" by Industrial Research magazine 1974 - Benson & Hedges (Canada) Ltd. sells Formosa Spring Brewery October 12 1974 - Richmond Operations Center is dedicated October 14' 1974 - Johnny retires December 1974 - License agreement signed with Tabacalera, S.A. for the manufacture Marlboro in Spain 1973 - Tabacalera S.A., Spain, announces it is a partner with Philip Morris in Philip Morris Espana, S.A., and Philip Morris Iberica, S.A. of
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January 1975 - Philip Morris Incorporated's 1974 operating revenues surpass $3 billion January 1975 - Milprint Inc., subsidiary of Philip Morris Industrial, celebrates its 75th Anniversary January 1975 - In Brazil, Philip Morris acquires Companhia de Fumos Santa Cruz February 1975 - Saratoga 120's test marketed March 1975 - Lite Beer from Miller introduced nationally April 1975 - Saratoga 120's introduced nationally April 1975 - By mid-April Miller's first aluminum can manufacturing plant is pro- ducing 1 million cans per day July 1975 - Apollo-Soyuz, commemorative American-blend cigarette brand jointly developed, produced and marketed by Philip Morris and the Soviet Union, is introduced September 1975 - Tabacalera Costarricense, S.A. (cigarette manufacturers) and Mendiola & Co. (distributors), Costa Rica, become Philip Morris affiliates September 1975 - American Safety Razor introduces the Lady Double II razor for women September 1975 - License agreement signed with Bulgartabac, Bulgaria, for manufacture and distribution of Marlboro 1975 - Miller assumes full U.S. distribution rights for Lowenbrau 1975 - Construction beings on Lake Mission Viejo, California December 1975 - By year-end Marlboro becomes the top-selling brand int he U.S. and all- time best seller in the world January 1976 - Fred Stefan becomes Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Philip. Morris Industrial; William D. McCoy, Jr., becomes President and Chief Operating Officer January 1976 - Merit, "the first low-tar cigarette with 'Enriched Flavor,"' introduced nationally January 1976 - Philip Morris announces that consolidated operating revenues for the year exceeded $3.6 billion and its share of the U.S. cigarette market increased to 23.6% January 1976 - Miller announces new sales record and moves into fourth place by increasing its share of the U.S. beer market to about 8.6% April 1976 - Construction underway to double annual capacity of Miller's Fulton, N.Y., brewery from 4 million to 8 million barrels April 1976 - Commercial brewing begins at Miller's facility in Fulton, N.Y.
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-13- May 1976 - Aluminum can manufacturing plants at Miller's Fort Worth, Texas, and Fulton, N.Y. breweries commence production June 1976 - Ground broken for new mid-Atlantic brewery in Eden, North Carolina September 1976 - Philip Morris Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Joseph F. Cullman 3rd agrees to unanimous request of the Board of Directors to stay on past his scheduled retirement in April 1977 September 1976 - Philip Morris announces decision to maintain its corporate headquarters in New York City and to expand the New York operation by more than 40% September 1976 - Mission Viejo Company purchases the 6,600 acre Moulton Ranch near Mission Viejo, California October 1976 - Tabacalera de El Salvador S.A. de C.V. becomes an affiliate November 1976 - License agreement signed with VVB Tabakindustrie, German Democratic Republic December 1976 - Dun's Review cites Philip Morris as "one of the five best managed com- panies of 1976" December 1976 - William D. McCoy, Jr., President of Philip Morris Industrial, is elected Chief Executive Officer; Fred Stefan is named Chairman of the Executive Committee January 1977 - Miller announces it has moved into third place by reporting another year of record sales and the largest annual barrelage increase ever achieved in the brewing industry. Its share of the U.S. market is about 12.2% January 1977 - Merit 100's introduced nationally January 1977 - License agreement signed with Licensintorg, representing the Soviet tobacco industry January 1977 - Philip Morris announces it again had record earnings for 1976 and its consolidated operating revenues for the year exceeded $4 billion for the first time. The company registered the U.S. cigarette industry's largest gain in unit sales and increased its U.S. market share to 25.1%. The international company's share of the cigarette market out- side the U.S. rose to 5.1% February 1977 - Wisconsin Tissue Mills acquired by Philip Morris Industrial March 1977 - Joseph F. Cullman 3rd is named "Chief Executive Officer of the Year" by Financial World magazine June 1977 - Philip Morris begins construction of a $34.1 million glass container ~. plant near Aubrun, N.Y. This facility will supply most of its produc- C tion to Miller c3 ~-+ ~ ~.: C CSt W C7:
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-14- July July 1977 - Miller announces it will increase the annual capacity of its brewery now under construction in Eden, N.C., to 8.8 million barrels from the 3 million initially planned 1977 - Lake Mission Viejo, California, opens August 1977 - Wisconsin Tissue Mills is awarded the Clean Water Award of the Izaak Walton League of America for its water pollution control efforts September 1977 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces a $241,000 grant to North Carolina State University, the largest single corporate contribution ever received by that institution, for the endowment and support of tobacco extension and agricultural education programs September 1977 - Philip Morris Incorporated announces the sale of American Safety Razor Company to a group of A.S.R. employees September 1977 - Domestically-brewed Lowenbrau is put into national distribution October 1977 - Benson & Hedges 100's Lights, a lower "tar" addition to Benson & Hedges 100 s, is introduced nationally November 1977 - Philip Morris Incorporated declares 200th consecutive regular quarterly dividend November 1977 - Miller breaks ground in Irwindale, California, for a new brewery with a capacity of 5 million barrels a year January 1978 - Miller reports 24.2 million barrels of beer were shipped in 1977, a 31.6% increase of 1976. This gain greatly exceeded the industry's increase of 4.4%. The company moved into second place in the U.S. brewing industry by increasing its U.S. market share to about 15.4% January 1978 - Miller announces plans to build a $37.5 million aluminum can manufac- turing plant in Reidsville, N.C. January 1978 - For the 24th consecutive year Philip Morris announces record revenues and earnings. Its consolidated operating revenues surpassed the $5 billion mark, and the company registered the cigarette industry's largest gain in unit sales for the 11th straight year. Its U.S. market share increased to 26.2% and the international company's share rose to about 5.2% January 1978 - Marlboro Lights 100's introduced nationally February 1978 - License agreement is signed with Dohanzipari Vallaltok Trostje and Monimpex, Hungary March 1978 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces plans to construct a major new cigarette manufacturing facility in 1979 on a 2,100-acre tract of land between ~ Charlotte and Concord in Cabarrus County, N.C. 0
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-15- April 1978 - A new $247 million brewery to be located in Albany, Georgia, is announced by the Miller Brewing Company. It will have an annual capa- city of 10 million barrels April 1978 - Philip Morris Incorporated makes a grant of $1 million (payable over five years) to Yale University's Graduate School of Organization and Management for the establishment of a Philip Morris Chair in Marketing in honor of Joseph F. Cullman 3rd May 1978 - License agreement is signed with Industria Montanya, Andorra May - June 1978 - Philip Morris announces a tender offer for The Seven-Up Company, and subsequently reaches an understanding with the management of Seven-Up for the combination of the two companies. As a result of the tender offer, Philip Morris acquires 97% of Seven-Up common stock and merges Seven-Up into a wholly owned subsidiary which assumes the Seven-Up name. Seven-Up now becomes the sixth Philip Morris operating company June 1978 - Philip Morris buys the international cigarette business of the Liggett Group Inc. July 24 1978 - Philip Morris Board of Directors elects new officers to manage the cor- poration, effective November 1, 1978 George Weissman, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Philip Morris Incorporated Ross R. Millhiser, Vice Chairman of the Board Clifford H. Goldsmith, President Hugh Cullman, Group Executive Vice President, Philip Morris Incorporated and Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Philip Morris U.S.A. John A. Murphy, Group Executive Vice President, Philip Morris Incorporated, and Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Miller Brewing Company, with responsibility for Miller, The Seven-Up Company and Mission Viejo Company Joseph F. Cullman 3rd, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Board New office of the Chief Executive is created consisting of Messrs. Weissman, Millhiser and Goldsmith. September 1978 - License agreement is signed with Ceskoslovensky Tabakovy Prumysl, Czechoslovakia, for the manufacture and marketing of Roy November 1978 - Expansion underway to increase annual capacity of Miller's Fulton, N.Y. brewery from 8.8 million barrels to 10 million barrels November 1978 - Surtech Coating Co. is liquidated 0 C3-e F-+ ~ CFt Oo
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-16- December 1978 - Philip Morris announces plans to construct a 26-story, $50 million new corporate headquarters building at the southwest corner of Park Avenue and 42nd Street, New York City January 1979 - Miller reports 31.2 million barrels of beer were shipped in 1978, a 21.1% increase over 1977. This is the largest annual barrelage gain in Miller's history. Its share of the U.S. market is now about 19% January 1979 - Philip Morris announces record revenues and earnings for the 25th con- secutive year as consolidated operating revenues surpassed the $6 billion mark. The company registered the cigarette industry's largest gain in unit sales for the 12th straight year and increased its U.S. market share to about 28%. The international company's share of the cigarette market outside the U.S. rose to about 5.5% January 1979 - Philip Morris signs an agreement with the China National Native Produce and Animal By-Products Import and Export Corporation (PRC) for the sale and distribution of U.S. cigarette exports in Friendship shops and tourist hotels January 1979 - Mission Viejo company acquires the 22,000-acre Highlands Ranch south of Denver, Colorado February 1979 - The Board of Directors of Philip Morris Incorporated declares a two- for-one split-up of the company's common stock subject to approval by stockholders at the annual meeting, increases the quarterly dividend on the common stock by 22%, and calls for redemption of all outstanding shares of Preferred Stock on April 11, 1979 The company also announces that its capital expenditure program will be somewhat in excess of $3 billion for the five-year period, 1979-1983 April 1979 - License agreement is signed with Tabaqueira E.P., Portugal, for the manufacture and sale of Marlboro in Portugal, Madeira and the Azores July 1979 - Philip Morris announces an investment in the cigarette manufacturing firm of Abal Hnos., S.A., Uruguay August 1979 - Philip Morris International announces that the headquarters function of Seven-Up International will move to PMI offices in New York from St. Louis, Missouri August 1979 - Tabacalera International, S.A., Chile, becomes an affiliate September 1979 - Philip Morris Incorporated and Miller Brewing Company officially open Central New York Bottle Company in Auburn, N.Y. Plans are announced to invest an additional $15 million to increase capacity from its present 720 million containers annually to 990 million annually September 1979 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces a $222,500 grant to Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for the support of its Extension Division and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. This is the largest single corporate grant ever received by that institution 2051630539
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F October 1979 October 1979 October 1979 -17- - Miller announces expansion is underway to increase annual capacity of Eden, N.C., brewery from 8.8 million to 10 million barrels - Miller announces start of aluminum can manufacturing at its Reidsville, N.C., plant - Virginia Slims Lights introduced nationally October 1979 - Massalin y Celasco, S.A., Argentine affiliate, announces intention to merge with two cigarette companies of a German firm. Completion of the merger is expected by mid-1980 December 1979 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces plans for construction of a $41 million, 550,000 sq. ft. administration building and technical center adjacent to its existing Operations Center in Richmond, Va. December 1979 - Miller announces plans for the construction of a $411.6 million brewery to be located in Trenton, Ohio. It will have an annual capacity of 10 million barrels January 1980 - Miller reports that 35.8 million barrels of beer were shipped in 1979, a 14.5% increase over 1978. This increase represents the 21st con- secutive year of barrelage gain for Miller and brings Miller's share of the U.S. beer market to about 21% January 1980 - Commercial brewing of Miller High Life Beer begins at the new Albany, Ga., facility, the largest brewery ever built in a single stage in the world, with an annual capacity of 10 mil.lion barrels January 1980 - Miller announces the start of commercial production at its Irwindale, Ca., brewery which as an annual capacity of 5 million barrels January 1980 - Ground broken by Miller for a $28.7 million aluminum can manufacturing plant on a 75-acre site in Moultrie, Ga. January 1980 - Philip Morris Incorporated announces the establishment of a Tobacco Technology Group which will provide assistance and expertise to Philip Morris U.S.A. and Philip Morris International January 1980 - For the 26th consecutive year, Philip Morris announces record revenues and earnings, as consolidated operating revenues surpassed the $8 billion mark. For the 13th straight year the company registered the U.S. cigarette industry's largest gain in unit sales, increasing its U.S. market share to 29%. The international company's share of the cigarette market outside the U.S. rose to about 6% March 1980 - Seven-Up unveils a graphics program that includes a new trademark for the company and new packaging designs for its 7UP and Diet 7UP brands 1980 - Cambridge is introduced nationally 411Z April fl ~ April 1980 - Miller celebrates its 125th anniversary ~ T.
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-18- May 1980 - Philip Morris signs agreement with the Light Industries Corporation of the Peoples Republic of China for the manufacture of L&M king-size filter cigarettes in Canton's number two-cigarette factory May 1980 - Seven-Up acquires Taylor Group Incorporated, the St. Louis Seven-Up Bottling Company May 1980 - Philip Morris signs an agreement with the Guangdong Tourist Supplies Corporation for the sale and distribution of L&M king-size filter cigarettes May 1980 - Philip Morris announces the funding of a new tobacco resource develop- ment program at the University of Kentucky college of Agriculture. Philip Morris has contributed more than $226,000 in grants and an endowment to expand the research and education base for burley tobacco June 1980 - Seven-Up acquires exclusive North American manufacturing and marketing rights for the soft drink Vimto June 1980 - Construction begins on a $17 million soft drink production/distribution center for Seven-Up Bottling of Houston, a division of The Seven-Up Company July 1980 - Miller announces opening of the new 50,000 square-foot Technical Center at its headquarters in Milwaukee July 1980 - Miller dedicates its 40th Street Pedestrian Mall and Beer Garden in Milwaukee August 1980 - Seven-Up acquires the Seven-Up Bottling company of Albuquerque, Inc. September 1980 - Marlboro Lights introduced nationally in the king-size flip-top box September 1980 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces a grant of $80,000 to the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture to support tobacco extension and agricultural education programs September 1980 - Miller dedicates its Miller Brands controlled temperature warehouse in Wauwatosa, Wis. October 1980 - Massalin y Celasco S.A.i.C., Argentine affiliate, Manufactura de Tobacos "Particular" V.F. Griego S.A. and Manufactura de Tobacos "Imparciales" S.A.C.I.A. merge into a new company, Massalin Particulares S.A. October 1980 - Seven-Up acquires Oxnard Lemon Company November 1980 - Production of L&M cigarettes begins at Canton number two cigarette fac- tory January 1981 - Miller reports that 37.3 million barrels of beer were shipped in 1980, a 4.2% increase over 1979. Lite beer became the third largest-selling brand in the U.S. ~05,1830541
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-19- January 1981 - For the 27th consecutive year, Philip Morris announces record revenues and earnings, as consolidated operating revenues increased to $9.8 billion. The company again registered a record increase in unit sales, increasing its U.S. market share to 31%. The international company's share of the cigarette market outside the U.S. rose to 6.2% January 1981 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces the establishment of a merit scholarship program in agricultural education at North Carolina State University February 1981 - Merit Ultra Lights, filter and menthol, are introduced nationally February 1981 - Seven-Up acquires Seven-Up Montreal Ltee. February 1981 - Mission Viejo begins new home construction at Highlands Ranch, Colorado February 1981 - Milprint's Downingtown, Pa., plant is sold March 1981 - Philip Morris Incorporated announces that spendings for its capital programs in the five-year period from 1981 to 1986 are projected to total approximately $3.5 billion, of which approximately $950 million is planned to be spent during 1981 April 1981 - The Seven-Up Company and San Pellegrino S.p.A. have signed an agreement for the production and distribution of 7UP in Italy April 1981 - Philip Morris Incorporated signs an agreement with Societe Ivoirienne des Tabac, Ivory Coast, for the licensed manufacture of Marlboro and Chesterfield April 1981 - Mission Viejo Company begins new home construction at Aliso Viejo, the community planned for the Moulton Ranch property in California May 1981 - Philip Morris Incorporated announces the acquisition of shares and bonds of Rothmans International PLC as an investment in that company May 1981 - Miller announces that its Moultrie, Ga., container manufacturing faci- lity has reached a production capacity of one million cans per day July 1981 - Philip Morris Germany inaugurates its expanded production facility in Berl i n July 1981 - Highland Ranch, Colorado, opens with the sale of its first homes July 1981 - Production begins at new facility of Seven-Up Bottling of Houston August 1981 - Miller announces plans to market Ma num malt liquor in 20 states and the District of Columbia September 1981 - Merit Ultra Lights 100's, regular and menthol, are introduced iZ nationally O cJt September 1981 - Miller tops out its Trenton, Ohio, brewery ~ O
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-20- October October Nove:-ber 1981 - Philip Morris U.S.A. introduces nationally The Merit Report: A Public Opinion Survey, a new concept in public opinion gathering 1981 - The first families move into Mission Viejo Company's Highlands Ranch, Colorado 1981 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces a grant of $135,680 over a four-year period to Clemson University for an educational program to train scien- tists and educators who work with tobacco November 1981 - Philip Morris signs an agreement with the Eger Tobacco Factory for the licensed manufacture of Multifilter in Hungary. (A license agreement for the manufacture of Mar boro was signed in February 1978) December 1981 - Milprint's South San Francisco, Ca., plant is sold January 1982 - Milprint's Milwaukee Wis., DePere, Wis., and Freemont, Oh., plants are sold January 1982 - Miller reports that 40.3 million barrels of beer were shipped in 1981, a 8.1% increase over 1980. This increase brings Miller's share of the U.S. beer market to approximately 22% January 1982 - Philip Morris announces record revenues and earnings for the 28th con- secutive year as consolidated operating revenues increased to $10.9 billion. For the 15th consecutive year the company registered the U.S. cigarette industry's largest gain in unit sales, increasing its U.S. market share to 31.8%. The international company's share of the cigarette market outside the U.S. rose to about 6.4% January 1982 - Philip Morris Europe/Middle East/Africa divides into two regions: Philip Morris EEC and Philip Morris EFTA, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa. Both regions are headquartered in Lausanne, Switzerland February 1982 - Miller receives the "Governor's Award" in recognition of its outstanding contributions to. the arts in Georgia through activities at the Albany brewery - February 1982 - Philip Morris signs an agreement with Rothmans of Pall Mall Malaysia Bhd. for the licensed manufacture of Marlboro. Marlboro was previously exported to the Malaysian market March 1982 - Philip Morris Incorporated announces that expenditure for its capital programs in the five-year period 1982 through 1986 are projected to total approximately $3.5 billion, of which approximately $1 billion is planned to be spend during 1982 March 1982 - The Seven-Up Company unveils "No Caffeine" advertising campaign for its 7UP brand March 1982 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces plans for construction of a $25 million, 214,000-square-foot primary processing expansion at the Maple Street manufacturing center in Louisville 2051630543
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-22- August 1982 - Philip Morris Industrial sells the three companies that comprised the Chemical Group. The companies include Polymer Industries, Armstrong Products Co., and Polymer Chemie GMbH September 1982 - The first families move into Mission Viejo Company's planned community of Aliso Viejo in southern California September 1982 - Philip Morris U.S.A. dedicates its new Operations Center in Richmond, Virginia, located near its Manufacturing and Research Centers September 1982 - The Miller Brewing Company's successful "Miller Time" advertising cam- paign is broadened to "Welcome to Miller Time" October 1982 - Seven-Up Canada Inc. launches its "No Caffeine" advertising campaign for its 7UP brand October 1982 - Oregon Freeze dry Foods Inc. dedicates its new administration building in Albany, Oregon October 1982 - The Seven-Up Company introduces Sugar Free Like Cola in six test markets November 1982 - Philip Morris U.S.A. announces a $617,000 grant to the University of Kentucky for the support of burley production research November 1982 - Seven-Up Bottling Company of Harlingen, Texas, dedicates its new, distribution center November 1982 - Seven-Up Canada Inc. acquires Seven-Up Bottling Company of Ottawa, Ontario November 1982 - Lider is launched in Venezuela, opening up a new cigarette price cate- g o ry December 1982 - Local cigarette manufacturing operations are closed down in Chile. Philip Morris' products will be imported into this market and sold.by local distributors January 1983 - Miller reports 1982 revenues rose to $2.9 billion, a 3.2% increase over 1981. Income jumped 37.3% to $158.8 million January 1983 - Philip Morris reports record revenues and earnings for the 29th con- secutive year as consolidated operating revenues increased to $11.7 billion. For the 16th consecutive year the company registered the U.S. cigarette industry's largest gain in unit sales, increasing its U.S. market share to 32.8%. The international company's export sales rose 4% to 47.4 billion units, a new high January 1983 - Philip Morris U.S.A. begins manufacturing cigarettes at its new facility in Cabarrus County, North Carolina January 1983 - Miller establishes its seventh company-owned distributorship, Miller Brands Inc., in Kent, Washington
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-21- March 1982 - The Seven-Up Company introduces Like Cola, a 99% caffeine-free cola, into eight test markets across the United States March 1982 - The Seven-Up Company acquires Seven-Up Bottling Company of San Antonio, Texas March 1982 - Miller's Eden, N.C., brewery receives the "Governor's Award in the Arts and Humanities" for significant achievement and development of North Carolina's cultural resources April 1982 - Philip Morris signs a license agreement with the Societe J. Bastos de L'Afrique Centrale for the local production of Marlboro in the Cameroons May 1982 - Philip Morris signs a license agreement with Garanis and Petrides Ltd. and Cassandra Trading Ltd., Republic of Cyprus May 1982 - Construction completed at Philip Morris' cigarette manufacturing faci- lity at Bergen Op Zoom, in the Netherlands. The plant's annual capa- city is 25 billion units June 1982 - The Seven-Up company receives the "Business in the Arts" Award from Forbes magazine and the New York-based Business Committee for the ARts for outstanding corporate support of the arts June 1982 - The Seven-Up Company announces "caffeine-free' advertising thrust for its Diet 7UP brand June 1982 - Benson & Hedges 100's DeLuxe Ultra Lights, regular and menthol, are introduced nationally July 1982 - The Seven-Up Company and Operation PUSH (People United to Serve Humanity) sign $61 million economic impact trade agreement July 1982 - Miller Brewing Company and Philip Morris Inc. announce the T. Thomas Fortune fellowship for a faculty member teaching journalism or mass communications at a predominantly black college or university August 1982 - Miller Brewing Company and Philip Morris Inc. sign an agreement with the National Association of Black Journalists establishing a $7,000 student internship program for a minority student majoring in journalism or mass communications August 1982 - Galaxy is launched in Uruguay August 1982 - Philip Morris U.S.A. breaks ground in Louisville for expansion of its Maple Street facility August 1982 - The Seven-Up Company begins to roll out Like Cola across the United States; first expansion market is Detroit, Michigan 2051630544
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1 -23- January January February February 1983 - Mission Viejo is chosen as the site for long distance cycling road races, the first event in the 1984 Summer Olympics 1983 - The Seven-Up Company begins to roll out Sugar Free Like Cola in selected expansion markets across the United States 1983 - The Seven-Up Company acquires Seven-Up Bottling Company of Boston, Massachusetts 1983 - Philip Morris International announces the official inauguration of Cerveceria Bohemia, S.A., an affiliate of E. Leon Jimenes, C. por A., Dominican Republic. Beer production began in late 1982 February 1983 - Miller test markets its new popular-price beer, Meister Brau March 1983 - Miller announces agreement with Carling O'Keefe Ltd. whereby the Canadian brewer will brew and market Miller High Life and LIte in Canada April 1983 - Players king-size, regular and menthol, are introduced nationally April 1983 - Like Cola and Sugar Free Like Cola are available in nearly 50% of the United States as well as Puerto Rico April 1983 - Philip Morris Industrial relocates its corporate headquarters to New York May 1983 - The Seven-Up Company launches its "No Caffeine. No Artificial Flavors" marketing and informational campaign for its 7UP brand June 1983 - Wisconsin Tissue Mills dedicates its $82 million expansion project in Menasha, Wisconsin July 1983 - Philip Morris signs agreement with Eger Tobacco Co. for licensed manu- facture of L&M 100's Flavor Lights in Hungary July 1983 - The Seven-Up Company and Schweppes France S.A. sign a franchise agreement for the production and sale of 7UP in France October 1983 - Ventura Coastal Corporation's headquarters building is a winner in the 12th annual Owens-Corning Fiberglass Energy Conservation awards program October 1983 - The Seven-Up Company renames 10 company-owned bottling operations Seven-Up/Like Cola Bottling companies November 1983 - Philip Morris Incorporated announces chairman and management successions: Effective December 1, 1983, Hamish Maxwell becomes President and Chief Operating Officer, Philip Morris Incorporated, and Clifford H. Goldsmith becomes Vice Chairman and Chairman, Corporate Products Committee, Philip Morris Incorporated 2051630545
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-24- November 1983 - Effective April 25, 1984, George Weissman becomes Chairman of the (Continued) Executive Committee of the Board, and Joseph F. Cullman 3rd becomes Chairman Emeritus of the Company Effective August 1, 1984, George Weissman will step aside as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Philip Morris Incorporated; Hamish Maxwell becomes Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Philip Morris Incorporated; John A. Murphy becomes President and Chief Operating Officer, Philip Morris Incorporated; and Hugh Cullman becomes Vice Chairman, Philip Morris Incorporated November 1983 - Philip Morris announces that it will purchase, from time to time over December 1983 the next year, up to four million shares of its common stock in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions - Real estate activities are reorganized into Mission Viejo Realty Group ecember 983 Inc., a wholly-owned unconsolidated subsidiary of Philip Morris. Continental Equity Investments, Inc. is formed for investment in income producing real estate - Benson & Hedges (Canada) Inc. headquarters moves to newly constructed January 1984 Banque National Tower in Montreal, Canada - Philip Morris announces record revenues and earnings for the 30th con- secutive year as consolidated operating revenues increased 12% to $13 billion. Philip Morris U.S.A. gained market share for the 21st con- secutive year; its share reached 34.4%. Philip Morris International increased total unit volume to 244.8 billion units. Miller Brewing Company operating income rose substantially, 43.1%, to $227.3 million. The Seven-Up Company reported a 22.5% gain in revenues to $649.9 million. Philip Morris Industrial reported operating revenues of $237.3 million, a 1.9% increase from 1982. Mission Viejo Realty Group Inc. announced operating revenues of $258.5 million and operating income of $40.5 million, respective increases of 98.6% and 100.0% from 1982, the highest in the company's history February 1984 - Stanton, the first free-standing American blend Philip Morris product wih Scandinavian taste" is launched in Sweden. On June 18, 1984, Stanton is launched in Norway. In addition to a standard flip-top box, for the first time in both countries, a 14's pack has been introduced March 1984 - The Seven-Up Company announced that it led the soft drink industry in 1983 with double-digit sales volume increases April 1984 - Philip Morris signs license agreement with the Manufacture de Tabacs de l'Quest Africain for the local production of Marlboro in Senegel April 1984 - ATW, the Austrian State Tobacco Monopoly, begins production of Marlboro Lights under license April 1984 - Miller Brewing Company rolls out Milwaukee's Best nationally in the budget brand category 205163054b
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-25- April 1984 - Peter Jackson 30's is launched nationally in Australia May 1984 - The Seven-Up Company announced results from independently conducted taste tests which found Diet 7UP preferred almost two to one over both Diet Coke and Diet Pepsi May 1984 - The Seven-Up Company and Universal Foods Corporation completed the transfer of Universal's Beverage Division, Mid-Continent Bottlers, to The Seven-Up Company in exchange for cash and the Warner Jenkinson Company July 1984 - Olympic cycling road races are held in Mission Viejo before a crowd of more than 200,000, with the American team wining its first gold medals of the 1984 Olympics August 1984 - Mission Viejo Nadadores swimming and diving teams win 9 gold, 2 silver and 1 bronze medal at the 1984 Olympics. If Mission Viejo had been a country, it would have ranked fifth in the world gold medal count August 1984 - Miller Brewing Company enters selected test markets with two new beers: Sharp's LA, the company first low-alcohol product, and Meister Brau Light October 1984 - Miller introduces a new premium beer--Plank Road Original Draught--in five test markets. The beer is a draft beer, but is packaged and sold in 12 oz. bottles rather than traditional kegs January 1985 - Philip Morris announces 1984 consolidate operating revenues increased 6.5% to $13.8 billion. Philip Morris U.S.A. increased its market share to 35.3%, the 22nd consecutive year of share gains. Philip Morris International's volume grew 5.5% to 258.2 billion units. Miller Brewing Company shipments totalled 37.52 million barrels. The Seven-Up Company reported a 12.9% gain in revenues to $734 million February 1985 - The Miller Brewing Company introduces a new marketing plan for Miller High Life, "Miller-Made the American Way" 130.PMH/R1/1
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ORG. CHARTS 2051630548
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VICt r1lESIDIXT ENCIMEERIIR', ORGANIZATION PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. OPERATIONS -.PLANT OPERATIONS Richmond RErOR7S T0 YICE PRESImtIf - PlIINC ExECUilYE VICE MtEEICEHi - OR£MIOM3 I•f! LUA MW R. 3ERRRHO 6ENERFL ?ffftSER MFlItlFRC71RI?IG LWISVILLE YILLIFl1 R. lqOtE SEE SFPfYtATE CHAtT SEE SEtAlqTE CHi1RT SEE S£PARATE C}iiRT (8.2) (D.3) (6.4) SEHIOR VICE Mt1~7IDENT MiiRIFRtT1Jt ) NC . JOfl/ CArDFIL fiEHEYK ~ ~ING rLfifTS RICTiO10 pRVID L. MILdY 6E?UUL MRtrR&F3t ItPI4FRCTilt I N6 RIL}iM R0NFIL0 A. LIVELY GE?ERfiL MfilA6ER FFi4JFRCTUR I?4'. CREARRUS tEYTON 0. FOYLFR.JR. S£E SEPARiTE CHAtT 15.51 DIRECTOR CO1f/UMITY RE1AT I atS 6EORSE Y.B. TRYLAR I I RQdERT J. MOORE IN, NUMBER PMUSA 6.0 DATED 3-31-87 REPLACES PMUSA 6.0 DATED 7-1 -86 RSEISTW TO 3E?l10R VICE f•RESIDENT MAIJFCTUt I HS l4ERICN E. HAS(INS D IRECTII<i K71UFRtTLR I NG SERYILES CHRtLES E. HORlfR SEE S£PR3ATE CHART (8.11 !lEE SEPARATTE CIAtT SEE SE?ARATE CHART (s.6I (E.7)
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ORGANIZATION CHARTS AND DESCRIPTION OF DEPARTMII1TS
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ORGANIZATION PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. OPERATIONS - PLANT OPERATIONS RICHMOND CIGARETTE MANUFACTURING Richmond Rf.i'ORYS TO SaUQt VICII rRf3iBENT RiW#.EACMIl7G V. JQiN CF#WlELl f 5€JF-RA. Ff11i1GFR MfiLJfiCTlatI1/G RIClROfO NYfU i1. LIYEi.Y NUMBER PMUSA § . 4 ! DATED 3-31-87 REPLACES PMUSA 6.4 DATED 7-1-86 rl10-,ECT lfqtiiC£Jt MFC. CTR. MOOmiZRTIa lWOE}tT M. FpS3II-L MRNfi6ER fiIT MFViW M rLRlT MRNFAZR f~AC~lt QlA-ITY RAIT R.At1 MRTfiGBt . OIIfi MEICMTS CO MFAFACTUR I kG alfU.ITY RIAIT srOCfdnn srR£ET sroacTON atRfET . . Mfz. co. c><rrrae RFC. CEHTER IRYIMGI QRiSTQfER L cILEEIR r r+oLMES R AR54ALL P rILl AlO DRY23 RICHiRO E rRISCILIA 0 YfiU?1FN . . . . ~ . . SE sEPW rE CHirr s fE 3e49a tE c11FIR s EE 3E?fvATE afaKr 15.4.11 ti.4.Zl fi.4.31
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ORGANIZATION PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. OPERATIONS - PLANT OPERATIONS RICHMOND CIGARETTE MANUFACTURING MANUFACTURING CENTER R ichmond Rk?ORTS TO CENERA MANAGER MRHUf RCTUtI N5 RI Df10NO RQNfiLD fi. LIVELY i rt,RNT hF#fiER MRtIIEFRCtURINC CENTER RIC}IRlO E.DAVIS MRiUFRCTUt I NG MANAGER rLf~iT ENGINEERING ws. CENTER C. YAYNE CRAY SEE SEPARATE CHART (6.4.3fl) MR"RC7UlINii MANAGER rRiMAItY r ftDCESSING Mf Q. CENTER S€NJRNIN C. PER!(INSON SEE SaARATE CHfRT (6.4.3D) SUPER INTE?QENT TRAINING - MFC. • CLNTER RCININISTRATDR DUILDING hANRGENETfi PATRICX L. CRFIE7REE ..EirftE C. GILLIHM ~ NUMBER ~ PMUSA 6.4. 3 DATED 7•1•86 REPLACES DATED 1ANIifRCTUtINS MANAGER FAdtICRTION NfG. CENTER ROBERT L. CfiVIQSQl1 SEE SEPARATE CHfRT (6.4.3C) f
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PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. OPERATIONS - PLANT OPERATIONS FABRICATION Richmond REtORTS TO PLANT MANAGER IWNUFiiCTtAtING CENTER RIC}iqRO E. OAYIS t hANUFRCTUtING MANAGER FRERICATION MRlUFRCTLit I1iG CEM@t ROQ£RT L. ORYI03CN! MANAGER PRODUCT J Otl SiPPOiT rETER F. NOLAN j ORGANIZATION fMlEA 11RNR6m JfM1E5 L. MFiRTIN Y. OOtAD MIRN NUMBER ~ i PMUSA 6.4.3c I DATED ~ ' i 7=.1-86 ! I REPLACES RSS I STRIrT TO lkqIUFRCTLRIPIS MANAGER FRMICRTION llAtNFFICTURIN6 CDf7ER IKAOt.F JRd6ER IpIHTENiiNCE MAwiGER TERRY ®R88[TT JOE N. CLF?~J. JR.
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P~t PHILLP MORRIS U.S.A. OPERATIONS - PLANT OPERATIONS PRIMARY PROCESSING MANUFACTURING CENTER Richrnond !t€t0ltTs To PLWT MI*CIhER MRNUFACTURIliC CENTER RIC?fARII E. DAVIS f ~RCTtIRItiG MRNASFat rRIMRRT PRCSSIkG MANIlFACTLRIkf. CENTER 3llrElt INTET~ETIT~ rttlMFiCf r}tDCFSSIM6 RIC?ifiR9 B. CRAIS ILLIRM M. FITZtHTRI -IAMES P. OLLH'I j ORGANIZATION 8ENJAMIN C. rERlfINSON. TECHNICGYi. 811!'£Jt I1rTETOElIT rRIlAtY PtOCEa3ING iiLFRED E. MILES JR. INCU3TRIR. EriCINEDt JON L. HFLLE NUMBER ; PMUSA 6.4.3b DATED 7•.:•86 REPLACES DATED R331S?RrR 3tX'ERINTEMENT MtIMRRY rROCES3IM6 MER1tY SUSAN SC}AtECK i
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P~1 ORGANIZATION PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. OPERATIONS - PLANT OPERATIONS PLANT ENGINEERING MANUFACTURING CENTER R iehmond REl'OItTS 70 PS.FtIT NRNRCEit MFiNUFiiCTURINC CENTER RICHM E. DAYIS f MRti1fR" I M5 MfI*i6ER rLfMi! ENGINEERINC 1PUfRCTURIN6 C€NTER YRYf1E UtAY StPER I MTETD£NT 0r£RATI0N3 SUrtORT YILLIRM M. OUFILHO 3UrtRIMTENOFHT IHYE?fTDRY rLfNNING,. CDHTROL 4 OrERATIONS RQY C. STROIA NUMBER PMUSA 6.a.3a DATED 7•1•86 REPLACES DATED SiXERIMTEDOEM MAINTETFIMCE MtIMRRY MtQCEJ3 F.C. H. 011I WT .1?liNSON
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1 ORGANIZATION i i PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. OPERATIONS ENGINEERING R ichmond R£rptTS TO SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT - WMfRCTUtIHG r. Ja,N CRtPaE11 VICE PftESID><1/T E1iC IWMI MG CEDRCE V. 8. TiiYLOR NUMBER i PMUSA 6.6 I DATED j 7-1-86 REPLACES PMUSA 6. 6 DATED 11-6-84 RSSI3TiWT TO VICE PRESIDENT ENGINEERINC EST CRSITYELL RQQfRT E. rIRRKY000 SEE SEPRRRTE CttF7tT SEE SEPfRATE C}stT SEE SEPARATE 01-ORT DIRECT>xt CI6RRETTE "#JFRCTLlR INC E?1CIriEERING YILL[RI R. TAYLOR 18.8.1) C IRECTDtt ENC INEE#t INC (JrERAT I ONS P1.FRED OPENGART OIRECTOR PROLESS & PR0IECT ENGINEERINfi tiWtOLfl G. BtIifd.EY (8.8.21 (6.6.31
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s i ORGANIZATION NUMBER i i PMUSA 3.2 DATED PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. 7-1 - 86 I PERSONNEL i I REPLACES EMPLOYEE RELATIONS Richmond RE"TS TD SEMIQR VICE PR£'SIDENT FfRMlNEL FRID J. LfiIX i DIRCtTDR E?ItLDYEE RE1AfID/O CfRRY 1. CRSE D IR£CTOR DiRECT9R DIRELTOR DIRECTOR LR80t REATIDkS EtRDTEE RELATIQltl MLtpl R'FSOURCE nAIMING & rERSC1VIEL 049FMD DEYEAREM OFERATIOfQ ~ LES:IE R. DOY(•RN ROoQlT D. EYiiM JRl1E6 M. tt1ou YILLIRM L. VRi ARtfqt SEE SEffiRATE QIART SEE 9EPWtqTE CHPRT 9E€ 3SIARATE CliFRT 3EE S€rAIIFTE CIKiIIT PMUSA 3.2 DATED 6-15-85 RS3ISTiM TD THE DIRELTDR TRiCEr N. LIeERSON DIRECTdt E7qkDYEE RELATIDMS iYy( I M ISTAi7T IQI Y. KaftTM FF?ICCR DIRECTDR EM.DVEE RELATIDMS LatISVILLE .it1EII F. FRYME SEE SEPARATE p}fRT SEE SEbq%qTE CHa2T (3.2.51 (3.2.1+1 (3.2.11 13.2.41 (3.2.51 (3.2.71
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r ORGANIZATION PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. PERSONNEL EMPLOYEE RELATIONS PERSONNEL OPERATIONS Richmond RLt4RT1 TO DIRECiDR E!lR.DYEE RdLATIDt/S DARftY 1. CfSE DIRfCTCR r4t3QWEL CIMMTIM YILLIRI L. YM RRfM R1.SISTiitT DIRELTOR ETIrL.DYEE ItEIATIQq DPERATID?q iKE}lETH Y. VfiHDEJwt0£1Q SEE SErfiitATE C!*iRT (3.2.2) lF1iiCFJt RfiFIRIRTiVE ACTIa/ DffMITRY E. Mm IA0iiGfR @*LDY££ DttfEIT3 JO1M F. GRVIM NUMBER PMUSA 3.2.4 DATED 3-31-87 REPLACES PMUSA 3.2.4 DATED 7-1-86 1F#V6ER CD}pEItSAT I DN 3USiiN 8. 3iTTERf I E.D MRVLSR F?ILOYM£ttT fND INTEIWfiL sTRffING J1MES E. HRRD 1 N -~j
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ORGANIZATION PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. PERSONNEL EAJPLOYEE RELATIONS ENPLOYEE RELATIONS SERVICES Richmax! R" ra TD o alECiat E?lL07EE RELRTIQl3 RDNI111S7RRTIDN r. KENMEIN ro+W t DIRa~Tfl! ETrLDYEC Rag.RP10)O mYICI;S L17tlIY D. C1t1rE NUMBER PMl1SA 3.2.5a DATED 6•15•85 REFLACES PMl1SA 3.2.5a DATED 3•2•84 iOIINIS11qTqt 0lLOYE€ HCIIYITIES E11D1 & FRUSi NMiGER CDNNUIICATIDIA liiRILYN 3. VIEFIeERO EI!'LIIYt:[ RssnTFSr2 J!! L. H~11 liiAGFA FODD SERYICES I GEaR>W N. mOF~I NRNRia! REDICH. iOlIN1111iRIDA RARG! C. KIRIT3I! /rUqCE2! S>;aOIrn DAMY R. I3G/ MFlq6ER L1INICR. SFRVICES FRi>MKLYN H. fi3tAY.Jt. t7n.art'< INfD>MT]DN srsT~s L. DE?NIS REVqK - - 2051630558
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P~1 COMMUNITY RELATIONS Richmond R#lKMT! TII soIOt rICE MtfJIDf7(T liMLFRCTUtIIIp V. .ror« rsVreei f DIlRL'iOt CQftJ1I77 kSRtIOq RalE1CT J. MOOti MtiACER CDMITY RflJfTIdO RICNIDO C. R. !E}LEr-~ i ORGANIZATION NUMBER j PMUSA 6.7 ; DATED PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. ;! 7- 1- 86 3tt4lYl OOt YISiTqR MR NIOOIiiI lARILti C. NlIAZ 11psiCilt ff?!lJQTT REJITIQ@ L.at7lyILl.i IsiltEl R. 2301 lMIG'Ct rRE~Q RB.RTIOQ OE7IT E. SiTEIA/ IOIIMISIRATIY! 0.t1I STWR TO oIR[LTOt 1'i~:pff I REPLACES PMUSA 6. 7 DATED 11-6-84 qQAGDt CalftllITf RE.ATIOd CfaNRII 1DITM G. AtES ?filiiGtR 'J'fLIAL iifFWIR! flVt rt.AfT COMIlNITIES MILLIAq R. .QHRA7i .R,i
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EHPIAYEFS RELATIONS OPERATIONS DEPARZMENT EMPLOYEE RELATIONS OPERATIONS has the overall responsibility for pro- viding Employee Relations services to Philip Morris, USA departments. This department ensures administration of the company's policies and procedures in such areas as: Affirmative Action Benef its Compensation Employment Training,and Development Employee services (such as medical and security) The Employee Relations Organization is available to provide you with information about the Company's personnel policies and procedures and other matters relating to your employment. For additional information, please call extension 4466.
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TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT The Transportation Department provides efficent and economical transportation service for Philip Morris, U.S. A. and Philip Morris, Inc. 1. Rates and Routes Section: A. Conducts special project requests such as plant site and transportation efficiency studies. B. Maintains responsibility for the maintenance and availa- bility of all freight rates. C. Recommends, establishes, applies and implements necessary administrative transportation and physical handling plans and practices to further maximize service and minimize distribution costs of our commodities. D. Ensures that relations with carriers are conducted as re- quired by the provisions of carrier tariffs and local, state and federal regulating agencies. 2. Claims Section Responsible for initiation, review and maintenance of an efficient and thorough freight loss and and damage claim procedure. 3. Warehouse and Services Section A. Maintains control over all dry and cold storage ware- houses throughout the United States. B. Monitors all rail and truck consignment shipments moving through the United States from all manufacturing plants and cold storage warehouses. C. Prepares the appropriate international transportation documents required for our import, export business. 4. Private Trucking Section Transports the finished product into consignment warehouses. Also services the Louisville, Kentucky and Cabarrus, North Carolina facilities. If additional information is required, please call the following extension numbers for: Manager of Transportation- x 3334 Asst. Manager of Transportation- x 3798 Supervisor of Claims- x 2719 Supervisor of Warehouses and Services- x 2805 Supervisor of Rates and Routes- x 5517 Supervisor of Private Trucking- x 2282
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PLANT ENGINEERING The Plant Engineering Department provides maintenance, stockroom support and utility production for the entire M/C complex. There are three (3) major groups within Plant Engineering. I. Primary and Finished Goods Warehouse, Electrical/Instrument and Mechanical Maintenance, Cigarette Manufacturing Mechanical Maintenance. This group is divided into four (4) main functional areas. - Primary and Finished Goods Mechanical Maintenance - Cut Filler Storage and Cigarette Manufacturing Mechanical Maintenance - Primary and Finished Goods Electrical Maintenance - Primary Project Engineering Each of these areas provides maintenance support to its assigned production area in the form of equipment and system repairs and modif ications . II. Inventory Control, Planning, and Operations Inventory Control consists of three (3) main functional areas - Shipping/Receiving/Incoming Inspection - Stockroom Operations - Administration This Department has three (3) stockrooms and a motor repair center, three (3) overflow storage areas, forty-eight (48) satellite stockrooms, and a motor repair shop. Inventory operations is responsible for an inventory of over 80,000 different code numbers. III. Operations Support This group consists of five (5) functional areas. - Utilities Group - Central Engineering Utilities Group - Central Engineering Preventive Maintenance Group - Central Services - Machine Shop This group provides the power and utility support necessary for the efficient operation of the M/C complex. plnteng
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d) Administrative Engineering- Provides services utilized by the factories as welll as the Engineering Department. One major activity is providing Plant Engineering and Plant Maintenance sets of up-to- date catalogues for all cigarette making and packing equipment. This section also operates and maintains department's information and document system, development machine shop, and coordinates/ administers property and grounds. e) Building Administration- Provides a full range of administrative and maintenance services necessary to operate the Operation Center. 3. Process & Project Engineering Process and Project Engineering is chartered to provide engineering services to primary and processing plants. This directorate designs and constructs new facilities and processes, develops andd introduces new and innovative processing technology, and provides technical support services to primary and processing plants. Efforts from these three major areas of responsibility are directed toward sustaining Philip Morris U.S.A.'s position of product leadership by improving manufacturing productivity and product quality. 1
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PHILIP MORRIS U.S.A. ENGIIEER-TNG DEPARTMENT Since cigarette manufacturing is primarily a processing and manufacturing operation requiring technically sophisticated equipment, the Engineering Department's function is to provide our production facilities with the best production equipment and processes available. The department must keep abreast of technological advances, and must be attuned to the availability of new cigarette making, packing and processing equipment throughout the world. It is the responsibility of the department to make recommendations concerning the purchase of this equipment by Philip Morris. The Engineering Department is divided into three sections. Each section has a director who reports to the Vice President of Engineering. These three direc- torates and a brief description of their areas of responsibilities are as follows: l. Cigarette Manufacturing Engineering This section deals with the development and improvement of high-speed making and packaging machinery and related equipment used in our production facilities. This includes the concept and design, as well as the fabrication of a new machine or modifying an existing machine to improve its performance. This directorate also includes the procurement of machinery. 2. Engineering Operations Engineering Operations is comprised of five major functions- all of which provide technical and/or support services to our factories and depart- ments. A brief description of the five major functions follows: a) Resident Engineering- Provides a full range of disciplines to resolve day-to-day engineering problems, and serves as liaison with the Cigarette Manufacturing and Process/Project groups at each cigarette manufacturing facility. b) Industrial Engineering- Applies tools and techniques needed to simulate equipment/manning operations, design integrated systems, justify capital expenditures, etc. c) York Engineering- Remanufactures, rebuilds, standardizes and upgrades to latest state-of-the-art cigarette making/packing equipment.
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MRO PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 1. The MRO Purchasing Department, which is located on the second floor of the East Wing in the Manufacturing Center, handles purchasing and spare parts inventory management for Richmond and Cabarrus. 2. MRO Purchasing is divided into two sections- Spare Parts Management and Maintenance, Repair and Operating Goods and Services. 3. The Spare Parts Management Section is responsible for the purchase and inventory management of fabrication spare parts in Richmond and Cabarrus. 4. The Maintenance, Repair and Operating Section purchases goods and services which are necessary to keep all our Richmond facilities operating. 5. All contacts with vendors should be made by the MRO Purchasing Department. Properly approved purchase requisitions shall be sub- mitted to this department to afford proper commitment of company funds and to ensure compliance with company policies. 6. If you have any questions concerning purchasing activities, contact the Director of MRO Purchasing.
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RESEARCH AND DEVELOT'MENT The Research Center is divided into four (4) major divisions: Research, Process Development, New Product Development and R & D Support. 1. RESEARCH Utilizing the general fields of biochemistry, organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, and physical chemistry, the complete cigarette/smoking system is investigated. Studies into all aspects of the smoke, tobacco, filters and paper are undertaken for both offensive and defensive purposes. 2. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT Utilizing chemical, mechanical and electrical engineers, Process Development engages in programs directed toward generating new processes that will improve Philip Morris' position within the tobacco industry. Process Development was instrumental in developing the technique and processes associated with refined leaf and expanded stems and tobacco. 3. NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Utilizing a staff of chemists and engineers, this directorate is responsible for development and testing of all new products and brand modifications for Philip Morris USA and International. In addition, the directorate carries responsibility for flavor and casing system developments and conformity to worldwide regulatory requirements. 4. R & D SUPPORT Provides the resources for all R & D computer application; competitive cigarette brand evaluations and our existing product quality; administrative assistance for budgets, building main- tenance/modification and security; and technical information. Responsible for hazardous waste management including acquisition and disposal of chemicals. August 1987
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Philip Morris Information Services Department (PMIS) The Information Services department has a traditional data processing organization structure. Information Services is broken down into five different departments. Systems Design and Development (SD&D) These departments are the first line contact with the different business units of PM-USA. They provide planning and analysis, design and development, and installation and support for business systems that support the manufacturing related departments within PM-USA. The SD&D Manufacturing is divided into two categories, Central Development and Plant Support. Computer Technology Provides research, planning and support for the technical environments utilized by PM-USA to automate its function. Computer technology is divided into five functional areas: Host Systems, Distributed Systems, Network Systems, End User Services, and Systems Architecture Development Groups. Data Center Manages the computer operations at the central data center located in the James River Center. It provides data entry services, network operations and support services, job scheduling for various computer systems, as well as equipment operations, problem monitoring control, change monitoring and control, and system librarian support. The Data Center also provides operational support to computer rooms at the PM various locations. Administration Provides support to the IS management staff in administering the Information Services department. This support includes budgeting, capital forecasting, handling and ordering of hardware and soft- ware items and invoices from vendors. Also, within Administration is the Security and Control group, support services, and the building maintenance group. These divisions of the Information Services organization allow functional specialization, but continual coordination and communication between these departments is essential for IS to provide its services to the rest of PM-USA organization. For further information, channel calls to extension 2726.
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Industrial Engineering Industrial Engineering is concerned with the design, improvement, and installation of integrated systems of men, materials, and equipment. It draws upon specialized knowledge of skills in mathematical, physical and social sciences, together with the principles and methods of engineering analysis and design, to specify, predict, and evaluate the results obtained from such systems. The Industrial Engineering Department is divided into two (2) groups. These groups and their respective areas of responsibility are as follows: 1. Central Group - Serves basically as internal consultants for a broad range of problems affecting the division. Provides information upon requests by upper management. 2. Plant Group - Provides basic Industrial Engineering expertise to the plant manager to whom they report. This group is based in individual plants throughout Richmond. The Plant Industrial Engineering_group at the Manufacturing Center consists of a supervisor and engineers assigned to each of the operating areas - Cigarette Manufacturing, Plant Engineering and Primary Processing. If there are any questions concerning Industrial Engineering, please call the MC Plant Industrial Engineering Group located on the East Wing - 2nd floor at extension 2613.
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THE ORGANIZATION, RESPONSIBILITIES AND OBJECTIVES OF THE LEAF DEPARTMENT The Leaf Department is divided into five areas of responsibilities with each having a Director who reports to the Vice President, Leaf. The five areas of responsibilities and objectives are as follows: A. Leaf Administration and Logistics The overall objective is the responsibility for corporate leaf policies and administering all leaf buying, as well as the storage, movement and protection of all leaf until used. Specific responsibilities are as follows: 1. Maintenance of leaf formulas and leaf blend preparation so as to maintain the high quality standards of the cigarettes produced in Richmond and Louisville, as well as export tobacco blends. 2. Administer the shipment, storage, and insurable values of all tobaccos to be used domestically and for export in Richmond and Louisville, maintaining a safe, clean environment where proper aging of the leaf will take place. 3. Developing short range and long range plans, budgeting, leaf requirement forecasting and then the implementation of operational and financial plans. 4. Providing the Leaf Buying Department with information concerning pounds of tobacco to be purchased by grade and belt, current and historical cost information, and any other information required to assist in purchasing tobacco. B. Leaf Buying, Domestic The overall objective is controlling, directing and supervising purchases of domestic leaf from leaf markets in accordance with inventory require- ments. Specific responsibilities are as follows: 1. Planning and administering the entire leaf purchasing program which includes all aspects of market strategy, such as quantities, quality, and cost of.tobaccos purchased.
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2. Keeping abreast of the supply and demand situation both in the past and forecasted for U.S. tobacco used by Philip Morris. Factors affecting supply are production quotas, farmers yields, government support rates, weather conditions during the growing season, farmers production cost, and marketing. Factors affecting demand besides Philip Morris requirements are domestic competition demand, export demand and inventories. 3. Knowledge of factors used to determine Philip Morris' requirements which includes domestic sales forecasts, foreign requirement forecasts, blends, processed tobacco yields and duration or inventory levels. 4. Keeping informed on new or experimental leaf production practices which can, in the future, have an effect on the tobacco Philip Morris uses. C. Leaf Buying, Oriental The overall objective is controlling, directing and supervising purchase of oriental leaf from foreign markets in accordance with company require- ments. Specific responsibilities are as follows: 1. Developing the Oriental Leaf Purchases program prior to the opening of the various markets which are located in Turkey, Greece, Yugo- slavia, Italy, Thailand and Bulgaria. 2. Implementing all buying programs, and packing and shipping instructions for each merchant, in the various countries, to conform with the Oriental Leaf Purchases program. 3. Visiting the growing areas to evaluate the crop prior to the village market to determine the desirability of the tobacco from each area. - 4. Advises the management of and directs the Philip Morris Inter- national oriental leaf purchases. 5. Keeping abreast of the supply and demand situation as it relates to Philip Morris requirements as well as competitive buyer trends and requirements. D. Leaf Agricultural Program The overall objective is to improve the image of Philp Morris in the agro-business community and on the farm level, and give support to agencies involved in tobacco production techniques that will be bene- ficial to the industry. Iz Specific responsibilities are as follows: O C.5'? c cA., c cP co
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1. Promoting a good Philip Morris image before farm organizations, extension services, land grant colleges and universities, government agencies and officials, and other organizations of the tobacco industry by originating, establishing, and maintaining favorable communications. 2. To cover all information and communication services that report for or about the tobacco industry, screen this information, and make it available to management, in a concise, informative manner. 3. Originate and generate new ideas and programs beneficial to the production sector that are to the direct benefit to Philip Morris and the total tobacco industry. 4. To study and observe trends, evaluations, developments, legisla- tion, social changes affecting tobacco production and make recommendations as to how this could influence our industry. E. Leaf, International Services The overall objective is to coordinate and act as liaison between Operation Services, Philip Morris International and Philip Morris Leaf Department in all leaf matters pertaining to our international affiliates and licensees. Specific responsibilities are as follows: 1. Evaluating and purchasing foreign flue-cured and burley tobaccos and remain up to date on world tobacco trade as to quality, price and availability. 2. Collecting and analyzing international market and intelligence data related to tobacco. 3. Participate in the development, changes and improvements of blends for Philip Morris trademark brands manufactured abroad by affiliates and licensees. 4. Participate in the development of blends for brands made and sold under license by Philip Morris in the United States. 5. To develop or participate, if requested, in blends for local brands manufactured by affiliates. 6. To undertake specific projects, such as investigations of proposed licenses, proper handling of export sales of tobacco and evaluate information relating to forecasts of tobacco requirements by affiliates and licensees.
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RICHMOND OPERATIONS The largest and most modern tobacco production facility in the world, the Manufacturing Center is part of the giant 150-acre Operations Center complex on Commerce Road. Here, tobacco is processed and cigarettes are manufactured, packaged and shipped to customer. The Plant can produce approximately 560 million cigarettes a day with the three-shift operation. Other buildings in the complex are: The Research Center, housing advanced technological equipment and laboratories for research on the development of tobacco and other products; the Finance Center, headquartering finance and related administrative functions; the Manufacturing Engineering Building; and the Operation Center which houses executive and administrative offices for the Richmond operations. Also a cigarette production facility, the Stockton Street Plant is located at Stockton Street and Commerce Road. Here, orders that require special handling and many export brands are produced. Four other Philip Morris locations in the Richmond area are involved in processing tobacco leaf. Newly purchased tobacco is stemmed and prepared for aging at the Green Leaf Stemmery on Maury Street. Another plant at 15th and Dock Streets receives and processes imported tobacco leaf; the Blended Leaf Plant on Everett Street is a tobacco blending and handling facility; and the Westab Annex also on Everett Street is a processing plant for bright leaf. Still another facility at 20th and Cary Streets processes export blended leaf for shipment to Philip Morris' overseas affiliates and licensees.
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ORIENTATION 205163051?9w
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ORIENTATION AND TRAIN-ING GLOSSARY OF TERMS START
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ORIENTATION AND TRAINING A. Introduction The concept of "learning by doing" forms the basis for the orientation and training program. For the program to be truly beneficial to you and worth- while to the Company, the "something for something" relationship must exist. You are expected to pay your way by making a worthwhile contribution to Philip Morris, while at the same time adding to your personal knowledge, under- standing and development. Naturally, there will be a break-in period. As you demonstrate your capacity and initiative you will have an opportunity to contribute in more challenging areas. Even if the beginning stages of your job are somewhat routine, you will do well to use the time to gain understanding of how and where your work fits into the overall business picture. How much you develop in skills and maturity will depend primarily on two fac- tors. The most important is, of course, yourself. Your own motivation will greatly determine how well you do and how far you go in any field of activity. This often means an increase in knowledge or change in attitude necessary for success. Only you can determine how important making the change is to you. Secondly, the Company has a role here, too. There must be a working climate where people are encouraged to accept increasing responsibility and achieve high levels of performance. Also, those who do achieve must be appropriately recognized and rewarded. An important part of the proper climate is support and understanding by your supervisor when he knows you are trying to improve your capabilities. The following orientation/training program is flexible enough to meet both your needs as well as the needs of Philip Morris. It can be tailored to consider your background and the demands of the Company.
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MANUFACTURING CENTER SUPERVISOR TRAINING PROGRAM ORIENTATION Phase I (4 weeks) 1 Day - Introduction 1/2 Day - Company Expectations 2 Days - Observation of Process Cigarette Manufacturing 1 Day - Observation of Process Plug Room 1 Day - Primary 2 Weeks - Cut Filler Storage 1/ 2 Day - Ripper Room 1 Day - Materials Distribution 1/2 Day - WSR 1 Day - Evaluation 2 Weeks - On-The-Job Training (Mentor) QUALITY AND SUPPORT Phase II (2 & 1/2 weeks) 3 Days - Quality Assurance Coordinator 1 Day - Roving Auditor 1/2 Day - Case Packing Auditor 1/2 Day -- Export Coordinator 1/2 Day - Menthol Procedures 1/2 Day - Case Inspector 1 Day - MK9-5 Maker Attendant 1 Day - Miscellaneous 1/2 Day - Container Packer 1 Day - Inspector Training Z1Z 2 Days - Safety Coordinator O CJt ~ 1 Day - Evaluation ' C1 :
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EQUIPMBNT TRAINING Phase III (13 weeks) 2 Weeks - Overview of Equipment T/C 4 Weeks - OJT MK9-5 Maker or PROTOS 1 Weeks - GDX-1, GDX-2 or Sasib 4 Weeks - OJT GDX-1, GDX-2, or Sasib 1 Day - Evaluation 2 Weeks - On-The-Job Training (Mentor) MECHANICAL AND SUPPORT AREAS Phase IV (2 weeks) 2 Days - Electronics Systems Analyst 3 Days - Mechanical Support 1 Day - Industrial Engineering 1 Day - S.T.A.R.T. 2 Days - Plant Engineering 1 Day - Evaluation 90 Day Follow-up Scheduled Subjects Self Pace Team Leader Training Policies & Procedures EIP Cost Accounting I Harassment in the Workplace Cost Accounting III Technical Assessment Labor Relations
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PHASE I Orientation 4 Weeks and 3 Days 1 Day Introduction to Philip Morris This day will include orientation by Employment, sign-up, and welcome. The afternoon will be spent with the training coordinator, the confidentiality of salaries, safety shoes, earplugs, dress code, badge system, parking, training program and how - training materials should be used. 1/2 Day Company Expectations On the morning of the second day, the trainee will be given a walking tour of the facilities. The remainder of the day will be spent in class. A member of Upper Management will discuss the role of the Supervisor, what the company expects of its Supervisors, and what they can expect from the company. 2 Days Observation of Process Cigarette Manufacturing This two day period will be spent on the floor in Cigarette Manufacturing. Trainee will be given a set of written objectives to meet for this period. A detailed written report must be turned in on the morning of the third day by 7:00 a.m. To meet these objectives, trainee must move freely from Bay 1 through Bay 5 and become acquainted with the floor set-up, ask questions, and gather informa- tion. (See Section "B" for objectives.)
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1 Day Observation of Process Plug Room This day will be spent in the Plug Room, a detailed report must be turned in by 7:00 a.m. on the following day. The trainee will follow the same procedure as above for Cigarette Manufactur- ing. (See Section on "B" for objectives.) 1 Day Primary Processing This morning will be spent touring Primary Processing, beginning with the Kenway system. Also included will be blending, flavoring, processing and Cut Filler Storage. 2 Weeks Cut Filler Storage The trainee will be placed in Cut Filler Storage for two (2) weeks (this time may vary) to become acquainted with the overall operation, to include silo loading, stem extraction, soft and dry tobacco, moisture content and dust collection. On the last day, trainee will be expected to turn in a detailed written report on this 2 week period. (See Section "B" for objectives.) 1/2 Day Ripper Room The trainee will be given a set of written objectives on the morning of the first day in Ripper Room. During this time, trainee will become acquainted with the operation, reject pick-ups, reports used in that area, procedures for accept- ing rejected cigarettes from various departments, etc. On the morning after, a detailed written
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report must be turned in by 7:00 a.m. (See Section "B" for objectives.) 1 Day Direct Materials One day will be spent in Orientation to become acquainted with the overall operation of this department. The trainee will become familiar with supply, handling reject materials, run time on supplies, supplier names and safety procedures. The trainee will be given a set of questions on the morning of the first day. (See Section "B" for questionnaire.) 1/2 Day WSR The trainee will spend 1/2 day in WSR to include the fundamentals of the Kenway system, proper procedures for shipping finished goods from the factory, checkout procedures for Cigarette Manu- facturing, hold work, etc. 1 Day Evaluation Discussion, Counseling and Reinforcement This day will be spent with Training Coordinator. The trainee will be given a questionnaire to include all areas covered in Orientation. All written reports that have been turned in will be covered. Trainee will be told how he/she is pro- gressing or digressing up to this point. (See Section 1rCn for evaluation.) 2 Weeks On-The-Job Training At this point in the training program, the Training Coordinator will have picked out a
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mentor. The trainee will be placed on a production line for a two (2) week period. The trainee will receive his/her first introduction to what it is like to run a production line under the guidance of his/her mentor. The mentor will slowly turn over some of the responsibility of his/her line. At the end of each week, the trainee will receive feedback from his/her mentor, as well as the Group Supervisor in that Bay. The mentor will also pro- vide the Training Coordinator with written feed- back at the end of the two (2) week period.
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PHASE II 2 Weeks 3 Days Quality Assurance The trainee will be placed in Quality Assurance with the Quality Assurance Coordinator. During this time, the trainee will become familiar with the job of this department and come away with an understanding.of the Quality Audit, the handling of customer complaints, defects, smoking tests, physical testing, packing will be covered and cigarette standards as well as the identification of a good cigarette from a bad cigarette. (See Section "D" for final exam give by Quality Assurance Coordinator.) 1 Day Roving Auditor During this training period, the trainee will work with the Roving Auditor as they check quality throughout the plant. The trainee will learn to recognize quality problems and the procedures to follow in correcting them. The trainee will assist the Auditor in performing dilution tests and checking foreign substances. They will learn to make the required checks per machine and assist in Special Testing in areas of specific quality problems. 1 Day Mark IX Maker Attendant The trainee will be placed with a Mark IX Attendant and perform the various duties to include checking
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of quality, record keeping, the checking of CID rejects, peelbacks and cleaning responsibilities. 1 Day Miscellaneous The trainee will perform the various duties that will include adhesive supply, material supply, cleaning duties, and any other functions as directed by the Line Supervisor. 1/2 Day Container Packer The trainee will be placed with a container packer operator as he/she performs the various duties that will include operation of left and/or right hand machines, carton plunger operation, roller conveyor procedures, carton-overwrap feed, conveyor belt hang-ups and carton hopper operation. 1 Day Inspector Training The trainee will be placed with an Inspector to perform the various duties that would include cigarette and pack inspection, checking of detectors, weight control measurement, CID functions, carton breakdowns, and pigeon-hole procedures. 1/2 Day Export A 1/2 day will be spent with the export coordinator to learn the procedures to be used for export change- overs and process changes. They will learn the responsibilities for the Unit Supervisor, other management personnel, and the hourly workers that will be required to make changeovers. They will also learn what security measures are employed to prevent material mix-ups.
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1/2 Day Menthol A 1/2 day will be spent with Menthol plug procedures, following the flow from the Plug Room to Cigarette Manufacturing. Security procedures and the duties of each person involved within these areas. 1/2 Day Case Inspector The trainee will perform as a Case Inspector for 1/2 day to include weighing cases, checking case detectors, checking of mini packers, security on cases, record keeping, collection of 10 packs per brand per day for lab testing. 2 Days Safety The trainee will receive a one (1) day safety class conducted by safety Coordinator. General safety will be covered along with hazard communication and Radiation awareness training. (See Section "B" for class format.) 1 Day Evaluation Discussion, Counseling and Reinforcement This day will be spent with Training Coordinator. The trainee will be given a questionnaire to include all areas covered in Phase II. All written reports that have been turned in will be covered. Trainee will be told how he/she is progressing or digressing up to this point. (See Section "C" for evaluation.)
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PHASE III Equipment Training 13 Weeks (This will vary with Bay assignment) 2 Week Overview of Equipment Training Center or STTP Modules This two week period will be spent at the Training Center. An overview of all equipment to include safety will be given. The Training Center will provide the Training Coordinator with written feedback at the end of the two (2) week period. (See Section "C" for T/C Evaluation Forms.) 4 Weeks OJT Mark IX Maker of Protos The trainee will be placed with a hand-picked, experienced operator who has demonstrated his/her operating proficiency and who also has the ability and patience to communicate. After the first week, when both operator and trainee feel comfortable, the trainee will gradually take over operation of the machine. The assigned operator will start to step back, but should be on hand to take appropriate action whenever necessary. It is at this point when trainee will be given a questionnaire to answer concerning the operation of this piece of equipment, job responsibilities and procedures. At the end of training on this piece of equipment, I will review the questions with the trainee and take appropriate action if necessary. (See Section "D" for Mark IX, Protos Maker questionnaire.)
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1 Week Training Center GDX-1, GDX-2, Sasib 6000 or STTP Modules This week will be spent at the Training Center in a 5-day class on the GDX-1, GDX-2 Packer or Sasib 6000 class, depending on Bay of assignment. It will include both classroom and hands-on training, machine safety and quality. 4 Weeks OJT GDX-1, GDX-2 Packer or Sasib 6000 The trainee will be placed with a hand-picked, experienced operator. We will follow the same procedure that is set up for Mark IX Maker OJT. (See Section D for GDX-1, GDX-2 and Sasib 6000 questionnaire.) 1 Day Evaluation This day will be spent with the Training Coordinator. The trainee will be given a questionnaire to include all areas covered under Equipment Training for Phase III. The trainee will be told how he/she is progressing or digressing. (See Section "C".) 2 Weeks On-The-Job Training At this point, the trainee will return to his mentor for a 2 week period. More responsibility for running the line will be placed on the trainee in Decision Making situations.
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5 Weeks Mechanical and Support Areas PHASE IV 2 Weeks and 2 Days Electronics Systems Analysts The trainee will spend 2 days with the Systems Analysts learning their functions and responsi- bilities. Trainees will receive instruction on Modic Weight Control, MAID Code Data, CRT menu functions and Production Check-out procedures. This instruction will be followed up by on-the- floor demonstrations. The trainees will be with the analysts as they answer machine calls and will be able to observe the procedure used to correct problems. Core 9 Computer Room- The trainee will be given an overview of the functions of the Computer Room in the gathering and compiling of data. They will also learn what roles the computers play in supporting the needs of manufacturing. Areas to be covered will include where the information is detected, what equipment is used, the capabilities of the equipment, and reports that can be compiled and generated. 3 Days Mechanical Support The trainee will spend three (3) days with the Mechanical Department. He/she will report to the Mechanical Superintendent for the overall orientation of the department. The Mechanical Superintendent identifies two (2) Mechanical Group Supervisors and
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a Planner for the trainee to work with throughout this three day period. 1 Day Industrial Engineering During this day, the trainee will learn what services Resident Industrial Engineering can offer to the Manufacturing Supervisor. They will receive an overview of the two (2) main areas within the depart- ment. They will be involved with studies of machinery downtime, operator workloads. Self Pace Training Cost Accounting I Cost Accounting III Labor Relations During Phase III and Phase IV, the trainee will be required to complete the above self pace classes. He/she will sit for exam under the direction of Kathy Jones, Basic Skills. 1 Day S.T.A.R.T. The trainee will spend one (1) day in class with a S.T.A.R.T. Specialist. He/she will receive a brief history of the program and the concept behind S.T.A.R.T. The trainee will learn how the information is generated, the specialist will demonstrate the types of information that is collected and show the trainee how to analyze the information towards the
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indentification of problem areas or trends. The specialist will then show them how to set objectives and action plans based on this information. 2 Days Plant Engineering The trainees will receive a two (2) day orientation to Plant Engineering. (See attachment for all areas covered and length of time in each area.) 1 Day Evaluation This day will be spent with Training Coordinator. The trainee will be given a questionnaire to include all areas covered throughout the program. All written reports that have been turned in will be covered. Trainee will be told how he/she is pro- gressing or digressing up to this point. (See Section "C" for evaluation.) 90 Day Follow-up After the trainee has been working on shift in assigned department for a period of 90 days, the training coordinator and group supervisor will pro- pose a development plan for continued development for the next twelve month period. * Scheduled subjects throughout program, based on availa- bility of classrooms, instructors and trainees progress. Team Leader Training EIP Harassment in the Work Place Policies and Procedures
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(trainees must learn two to three new policies and procedures per week.) Technical Assessment
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On-The-Job Training Throughout your orientation and training, you will be placed in a department. You will assist the supervisor (mentor) in the department to which you have been assigned for an undetermined length of time. As you demonstrate your proficiency as a leader, your supervisor will turn over an increasing amount of responsibility for the day-to-day operation of the area. During this time of your training, you will still maintain contact with the Training Coordinator. Performance Appraisal After your training on a line with another supervisor, your performance on the job will be appraised by your immediate supervisor and the training coordinator. Purposes for these appraisals are to identify strengths and areas for improvement and set up programs with objectives and target dates to attain the improvement needs. In the beginning, the appraisals will take place approximately every three months; later, they will be done annually. These appraisals are strictly to discuss your job performance. Of course, appraisals take place daily in the normal course of discussion with your Group Supervisor.
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'Philip Morris U.S.A. Glossary of Tobacco Terms A.P.H.I.S. Automatic Plug Handling and Inspection System. A.M.F. American Machine and Foundry A cigarette packer used for soft packs. Bay A space between four columns or the space between the walls of the manufacturing area, consists of four. (4) production lines. B.L. Blended Leaf - A sheet of reconstituted tobacco made in the B.L. Plant from tobacco shorts, stems and dust obtained in the manufacturing process. B.L. Plant The Philip Morris Plant at which the blended leaf is produced. Bright A type of cigarette tobacco grown from Florida to Virginia, flue cured without direct contact of fumes, commonly used to give smoothness, mildness, and color to the blend. Burley A type of tobacco grown mainly in Kentucky and Tennessee, air cured, and commonly used to give richness and body to the blend. ET Expanded Tobacco - bright tobacco,cut like cut filler, which has been increased in size in a process of cellular expansion followed by freeze drying. Export Orders Orders for finished goods for foreign countries, which will be sold outside the three (3) mile limit of the U.S. Imported Leaf One of three major types of cigarette tobacco, (Turkish) grown in the Mediterranean area (mainly Turkey, Greece, Lebanon, and Yugoslavia, air cured, commonly used to give extra aroma and richness to the blend. RCB Reconstituted Tobacco - A sheet made of tobacco by-products by use of natural tobacco gums or synthetic additive gums. Also known as recon- stituted blend. Richmond Draw The shipping of finished goods to local distri- Shipping butors located in the six states adjacent to Virginia.
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Tax Free Export' Export orders that are billed in Richmond and shipped from either Richmond, Louisville or one of the export field warehouses. The orders consist of the following: 1. Seastores - these are orders from seastore jobbers who service ships. 2. Military - these are orders for all military bases around the world. 3. Small Parcels - these are orders for U.S. personnel in foreign countries. Carton Over- A machine which automatically wraps and seals Wrapper foil, cellophane, or other materials around cartons. Case A fluted single wall or double wall cardboard container for packing and shipping cartons of cigarettes, boxes of gum, and boxes, bags, and cans of smoking tobacco. Case Packer A machine which gathers cartons (cigarettes, gum, etc.) together and packs them into cases automatically or semi-automatically. Case Sealer A unit which seals both ends of a shipping case automatically. Cased Burley Burley strip tobacco which has been sprayed with casing, a flavoring solution, after drying. Casing A solution of flavoring additives used for spraying onto tobacco or stems. CID Central Plant Conditioning Cigarette Indicator Device designed by Molins. The plant that supplies steam and chilled water for the Operations Center, R & D Buildings, and Commerce Road Cigarette Manufacturing Plant. A department located in Primary Processing. The preparation of dry tobacco for handling by the addition of moisture in the form of steam. Consignment An allocated quantity of finished product for Order shipment from the finished goods warehouse (in either Richmond or Louisville) to a field warehouse for replenishment of stock.
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-3- Consignment Shipping Cut Filler Storage Dept. Direct Materials Department Dock Street Plant Dryer Field Warehouses Finished Goods Finished Goods Warehouse Fabrication The shipping of finished goods to field ware- houses located throughout the United States, as opposed to direct to customer shipping. One of ten structures which connect the Commerce Road Manufacturing Building with East and West Wings. It contains production offices, rest rooms, lounges, stairs, elevators, and utilities. The final blend of tobacco, flavored and cut, used to make cigarettes. It consists of Burley, Bright and imported tobaccos, stems, blended leaf, and expanded tobacco, at a moisture con- tent of about 13%. The cost center department responsible for the input, storage, and supply to Make/Pack of cut filler. The department responsible for the receipt, issue and inventory control of direct materials to Plug Room and Make/Pack. The Philip Morris Plant located on Dock Street where imported tobacco is received, stored, weighed, conditioned, blended and issued to the cigarette making plants. A unit which dries, that is, removes moisture from tobacco, or blended leaf by exposing the- product to heated air. The dryer may be a long oven through which a belt moves, or a rotating cylinder through which heated air is passed. Privately owned storage facilities located across the country that are contracted by Philip Morris to stock finished products for shipments to customers upon notification by Philip Morris. All products manufactured by Philip Morris contained in cases and shall include cigarettes, chewing gum, cut filler, export plugs and smoking tobacco in their final shipment form. Storage facilities located in Richmond and Louisville where finished products are stored before they are shipped to a customer or field warehouse. The making and packing of cigarettes from cut filler to cases. f
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-5- Module A cigarette fabrication system which converts cut filler and direct materials into finished cartons of cigarettes. Consists of one each of the following equipment: Maker, Tipper, CID, OSCAR, Packer, Wrapper, and Boxer. McFadden The existing warehouse situated north of the Warehouse new finished goods warehouse, to be used primarily for storing direct materials for making cigarettes. OSCAR Molins' "overhead spiral conveyor and reservoir" system which is used for linking a cigarette maker to a cigarette packer. The OSCAR accepts cigarettes from a maker when the packer is down, and feeds stored cigarettes to the packer (following a LIFO discipline) when the maker is down. The OSCAR reservoir can hold about 75,000 cigarettes. PA8 Molins Filter Tip Assembler. Palletizer A machine that automatically positions a predetermined number of finished goods cases on an empty pallet in a predetermined pattern, moves the loaded pallet to a take-away conveyor, indexes the next empty pallet into the loading position and repeats the cycle. Preblend Silo A blending silo used to blend the many grades -of Bright or Burley strips before the Bright and Burley strips are blended together. Prefabrication The processing of tobacco from strips to cut filler. Primary Same as "Prefabrication". Processing P & S Dryer "Proctor and Schwartz" dryer. It reduces the moisture content of sprayed Burley before it is cased and blended with the Bright. SASIB The subsidiary of AMF, in Bologna, Italy. Scandia Wrapper An overwrapping machine for cigarette packs, smoking tobacco, and gum products. Manufactured by Scandia. Ripper Shorts Reusable tobacco removed from rejected cigarettes in the ripping operation. Contains many short pieces.
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Ripping The operation of removing the tobacco from large quantities of rejected cigarettes using processing equipment, such as a feeder, steam cylinder, ripping cylinder, shaker and air separator. Quad A group of four modules (one half of a row of eight) whose carton output is conveyed into a common case packer. Shift A scheduled period of work: "A" Shift - Approximately 7 a.m. to 3 p-.m. "B" Shift - Approximately 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. "C" Shift - Approximately 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Shipping An order transmitted to the finished goods Consignment warehouse (either in Richmond or Louisville) for shipment of finished products to one of the field warehouses. Shorts Short pieces of tobacco which fall from the ends of just processed cigarettes prior to being packaged. Designated as Class I by- products. Stripping Removing the mats and top head from the hogshead, leaving the tobacco mass. Stacker Crane Unit consisting of a top running, under running, or a floor running trolley to which a rigid hoisting column equipped with a carriage is attached. The carriage is fitted with load-carrying, telescoping forks powered for left and right motion. Silo A long horizontal belt conveyor with high vertical sides used for storage of tobacco. Strip A tobacco leaf from which the stem has been removed. - Steam Cylinder A rotating cylinder which adds moisture to the blended tobacco at about 20% by spraying steam on the tobacco as it passes through the cylinder. Stem The midrib of a tobacco leaf. Stockton Street The Philip Morris cigarette plant located on Plant 7th Street between Stockton and Everett Streets.
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-7- Train A tractor-cart link-up used to transport (1) palletized direct supply materials from one warehouse to another and (2) unit direct supply materials from the warehouse to the manufacturing floor. West Wing The building west of the Manufacturing Building and connected to it by five cores. Also connected to McFadden Warehouse. It contains the glue room, machine shop, plug room, ripper room, spare parts and storage. PZ TDSJ MAID MODIC WS R G.D. Plasticizer - used to bond and add firmness to the plug. Tipping Doesn't Seal Joint - tipping does not completely cover the entire joint of the cigarette and filter. Modular Automatic Inspection Device The long term weight system. Molins Double Ionization Chamber Weight Control measures the density of the tobacco. Warehouse, Shipping/Receiving The last initials of the two (2) gentlemen Ghirardi and Dallolio. They began the G.D. Company in Bologna, Italy in 1923. QA Quality Assurance
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Q.A. PRODUCT AUDITS CRITICAL CIGARETTE DEFECT DEFINITIONS Note: The defect abbreviation for the Product Audits system is shown in parentheses if applicable. *= Current standard has been clarified ** = Standard has been changed I. ENDS CRITERIA computer 1. Loose End- not considered critical; see void ends. 2. Void End- the tobacco is recessed or can be depressed 4 - 10mm from the end of the rod, as measured by a void end gauge or millimeter ruler. (After 10mm, the defect is called a critical Incompletely Filled Rod.) 3. Recessed End- not considered critical; see void end. *4. Torn End/Ragged Cut (T End/Rag Cut)- there is a tear at the end 4mm or more, or there are multiple tears 3mm or more, or a torn end located under the tipping (Protos) extends 1mm or more past the tipping. 5. Bias Cut Rod- not usually critical. (Would probably become a critical Torn End/Ragged Cut.) II. ROD CRITERIA *1. Stem Hole- an unplugged hole anywhere on the rod, lmm or more in size, or multiple stem holes of any size; must be able to see/feel stem that caused the hole. *2. Incompletely Filled Rod (Incom Fil Rod)- cigarette feels soft or non-uniformly packed for a distance 4mm or more anywhere along the rod (except at the end, which is a Void End). Multiple incompletely filled areas in a rod are critical regardless of size. Defects formerly called void necks or void rods are also included here. 3. Broken Cigarette (Broken Cigt)- the cigarette rod is broken anywhere. 4. Paper Break- Visual: a complete break in the paper which extends lmm or more around the rod, any part of which is located 4mm or more from the end, or multiple paper breaks of any length anywhere on the same rod. Or Functional: any break in the paper that results in "smoke" exiting the break when puffing the cigarette. (Exception: paper breaks on the seam are classified as 0 Slits/Tears/Holes Along Seam; see Seam category.) ~
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5. Torn Rod- any tear or slit lmm or more with tobacco ex- posed, any part of which is located 4mm or more from the end of the rod. 6. Rod Hole/Indentation (Rod Hol/Inden)- any hole which measures 1mm or more, any part of which is located 4mm or more from the end of the rod, or multiple holes of any size anywhere on the same rod. *7. Dirty Rod- depends on size, quantity, color and intensity which give an objectionable appearance (judged in the same way as spots, foreign matter, smears, etc.). 8. Wrinkles- generally not critical; an extremely wrinkled cigarette is usually a critical Mashed Cigarette. *9. Mashed End/Cigarette (Mash End/Cigt)- depends on degree of mashing and overall appearance (flatness, # wrinkles, size of mashed area). *10. Out of Round Cigarette (M/O Rnd Cigt)- not critical (severe case would be called Mashed Cigarette). *11. Flavor/Oil/Water Spots- any spot 5mm or more in any dimension is critical. For smaller spots, critical classification depends on size, quantity, color and intensity which give an objectionable appearance (judged in the same way as foreign matter, smears, dirt, etc.). 12. Long/Short Cigarette (L/S Cigarette)- generally not critical. 13. Long/Short Rod (L/S Rod)- generally not critical unless it affects cigarette's length. *14. Missing Rod- the filter is present, but it is not bonded to a rod or part of a rod. (If 20 whole cigarettes are present in the pack, an extra filter is called the critical packaging defect Improper Count.) 15. Cigarette Paper Splice (Cigt Pap Spi)- a manufacturing paper splice is present on the rod. (Silver Metalic also) *16. Supplier Rod- supplier holes, spots, and wood chips (that look like foreign matter or dirt) are judged using the same criteria as for holes, foreign matter, etc., caused in manufacturing. Size, quantity, color, and intensity are factors. *Supplier cigarette splices must cause an open seam to be critical. *17. Beetle Spot- (Seen in Competitive Audit)- all critical regardless of size, quantity, color, and intensity. This counts as 1 critical defect per pack regardless of the number of cigarettes with the defect.
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*18. Age Discoloration (Age)- (Seen in Competitive Audit)- yellow or gray cigarettes; depends on size, quantity, color, and intensity. This counts as 1 critical defect per pack regardless of the number of cigarettes with the defect. *19. Cigarettes Stuck at Rod (Cigt Stuk Rod)- cigarettes are stuck together due to flavorants or wetness (except at the seam, which is called Cigarettes Stuck at Seam). III. FILhER CRITERIA **1. Paper/Tow/Packaging Materials in Filler (Pa/Tw/Pkg M F)- paper visible 4mm or more in any dimension under the cigarette paper or at the rod end; any packaging material; any tow. 2. Foreign Matter in Filler (F M In Filler)- any foreign matter in filler. 3. Light End Stem/Tobacco (Lt Stem/Tob Ed)- not critical. 4. Light Stem/Tobacco Under Paper (Lt Stm/Tob UP)- not critical. IV. PRINT CRITERIA 1. Missing/Illegible Die Number (Msg Die #, Ill Die #- not critical. **2. Die Number Exposed (Die # Exposed)- any portion of the die number is visible past the tipping or seam lap. (For filtered brands, die number visible through the tipping or seam are defective, but not critical.) 3. Missing/Non-Uniform Print (Msg/N-U Print)- one or more characters of the brand name are missing. 4. Light Print- illegible due to intensity. *5. Smeared Print- smeared along the rod or around the cir- cumference, or the brand name is illegible; depends on size, quantity, color, and intensity which give an objectionable appearance (judged in the same way as spots, foreign matter, etc.). **6. Print Position (Rod Circumference) (Prt Pos (RC))- any portion of a letter is covered by the seam lap. (On preprinted tipping, the brand name is improperly formed or covered by the tipping seam.) **7. Print Position (High/Low) (Prt Pos (HL))- High: any portion of the brand name is covered by the tipping paper. Low: the top of logo is 6mm or more from the tipping paper. (If the die number is visible, it's called a critical Die Number Exposed.)
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On nonfil'tered brands, critical High position is 10mm from the mouth end; critical Low position is 16mm from the mouth end (target 13 + or - 3mm, giving a 6mm range of variation. 8. Print Hole- visual: 1 hole 1mm or more in size, or multi- ple holes of any size all the way through paper. Or functional: smoke exits the hole when puffing the cigarette. V. SEAM CRITERIA 1. Open Seam- any portion of the seam is unsealed for a distance of 4mm or more and is positioned 4mm or more from the end of the rod, or there are multiple openings of any size anywhere. 2. Open Seam with TDSJ (OS/TDSJ)- any open seam occurring simultaneously with a TDSJ. 3. Shorts in Seam- any portion of the seam is unsealed (due to a short) for a distance of 4mm or more and is positioned 4mm or more from the end of the rod, or there are multiple openings of any size anywhere due to shorts. 4. Feathered Seam/Dry Lap (F Seam/Dry Lp)- not critical. 5. Slits/Tears/Holes Along Seam (S/T/H Seam)- an opening 1mm or more, with tobacco exposed and positioned 4mm or more from the end of the rod, or multiples of any size any- where on the rod. (Paper breaks along the seam are included here.) 6. Scorched Seam- dependent upon size, quantity, color, and intensity which give an objectionable appearance. 7. Creased Seam- there is a flag on the seam where the inside edges of the paper are glued together. 8. Wide/Narrow Seam (W/N Seam)- not critical. 8. Cigarettes Stuck At Seam (Cigt Stk Seam)- cigarettes re- quire separation by pulling apart. VI. FILTER (PLUG) CRITERIA 1. Recessed Plug (Non-Recessed Brand) (Rec Plug NRB)-plug is recessed 2mm or more. 2. Too Much/Too Little Recess (Recessed Brand)(TM/TL Rec RB) -more than + or - from specification. 3. Loose Plug- not critical (when the tow is not bonded to plug wrap). 6
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**4. Too Much/Too Little PZ (TM/TL PZ)- Too Little- there appears to be no PZ. Too Much- there is a hole 0.5mm or more in size where the plug has disintegrated, or there are multiple holes of any size. (Each cigarette with the defect is counted as 1 critical.) 5. Improper Bloom (Improp Bloom)- not critical. 6. Long/Short Plug (L/S Plug)- + or - 2mm or more from specification. *7. Rod-Filter Space (Rod-Fil Space)- there is a space 2mm or more in size between the plug and the rod. 8. Combined Filter Registration (Comb Fil Reg)- charcoal component is at mouth end (components reversed), or any component is less than 50% of its specified size. *9. Dirty Filter Tip (Dirty Fil Tip)- depends on size, quantity, color and intensity which give an objectionable appearance (may be judged more strictly than spots, smears, foreign matter on rod due to location at mouth end. 10. Internal Bypass (Plastic Fluted Plug) (Intrn Byp PFP)- not critical. ' 11. Internal Bypass (Combined Filter) (Intrn Byp CF)- not critical. *12. Scattered Charcoal in Plug (Charc Scatter)- depends on size, quantity, color, and intensity which give an objectionable appearance (may be judged more strictly than spots, smears, foreign matter on rod due to location at mouth end). VII. TIPPING CRIT~RIA 1. Filter Falls Off (Fil Falls Off)- the tipping paper is not bonded to the cigarette rod for half or more of the circumference. *2. Air Leak-the tipping paper is not bonded to the cigarette rod for 4mm up to half the circumference. Critical class- ification depends on degree of fiber pull, how much bite there is, and how close to the seam the air leak is. 3. Tipping Does Not Seal Joint (TDSJ)- the joint (space) between the filter and the rod is not completely sealed by the tipping paper. 4. Tipping Turned Up/Under (Tip to Rod) (TT U/U T to R)- tipping is turned up 3mm or more, or on preprinted tip- ping the brand name is partially covered. *5. Tipping Adhesion (Tip to Tip) (Tpg Adh T/T)- depends on size, quantity, position (whether tipping paper is sit- ting up) and distance from mouth end.
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**6. Tipping Adhesion (Tip to Plug) (Tpg Adh T/P)- the plug wrap separates from the tipping paper with absence of fiber pull. (Each cigarette with the defect is counted as 1 critical.) 7. Missing Filter Components (Msg Fil Cop)- all of any com- ponent of the filter (e.g., plug, tipping paper, plug wrap) is missing from the cigarette rod. *8. Foreign Matter/Dirty Tipping (FM/Dirty Tpg)- depends on size, quantity, color, distance from mouth to end, and intensity which give an objectionable appearance. *9. Torn Tipping- any cut/slit/tear which exposes the plug, creates an objectionable appearance, interferes with the brand name (preprinted tipping), or leaks smoke. 10. Tipping Misalignment (Tpg Misalign)- the edges of the tipping paper are skewed 3mm or more. 11. Long/Short Tipping (L/S Tipping)- not critical. 12. Wrinkled/Pleated/Mashed Tipping (Wr/Pl/Msh Tpg)- depends on length, thickness, and position (distance from mouth end, whether pleat is sitting up) which give an objec- tionable appearance. 13. Circumference Mismatch (Circ Mismatch)- not critical. 14. Rough/Bias Cut (Rugh/Bias Cut)- a bias cut with 2mm or more difference between the longest and shortest length of the filter. (A critical rough cut would probably be called Torn Tipping.) 15. Cigarettes Stuck at Tippinq (Cigt Stk Tpg)- cigarettes require separation by pulling apart. 16. Tipping Paper Splice (Tpg Pap Spl)-a manufacturing splice on the tipping. *17. Supplier Tipping (Supplier Tpg)- supplier spots, smears, missing letters, splices, etc., are judged using the same criteria as for manufacturing-related spots, print smears, missing/non-uniform print, splices, etc. *18. Charcoal Under Tipping (Char Und Tpg)- depends on size, quantity, color, distance from mouth end, and intensity which give an objectionable appearance. *19. Shorts Under Tipping (Shts Und Tpg)- depends on size, i.~ quantity, color, distance from mouth end, and intensity which give an objectionable appearance. C *20. Extra Tipping- depends on size, quantity, color, and dis- tance from mouth end which give an objectionable appearance. ~ C ~
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S.T.A.R.T. START is an acronym for Supervisory Technical Analysis And Related Training. It is a tool used by Unit Supervisors to effectively manage their department through data analysis, objective setting and monthly/quarterly problem-solving meetings. START was introduced at the Manufacturing Center in 1984 (via Louisville, Kentucky) because the available performance data was not sufficient enough to identify and solve problems, the information generated wasn't in a usable format, and supervisory effectiveness and control was declining due to the unavailability of reliable data from support groups. The three (3) parts to the START process are: 1. Data- Data (information) is received and analyzed to identify and prioritize problem areas and to monitor plans that have been implemented. 2. Meetings- Conducted monthly/quarterly, promotes organized problem- solving, unit performance feedback and develops planning skills of the group members. Participants included are the Unit and Group Supervisors of an area, Mechanical Supervisors, Technical Supervisor, Planner and mid-level managers. 3. Objective Setting- Improving performance requires identifying problems and implementing changes consistently over time. Objectives are determined and action plans are written to promote short- term and intermediate-term planning. The objective setting procedure is simply a systematic way of attaining a solution to a problem. The true benefits of START to supervisors and managers are the following: A. Accurate and concise data in a usable format. B. Assistance with departmental analysis. provided by C. Training and assistance to all levels of management for problem analysis, objective setting, devising action plans and formu- lating a successful meeting format. Through active participation in the START process, supervisors are able to measure performance, which is a major factor to the success of managing their individual department.
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BENEFITS 24b1G346a4
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B121UITS Philip Morris offers a wide variety of employee benefits and services. nefit plans, most of which are paid for in their entirety by the company, ~ve been designed to protect employees and their families against situations iat might cause financial hardship. The various plans are designed to work together to help you to: meet the cost of medical and dental care meet your financial needs if you become disabled provide financial security for your family in the event of your death build income for your retirement meet the cost of pursuing continuing educational goals. The "Salaried F.mployee Handbook" manual contains a section on Benefits and Services. We urge you to refer to this section when seeking the various types of valuable coverage which are provided under this program. Also, you are encouraged to contact the Employee Relations Operations Office for further information or explanation of any of these plans. The actual provisions of each plan will govern in settling any questions that may arise. All documents which legally govern the operation of the plans are on file and available for review in the Benefits or Employee Relations Operations Department. It is imperative that you report any changes in your personal status so that records may be kept current. .0 ~
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205163V6Ur1
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I N G B N g R A L
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IN GENERAL Pay Day As a member of supervision, you will be paid on the 12th and 27th of each month. Overtime and shift differential will be included in each check and itemized on the stub. Check Cashing Check cashing is available for salaried employees in the East Wing, Second Floor Administrative area. Hours of operation are from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Credit Union The Credit Union is located at 4605 Commerce Road. Hours of operation are 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday. Employee's Store The Employee's Store is located on the First Floor, East Wing area. It is open daily from 7:00 a.m. to 7:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The store is closed on factory non-production days and inventory days. Safety Shoes Foot protection is required of all salaried and hourly personnel working in Production, Materials Handling, Primary and Warehouse areas. Safety shoes may be purchased from the shoemobile which makes monthly visits to the various locations within the company. Dates and locations will be posted on bulletins throughout the company. . Hearing Protection Hearing protection (earplugs) must be worn by all employees who work in designated "ear protection required" areas at all times. If you forget or lose your earplugs, they may be purchased from the Earplug Dispensary Machine located in the Employee Locker Room, North and South entrance/ exit doors or through the Medical Department. . Medical Department The Medical Department, which is a three-shift operation, provides emer- gency medical treatment for employees. This department is located on the First Floor, East Wing area. For emergency medical assistance, call extension 3033. For non-emergency assistance, call extension 3121.
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Security Department Security personnel are on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to provide protection and assistance to the employee, employee property and the Company and Company property. For assistance with vehicle decals and lost or worn identification badges, contact the Security Officer located at any of the entrance/exit doors. For additional assistance or infor- mation, contact the Security Department at extension 2416, which is located on the Second Floor, West Wing area (above central stockroom). i Maps The following are mapped diagrams of: 1. Richmond Area Locations 2. Manufacturing Center Complex 3. Manufacturing Center Module Lay-out 4. Evacuation Route (through Bay 3) (For a diagram of the primary and secondary evacuation route for your respective area, ask your supervisor, or call the Safety Department at extension 4846.) . Process Flow Chart illz 'or further explanations of information in the "In General" section, consult ~ ,our "Employee Handbook" or "Standards of Work and Conduct" manual.
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LEGEMo 1. MIr.Ce.ier 2. fiMa.ce Irilli.` 2. E.rireerbl Iwi1~i.1 4. Iuurcl CeNlu S. Oeepwaler facility 1. Over.ile Iirll/irl 1 YYleclaY Iwii/i.` t. Slocklo. Slreel tlaal !. Deck Slreel 10. 20iY Slreel. rla.l !l. Il fhwl 12. Slemrr.err 12. 1640 Ietlert. Davis wlSkway 1t 1raiWht Ce.ler lS. Millelhiaa E.liseering Cesler PHILIP MORRIS USA RICNMONQ ARrA LOCATIONS
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MANIJFAMIRING CENIFR Richmond, Virginia GATE F O~E I - I Q ~ ENCiI TIHANCE Nnnw - Ol.bo. towtn LJb-L"° t;= rnnKl MI"AnY PltOLESSl/14 OLD0. riHIS11Eo Gooos 1YI15t, I GATE 0 svrrLlEs o1,InluvtlON wEST W1N0-SEnVICE' ClcnnCTTE MfG. bl.oa. y ~ Aor11r1, bLO0.- MrO. ANO LEAI' AInKINO A/lf/1 S
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GENTER MODULE INFORMATION GUIDE JULY 1987 A BAY 1 BAY 2 B C D A B C D A BAY3 B C D A BAY4 B C D A BAY5 B C D CIEC1[J LI HH iLJ [ II-IIJ LIrJ II] t[r.ll1 ~!I I~ ~L _ ~~1~ ll: ~ CJL1~~I ] HL L,~~~ ~ ~Ll C1~L~~~ ~ li '~ ~[ I F-] [11 ' ~ ~~J~ ~CICJCI F: j ~~ un~ 1 L LiHLJE L]flH o~~~~ - _ ~-~[I oa _ a~oo r~~~~~ _ L[]a
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Q oLocation of Diagrams Fire Escape From Bay 3 WEST I GARDEN E Eva SECONDARY EXIT- - - -* Q El GARDEN U Primary evacuation route: Exit down west fire escape stairwell, turn left, go through evacuation tunnel to outside. Primary assemble location: Northside of west wing connecting link. Secondary evacuation route: Exit down east fire escape stairwell, turn right, go to east wing basement corridor, turn left and go north through corridor to outside. Secondarv assemble location: Grassy area beside sidewalk leading to nick-un area. W! IV G uation el M0E0Tq'09
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PHILIP MORRIS U. S. A. I N T E R- 0 F F I C E C 0 R R E S P 0 N D E N C E Richmond, Virginia To: Supervision From: Safety Department Subject: INJURY REPORTING 1. In case of injury of sudden illness, the employee reports promptly to you, then is directed to the Plant Medical Depart- ment for treatment. 2. All injuries, no matter how slight, must be reported immediately in order that: a) The employee may receive proper examination and treatment. The lack of prompt attention to slight injuries could lead to serious complications. We've experienced several inci- dents to date where injuries are reported days after the accident. b) A report be made out to comply with the Workmen's Compensa- tion Law and the Occupational Safety and Health Act (Plant Nurse initiates). Remember - each recordable occupational illness must be entered on a log of cases (OSHA form No. 100) within six (6) working days of receiving information that a recordable case has occurred. c) The experience may be used to prevent the occurrence of similar accidents. d) Supervisors (you) can investigate all known accidents or injuries. 3. In the case of multiple injuries, contact the Plant Safety Coordinator, extension 4846, and report type and location of injuries. 4. The Supervisors Accident Report must be made out on the shift that the accident occurred. (Obtain the report form from the Plant Nurse.) Forward report to the Plant Safety Coordinator. Remember, after an absence due to illness or injury, permission to return to work must be obtained from the Medical Department. ~ C3T Safety Department }-+ ~ c ~ ~
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PHILIP MORRIS U. S. A. I N T E R- 0 F F I C E C 0 R R E S P O N D E N C E Richmond, Virginia To: Supervision ' ' From: Safety Department Subject: MANUFACTURING SAFETY POLICY Effective immediately, all machines in your respective work areas are to be checked at the beginning of each shift for proper guarding. Any previously installed guard found missing must be replaced and an explanation forwarded to me as to why it was re- moved and not replaced. No machine will be permitted to operate in an unsafe manner. Newly installed machinery must be properly guarded prior to start up. Material shortages could create some delay in complying with this policy but every effort must be made to guard hazardous locations. It is the responsibility of each of us to provide a safer work environment for our people. Additionally, when an accident occurs in your department that is OSHA recordable (this is any incident that requires anything other than immediate first aid attention, i.e., sent off plant for out- side physician's assistance, placement on light duty) a super- visor's accident report form must be made out and forwarded to Manufacturing Center Safety Coordinator within two (2) working days of the accident (plant nurse has accident forms). No delays! Corrective action to eliminate recurrences of this accident must be made immediately.) Through the efforts of each of us working as a team we are dedi- cated to improve our safety performance. Your cooperation is expected. Safety Department
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EVACUATION PROCEDURE Making and Packing Bay 1- Primary escape route: exit down west fire escape stairwell, Core 1 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down east fire escape stairwell, Core 6 to outside. Assemble location: southeast corner of Finished Goods Warehouse. Bay 2- Primary escape route: exit down west fire escape stairwell, Core 2 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down east fire escape stairwell, Core 7 to outside. Assemble location: southside of West Wing connecting link. Bay 3- Primary escape route: exit down west fire escape stairwell, Core 3 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down east fire escape stairwell, Core 8 to outside. Assemble location: southside of West Wing connecting link. Bay 4- Primary escape route: exit down west fire escape stairwell, Core 4 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down east fire escape stairwell, Core 9 to outside. Assemble location: northside of West Wing connecting link. Bay 5- Primary escape route: exit down west fire escape stairwell, Core 5 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down east fire escape stairwell, Core 10 to outside. Assemble location: northside of West Wing connecting link. Or
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EVACUATION PROCBDiJRS West Wing: MaintEnance Shop- Primary escape route: exit through Door 15 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down fire escape stairwell, Core 1 to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of West Wing at unloading dock, Door 14. Mezzanine Office Area- Primary escape route: exit down west emergency stairwell to outside. Secondary escape route: down main stairwell to fire escape stairwell, Core 2 to outside. Assemble location: southeast corer of Finished Goods Warehouse. Ripper Room- Primary escape route: exit through emergency door, west side of room to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through fire escape stairwell, Core 3 to outside. Assemble location: southside of West Wing connecting link. Plug Room- Primary escape route: exit through emergency doors nearest your work area, west side of room. Secondary escape route: exit through fire escape stairwell, Cores 4 or 5, (use one adjacent to your work area) to outside. Assemble location: northwest corner of West Wing.
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EVACUATION PROCRDURB Basement- Make/Pack Building: Cell 1- Primary escape route: exit through west fire escape tunnel, Core 1 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through east fire escape tunnel, Core 6 to outside. Assemble location: southeast corner of Finished Goods Warehouse. Cell 2- Primary escape route: exit through west fire escape tunnel, Core 2 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through east fire escape tunnel, Core 7 to outside. Assemble location: southside of West Wing connecting link. Cell 3- Primary escape route: exit through fire escape tunnel, Core 3 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through fire escape tunnel, Core 8 to outside. Assemble location: southside of West Wing connecting link. Cell 4- Primary escape route: exit through west fire escape tunnel, Core 4 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through east fire escape tunnel, Core 9 to outside. Assembly location: northside of West Wing connecting link. Cell 5- Primary escape route: exit through west fire escape tunnel, Core 5 to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through east fire escape tunnel, Core 10 to outside. Assembly location: northside of West Wing connecting link. s
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RVACUATION PROCEDURE Finished Goods: Mezzanine Area-Primary escape route: exit down west stairwell to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down east stairwell to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of Finished Goods. First Floor (Office & Operating Areas)-Primary escape route: exit through south center emergency door under mezzanine to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through employee entrance door, southeast corner of building to outside. Assemble location: southeast corner of Finished Goods. Central Plant- Primary escape route: exit through personnel door, north side of plant to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through personnel door, north side of plant to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of Finished Goods.
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EVACUATION PROCEDURE Primary Processing Penthouse-Primary escape route: exit down the south stairwell to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down the north stairwell to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of Primary Building. Second Floor (Proctor & Swartz Dryer Area)- Primary escape route: exit down the southwest stairwell to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down stairwell adjacent to Computer Room, proceed south through truck dock area to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of Primary Building. Matting & Headboard Area- Primary escape route: exit down the stairwell adjacent to Computer Room, proceed north along truck dock area to outside Secondary escape route: exit down the northwest stairwell to first floor, proceed west to truck dock area to outside. Assemble location: northwest corner of Primary Building. Total Blending Area- escape routes: exit down one of the six (6) stair- wells nearest your work area to outside. Assemble location: southeast corner of Primary Building. First Floor/Flavor Room Area- Primary escape route: exit east through Tank Farm Room, turn right (south) and proceed through exit to outside. Secondary escape route: exit through stairs adjacent to QC Lab in Flavor Room, proceed south through truck dock area to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of Primary Building. Hogshead Receiving Area- escape route: exit through north end of truck dock area. Assemble location: northwest corner of Primary Building. ES, Primary 1 & 2 Areas- escape route: exit through one of the four (4) exterior doors nearest your work area to the outside. Assemble location: northeast corner of Primary Building. QC Link, First Floor- Primary escape route: exit south through emergency door, northeast corner of Primary, to outside. ~ O Secondary escape route:exit north through Core 6 to employee entrance/ CP exit, south end of east wing to outside. ~ . ~
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rimary Processing (cont.) Assemble location: northeast corner of Primary Building. Second Floor- Primary escape route: exit down the south stairwell to emergency door, northeast corner of Primary, to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down the north stairwell, proceed north to Core 6 through permanent employee entrance/exit to outside. Assemble location: northeast corner of Primary Building.
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EVACUATION PROCEDURE East Wing: Mezzanine Area- South of Main Lobby- Primary escape routes: exit down the fire escape stairwell in Cores 6, 7 or 8, whichever is nearest your work area to first floor, proceed south through employees entrance/exit, south end of East Wing to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down stairwell at south end of mezzanine through employee entrance/exit, south end of East Wing to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of East Wing. Mezzanine Area- North of Main Lobby- Primary escape routes: exit down the fire escape stairwell in Cores 8, 9 or 10, whichever is nearest your work area to first floor, proceed north through employee entrance/exit, north end of East Wing to outside. Secondary escape route: exit down stairwell at north end of mezzanine through employee entrance/exit, north end of East Wing to outside. Assemble location: northwest corner of East Wing. First Floor- South of Main Lobby- Primary escape routes: exit office areas, proceed south or north to the employee entrance/exit located on opposite ends of East Wing to outside. Assemble location: Southwest or northwest corner of East Wing depending on which end of building exited from. First Floor- Cafeteria-Primary escape route: exit cafeteria through "Emergency Exit Doors", on opposite ends of cafeteria on east well. Secondary escape route: exit cafeteria through one of the three (3) entrances/exits located on west side of room and proceed south through employee entrance/exit, south end of East Wing to outside. Assemble location: proceed south down employee walkway to southeast corner of Primary. First Floor- North of Main Lobby- Primary escape routes: exit office and medical area, proceed north or south to the employee entrance/exit located on opposite ends of East Wing to outside. Assemble locations: northwest or southwest corner of East Wing depending on which end of building exited from.
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East Wing (cont.): South Locker Rooms- Primary escape routes: exit locker rooms through one of two entrance/exits provided, proceed to the permanent employee entrance/exit, south end of east Wing to outside. Assemble location: proceed to northeast corner of Primary Building, remain there until told area is clear, then report immediately to your respective work areas. North Locker Rooms- Primary escape routes: exit locker rooms through one of two entrance/exits provided, proceed to the permanent employee entrance/exit, north end of East Wing to outside. Assemble location: proceed to northeast corner of Making and Packing Building, remain there until told area is clear, then report immediately to your respective work areas. East Wing Basement: Mail Room- South End Corridor- Primary escape route: exit building through "Emergency Exit Doors", southeast corner of corridor, to outside. Secondary escape route: exit building through "Emergency Exit Doors", north end of corridor, to outside. Assemble location: northwest corner of CCD Building. Kitchen and ARA Office Personnel- Primary escape route: exit kitchen and office areas to corridor, proceed south to "Emergency Exit Doors", south- east corner of corridor, to outside. Secondary escape route: exit kitchen and office areas to corridor, pro- ceed north to "Emergency Exit Doors", north end of corridor, to outside. Assemble location: northwest corner of CCD Building. MIS Computer Room & adjacent offices- Primary escape route: exit area through one of two entrance/exits to corridor, proceed south to "Emergency Exit Doors", southeast corner of corridor, to outside. Secondary escape route: exit area through one of two entrance/exits to corridor, proceed north to "Emergency Exit Doors", north end corridor, to outside. Assemble location: northeast corner of CCD Building. Auditorium- Primary escape route: exit into corridor through the entrance/exit doors, on west side of lobby, proceed south to "Emergency Exit Doors", southeast corner of corridor, to outside. Secondary escape route: exit into corridor through the entrance/exit door on west side of lobby, proceed north to "Emergency Exit Doors", to out- side. ~41_
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East Wing Basement (cont.): Alternate escape route: exit area to first floor via lobby stairwell, avoid using elevator, proceed outside through the main entrance/exit. Assemble location: northeast corner of CCD Building. Core 9 Computer Room- Primary escape route: exit into East Wing corridor through east personnel door, proceed north to "Emergency Exit Doors", to outside. Secondary escape route: exit room through west personnel door into Cell 4 Basement, proceed west across Cell 4 to Fire Escape Tunnel #4 to outside. Assemble location: southeast corner, Parking Lot #6. Training and Safety Department Offices- Primary escape route: exit areas to corridor, proceed north to "Emergency Exit Doors", to outside. Secondary escape route: exit areas to corridor, proceed south to "Emergency Exit Doors", southeast corner of corridor, to outside. Assemble location: southwest corner of Parking Lot V. Material Distribution Areas- Primary escape route: exit building through the employee entrance/exit, north side of McFadden Cafeteria to exterior of building. Secondary escape route: exit building through one of the emergency exit doors, east side of Cells 8 or 9, to exterior of building. Assemble location: northwest corner of McFadden Building. Damaged Rework Room- Primary escape routes: exit room through one of two entrance/exits provided, proceed to main employee entrance/exit, north side of McFadden Cafeteria, to exterior of building. Assemble location: northwest corner of McFadden Building. Quality Control Laboratory- Primary escape route: exit room through main employee entrance/exit or the emergency exit on east side room, proceed to the employee entrance/exit, north side of McFadden Cafeteria, to exterior of building. Assemble location: northeast corner of south warehouse. McFadden Carpenter Shop- Primary escape route: exit room through main employee entrance/exit or the emergency exit on west side of room, proceed to the employee entrance/exit, north side of McFadden Cafeteria, to exterior of building. Assemble location: northeast corner of south warehouse.
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SUPERVISING SAFELY There are many concerns about what it means to be a supervisor. We all have different impressions on what the supervisor does. It is perhaps the most misunderstood job in the industry---mostly by those who never supervised. Besides being the toughest job in a plant, supervision is the key to keeping the plant operating. Without the supervisor, nothing would get done. Any work that would be done would be uncoordinated and little would be accom- plished. So what is a supervisor? The supervisor today must be a leader. Supervisors must possess the knowledge and ability to supervise efficiently and safel the many phases of work that are assigned. Other qualifications include: 1. They must be able to acknowledge, without hesitation, the errors for which they are responsible, and. to accept constructive criticism when offered. 2. They must keep abreast of company policies, rules, regulations and procedures. It is their responsibility to see that these items are adhered to when and where applicable. 3. They must encourage good habits, which are essential to the safety, efficiency and morale of every employee, by setting the example them- selves. 4. He or she must be able to size up the job and make proper work assign- ments for both efficiency and safet . 5. Must be capable of spotting hazards at a glance, and either eliminate or guard against them. 6. Must be able to conduct meetings with employees, and create an atmos- phere of individual participation. 7. Supervisors must make fair and impartial investigation of all acci- dents and unfavorable incidents that occur within their area of res- ponsibility, and must make written reports of them. 8. It is essential that they can act without hesitation in emergency situations. 9. To be a good supervisor, one must know something about human behavior; that is to possess knowledge and skill in the counseling of others. SAFETY MUST BE SOLD As a supervisor, you are responsible for the total well-being of your employees while at work. If you sell safet to our people, the burden of this important responsibility can be lessened. The best way to sell safety is to talk about it. Do it on a regular basis, and do it on a friendly, personal basis. When we examine reasons why workers do their job well, we find that money is not the primary motivator. Since 1961, National Safety Council Statistics indicate the national accident rate has risen twelve out of thirteen years despite wage increases. Money can move employees to work well, but it does not give them the inner desire to try. The inner needs of employees are the most demanding for satisfaction. The need to learn, to see accomplishments and to be recognized are as basic and strong as the need for food to satisfy hunger.
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As a supervisor, you can help meet these needs in several ways: 1. Establish a good orientation program for new employees or job transferees. The new employee should be made to feel at home. Spell out their job functions. Make them feel needed. 2. Good communications that show the employee is a partner in the safet program, having responsibilities and being capable of contributing valuable ideas on safet . 3. Enforcement that includes evaluation of performance, advice, further explanation and training, warning and appropriate discipline when necessary. A most difficult aspect in selling safety is selling change. It is human to resist change unless we are sold on it. Change is more acceptable when it is understood than when it is not. Don't underestimate the value of explaining a change. Few things can trigger rumors and resentment more quickly than a change that is not not explained. Change is more acceptable when it does not threaten security than when it does. Explain that the change will not affect the employee's job and income, and you will have gone a long way toward winning employee approval for it. Resistance to change can be overcome by getting employees who will be affected by it to participate in making it. Change is more acceptable if it is obvious that it is well planned and thought out. . Try to avoid confusion of several major changes at one time. Finally, the clinchers for accepting change would be showing employees the value of change by evidence they can see. Show them it can work. Show them how it is better and, if necessary, give them statistics to demonstrate how much better the change is. Another aspect of selling safet is involved with the supervisor's public relations job. Maybe you have never given much thought to the importance of your role in the company's public relations. Supervisors should because they are much more important in molding opinion than they realize. In fact, the supervisor is a vital link in building our image of the company and also its Safety Program. The image set depends on what they say about the program and how well they support it. Know the whys and wherefores of the policy so you can explain it when the occasion arises. Without knowing the reasons behind a policy, it is very easy to have it meet with ridicule. Also, if you, the supervisor, sneers at a policy or rule, your employees will sneer with you and discipline will be lost.
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The supervisor must set the example if he or she expects the employee to think and work safely. Set the example for your employees in the following ways: 1. Consider safety in every job assignment. 2. Demonstrate serious concern for policy, safety rules, regulations and procedures. 3. Follow all safety rules themselves. Finally, to YOUR AREA repeat: When you talk about are most important safety should come before considering THE BEST WAY TO SELL SAFETY IS TO TALK ABOUT IT. safety with your employees, the items of discussion that should concern your area. Your own work-related items of first, resolving any problems or lack of understanding other things. Such things ranging from department policy to safe performance of work should be first priority in your discussions. During your discussions, impress your employees of the need for their cooperation in the Safety Program. Increase their interest by asking them to detect obvious hazards or unsafe actions which may cause an accident. Then follow through by abating the hazards as soon as possible. Take all possible avenues to convince your employees that safe procedures are important. You cannot merely tell an employee about safet rules or ask that they not work in a careless manner. Repetitive reminders will serve to combat the tendency to develop unsafe habits. The safety story is often an old and familiar one, but repetition is a legitimate part of any training. Even if the story is an old, familiar one, it is worth the effort on your part to find new and interesting ways to get it across. In summary, you can increase the safety awareness among your employee if you: 1. Convince employees that development of safe work habits is each individual's responsibility. 2. Consider the fact the memory is short and you must follow-up on matters of safety regularly. 3. Demonstrate the importance of safety by showing your concern in words and actions. Safety Department Philip Morris U.S.A.
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RAW TOBACCO DOMESTIC VENDORS IV DIRECT MAT. PLUG ,IF G \41 WAREHOUSE COLD STORAGE STEMMERY HOGS HEAD WAREHOUSE RECEIVING & KENWAY PRIMARY PROCESSING SILO STORAGE P'IAKE/PACK FABRICATION .1 WAREHOUSE SHIPPING \v WHOLESALERS JOBBERS DISTRIBUTERS L CONSUMERS PROCESS FLOW RAW TOBACCO IMPORT CONDITIONING PRE-BLEND TOTAL BLEND FLAVORING FOREIGN EXPORT
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BECOME A PART 205IC30631
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BSCOZQNG A PART OF `1'HE ORGANIZATION
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BECOPING A PART OF Tffi? ORGANIZATION----- Although each individual lives a particularly distinctive life, there are some valid thoughts for you to keep in mind while you seek the best path to self-development and success. Despite our best efforts to provide the kind of experience and training to enable you to realize your fullest potential, we cannot plot or guarantee anything like a"royal road to success". How far and in what direction you ultimately go will be entirely up to you. All we can offer is the opportunity for self-development. Among the traits you will especially want to cultivate are these: Analytical Ability Industry Creative Ability Judgement Initiative Business Consciousness Perserverance Dependability Results on the Job As a part of your job, you will have the opportunity to work with a number of different business functions and personalities. These experiences and the thinking and behavior patterns established during your job will provide a solid framework upon which to build your future progress. - _ SOME GENERAL OBSERVATIONS THE BEST WAY TO LEARN IS BY DOING. Follow the instructions of your supervisor. Your job will be interesting; some parts will be more challenging than others. Even the most routine job provides opportu- nities for learning. Do more than is expected rather than less. O&SERVE. There are many things that you can learn by keeping your eyes open and becoming familiar not only with the particular task which you are called upon to perform, but its relationships with the other parts of the business process, the management problems and the human relations problems. LISTEN. Everyone likes a good listener, and there are many times when listening pays dividends even if it only leads to questions to which you may have to seek answers. INQUIRE. Do not hesitate to ask questions and to seek advice. You will find that your leaders and many of your associates are anxious to help you if you approach them properly. Think your questions through carefully and make sure your comments are constructive. STUDY. Dig into what you do not know to stay abreast of the latest thinking in your field of work.
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THINK AHEAD. If you must criticize, be tactful and constructive. Never forget that anything you say or do is interpreted by others from their viewpoint, not yours. Most of these people will be interested in helping you. It is impor- tant that you make a good first impression. The best method of doing so is to be honest, sincere, natural and to maintain a good appear- ance. Let it be known that you are prepared to do your part as a cooperative member of the team. Don't try to undersell yourself or you are likely to build up suspicion and create resentment. Don't boast about the opportunity that you are being given or what you believe the future holds or other plants that you have visited or anything which someone else might construe as pretentious. You are going to be constantly establishing relation with various levels within the organization. Each requires the use of good judgement. YOUR RELATIONS WITH YOUR LEADERSHIP. Remember that you are fully responsible to your leader for performance on your assignments. Follow instructions. Seek his advice, then when necessary go to him with suggestions. Live up to the rules and regulations of the factory. YOUR RELATIONS WITH YOUR ASSOCIATES. Make yourself a part of the group. Be cooperative and helpful. Take an interest in the other fellow. Ask the advice of the older employees. Be friendly, enthusiastic and participate in group activities. Naturally, you are very interested in your long-range future and what your career holds in store for you. You might be wise to keep in mind that your plans will change from time to time and opportunities do not appear according to any magical formula. So, be flexible and concen- trate on the best possible performance in whatever job you hold. Build on your strengths in personality, background and aptitudes and always be accomplishment-oriented. Perhaps, the best advice to remember is that a positive approach and a persistent curious mind can achieve that which you may have though impossible. IN CONCLUSION The foregoing merely hits the high spots of the learning and creative opportunities that lie before you in the months ahead. Possibly some have been overdrawn; undoubtedly, a good many more have been passed up completely. Actually, it would be impossible to try to write a defin- itive guide to your training experience- and manifestly undesirable if we could. The truth of the matter is that every person is going to have a unique individual experience as he progresses on the job. What you bring to your job; what you get from it, and finally, what manner of professional merges from the whole process is entirely up to you. For our part, we stand ready to give you all the help we can, confident that you are both fitted and anxious to make the most of your training opportunity. Good luck!
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