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Philip Morris

Response to NCI-Cn-95165-38 American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (Assist) for Cancer Prevention Technical Proposal Original

Date: Sep 1990
Length: 325 pages
2023676247-2023676571
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Fields

Type
REPT, REPORT, OTHER
BIBL, BIBLIOGRAPHY
Area
SLAVITT,JOSHUA/OFFICE
Characteristic
OVER, OVER SIZE DOCUPARE, PARENT
Named Organization
Adelphi Univ Garden City
American Heart Assn
Assist, Assist
Boston College
Brandeis Univ
College of St Elizabeth Nj
Columbia Univ
Commission on Smoking or Health
Community Intervention Trial for Smoking
Division of Epidemiology + Disease Contr
Emory Univ Atlanta
in Univ
James Madison Univ Harrisonburg
Johnson C Smith Univ Charlotte
Methodist Hospital Brooklyn Ny
Montclair State College
NCI, Natl Cancer Inst
Nj Dept of Health
Nj Educational Computer Network
Nj Lung Assn
Nj Medical School Newark
Oberlin College Oberlin
Rider College Lawrenceville
Rutgers Univ New Brunswick
Seton Hall Univ South Orange
State Commission on Smoking + Health
Temple Univ Phila
Trenton State Collee Trenton
Univ of Ga Athens
Univ of Ma
Univ of Md College Park
Univ of Pa Philadelphia
Univ of Pittsburgh
Univ of Tn Knoxville
Univ of Va Fairfax
Western Mi Univ Kalamazoo
Yale Univ
Named Person
Arndt, R.W.
Cooney, M.A.
Greene, S.M.
Horner, R.
Hymowitz, N.
Kowalski, L.
Marshall, J.W.
Mccrady, B.
Nsiahjefferson, L.
Parkin, W.E.
Reyes, N.
Slade, J.
Thorndike, K.
Document File
2023675836/2023676572/Assist Program (Successful) New Jersey Proposal 2 of 2
Litigation
Abcd/Produced
Master ID
2023675989/6571

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N340
Date Loaded
24 May 1999
UCSF Legacy ID
fpx03e00

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Norman Hymowitz, Ph.D. Personal Statement Dr. Norman Hymowitz is Professor of Clinical Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry of the New Jersey Medical School in Newark. His history of scholarship in the general field of health behavior and prevention spans close to two decades. During that time, he has gained a reputation on both local and national levels for outstanding research productivity, teaching, and clinical work. Currently, Dr. Hymowitz serves as the Principal Investigator of the New Jersey Medical School Center for the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT). This maj,or NCI initiative serves as an important "pilot" for Project ASSIST•, and Dr. Hymowitz' experience with all aspects of COMMIT, from community analysis and mobilization to implementation and intervention will enable him to make a sound positive contribution to ASSIST. Many of the same issues faced in COMMIT will no doubt surface again in ASSIST, this time on a grander scale. Perhaps, Dr. Hymowitz' expertise as a teacher and trainer will facilitate his most important contribution to ASSIST. He has worked extensively with professionals and nonprofessionals, providing them with skills and expertise to modify risk factors and prevent disease among populations in, schools, hospitals, worksites, organizations, and communities. His ability to work with staff, students, nurses, and physicians contributed greatly to the success of many very successful intervention programs for preventing heart disease, lowering blood pressure, and modifying smoking. It is anticipated that his expertise as a teacher/trainer will also allow. Dr. Hymowitz to make a similar contribution to ASSIST staff and communities. In summary, Dr. Hymowitz is an accomplished researcher, teacher, and clinician. He has a long history of involvement with research and clinical application in the area of disease prevention and smoking, and he will be able to contribute to the success of ASSIST in many ways. Dr. Hymowitz also is a life long citizen of New Jersey, and he has served the state through, his volunteer work with the American Heart Association, New Jersey Lung Association, the State Commission on Smoking and Health, and as a member of the faculty of the New Jersey Medical School. His knowledge, practical experience, and history of community involvement make him, an ideal consultant for ASSIST.
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Ashanti Health Consultants Four Upperbrook Court, Parlin, NJ' 08$S9 1201) 721-3059 Ashanti Health Consultants is a firm providing consulting services to hospitals, public agencies, edticational institutions, HMOs, consumer and professional organizations. Services include: program development, conference presentations, research and evaluation, training/education and information, dissemination on health care issues/probllems of low- income and minority populations. Prior to the creation of Ashanti Health Consultants, Laurie Nsiah-Jefferson, President, worked in the public health field as a consultant; administrator, evaluator, researcher,. and planner. She has been employed by Columbia University School of Public Health~ the University of Connecticut Medical School, Rutgers University School of Law,. the City of New York, Bureau of Maternity Services and Family Planning, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Oxfam America, the Crime and Justice Foundation, and the Agency for International Develbpment. Ms. Nsiah holds a M.P.H. from Yale University in Health Administration, a B.A. from Brandeis University in African and Afro-American Studies and Politics,, and is currently a doctorate candidate in Health Policy and Management with a concentration in research and evaluation at The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Ms. Nsiah has actively participated as a task force and board; member in many civic, professional, national and community organizations, and institutions. She has spoken nationwide on health issues relating to low-income and minority populations.
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Ashanti Health Consultattts Four Upperbrook Court. Parlin, NJ 08859: 12011 721-3059 PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS PRESENT POSITION: Laurie Nsiah-Jefferson is President of Ashanti Health Consultants. In this capacity, she is responsible for consulting to hospitals, public agencies, HMOs, academia, consumer, and professional organizations on health care for low-income and minority populations. EXPERIENCE: Ms. Nsiah-Jefferson has actively participated in developing programs, conducting researchi evaluation, designing and implementing health education programs, and training/' workshops. She has also presented extensively at conferences, symposia, seminars and meetings. In addition, she has access to health education materials about and designed for low-income and minority populations. Ms. Nsiah-Jefferson has particular expertise in reproductive, maternal, and child health. EMPLOYMENT: Prior to forming her corporation she was: • Senior Research Associate at Columbia University Schooll of Public Health.. • Co-principal Investigator on a nationwide research project funded by the Ford Foundation to identify innovative health care program models for low-income and minority populations. • Member of a consulting team conducting research and policy analysis on reproductive hazards in the workplace, abortion, fetus as patient, the new reproductive technologies and prenatal screening and diagnosis. Her particular task was to analyze these issues as they relate to low-income and minority populations, as well as to develop policy recommendations. and critique legal proposals. This project was initiated out of Rutgers Law Schoolt and the Rutgers University Institute for Research on Women. • Director for Reproductive Health for the State of Massachusetts. • Consultant to the Crime and Justice Foundation in Boston to develop and implement a health education program geared toward incarcerated black women. • Associate in Resource Development for Oxfam, America, an international development agency. - Policy analysis consultant to the Agency for Internationall Development. • Consultant to Yale New Haven Hospital's Hill Health Center, acommuruty health center serving.a primarily black population. • Consultant to the University of Connecticut Medical School and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey on a
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Ashanti Health Cansultants Page 2 EMPLOYMENT: (Cont.) • projeet' to increase access to medical genetic services to low- income, minority and immigrant, populations. Cbnsultant to New Jersey Public Policy Research Inst2tute to EDUCATION: • OFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: • write an article on Pediatric AIDS in the Minority Community. Ms. Nsiah Jefferson holds a bachelors degree in Afro-American and African Studies and Politics from Brandeis University. She received a Masters in Public Health with a concentration in, Health Administration from Yale University School of Medicine. She is currently doctorate candidate in Health Policy and Management with a concentration in research and evaluation at The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. In addition, she has taken numerous courses and attended seminars on health-law; ethnicity and health; reproductive health and fundraising. Ms. Nsiah-Jefferson has been affiliated with: Reproductive Hazards Working Group • Committee for Responsible Genetics • Trans Africa • The American Public Health Association • Task Force of the National Black Women's Health Project • Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Task Force on • cervical cancer Massachusetts State Legislature Breast Feeding Task Force • Coordinating Council of the Hayrnarket People's Fund • Served on the Board of Directors of: ARDS: The Philadelphia Black Women's Health Project The Elizabeth Blackwell Health Center North Inc. - A Philadelphia WIC Agency She is currently a Committee Member of the National Subcommittee on Low-Income Issues of the Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition, and on the Board of Directors of Planned Parenthood of Middlesex County, New Jersey. Citations for Outstanding Service to the Massachusetts Black Legislative Caucus and was nominated Outstanding Young Woman of the Year in 1986. N C 1<17 PUBLICATIONS: Ms. Nsiah-Jefferson~ has published a number of articles on low- income and minority health issues. The articles have W ~ concentrated on policy,, legal, and program development. C?'
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL )t. O S E M A R Z H O R N E REiii"wt,"Ti.D SiJt4SARY OF QUALIFICATIONS Over 17 years of diversified and progressive experience in marketing, training, public education, program development and public relations. Designed and presented individual and group training programs. Consulted with various levels of personnel to assess project needs to community organizations, corporate staff and health professionals. SELECTED ACCOMPLISHMENTS - Coordinated, marketed, conducted, and evaluated smoking cessation programs for corporate and health professionals. - Trained profe';si`onat teams to conduct patient education programs servicing a population of over 350,000. - Initiated and developed a train-tbe-trainer manual for technical trainers. - Developed, implemented and conducted Public Speaking skills training sessioss for corporate and health professionals. • Served as Cancer Society Volunteer and actively promoted Cancer education programs and training for Newark community. I - Launched and _conducted a wellness program for health employees. W - Presented health information issues on National T.V., Radio and public forums. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 9/84 - Present 7/g^. - .^resea: 8/79 • 8/84 . 10/76 - 7/79 9/75 • 8/76 ~ ~ ~ 1/74 - 8/75 W ~ 9/72 - 8/73 ~ ~ EDUCATION MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN PUBLIC HEALTH - University of b1ass., N.A. BACHELORS OF ARTS, SOCIOLOGY - College of St. Elizabeth, N.J.
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL ED*iIBIT B SAMPLE BIOM~APf-IICAL SKEIai, FURM (Form PiiS 398) Contract Proiect Lirector rr •.rwC+VILL wvES?Ga•O8k saoOK.v Dra[.^7o44 r 610GiiAPtpCAL SKFZCH G•.. rn. fawmG «+.a..w o" ~r nv .q pfteMV .+e o"a..ma•M. aawo ." Np. J Mr" .,r nr hr"c ~a rw-sr.pwaw.oC•.- D•w:rr Awocoop e"+s s.pe br ..cn NLME ,~OS~TpA TITL[ _ ijJqTMOAT[ (MG, LS ~,. ~, /•f,• Williatn E. Parkin 'f ~~~~~"~~~ r' s~Kys•r+. x_zx•c a~: • rwo. av.rcro rora r•a • WiTrMIpw .,NO IOCATION ~ OELM CW+FENRED hEtD O' tTUD" U- of Maryland, Co11eRe Park, bID - J - I-Pre-veterieary nedicine [6. of Georgia, Athens, GA " DVM - ~ 1966 yVeterinary medicine U. of Pittsburgh,, Pi,ttsburgh, PA MPH 1970 ~ Epidaniology U. of Pittsburg}i, Pittsburp~t, PA DrPH ~ 1971 IEpidemiology •ESE•c_- ar:=*RJ=ESS.C`,L.EXOENrEr.CF -•_v.se-•vosrtw- r-t: rnCm.onowp-ca•oro.r c•«ovar+ao.wnt.cxrr+ct ."e ew"on M.uroe osW+ m.mo. srro a+."r F.w•. Go....r+Krt auo•c rw.u.y eormnm.. Vat, •n cworwrop•ca• oro.: rne mr.a r+: Co••- ; av,++{ tne on' nmr." y..m .•+t w reasem•a•w ar+w Ovarcnan o.n-ti": tc tn.t aov•c.+w- = w:' I" 7/66-4/68 5/68-7/69 12/71-3/73 3/73-8/79 3/73-8/78 1/77-8/78 1/77-8/79 8/78-8/79 9/79-Present 9/79-4/80 4/80-4/88 4/85-8/88 12/87-Pzesent 11/89-Present 1984-Present : 1989-Present 1988-Present 1988-Present 1988-Present 1990-Present 1990-Present - PEDAC-TED PublicatiorLs: 1. chaikPn et al., 1987. The_ Fffect of a Sc1hoo,L Entry Law on Mimps Activity in a School district: JAMA, 257:2455-58. 2. Schu1 ze et al., 1987. Ef fectiveness of 'Itwco Insectic.i:des in Ccrntirolling Ixodes clammini ( Pcari, : Ixa3idae ) Followirig an Outbreak of Lyrm Disease in. New Jersey. J. hled Ent, 24:420-24. FF
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL FxFiIBTT B 5A2TL.E BICCRAPfiICAL SgKETQ-i FOF" (Form PHS 398) Contract Prcjecr• Director FF ne w~ ~ac rMVEST-C.a-O+t.•ep6ew DreECTpQ r QfoGRAPhdCAI SKETCH Gw tw. W ub ..y eelsonrW t.t esnfwr.r. '.awa -A a.pr 2 lfTn ."r tnr pnnc.aa M.nt.paw~.oCs~ OQw_tv AMee.q twe. e.pf b• aaen M.fa+ /MME William E. Parkin ~'Q17TiQ1. Ti'TLF {I0TMQATE tWc.. LH, 1?. , REDACTEd i ore• .n.t.. o-mss•D~. ntSTrtllTiOw t<KO IOGTqw UU o Marytand, College Park, r~ U. of Georgia, Athens, Gl~ U. of Pittsburgh, Pi:ttsburgh; PA U. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA s..c, e n.rs•^: murncten •v • '' OEGAfE YEAC I C~ ~ nED ` FsE1D Oa STLD. -- ~! -- iPre-v~terinary m i.cine t D~Ii•f 1566 ~ ,• , Veterina ry meol.cuie MPH '1.57D _ IEpic:emio.icgy I BrPF ~~1971 iFpideaiol.ogy eESE.R_-.w_.0t=zESS.C%r..ExaEfuEwC_ :onc..a.n; ..••rsrooan.or .-s! «+cnmAwop.ca- oro.. onnovse~oao.w.+n .c-...r+ce afte no•.en •+u,.oa e•..rl mu~ersr.o on an, e.or.• Go..-01N.n: h,o,.c .a..ao.ti can+Tnt.. tnt. M cnraroap.eu• oroar tne utw" an: co~ : r.e ~.n-:ac :e a" ou7 x a-s ev..~ te~ oas en... ysvs ene la ftaevft'.w..a s~..• wa.e-•mr o.et..wn: tc tn"e wx.uiw- YJ wz- Ex~E::'Y.~ fa,F~ 3. Porter & Parkin, 1987. Outbreaks of Clanr-Associated Gastz-naiteritis in New Jersey, 1983-1984. NJ Med, 84:649-51. 4. Pcrter et al., 1988 Giardia Transmissim in a S+rimning Pool. AJPH, 78:659-62. 5. Fa_*-*el 7 et al., 1988. Cluster of Suicides and Suicide AttaTpts - I3ew Jersey. JAMA, 259:2666-68. 6. SdnLtze et al., 1988. Vector Tick FtQulatian.s arrl Lyme Di sease: SmmaLy of 7. Cartxnl Strategies. Petrcne et al., 1989. Ann NY Acad Sci, 539:204-11. Enir3ominlogrpf r-Zngenital Sypu 1 i G, AF.7 Med, 86-965-69. Four additional ma¢wscripts on Lyme disease, mxtality due to glutethimide/oodeine abuse, ec3enovinLs outhreak, or foocborne giarrli ac1S have been aocepted/SVrimitt.-ed to NJ. . Med, AJPH, and J Ped Inf. i3on-refereed PubLi.t3ti.ans: . 1. CDC Recoarendatioris for a Camamity Plan for the Prevention and Coritaisment of S, zi ci d. Clusters. NMVR; Augus-t 1988. 2. Ooean fiea.Lth Study: A Study of the P*.latioE>_ship Hetween Zllness arxi Ooean Beach Water Quality: Intesim t. t~7DOEi; March 1989. (editor) 3. Pre.Liminexy ~'t. F3ealth ~ t. Prrm-file: Bladc and Miznr-ity Prpulations in ~Iew Jersey. NJDCH; Jime 1989. ( ecl.i.tnr) 4. A Case-f'ontso.l Study of Radon azri Liing CanoPS Among New Jersey WanPn. NJDC}H; August 1989. ( editoi• ) 5. The Nbst -Frequent Carcers in New Jersey: Incs.dezxce, Stage, Survival, and Nbrta7 i ty Rates. I3 JDCH; March 1990. ( editoz' ) - te.e •.e. y FF •~.r".+• .+M. c.+..cNw.. r~e~r ..a... .....,p...~ n. .....u~.• Oe r.ac W~,.ec s.t• w L 1e
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL Ea Mrr B SAMPLE BIOG2AP~iZCAZ, SKEICH F'C;M (Form PHS 398) Contract Project Manager iF .e{-4.CIPa wvES?-f.A•p•,•OGaav D,RECOe+ r d1OGRAPtl1CAL S#CETCN G•w uv ,y.,..wE n,o..wn•o. +r !h .et O.-W /r' enc anti.rw'w 1•eae .A rp. 7 Mr...r ene Mnc,Z. D.4:»• Awotooy n%.s e.p. W aacn o.-w, MAME ewiTrrUTiOt. Aw0 lOCa7q., ~' DEGAEr [ co"*AED , riEtD oe tTtA+ Methodist HospitaL, Brooklyn,.,NY , R.N. 111958 iNursing Adelphi University, Garden City, NY i B.S. 111966 1 Nursing Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelph'a, IM.S.N. (i1978 ~ Nursing ~Ai.7qk iTT6L ~1ATMQATE *Y6. (1e, fr., Janice W. Marshall RE~~CTED ~ ~ REDAGYEQ niv. . New Rri rn.,; un . Soci:al~ Research •ESE•S.- tA_ owZ:ESS.:`a. UtPElUEtiCE 'on:wo.,S. •' rne-• oosnro• ••r• M Mfono,op.u•oror, a.p.ovs.~ao+~~, ew~r c. fr,e ne,-es .K,...e Me+.~, n,t~wrs~.o on... teo.•r C.Ow,..m.wt HO•~: sO-.o-Y c01^m.. L,e-t. ~ ttaOl~aoq.Ga. O1a.: !+r ,x+...lc co- : Y•f 't'tN'a! :[ t" DWY•a••O's 0wl^( tAe Oe;f' mMe tAv1 1Y 10 wMtLn:11•N t4'+.N MMKJ1.Oft e+en.nM: I[ lfws LD>+•:l1W' ~^J e~' Ef:.E:: 'v._- Ea7AES 10/58 - 8/63 8/63 - 5/68 4/71 - 8/72 9/72 - 8/74 ~ 9/74 - 5/77 ~ 9/77 - 8/78 REDACTED 9/78 - 8/79 9/79 - 12/81 1982 - 1987 1/82 - Present: 1/82 - 6/85 - 7/85 - 8/88 - 9/88 - Pzesent P=esesrtatiais : Smnking Cessaticn Strategies For Pzeg)att kianen, Grantee tx'a-isiing program, University of Med.ir'i *p arYi Denti.stiy of New Jersey, 1vPSwraZ3{, NJ, July, 1985. StitOk1IYg CoEYtL41. R]1]~C.,'Y DeLTeloptilPStt, Trrtistr'i a l g3tlC3ti0[7 pir'OgZaRt, New Jexsey Departrent of Iiealt-h, Statewi.de 1.ocaticcLs, October, NovPSOber and Deartbes, 1985, Jara3arg, Febzuaiy and Ma>cli, 1986. S,tnaking Cessation 'Iecbuziqtses for Health Care Providers, Ccn 'utng Ec3ucaticn Program, New Jersey Degt_ of Healfih, Princeton, NJ, April, 1986. -S M •-.. toit FF
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL FXHMI'T B SAMPLE BIOGPAPHIICAL SKE= FOW (Form PfiS 398) FF Contract Project Manager P01wC».L wvES*rC..'D• 04pC,LV Or*E::Op • dlOGRAPHfCAL SKETCM Gw tM 1awn% Aror.rvt•ow 1r tM .ry Mn1CwM• iP[ OFMwn.•N. 1.0" on {6" 1/oon .•R tty tw.at.yn.•~•r DM:rs N wecap t%rs Mpw w.acn M•W 4 14 MarE I'OS:TpA TR,.E t1RTaDaT Mc. Wr rr. Janice W. Marshall ~~~QCTED arv r: +nwr cos:rot+or. Ii.fTtTUTtow YND LOCAhouw i OtC.+iEi I COM RREp I n(LD O~ f11Ar e i.st Hospl.tal, Brroklyn, NY R.N. 1: 1958 Adelphi University,'Garden C'i~y, N.Y+ B.S.- 1~ 1966 Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadei hia,l M.S.N. 1978 ~A. I RutQers Univ.. NPw Rtl mswlck__ttl- -- uvursing Nursing Nursing 6ocial Research •ESE•a_- awC rR;,=ESS._NA. UPER.EW.CL . - e•e.r• oosn•o- f•r M c-avop.c.. ao.r Ne ne•Ien M.c1.Af a1iM1 n1flnOf'f/M00n Mv iW1•i Go.."%ReA: wa•:.n.aoh conVnm.. Iwt. r.auorowq•u• o•or tn. 1nw..~c ca- :•t:e r•.•e-cet :c a•' oua•-r.•o-t eu."r. twt e..• m..a ,..•t r+c to naew«cr•w .r-V q,4M.u.wn o.n.r..n: u m. apa~.ut r Y~ .C' Ex:Fi: 'Y.: i.:.i5 Strategies for PromatiM Healtfiy Hehacrior, Cont; rv t; rg Fdtration Program, Dept. of Health Edt)cztion, RztxJers, New Brunsai.ck, NJ, June, 1986. Nesa JP.rsey's Clean Iiadoor Air Laws, SOFHE Midyear Scientific Crnfesenr_e, University of Nort3z Carolina, 0-iapP1 Hill, NC, June, 1986. Health u•a=r rds of 'Ibbarooo Lfse, Crnti *rn tj *g echxration prograEn, New Jersey Dept. of Health, Prinoetxxn, NJ, October, 1986. New Jersey's Anti Smolcing Efforts, Anrn~31l meeting, New Jersey Public Health A~oc3aticn, Nortlz ana-lswick, NJ, Novertdber, 1986. 7mp.laEent_ing a Scmkae-P7ree Policy, Staff develo¢rent parogran Xor mid-level manage•rs. N_ J. Dept. of Health, Trenton, NJ, Jure, oct. and Nov. 1987. The Scientific Basis for Clean-Air Fbli.cies in tfie Wozkplaoe, Indust-sial trai-n? "g progran,• American Canoes SoC.iety, Paxsippany, NJ, SeptembPS, 1987. l Preventi•ng TotaccO Dependenoe in New Jersey a-;1 dresl and 'Ihe Mer= Co. ama.st Carx~ Screening Project, Ar~ Meeting,. American Public Health Associ.ati.on, Bost3cn; MA, Nov~, 1988. - Woriting 'Ibgethes to be &dte~-Free: Safeguar*j' ng•the Health of State Bapioyees. Ccnfereme for State Dept. Cammissirners, Tr•enton, NJ, April, 1989: Prenata.l S+mlcirxJ ces_sation lntezventicns/Annual ceeting, Healthy rrothers, Healthy Babies Ccciference., •Newar3c, NJ, Jime, 1989. PI-S rt A.. ,o.e N 0 N Ca ~ ~ ~ ~ CA U1
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL r EXiIBIT B SAMPLE BIaCZ2APf•ffCAL SKEI)ai FCW (Form PHS 398) ~ FF Pw'w--1tAL wv(ST'Ga'paA'4OGaAV D/aEC:O0 d10GRAPtNCAL SKETCH fe•A tM /MI~rT~ NIrR1./Mn ~' ilr Vt M/10AM' !K .1ftfu'IaM{ $044" M Ma/ J~~ ~R 11t At.n~yt w.fs/•Nlr/Apq•r- 0-^:w Pon.eerf ew/. MOs a' ..cn Mnon RICHARD W. ARNDT f~itla rct. RE-1• ~ `illtaBwTE Mc.. p.. rr . REDACTED - r, or::...n. ~ o• orY• -n.a o~'as•ra .C-_.'•:~_ .w& i^: "~cN.or _oosrro:ror. r'i• ~- •rflrM/Ow .MO LOCUtqa , DEGRE~ •EA'L Os ituDy ~ Go/+;EaREO , RIDER COLLEGE, LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ B.S. I 1960 ~ COMMERCE, JOURNALISM INDIANA UNIVERSITY, INDIANA HEALTH AGENCY EXECUTIVE COLi1MBIA UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK ! MTT.NUIN~TESOFOREVOLUNTARY •fSE•s'_ ~r:- .a^=ESS'~~. Ex~E; Ewci : o~:wo•~; .- r...- oosn.a- ~ s: In cnroroaQ.u• aoe1. o~Y+v..^~ao.rlwu •cat~ exaHEAI:TH .~e no•+cn •IC'.se c/esrt nr1ma'sn.o o~ .'h c.wn• Go...nea.e: wo• :.e..ary co"mm.. vai. «% ennProwq•c.- o•ar u+0 lnw co-AGENCY : .:e :c . " ov>•cs m-s oul~C me orr 1h" V..•+ .x 10 ..wa..RCaI•w ..-w' P.rt+.eas.on ..n.n.n: u in.. .oDi•:.I.w YJ *= PERSONNEL EtZEH= w.C °•+Ef 1964: 1966 1967 1968 1973 1976 1977 1978 1978 . 1990 R ~DACTED *+s 3" •4. +c a • sap. - FF '1..IMI• MM, «- •• " • - '~' Vrul~- Oc • .rM V•.....+t• M L t
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL EX=rr B- SAMPLE B ICGPAPi-iI CAL SI~M FOFM (Form PHS 398) LF Hi~Lie.L tivtS'G.'ZOA JapG•.v a.EZ-p. . dfOGRAPWCAL SKETCH 6•w Iw ~a..^G •~•r-w.o~ +r n~. ~n r.•+en^. .K rvs•M. ..MM r f•...cM -•. 1rOr W ucr 1e-%on rAwt I~'OS•'4f. Tn.2 o+~-~II.rt Ne ,~., rr., Shirley M. Greene : REDACTED .rSTrtV*60k Sw0 tOCtTCk i DEG4tE ~ GO~EE~~LD I VKLD 09 iTUDv Johnson C. Smith University B.A. ~ 1969 ~Economics/Sociology Charlotte, N.C. Temple University, Phila. Pa., M.Ed. j 1971, ;;Elementary Ed. •ESE.a_- aI. *e==ESS.-%a- Ea•OEaENCi :":..a. ,.- resr• ov.Aw- •c .•. c-o'ewp.u• ro.1 y.rwaav.•.*'c. Mt M~C0L K+..9f ORws -f-Of'th.0 M' MT JJWw WY•: tl.NY1 [mwinR/M lAi. A puOnp.p f.V, t.Of' tN In.r 1^_ [OY• :'ta 9'fY-:f! 'C M" WY~a••O'-1 w+K iN MY MwN l~t'l IK IN AWKtw:M..4 ft1.M N01.6i1.0/y OOILerH: IC l1.{ l.pY..J1.0' r. ` EAZ[:: 'Y.: , aij: 1984-1990 RE WkB.rTfG:.td' W, 1981-1984 1980-1981 PIE Professional Boards and Groups: Member, Institutional Review Board, Zurbrugg Memorial Hospital, Williingboro, N.J1. -Member, State of Bliack Health Committee Member, Commission on Smoking or Health: Member, Interagency Council on Nutrition Member, Advisory Committee on Minority Health 2023676257
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL ECE= IT B SAMPLE BICGRAPHICAL SKE1ai FC3W (Form PHS 398) FF wvEST•C..'O* 04OGtav p.fC'J6 r S10GRAPFilCAL SKETCM fr•. Itt ~. w~ w"~nwa w W t~f vr M'fW.N' K oMU/u•4. N.W M• rP" 7 M~~ ..r tw1 rr,nc.y M..n.y.w,..OG-r D-.:iw p.rxoar r"a wp" r. s4en 9rW i.ArE IMOLtAk 1ST+t &tR:ML/•TEMc G, rr, Nancy Reyes _ - REQI~CiTEd REDACTED - , i., „r a o a•sa•ra .e.t.-r s c• a w•t ^~ .-e •cwx ~o.coo:ron . -: ~. . _ - - - - - - - - iwitmVTrO0. &ND LDCo1qa I CD"FE•.ED ` oRtA O. S~S1D. University of Pennsylvania K.S.N. 4 1982 iOncology Clinical Philiadelphia, PA ~ ~ Nurse Specialist Trenton State College ~ B.S.N. ~ 1977 iNu•rsing Trenton NJ ~ DESE•a__ Lb,- ~tC°ESS _~a~ EXPEart•.GL :.o-: w•^: oasn.o- • r,e c~wnowp.c.• o•e.r orwws.- ao•^.~ ..~.rwce rt '~O'^Cn WC•vOr oR.f-t T!•MoR"iao or Mry $fOfr. &u0••: cDr"enn1M LAt. ,n aqrOU4•CJ. o•o.• 1"e rnw r~ CY : eu v rr-:r. c r' o.}•:r o-S sU,% m. oK mn. y.aM Ve wuIr r.ro -CAPror& pn,rwr: wIn S aoa+,cnw YJ K_' 1982 - 1'983 1983 - 1985 1986 - 1986 1988 to present _ _ American Cancer Society - New Jersey Division Board member, Board of Trustees Board member, Minority Advisory committee member, public Education Committee REDACTED - YWCA of Mercer County Board member - REDACTED - American Cancer Society, Volunteer of the Year Award, 1987 . <
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL EXHY-BIT B SAMPLE BIOGPAPf ICAL SKE,'I'~i FnRK (Fonn PHS 398) FF rRiNC)PAL INVES?IGATD14•D NOGRAU DrRECTOR ~ . 81OGRAPHICAL SKETCH Gwy tne /ouo.rm; wontut.on to' Me tey Dersonna tNC consulltms uNtO on apt 2 61vn +ntf. trx O~.nuoa Inve!).QalO•/~OS'tm Dwit_t0' htOtoCOoy In'l D.Qe t0• aaCn DtROn N~~ ~ Cooney ' i POSiTiOI. m~..E REDACTED ®IR TMQA7~k'4fyTED EOJ:=- .-. rst[ ' rMn O,~:La~rNft O' olnr inr/.a 0'O~tSi .Ona K1Ce:•.' i.dt y rnC)uOr OD S)Q0.)Ora ira I .^- mS7t71JTt00% ANO LOG7/ON ~ DEGREE ` YEAS I~ CQMLFRRE 4D FIELD OF STUOr Jams Madison University B.S. I' 1976 1 Major-Biology Har:isonburg, VA 22801 ~ iI Minor-Chemistry University of Tennesse _~e,'IN I I~H ~ 1977 I Co strm mity Health Fsi=atim R_SE.FC- j.):C DR;,=ESS::.%A_ ExDER/Er.C_ Cona..mnQ .•.- oyese-: oosn o^. uu In Cnrono4opIc& o•o.r, DnWaus rno ov+n.nt .cOe•Knce tnc ronon InC1uOC DrfNnt nKmot^tAiO on N+y feotra• Go.tTmtn; Dyo-. aatisOry commm.. tJ1t: In CntonOloQ.CJ. o1ot: )n" tillta a-Z co•'. : rtt 'r•sV'crt :c a'• ou}~Li:.o-s Ou'inc tnr Dtst tnrei y.a•s .'K to Hor.s.n:a1-. .a't.a pua.LUUons o.n.n.nt.w )n.s aopjiut.o- To YO' ExC"c=: *v.Z ca:aES C.H.E.S. Certified Health Education Specialist; The National Corrmi.ssion~for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. April, 1989 Health. Education ('uE&taz 4/87- Heal th ' MaT-Er pEDACTED
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Other: kmerican Cancer Society Facilitator Trainer Memberships- Society for Public Heatih Educarion-Nationall and N~!w•.iersey
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL f.XHIBIT B SAMPLE BIOG2APfaCAL SKET'ai Fa;!M (Form PKS 398) Orr •..w`»A, nrrES'K,.'O~+a06a.v pd0E:.'o& • d/OGRARMlCAL SKETCN w Iw. vf w'ww eV ar/»,na•u M.ww r.y. nr Dra.c•>. t>-.:»• "W.c.n r+•a pp. w..cr rr-W MAME *os.T a ms ~ REDACTED ,' . ~A•M OBka.Y/1V./r.D Lorraine Kowalski - MeSTrtIlt1A AND tOCA110% ~ OEGnEE { CO~+EE~wEp I R4Lp 46 S•rLOv University of Virginia, Fairfax, Va... BS " ! Montclair State College, Montclair, ~ MA New Jersey ~ i I •ESEa_- .w.•R::-ESS.V,a.EXPE+4Er.GE •oeno-•~•o- .•r ,nc~rorowyu.M~ D+..w..~ro.nv~A .u.n~.c. •At *O'107. 0t•Y0t ORN^t MV sMv•D WD••: ~D..f01 ComnM{M "l. Mn CA+p-Olpp.ti. D'M' 1M 111NL h: CY DY"N nV DDW M.M N4'f 1'C W nW~YT.Jt.e D&',at /iad.Cil.oqt DfrS.nlA: IC 1!YS ADV•:4!W' » 4~: fJ~:.F:: 1952 - 1956 1965 - 1969 1969 - 1976 1976 - 1985 1985 - Current 1969 - 1976 1985 - 199& 1978 - Curren 1982 - 1985 1987 - 1990 1980 - 1990 1987 - 1990 1 1972 i Health Education i 1981 ~ Health Education RMA.CTIED RE D Arl tiPT E. D FZJ FE',A.CTED Publications: - - - 1. New Jersey State Department of Health An Overview of AIDS & HIV Infection,Traininq Manual Contributor 1988-89 2. Well Being,of a Woman Puzzle, Presentor _ American, Public Health Association National Meeting~ Boston, Mass. 1989 w rt
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL D*{M IT B SkMPLE SI0G2APHICAL gCE~ flcF'dK (Form PHS 398) CF wv(3TG.•J4 aaOGuV DOsf.':7. ~ aIOGR.IPhnCJIL SXETCt1 6... taf .. ti.wv ew cr•..s-9 a rsW .^ ssM 7 I+pw .+ na s. ~.~. ....u."wag -.- J..:~ Awus.. -n rse r a.cr a.•vw "Ri~berley Thorndike I 'C!&°& nT `fp~ g ~g~ '~ -~DA~~ ' : •~•o~g ~ I IGIJ I t-'..:• V10., .• va•. r s:y v-& se..:r_ :• t.r a•. s+~ r- •earr x"!ro_le.a ••8 • -- MSTRtJtK)k l.NO IOCATqr ~ DlGM T4A I co•KtliRtD Boston College ; University of Massachusetts ~ 2 1 rwlII pt iTLA+• Comm.jPsychology Psychology •tSis&_- lw: •R_ 'CSS.:%A.- Lssf yE+C: - rne- a..•er -r. +r+•e~.•.f.cr rw• Y.•w.fax..+c. .•.c ..+as •.c.~.e eM s.o.•r Gw.-.+r p„s•.: r..ao•r ca~w~wtw ut w tno•~o~ rw: rnw lnnr r: c.r- ; r:a . s-.-:rr :: r svr Fv-~ w+~ n+t aa' W-.. ra•s a-c rMvsv-.&w Ir+r. Ww.cy.mr aa+ww: tc a.6 aoa~:a:.r Y~ w_' February 1988 - June 1990 0 7 June 1990 - Present ~DACTE"'D
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL FF- PHINCIFAL iNVl:sll(~A.IUI/.'1'IIUL.ItAM Ulilf_LIUIt -..--11G1'.Ldd_y1-._B,1=12dr;3 S. BlOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Give lhe 1oSlowinp 1nlormalUon lor the key personnel and Consult0nts listed on, pape 2 Begin with the Prlnclpal, InvestUpator/Propram Director. Photocopy this pape /or each.person -'4hiE POSITION TITLE / ~Eg~~p~TEq~ 4^ R.°!~ v a S~ John,Slade, MD, FACP it BIRTHDATE tMo. Day% Yrj KCtli-rL EDUCATION (Be rn with bacca/aureate oJ other Inrtra/ pfolesslonal•educatron. such as nwsrn , and include postoocloral tra,n.ng I INSTITUTION AND LOCATION I I DEGREE YEAR FIELD OF STUDY CONFERRED 11 Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia BA RD 1969 1974 Biology Medicine RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Concluding with present posltlon• list. in chronoloqlcalbrder, previous emplol ment ezperlence. and honors. In¢lude present membership on any Federat Government public advisory committee Llst, in chronolo4lcal order, the titles and coT• pLete reierences to at4lpubticalions during the past three years and to reptesentalive earlier pubhcatlons penment to thrs a~pl cat on. DO NOT EXCEED TWO PAGFq 1969 1974-1977 1974-1977 1977-1979 ~ 1978-80 1980-1982 1980- ON 1982- 1982- 1984- 1984- ED Bourne, P.G. & Slade, J.D. (1974). Methadone: The mechanism of its,success. Journal of Nervous Mental Disorders, 159(5), 371-375. Slade, J.D., Luskin, A.T., Gewurz H., Kraft, S.C., Kirsner, J.B., & Zeitz, H.J. (1,978). Inherited deficiency of second component of complement associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Annals of-Internal Medicine. 88, 796-798. Class, R.I_M., Brann, E.A., Slade, J.D., et al. (1978). Community-wide surveillance of influenza after outbreaks due to H3N2 (A/Victoria/75 and A/Texas/77) and H1N1 (A/USSR/77) infl-uenze_visuses, Mercer County, New Jersey. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 38, 703-706. - Brescia, F.J. & Slade, J.D. (1981). Vaccinia necrosum in an Army reservist with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The New York Medical Quarterly, 3(2), 78-82. N Slade, J.D•. & Lenz, P...(.1982). Lyme disease in New Jerseyc A cluster of 4 cases C and 13 sporadic cases. Journal of Medical Society of New Jersey, 79(6), 496-500. ri Slade, J.D. & Hepburn, B. (1983). Prednisone-induced:alterations in the size of ~ circulating human lymphocyte subsets. Journal''of Laboratory Clinical A1ed,icine, 101, ~ 479-487. ~ Stemhagen A_, Slade J,., Altman Bill J. (1983). Occupational risk factors and liver '. cancer: A retrospective case-control study of primary liver cancer in New Jersey. ~ American Journal of Epidemiology, 117(4), 443-454. Q~ PHS 398 (Rev, t0/88{ Pop. - FF 'NUn,p.l P.VOs puryncutlYO1Q sI Ihs bu/lurn 1h1uuphout th* sUPfic.11on Uu nor-use su/h.Irs tuch rrs Ds, bh
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Slade, John ,._aen, G.S., Griffin, Mi., Hayne C., Slade J., Schultz T., Parkin W. (1984). Clinica2l manifestations and descriptive epidemiology of Lyme disease in New Jersey, 1978-1982. J'ournal of the American-Medical Association, 251(17), 2236-2240'. Slade, J., Billboards advertising cigarettes: Content and trends over six months. (Abstract). Clinical Research, 33., 733A. Slade, J. (1985). Cigarette advertising and media coverage of smoking and,health. (Letter). New England Journal of Medicine. 312(26), 1712. Slade, J. (1985). A disease model of cigarette use. New York State Journal of Medicine, 85(7), 294-298. Slade, J. (1985). Preventing complications of tobacco use. New York State Journal of Medicine, 85(7), 474-476. Markowitz, L.E., Steere, A.C., Benasch, J.L, Slade, J.D., Broome, C.V. (1986). Lyme disease during pregnancy. Journal of the American Medical Association, 255, 3394-3396. Slade, J. (1986). Statistics, Smoking and health. (Letter). Journal of the American Medical Association, 255, 1025-1026. Kaufman J., Bancilla D., & Slade J. (1986). Lupus vasculitis with gangrene of an extremity. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 29, 1291. Slade J. (1986), Alternative nicotine delivery systems (ANDS). Cancer Update, 7(1), 1. Hepburn B., & Slade J. (1987). Effect of divided daily dose prednisone therapy on circulating T cell subses. Journal of Rheumatism, 12, 19-22. Slade J.,. Koplowitz A., Nissenblatt M., et al. (1986). An analysis of "R. J. Reynolds' Position Paper on the Health Effects of Smoking." Tobaccco Products Litigation, Reporter, Parts I, Ih, and III, 1(8,9,10), 5.97-5.105; 5.107-5.113; 5.115-5.121. Part IV, 2(2)•, 5.11-5.2L. Slade J. (198'7)-. Notes on the history of tobacco. Journal of the Central New-Jersey Medical Group, 3(3), 6-10. Slade, J. (1987'). Diagnosis of nicotine dependence: DSM III/DSM,III-R. Tobacco Products Litigation Reporter, 2(7). 5.119-5.120. Slade, J. (1987). Tobacco dependence a recognized medical condition by tobacco company's health insurer. Tobacco Products Litigation Reporter, 2, 10:5.121-.122. Slade, J. (1987). The ways cigarettes contirbute to GNP. Eastern Economic Journal, 13(4), 353-359. Davidson L., Slade J., Stang, C.L. (1988). Knowledge and attitudes about tobacco among pharmacists who do and who do not sell tobacco. Smoking and Health 1987, Excerpta Medica, Amsterdam•, 343-345. Slade, J. (1988). The role of health professionals. New Jersey Medicine, 85(2), 97-99. Slade J. (1988). Learning to fight Nicotiana tabacum. New Jersey Medicine 85(2), 102-106. Burtaine J. & Slade, J,. (1988)'. The smoke-free hospital. New Jersey Medicine, 85(2), 143-145. Slade, J. (1989). The tobacco epidemic - lessons from history. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 21(3), 281-191. Slade J. (1989). Nicotine addiction. Hawaii Medical Journal, 48(11), 485-490. Slade J., Johnson R.C. (1989). Lyme Disease. In: KeLley W.N. (Ed.), Textbook of Internal Medicine. Phriladelphia: J.B. Lippincott. Slade J. (1989). Nicotine addIction. In: Blackman, E.M., & Engelbert, A.L. (Eds.), Tobacco use In American-Conference Final Report. Washington, D.C.: American Medical . Association. bLade, J. (1990). Controlling tobacco smoke pollution (Editoral) New Jersey Medicine, 87(1). i Page 32
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American Stop Smoking Intervention Stu4.l Trail Publication/Patent Agreement I agree to abide by the American Stop Smoking Prevention Trials publications and patents procedures developed,by the National Cancer Institute for this project. It is my understanda.ng that these procedures will be circulated to me prior to the assignment of a consulting job. \ kN Signature: Witness: Date: ~ ~ eler z~lav a
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL D41NCIraL !NVE3-1GATOR.pGCG.ZZaM DiFC-= C;2 BIOGRAPHlCAL SICETCH ; &ve the tollcwing iniormanon 'or v:e key persocr•ei anc conswtants llstec on ~;age 2. Bey•n.x,ir. :-m Investi;iator:P•oSrem,D.rector. Pactocopy th s page `o• each persor. NAME Norman Hyrnowitz ! POSITION '7TCF gIFT/-:).; E..Vc ~d. - REDACTED : REDACTED E.UCATiON f8egin with baccalaureate or ot~e~ wr,at orotessronat aoucaee, sucr+ as nurs:^2 ar•j.:rc:cCe oostcecrora,~ INSTITUTION AND LOCA-ION D`"Pt= YEAR CDNFErRRED ~IE_D G~ s-~D'r Seton Hall University : B.A. 1966 Psychology South Orange, N.J. Western Michigan University M.A. : 1968 Exp. Psychology Kalamazoo, Michigan E2 cl~y--- PcS_ARCK AND OROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE. Cccciuo ng w-th present oasit,On. iist, :n cn or•ologiC31 orcer ore~k:•_s e-c cy-= :__I~~ an, nonors. Inciuoe oresent membership on any Feceral Govemrnent puolic acvlsor/ committee List..n cnronoioC•cal c•:e• :re •t es =-c N plete reterences to•all pubhcarons aunni; :ne oas thr_e years ar.c tc representatwe ear•ier cuGicat:or•s pertineat :,, :c:s ac_ c3:._ EXCEED TWO PAGES. Post-Doctoral Training Post-Doctoral Clinical Traineeship, V.A. Hospital, Lyons, N.J. 1972. Fellow, Fourth U.S. 10-Day Seminar on the Epidemiology and Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases, Lake Tahoe, California, 1978 Academic Positions REDACTED H onors Visiting Scholar, The Graduate Psychology Division, The National University of Mexico, Mexico City, 1982. Fellow, American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology ~ Professional Committees (Selected) REDACTED Grant Activity (Selected) _ G ~ -Co-Principat Investigator, Clinical Center for I~tultipl'e Risk Factor Intervention ~ Trial (MRFIT) (NHLBI). Principal Investigator, Smoking Cessation.Reduction Action Program (SCRAP) (AHA). Principal Investigator, Clinical Center for the Community Intervention Trial (NCI) N c.a j ~ . N Professional Publications (Selected) Hughes, G.H., H•ymowitz, N., Ockene, J., Simon, N: and Vogt, T.H. The Multiple zater PtiS 398 ;oev. M6; Paye~/./,~~ nC a..'"xes :,c-1 as :7 5C
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Professional Publications (selected) continued Preventive Medicine Vol. 10, 1981, 476-500. Hymowitz, N. The practicing physician and smoking cessation. Journal of the Medical SocietV of New Jersey, Vol. 74, 139-141, 1977. Hymowitz, N. Personalizing the risk of cigarette smoking. Journal of the Medical Society of New lersey, Vol. 77, 1980, 579-582. Hymowitz, N. Behavioral approaches to preventing heart disease: Risk factor modification. International Journal of Mental Hea{th, Vol. 9, 1980, 27-69. Hymowitz, N: Teenage smoking: A medical responsibility. Developmentat. and Behavioral Pediatrics, Vol. I, 1980, 164-172. Hymowitz, N. The Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial: 4 year intervention results. International Journal of Mental Health, Vol. ll; 1982, 6-43. H'ymowitz, N.. (Guest Editor) Behavioral' Approaches to Disease Prevention. International Journal of Mental Health, Vol. Il, 1982. Hymowitz, N., Laquatra, I., and Karl, S. The smoking cessation reduction action program (SCRAP). Journal of the Medical Society o.f New Jersey,. Vol. 81; 1984. Hyrnowitz, N., Lasser, N.L., and Safirstein, B.H. Effects of a graduated filter system on smoking cessation. Preventive Medicine, Vol. 11, 1982, 85-95. Uckene, J.K., Hymowitz, N:, Sexton, M., Broste, S.K. Comparison of patterns of smoking behavior change among smokers in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (iV1RF1T). Preventive Medicine, Vol: II, 1982, 621-638. Hymowitz, N. Behavioral approaches to coronary heart disease risk factor modification. Perspectives on Lipids Disorders, Vol. 3, 1985, 17-23. Lasser, N.L, Satey, D.M., Hymowitz, N., Lasser, V.I., Kanders, B.S., and Lehrer, P.M. The Hypertension Intervention Trial (HIT). In: Mild Hypertension, From Trials to Practice, New York: Paveen Press, 1986. Hyn.owitz,. N., Community and clinical trials for disease prevention: Effects on cigarette smoking. Public Health Reviews, Vol. 15, 1987, 45-81. Hymowitz, N., Sexton, ArS., Shekelle, R., uckene, J., Grandits, G: Relationship between baseline variables and smoking cessation and• relapse in ;viRFIT smokers. In press, Preventive Medicine. Hymowitz, N. Tobacco Dependence. In Press (Chapter). Uckene, J.K., Svendsen, K.M., and Hymowitz, N. Cigarette smoking intervention in N ~ the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention. Trial: Results and relationships to other outcomes. Smoking behavior change outcomes. In Press, Preventive Medicine. ~ Hymowitz, N. Smoking modification: Research and:clinical application. In Press (Chapter) , ~~~VVV ~ ~
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American Stop Smoking Intervention Stud2 -rrail Publication/Patent Agreement I agree to abide by the American Stop Smoking,Prevention Trials publications and patents procedures developed by the National Cancer Institute for this project. It is my understanding that these procedures will be circulated to me prior to the assignment of a consulting job. Signature: ®1 Witness: Date: az
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL EXHIBTT B SAMPLE BIOGRAF'fiZCAL SKEIX3i FORM (Form AiS 398) « rw.wCuA. +vrESsIGa'Oa a.OGew 044f. O6 r a10GRAPHlCAI SKETCH G•w +~. +o.w~ M+u•••v+ o. or nv ae~ w•senw nc cr+.,na•4. +•u.a .~ ..p. 1 Mp ^.~ c~ rnnc•;a +wws+.~nva,o~ a~ "_ro• awecaers M•a sra b• a.cr q•v^ M~ME IrOS•7AA TI761 j~/4TM(L7E /Hc CSL+ TI• . Rosemary Eforner ~ I R l~ - ~_ • ~e: ' . rn p~::~ Lyt'r e• e'Y' ^•r.a 1'~•vfJ•Yq K.2Jf :' ..d+ a7 ^v7 ~: r: ~c.WI 00s ~b: rora ••. ` INS7rt1lt+Ow AND lOCA7+Ou ~ CEWtE ~ CO~+ Ea~ED ' r+tLD Oe lT1A. College of St. Elizabeth,NJ i BA ~ 1972 i Sociology i U. of Mass.,MA I MSPH ~ 1975. i Community Health Ed. •ESE••.- c~Z e1kC'ESS•:%.• Ex•ER,EaC: :a~: • o•^C ~- o nr aofna^ • tt ,^ c~.orowp u• ao.~ on.c,n .~aoN+»n+ tcxw~cr a~e ro• en ^`c.yoe o'..e-+ nw•nD.•sn.a oA f+ns s.o.•a Go.e•nnv^: co+•mmw t.at, a, ac~owaq u. e•o. nr +m." a,: co~ oV'i•:r•e•s au,^s i*. Ot1• M•M p.a•1 e•K w Nw.1.R•.11.w .av~ ~dLiIWK peM1.Nn: IG iM. ap71•caw- REDACTED O N W ~ N ~ tt~ P+S re &.. lou
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~ American Stop Saoking Intervention St.un2 Trail Publication/Patent Agreement I agree to abide by the Atnerican Stop Smoking Prevention Trials publications and patents procedures developed by the National Cancer Institute for this project. It is my understanding that these procedures will be circulated to me prior to. the assignment of a consulting job. Signature: Witness : Date: 2 ~
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL E4ffB IT 8 SWg'LE BI OCRAF1-iI CAL SXEPQ-i F'OFdvi (Form PHS 398) nt-..;,tVAL rrvES••G.•p& iaOGrAv 04*tZ-OO dIOGRAPNICAL SKE7CN frw 1nw +awwc +ttpr^utw w '!M afr »qaftrv, K cYftb.nsm6 w64N e~ r+p- 1~A - trr Mw~••paw+~oi-r 4•w_+r ftwocrtq Iwn srp to Gatr M•w k/.M( I-pL.t4w ttTa 9I0,1wOLiE M1tc byr 7r. Laurie L3siah-Jefferson R t~___.: :.__i~__ « os:_:. a_••. e o acro ,.w o a•~ar~ vc-:r :- ..rcr o~rs•-: r: 'c w~ xn ~ro:ror+ •. , EefTrMfOW- AMD LOCATAy riA; ~ OEG~ES ' fiELD 0. fTLDr ~ GO«~E~RfO Brandeis University ~. E4 Yale University MPH 1979 Afro-American Studies 1982 iHealth Administration 'PESEAA-- c#,'- O4Z=ESS.:1,c. E1-E4,44CE . •- rnt•• oosh•o- •-c• •w c'rorowp.u• o•owr o•NCV..-+ao..Wwt ~c~-r e~cr .wC w0••cr1 ~w['~.of D+•rt^~ Tf"~OR'~w.0 Or N1 efOW6 CA.t~wrwfw: w0••: 110-.y-y CWwr*qIM LUt, m ITAeO~pp.Ci. o•Of' try IAy-.w: Co" : it Y'f•~•_~! :c .•' 0~11.•:1:10,t luwK tM OfS' MMl !e.n .Y VO rwaNw'.!t•.! 44'14• 0.44w-woN Mll.Nn:SG 1M4, 1L~•:~1•C ~ 1:~~ EJt_ii: -V.: Iti's: REDACTED REDACTED V-S re 44. lort _ ..o. _• - - FF
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LAURIE NSIAH-JEFFERSON' Page 4 PUBLICATIONS Laurie Nsiah•Jefferson and Elaine Hall , "Reproductive Technology and Low-Income Women and Women of Color: Perspectives and Inzplications" in Women. Health and Technologv: Per,pectives and Prescriptions, University of Michigan Press, 1988_ Laurie Nsiah-Jefferson; "Reproductive Laws, Women of Color, and Low-Income Women,. in Reproductive Laws for the 1990s, The Humana Press, 1988. Laurie Nsiah-Jefferson "Perspectives on Low-Income Women and Women of Color for Reproductive Law and Policy;" Women's Rights Law Reporter, Rutgers Law School, Newark, N.J. 1989.. Laurie Nsiah-Jefferson, "Prenatal Screening and Low-Income Women," in, Perspectives in Genetic Counseling, published by the National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc., Wallingford, PA 1988. Emergency Care Research Institute, "In Vitro Fertilization," Emergency Care Research Institute (ECRI) Newsletter,.Issues in Health Care Technology series, 1986, Plymouth Meeting, PA. Laurie Jefferson and Betsy Smith, "Black Incarcerated Women, An Innovative Health Program;" SAGE' A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, 1985. SELECTED PRESENTATIONS National Women's Health Network National Meeting: "Women of Color and Occupational Health." Mini-lecture (1988): Myrtle Baptist Church - Women's Day Presentationc "`I'he Social Responsibility of Black Church Women!' (1988). Hampshire College: "Low Income Populations. and Infant Mortality" Fall Lecture Series (1987). American Association for the Advancement of Science: "Gene Therapy: Their Social and Political Implications" (1987). Union College - Spring Colloquium on Reproductive Technology and Prenatal: Screening: "Reproductive Technologies~ Their Implications for Low-Income and Minority. HHealthL" - "Careers in Public Health" (1987). Committee for Responsible Genetics Conference - Creating a Public Agenda for Biotechnology: Health, Food, and the Environment: 'The New Reprod'uctive Technologies and their Connection to Poverty''' (1986).. _.ew York Academy of Science Symposium on The New Reproductive Technologies": 'The New Reproductive Technologies and Low-Income Women" (1986). 20236'762'72
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1. U.S. Bureau of the Cezwis, G1urxent Fcpula.ticn FQports, Series p-25, No. 1044, State Pt~ti.on arr3 Sousehold Estimates, With Age, Sex, and Camponsxts o ganr_:Ce: 1 1- . U.S. Qvernrent Printing Office,. Washingbon, D.C. 1989 2. Maraus, A. D. ShoQl.and, L. Crane, and W. Lym. Presralenoe of Cigarette SimOkirV in the United States: Fstimafie.s frtm the 1985 Current Pnpulatirn Survey. J. Nattonal Caroer Institute, 1989; 81(6):409-414 3. New Jpssey Department of Heatth, DqMrtnent of Persaael.
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0 I I I A 2OZ3fi76274 '~ ~',~ ? S''~~
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I I B ' Q k2.FR4i4 I~ 3i ~9 d~9 9 9~d S l I P 11101 ~P, IT ~ ~~ e i P 1- ~ ~ ~ ~a s g M ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i s4Z949CZ09
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2OZ36762'7 .fi e3 ~ e~ 44 {p~ i ~ ~~ , ~~" ~gz ~ ~~ ~~ m , I „ m ,,, m 9 giiiil A
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rrn~-~rrr .rrrrrH&r--4 6 --~ r i i tatvr 91111 aia a Id g 4~~ hhLI. N N Nil 1 a~ IN~ ~ 9 ~as ~~~~9=09
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Compzter (c3uab) terminals: 3 - Digital DeQqriter II LA-36 1 - Iiaze,ltine 1400 VDr 1- Texas Instnivents Si1ent 700 portable tezminal PC 9oftware (fre4uentlY u.9ed): WoQdPetfeot word pr+coessing pat~Cage ver 4.2, 5.0 & 5.1 Ktxwl.edgdar~/2 ver2.01 database managatent system PC-SAS ver 6.03 smart:aan, Felvink & SIMPc oomtLuzicatiar, padsages 1'nn Epistat Other ( PC ) sofLware a.ra.i].ab].e (partial list ): lut Atlas Granhiws vpr 2.1 Quattzv Pro ver 1.0 BASIC APL Now Uxt Utilities Sidektcis Forabool Equiptpnt of New Jersey State C,anoar Pagistcy, anline to Offiaa of 8nd lmformatiart Sgshars I'm mainfrdme: 8 - Telex 078 terminals 7 - Telex 278-2 tetmi*+alG 1 - Tel" 287-M printer 1 - TelAM 274-C2 Cantzollez 1 - AT&T Digital 9600 baud high sveed modem Equipmant of Management Infaxmatian Se=viGies, avaihb.le to users in t3ve NJ Departnent of Health ( tortal. sysban ): 1 - PR1ME 6350 1- PRIM 9955 II SUpp~i ni rr. =y utpr 1 - PRIM 9650 (located at Vital Statistics) approoc 6.1Gb total mass storage cn several devices 35 - PRIM PT200 temuissals orsmecbed to sysien for Qu:oritc Disease Svcs 2 - Toshiba P351 printers oonnected to sgsibaa for Qunnic Disease svcs As,9oclaed prop~.^ietaxy PRIM software: taord pa:anessor, database manager, - - 3d~, offioe informaition netwozis, etc. PR1ME SAS for analytic worfc Fquiprent of New Jexsey Fdumtialal Coaputer Netwmk ( N,7Da1) ,( a not-for-panofit mainfrane timeshazing sgs-tem) avatlable for Program use: -263-
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N 1 ssss 8~ 1 * ~.i . . . . ~ 8 8 8 8 8 r F+ Z r $0 I r { ~ 64,Z9449=02!
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2023676280 1-4 LO
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7Q.II. ATTRCHMENiS. This seation oontains the required Attacbrtpnt 6, Te&nical Rc+oposal Cost Information; Attadrxnt 10, Sunnaxy of Related 74ctivities; and Atta~t 13, Gawpsnnmt Notioe for Har,dlj*ng PtnQosals. ~ -266- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL TECHNICAL PROPOSAL COST INFORMATION/SUMMARY OF LABOR AND DIRECT COSTS DmECTi LABOR: Beg. Labor Category Rate (Title and Name- use additional pages as necessary) Janice Marshall, 2Si`T, >~ Project Manager rl•arc}• Reyes, rbN Field Director (See attached) Total Hours DIRECT LABOR COST. MATERIAL COST• TRAVEL COST: OTHER (Specify)-Interventian Costs OTHER (Specify)-Con.suLtants Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Hours Hours Hours Hours 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 Year S Year 6 Year 7 Hours Hours Hours Total 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 R 7700 7700 11,550 11,550 11,550 11,550 11,550 73,150 5208,864 5225,050 S 340,580 5366,976 5395,416 5426,062 5459,080 5.2,422,028 S 4,463 S 3,875 S 6,765 S 6,749 S 2,346 S 2,443 S 2,542 529, 173 S 32,138. S 28,140 S 56,887 S 54,396 S 23,466 S 23,562 S 23,664 S - 0 - S- 0 - 5492,M7 S492,047 S492,r47 5492,047 5492,tY+7 $ 38,424 S 40,729 S 43,172 S 45,763 S 48,509 S 51,418 S 54,503 OTHE R(Sp _eci -postage, telepi~or~ 25,650 S 25.75 2 S 28,35 7 S 28,467 S 28,581 S 28, 700 S 28.824 o ic'~.a~ reception, data processing, rental S 10,035 S -0- S-.0-- S-0- S--0- _ S-0-- S-0- _ OTHER (Specifyl-Subcontracts S 125,807 S 132,053 $ 211,228 $221,413 5231,760 5242,595 5254,086 S 1,,418,942 OTHER (Speci fiy) -EquiRnent TOTAL DIRECT COST: S 242,253 4fiQ 225 S 322,518 S 194.331 S 10.035 5445,381 S 455,599 Z 1,179(J361SI,215,81151,222, 12551,266,817 9,3_14,746 S7,099,515 December, 1988 ATTACHMENT G
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R: REDACTED MATERIAL DIRECT LABOR: L,.Jor Cateqory (Title and Name-- use additional pages as necessary) Beg. Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Rate Hours Haurs Hours Hours Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Hours Hours Hours Total Vacant (1 fu11 time, ' 32.16 - - 2310 2310, 2310 2310 2310 11,550 1 part time) Field Coordinator Vacant 26.38 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540- 10,780 Admin Assistant I Vacant (~ time) 22.79 770 770- 770 770 770 770 770 5,390 Admin. Assistant II Vacant 15.45 - - 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 7 700 , Coding Clerk II Vacant (~ time) 12.07 770 770 770 770 770 770 770 5 390 , Sr. Clerk ist I~iarmm P. Bhalla 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 1540 Sec. Assistant III h N ~
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'UMMARY OF RELATED ACTIVIT' The fcllowing specific information must be provided- by the offeror pertaining to the Projiect Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under any resulting contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and. commercial.agreements citing the committed levels of effbrt for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professiona 's Name and Title/Position WiL'1'iam E. Parkin,, DVM, MPH, DrPH, Assistant Commissioner, Division of Epid'emiology and Disease Control l:entifyincr Number enc Total Effort Comnitted 1 , No obligations 2. 4. *If an individual has no obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by~your organization, not presently accepted~but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and Title/Position William E. Parkin, DVM, MPH. DrPH, Assistant Commissioner, Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Identifying Number en Total Effort Committed obligations *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. a e Title/Position Total Prooosed Effort 1. 2. 3. 4. William E.. Parkin, DVM, Dr.PH, Project Director 209s.(Inkind)- Jan.ice W. Marshall, RN, MSN, Project Manager 100% Shirley M. Greene, M.Ed.. 20% (Inkind), Nancy Reyes, RN. MSN 100%. March,, 1984 ATTACHMENT 10 2023676284
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SUMMARY OF RELATED ACTIVITIES (-Attachment 10) pg.2 (Continue) C. Level of effort to be dedicated to any. resulatant contract for individuals cited in this proposal. 5. Lorraine Kowalski, M.A. Field Director 1100Pc 6. Mary Ann Cooney, MPH: Fielld Director/' 90% Project Manager (•501k salary, 40 % in kind) T. Kimberley Thorndike Project Manager 60% (In kind) 8. Richard Arndt 5% (In kind) 9. John Slade, M) Consultant 10% 10. Noruan Hymowitz Coasultant 5Z 11. Roseaary Horner, MSPH ConsuLtant 5K 12. Laurie Jefferson, MPH Consul'tant 5%
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'JMMARY OF RELATED ACTIVIT -i The following specific information must be provided by the offeror pertaining to.the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under iny resulting contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and commercial.agreements citing the committed levels of effbrt for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and Title[position Janice W. Marshall, RN, MSN, Coordinator, Cancer and Tobacco GTse Control Program _3e-:tifvi~.^.g Nunber enc Total Effort Comnitted 1_ L . ` . No obligations *If an individual has no obliqation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization~, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and Title/Position Janice W. Marshall, RN, MSN, Coordinator, Cancer and 'Dobacco Use Control Program Identifyinv Number Agency Total Effort Committed l. No obligations 2. 3. 4. - *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated, to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. a e Title/position Total Pronosed Effort 1,, Janice W,. Marshall, RN, MSN, Pro3ect Manager 100% 2. 3. 4. see attached March, 1984 ATTACKMENT 10 20236'76286
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SuNIIMARY OF RELATED ACTIVITIES The following specific information must be provided by the offeror bertaining to the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any her proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under any resulting: contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and commer•cial.agreements citing! the committed levels of effort for those projects for each of the key individuals* in,this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Position Richard W. Arndr, AQ ':•-n-t.i• ive Vice President & Qiief aaecutive Officer American Cancer Societv Identifying Number enc Total Effort Committed 1, no obliRations 2. 0 4. *If an individual has no obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and Title/Position sam Identifuing Number Aaency Total Effort Committed 1. 2. 3•. 4. *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. ~ Name Title/Position Total Proposed,Effort ~ 1. Richard W. Arndt 57. (In'.cind) ~ 2. ftJ 3. see attached (~ 4. ~ GO J March, 1984 ATTACHMENT 10
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;`ie `.c1To::~ng scec__=c :nfor,.at:cn must be provided by the offeror perta.ning. to the Pro)!ect Director, Principal In.vestigator, and each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for perfor,nance under any resuTting; contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal c:,ntracts/cooperative agreements/grants and cocamercial. agreements citing the committed levels of effbrt for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and 'hitle/Position Shirley M. Greene, M.Ed., Division Service Manager, American Cancer Society ' :__- _ ` _ `:u.-beY Acency Total Ef for:. Cos;°.tted :. No ob,1i;gation ~. 4. *If an individual has no obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effortt by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Nare and Title/Position Shirley K. Greene, M.. Ed., Division Service Manager, American Cancer Society Identifying Number enc Total Effort Committed 1• No obligation 2. 3. 4. ` *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individua.]s designated and cited in this proposal. Name Title/Position. Total Proposed Effort 1. 2. 3. 4. Shirley M. Greene, M.Ecl. ?C4 (~I~n kinel) March, 1984 ATTACHMENT 10
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rt+4iARY OF RELa_TED• ACTIVIT' The following specific information must be provided by the offeror pertaining: to the Proj,ect Director, Principal Investigator, and each of anyy other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under r.y resulting contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and commercial.agreemerrts citing. the committed levels of effbrt for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Position Nancy Reyes, RN, MSN- Public Health Consultant, Dept. of HeaDth -'e-ti`v: '+u^''e• Agency Total Effort Committed :. No obligations L' . <. *If an individual has no obligation(s), so• state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and Title/Positiyn Nancy Reyes, RN, MSN Pub]Jic Health Consultant, Dept. of Health. Identifvina Number enc Total Effort Committed 1. No obligations 2. 3. 4. " *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. Name Title/Position Total Proposed Effort 1. Nancy Reyes, RN,. MSN' Fi;ebd Director 2. 3. 4. see attached March~, 1984 ATTACHMENT 10 20236'76289
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$lJt4MJNRY OF REL?,TED 1iCTIVIThFS The fo; lowing; spec:f:c informat.cn must be provided• by the offercr perta_ning to the Project Director,. Principal Investigator, an.d' each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under ar:y resulting contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agree:;ents/grants and commercial. agreer„ents ci:ting the committed levels of effort for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Position Mary Ann Cooney MPH, Health Educator, Vineland' City Dept. of Health "~entifv_- `:u-te- oenc• 'Dotal Effort CoR:.,:tted - No obligation ~. 4. •If an individual has no obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organiaation, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Pro-fessional's Name and Title/Position 49 Marv Ann Cooney MPH, Health Educator, Vineland City Dept. of H ealth Identifvin4 Number enc Total Effort Committed 1. No obLigaticn 2. 3. 4. +If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. Name TitlelPosition Total Proposed Effort 0 1. Mary Ann Cooney, Field Director. 90% IV CJ 2. (5n% salarv, 40% in kin:) ~ 3. ~ 4. ~ ~ see attached March, 1984 ATTACHMEN'S" 10
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'JMtARY OF RELATED ACTIVITI ' The following specific information must be provided by the offeror perta;ning to the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under ~ny resu,lting; contract. a•. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and coramercial.agreements citing the committed levels of effbrt for those projects for each of the key individuals* in, this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Position Lorraine Kowalski, MA, Health Educator, Visiting Nurse and Health Service '.e-wi`v_-.: *:W-ber ae:,c Total Effort Committed ~, . 2 . 4. No obligation *If anindividuaY has no obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Fr•ofessional's Name and Title/Position Lorraine Kowalski, NA, Health Educator, Visiting Nurse and Health.Service Identifying Number enc Total Effort Committed 1. 3. 4. No obligation *If no commitmerit of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for tbose individuals designated and cited in this proposal. Name TitletPosition Total Pronosed Effort 0. N l. Lorraine Kowalski. MPs Fielid Director, 100% W 2. ~ 3. ~ e. ~ ~ see attached March, 1994 ATTACHMENT 10
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SUMMARY OF RELATED ACTIVITIEs The following specific information must be provided:by the offeroz nertaining to the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any ther proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under any resulting contract. a_ Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and commercial.agreements citing the committed levels of effort for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Position Kimberley Thorndike, Project Coordinator, American Cancer Society Identifying Number nc Total Effort Committed No Obligation *If an individual has no,obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and Title/Position Kimberley Thorndike, Project Coordinator, American Cancer Society Identifying Number Aaencv Total Effort Committed 1. 2. 3. 4. No. Obligation *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. N. Name Title/Position Total Proposed Effort 0 ~ 1. Kimberley Thorndike Project Manager 60%, (Iin ki,nd) W 2. 3. ~ 4. ~ ~ N March, 1984 ATTACHMENT 10
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5UNlMARY OF RELATED ACTIVITIES i following;specific information must be provided by the offeror t_tainng to the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and~ each of any other piroposed key professional individuals designated; for performance under any resulting contract- a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and cornmercial.agreements citing the committed levels of effort for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Pos't'on •7-ol,r SM~ Identifyina Number enc Total Effort Committed 1. N.MQ- 2. 3. 4. *If an individual has no obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an-anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and,Title/Position 9",,-G'x St-LJ'- MD Identi yina Number• e c Total Effort Committed J1//AAa 2. AA u'T e') 3. ~4l~tQ Rt~l.~•~V Ct..Tc~ 4- {.-.~. 4Rr.rt ~•Y C,,~'e~ri, *If no comihitment of effort is intended, so state. C. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. Name Title/Position Total Proposed Effort N . ~ Sr G~z.. ~ /' GJi25~CCf'cXt~'. W wq ~ ~ ~ ~ C41
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SUMMARY OF RELATED ACTIVITIES ^" S following specific information must be provided by the offeror :taining to the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under any resultin.g contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and commercial_agreements citing the committed levels of effort for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. professional•s Name and Title/Position Norman Hymowitz, Ph.D., Clinical Professor of Psychiatry Identifvinv Number en Total Effort Committed 1. NQ1-CN-54099 NCI 2596 2. 3. 4. *If an individual has no obligation(s), so state. b,. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Pro£essional's Name and Title/Position Identifying Number Agency Total Effort Committed 1. 2. 3_ 4. *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. Name Title/Position Total Proposed;Effort 40 4V 1. Norman Hymwitz, PhD Consultant 52 2. j~ 3. see attached ~ 4_ ~ ~ ~ ~
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'?KiARY OF RELATED aCTIVITI'" '. The following; specific in,formation, must be provided by the offeror pertaining to the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under ny resulting contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and commercial.agreements citing the committed levels of effbrt for those projects for each,of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Position raurie Jefferson. Consultant .4s~anti IieaLG't Consultants _se-:tifvina Number enc Total Effort Committed no ofbligatioos *If an individual has no obligation(s):, so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which. will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and Tit2e/Position Identi$vina Number e c Total Effort Committed 1. 2. 3. 4. C. Name Tit2e/Position Tota l Proposed Effort Q 1. Taurie Jefferson ConsuLtant 5% N W 2. L~ 4. ~ (V~ ~ *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. March~, 1984 ATTACHMENT }.t7
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SUMMARY OF RELATED ACTIVITIES -',:? following specific information must be provided; by the offeror 1. :taining to the Project Director, Principal Investigator, and each of any other proposed key professional individuals designated for performance under any resulting-contract. a. Identify the total amount of all presently active federal contracts/cooperative agreements/grants and- commercial. agreements citing the committed levels of effort for those projects for each of the key individuals* in this proposal. Professional's Name and Title/Position Identifvincx Number enc Total Effort Committed NO WOV~W-OrwA4 *If an individual has no obligation(s), so state. b. Provide the total number of outstanding proposals, exclusive of the instant proposal, having been submitted by your organization, not presently accepted but in an anticipatory stage, which will commit levels of effort by the proposed professional individuals.* Professional's Name and Title/Position Identifying Number enc Total Effort Committed 1. 2. 3. 4. *If no commitment of effort is intended, so state. c. Provide a statement of the level of effort to be dedicated to any resultant contract awarded to your organization for those individuals designated and cited in this proposal. Name Title/Position Total Pronosed:Effort ~ 2. -'{ dA-t w1G. N 3. W 4. ~ ~. ~
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GOVERNMENT NOTICE FOR HANDLING PROPOSALS This proposal shall be used and disclosed for evaluation purposes only, and a copy of this Government notice shall be applied to any reproductiomor abstract thereof. Any authorized restrictive notices which the submitter places on this proposal outside the Government for evaluation-purposes shall be made only to the extent authorized by, and in accordance with, the procedures in (cite agency regulation implementing 15.413-2(f),. If agency implementing regulations do not authorize release of proposals outside the Government for evaluation purposes, the last sentence of the foregoing Government notice is to be deleted. (f), If authorized in agency implementing regulations, agencies may release proposals outside the Government for evaluation, consistent with the following: (1) Decisions to release proposals outside the Government for evaluation purposes shall be made by the agency head or designee; (2) Written agreement must be obtained from the evaluator that the information (data) contained in the proposal will be used only for evaluation purposes and will not be further disclosed; (3) Any authorized restrictive legends placed on the proposal by the prospective contractor or subcontractor or by the Government shall be applied to any reproduction or abstracted information made by the evaluator; (4), Upon completing the evaluation, all copies of the proposal, as well as any abstracts thereof, shall be returned to the Government office which,initially furnished them for evaluation; and (5), All determinations to release the proposal outside the Government take into consideration requirements for avoiding organizational conflicts of interest and the competitive relationship, if any, between the prospective contractor or subcontractor and the prospective outside evaluator. (g) The submitter of any proposal shall be provided notice adequate to afford an opportunity to take appropriate action before release of any information (data) contained therein pursuant to a request under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552); and, time permitting, the submitter should be consulted to obtain assistance in determining the eligibility of the information (data) in question as an exemptionn under the Act. (See also Subpart 24.2, Freedom of Information Act.) "HHSAR- Paragraph 315.608(e).'• April, 1984 -ATTACHMENT 13
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TABLE OF CONTENTS Tedvnical. Proporal APPmdfxes (RFP) No. NCI-CN-95165-38 ORIGINAL I. CQMKJNITY LEI'IERS OF SUPPORT.......... 275 II. EaTTtSSION, CN, 3MOKITIG CR FEALTH....... 371 Ill. BYIAW,S ................................ 373 IV. CXaAISTICN IEITFIZS OF f0WI'IMU ....... 377 V. PUBLIC FC" REPCR75 .................. 488 VI. SURVEYS ............................... 519 274
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. OaMMJNITY L~.TPEiS OF St3PPCRr -275-
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BEfRTRAM:J. LEV{NE VICE PRESIOENT SfA7E NELATIDNS CpRPpRATE STAFP William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control State of New Jersey Department of Health Trenton, NJ 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: NEW BRUNSWICK;, N. J. 08933 September 13, 1990 The concept of providing statewide and local programs to deal with tobacco control is an excellent one and one which Johnson & Johnsonn supports enthusiastically. our company has a long history of commitment toward encouraging healthy life styles among its employees and their families and considers elimination of smoking critical to that goal. We already offer, on a regular basis, a number of programs to eliminate tobacco use among our employees including: + an eight week smoking cessation program~ offered at the work site * a one hour quit clinic and a variety of special programs on a limited basis involving hypnotism, contests and the use of nicorette gum. Additionally Johnson & Johnson, after more than a year of preparation, will become smoke free within all domestic work sites effective October 1, 1990. We are pleased that the NJ Department of Health and the NJ Division of the American Cancer Society are making application to participate in the ASSIST project and we are certain that' they, along with the various state and local coalitions, will carry out the terms of their contracts. Johnson & Johnson would be happy to share its experiences in developing and implementing the various programs with any of the groups involved.
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I HEALTH RESEAFdCW AND EDUCATIONAL TRUST OF NEW JERSEY a. _.Center for Health Affairs 760'Alexander Road CN-1 Princeton. New•Jersey 08543-0001 July 23, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, Dr.PH. Assistant Carmissi oner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control New Jersey Department of Health CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: t;-09t 275-4000 i;09-, 275-4'.100 REOE)UEII JUL 3j1990 fliV. EPtlC3~Er".SE CO1.TRL'E' On behalf of the Health Research and Educational; Trust of NJ (HRET), I am writing this letter to support the grant application of the New Jersey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society to the National Cancer Institute's American Stop Smoking. Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. Smoking is the single most preventable cause of death and disability in. the United States and should be the number one public health issue of our time. There is overwhelming need for the ASSIST project because over 350,000 Americans will die prematurely this year of disease linked' to smoking. The Continuing Education Department of HRET has developed, coordinated and conducted a variety of programs designed to reduce tobacco-related cancer morbidity and mortality In New Jersey. HRET has held educational conferences to promote smoke-free healthcare institutions, i.e., "Smoke-Free Hospital Implementation Clinics," "Nursing Interventions: Clearing The Air With The Smoking Patient," and "Smoke-Free Policy And Interventions For The Psychiatric And Substance Abuse Patient." Most recently, because of the direct aid received from the Statewide Youth Tobacco Use Control Project, HRET has initiated the TOPS (Teens Organized to Prevent Smoking) program. TOPS is a collaborative effort between the Health Research and Educational Trust of NJ, the New Jersey Hospital Association Council on Auxil-iaries' Consumer Health Education and'Junior Volunteer Committees, as well as the New Jersey Association of Directors of Volunteer Services.
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Statistics show that 60% of all smokers start by the age of 14, and,are addicted by the age of 19. The purpose of the TOPS program is to train hospital junior volunteers to become anti-smoking leaders. These young "teachers" will go out to community youth organizations to promote non-smoking to pre-teens and adolescents. TOPS will develop a training manual which will be distributed to all hospitals, and conduct a statewide program to introduce and promote this project throughout New Jersey. NRET hopes that with continued support, TOPS will become an on-going program that will result in effectively reducing the number of young smokers in New Jersey. The Department of Health has been instrumental in helping to launch the TOPS program. We know that you will conscientiously carry out the terms of the ASSIST contract, and we will cooperate with you in that effort. We look forward to being part of the coalition formed between the New Jersey Department of Health, the American Cancer Society, and other state and local organizations for the prevention of cancer and elimination of other tobacco-caused disease. Sincerely, Charlene Shapiro Vice President HRET, Educational Services KPS:1cm
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NEW JERSEY LEAGUE FOR NURSING 332 North Avenue Garwood, New Jersey 07027 a Telepkone: (201) 789-3398 July 9, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epid'emiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton,New Jersey 08625 Dear Ms. Marshall: The New Jersey League for Nursing Board of Directors strongly supports the efforts of the New Jersey Department of Hualth,and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society to develop tobacco control activities through the American Stop,Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention. This innovative program is sure to bring New Jersey national recognition for its positive response to the problems of cancer morbidity and mortality. A project such as this will only enhance the general well-being of all consumers and allow for cleaner air for all of us to enjoy. The New Jersey League for Nursing is willing!to assist the New.Jersey Department of Health with this project by promoting it through our newsletter and having handout materiels available at all of our edUcational programs. We began a practice three years ago to,not allow smoking.during our programs session and at our Board of Directors meetings. As an organization concerned with nurses as well as consumers of health care, the New Jersey League for Nursing supports your efforts.and welcomes the opportunity to assist you. Sincerely, NEW-JERSEY LEAGUE FOR NURSING Q:~,~-~. lo. Ad' Ruth, W. Lai ng, Pres i den+t GAH:I A CONSTITUENT LEAGUE OF TWE NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR NURSING
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Home Health Assembly ot Ntw Jersey, Inc., 760 Alexander Road, CN-t, Princeton, NJ 08543-000 1 609-452-8855 April 25, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control NJ Department of Health CN 360 Trenton, NJ 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin, The Home Health Assembly of New. Jersey enthusiastically supports your plans to submit a proposal for funding under the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study program of the American• Cancer Institute. I understand that the application will be submitted in partnership with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society and' is intended to develop tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. We see a very strong need in this state for activities related to the above-stated goal. The 100 home health care providers in our membership care for over 150,000 homebound persons in this state. Many of these patients suffer from chronic illnesses, such as emphysema, which are directly related too smoking. We will be happy to assist in publicizing or otherwise supporting the achievement of the goals of your project, and we wish you success in your endeavors. N cc: J. Pecorelli, Chairman R F C ~ E~~~D APR 2 ~ { DJV, FPf l ~F CairTr C"? ,a ~ !~
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New Jersey Association of Health Care Facilities IEXINOTONSOUARE COMMONS 2131 ROUTE31 TiEI. 609=890-8700 TRE NTO N, NEW J ERSEY 08690• 1740 FIiX 609-584-1047 May 11, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPh. Assistant commissioner N.J. State Department of Health Div. of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Commissioner Parkin: This is to advise you that the New Jersey Association of Health Care Facilities wholeheartedly supports the New Jersey Department of Health and New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society in their effort to develop tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. We feel such a project is worthwhile and stand ready to assist your effort through educational semi- nars, distribution of materials and any other way we can be of help. As you know, we represent nursing homes, medical day care and residential health care facilities; therefore, we see the devastating effects of smoking and cancer in the patients we serve. We also constantly have the need to educate staff regard- ing smoking. As an added bonus, your study would assist our facilities in another area since smoking is a major cause of individual injury or death in our facilities due to patients or residents who do smoke, violating smoking policies and regula- tions. We know the combined forces of your Department, those of the American Cancer Society's New Jersey Division and the local coalitions will be successful in carrying out such a contracted project. As previously stated, we stand ready to assist. S E. CUNN IIdGHAM ~, President JEC:GTM
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1, 113 W. Franklin Street Baltimore, MD 21201 (301) 752-3318 FAX (301) 752-8295 The American Association of Nurse Attorneys, Inc. May 24, 1990 91 Ms. Janice Marshall MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: I am in receipt of Dr. Parkin's letter dated May 8, 1990 regarding your smoking control program. The letter indicates that there is a June 29, 1990 deadline regarding this project. While I am sure that the Pennsylvania/New Jersey/Delaware Chapter of the Association of Nurse Attorneys would support your project, our next meeting will not be until September, 1990 at which time we will bring the subject up. Therefore, would you contact me if this date will not be appropriate to your needs. Very truly yours, ELEANOR T. SEGAL ETS:ld cc: William E. Parkins, D.V.M.
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New Jersey Association of Rehabilitation Facilities 850-870 Route 1, North Brunswick, N.J. 08902 •(201) 246-4411 PRESIDENT J.mes E. Setlb VICE PRESIDENT Daniel Kel+r SECRETARY Manbew G. Todhut TREASURER 7La.sJ..S.dth PAST PRESIDENT M.rrem W.Iliur Janice Marshall, MSN N.J. Dept. of Health Div. of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN,369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: "~; \ ja~r f, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Waltv R. How.rd May 25, 1990' I was encouraged to learn that the N.J. Dept. of Health is applying. for the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study. Our Association believes this effort to be very worthwhile. Please be assured'that NJARF will be available to assist you iin your operation,of this program in any way you may deem necessary. Our thirty= two (32) member agencies also-offer their support. Our experience with the N.J. Dept. of Hlea1th and the N.J. Division of the American Cancer Society assures us,that the conditions of this contract and the success of the program will be carried out to a positive conclusion. Walter Howard' /lg Executive Director
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NEW JERSEY STATE ASSOCIATION OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH NURSES, INC. CONSTITUENT OF THE AMERtCAN ASSOCIATION: OF OCCUPATIONAI. HEALTH NURSES, INC. May 24, 1990 This letter is in support of the ASSIST Project designed to develop tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. The New Jersey Association of Occupational Health Nurses strongly supports this project. We in industry have been steadily working towards total smoke-free workplaces for several years and welcome this project to further our efforts in accomplishing the Surgeon General's call for a smokefree society by 2000. Occupational Health Nurses recognize the great hazard to the smokers health and the health of those workers exposed to others smoke. Smoking Cessation programs and often offered by these nurses at the worksite and educational literature is available for workers and family members at many industrys. Occupatinal Health Nurses have, in the past, worked closely withACS and the NJ State Dept of Health on many health related issues. We welcome this opportunity to join forces once again with-both groups in support of this project. Sincerely, J Mary L.4/ Mills, BSN, RN, President, NJSAOHN
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Organization of Nurse Executives- May 16, 1990 I Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Department of Health D9.vi si.on, of Ei i dem.i ol~ ony and Di sea se Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshal].: 1. We were delighted to learn-that the New Jersey Department of Health,and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society have applied to the National Cancer Institute to develop tobacco control activs.ties here in New'Jersey. Our merabers stand can. As you know Care Services and facilities and we in,New Jersey. ready to support your efforts in any way we our members are the Vice Presidents of Patient VP's of Nursing in the State's health care know, first hand, of the need for this project Please let us know if we can be of assistance. Sincerely, r/, .--(.,`_ Jpanne J. Cole, CAE Executive Director NCiproj.one N O N W ~ ~ ~ W a ~ 180 Towaship Line RoadBeHe Mtad NJ. 08502 (201) 359-1184
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Two Princess Road • Lawrenceville, New Jersey 08648 •(609) 896-1717 May 3, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control New Jersey State Department of Health CN'369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: The Academy of Medicine of New Jersey is pleased to offer its support and advise you of our willingness to cooperate in ASSIST. The Academy has long been aware of the need to include smoking cessation in physician continuing medical education programs. It is our contention that physicians must address and introduce smoking cessation interventions with their patients. As you know, the Academy reaches over 8,500 physicians through the its membership and the specialty societies it manages. We list smoking cessation as a topic in our Roving Symposia series and conducted an all day conference TREATING TOBACCO DEPENDENCE on April 8, 1987. This program, chaired by John Slade, M.D., attracted over 200 persons. We are eager to work with you on this. project as we are cognizant of the unique ability of physicians to advise and influence their patients to stop smoking. Sincerely, Ronnie Davidson, Ed.D. N ~ Director of Research and'Education ~ ~ ~ njdh-acs ~ ~ . ~'. .".'~. ~ ~"1
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rRESIo[Nr IACR s. RRfA/BtS. M.D. nRevou+T axT ROSE IRYS7oriSKY. M.O. NEW JERSEY PSYCHIATRIC ASSOCIATION YKE rR6lOfNr. EXtFRNAI AFfA1RS 11AIK/tZ M. CRIGORIAN. M.D. VICE /RFSIOfNi. INi9WA1. AFFAIRS RfNA M. NORA. M.D. TRFAUlRfR lBtTRAM WARREN. M.D. SECRFTARY HHRIr atucN. nw. MSTlRSIDENT EVA M1N11R, MD. COUNCRORs UNDA 4 GOQIFEtD. M.D: nM ARNOLD 0. f.OIAARAN. M.D. r.ea DANIEL M. GREENWALD, M.D. ro H9t16CT 1. McfRlDE. MD. nM M. NIGOW NIF3SEN, M.D. ne» DONALD R. SWEENEY. MD., lh.D. nMu CNA/1ER RSRRfS[i(fAS1YP5 RO{EtT B91CONRr1. M.D. toCEA N.MOPMAOUiHI VIIAYALAIIMI ROOAVHL. M.D. n+oRTHetN) JAY FlOIFlt, M.D. tCENTRAQ ANWAR Y. CHAU. M.D. (nG-louNr.r) iHOA/ASS. NEWMARK.MA. tsOU1H9tM KENNETH 1. IEMANBC. M,D. (RESAOMn1'. Rfl'RFSFlRA71VF5 TO AM ASSEMltY W IwAM H. RRf STO W.1R.. l.l. o. (1!!i) GEORGE F. WILSON, M.o. vea CHERYL A. KENNEDY. M.O.. MIT REPRESENTATIVE ADMINISTRATOR CARLA A. ROSS A District Branch of the American Psychiatric Association Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Departaent of Health Division of $pedeaiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: I aa writing in response to the letter of April 18 from William S. Parkin, DVM, DrPH, Assistant Commissioner, requesting support from the New Jersey Psychiatric Association for the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention with regard to tobacco control. The New Jersey Psychiatric Association would like to add its support to this important work in helping New Jersey citizens reduce the incidence of tobacco related cancer. We are referring your letter to our Addictive Disorders Treatment Committee for their consideration and response as to how the New Jersey Psychiatric Association can be of assistance. We can alert all of our members to this project by pub,lishing an article in our Newsletter. If we can be of further assistance at this time,. please do not hesitate to contact me. Sincerely yours, Carla A. Ross Administrator cc:. Rose Prystowsky, M.D., President Elect Herbert J. McBride, M.D., Chairperson Addictive Disorder Treatment Committee 803 Partridge Drive • Bridgewater, New )ersey 08807 •(201) 685-0650
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NJPCA 'ew Jersey Primary Care Association, Inc. .c The Center for Health Affairs Debby R. Hoffman Executive Director June 25, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control NJ Department of Hea]lth CN 360 Trenton, NJ 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: This letter is in support of the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention Project which is a partnership between the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society (ACS). As the representative of New Jersey's federally funded community health centers, we recognize the need for a project which will focus on tobacco control. The eight Community Health Center Corporations provide services at some 22 sites throughout the State, and each of these organizations has a strong relationship with the NJDOH and the ACS. The use of tobacco by minorities and by the poor has received' considerable focus in the media recently. However, the primary care providers in New Jersey have long dealt with the tremendous .negative impact on health caused by tobacco use. We applaud the State and ACS for developing the ASSIST pro ject and feel the program will be carried out under the terms of the contract. if further information is needed, or if we can assist in any way, please let me know. Debby Hoffman DH/sj Executive Direc~tor N ~ N RECE11iED t~ ~ AN 2 6 17;J ~r? DIV. EPI/M'" * SE COI1TGCli N 760 Alexander Rd. • CNL1 • Princeton, N.J. 08543-0001 .(608) 275-4187/.275-4156
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AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS f 79 PRINCETON BLVD. L0WELL, MA 01851 617 937-7343 June 21, 1990 William E. Parkin, D.V.M., Dr. P.H. Assistant Commisioner Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control State of New Jersey Department of Health CN360 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0360 Dr. Parkin: It is with pleasure that this letter is written in support of your Request For Application from:the National Cancer Institute in partnership with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society. The request applies for the seven-year initiative, the American- Stop Smoking Interven- tion Study (ASSIST) for cancer prevention and will provide needed'activities which are targeted to get people in New Jersey to stop smoking. As Regional Director for Region 2, (New York and New Jersey) for the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, I can fully support an initiative designed to assist providers of direct health care education and support in assisting our patients to stop smoking. Nurse practitioners, are, as you know, a provider group especially concerned with promoting-healthier life styles as a part of the care they provide to their patients. Nurse Practitioners care for people of alll ages, but do specifically care for people who are part of some of the groups targeted in this initiative. The need for specific education regarding-smoking cessation for patients is evidenced in-the accompanying article andi letter to the editor response from the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners' Journals, April-June 1989 and April to June 1990. The Academy is willing to participate with you in identifying nurse practitioners in New Jersey and iir_ planning for educational activities targeted to them,. Please let us know how we may participate in the state and local coalitions designed to carry out the terms of the contract. i;rCEi ,iU;'1 2 ~ r.~....~.,~ ....,..-- r,i. e~~ ~. . .- L
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11 Best wishes in a successful application. Please contact me if any further information or assistance is.needed. Sincerely, Anna Marie Hughes, Ed.D., R.N., C. Adult Nurse Practitioner Region Two Director ,American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Enclosures (2), copy to: Zo DeMarchi, Executive Secretary American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
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NCN~J North Central New Jersey Chapter Oncology Nursing Society June 25, 1990 Mr. George Wasser Public Health Consultant Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mr. Wasser: The North Central New Jersey Chapter of the Oncology Nursing Society, at a recent meeting, voted• to support the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. Because of our work with patients in all stages of illness, we see and know firsthand the dangers of smoking. As with all major health problems, we are aware that prevention is not only more cost-effective, but also more beneficial to the quality of life for the individual. Our local chapter will endorse legislation aimed at improved tobacco control. We are encouraged by the great success of smoke-free hospitals. More than 5,000 nurses attended: the 15th,annual Congress of the Oncology Nursing Society in Wash- ington, D.C. during May; this Congress has now been "smoke free" for several years. We look forward to working in collaboration with~ other groups who are committed to promoting good health, and a healthy environment, through the cessation of smoking. Sincerely, ;f_~,./? t) ., UCN (Mrs.) Barbara Livingston, R.N., OCN Secretary, North Central N.J. Chapter, Oncology Nursing Society Home: 22 Cider Mill Circle, Flemington, N'.J. 08'822' 201-782-039'1
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UNION CARBIDE UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION 3s ox m FvoGEsuRY raoo.n..m.aneuaY, cr osg,,.ooa, June 20, 1990 Ms. Jan!ice Marshall, MSN Coordinator, Smoking,Control Program New Jersey Department of Health Dfivision.of Epidemiology and' Disease Control CN 369. Trenton, NJ 08625 Dear Ms. Marshall: The Union Carbide Corporation, which currently has a very restrictive smoking policy with a long term goal of a smoke-free workplace, is i-ntent upon providi-ng its employees wi;th a healthy and safe work environment. Consequently, I was pl;eased to get your letter about developing tobacco control activities in the State of New Jersey. Because of our commi;tment to eliminating envi:ronmental and workplace exposures, we strongly support the New Jersey Department of Health's application to be part of the ASSIST program to reduce overal+ smoki ng prevel,ance i n the Un i ted States. I be 1 i eve i-t i,s onl y through: such joint, l:ong term,efforts that this major public health hazard will be dealt with and will begin to lose its overwhelmi,ng role in cancer morbidity and mortality. As part of our commitment to empi;oyee weilbeing,, the Union Carbide Corporation encourages smoking employees to quit and'provides assistance for those doing so. We would, therefore, be happy to help the New Jersey coalition publicize its activities through our in-house publications. We also will offer any other assistance to thi!s endeavor which,seems appropriate as you Implement ASSIST. With its track record in public heal!th leadership, I am sure the New Jersey Department of Health can work w4th the American Cancer Society to form a powerful and effective coalition which wia!l, aggressively and successfully achieve the goals of this initiative. - Union Carbide Corporation urges the National Cancer Institute to give the New Jersey Department of Health's application the most serious appraisal. I look forward. to hearing of the Department's success in winning, a contract to, take part in this much needed program. Si ncere liy cc: R.V. Welty /Cip Jean B. Case, M.D:. N Corporate Medical Director ~ ~ Q? ~ ~ s~
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UNION CARBIDE UNION CARBIDE CORPOIRATION 39 OLD FIDGEBURY ROAO..DANBURV. CS p6BT7-OOOa July 12, 1990 Janice Marshall, R.N., M.S.N. State of New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control 3635 Quakerbridge Road CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: Thank you for all the materials you sent relating to a smoke-free work environment and for the contact name at New Jersey Bell. They were helpful to me, especially The New Jersey Department of Health materials and the resource directory. I hope you received Dr. Case's letter supporting The Department of Health's application to be part of the ASSIST program and that it fits your needs. I apologize for being so slow in saying, thank you. It's been very hectic, but exciting as we work on moving towards a smoke-free workplace. I greatly appreciated your assistance. Sincerely, Louise Roumagoux cc: j.B. Case, M.D. LR/cjp
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Bellcore @SNI Gommunications Research Rocco J. Marano President June 6, 1990 Mrs. Jani.ce Marshalli, MSN Coordinator N.ew Jersey Dept. of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Controli Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: In response to Dr. Parkin''s letter of May 21, 1990; I am writing to offer Bellcore's support in your ASSIST for Cancer Prevention initiative. Because of the growing evidence that exposure to-tobacco smoke represents a major health risk. Bellcore has recently implemenite6a company-wide pollicyy which bans all smoking-on company premises and;inicompany owned or leased vehitcl'es. There is a clear need for meaningful efforts to reduce the prevalence of smoking among our citizens, andithe ASSIST projiect, under the comtbibed sponsorship of the New Jprsey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American,Cancer Society, will surely be an effective instrument in fulfilling this mission. For iinformation regarding Bellcore''s efforts to reduce the incidence of tobacco-related diseases among our employees, and to explore ways in which Bellcore might assist you in your project, please contact our Corporate Medical Director, Thomas M. Shea, M.D. (201-740-4075). Sincerely, .C~ 4"a.W 290 West Mt. Pleasant Avenue Post O1hce Box 486 lLvfngston. New Jbrsay 07039-0486 201. 740: 3131
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-:; 6el{ Ptlantic CompZny C~ New Jersey Bell 540 Broad Street George H. Franck, M.D., M.P.H. Newark, New Jersey 07101 Corporate Medical`Director 101 649-4499 July 27, 1990 William E. Parkin, DiVM-, DRPH Assistant Commissioner New Jersey Department of Health Division-of Epi~demioUogy and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: Thank you for your letter of May 21, 1990, regarding the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST)1, which will entail local and statewide programs.offered by tobacco control coalitions. The New Jersey Bell Medical Services Organization recognizes the hazards of tobacco smoke andisupports the concept of a project that incorporates activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. Per your request, we are willing to-participate in this initiative by providing information~to our employees about tobacco control programs and will extend some time as a role modell at policy development workshops. As you know, our organization participatediin,a smoking policy survey conducted by the New Jersey Department of Health with Cechnical assistance from,the national Centers for Disease Cbntrodi. Xouwshowld; also know,that our company has been smoke-free since May 1, L989-. Sincerely, ~ ~. k_ 'z' "/ CC: C. Crist D. Strigl
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PSEG PublicSeruice fflectncand Gas Corncsany 80 Park Pfaza, Newark, NJ 07101 / 201 430-7000 MAtuWG.ADDRESS / P0. Box 570, Newark; NJ 07101 June 12, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health• Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN369 Trenton, N. J. 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: PSE&G wholeheartedly supports the initiative called the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. For the past four years, we have tried to encourage our employees to quit smoking-by offering smoking cessation programs, restricting smoking to designated areas, and supporting non-smokers' desire to work in a smoke-free environment. In our health promotion program, we had developed an in-house video by a prominent oncologist on the deadly link between smoking and cancer. This tape was offered to 2,000 secondary schools in New Jersey and over 900 accepted the free copies. Our continuing effort to promote the concept of smoking control and prevention will be an ongoing subj,ect which will utilize our in-house newspaper, pay envelope stuffers, and health promotion program. We appreciate the importance of your project, for it is a known fact that almost 80% of all cancers are potentially preventable. of that number, 40% is attributable to lung cancer. Therefore, we will support your effort in trying to make our society smoke-free in the future. LoTtis Marturana General Manager Employee Services 95•2001 (20®M) 1•90
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':rum & Forster Corporation A XEROX Financial Services Company. 2i W.AVy Road; Basking Ridge, New Jersey 07920 201 204+3500 June 4, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: This is in response to your request to Mr. Vairo requesting a letter of support for the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. We recognize the need to encourage smoking cessation and the importance of educating our youth on the health dangers related to smoking. We have a smoke-free environment at our New Jersey facilities and offer educational information on cessation programs for our employees. We support the effort to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. Sincerely, 2 Maria D. Janke Asst. Vice President Community Affairs jms CC: R. A. Zito
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H, lT T Corporation World Headquarters 320 Park Avenue James F Witimer, M.D. New York, N.Y. 10022 Vice President Telephone (212) 94t1-1940 Director - Health, Environmen4 and Safety June 18, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control State of New Jersey Department of Health CN 360 Trenton, NJ 08625 Dear Dr. Parkin: I am responding to your letter of May 18 to DeRoy C. Thomas, President, ITT Corporation, concerning the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study application. ITT Corporation supports tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. Several of our companies, and ITT World Headquarters itself, have instituted smoke-free workplace policies. Smoking cessation programs are routinely included as part of our corporate health enhancement and wellness programs. As you have described it, the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) should be a worthy effort to further control tobacco use, and as such we endorse your participation. Sincerely, .7FW : dn
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/.tiW2500 REK'R/69 Chambers Works Deepwater, New /ersey 08023 (,609 ) 540-2600; July 9, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Department of Health Div. of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 .Trenton, NJ 06625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: We support the initiative called American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) that is being proposed as a partnership among the New Jersey State Health Department, the Cancer Society, and businesses in New Jersey. Du Pont's Medical Services and health promotion programs heartily support the goal of this initiative which is to reduce the incidence of tobacco-related cancers among New Jersey's citizens. Our Chambers Works facility in Deepwater is interested in assisting with the implementation and evaluation of innovative smoking cessation programs in the workplace, especially those that can assist high risk individuals. We look forward to cooperating with the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society, and the state and local coalitions in carrying out the terms of this worthwhile contract. We believe that the partnerships proposed in ASSIST will result in tobacco control activities that will benefit our New Jersey employees, their families, and health promotion efforts throughout the Company. Sincerely, iCSC' ~ Richar&D. Stewart Works Manager Better THings for 8etter, Living
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Coraatr,ent COn7putPl" COrPQld6017 July 12, 1990- New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Controi Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 43625-0369 Att: Mr. William E. Parkin, VVK. DrPH Assistant Commissioner Dear Mr. Parkin: 106 Apple Street Tintbn Falls;, NJ 07724 (201) 758-7000 Concurrent Computer Corporation, an, employer of 220-0 employees in Monmouth CountyF strongly endorses and supports the programs concerning tobacco control activities. These programs will help to reduce cancer morbidity and•mortal-ity. We will be happy to endorse and• offer programs provided by the New Jersey Department of Health, the NJ Division of the American Cancer Society. Attached is a list of the current programs being offered-at our facilities. Please contact me if I can provide any future assistance. Thank you. Sincerely, liJ~ (i /(.tfL/~k / r~/ ' AE,GI- Darlene G. Meagher Occupationa,L Health & Safety Nurse DGM/,pk
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ACME MARKETS, iNC. 75 VALLEY STREAA4 PARKWAY:.AtALVERN. PA 19355 l215/809-4000 May 23, 1990 !. Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN, coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Amoki-ng Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: In response to the request of Dr. Parkin, this will confirm that Acme will certainly provide some support to the Division in regard to its smoking control program. We certainly agree that there is a need for such, a project and aili be happy to provide assistance through our stores. by publicizing whatever materials that are generated as a result of the p:: o j ect . By thi s, I mean that we will be happy to post signs and' distribute material to our customers that are provided pursuant to the program. me. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Vc-,-y ti:uly yours, WALTER P. RUBEL. Counsel/Director of Public & Governmental Affairs. WPR/dc
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New Jersey Carpenters Funds (20t) 855-1200 in N.J. 1-800-624-3096 10tVVoodbridge Center Drive, Woodbnidge; N.J. 07095 June 28, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN NEW-JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: I am in receipt of Dr. Parkins May, 1990 correspondence, and~would like to offer the support of the New Jersey Carpenters Funds in your efforts >:o develop tobacco control programs. We recognize the problems society is facing due to lung cancer, and'believe that the New Jersey Department of Health, along with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society, can make a positive difference. We would be more than willing to disseminate any articles you deem appro- priate to our members via our newsletter. SincereLy, ~ Anthony Soprano Director, Employee Health Benefits New Jersey Carpenters Funds AS:lg cc: George Laufenberg New JKsey, Carpenters Penaion Fund • New Jersey Carpenters Health Fund • New Jersey Carpenters Annuity. Fund • New Jersey Carpenters Vacation Fund. Nerv Jersey Carpenters Apprentice Training & Educational Fund • Now Jersey State Council of Carpenters Check-off Fund • Duas Check-off Fund. .,.~-,.-.
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101 MORGAN LANE, PIAtNSBUtRO, NEW JERSEY 08536 0(609) 275-8tsti8 • PAX (609) 275-441i1 May 16, 1990. Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Dept. of Health Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall, In response to Dr. Parkins letter of May 8, 1990, I am writing on behalf of the New Jersey Builders Association (NJBA) to support the New Jersey Dept. of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society in the effort to develop.tobacco control activities viaa the ASSIST initiative. NJBA has a genuine interest in curbing smoking. Of utmost concern to our industry is the substantial number of smoking, related deaths that occur in residential occupancies as a result of negligent smoking habits. According to the National Fire Protection Association, approximately 30% of fire related deaths are attributable to smoking. Further, thousands of people suffer disabling injuries as a direct result of smoking related fires and, millions of dollars in property damage occurs annually as well. NJBA is vitally concerned about the life safety of all home occupants and supports a cost effective, proactive policy towards fire protection which would reduce deaths and injuries due to residential fires. At the top of the list is cigarette safety. Fewer smoking Americans will certainly result in fewer American fire fatalities, fire related injuries and smoke related illnesses within residential occupancies. Yours truly, Ct1 X - ~~ ~ L. Ke~=nell NJBA President WLK: sb 1990 STATE OFFICERS WAYNE L. KARNEL4 Prrr drm ROBFBTH KAREN' GREGORY C ROS11ilOT fI !PreSIJIN SKOntVlff Irefi/eM rN RIGGS JOHN FALLONE VI& uttnr•Trrarwn Y- Pres,dens Secrearv ROB£RT BI7IENBINDER' PATRICK ). O'KEEF.E Vlfe hesdlN Assxuue Afairs Ear<WiK Vice Prer1/enr Hun t Bakar Mich.cl Gross, Esq. Gewrwf Cawd faWrain.r-a! Coun.el /. H. Cuh. & Conyany Pmschto k Ietschto A~ilM FI-N/ CGnnJlaMl AFFILIATES • National Association o6 Home Builders • Atlantic Builders Association. of New Jersey • Home Builders Association of Cape May County • Central Jersey Builders Association • Builders Association of Metropolitan New Jersey • Builders Association of Northern New Jersey • Home Builders Association of Northwest New Jersey • New Jersey Shore Builders Association • Builders Association of Somerset & Moms • Builtiers League of South Jersey • Builders Pblitical Action Committee of New Jersey • Home Owners Warranty Corporation of New Jersey • Insurance Trust of the New Jersey Builders Assoe. • Institute of Multi-Family Housing -Nb man has the moral right to withhold his support trom.an organization that is strivinp-to improve conditions within his trade sphere" - Theodore Rooseveltf
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0 ® The New Jersey Asphalt Pavement Association Seven Centre Drive Suite 7 609-655-2733 FAX Jamesburg, New Jersey 08831 609-655-2030 April 25., 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN State of New Jersey Department of Health CN 360 Trenton NJ 08625 Dear Mrs. Marshall: Our Association strongly endorses and supports your application. to the National Cancer Institute to participate in the seven year project designed to reduce the prevalence of smoking!, and;the adverse health affects associated with that activity. Without question there is an enormous need for such a project, as attested to by the higher probability of lung cancer among the smoking population. We are confident that the New Jersey Department of Health, in partnership with the N.J1. Division of the American Cancer Society, will develope effective local and statewide programs using designated control coaliti:ons. Along with our support, you have our pledge to a.ssist in giving the project a wider audience by publicizing the programs in our weekly newsletter. Wishing.you all the success, I am Very truly yours, Clif o d J. H ath President
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4a7rralhs MARINA ' HOTEL ' CASlNO June 28, 1990 0 Mrs. Janice Marshall MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: The management of Harrah's Marina Hotel Casino recognizes the need to reduce tobacco related cancers and the prevalence of smoking in society. In an effort to target this important issue, Harrah's employees have the opportunity to attend on-site Stop Smoking Workshops and seminars during the months of June and• July. This is just one example of Harrah's committment to providing a healthier workforce environment. Harrah's supports the New Jersey, Department of Health together with the New Jersey Division of American Cancer Society in their application efforts to• the NCI to participate in the ASSIST program. The structure of the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study to offer statewide and local programs through tobacco control coalitions is commendable. We look forward to receiving additional information on this worthwhile project.. Sincerely, ~ p I G'lW `i~~ Ron Lenczyck •f Executive Vice President and General Manger 1725 Brigantine Boulevard Atlantic City.. New Jecsey 08401 609-441-5000
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Elizabeth Moench Executive Director, Public Affairs Pharmaceuticals Division CIBA-GEIGY Corporation Summit. Ni'w Jersey 07901 Telephone 201 277 758B CIBA-GEIGY June 28, 1990- Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoki ng Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: I would like to thank you for contacting CIBA-GEIGY to gain support for the American. Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST). Being in the health care business, we are acutely aware of the damaging-effects of cigarettes, both to smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke. As such, we are making our own plans to reduce smoking at all of our Pharmaceuticals Division locations, and have organizedta task force internally to address this issue. We agree wholeheartedly that there is a vital need for the ASSIST Project, not only because of the morbidity and mortality caused by smoking, but a1.so because of the high costs that smoking,places on the health care system. Anything that you can do to help reduce this destructive practice would be more than welcomed. We support your efforts and would be pleased to know how your project cou.ld support our activities. Good luck with your project. eth Moench E~cutive Director Public Affairs
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E*,,ON COMPANY, INTERNATIONAL 2WRARKAVENUE FLORHAPA PARK V J, 07932• 1002 MEDICINE ANO ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT MAURICE E GOLDMAN.. M D, f A C.P• ASSOCIATE MEDICAL DIRECTOR July 5, 1990 Dr. William H. Parkin New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: In response to your letter of May 18, 1990 to Mr. L. R. Raymond, President of Exxon Corporation, I am pleased to indicate that he will support the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. We will plan to disseminate, as appropriate, the materials you send us relative to the health consequences of smoking and to publiciae the availability of your anti-smoking programs. We wish you success in this important initiative. Sincerely, 'mo_~~ -Z. MEG/dg MEG9040 4 DIVIyON!OF' ExXON COAPORATiON:
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Employe. Relations Staff Ford Motor. Company 900 Parklane Towers Weat' One Parklane Boulevard Dsarborno.Michiqan 48126 June 26, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Cbntrol Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: I am writing in response to the request £rom,Dr. William E. Parkin for a letter of support regarding your application to the National Cancer Institute for funding of tobacco control activities. Ford Motor Company respects the right of each individual to decide whether or not to smoke. Permitting employees to expose their co- workers to the possible adverse health risks arising from environmental tobacco smoke, however, is inconsistent with our goal to provide safe and healthful working conditions. To improve the overall quality of our work environment, smoking is prohibited in all U.S. facilities except open production areas, designated sections in cafeterias, and additional nonwork areas designated by local management. Smoking cessation and counseling services are available to all employees who wish to stop smoking. Given•the above activities which are already in place, Ford cannot support your proposal by offering worksites in which to implement tobacco control activities. We do, however, fully support the goals and concepts of your intervention efforts, andilook forward to hearing about your study, as it progresses. Sincerely, u._+-V1 n H. Tfiebwasser, M_D. Director Occupational Health-and Safety 607
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Internabonal'Business Machines Corporation 2000 Purchase Street Purchase. New York 10577-2597 914/697-6000 July 20, 1990 Mrs. J. Marshall New Jersey Department of Health, Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: Thank you for inviting IBM to participate in the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study in New Jersey. IBM is concerned,about the health implications of smoking and has had smoking guidelines for 17 years. The current guide- lines, updated in 1987, prohibit smoking except in specially designated areas and support the non-smokers' desire to work in a smoke-free environment. IBM also supports smoking cessation through our health education programs which are available to our employees, retirees and,eligible dependents. While we have shared information on our practice and programs with outside groups and would offer to do this for your program, we cannot agree to support all of the items listed in-the attach- ment to Dr. Parkin's letter of May 21, 1990. I wish you success with your application to the National Cancer Institute. Sincerely, . 'J. SepuIlved Director - Health IBM United Sta s. /as
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UJB Financia/ Corp UIB rf'l/YC[NL. 301iCarne9ie Centec PO, eo~c2066 ~ F/l Pnnceton. ta1i08543-2fl66 609 987•3200 July 12, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: I have been asked to respond to William E. Parkin's letter to Mr. T. Joseph Semrod concerning smoking in the workplace. Although it is difficult to respond to several of the suggested topics, we as an organization are concerned with the health related costs of smoking incurred by our staff and~ subsequently passed on to the company as medical claims expense. We have taken action to reduce smoking in-the workplace by restricting smoking to limited areas in most of our facilities. We have also provided in-house programs to aid smokers in breaking the habit. Without specific requests from you, I am at a loss to say what we as an organization might do to assist in this project. Sincerely, ames N. Ferrier Vice President Human Resources
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`.1NDUCTOTHERM CORP. ~-- {;,t_,,,. - 4 SUBSIDIARV.OF SNDUCTOTHERM iNOUSTAIES NC 10 INDEL AVENUE RANCOCAS, NEW JERSEY; USA 08073-0157 (609) 267-9000: FAX (609) 267-3537 TELEX 685-1048 July 31, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs Marshall: Smoking and cancer go hand in hand and it is important that we all to do our part to educate people to the dangers. We at Inductotherm Corp. decided to do our part quite a number of years age when we offered a partially company-funded smoke enders program and instituted a policy of only hiring non-smokers. Over the years the number of smokers here at Inductotherm has of course decreased. Recently we have made our facilities completely smoke-free by not allowing smoking anywhere on the premises. By doing this we hope to eliminate the dangers associated with secondary smoke thereby improving the safety and health of our employees. Whereas we wish to be cooperative and support worthwhile causes, we really don't have enough information to issue a letter of support for the ASSIST project. If we don't clearly understand what the project is, then we cannot state if there is a need for it nor can we state we will support it or can we state that the state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of a contract we haven't seen. If we are to comply with your request we must have a much better understanding of the project. In light of our efforts as a private company you can see that we do support the idea of reducing the prevalence of smoking. Please send whatever additional information you can and we will review it and determine the extent of our support based upon the facts as we perce;tl{e them. ~1 , ~~~ Davi ~L. Braddock Vice President, Administration DLB/cf INDUCTION MELTING & 6iEATING•EOUIPMENT
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N~w Jbrsey-Naticna"~=:),K CN.S Peraningtorn NJ 08534 00.05 609 7.'.1:5752 Ronald 8 Hamilton Vice Presid'ent Ditector. of Human Resc.::ces June 27, 1990 New Jersey Department of Health Division,of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Attn: Mrs. Janice Marshall Dear Mrs. Marshall: I am writing to you to inform you of our support of the ASSIST program. We believe that there is a need for more state and local tobacco control programs. Our company had positive results in controlling the usage of tobacco by creating a smoke-free working environment and providing a series of smoking cessation programs for our employees. Many companies in our marketplace are going in this direction. Unfortunately, we have not seen the same response by the state and local government. Our company would be willing to provide managerial support and guidance in setting up smoking cessation programs similar to what we did for our employees. If we can be of further assistance, please contact me at (609) 771-5752. Sincerely, Rbn Hamilton Vice Presiden.t Director of Human Resources aw CoreStates New Jersey Nat'sona! Bank N 0 N W ~ ~ ~ Cj W (7)
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kmhdkK-vse of Newark100 Linden Avenue, Irvington, New Jersey 07111 201159614260 C CE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS July 26, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health, Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: In response to your letter of July 3 regarding the initiative called the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention, I wish to offer my support and encouragement. Such a statewide effort to reduce the prevalence of smoking can only improve the well-being of our citizens. Even though statistical evidence points to long term ill-effects on smokers of all ages, I am especially concerned about health damage caused to the school children of our state. Young minds are intrigued and influenced by the apparent glamour and sophistication of smoking. Therefore, I welcome the concept of "tobacco control coalitions" proposed by the New Jersey Department of Health, in partnership with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society. My hope is that such groups might effectively assist our teachers in. their efforts to educate children to the dangers of smoking,. The development of pedagogically sound materials an& techniques, designed to capture the interest of young children and engage the attention of teenagers, would be most appreciated. As the Superintendent of an area serving 60,000 young people in over 200 schools, I support your attempts to reduce New Jersey's rate of tobacco related'cancers through this initiative. Sincerely, ~yu4, rother James A. Liguori, CFC, Ed.D. Superintendent of Schools JAL:ctr Fax Number: (201) 596-4250,
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July 9, 1990 OFFICE OF CATHOLIC EDUCA.Ti(ON DIOCESE OF TRENTON; 1018 WHITEHEAO ROAm: EXTENSION TRENTON, NEW JERSEY 08638 PHONE: (609) 771-0141 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Conmissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control State Department of Health CN 360 Trenton, New Jersey 08624-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: The need for Project ASSIST is crucial on all levels. Smoking is so habit forming: Adults provide young people with example and license. Parents are the main educators of their children. They must learn as well as the youngsters. Drugs and alcohol are receiving the attention they deserve, and the education is proving effective. The dangers of tobacco are not realized nor have the educative efforts been effective up to this point. Part of the reason for this has been the ability of the tobacco industry to override any projects undertaken thus far. The 73 Catholic elementary and secondary schools will support Project ASSIST; and we feel confident that such a strong coalition in New Jersey, teaming the Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society will be effective. Not only our children but our adults as well need; persuasive education on tobacco control. Very truly yours, ~ . I ~ - • i _ , / ; Sister Loretta Hogan Associate Superintendent of Secondary Schools ~ a ~
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~ A~ `i) i R New Jersey Association of School Administrators 920 West State Street, Trenton, New Jersey 08618 O!![CEIE tltl•" Telephonee (609) l99-2900/FAX (609) S99•1693 P..dtw Ricf{ud P. Saxer PrOMi..1*E1.01 Mutin Ney f~~ Ro~t A. Wiota 7Swrr.r David H. Mayv r.. P.amw." ril 23, 1990 Jaeees N. Mufphy bfvs DY.cwr James A. Moran REPRISLMAT'IVitE Ml.rSe Crf E Scheas 1~~.. ARaymond aMny At M.ne~l(a l. ub.no .ry~.. lahn M.Sherry Gknn T. Gray c..A.. G.sw A. Kiueen Danid E. Hidu Rieirnd pCa..wr Straus Cr...r.. IosePFi H. Webb itm= John P. rryor GlId"Cast.. ecyd A. S.nes u.a... con.,ntl.w A. Scarbo Hur/.r... eanare r. o11rim r.a. FJcic A. Cicshe6 Oa'..'t.-s John S. okca K...... wd+.d K. Klavon WiYiffirn A. Pe1aL lha1. Aenedia A.CudneD. loM F. FwufK oo«~. Domieie l. Cotupw John F. htrick Pa.Yt D. Raymond Orsi s.r.. Wiui.nt H.,.te.ms s.....4 John A. Fattre s...ec Wayne L 7airelluid u.ie. Ro6en A. tachenwer Man.. John M.Fre,v MwmM-M-t+r" K.cen G. Halt Cw0l7 fyt. RA. V'vpnia L Hriman Hl¢ar Bdre i.F. Thomaa 4 McCain Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN; Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control' Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Janice: It has come ta our attention that you are in the midst of requesting, an application from the National Cancer Institute to develop tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. The New Jersey Association of School Administrators is a professional organization dedicated to the advocacy and welfare of the children of this state. It is of utmost importance, therefore, that you meet with great success in this project. The necessity of developing good health habits in our children goes without saying; smoking will continue to destroy many lives. As an organization we are most willing to support the contract and will assist you through public relation vehicles and any other ways we may be helpful. We hope that the New Jersey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society will succeed in carrying out, the terms of the contract and; therefore, will reduce the prevalence of this most heinous habit among all people of New Jersey. VrM~ Rq..~wtatta Qr»aid F. Laricin sA P.eaMmat.E.i.ot HST:nhw EAi.K W_ ciarsen AAiA P.M Pe.Yist John B. Geissin`er Harriett S. Thomas Assistant Executive Director 2023676339
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May 17, 1990, Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN;, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidem2ology and Disease Control CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: The New Jersey College Health Association, at its general meeting on,May 16 at Trenton State College, discussed with its members the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. There was unanimous agree- ment by all in attendance that this project is indeed necessary if cancer morbidity and mortality are to be reduced. We, as an organization, wholeheart- edly support the contract. The New Jersey College Health,Association is prepared to assist the project by offering a program,on tobacco controls at one of its future meetings. The information gleaned can then be brought back by the college health nurses to their individual institutions where they can develop programs for students and employees tailored to meet the needs of their campuses. Although most colleges have adopted-strict smoking regulations on their campuses, the fact remains and is quite evident that use of tobacco~continues among college students and with,employees of our institutions. Tbbacco related problems are routinely observed in the college health centers. Without question, services for tobacco control, which are not currently available, are certainly needed. The New Jersey College Health,Association feels confident that the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society, and the state and local coalitions would carry out the terms of the contract. We would hope that this initiative would be given utmost consideration. Sincerely, N C? ~ ~ ElizAtieth T. DiAndriole, R.N. ~ Corresponding Secretary ~ County College of Morris Randolph, New Jersey 07569, W YGk 0 NEW JERSEY COLLEGE HEALTH ASSOCIATION
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STATE OF NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF EOUCATION CN 500 TRENTON. N.J. Oa625-OSOO May 18, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Department of Health CN' 360 Trenton, NJ 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: SAUI- COOPERMAN..COMMf5S1ON£R Thank you for your letter of May 2, 1990 and the opportunity to express support of the America Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention initiative. Since cancer is the number one cause of death in the United States, its etiology and irradication are among critical concerns for all and a major thrust of current research. The strong relationship of smoking to cancer is widely accepted. Multiple sources such as the Surgeon General of the United States, the America Cancer Society and the American Heart Association have expounded upon the dangers of smoking. Smoking is considered to be a contributing cause of lung, larynx, and oral cavity cancers as well as a contributing factor in the development of cancers of the bladder, pancreas and kidney. Many of our citizens, old and young alike, ignore these warnings and engage in this practice. The harmful effects may take years to, appear, therefore, making it easier for people to think that using tobacco is not harming them. In an effort to reverse this trend. I offer my support to you in your efforts to expand public health programs and help decrease the incidence of tobacco related cancers. In addition, our staff, particularly our health occupations program specialist or the safety control program specialist can be contacted for technical assistance if needed. We would appreciate your keeping us informed regarding the status of your data collection and progress. In particular, information describing the smoking patterns of vocational students, effective educational programs and supportive smoke-stop efforts would be of interest to us. If you are in need of further assistance, please contact Marion Mullarkey, HeaLth N Occupations Program Specialist, at (609) 292=6594. Sincerely, ~ Lloyd J. Newbaker, Jr., Ed.D. Assistant Commissioner Division of Vocational Education LJN'/MM/1g:11/6361N
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LLL LLL LLL L \E\C IfiRtiBIS ST.4TE (;DLDEGE F,OVERXInG BQ)ARD*~ AtiSQCIIaTIO.N. INC.. Iiu \\'EST NTATE STREET TRENT©N, NE\\' IERtiEI' QRo(>N ((e(K)1 9N9-41u1>• Dr. William E. Parkin, Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Department of Health CN 360 Trenton, New Jersey 08625 Dear Dr. Parkin: •PiTF (a+/.LE(ilf IM,t)i (.IT ~,T\TF ( u!.LFt,I. f:F:N. ( u:.t.l:C4. ()F \F\.* INaIr) \U1\T( lfA1R.THTE'. t t:>OLN6F. R:a\ta'P +„'(-)l.l F(•*,F't:+N \f\(. le R•F N :TO( >cTc)\.vTATe + l)LLF(,i. TH) ?1Aa .\. EDISON STATF ('lNlLli(:C. TNti\T0\ PATE t:(•)LLEGL'. \\4Lt.l.a\;,I4TF.R•(+~+'(+tUlYcaF +E •1.\1 IF'R~E1 April 30, 11990 The New Jersey State College Governing Boards Association, Inc. is a nonprofit educational association serving the advocacy and;policy research needs of New Jersey's nine state colleges. The colleges collectively serve 70,000 students annually, and represent the state's primary source of baccalaureate education. Among our major activities is monitoring and taking positions on public policy affecting academic quality and campus life. We also communicate with the colleges on topics which affect campus operations, particularly when they are shared commonly by the nine institutions. Given the responsibilities I have mentioned above, I believe that there would be a role for us to play in the implementation of the ASSIST program, which could include, but not necessarily be limited to: communicating information about the program to the appropriate staff at the campus level; taking a position, as an organization, on state-level policy generated by the ASSIST program; and providing consultation to the program. In addition, I am certain there are people in our Association-who would be willing to participate on a state-level advisory panel, if need be. Although the specifics of the program are not yet available to.us, I believe you will find that the campuses and Association will be generally supportive of any policy or organizational activit}~ that would benefit the health and well-being of current and futur~bw J~rseyans on our campuses. Darryl G. Greer E'xecutive, irector DGG: crs
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DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION BILINGUAL/FOREIGN LANCsUAGE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT CAMDEN OTTY SCHOOLS 1656 Kaighn Avenue • Camden, New Jersey 08103 Telephone (609) 541-4246 DR. MARY A. FRAZIER MR. JOSE A. JIIvIENEZ Assistant Superintendent Director August 23, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN,369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: Because of the high mortality rate related to tobacco use I believe that there is a critical need to provide a variety of activities that will educate the public about the dangers of tobacco use and its health risks. The increase of hispanic population and other races that are speakers of other languages in the USA makes it necessary that the project provide information in Spanish, Vietnamese & other languages. The Bilingual department of the Camden City Schools proposes to carry out the following activities to assist the project in developing tobacco control activities: - Distribute information to parents regarding the dangers of tobacco use. - Invite program sponsors to talk to parents, teachers and students. - Assist in the distribution of questionnaires to parents and students regarding the problem. - Sponsor contests in all the schooLs, at all levels, regarding the health problem of tobacco-use. JAJ/MS/'aor `~ Mr. Jose A. Y"i"menez Director
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DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY, fNC. A PUBLIC SERVICE SORORI "f Morristown Alumnae Chapter August 16, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, N.J. 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall, I'm writing on behalf of the State Council of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. to support the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention. It is well documented that smoking is linked to many chronic illnesses. Cigarette smoking is re- sponsible for one out of every six deaths in the United States. Other health data shows that approximately 1000 people die from smoke related diseases. There are many official bans on smoking but health care dollars linked to smoking related diseases are costly. The cost and the impact on health, are all reasons to support programs to help people stop smoking. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority is concerned about health and health related issues. We will suFpcrt yosr-efforts and encourage all of our chapters to join you in support of the ASSIST Project. Our State Council consists of local chapters throughout New Jersey. We are willing to promote local projects as individual chapter initiatives, and on a statewide basis we offer our man- power and support for state programs. N O I understand that the New Jersey Department of Health and the ~ American Cancer society will coordinate or be responsible for the CJ ~ ~ W ~ ~
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i contract of the Program. We have health professionals and educa- tors in our organization who have agreed to assist usn in this effort. Sincerely, G1 hei:la Thorpe; President New Jersey State Council Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.
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~~F C QiNli i. v.+/ CJ Y,¢C1.1RlL aJJ A. Jt1 C ' c RESEARCH, EDUCATION & COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION 47-49 THROOP AVENUE NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY 08901 (201). 247-9066 JANETH ELAINE SCOTTi Cfieirpenoa July 27, 1990 Mr. William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control State of New Jersey Department of Health CN 360 T'renton, New Jersey 08625-0360 Dear Mr. Parkin: C. ROY EPPS President We are pleased to know that the New Jersey Department of Health is responding to the RFP fromthe National Cancer Institute. Statistics have shown a tremendous need for tobacco control activities, particularly in minority communities. We have been monitoring the steady increase for cancers of black males and females and have concluded that smoking cessation and control programs are a top priority. Health education from a preventative standpoint is one program area which the League has targeted to be made available for many of our clients. Our organization is in full support of your efforts and will assist with th-e project in any way we can to assure its success. Having worked with the State Department of Health and The American Cancer Society on o-ther successful projects, we know that the terms of the contract will be carried out. We wish you every success in your efforts to mount this program. We look forward to our continued cooperative working relationship. CRE/zad i 3022P FORMERLYTHE URBAN LEAGUE OF GREATER NEW BRUNSWICK. INC. + MEMBER AGENCY. UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL JERSEY
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ROSEMARY R JACKSON EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS MARIA HAYNES PREStDENT BARBARA POWELL VICE PRESIDENT ROSEANNE E 19ROWN SCLAFFORD TREASURER DINA SCHLOSSBERG. ESO SECRETARY MARIA RIVERA PARUMENTARIAN G1G1 BANXS DEBBIE BELL PAULA SANTIAGO•BENITEZ EDDIE MAE CANNON WANDA DICKERSON ELMAJ KANE SUE LEGGOE BETTY MOORE DORIS NEELY HABIBA SOUDAN ANNIE UNDERDUE STEPHANIE WARREN OLLIE WILLIAMS • SHIRLEY WtLL1AMS eaaxrdev+. QA1ban 501i COCDPER STREET. SUITE B CAMDEN., NJ 08102 16091 963-8160~ July 19, 1990 OA2orn'en 's eerIer, cCJ nc. Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Department oE Health, Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 36-9 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: The Camden Urban,Women's Center, Inc. is especially pleased to give its full support to the ASSIST Pro- gram. And, we would like to extend our full coop- eration and assistance. Camden City has a large population of African- _ American and Hispanic women. Unfortunately, there is a high ratio of smoking among these women. At this time, we have no smoking cessation programs being initiated'at CUWC,Inc., therefore, we will support your efforts in developing effective programs that are conducive to the well-being, of our citizens. I will be looking forward to hearing;from you,when the ASSIST Program begins. Sincerely, Imani I. Green Housing Information Specialist cc: Rosemary R. Jackson
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P(IER'TO RICAN A flCIATION FOR H[3MAN D: TELOPMENT, INC. 100 FIRST STREET, PERTH AMBOY, NEW JERSEY U8861 TEL. (201) 442-1051 SEHVICES TO THE COMMUNITY ... CHILDREN ... YOUTH . . . FAMILY . . . ELDERLY ANA CRUZ CABASSA Chairperson LYOIA TRINIOAO Exscutiva Oirectar July 11, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSNI, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN!369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: The Puerto Rican Association for Human Development, Inc., will support the New Jersey Department of Health and the American Cancer Society in their efforts to stop the public from Smoking which will reduce the incidence of tabacco related cancer. There is a definite need for tabacco control activities in the Perth Amboy area. As a non-profit social service agency serving the pre-dominantly hispanic Middlesex County Community, we will be able to assist the program to disseminate information showing the hazard associated with smoking. The hispanic commu- nity will greatly benefit from such information; there are many hispanics who suffer from lung and other respiratory problems associated with tabacco. This is an important project which will require the involvement of all State agencies as well as-private and public establishments. We wish you success in attaining your goal. Sincerely, ~~ N Trinidad CU ecutive Director ~ GJ. LTJ1p ~ cc: Ana Cruz Cabassa ~ ~ Board Chairperson ~r? ~ ~
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i Chief - Roy Crazy Horse COUNCIL Floyd Adams- Chairman . Kenova Bradby - Treasurer Curtis Diyqs - Secretary Edgar. Harmon Ringo Johnson Carl Major Wendell Miller Eddie Nblson ELDERS Jack Forbas, Ph.D. Charles Juancito Rarihokwals POWHATAN-RENAPE NATION Rankokus Indian Reservation P.O. Box 225 Rancocas. New Jersey 08073-0225 Phone (609) 261-4747 Mrs. Janice Marshall M5N Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Ep3rlaniology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program Qd 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369-, Dear Mzs. Marsha]1: Qi behalf of the PowYatan Aenape Nation.and the Powhatan Tribal Council, we whaleheartedly- support the New Jersey: Depa_*+Tent of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Soci,etys, request to the National,Cancer Institute to apply for(ASSIST), Aern.rican Stop 3tqk•ing Intezvention Study. We are painfullyaware that there iss a~direct. link .between smoking and tobacco related cancers, and appaaud. your effozts~ to addre,ss -this rrost needed project. Many menbezs in the eaimtmity have dieff because of lung cancer and ert>}ahysema caused by smaking, and tbe state and locai' prbgrams that would be formed to advocate tabacoo contrrol, that hav+e: beesi tcrissing in, the. paat.. would be an important needed seivice to the" coRmtMty in the future. The Powhatan Renape Natioa:.©oald assist the project b)r:publ•isYiing, an article in our newsletter which i.s=.mmtled nat. only to our 20,000 .Atmerican Indian mmbers, but to interested people thtvughout the statx~and- country on our extensive mailing list. We could also distribute:~infeamtiorrTcanpiled by your agency, at our cultural affairs which is attem3ede-by the public. We further feel that information should be available and disseninatect to youths throughout the state, to discourage smDking. - I}mow that the New Jersey Department of Health~, the New Jersey Divisiion• of the Anie•rican Cancer Society, and the state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of the contract, and we look foiwardto a concerted effort.~ In Unity With Creation I Relnain ~ W Sincerely, 1 4 Chief _~> 0) Roy Crazy Horse ~ ~ GWAIAKOHIMADISIWINACHI DIBENINDISOWIN JUSTICE AND FREEDOM
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( In NORTH HUDSON COMMUNITY ACTION CORPORATI!ON DOMINICK PAPA Pr0Mpe.N MICHAEL A. LEGGIERO FXeaWbe mlfetltor Mrs. Jani,ce Marshall MSN, Coordi-nator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 TELIMHOMC 201 -ese•225o FAX # 330•3803 Re: ASSIST• Application Dear Ms. Marshall: The NorthiHUdson-Community Action Corporation definitely supports the American Stop Smoking Interventiorn Study (ASSIT) for cancer prevention as a program vital to the needs o,f our state and its community and will certainliy cooperate in its functions. Specifically, North Hudson CAC will provide in- formation and referral, sharing data with,clients and:staiff and, also, help with public awareness through press relleases and other announcements. As we are all aware of both the direct and indirect adverse health impli- cations of smoking, NHCAC will do all we carn to help ASSIST be successful. Very truUy yours, MAL/jz cc: Ann T. Dudsak, NHCAC Deputy Di,rector* Theresa Ruane, NHCAC CLi,nic Di,rector Barbara Phaire, NHCAC Planner AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
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P U nited Cerebral Palsy Associations: of New Jersey, Inc. 354 South Broad Street • Trenton, New Jersey 08608 • 609-392-4004 • Fax 609-392-3505, Patricia Munday Hill, Ed.D. Myra Ryan, MtB•,4. Prerident £•xeculive Director May 31, 1990 i Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: On behalf of United Cerebral Palsy Associations of New Jersey, I would like to voice our support for the ASSIST smoking cessation program, which I understand is a joint effort of your agency and the American Cancer Society, New Jersey Division. Our agency is aware of the effects of smoking on the fetus, and we would be very supportive of intervention effarts geared towards expectant mothers. Exposure to in-utero tobacco smoke increases the risk of the child being born with developmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy or mental retardation. We therefore support your efforts towards bringing healthier babies into this world. A number of my staff are very familiar with the work of your agency and the American Cancer Society. Both agencies• smoking cessation and tobacco awareness programs have been proven very effective. Therefore, in my judgment, your agencies would be the ideal implementors of this program. I wholeheartedly wish you luck in your application for these funds. Please feel free to contact me if our agency may be of assistance with your efforts. Sincerely, • 1 v J Myra Ryan, M.B.A. ~ Executive Director ~ W U1 rn r6.. -dc qnd r•.nrrrn~ n(nrr<nna ++.irh dicnhiNkat tn, a chanvrnr~nrrrtr.
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BERGEN - P•AS-SAI:C CPiAPTER N' A T 1 O N A U h1 U L T I PL E S C L. E R O S 1 S S C C I E? V 730 RIkCR ROAD. P. O. BOX 348; yO`.'J•tlILFORp. NEW JERS[+ TEL. (2r~! 9Pi•a5°_? • FAX: (2.^.7).nf7•7J83 May 31, 1990 Janice Marshall New Jersey Department of Health Division of Cpidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Janice: This letter is in strong support of an extremely important and worthwhile project to reduce the incidence of tobacco related cancers. Although no evidence exists to show any increased heaLtti.risk to,MS smokers vs. the general smoking population, smoking is an added burden, that wil.ll compound whatever health problem one might have. One of the greatest concerns of family members of MS smokers who suffer from severe tremor of the hands is the constant fear of their loved'ones burning their hands or clothes or even worse, setting them- selves or the house on fire. I think education provided statewide and locally about the health risk associated with smoking as well as the potential danger to MS smokers and others would undoubtedly raise the consciousness level of this client population. The Bergen-Passaic Chapter would support your coalitions in this endeavor by announcing and advertising future programs that will be offered!in the Bergen-Passaic Cournty area. Additionally, we would arrange speakers from your coalitions to speak at our monthly support group meetings,. Please keep us informed of the progress of this project. S:incerely, yours, ~.Gl_1.eo anet Mateo, MSW. Client Services Director TRt6WTES AND MEMORIAL GIFTS ARE APPRECIATED.
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EVA BURROWS GEraER.~ THE SALVATION ARMY IINCyORPORATEDf: FOUNOED IN 1865 BY WILLIAM 800TH NEW JERSEY DI,YISIONAL kiEADQUARTERS 4 GARY ROAD UNION, N.J. 07083 TELEPHONE (201) 851-9300 May 25, 1990; Mrs. Janice Marshall NJ Department of Health Div. of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ, 08625-0369. Re: Project ASSIST Dear Mrs. Marshall: MAIUING ADDRESS. PO BOX 3170 UNION, N.J. 07083 It is myy pleasure to write in support of the proposed initiative called, the America Stop Smoking Inttervention'Study for Cancer Prevention. Since 1865 The Salvation Army has been one of the largest and most active movements against smoking and;nhe negative social and physical results of this drug habit. In the course of those years we have seenmany situations of family grief and conflict because of smoking. It is our firm belief that smoking represents a major health and social impairment to those who smoke and those they live with. We would be most happy to lend the support of The Salvation Army across New Jersey to project ASSIST. The need for such an initiative is pronounced. It is a`drug" habit that has been accepted imour society and our young people remain in jeopardy. We offer our 23 centers in New Jersey to the project for education and counseling. We would; be willing to incorporate educational materials into our youth and adult programs state-wide. Having had past positive relations with the NJI Dep,t. of Health we are confident of their ability to-carry out the terms of a contract. The American Cancer Society represents one of the best organiza-tions in the area of cancer related to smoking. LT.-COLONEL WILLIAM A.8AMFORO OIVISIOMAI COMMANDER
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page 2 Ms. Janice Marshall May 25, 1990 We would support the initiative in any way possible and feasible. I urge the National Cancer Institute to proceed with this program. If I can be of further assistance please let me know. , Lt,(4041_1 William A. Bamford Lt.-Colonel STATE-COMMAND WAB:ep cc: William E. Parkin, DVM,DrPh Assistant Commissioner
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GJavILLI'5UiiiK rRECFNEW ~~INC M 400 WORTHINGTON AVENUE. HARRISON: NEW JERSEY 070L9' .(201N481-2300 OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION PATRICK J. NATALE. PE Chairman THOMAS J. SMITH Presrdont EVERETTW!JENNINGS Vise Chairman STUART F. SAKOSITS 1•fNrurel REV. TIMOTHY NOURIHAN Stenrasl: DIRECTORS OF TNE BOARD RobNrte Diusaa Glona Esposlto Rishard Friand Noeman Gamble Jacb Gold Rw. D.an llanniny Jonn Lynch Jam.a McLatM Mark Mortha Rebecca Rabmovwt: •John C. Rams.y Chairmaa 6n.rrtus Oli.i. Sale RobNt.Spatn.r Anq.lo valinte ••Norm.n Zipp/ar, d'ratta Emarirur ADVISORY BOARD DorotA.a Appar Oerard Clips Dominick D'Ayost. Kennath Donaldson Roban Gimpil Or. Paul Hardin wlNam Heaney Henry F. Henderson Dolor.s Hermann Jerome Hines Alan T. Kane Dr. San({ Jim KimDr. Karl Klinp.s D.vid L.eff Dr. wllam Marwell M.rc.dfs McCormick Elaanor McGlynn John O•Donn.R Ntckolas Tethzri Jr.. J6spn UMnw Evaluation. Training Employm.nt & Placement for O~sabl.d P.opt. Accredited by lh. Commisston on ~ ACL/edn.non of ~ R.habilitaaon Faalities Certified by the New Jersey Ornston of Rehabdnatren Services and Commtstion fos tne 8/tnd Member Goodwdl Industnts of Amer ca Centnbuuons ar. rarOeducuble Mrs. Janice Marshall, M.S.N., Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 25• May 1990 Dear Mrs. Marshall: It is our understanding that your agency, in par*_nership• with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society, is responding to the National Cancer Institute's challenge to develop a-tobacco control project christened the American Stop Smoking Intervention,Study (ASSIST) for cancer prevention. We here at Goodwill Industries of New Jersey, Inc., applaud and;support your efforts in this regard. As a non-profit vocational rehabilitation facility providing training and work services to disabled adults, we have seen the ramifica-tion,s of tobacco related diseases as they impact on the health and vocational prognosis of adu.lts in the population. Specifically, we have worked with individuals who required career redirection following detection and;treatment of cancerous conditions directly related to tobacco ingestion. Other clients have complained of an inability to locate smoke-free work environments which they required;due to their own particular allergic profile. In the last year, we lost a client finally diagnosed with lung cancer at the age of 56. With a fine resume, having, raised a family, all of whom are productive citizens, his emotional stability was unquestioned throughout his life. Two years prior to the detection of CA he developed anxiety with panic attacks that completely debilitated him. He died next to a night table stocked with cartons of cigarettes_ We here, then, bear witness to the havoc wrought by tobacco consumption. Clearly we see the needd for more aggressive tobacco control tactics and are prepared to support the project as set forth in the terms of the program contract. We believe that professional staff here could disseminate educational 20236'7f 355 Our Rasrnrv>•Witrk,,. `u Pct,pir Can
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D1iI1NDUSTR1ES UF NEW JFRSEY ING 91 400 WORTHINGTON'AVENUE. HARRISON; NEW JERSEY 07029 .(10l) 481-2300 OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION PATRICK J. NATALE. PS Churmen THOMAS J. SMITH. rMesde.x EVFJiETT J. JENNINGS vJte cnarman STUART F. SAKOSITS 7r..surer REV. TIMOTHY HOURIHANSecr.«ary DIRECTORS OF THE 6OARD Rob.na 'Dtusss Gbna Esposito Ricn.rd Ftiend ; Norman Gamble JacK GoM Rev. Dean ltmmno John Lynch JatlNf MGJIM Merk Mattfis/ Rebaca Rabinowitz 'John C. 1lamseY Chairman Emerrtfa OIiNa Sals Robsn Spuxier Anplo V.lente ••Naman Zlpplsr Directw Em.rutu ADVISORY BOARD Darothea Appa Gxard Cla's DomtnicK D•Aqosla Kenn.th Donaldson {lobert Gimppl t Dr. Paul Hfrdin 1M1Mlum //.eney FNnry F. Henderwn Dolor.s H.rmann Jarome Hmes Alan T. Kane Or. Sanq Jim Kim Dr. Karl Klnqas David L.N Or WilWamMa>tvre0i M.rcedes McCormick El.anor McGlynn John O`DonnNl N2ketas Terliar Jc JBeeQh UnamN Evaluation. Training EmDloyment 6 Racement for aisabled I'.cple Accrednedhythe Commrsswn on AccrWnabon of Rehabditation Faarbties Ceni6ed by the New Jersey Division of Rahsbthtanon Services and Commlision (oc the Blind Member Goodwill Industries of America Contnbutmns are Taa D.abcvble information. Seminars or other public programs could be held at Goodwill and conversely we would not be averse to performing: ou,treach functions to our surrounding communities in the counties of Hudson and Essex. Of course we would be amenable to the negotiation of any responsibilities or dtities which the N.J. Department of Health, the N.J. Division of the American Cancer Society and,appointed coalitions would deemiappropriate. With a sincere belief in the productivity of cooperative effort, we look forward~to the opportunity to work with both of the agencies noted'above. Our own focus of rehabilitation, permiates the atmosphere here at Goodwill. Many persons have stopped smoking during• their employment and training here and such behavior is encouraged andireinforced. We maintain good working relationships with other state agencies such as the Division-of Vocational Rehabilitatiom, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, the Department of Education and, the Division of Developmental Disabilities. With such a• proven track record, we anticipate making a positive contribution to your agency's tobacco control program. Please feel free to contact me with regards to the development of this project. Sincerely, i ~. Li Alicia J. kupchik, C.W.A., M.S.W. Climical Director of Rehabilitation AK/ t g; nttr Rtt<Int•.. Work., ctn f'r.nr.lr C'ari
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NTER I FOR NON-PROFIT CORPORaTIONS June 14, 1990, William E. Parkin, DVtd, DrPh Assistant Ccxtmissioner New Jersey IDepari~esit of Health Division of E.pideniology & Disease Control CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: I am writing in support of the New Jersey Department of Health/American Cancer Society cooperative application to the National Cancer Institute for the ASSIST saoking intervention project. The Center for Non-Profit Corpora- tions is a non-profit umbrella organization,representing and serving, New Jersey's charitable non-profits, including 600 dues-paying members. Many of our tnesnbers are crnnauuty-based organizations serving children and disadvan- taged youth,in distressed areas where levels of smoking and cancer morbidity are especially high and the econatnic impact of scnoking dependency is more severe than for the population at large. The Center wholeheartedly supports the ambitious goals of the ASSIST program and we are confident that the American Cancer Society - New Jersey Division and the New Jersey Department of Health will! carry out the project ef fectively. We would be happy to lend our support to the proj ect by running pramtiona]l articles in our newsletters, which reach approximately 1,000 non- profit leaders and other interested parties frem the government and for•-profit sectors. If you need additional information regarding the Center or uts member- ship, feel free to contact me. : 36 W Lafayette Street,, Trenton, NJ. 08608 • 609-695•6422
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ORGANIZED `~If, INCORPORATED 1894 1914 NEW JERSEY STATE FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS 55 Clifton Avenue New Brunswick, N. J. 089011 May 24, 11990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Cocranissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Department of Health CN 360 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: Your recent letter requesting the New Jersey State Federation of Women's Clubs participate in the i'nitiatiue American Stop Smoking Inter- vention Study (,ASSIST) for Cancer Prevent3on,was passed on to the new Administration of the Federation on May 11, 19:90. You have our good wishes in this.seven-year project. Very truly yours, •__ .c < <_ rc Ruth W. Supp Corresponding Secretary ~ ~ W REGEIVED ~ JLN. D1U. C?{~n> _.~` ~
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M1SS10 Q ) ~ OF TRENTON P.O. Box 617 98 Carroil Street Trenton, NJ, 08604 (609) 695-1436 June 12, 1990 MTs. Janice MarG}+a11 r MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Deparlmeit of Health Division of EpidPSniology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program fN 369 TrnntAnR New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: The Rescue Mission. of Trenton is in support of your application to be su2znitfed to the Nati.onal Cancer Institute to develop tobacco control activities. The clients wbo seek the Rescue Mission,'s services have a very high rate of use of tobaceo products. We would welcome educational pro- grams on the effects of tobacco products and classes or other programs to assist staff and residents to stop smking. If we can be of further assistance, please feel free to contact the Fescue Mission, SinoerPly, bGAY/rft Peap~e [ ~elp`~ns Peup e R'aghtia QarOarn Communi2y N 0 N W ~ ~ W CD
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El~tS S..utES2F . Pii1UP tA (3tAiyllEh%' F.... . NewJers ev~~.,. - ALLIANCE for ACTION 1 NC. ---- P.O.. Box 6438 • Raritan Plaaa, IJ • Edison. New Jersek 0&610. FA•X (20,1ir2254694 • (20!) 225-1180 May 30, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control State of New Jersey Department of Health CN 360 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: I am writing to you in support of the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. Our group, the New Jersey Alliance for Action, has been working hard for over ten years since our inception on all quality of life issues and projects that relate to same. Air quality and the resulting health benefits derived from a clean environment are most important to all citizens. We thank you for your efforts to keep our surroundings in optimum condition by helping to reduce the effects of tobacco upon smokers and nonsmokers alike. Hopefully, your project will greatly reduce the cases of lung cancer and resulting mortality rate throughout our state. Wishing you success in your endeavor to better the health of all New Jersey residents. jl~ Ellis S. Vieser President ESV:gp cc: Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator
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Q ukicuk-uu I LL C47 1 ~'~ PUERTO RICAN CONGRESS OF NEW JERSEY ~ MILTON MEDINA Chairperson, LYDIA VALENCIA Executive Director May 15, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN; Coordiinator New Jersey mepartment of Healith Division of Epidemioliogy and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: It is with great tnterest that we received your communiiication of April 1, 1.990 in regards to the much needed in,itiative to devel!op Tobacco Control Activitiies to reduce cancer morbi.dity & morta l i ty . Please be assure6 that the Puerto Rican Congress of New Jersey will assist in whatever capaciity necessary, especially in reaching out to ou r H;i span i c Commun i ty , who unfortunatel y i s not as i nformed as to the risks of cancer & tobacco usage as the general community. Youngster are especiaTl,y a group that should be focused on. We are sure that with the track record of the Department of Healith: and the ensuing coalition N.J. Di.vision of The Ameriican Cancer Society will successfully iimpllement the goals. of this initiative should it be awarded. It is our hope that this applicati:on will so that the Community wil'1 have the benefit of i nformati on meet withisuccess th,iis liife-saving. Sincerely Lydia J:/ Valiencia Executive Director 515 SOUTH BROAD STREET, TRENTON, NEW JERSEY 08611 • TELEPHONE (609) 989-8888 • FAX (609) 989-8883
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` New Jersey State Safety counclt 6 COMMERCE DRIVE•CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY 07016.(201) 272•7712/2l30 A NONPROFIT, NONGOVERNMENTAL, PU6LIC SERVICE OROANIZATION DEDICATEO TO THE PREVENTION OF ACCIDENTAL DEATH AND INJURY May 9, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, Dr.PH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control State Department of Health CN 360 Trenton, NJ 08625-0,360. Dear Dr. Parkin: The Council is most supportive of efforts to control smoking and to make the public more aware of the health threat posed by smoking. We will be pleased to participate in the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention and are confident that the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society and the state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of the contract with the National Cancer Institute. We feel that we can help in implementing this project by disseminating information through the news media and publications, such as the enclosed Family Safety and Health Magazine which we make available to thousands, of employees and their families in our state (see page 14). We trust that your application willi be approved and look forward to working with you in this vital undertaking. C. Edwin Max President CEM-:sr cc: Mrs. Janice Marshall CHAIRMAN; RUDOLPH 0. STYS, S.nior Vlc. Pn..Id.nt-Ga., Public S.rvica Electric d1•Ga. Company;,V ICE CHAIRMAN.,,HAROLO G. CULLER, Senior V ice Prasidant, Continental Insurane. CompanV: VICE CHAiRMAN'ANO TREASURER, DESMONO P. McOONALD, Pr.ckfint, MIdlYntic NationaliB.nk; PRESIDENT AND SECRETARY, C. EOWIN,MAX. Chapter of the National S.fety Council
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D.A.AN.J., Inc. EXECUTIVE COi`lMIT?EE 1990 - 91 rretidext: Robert Hopek North Hunterdon H.S. Preuidtxt Eletr: Ron SanFillipo Caldwell H.S. E?rerNl7iYe SKfKpy-TfeaJYrH. Virgil G. Sssao Retired (Fair Iswn) Tony Gedaka Woodbury H.S. Jeff Burkhardt Bord6ntown H.S. David Salberg - Registration Cha7iman Pennsville H.S. (NCSSAD Representstive)Robert Kaaaby (NJSIAA Exesuti've Directot) Frank Baldachino Dumont; H.S. Louis Peuaallo A. L. Johnson HS. Jack DuBois Maachester Township H.S. David Swemun Warren Hills ReR. HS. Robert Coward Edison H.S. Vito Di Orio Emenoa H.S. Robert Caprio Parsippany Hills H.S. bfart} Boslaad Passaic Co, Vo-Tech H.S. Tony Bocchiori - Ex-offido West I*1 Y. Memorial - Retired Derry Michael - Ex-Officio WhilPpaoy Park H.S. . Retired Robert Feeney - Ez-Officio Shore Regional - Retired Joseph S. Novak, Esq. Cliaton. N.J. (I.egal Counsel) Directors of Athletics Association of New Jersey, Inc. D.A.A.N.J., Inc. Organized in 1951 Correipondin~; Addretf: Mr. Virgil Sasso 14 Brearls• Cresce•ot Fair Lawn.. N. J. 07•i 10- ('_0P.) '96•6320 May 18, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinato•r New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, N.J. 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: The DAANJ, Inc. endorses th,e New Jersey Department of Health's initiative to develop; tobacco contro]l activities to reduce the cancer and other health-related consequences of smokinQ. Mr. Kanaby, Executive Director of the NJSIAA and also a member of our Executive Board, quite frankLy, represented both organizations with his response to•your request on May 4, 1990. If we can be of further assistance do not hesitate to call upon us. We wish you success in your pursuit of this important health problem. Bx/sc N ~ N W ~ W W
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~~d"Gle'r P.O: BO%'487 • ROUTE 130 • ROBBlNSYILLE, NEW lERSEY 08691 (609i 587-4855 May 4, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: ROtER7 F. KANASY Executive Director FLORENCE K. PFRAGAUO Associate Director ROY SCHLEICHER Associate Director JOSEtH P. PORCAROAssistant Director The NJSIAA endorses the New Jersey-Department of Health's initiative to develop tobacco control activities to reduce the cancer and other health-related consequences of smoking. Our TARGET program includes a comprehensive chemical health. education program which includes anti-smoking. In addition, many of our member schools have adopted an athlete's code of conduct which includes non-use of tobacco as well as alcohol and drugs. Most recently, all our schools have been sent a video on smokeless tobacco and the risks involved. The NJSIAA would welcome additional resources and information which may be provided by the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) project. In addition, we offer our assistance through our TARGET coordinator, Mr. Joseph Porcaro. Quite frankly, there is a need for this effort, since most of the efforts in substance abuse in the past few years have ignored smoking and concentrated on alcohol and drugs. The American Cancer Society and the New Jersey Department of Health seem to be the most knowledgeable and logical agencies to conduct this comprehensive study. Both agencies have provided many outstanding resources to our schools for use in our health, safety and athletic programs. I wishlyou success in your application. RFK:rf Executive Director Sincerely yours, Robert F. Kanaby A VOLUNTARV; NON-PROFI rASSOCIArION•HAVING NO AFF/LIATRON WhlH'STATE GOVERNMENr rc~r~~aNq,c.+nr~acrv rnVrnTrcv n,Arn aq1n oi qvlN -0Ti4l Ftt(' r;(1l..fnF!i-Ul)N
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LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL. INCORPORATED INTERNATIONAL HEADQUARTERS OFFIcE OF THE PRES/DENT AND CHIEF FXEMIVE OFFicER Dr. William E. Parkin Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control' State of New Jersey Department of Health Trenton, NJ 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: June 19, 1990 Your letter of June 5, 1990 to, Mr. James Ferguson has been referred to me. For your information, Little League Baseball is deeply involved and is keenly concerned about the use of smokeless tobacco. We have taken an active role in a smokeless tobacco prevention project at the University of Houston which is underwritten by a grant from the. National Cancer Institute. Many of the subjects are Little Leaguers and we arranged for several of the Houston Astros players to be included in testing the hypothesis that athletes can be positive role models. Last week I was contacted by the Department of Health and Human Services to assist them in an anti=smokeless tobacco campaign and it was suggested that a meeting would be held in Washington. D. C. to discuss this major ef fort. As you undoubtedly are aware, there is building interest in this concern and Little League Baseball stands willing and ready to join in any and all projects which will result in the reduction andlor elimination of the use of smokeless tobacco. N ~ W M Cfi,JETGHTON J. HALE, Ph. D. 9i f CJH/bg President and Chief Executive Officer E~~~yED IR 1~j , ~q 2~15%~ aV.f:AVQtj'r-SS P.O. Box 3485 • WILLIAMSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA 17701 • 717-326-1921
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BABE RUTH Babe Ruth League, Inc. INTERNATIONAL HEADOUARTERS: NASHVILLE. TENNESSEE OFFICE: 1770 Brinswick Ave., P.O. Box 5000. Trenton. NJ 08638 Phone 609•695-ta35 Fa+ 609.695-2505 211 Donelson Pike. Surte 7 P.O. Box 140090. Nasnv,lte TN 3721,. Phone 616•883-1Q7~'r Fax 616-883•166- July 9, 1990 President !'Chief Executive Officer RONALD TELLEFSEN' Vice Presfdent/Secretary-Treasurer ROSEMARY SCHOELLKOPF Commissioner. Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control ROBERT P.' FAHERTY. JR. Commissioner Smoking Control Program CN 369 JAMES O. STEWART Trenton New Jersey 08625-0369 Public Reiations/MarKeting Director , JOHN W.KRAMER Administrative Assistant SUSAN Y. WEISSMAN Dear Mrs.. Marshallc International 8oard of D+rectors. Chairmen of the Board BILL SMITHI Chlcka3ha. OK Executive Consultant ROBERT M.CURRAN Ltverpool NY, BOB'DICKSON Aleaanaria. IN ALLHN'L. ELLIOTT 9urrey.B.C.Canada MARION ELLIOTT rdanreca, CA GEORGELALLY Norwoaa. MA JIM' LEMP Cneyer.ne. WY. LARRY MAGERS Jamestowrw NY FLOYD MARKHAM, Portiantr. OR; ERNEST P PAPAZOGLOU Lynn MA~ RONALD G SCHHID Haywar0. CA HARRY'SMITHI -aamdton Suuare NJ. DAVID E. STONE r:reoenc. MO NORMAN TRAVIS 3wnnqton Co JAMES WAGONER Fon Smnn AR WILLIAM E WHITEHURST Gmton NC The threat of tobacco indticed;cancer is prevalent throughout our society and is all too often the result of misinformed or uneducated: youth. Speaking for Babe Ruth League, Inc., I feel very strongly that the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention is necessary in the State of New Jersey and would receive our full cooperation and support. Babe Ruth League, Inc. would be happy to assist the project by publishing appropriate anti-smoking and/or tobacco chewing information in our quarterly publication, BULLPEN, which enjoys an international circulation of welL over 28,000. I am confident that the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey Division of the American. Cancer Society and the involved state and local coalitions will see the (ASSIST) program. through in a thoroughly professional manner. In closing, although lung cancer has been and contimues to be the most visible form of cancer contracted by the misuse of tobacco, I urge you not to underestimate the seriousness of oral cancers created by the sustained use of chewing tobacco. I wish you tremendous successs in this most important endeavor. /` f • _ ~ ..K. _. 1. / . _r Ronald Te11ef sen President/CEO BABE RUTH LEAGUE, INC. RT/tc A Non-ProAS Tax-Exempt Orgamzatron.lor 6 thrv 18 Year Oid-Players.
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July 11, 1990 3 Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Dept. of Health Div. of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking'Control Program, CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: This letter serves as a support letter to the New Jersey Department of Health in partnership with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society in their application to the National Cancer Institute for the ASSIST project. There is obviously a strong need for such a long-term initiative in-tobacco control. "Just Say No" International strongly supports such a tobacco control initiative since tobacco is a "gateway" drug and is emphasized in our primary prevention program. There are over 8500 registered "Just Say No" Clubs (children 5-14 years of age) in the United Stated alone. These Clubs meet year-round and' conduct drug education, recreation, peer and family outreach, and community service projects. In addition to drug education, Clubs have takenstrong,advocacy stands to control tobacco,and alcohol advertising promotion. "Just Say No" International would be most willing to provide Club leader training, Club materials, and techn-ical support to create "Just Say No" Clubs ._. . f ~.Q[OWrvOwiICY MONO.A~M CNAIfMRM' .t•,f• i[~iwrr
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Page 2 Janice Marshall July 11, 1990 throughout the state of New Jersey to help,implement a primary prevention component in the ASSIST•program. Enclosed are some sample materials from our program. Sincerely, obert A: gimmons, Dr.P.H. Program Director RAS lm ji Enclosures: NOtes Newsletter Brochures Meeting The Challenge Back-to-School Month kit Club Member Handbook cc: William E-. Parkin, DVM, Dr.PH Asst. Commissioner Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control
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NATIONAL BLACS WO1ViEN'S HEALTH PROJECT 1237 (3a+don 3t.. SW Dear Sister, Adants, t3.orlia 30310 (4u+) 763-091e Thank you for your interest in the National Black Women's. Health Project's (NBWHP) Self-Help Program. Enclosed is a packet of information to give you an introduction to our Self-Help Groups and a history of NBWHP. The information you have received is an introduction that is lifted out of our revised "Self-Help Develmper's Manual." Once you have read over the material, if you are still interested in actually starting a group, give us a call or write us for the whole manual, and we will send it to you. The actual manual gives clear, detailed information on how you can go about starting a group and what you do in the group once you bringg them together. Included in the manual are sample agendas, do's and don't's, and details on how to facilitate the self-help process. The information will hopefully outline for you what you can do in your group to continue your journey to wellness. We hope that what you receive today, will inspire you to go ahead and make the move to commit yourself to continued growth through our process. Also, included in your packet is a business card with my name on it. Feel free to call or write me if you need assistance with your group. Additionally, if you desire to have training with your group(s) or an assembly of women, call me to see if we can set up a way for someone from our office or a closer office to come to your area. Our funds are limited, so the type of arrangementss we would make include supporting your fundraising efforts to pay for one or more of our transportation. Let us know how we can support you in your self-help endeavor. Any further questions you may have, do feel free to write or call. Thank you again for your interest: We are always excited about inquiries in the program. In Sisterhood, 'A ,,~ L ~ ~-~- ~.~~ c L~~ Pa~tricia White Program Developer/Trainer
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. ; y. a 1< , R(CHhRD E. SQUIRES COilN1Y DcECUiNE June 29, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, M•.S.N., Coordinator NJ State Department of Health, Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program- CN-369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: ATLANTIC COU NTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND INSTtTi1T1ONS 201 SOUiH SHORE ROAD NORTHFiEID. NJ. 08225 (609) 645-7700 (TTY: 34a,5551) JOHN H. CRONIN DEPARTMENT HEAD I am writing in support of your application for funding from NCI for the ASSIST project. Our Department has been a recipient for the past two years of grant funde for Youth, Smoking Prevention & Cessation Pr•ograms. The programs have been well } received and preliminary evaluations have shown a significant impact on the youth of our County. However, we are aware that more active programs.are still needed to further reduce tobacco related illnesses and death. Our past and present partnerships with the State Department of Health and the American Cancer Society have been positive. Because of our commitment to Smoking Prevention and Cessation, I believe that we could provide valuable assistance to your endeavors for a successful program. Please contact me if I may be of further assistance. Sincerely, Tracye McArdle Health Officer N A ~ TMC:ag W ~ C Linda Duca, Health Educator ~ ~ r.++ DMSION OF DMSION OF OFRCE OF RESiDENT SERV}CES PUBUC HEALTH MEDICAl. D(AMINER
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COUNTY OF BERGEN DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES 327 Ridgewood Ave. • Paramus. N.R 0Z652-4895 (201) 599-6100 William D. McDoweil Cowuy Ezucutive June 15, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, M.S.N., Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program, CN 369 Trenton, New-Jersey 06825-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: Michaei A. Guarino, `vI.P.H. Dirccro. The Bergen County Department of Health Services is pleased to endorse the participation.of the New Jersey Department of Health and New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society in partnership for the National Cancer Institute's project called ASSIST for Cancer Protection. For those of us in public health, tobacco related:, problems due to smoking still remain a high priority. It is one of the most difficult health problems facing us today. Our organization recognizes the need for the ASSIST project and sup- ports the contract, as we know the New Jersey Department of Health, the new Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society and the state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of the contract. This Department has long been a successful forerunner in early detection and health education regarding smoking prevention and cessation. We presently provide: • Low cost smoking cessation programs for county residents based; on behavior modification techniques and utilizing materials provided by the American Cancer Society and the American Lung Association; • Lunch time "quit smoking" programs for county employees. • Teen smoking prevention cessation activities funded by a grant from-the State Health Department and targeted to students and teachers within local school districts. We would like to provide: • Continuation-of the employee smoking cessation program and,expansion,of the program into local industry. • An education and support program for pregnant women and their significant others geared to cessation of smoking and other behaviors harmful to their babies. N ~ N W i?? ~ ~ ~ N
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Mrs. Janice Marshall, M.S.N., Coordinator Page 2 June 15, 1990 • Weight control activities specific to those who are attempting to quit smoking. In addition, our Cancer Detection Program for Women and our Health Consultation, Prograuns, a1l staffed by public health nurses,, assess and educate Bergen County residents regarding the danger and consequences of smoking. We can assist with this project by sharing our program goals, procedures and;curricultun. A long-term desired goal for the State of New Jerseywould;be to offer a toll- free Hotline for smokers to call when they need support. At the present time, there are Hotlines for almost all addictions, and yet, there is nothing for the smoker. Another suggestion would entail working with,New Jersey legislators to enforce the "no smoking" laws and to ban the use of vending machines. This department supports the State Health Department's participation in project ASSIST for Cancer Protection, and will cooperate with the program's goals in every way possible. Sincerely yours, Michael A. Guarino Director MAG:ag
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH l' "D HUMAN SERVICES Michael J. DiPiero Freeholder Mark J. Lonetto Director Dr. Jung H. Cho Public Health Coordinator June 19, 1990 Camden County' 1800 Pavilion West, E107 Ferry A'venur Camden, N.T. 08104 Phone: (609) 757•8600' Janice Marshall t3JT Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control S::~d,cin-y Control Pregrata CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall, I understand'that you are preparing the application for New Jersey to participate in the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study - (ASSIST). The program~sounds very promising for New Jersey. We have a strong American Cancer Society Chapter in New Jersey with an excellent track record•for catmunity based'programs. Since the Camden County Division of Health is a recipient of two Tobacco Use Control Grants from your department, we are in a position to know and appreciate the State Health Departlnent's commi.•ttment to effective Smoking Cessation efforts. The Coalition cmdel seems an especially apt approach for ASSIST. In Camden County we have had a very good, experience with our Healthy Mothers/Healthy Babies Coalition and AIDS Coalition_ There exists a loose affiliation of interested agencies and groups in Camden County relative to Tobacco Use Control. The ASSIST project would be facilitated and accelerated by utilizing our existing networks. 1 noted the interest in curtailing smoking jalitiatioil. illio is a vital area of emphasis as the young are so susceptible to tobacco marketing. The Camden County Division of Health has many programs; Adult Healtht Improved Pregnancy Outcome and Health Promotion to name three, which would be very involved in local planning and implementation of hSSIST. It is a partiicularily important health, i,ssue for New Jersey. I wish you every success in your application. Sincerely, --~ t-f-. A.r ;,. w- G9 , M• S• c. Dr. Jung, H. Cho Public Health Coordinator JHC/pmd,
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CITY OF TRENTON, NEW JERSEY Department of HEALTH AND HUMAN'SERVICES DIVISION OF HEALTH June 11, 1990 William E. Parkin, D.V.M.,Dr.PH Assistant Comaissioner Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control State of NJ Departznent of Health CN, 360 Trenton, NJ 08625 Dear Dr. Parkin: Carmen J. Armenti, tKayor Catherine S. Graham, Director Hichard'D. Salter, Health Officer The City of Trenton, Department of Health supports the New Jersey Department of Health-and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society in its application,for NCI's ASSIT Project. Each week, we continue to hear aboe.t health hazards related to tobacco use. We must expand projects to curtail sales and increase prevention and cessation programs available to New Jersey citizens. During,the past five years, our health department has been a recipient of Smoking Cessation/Prevention grants from the N.J. State Department of Health. As a result of these grants, we have beenrnable to make a significant impact in NSercer County on the number of educational programs that have been offered at hospitals, schools, connwnity groups and businesses. Our programs are widely tawm and in great demand. But a lot more still needs to be done to reduce the prevalence of tobacco use. Because our health, department has a proven track record in Mercer County, we feel that we could greatly assist the coa2'itien-in its projects. We also feel that the coalition could assist us by providing us with educational•materials to reach a greater nulnber of citizens. Our experience with the State Health Department and the Cancer Society has been positive. They will work hard to meet the terms of the contract and make the project a successftal one with the outcome being reduced tobacco.related illnesses and deaths. Sincerely, A"L~(G4<l N t i~4^v Richard m. Salter Healith Officer RDS:bh -RFCEfVE© J11~.1s~19?~ c:Q:rTl:ul: 2Q236"763'74
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, NEW JERSEY HEALTH EDUCATION DIVISION COUNTY ANNEX BUILDING 841 GEORGES ROAD NORTH BRUNSWICK, N.J. 08902 (201) 7454100 STEPHEN "PETE" DALINA CHAIRMAN June 12, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: SERNARD G. MIHALKO DIRECTOR I am writing in enthusiastic support for American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) resources to be awarded to the New Jersey Department of Health and the American Cancer Society. As you know, the Surgeon General has estimated that 390,000 Americans die preventable deaths every year due to tobacco-related illness. Tobacco has also been determined to cause cancer in those exposed to other people's cigarette smoke, making "second-hand" smoke the third leading cause of preventable death in this country (preceded only by alcohol-related illness). In addition, studies indicate that smoking has not significantly decreased in America's teenage population. It is for these reasons that we Health Educators have a lot more work to do to raise young people's consciousnesses to the fact that smoking isn't "glamourous," "sophisticated," "sexy"; it's downright foolish. The work that we have been able to do in Middlesex County to help educate young people, so that they do not start, and to help adults quit has reached over 7,000 people. But, without some strong reinforcements, our grassroots efforts will be undermined by the tobacco-industry's three billion advertising dollars a year, our smoking prevention and cessation progress in Middlesex County would not have been possible. We particularly appreciate the resources, support and ideas provided by you and by George Wasser at NJDH. Your expertise, excellent management, and networking on our behalf helped us to provide smoking: prevention education, adult and teen cessation groups, and advocacy to implement a smoke-free environment. Considering the fact that cigarette smoking is the number one cause of preventable death in this country, the ASSIST project is the most important health program available today. And, as Tobacco Control Field Representative for the Middlesex County Health Department, I strongly feel that there are no better organ- izations than the New Jersey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society to carry out the terms of the ASSIST contract. i 2Q23S763'75
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2. I believe that NJDH and ACS working synergistically together, irn cooperation with our state and local coalitions, will effectively reach as many people in New Jersey as possible. Our health department stands ready to help NJDH and ACS to implement this vital program. The funding provided by ASSIST could truly keep the prevention and cessation momentum going in Middlesex County. We, at Middlesex County Health Department, who have worked so closely with you in the past, believe that there are no more deserving, no more knowledgeable organizations in the field of smoking prevention and cessation today than the New Jersey Department of Health and the American Cancer Society. Sincerely, ~~~~c~!~a~r,~.u Linda Benjami Kline Tobacco Control Field Representative Middlesex County Health Department
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Borough of Red Bank HEALTH DEPARTMENT MONMOUTH COUN1'Y, NEYUJERSEY Frederick A. Richart Health Officer J'une 29, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marehal7 New Jersey Departznent of Health Division of Epide~tri.oloSy and Disease Control S9mking Control Program CN 369- T.rentoQi. New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: The Red Bank Health Departrment supports the State Health Department apQlication for a Smoking Intervention Study Grant. Prograams to rec311oe tobaooo smlti.ng will help lower the incidence of lung cancer and related diseases. This Deparbnent will coopesate to the extent possible with available staff and fmxIing. Veiy truly yaurs, FrederiCk A. Richart Health Officer FAR/jat (201):530-2754 Health Office Vital Statistics 32 Monmouth Street, Red Bank. N.J. 07701
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PATd21CK PASCULLI MAYOR Board of Health 916 Garden Street HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY 07030 Tel. 420-2365 June 13, 1990 :# j Ms. Janice Marshall New Jersey State Dept. of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall, PATRICIA M. MITTEN. R N HEALTH XiiCIER This letter is in support of the New Jersey Dept. of Health who, in conjunction with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society is applying to the National Cancer Institute to develop a program entitled ASSIST, a seven year project beginning in 1991 to lower cancer mortality and morbidity by reducing the prevalance of smoking. Cancer rates and other smoking related,diseases such as COPD and emphysema have always been high in Hudson County. Hudson County and Hoboken have historically included a large, Hispanic, lower socio-economic group. it is well known that smoking is more prevalant among poorer groups and among Hispanic males. Hence, this is a segment of Hoboken that becomes an ittmediate target for smoking cessation programs. Smoking is a primary, contributing factor in many types of cancer as well as circulatory and: other diseases, including.the effects of passive ''second hand smoke.' At the Hoboken Health Dept.,, our pre-screening interviews for cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes reveal that many older adults continue to smoke in spite of the adverse publicity and serious medical effects. Undoubtedly, they are very addicted•to nicotine. Other targQt groups are pregnant mothers, teenagers and young•adults who are influenced by peer pressure and the notion that smoking is 'cool'- An additional issue is chewing tobacco,. used predomonantly among malles. There is a substantial target group in Hoboken who need smokingt prevention and cessation programs_ Whereas smoking cessation attempts to: help smokers stop, smoking prevention attempts to-get the non smoker to to make a conscious decision and coxmitment not to begin smokino;. The Hoboken, Health Deptt. wouLd like to make a major effort to help iindividuals prevent or stop smoking. The Health Dept_needs professional assistance througK contacts. and liaisons: and we hope to obtain these through, the 'tobacco control coalitions' under the ASSIST program_ If staff can gain mot;e knowlledqe about methods• of prevention, the Health Dept. willl be able to reach further into the Hoboken community and perhaps begj.n, to:meet our
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PATRICK PASCULU MAYOR Board of Health 916 Garden Street HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY 07030 PATRtC1A M. MITTEN. R.N. Tel. 420-2365 MEALrH,oFricaR -2- ideal. By obtaining funding for increased publicity - through posters, advertisements, fliers, presentations, counseling:and on-going groups, we can begin to raise awareness of this very addictive legal substance. Enough publicity can help to make smoking 'socially unacceptable' in much the same way as drugShave started to~lose their appeal. Our understanding is that the New Jersey Dept. of Health, the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society and state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of the contract. We strongly support the ASSIST project as we feel it will greatly benefit Hoboken. Not only will ASSIST contribute to a direct redUction of the incidence of tobacco related cancers, it will also contribute to the health of a generation of young people whoY through our efforts, will hopefully not be seduced by the illusionary glamour of smoking.
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OCEAN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT C.N. 2191 Toms River, N.J. 08754 201-341-9700 June 20,, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: CHARLES KAL3FFMAN PUBLIC HEALTH COORDINATOR The Ocean. County Health Department supports the New Jersey State Department of Health in its efforts to, obtain a grant for the ASSIST Program. The Ocean County Health Department has been concerned for many years in changing life styles of individuals and to expediently address smoking intervention. I am enclosing for your information a recently completed smoking, report obtained through our School Health Newsletter. me. For further information, please do not hesitate to contact Sincerely, CK/sw Enclosure
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Township of Mt. Olive June 18, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN' 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 SUBJECT: American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention Seven (7) Year Project Dear Mrs. Marshall, I am writingt in full support of your efforts to develop, tabacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking.. Local health departments, such as ours, are in a unique position both to observe the prevalence of smoking•and the devastation and pain caused by this addiction. The need for concentrated efforts on behalf of smoking prevention can be documented on a daily basis at our health screenings. our statistics show that more young women are smoking thus endangering their lives and the lives of their children. We also see by networking!with smoking cessation clinic leaders, how difficult it is for smokers to quit anastay quit. Health departments can enhance your efforts by becoming the conduit through which, networking! channels are built, ordinances are enforced, and pressure to conform is placed-on establishment owners and vending machine companies. We have established a liason with the Morris County American Cancer Society Chapter and work closely with them to promote lifestyle changes and to increase the awareness of the public regarding the warning signs of cancer. I am certain that by building.upon such networking efforts that the smoking prevention effrorts of the New Jersey State Department of Health will be successful. Please feel:free to call upon the Mount Olive Township Health Department in your well focused efforts. Sincerely, Frank G. Matteo Health Officer FGM.: my lf gm2'. 065 cc: Dr. Ronald DuBow, M.D. Board of Health Members David W. Alvarez, Esq., Board of Health Attorney P. O. Box A. Route 4v.. Budd Lake. New /ersey 07828 Telephone 201• 691-0900
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WARREN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT Post Office Box 337 Washingfon, New Jersey 07882 Tef.: 689•6693 EMMETf E. LANDIAK PubUc Haakh Coordinator E. JOYCE SCHEUERMAN, R.N:,M.A. Oirector of Oivision of Personal Hialth Ser.ices June 14, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN,, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: This is to-confirm Warrecr Coun,ty Health Department support of your application to•NCI concerning the ASSIST project to develop tobacco control activities. Smoking continues at significant levels in-certain Warren County populations. School-age children continue to initiate smoking at a young age. The few courses we have been able to offer through our Health Educator have been very successful. However, a major comprehensive initiative in our schools is very much needed. Smoking amoung older adults is another difficult issue. Again, we have made small efforts in this direction., but much-more staff and materials are needed. We would be pleased to•support the New Jersey Department of Health, The American Cancer Society, and the state and local coalitions in any con- tract and/or project that assists us to;address these community needs. We would be pleased to•make such staff and material that we have available to the program,and would be willing to participate withim the limit of our budget. We aliready work closely with the local unit of the American Cancer Society and wouUd be honored to serve in any state or local coalition effort to which we could contribute. Don`t hesitate to contact me if we may be of further assistance. Sincerely, Emmett E. Landiak PubLic Health Coordinator EEL:sm
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PRIlNCETON REGIONAL HEALTH COMIvQSSION Princeton taegional Health, One Wnument Drive Commission Members Box 390 Borough of Princeton Princeton, Miw Jersey 08542 Township of Prinoeton (609) (609) 497-7608 497-7609 Mrs. Janice Marshafl, MSN June 4, 1:9s0 New Jersey State Department of Health Div. of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: As a local Health Officer in the State of New Jersey, I am in full agreement that there is a need for projects providing expanded publrc health programs to the citizens of New Jersey to help reduce our incidence of tobacco related cancer. li also feel it is necessary for the State to assume a leadership role in this endeavor. The Princeton Regional Health Commission and Department will help publicize your efforts and provide sites where possible. I think that it is time we in Public Health use the television media "Prime Time" spots in our educational efforts. This type of effort may be costly initially,. but it would be cost effective when one calculates the number of people who wili be impacted. Please forward a copy of your application methods and objectives so that I may be able to offer specific suggestions. Also, if you have not already done so, I suggest that you contact the New Jersey Health Officers Association for a letter of support. Thank you. Yours truly, Stephen J. Papenberg Princeton Regional Health Department SJP: jc
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rowNSHiP' CF ParsippcznrJ-Trvy Hills Ma,nre,n owr Ecviog;. Proiecr Yaur Er.wrcnmenr 1001 Parsippany Boulev3rd Parsippan3•, ,Vew Iersey 070,54 • 201 'n.i-'TocJ C0 ~F: HEALTH DEPARTMENT Max Schubert, M.P.H. Health Officer June 6, 1990 Dr. William E. Parkin, Asst. Com. Division of Epidemioiogy and Disease Control New Jersey State Health Department CN 360 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Parkin: This is to acknowledge your letter of May 24, 1990, regarding the d'evelopment of tobacco controll programs in the State of New Jersey. The proposed Smoking Study will be supported: in this community, as there is a decided need to maintain a continuim of smoking prevention education-in the schools. Although smoking prevention is briefly touched in social and physical education classes, these programs receive little priority with school educators and administrators. Smoking reduction, and the elimination of cancer can only be achieved by identifying the problems at an early age. Such programs using the resources of the local HeaLth Department can make lasting impressions on eiementry grade students. The Parsippany Health Department is prepared' to participate in a local tobacco control program, if such a program would involve the school system. A state-wi;de program such as the American Stop Smoking In,tervention Study will be successful if State directives encou-cage local health departments partici;pation in such a state-wide program.
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Dr. William Parkin (2): June 6, 11990: New, Jersey's residents wi? 1 great]ly benefit from this program if approved by the National Cancer Instituite. Also, this program will help the State to compl:y witih~ the national health. goals for a smoke-free society by the year 2,000. MS:jv
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LOUIS J. LAMANNA; M,A. DAtVIEL BEYE111, Freeholder Health Officer ~ . ,' Director, Department of Health Public Health Coordinator //) D~ `~F~/~~~~ry COUNTY OF CAPE MAY CREST HAVEN COMPLEX ON PARKWAY CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE, NJ 08210-3067 (609) 465-1187 after hours (609)•465-1190 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New J'ersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: June 6,. 1990- I am,writing to youiin support of the American Stop Smoking Interven,tion Study for Cancer Prevention. In spite of increased public awareness of the relationship between smoking and cancer, far too many people continue to place themselves at risk. Indeed, among teenage females the percentage of cigarette smokers continues to increase. The number of young woman at risk of giving birth to low birth weight infants as a result of smoking continues.to increase as well. The Cape May County Department of Health has for many years sponsored programs to assist people who want to s:top smoking. I would be delighted to have my Health Educator work with the State Health Department and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society in carrying out the terms of this project. ere LJL/kmm cc: Andrew W'. Melchiorre, Health Educator file Louisl/J
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t West Windsor Township Post Office Box 38, Princetom Junction,, New Jersey 08550 (609) 799-2400 June 4, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: I have recently been made aware of your partnership with the American Cancer Society to apply for funds from the National Cancer Institute to develop tobacco control programs. The continued prevalence of smoking and smoking-induced cancers demonstrates a need for this program. The West Windsor Township Health Department supports your application and will assist in its implementation as a local provider of services, data, and intervention. A partnership between the State Department of Health , Local Health Departments and the American Cancer Society will insure an orderly development of a successful program. Please contact me if I may be of any further assistance. Sincerely, Robert Hary Health Officer RH/fms 6-4Marshall
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CiTN OF PATERSON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES FRANK X. GRAVES, JR. MAYOR MS. NELUE PO1J OIRECTOR Ms. Janice Marshall, M.S.N., Coordinator, New•Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Ms. Marshall, DIVISION OF HEALTH John J. Ferraiali, Health Officer 176 Broadway; Paterson. New Jersey 07505 (201) 881-3900 I am definitely in,support of your application to the National Cancer Institute for funds that will be used for Tobacco Control Activit+i;es.. Considering the indisputable fact that cigarette smokers abound in the City of Paterson and in the State of New Jersey this would be welcome funding. Robin Monkowski, our Health Education Field Representative, is the Worksite Taskforce Chairperson for.COMMID ( the community intervention trial for smoking.cessation)_ She along with other members of COMMIT approach the leaders of business and industry in the City of Paterson-to encourage them to set up Smoking Policies in their workplaces. Smoking. Cessation Classes are offered and literature is provided by The American Lung Association, The American Cancer Society and The Respiratory Health Association. Ms. Monkowski is also the Public Education Chairperson for the American, Cancer Society (Lakeland/Passaic Unit). She is constantly giving Anti Smoking Programs to the youth of Paterson and the surrounding towns. There is a definite need for more of these programs, unfortunately, with budgetary constraints andcuts, I can-only see a reduction in these much needed services. The Paterson Division of Health will enthusiastically support the contract if awarded to the State of New Jersey , Department of Health-. The entire state needs Smoking Awareness Programs. On a news brief it was reported that the Tobacco Industry must replace the 3,000 smokers that they lose everyday through IDEATH with 3,000 more NEW smokers. It is obvious with the introduction of "Dacotah" cigarettes (alluring to Blue collar, young,, low income females): and "Uptown" cigarettes (alluring to young Black,, male and female also in the low income category), that the Tobacco Industry is "pulling out all stops"' to save what they know is a threatened industry. We mustt pull ou-t+ all stops in closing down this industry for all time. (continued) 2023676388 COUNTY SEAT OF PASSAIC COUNTY '•- RANKS THIRD IN POPULATION IN THE STATE
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('continued ) Th&Paterson Division of I3ealth,will work with The American Cancer Society, the State Department of Health and other coalitions by providing; -ograms, displaying information and continuing to pazticipate in coalitions .Lat advocate better health through a Smoke Free Environment. Being. an, ex smoker, Robin, can definitely empathize with the smoking population of this state. She and I both,feel that we must educate and not intimidate in,order to reach a healthier environment for alll people. Re?peq/t~ull~ Yours, ell . Jo Ferzaioli Health.Officer Patersoh Division of Health f:
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t NEW JERSEY GENERAL ASSEMBLY BERNARD F. KENNY, JR. ASSEMBLYMAN 33RD DISTRICT HUDSON COUNTY 430 7TH STREET HoaoxaN. NJ 07030 201-dE3-146e COMMIiTTEES CHAIR.`4AN. ASSEMBLY DRUG 6c ALCOHOL ASUSE POLICY VICE CHAIRMAN. TRAPISPORTATI0N Al2THORITIES. TELECOHMUIICATI0v $c TECHNOLOGY VICE CHAIRMAN, OVERSIGHT & GOVERNMENT EFFICIEKCY 4808 BEROENLINE ASVENOE 9TH FLOOR t7NION CITY. N.3 o-7oa7 August 14, 1990 203-863-035E Mrs. Janice Marshall MSN Coordinator, Division of Epidemiology & Disease Control Smoking Control Program 3635 Quakerbridge Road(Univereity Office Plaza) CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: As the chairman of the New Jersey Assembly Committee on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy(ADA), I am writing to express my support of the Department of Health's application to the National Cancer Institute to develop tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking through a project called ASSIST for Cancer Prevention. In my capacity on the ADA, I have sponsored and supported legislation which addresses the issue of smoking, and I will continue to work toward the goal of reducing smoking and tobacco use among New Jersey residents. Therefore, I offer my help and that of my staff to tobacco control coalitions which will be developed through thia project. In addition, I would be available to speak to specific groups in my legislative district and to distribute factual information compiled by coalitions. I am confident of your success in this very important endeavor. State and local programs that are developed to promote tobacco control and to educate about the immediate and long term detriments of tobacco use will benefit every segment of our society. The health of future generations will be affected by what is done today. Very truly yours, tv/~• • , u Sernard F. Kenny, Jr. Assemblyman,i 33rd District ; i. BFIC: kc PyrmrC on Rtrytlyd. Pnper n
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NEW JERSEY SENATE C.A.TIiERIN'E A. COSTA ASSISTANT MAJORITY LEADER SENATOR: 7TH DISTRICT (9URLINGTON: CAMDEN) it WEST BROAD SSREET BuBLIPioTON, NEW .-TERSEY 08018 600-3e7-9378 6 67-12 3 0 July 18, 1990 New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Janice Marshall, MSN Coordinator Smoking Control Program 3635 Quakerbridge Road (Univ. Office Plaza CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: I am writing to you in full support of your efforts to reduce the smoking dependency of all New Jerseyans. Smoking advertisements, despite their absence from the air waves, remain as a constant presence in our daily lives. Attractive, athletic, and often glamorous figures seem to be in every magazine, newspaper, and billboard seducing the very young while keeping a firm grip on older smokers. They perpetuate the myth that, by smoking this brand or that, you, too, can enjoy a similar lifestyle. Obviously, I do not subscribe to that view. I applaud your attempts to teach our citizens that smoking is more appalling than appealing; more dangerous than glamorous; and certainly more harmful than helpful. I appreciate your willingness to address such a critical public health issue. Sincerely, q CAC/na
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BERNARD J. DWYER 6TN DISTTIGT, NEW JE11SE`/ COMMITAEES APPROPRIATIONS SUBOOMMITTEES LA6OR. HHS AND EDUCATION COMMERCE. JUSTICE. STATE AND THE JUDICIARY BUDGET PERMANENT SELECT COMMITTEE ON INTELLIGENCE Congre~g of the Ziniteb *tateg jboae of itepregentatibeo naf5itington, MC 20513. August 20, 1990 Janice Marshall, MSN New Jersey Department of Health Div. of Epidemiology & Disease Cntl Smoking Control Program 3635 Quakerbridge Road, CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: WASHINGTON OFFICE 2429 RAYRUNN MOUSE OFi1CE 5VILCN/4 WASHINGTON, DC 20516-3006 (2021225-6301 OISTRICT OFFICES Z14 SMITH STIIEET PEATH AMeoY..NJ 08561-4338 (201) 626-161 O 628 W000 AvENUE. NORTH LINOEN. NJI0 7036-6 1 62' (2011486-4600 86 6AYARD ST//EET NEw 6nuNSwtcc. NJ 08901-2115 (201) 545-56LS Thank you for your recent correspondence apprising me of your efforts -to curb the cancer morbidity and mortality rates of New Jersey citizens. I appreciate learning about the ASSIST program, and welcome the opportunity ta be of service to you. Enclosed, please find a copy of my most recent correspondence to Dr. Broder, Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), urging complete and favorable consideration of your application.. Rest assured, I shall forward to you any correspondence I may receive from the NCI. Thank you again for apprising me of your application. Please do not hesitate to contact me again, if I may be of further assistance. With best wishes, Sincerely, JI Bernard J / Dwyer Member of Congress BJD:cah, Enclosure
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ROBERT A. ROE 87N DlSTRICT..NEW JEASEY CHAIRMAN SCIENCE. SPACE. AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE CIIAIRMAN SV.CAYNITFEE INVESTMfATiONS AND OVERSIGHT PUBUC WORKS AND TiiANSPARTATION. COMMITTEE EUbCO/MMTTIES. WATEII RESOURCES INVESTMATIDNS AND OVEIISwHT SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PERMANENT SELECT-COMMiTTEE ON INTELL4GENCE Congrea of the lu"niteb btate5 J~oua of Repreatttatibeg Wagfjington, IM 20515-3008 July 30, 1990 Smoking Control Program New Jersey IDepartment of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control 3635 Quakerbridqe Road CN 369 Trenton, NJ, 08625-0369- Attn: Mrs. Janice Marshall Re: ASSIST Coordinator Dear Mrs. Marshall: WASHINGTON'OFFiCE: Roowt 2243 RAYBURN HOUS! OFSiCE BU7LDING 202-225-6751 DISTRICT OFFIOES: LAW Bu0.01N0 86 HAMILTON STREET RooM 102 PATESSON, Ni 07505-2003 201~523-5152 U.S~ PD9T OFFICE Bu¢DING BLOOMF/ELO AVENUE BtooMFlEto. NJ 07003-3471 201-845-6199 158 MOUNTAINVIEW BOULEVAIID PO. BoX 407 WAYNE, NJ 07474-0407 201'-846-2077 I am writing to you today on behalf of the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. I fully support the efforts of this program and it's initiatives to, help develop tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. I believe that the structure of this program'on a statewide and local level will help deter smoking. In the past years during my Congressional tenure I have supported legislation'which would remove public promotion of tobacco products, as well as several bills which contains extensive provisions relating to the sale of tobacco. I agree with many of my colleagues that this program is a major step towardimproving the health of New Jersey residents, as well as the Nation's. With programs such as ASSIST, we can help in the fight against lung cancer and heart disease. Thank you for allowing me to voice my strong support for this program. If I can be of any additional assistance on this matter please do not hesitate to contact this office. Witth' all good;wishes. Sincerely,
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WILLIAM Ji HUGHES 20 OISTRICTi NEW JERSEr COMMOTTEES COMEMTTEE ON THE JUDICiARv CHAIRMAN SU'COMMITAEE ON CRIME COMMITTEE ON MERCNANT MARINE AND FISHERIES SELECT COMMITTEE ON'AGING. SELECT COMMITTEE ON NARCOTiCS ABUSE ANO OONTRO4. (Zongus of the 1111nited ~5tate,o tonst of Ripratntatiees Washington, BC 20515 July 20, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program 3635 Quakerbridge Road CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall, WASNINGTON Oif~pE. 3d'1 CANNON HOUSE' OFFICE BU1L0lNG W.SNINGTON. OC 205I5 (2021225-6672 OISTIIICT OFNOM CENTRAL PARK E.LT BUILDING 4. SUITE 5 222 NEw RoAO- LINw000 NJ 08221 (609) 927,9063 151 NORTM 6ROADWAY P 0 BOx 248 PENNSVIIIE. NJ 06070 1609/ 678-3333 It has come to my attention that the New Jersey Department of Health will be submitting an application to the National Cancer Institute for a project to develop tobacco smoking control activities. This application, which will be developed jointly with the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society, is extremely important. As the health risks associated with smoking have become so evident, it is crucial that efforts be stepped up to increase public awareness as a means to reduce the incidence of smoking and thereby reduce cancer mortality. The New Jersey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society are to be commended for 'their aggressive and pro-active stance regarding this extremely serious national health problem. I am sure that the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention (ASSIST), which will offer statewide and local programs, will be a very effective vehicle for achieving the desired results. I offer my best wishes to the New Jersey Department of Health for success with this very important application. If I can assist you in any way with this project please feel free to contact me. With kindest regards, WJH:jhm/csp PLEASE RESPOND TO: WASHINGTON' (. ) iam LINWOOD ( ) Con g PENNSVILIE ( )
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DONALD ML PAYNE 10T~ii DISTRiCT, PSEW' .1ERSEY COMMITTEES: EDUCATION AND LABOR ELEMERTARY.SECONDARY AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION LABORSTANDAROS SELECT EDUCATION FOREIGN AFFAIRS AFRICA GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS HUMAN.RESOURCES AND INTERGOVERNMENTAU RELATIONS 4C ottgrt!99 of tfje Mniteb *tateg 3boua of Rtprtoetttatibeg 0 agfjingtott, "0104 20515 0 August 24, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Contr.ol~ Program 3635 Quakerbridge Road CN 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: WASHINGTON OFFICE 417 CANNON 1-IOUSE OFFICE BUILDING WASHINGTON. DC 20515 (2021 225-3436 DISTRICT OFFICE FEDERAL BUILDING 970 &1OA0 $TREET, RooM 1435 NEwAR K., NJ' 07102' (201( 645-3213 I am writing to you to express my strong support for the New Jersey Department of Health's application to the National Cancer Institute to develop tobacco control activities to. reduce the prevalence of smoking. This project, called the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention,, represents a joint planning effort between the Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society. I applaud the project's objectives to reduce the incidence of smoking among adults and to reduce smoking initiation among youth. The thrust of ASSIST is to increase the capacity for existing organizations to enhance their role as smoking prevention and cessation agents. Cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of death in our society. Yet, smoking is responsible for more than one out of every six deaths in the. United States. I believe that the ASSIST program has great merit and will meet a; crucial need to reduce smoking-attributable cancer morbidity and mortality. This program is vital to the health of New Jerseyans and Americans. I strong4y support the application of the New Jersey Department of Healt-h for this valuable and much-needed project. Please do not hesitate to contact me if I can be of any further assistance to you. With kindest regards, Respectfully, Donald M. Payne Member of Congress
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2023IM396
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Commissioner's "Commission on Smoking " Department of Health Commission on Smoking and Health There is to be established by the Commissioner of Health the Department of Health Commission on Smoking and Health. This commission will function as an advisory board to the Department of Health in matters concerning smoking and;tobacco use and control, development of policy recommendations and .legislatiort and implementation of educational programs. The purposes of the commission are to: a. Discuss broad issues surrounding tobacco use and control. b. Advise the Commissioner of Health on the development of policy recom- mendations in regard to tobacco use and control. c. Advise the Commissioner of Health, on the implementation of tobacco use and control legislation. The Commission shall: Review and evaluate the impact of legislation regarding smoking and tobacco use on health. Review and; recommend legislative action on clove cigarettes, vending machines and advertising of tobacco products. Evaluate the feasibility of differentiall insurance rates for tobacco users/non- use rs. Report on the economic impact of tobacco control in term.s of health care costs and injury prevention meausres such as self-extinguishing cigarettes. Recommend educational/intervention programs for specific target popula- tions. Provide the Governor and Legislature with, a report by January 30 of each year describing the status of the Commission's activities and the results of its efforts. The commission shall consist of at least twelve members who will' include the commissioners of the Departments of Health an.d Education and the state Treasurer or their appointed designees, and, citizen representation from New. Jersey who are known. for their knowledge, competence, experience or interest in the health, legislative, insurance, labor and business communities. The members of the commission shall not receive any compensation for their services, but shall be reimbursed for the actual an& necessary expenses incurred in the performance of their duties as members of the commission6 The Health Promotion/Risk Reduction, Program will act as staff, to the commission.
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The commission will establish its own bylaws which will include: a. Establishing rules and regulations concerning the operation of the commission, the function and responsibiliities of its officers and other matters as may be necessary to carry out its purposes. b. Electing a chairman. and vice-chairman from among their members. The chairman shall be the chief executive officer of the commission, shall preside at all meetings of the commission and shall perform other duties that the commission may prescribe. c. Designating a fair and equitable system for the solicitation, evaluation and approval of proposals for tobacco control projects. di6 Determining the term of office of each appointed member. lkl/3/4 ~
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III. SYI,A4+S -373-
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~ 9 ° rn O v I 9 9 1 (n M Vd/"4t9M)z
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00 . I ~~~~ r~ir~ n fD M iOV90!49C%oz
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-3- with the assistanoe of staff keep the minutes of every meeting in a permanent fashion; establish suc3i pemanent and ad hoc oommittees as are neoessaty for the cper-ation of the Comd.ssion and appoirit the chairperson~ for such oaimittees-; and serve as liaison ]betaeen the CSommissiorns of Health arrl the oamnissioci. 'I'he ViciClSaitpersai shall: schedule and chair meetings inn the absenoe of the cdhair; represent the oaamissicn to outs3,da agenries when so designated by the dhair and/or the Canmissioner of Health. If the chair and vice chair are unable to atbend a meeting the chai:r or the vioe-chair sha].l apQoint anoRfier member to act in theiC absgre. ARTItLE VI • MEETIIM A. F!requeryc.y: Meetings shall be lneld at the call of the dhairper~on, and shall be at t3mes and pplaoes mutually ag=eed upori by ooirnission manbeis. Special meetirgs shall be held as required. B. Quonxn: A quozua will be a majority of the caRmissian ( 5(A+l ) or m®mbe.rs present if a meetiryg has bePSZ scheduled at least 30 days in advance and the itens to be voted an circulated to the ma7bers at least 10 days in. advrarce. C. Vot : VotirxJ will be by voice. Any rtember may call for a tally of voice votes. An afftrmative vote by a majority of inembers in atbendanoa is required to appa.ove or pass on a mortirn. Members may vote by Proxy or by telephone poll if cdxcumstances require. D. Minutes: Minutes shall be prepared and maintained by Depaaztment of Feal.th staff assigned to the Carmission. Mini,ttes shall be in sufficient
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2023u'76403 0 w I a ~ 1 4-1 ~ 0 11
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IV. QluITICN wImiS QF OCNicZI4ENP m -377-
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Blue Cross bue Shield Of Newim-sey 33 Washington Street Newarlc, New Jersey 07102 August 13, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall N.J. Department of Health Smoking Control Program CN' 369 Trenton, N.J. 08625-369 Dear Janice: As per our recent conversation, I would like to confirm my support and the support of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Jersey for the ASSIST project. As the largest health insurer in the State of New Jersey, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Jersey recognizes the correlation between smoking and the cost of health care. Our company has long been involved in promoting stop smoking programs, both~ in the corporate world and the general community. A program such•as ASSIST will no doubt help smoking prevention in New Jersey. This is something which cannot but improve the health of the people of this state. If there is anything else I can do, please do not hesitate to contact me. I wish you much luck during the application renewal process. J"// , ~tichard JW. Lloyd Director Government Affairs RWL/jb Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Jersey, Inc.
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2550 U.S. Route N1 rth Brunswick. NJ 08902-4301 201/821-2610 8AX # 201/821-2736 # foAmerican Heart Association New Jersey Affiliate Headquarters Office April 23•, 1990 rnlau.nl John Kastts. M.D. chw,n.n of n».ere Jan ScnNrsihy.r, tisq. t+tis.kMnt-El.a Williim Tan.ey, Ill, MA. qtdrntandfleet RobM Eddion T.e.wr.r John W. S.undars,.Sr.. CBA AulalYnt TrMwrw Anthany.L.on.tt, 2-11141111' JaMt AINVMf, M.D! rnt•.ndteN John Ar.yory. M.D. hr-ca,.lmtr+ Rop.r Gin, fisp. 911104111111" vlw <•nda.M Sandla FosaalrMn fl..rd d'D/s.elon, Josapn J. Amato. M.D: Joseph Ascfon., Esq. Trwor Ath.rhy, M.D: John 8anat, M.D: M.ry Joan 8erq.r. Ph.D.. M.D. 6aorq. Eol.t.r, EsQ. John Chrtstia. Esa. Anthony Ghiqounis Ernst d.FNas. OSc,.PE _ warren OMnnls, Ph.D. Chriatln. Donnally, M.D: Frank Doupfas, M.D. H.nry L Orazmr, M.D. DorothMa Dunn, R.N: Nancy Etkis John Ery3kl. CPA Alben Famia Joseph FirtiQ, D.D.S. Staphen Fischl, M.D. Anthony T. Grqao Mark Hochuarg, M.D. Jbhn Hutchinson, M.D: Rane. Kanoyurz Christina Kozmor. R.NI Mark Kret1, M.D. JoseOh LaFetrH. Elauna Lawntnal, M D! Benjamin Nafelson, M.D: Tfiomas Nesu Bxtram Nuisbaum. EO D Mark Otesmcky. M.D. Victor P.anonn.t. M.O: Nancy Redek.r, R.N.,,C., M.S.N Klaus J. Schutz, M.D. Eva E. Sltler, M.D. / Tica. R.N.. M S.N Harvfy WeXman, M.D. CaN A Wluaner George Wasser Cancer and Tobacco Use Control Program NJ Department of Health CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mr. Wasser, The American Heart Association, New Jersey Affiliate, is pleased to offer our support to the Commission on, Smoking. OR Health in their cooperative venture to apply for the New Jersey State Department of Health Smoking Education/Prevention-Program grant. Having participated in recent commission-meetings, we understand the requirements of the project and-are prepared to provide our available educational resources and;supporting•training for their implementation. The New Jersey Affiliate has divided-its program markets into four sites; Communitysite, Worksite, Schoolsite, and Hea.Lthsite. Within these sites, we have numerous prepackaged programs which have been proven to both,increase awareness about smoking and promote positive lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of heart disease. We wish to be involved as a member of the Commission,on Smoking. OR Health and offer our support to this grant applicatiom. Sincerely, Kevin R. Sorge Vice-President, Programs VuE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE
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'•TH-c" CHRlSTPA4S• SEAL P~C'L' E AMERICAN ~ 1600 LUNG Route 22 EaSU . Union, ASSOCIATION NJ. OF NEW JERSEY 22 Union NJ. 07083 . (201~ 687-9340 1600 Route a East~ 07083 (201 ~ 687 -93d0 Aprill: 13, 1990 oFFFicERs Robart 0. PeMet Plsid.r~t Jaoqu.lrw C. FloWws, M.P.H. F'xaf S6a. Pnssidrnt EB:abeOf W. RoalwMi, C.R.T.L Secau~C Vka. Pnsd.nt Wart~r H. if~low Thi~d Uio. Pr.Jkl.nr Ruth Al Wigpinz, R.N., M.A.. 8.a.rayr Rwoo. E. C~n Tnratrrnr Carot A. M.ier. R.N. A~ Tr.su~er Robert F. Corso e+.n+a+~y aWecro. BOARD OF DIREC~roRs ArNtwny J. Albarm... R.R.T. J. DaNM 8akw Brlan J. CoNirn. M.D. Coag~ a*ymon Ma. Dola.. C. H.rm.nn WaBx W. Hhbp DadMa K. Haknas. R.N.. M.A. Fred M. Jacobs, M.D. Ioui'a J. Lamuxna Rob.rt J. Mdovary. M.D., K*i1h L Muure. Esq. JEaph P. P.du/.. M.D. lewfs W. PaK.r, ,k., C.P.A. asn. PMxs MtrGa PkNt~tbHeBer L.. e. R.fcfrrt.n. M.o.. M.P.H. David'J. RMy. M.D. Eugene E. Rodpars Rob.ct,C. Roy P.aul'SawrWd Phili{~ L Sch1ffm~n. M.D. Gracs L Si~px L.ouis S. smiq, LT.Sd Jo..Ph W. Soiwiowiki. Jr.. M.D. Katlwrin. T. Umbid, R.N. Fr.dMidc Ci. WM{ply K.rr~e: A. Wyka, R.R.T D.tiaah K. 7aatodd, R.N.. Ed:M. aneSIDENrs cour~cxxL vmran cohen JosepM Fnnctlint KatMien Moran, Esq. Rudy Stervut WONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. EttL C. Braddock wanem su~l /lobM 0. Hartley. R.N.. M.N. Mrs. Tha~us H. McGlad. Chsrles R. Re.r~n, M.D. Mrs. Ann Rabiann Janice Marshall, RN, MSN NJOOH Division,of Epid. and Disease Control 3635 Quakerbridge Road CN-369. Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Janice: Tihis letter is to inform youlthe the American Lung Association of New Jersey (ALANJ)•supports New Jersey's application for the ASSIST Project contract_ As you know, we believe there is a need for the project. Smoking, both active and passive, kills many of our citizens every year. Those i:n~iividuals who still smoke are usually hard-core long-term smokers who are addicted to nicotine and dependent on smoking. In our intervention work, we are finding that it takes more time and individual attention for these people to~quit smoking than it did only a few years ago. We believe the project is necessary and we will support the contract. We have already assigned a bi-linqual staff member to be a member of the organizing coalition for one of the proposed intervention sites. The ALANJ'~can provide a variety of community-based smoking educatiom and cessation programs. We are willing to provide facilitator training for community volunteers who will work with adults and teens in various cessation programs. We believe that we can help publicize the project through our well-established media contacts and can provide a high level of credibility to the project's various activities. We know that the New Jersey Department of Health, the NJ Oivi'sion of the American Cancer Society and the state and local coalitions wiilili carry out the terms of the contract. Intsummary, we strongly support the contract and look forward to working together to help New Jersey be smoke-free by the year 2000. Robe rt F. Co rso Managing Director RFC/km el eAnpr TwAn, af) v! 4RC (1~: (`I7p.,f ,nil.&i.lrti' cTps.~~.r:
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..THE CH,RJSTrv9:,SS.5-.L --EO°CE.. AMERICAN a-sp; LUNG ASSOCIATION OF NEW JERSEY 1600 Route 22 East . Union,, NJ 07083 . (201) 687-9340 OFFICERS Roan 0. Pam Prea+dear Jaaqu.Ww C. Flowers, M.P.H. rkW vro. ahsia.M Eliasbetli W. Roochetti, c.R.T.T. seamd vras ftsid«d Warner H. TMulow 7Mrd Yice PreaidiM Rulh A. Nfiypins, R.N.. MJI. S.ar(ary Ro.oo. E. ConMin rf,.s„nx Cara/ A. MOiM, R.N: As/f. riNawN Rob.r1 F. Corao M.n." arr.aw OO/UIO OF DIRECTORS Arkhorry J.. AbaMa, R. R.T. J. DwiM Baker 8de+n:J. CoYins, M.D. Goay. Gt<Ymon Mrs. DoWros C. Hamarn wik.r W. Hi.bp DaoUf.. K. HoMnM. R.N., M.A. Fred M..JJtCObs, M.D. Louis J: Uam.nna RoNert J. Ma/bvany.,M.D. KsNh L Mbotf. Eaq. Jadsph P. Padula, M.D. Lewis W. PukK, Jr., C.P1. Gen. PNars Muda PkWatt-H+Wr L... B. RMdrnrt. M.D., M.P.H. Dar+d J. Rtsy, M.D. Eup.ne E. Rodp.rs Robert C. Roy PauF Sauatand PAIBP L SehiMnwa M.D. Gna L Singer Louis S. SmIM LT. Sn..d Joseph W. Soko/owaki. Jr.. M.D. Katli.rine T.tknfrid R.N. Frederick G. Whelpty Ketxath A. Wyka, R.R.TL DWoa.h K Zastodd, R.N., 6d.M. MESWENTS COUNCIL vrilf.m Coh.n Ja.eph Frmchini KanM.en Monn. Esq. Rudy Stewart HONORARY MEMeERS Mts. Etta C. Braddock Wiuiem Bu.cat Isobel 0. Hartley; R.N.. Ai1.N. Mnt.,Thomu H. McGlads Charles R. Ream. M.D. Mrs. Ann Robeann Janice Marshall, RN:, MSN NJ DOH Division of Epi:d. & Disease Control 3635 Quakerbridge Road CN' 389 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Janice: Enclosed is our support letter for the ASSIST contract. Following are the other items you requested: 1. Goals & Purposes Attachment 1 and 2 2. Statement of Membership & Constituencv Attachment 1 3. Major Smoking-Related Experience and Proven. Programmatic Success Attachment 3 - 1989-90 - Program of Work Attachment 4.- 1990-91 - Draft Program of Work Attachment 5- 1989-90 Annual, Report Attachment 6- ALA Annual Report 4. Similar Experience (See *3 above) 5. Rationale for Coallition Membership & Record of Working With Other Members ALANJ has been an active member of NJ'Commission on Smo4r;i ng OR Hea l th since i ts i ncept.i on . ALANJ has been an active member of NJ'Interagency Coun:cil since it began. ALANJ helped re-establish the Tri-Agency Coalition on Smoking OR Health three years ago. Since that time, we have undertaken several major projects as a Tri-Agency group. ALANJ chaired the Coalition in 1988-89. N 4 N W ~ ALANJ;is part of a grant group working with the ACS ~ NJ Health Officers,, NJSBA, SOPHE and others to further tobacco preventi,on education in the state.. ~ MORE THAN, 80 YEARS OF COAdM,Uh11TY SERVIC€
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Janet Marshall Apriil 12', 1990 Page 2 We co-sponsor numerous projects wi,th NJ GASP, serve on their Board and provide funding for several joint publications each year. (Attachment 7). 6. How To Reach Spec i,f i c Target Groups Attachment 4 - Page 3 - please note new program goal designed to reach special, high-ri'sk, underserved popul'ation groups. We have on*-going prevention and cessation programs for youth andr teens. We are introducing a new workplace cessation program, Team Up for Freedom From Smoking at Work, geared to blue-collar workers and have hired a consultant to help market it. On-going minority out-reach program for businesses and for youth programs. 7. How It Works Attachment 8 - publications on smoking cessation programs including self-help manuals, the In-Control video program, Team Up For Freedom From Smoking at Work (TUFFS), and the Freedom From Smoking clinic program as part of our motto to "Join the Smoke Free Family." 8. Prooosed Contributions We can provide program expertise and program materials at a reduced cost. We will provide training for facil'itators for adult cessation programs and for leaders of teen cessation programs. We wil'1 participate on local' coalitions and boards as evidenced by our commitment and leadership with COMMIT. Janice, please feel free to contact me for further information or if I can be of assi'stance. Best wishes. Cordially, . . Kathy Afle 1 she iim ( ograrn,Director KA/km enclosures
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MEDICAL SOCIETY OF NEW JERSEY EXECUTIVE OFFICES O TWO PRINCESS ROAD. LAWRENCEVILl1E, NEW JERSEY 08648 0 TELEPHONE 609-896-t766 April 3, 1990 . Ms. Janice Marshall Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control New Jersey Department of Health CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Re: Project Assist Dear Ms. Marshall: 1. The Medical Society of New Jersey (MSNJ) has had an extensive public health care awareness program for many years. The direction of this public service effort continues for the benefit and edification of the general public. 2. There are approximately 9,800 actively practicing physicians in New Jersey who are members of MSNJ. Within the composition of the Society's membership there are forty specialty societies represented. Their function permits the constant upgrading of medical skills and knowledge for the benefit of the public. 3. MSNJ has actively campaigned for the elimination of smoking in hospitals, schools, restaurants, all public buildings, and the work place and has enforced a ban on smoking in its office since 1982. MSNJ was successful in gaining the support of the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey Hospital Association and industry for the development and implementation of smoke free work places. The Society supported Senate Bills 1276 and 2682, banning the sale of tobacco products to persons under age 18. MSNJ is committed to increasing public awareness of the magnitude of health problems zelated-to the use of tobacco products, including addiction, and• its adverse impact on the economy in the work place.
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- 2 - F,j.NDINGS Magnitude of the Public Health Problem Tobacco is the leading cause of avoidable illness and death in New Jersey. Every year nearly eleven thousand deaths are caused by cigarette smoking in three categories alone: (a) Thirteen percent of cardiovascular disease deaths (4,300)! are attributable to smoking cigarettes. (b) Thirty-two percent of cancer deaths (5,000) are caused by smoking cigarettes. (c) Eighty-eight percent of chronic lung disease deaths (1,600) are caused by smoking cigarettes. The annual economic impact of tobacco on New Jersey is immense. 0* (a) One billion dollars are spent each year to purchase over 880 million packages of cigarettes in New Jersey. (b) An estimated 790 million dollars are spent each year as the result of increased health care costs created by tobacco use in New Jersey. (c) An estimated 1.3 billion dollars are lost each year to the New Jersey economy by decreased productivity and earnings due to illnesses caused by tobacco. Tobacco use has declined among all age groups except children. A 1986 high school survey of lOth, llth and 12th grade students in New Jersey indicates that almost forty percent smoke; and half smoke every day. This data is unchanged from 1980. MSNJ"s Committee on Drug and Alcohol Abuse has conducted seminars on drug addiction for physicians and other health care professionals which included tobacco products. A nationally famous artist, Bonnie Vierthaler, displayed her renown paintings Parodies of Commercial Tobacco Products Promotions. A co-sponsored AMA program utilizing a postcard cause of death announcement was sent to congressional representatives by physicians informing them of their constituents who terminated from the use of tobacco products. The Office of the Surgeon General of the USDH and the New Jersey Commissioner of Health was solicited for support against the introduction of alternate tobacco product forms for oral use, such as, flavor and tobacs chewing-gum.
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3 4. MSNJ has actively supported other public service programs on addictive diseases relating-to other addictive drugs, such as alcohol, heroin, marijuana, cocaine, etc. The Society has also sponsored programs on AIDS, pollution and senior citizen health care, utilizing media promotions for public information and symposium and seminars for physicians and other health professionals. 5. MSNJ has historically joined with the Academy of Medicine of New Jersey, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, the New Jersey Hospital Association, the Medical Inter-Insurance Exchange of New Jersey and the New Jersey Association of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons in addressing public health concerns in New Jersey. 6. MSNJ will continue to address the target groups through the media networks and speaker programs for public group meetings.. County medical society meetings and seminars for physicians and other health care workders will continue to be utilized. 7. We are attaching copies of some of the printed media promotions that have been used. We also have tapes of our public service public service TV programing. A professional clipping service gives the Society access to public and professional opinion on the success of our efforts. 8. Any requests for in-kind and direct support would have to be requested by a formal application to the Medical Society of New Jersey for review by the Board of Trustees. I hope this is helpful to your efforts. Sincerely yours, ~~ ~~l~ Vincent A. Maressa Executive Director/ General Counsel VAM:ah Enclosures
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STATE OF NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OE EDUCATION CN SOO TRENTON; NJ 0H62S-0500 JOEL oLAOM. ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER May 4, 1990 Mrs. Janice Marshall, Coordinator Smoking and Tobacco Use Control Program Division-of Epidemiology and Disease Control New Jersey State Department of Health University Office Plaza, Q3 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: SAUL COOPERMAN COMMISSIONER In New Jersey tobacco is a leading cause of avoidable illness and death. The economic impact is imnense in terms of money spent in buying tobacco products, health care costs, and. decreased productivity. The New Jersey Department of Bducation supports the New Jersey Department of Health in. its continuing activities to promote the cessation of tobacco use_ The American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention is needed to identify effective methods of intervention. The organizations completing the study can be relied upon to successfully fulfill the contract. The Department of Education, has included tobacco within the substance abuse education program and in. its guidelines for chemical health education. As tobacco use has declined among all age groups except children, the need remains to improve intervention among adolescents. Data provided by the study will be made available to local school districts to use within•their substance abuse curriculum. The Department of Educa.tiorn in cooperation with the Department of Law and Public Safety conducts a triennial survey of substance use among high school students. Tobacco is included among those substances surveyed. Data is available from the 1980, 1983, and 1986 surveys. The Department of Education will continue to provide representation and support to the Conanission on Smoking OR Health and the ASSIST project. Joel m, Assistant Commissioner Divi i,of General Academic Education JB:TJR:CHT:jcb, c: R. DiPatri N A ~ W Cr? ~ ~ w
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STATE OF NEW .JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CN 500 TRENTON.NJ 0862S-O500 JOEL BLOOM. ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER SAUL COOPERMAN. COMMISSIONER May 16, 1990 TO: George Wasser, Public Health Consultant Smoking-and•Tobacco Use Control Program Division,of Epidemiology and Disease Control FROM: RE: New Jersey State Department of Health .~ Carolyn. H. Turner, School Health Sp(eJTa~.t9t~d ' Division of General Academic Educat.ion New Jersey State Department of Education Description of Organization go 1. Goal~s and-purposes See attachment 2'. Membership and constituency The New Jersey Department of Education is comprised of department staff, a county office for each of the 21 counties and public elementary and secondary schools administered by district boards of education. There are 593 school districts and 1.1 million students in New Jersey. 3. Major smoking-related experience, and proven success of programs Tobacco has been included in the substance abuse curriculum since its•inception in 1987. Instruction became mandated with the passage of P.L. 1989, c. 225. Also. P.L. 1989, c. 96- prohibits smoking of tobacco in public school buildings, and: became effective December, 1989. 4. Experience with similar public health or public interest issues The Department of Education has developed strong programs in specific areas related to health education and services. For example, New Jersey is the first state to have created a standard educational credential for professionals in substance abuse prevention. Our substance abuse prevention program, inwoiving law
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2 enforcement, health, human services, K-12 educatiom, and higher education has served as a national model~. We have also mandated family life education at the elementary and secondary levels for the past eight years. In the past four years we have had a statewide coordinated suicide prevention program involving the State Department of Human Services. C]rIDNJ, and cortmunity mental health centers. HIV prevention-education, previously recortmended, has been mandated since February 1990: 5. Rationale for membership The public schools of New Jersey provide an opportunity to influence student behavior through instruction and• reinforcing positive skills, health attitudes and health practices. 6•. How specific target groups will be reached Tobacco is included in substance abuse curriculum for grades K-12. 7. Demonstrate that you have created a mechanism that will work School district implementatiom is measured through county office monitoring. The incidence and prevalence of tobacco use will continue to be tracked through the triennial survey of substance use among high school students, which includes tobacco. 8. Proposed contribution (in-kind and direct support) The State Department of Education will continue to be represented on coamittees related to tobacco use prevention and to include tobacco in chemi.call health curriculum guidelines. Data obtained-from the triennial survey of substance use among high school students, which includes tobacco, will be provided to ASSIST. Results from the 1989 survey will be forwarded when available. CHT:jcb Attachments c: Thomas J. Rubino
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*STATE EDIPCATTANAT. GOALS ANn STANI)ARDS•; SU11CIlAP'RER 2 N.J.A.C. 6:8-2.1, - State Educational Goals (a) The State educational goals shall be the following outcome process goals and shall be applicab,le to all• public school districts schools in the State. and and (b) The public schools in New Jersey shall help every pupil in the State; 1. To acquire basic skills'in• obtaining information•, solving problems, thinking critically and communicating effectively; 2. To acquire a stock of basic information concerning the principles of the physical, biologicaI. and social sciences, che historical record of human achievement and• failures, and eurrent social iasues; 3. To become an effective and responsible contributor to decision-making processes of the political and other insti,tutioms of the community, State, country and world; 4. To acquire the knowledge, akiUls and understanding that permit him or her to play a satisfying and responsible role as both producer and consumer; 5. To acquire job entry level skills and also to acquire know•ledge necessary for further education; 6. To acquire the understanding of and the ability to form responsible relationa with a wide range of other people including, but not limited to, those with social and cultural characteristics different from his or her own; 7. To acquire the capacities for playing satisfying and 'responsible roles in family life; 8. To acquire the knowledge, habits and attitucles tllat promote personal and public health, both physical nnd mental; 9. To acquire the ability and the desire to express himself or herself creatively in one or more of the arts and to appreciate the aesthetic expressions of other peoplie;
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- 2 - 1®. To acquire an understanding of ethical pri•nciples and; values and the ability to apply them.to his or her own li'fe; 11. To develop an understandi•ng of his or her own worth, abili-ties, potentialities and limitations; 12. To learn to enjoy the process of learning and to acquire the slcills necessary for a lifetime of continuous learning and adaptation to change. (c) The public schools in New Jersey shall providec 1. 7nstruction which bears 'a meaningful relationship to the present and future needs and/or limitations; 2. Significant opportunities, consistent with the age of the pupil, for helping to determine the nature of the educational experiences of the pupi•1L; 3. Specialized and individualiaed kinds of edueational experiences to meet the needs of each pupil; 4. Opportunities for teaching staff members and pupils tn make recommendations concerning the operation of the schools; pupil; positive; 5. Comprehensive guidance facilities and services for each 6. An environment in which and competition among pupils is 7. Resources'for education, used with maximum efficiency; , 6. Tesching staff members of high quality; 9. Diverse forms of constructive cooperation with parents anti community groups. N.J.A.C. 6:8-2.2 - State Educational Standards The state educational standards shall be those set forth in N..T.A.c;. 6:8-4.3 which shall be used for the implementation of a thorough and efficient system of free public schools in accordance with N..I.S.A. V8A:1A-1 et sec. and-the New Jersey Constitution.
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.A - 3 - N.J.A.C. 6:8-2.3 - Review of State Educational Goals and, Standards (a) The State Board of Education, after consul,tation, with the commi,ssioner and review by the Joi,nt Committee on the Publlic Schools, shahl, from time to time but at.leastl once every five years, review and update the State goals and standards. (b) In reviewing and updating these goals and standards, the State Board shall consult with the Commissioner of Labor, the Chancellor of Higher Educaiton, the Commissioner of lleal,th, the Commissioner of Iluman Services and such other State employees and officers as deemed necessary. * excerpt taken from New Jersey Administrative Code, Chapter 8, Thorough and Efficient System of Free Publ•ic Schoola (updated and adopted 12f2/86). LMU/1200q
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T11e pri.mary misstoi! of lll-e New 3ersey Department of Education is corttitrued edreca- 1ionril ilnflroverrrerrt for all jltcblic sc/cool sttrdenls in kindergarten throrrgJt grade twelUe. Elrllphasts will be on providing services whiclt address staf, ,/u»ditrg, curriculum r1nd facililie.r. Tlte De%artllrent will f5rovide additional services which are required by statrrte and regulattott. The public local erlucalio» agertcies are the direct and primary recipients of .rervices; ultimately the Del5arlmeat serves students. A secondary role of the Department is to provide services for pre-kindergarten, posl higla school and non-public school students. For these students priority will be placed on meeting tlte requirements of statute and regulation. Tte` Department will be guided by high standards in: product design; a low, cost,, hi~hly efficient distribution system; and otJler services to local education agencies. The Department willr furtlzer be guided by the prudent use of. authority derived from statute and regulation.
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NEW JERSEY PTA 900 Berltelty Avenue Trenton, New Jersey 08618 (609) 393-6709, 393-5004 July 9, 1990 Dr. William E. Parkin Assistant Commissioner NJ DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program~ r i Ul..~ ~ ~CGt1 IIMF'••~ CN 369 Trenton, N.J. 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: RE: ASSIST Project New Jersey PTA has been a member of the Comnission on Smoking OR Health since its inception in 1985. As the largest and oldest Child Advocacy organization in New Jersey we have a vested interest in any program designed to protect our children's health and welfare. The National PTA wholeheartedly endorses the concept of a smoke free young America by the year 200 and-encourages all PTAs to cooperate in educational and promotional activities designed to discourage students from smoking, or using tobacco•inn any form. New Jersey PTA will be supportive of the efforts of the ASSIST Project in any way it can. Very truly yours, / /1' ,y, ~Le cL.:~~~ ~f. e_ Paula L. Coover President PLC:ek
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STATE OF NEW JERSEY JIM FLORIO DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BENJAMIN J REDMOND GOVERNOR DIVISION OF TAXATION ACTnNG DIRECTOR CN 240 DOUGLAS C. BERMAN STATE TREASURER TRENTON. NEW JERSEY 08646-0240 TELECOPIFR (609) 292-5185 TRENTON 609-989-0113 July 9, 1990 Dr. John Slade c/o George L. Wasser New Jersey Department of Heal'th CN 369 Trenton, NJ, 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Slade: -W This letter is in support for the ASSIST Project. Pl1ease be advised that the New Jersey Department of Treasury and the Division of Taxation feel there is a great need for this project. We feel' the project is absolutely necessary and-we will support it in every way we can. Please be assured that the Treasury Department, along with the New Jersey Department of Heallth, the New Jersey Division of American Cancer Society, and the state and 1'ocal coalitions will carry out the terms of the contract. Very truly yours, r' 'tvl.&40 &J, Richard D,. Gardiner Assistant Director Division of Taxation RDG:ab New Jerser Is An Equal Opportuniti-Emplover
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NEW JERSEY GASPINC. Group Against Smoking Poiiution 105 MountainJ.venue Summit. NJ 07901 201.273-9368 Lo April 1990 Dear ASSIST grantors, Once I read' a story abou-t a teacher writing a recommendation fo-r a student's college admission application. In addition to providing the usu,al accurate and entti•usiastic informatiom on the form, the teacher wroue across the top. in large letters, "Take this kid". 21'ease consider the ::ew jersey ASSIST ap?lication to have "Pick this sta•te" s:ritten in large leters across th,e top of the anplication in ny handvr_tin-. t.rh..? Because you,won`t fir.d a better state than ::ew Jersey to give vou `ooc' value for your ASSIST dollars. We have a stunniing and deligh•tful group of organizations an-d individuals who have been working on smoking elimination for more than a d-ccade. We have a wonderful balance of scientific an.d grassroots, large and small, private and:au5lic, estahlishment and radical segments humming along cooperativel;•, wi-eh p-ra-ccically no fighting over turf and with sensible divisio,n of labor. We've just elected an interested governor, backed bv a legislature of his party. Our media is attuned to th,is issue. So t,e have a team that has accot-:plishec: much and is eager to accomplish mo•re located i-n a favorabLe setting. Sadly, -we also have sco7e. I know the Department of. ::ealth N A 2V C4 ~ ~ N N
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i is documentin•g the problem of tobacco use in New „er•sey. I ahink W t ::•ew Jersey is an especially valuable site because of our heterogeneous population, fi•nancia•Lly secure a•nd poor, u•rban, su•burban, anZ rural, white, black, and hispanic, young, adult, and retirees. I know the ASSIST con•tract would be carried out by our Department o•f Health, Cancer Society, and coalitions. New Jersey GASP will work enttiu,siastically as a part of the coabition. IIe occupy a special n,iche. New Jersey GASP is a citizen• action group, one of the world's most successful grassroots nonsmokers' groups. Our members demonstrate the public demand for smoking control. Last autumn, one one week's notice, our members wrote 135•letters in•support o•f smokefree hospitals. GASP staff and board will actively support the project in any appropriate ways, including serving on committees, provi•ding information and•materials, working on projects, networking, mobilizing public support, etc. Basically New Jersey has a problem worthy of your support and proven resources to address the problem. S incere ily, 9 R'egin Carlson Execu ve Director t RC:Is
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Description of N.J. GASP for NJDOH ASSIS7 aopli,ration. New Jersey Group Against Smoking Polluti-on (GASP) is a nonprofit, educational organization, granted•tax-exemptt status by the IRS. A•citizen action group, GASP works to secure smokefree air for nonsmokers and to ensure tobacco-free lives for children. GASP's 2,000 memberships are held by individuals, families, and organizati•ons. Most are in New Jersey; perhaps 20:G are elsewhere throughout the world', but primarily in the United States. GASP has acqu-fred enough memberships to support its work and regards its constituency as all nonsmokers. For 16•years New Jersey GASP. one of the most successful grassroots nonsmokers' advocacy groups in the worl:d, has pursued educational, policy, legislativeq and legal aactions tn eliminate smoking. A partial list includ'es: -supporting regulations to control smoking -supporting laws, local, state, and federal' to co rntrol smoking -supporting N.J. and NYC legislation to-eliminate chi-lde-en's access to tobacco -help,ing create nonsmoking,polici.es im-workplaces, hospi-tals- schools, elsewhere -blocking introduction of alternati•ve nicotine delivery systems -litigati,on for smokefree workplaces, schools, hospitals -art exhibits lampooning tobacco advertisi-ng. -innovative an,tiismoking education for youth -encouraging nonsmoking dlining, travel -emcouraging pharmacies to refuse to sell tobacco products -pro-testing tobacco-sponsored events -co-sponsoring U.S. boomerang team -demonstrating at tobacco companies and tobacco blllboard~s -forward;ing stockhodders' resolutions agai.nst tobacco marketing -providing information for pliaintiffs suing tobacco companies -comp•iling list of smokefree workplaces. dining, education, etc. -creating and distributing,handbooks, brochures, signs, other materials -hu•ndreds of media inter,views and appearances. GASP ' s successes can ihe measured by the number of c lean a i r laws, nonsmoking policies, and general publi,c attitude. New Jiersey GASP'liimits itself to tobacco-related issues. GASP's staff, board members, and other members are active in a variety of social change issues. New Jersey GASP is a centra'.- player in the pro-health, ant'i- I
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tobacco lobby in New Jersey and'has been an active member of that communi.ty for more than a decade and a half- GASP reaches out with materials, di~splays, Qroqrams. conferences, art exhibits, media interviews, press releases, letters, meetings, etc. GASP has 16 years' history of maintaining a viable organization, invol'ved in most of the smoking. control acti-vities in New Jersey. GASP will assist ASSIST by partici-pating on commi-ttees, provi,ding materials and'information, sponsoring programs, metworking, etc. 2
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FROM : BERNAF2D5 HEMLTH DF7 aUG .b990 i1:5C- rki FROM : BERMARDS HEALTH DPT AUG. 17. 19a@ 11:59 AM P? The New Jersey Health Officers is the largest publtc heal-th association in the state. It represents health,professionals from every type of publAc health agency. The objectives of this association are as follows: 1. The advancement of knowledge relating to public health, sanitary and environmental sciences. 2. Consideration of public health problems and improvement in public health administration in New Jersey. 3. Promotion of uniformity in public health proced'ures and in laws and-ordinances relating to public health. 4. Encouragement of personal and group contacts between allied health professions and agencies in New Jersey. 5. The protection of the rights of health officers and other public health personnel. ~
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F4JIL,_NEW JERSEY HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION a' Cerater for Health Affairs 760 Alexander Road (609) 275•4000 CNL1 FAX (609) 275•4100 Pnncetoni New Jersey 08543-0001 Louis P. Scibetta FACHE President. August 13, 1990 William E. Parkin, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control New Jersey Department of Health CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: *0 On behalf of the New Jersey Hospital Association, I am writing in support of the grant application of the New Jersey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society, to the National Cancer Institute's American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. Medical evidence clearly shows that smoking is not only harmful to the health of the smoker, but it is also•an irritant to many nonsmokers. Recent medical studies indicate that long term exposure to smoke may increase nonsmokers' risk of developing severe limg diseases. Smoking has been clearly cited as the single most preventable cause of death. Over 390,000 Americans will die prematurely of diseases linked to smoking this year. The number is greater than the combined deaths from alcohol, illegal drugs, traffic accidents, suicide and homicide. The continuous effort of the New Jersey State Department of Health has been to reduce tobacco-related cancer morbidity and mortality rates in New Jersey. The DOH's enthusiastic response to the prospect of New Jersey's hospitals voluntarily going smake-free, and their willingness to address smoking in other healthcare facilities, helped NJHA to initiate it's Smoke-Free Hospital campaign.
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Our smoke-free program is funded in part by a grant from the New Jersey State DOH. This support helped NJHA to become the nation's first hospital association to help member hospitals voluntarily institute 100 percent smoke-free policies. Our upbeat campaign, entitled "Let's Clear the Air," provides help and guidance at each step of the way. We've developed and distributed-Smoke-8ree Hospital Program Kits to all member hospitals. They include colorful Let's Clear the Air posters, hospital employee, patient and visitor brochures explaining why the institution is going smoke-free, sample public service announcements, press materials and a step-by-step guide to becoming smoke-free. The Department has been a consistent ally in these efforts. ift Press conferences have been held to help inform the media and public of the NJHA position and commitment to this program. The association also has held a number of seminars that provided nurses, physicians, social workers and hospital administrators with strategies for the successful establishment and. maintenance of an institutional smoke-free environment. Free consultations for member hospitals are an important part of NJHA's education campaign. Continual education will help employees learn how to help themselves and others deal with the transition from smoky to smoke-free. Launched a year and a half ago, 86 percent of the association's 119 member hospitals have committed to going smoke-free. To date, 85 of New Jersey's hospitals have made the transition and kicked the habit. Seventeen more hospitals will become totally smoke-free before 1991. By the end of 1991, the association expects all New Jersey hospitals will be smoke-free. NJHA hopes that with continued support, the smoke-free program can also be implemented in nursing home facilities. The Department of Health has been very supportive in the launch and implementation of the "Let's Clear the Air" program. We know that you will conscientiously carry out the terms of the ASSIST contract and we will cooperate with you in that effort. IITHA offers its' assistance and available resources to help further your goal of reducing morbidity and mortality rates from the detrimental effects of tobacco use. NJHA looks forward to being part of the coalition formed between the New Jersey Department of Health, the American Cancer Society, and other state and local organizationas for the prevention of cancer and elimination of other tobacco-caused diseases. Sincerely, Edmund Abramovitz, FACHE, Vige-15~esident Hosp9:ta1 Management and P New Jersey Hospital Asso 3= ing lation RECEIVED AUG i l 199Q DIV. EPI/DISEASE CDNTROL
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NEW JERSEY 1NTERAGENCY COUNC3l. ON SMOKING OR HEALTH May 14, 1990 C.N. 362 Trenton, NJ 08625-0362 (609) 292-7232 Dear Ms. Marshall: W, ctarp.rson Matthew Martln NJ Stats Oepartment of Health Memh.rs Amencut Canwr Society NJ oiv;s;«, 'Amsncan, Council for Heaftltful Li+rinp Am.rian Hsart Association of NJ Amsriqn Lunp Association ot tY! Artoncan Lung Association of Central NJ Erwironmental /mprovoment Associat.s March of 0imes Th. Medicai Society of NJ NJ Group Against Saakinp Pollution (GASP. Inc.) NJ Health offic.rs Association NJ Public Health Association NJ Stat. O.paiunent of Eduration NJ State Oapartrti«n of Health NJ State, Nurses Association The Respiatory Health Asioaasian Soaary for Publia Health EducaUon Ms. Janice Marshall NJ Department of Health Chronic Disease Control Q3 369 Trenton, NJ 08625 Services The New Jersey Interagency Council on SYmki:ng or Health is happy to support the American-Stop Smoking (Assist 2,000 Intervention Study). There is a great need to reduce the use of tobacco in-our society. This collaborative effort is necessary and you can count on the support of the Council. The Council represents major health care and educational organizations joined together to reduce tobacco use. We are willing to assist in any way and feel that our corRrnanity networks will be a major support to the Assist program. We have worked cooperatively over the past decade with the New Jersey Depa.rtment of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American-Cancer Society. We are confident that they will make this project work and we will be happy to lend our NJ Chapw UnrversAy of kAedicine and Dentistry of NJ Sincerely, Matthew Martin Chair A Voluntary Association of Agencies and, Organizations Concerned, About Smoking and Tobacco support.
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JLN-©5-'90 TWE 15:47 1DWTSBA - TRENTON TEL NO:b-bQ9-69q-0413 1590 RL_'.•W New Jersey School Boards Association .ig Msadquarters: 413 West State Street, P.O. 8ox 909, Trertton, New Jersey 08805 Telephone (60% 683-7600 Fax 809-695-0413 Jatzuary 9, 1990 Dear Chief School Administrators: Chapter 96 Public Law 1989 is now in effect banning smoking in all board of education buildinas. To ensure that: your district policies are in compliance, you should review them to determine if revisions are necessary. As a servics to your diatrict, and on behalf of the Naw Jersey Commission on Smoking OR Health and the Stdts Departmrent of Health, the Now Jersay School Eoards Association aould liks to provide you with information regarding district isaplsmentation of the new no-smokina law. We are aware of concerns soms districts have about compliance and enforcement of polici.s which go beyond the scope of the no-smoking law, and we feel it may be of value for you to know how boards of education are implementing the new law. Please take a fev uinutes to answer the following survey and return it to NJSBA by January 26 in the postage paid envelope enclosed. We would also like you to enclose, copias of both your district no-smoking policy and your state mandated regulation. Also include a copy of your district's probressiva disciplinary precedures far both students and staff if your nev no smoking regulation does not include them. NJSnA will be anding out the survey results as soon as a tabulation is complete. Again, on behalf of the Commission on Smoking OR Health, the Stata Department of Health, and the Kew Jersey School Boards Association we want to thank you in advanee for your time and cooperation. Ws are always looking for ways to in.erease our services to you. Sincerely, Octavius T. Reid, Jr. Executive Director NJ School Boards Association William E. Parkins, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner NJ Department of Health John Slada, MD Chairman NJ Commission on Smoking OR Realth
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3tN-435-'9O TLJE 15:-A9 1D:N'48A - 11RENTD1 TEL `+p:l-6Q9-e?'-©413 t'+98~_) FQa Lb New Jersey School Boards Association 40 Telephone 0% epS.7600 H.aaquartera: 413 We.t 8tate airnet, P.Q. Box 9QB, Trenton, New Jereey Cd80S March 28, 1990 Dear Chief School Administrators: The no•smoking survey tabulations are now completa. Due to the overall participation of New Jersey school districts, we are able to present you with statistics that reflect a true majority of school districts: 423 districts•respoAded to the survey. The survey focused on what districts are doing re: enforcement beyond the scope of the no-smoking law. Such information has been compiled and is being provided to you in the statement attached. Many districts sent in their copies of board adopted policies and adminis- trative regulations which address the no-smoking legislation. If you desire to see how other districts are implementing this new legislation, please contact the New Jersey School Boards Association Policy & Information Department. This project could not have been successful without your support and cooperation. So, again, on behalf of the New Jersey School Boards Association, the Commission on Smoking OR Heaith and the State Department of Health, we want to thank you for taking part in this process. Sincerely, Octavius T. Reid, Jr. Executive Director NJ School Boards Association William E. Parkins, DVM, DrPH Assistant Commissioner NJ Department of Health John Slade, MO Chairmart NJ Commisslom mn Smoking OR Heatth Attachment dm ,.,,_
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7UN-1`_+-' °0 TUE 15 s 50, 1 D-t' TSBw - TREhFTOSit TEL 33?t '3 'rG° Mt Nat4y Ney J&r ~SY Schoola_ E7[tat'ld NeM SenOKZn¢ San t0 a1 A survey of all NeN J.rsey public schools shows thatArithin 10 weeka-of -ths effeative data of a law banning all smoking inside schools, many schools have included school property outside school buildings in their ner no-smoking poli- aies. A survey of 606 school districts in the state (with 423 reporting) reveals that almost one-third (31.6%) of districts have banned smoking outdoors during school hours only. Kore than one-quarter (26.6%) of school districts have made their grounda non-smoking 24 hours a day, seven daya a week. All board of education buildings were required to be entirely smoke free beginning December 14, 1989 (Chaptar 96, Public Law 1989)_ Many districts have mhda ameudments to existing district policies since the passage of this new law. In addition, districts ara now required to have no-smoking regula- tions in place. School distriets that extand their smoke free areas to outdoora were asked to daseribe their policies. The queations and r.he results wera: ~ Have you banned sntoking outdoors during school hours only? Elementary districts Yes 26.3• K-12/secondary districts Yes 40.1% No No 73.7% 59.9% Vocational districts Yes No 100a Have you banned smoking outdoors during school hours and extraeuizieular events (including sporting evants)? Elementary districts Yea K-12/aecondary districts yes Vocational districts yes 23.8% No 76.34 14.0% No 86.0% 10.0% No 90.0% Have you banned smokins outside on all grounds 24 hours a day seven days a week? Elementary aistricta yes 22.2% No 77.8% ~ K-12/s.coAdary districts yes 32.2% No 67.8t Vocational districts Yes 35.7% No 64,3• A ~ ~ The survey was conducted by the New Jersey School Soards Association, in cooperation with the Nea Jersey Commission on Smoking OR Health and the N.w Jersey Department of Health. t~'t 3/90 3S33a (over)
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aluni-e5-, go ,jE 15:5i, 1D•N "~Br~1~ - TRENTON TEL NO: l-tfl°-oQ~-~ab3• U'?P3 FOiS Oh.- -2- School diserict respons, to the survey was overGtheLming. NJSBA tabulated returns froat 423 districta and reported that district responses continued to eoste in even after tabulations were completed. Among school di.tricts extending their no-smokin` rule to outdoor areas, 63.1% include areaa thaat are uaed by people other than students, includinS visitors, and 48.76 iriclude a ban on smoking in motor vehiclss. Schools were askad vhether their regulations included a ban on ths uss of sll tobaoco products, including chewing tobacco and snuff. Almost two-thirds (64%) of districts reported they included all tobacco products in their rsgula- tions. Survey results sho.r that 47.5; of the schools incorporated their usval discipline procedures in their new smoking regulations for staff and 55.6% incorporated diseipline procedurea for their new smoking retttlatioas for studentx. Effective implsaentation of the law and local school policies is helped when districts include the snoking regulations in their progressive discipline procedures for employees and students. Another aid to implsmertation of non-smoking policies is the provision of smoking cessation programs for treatment of nicotins addiction, to assiat students and teachsra who smoke. Survey results show that 21.7% of dis- tricts reported offering eessation servicss for employees during the imreadiats implementation period; 6.84 of districts offered eessation pro- grams for atudents. . W
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1 io c9ew Jersey State Nurses Association June 1, 1990 Mr. George Wasser Public Health Consultant Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mr. Wasser: 609-392-48" FAX 609-396-2330 Jane A. Adams, M.S., R.N. PAesident Dorothy U. Flemming> M.S.IY., R.M. I;,xecutiue Director The New Jersey State Nurses Association is pleased to support the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. As you know NJSNA, through the fine representation of our designee, Dr. Elizabeth Wilson, has been most active in legislation against smoking. Our members are aware of the dangers of smoking, as we work with the victims in all stages of their illnesses. As with all major health problems, we know that prevention is not only more cost effective, but also more beneficial to the quality of life for the individual. NJSNA will continue to develop and lobby legislation that will work for improved tobacco control. The success of the smoke-free hospitals has been phenomenal. Education being the key ingredient for all prevention activities has always been a mainstay of the Association. The addictive quality of nicotine dependence is an area that must be more fully discussed. We look forward to working in collaboration with other groups who are also commited to promoting good health.. Dorothy Flemming, MSN, RN Executive Director ncerely, cc: Liz Wilson, Member, NJDOH Commission on Smoking DF: bs d/1L6 320 West State Street, 'tYeaton, New Jersey 08618-5780
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XSINTC1 609-392-4884 FAX 609-3962330 ,ew Jersey State P(uraes Assodatfon Jane A. Adams, M.S.. R.M. Prrsident t Dorothy D. rfemming, M.S.IY., R.IY. Ezecutive Director June 4, 1990, Mr. George Wasser Public Health Consultant Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mr. Wasser: To meet the mandate of your grant application the New Jersey State Nurses Association is pleased to forward the requested information. 1. GOALS and PURPOSES - Article I, Section 2. NJSNA Bylaws The purposes of the NJSNA shall be to: 1) Work for the improvement of health standards and the availability of health~care services for all people; 2) Foster high standards of nursing; 3) Stimulate and promote the professionaIl development of nurses; 4) Advance the economic and general welfare of nurses. These purposes shall be unrestricted by considerations of nationality, race, creed•, lifestyle, color, sex or age. 2. MEMBERSHIP - Article II, Section 2. NJSNA Bylaws Qual if icat ions A member is one: 1) Who has been granted a license to practice as a registered nurse in at least one state, territory, possession or District of Columbia of the United States and who does not have a license under suspension or revocation in any state or 2) Who has completed a nursing education which quaiifies the applicant to take the State Examination for Registered Nurses Licensure as a first time writer, and, 3) Whose appiication,for membership has been accepted in accordance with Association policy, and 4)• Whose dues are not delinquent, and 5) Whose membership is not under revocation for violation of the Code for Nurses, ANA or NJSNA Bylaws. 320 West State Street, Trenton, IMew Jersey 08618-5780
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! 3. SMOKING - Related experience Adoption in October 1984 of Resolution on Smoking. Lobbied in-1987 for legislative/regulatory initiatives to increase public awareness of dangers associated with tobacco products. Developed• a position statement in 1988 addressing Smoking in Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities. A member of NJSNA serves on the New Jersey Department of Health Commission on Smoking. 4. OTHER PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES - The New Jersey State Nurses Association has been an activist in addressing health care needs through our formal lobbying process and work with coalitions. 5• RATIONALE FOR MEMBERSHIP - Historically we have worked with other professional groups and with coalitions. Our present member has been a valuable contributor to the process. 6. SPECIFIC TARGET' GROUPS - Our major target group• is registered nurses, as well as other health care workers and the consumer. 7. MECHANISM THAT WILL WORK - Our long history of providing education for nurses as an approved provider of education, as well as our legislative activity on health speaks to a mechanism that works. 8. PROPOSED CONTRIBUTOR - An NJSNA member will continue to participate on the committee. Information about smoking will be shared with our members and others via our newsletter, The New Jerse Nurse, as well as formal continuing education programs. We hope that th•is will provide you with the information you need•. Please contact us, if you•have any additional questions. incerely, Dorothy Flemming, MSY, RN ~ Executive Director ~ ~ ~ cc: Dr. Elizabeth Wilson•, Member NJDOH Commissionion Smoking ~ DF : b s i1~
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NEW JERSEY CHAPTER SOCTETY FOR'RUBLIC HEA6TH ED(lCAT!ON March 30, 1990 George L. Wasser Cancer and Tobacco tTse Control Program New Jersey State Department of Health CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Mr. Wasser: On behalf of the New Jersey Society for Public Health Education (NJSOPHE), I wish to extend my support for seeking the ASSIST 2000 contract to implement smoking-related activities in New Jersey. A proJect such as this would help us sustain the momentum that we have already established within the state. NJSOPHE would be delighted to help with the administration of the smoking education initiatives specif ied by ASSIST 2000. In view of New Jersey's distressing fiscal condition, the state is in 3eopardy of losing both health educators and the important services they provide. I know that I speak for the individual NJSOPHE members in saying that ann influx of ASSIST 2000 funds would provide vital new support -- we all offer our time and expertise for planning, implementing, and evaluating these activities should the contract be awarded to our state. The Executive Committee of NJSOPHE is aware that the New Jersey State Department of Health, the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society, and a variety of state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of the proposed contract. We look forward'to becoming a part of this collaboration and hope that you are indeed successful in your attempt to obtain the ASSIST 2000 contract. Sincerely, Denise A. DePalma, MA, CHES F3ealth Educator President, NJSOPHE
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N'E W JERSEY CHAPTER SOCIETY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH, EnOCrtTION March 29, 1990 George L. Wasser Cancer and Tobacco Use Control Program New Jersey State Department of Health CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear George: As requested, below is an information profile for NJSOPHE. Please feel free to reorganize it as you see f it when completing the application for the ASSIST project: 1. NJSOPHE's goals are to= - promote health education concepts. - provide a network for prof essionals. - represent health education ideas and principles in the legislative and public arena. - respond to legislation affecting the health and welfare of New Jersey's residents. - foster professional growth. W 2. NJSOPHE has over 160 members currently, serving in a variety of capacities in both the public and private sectors: as health educators in local, county, and state government; in hospitals and other health care centers; in planning agencies; in schools and colleges; and as consultants. 3. Most of our members have gained smoking-related experience as a critical part of their service in the above-mentioned settings. Local health department-based members have an even more concrete commitment to smoking prevention and cessation services as part of their "Minimum Standards of Performance. " 4. Since most of the members of NJSOPHE are "one-man" departments, they are required to be versatile. In most instances, the members are expected to offer a broad spectrum of health education activities, of which smoking cessation and prevention is one important component. 5. NJSOPHE has members from throughout the state, making it an excellent vehicle for broad-based implementation of activities. An important technique that health educators use to amplify their impact is community organization. By its very definition, community organization involves working with other persons and agencies, pooling efforts where indicated, while avoiding unnecessary duplication. (continued)
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Furthermore, NJSOPHE has been a long-standing member of the New Jersey Commission on Smoking OR Health, through which it has worked with numerous other organizations in seeking a more smoke-free environment. Collaboration is a way of life for the members of NJSOPHE. 6. The broad geographic distribution of NJSOPHE members and their position as part of the state's health care "network" allows them relatively convenient access to the important target groups for smoking-related programs. 7. To comply with state guidelines of performance, many locally-based NJSOPHE members must provide smoking cessation/prevention services to their community. State audits periodically verify the quality of these services. Furthermore, a few NJSOPHE members have received special state grants specifically for smoking-related services. The grants were awarded on a competitive basis to those proposals showing the greatest promise, and the resulting activities are often cited as model projects. 8. The members of NJSOPHE wish to offer their support for the ASSIST project in New Jersey by offering to aid in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of the smoking-related activities (especially the education components) funded by the grant. Sincerely, David Rata3ack, MPH, CHES Health Educator NJSOPHE Representative to the NJ Commission on Smoking OR Health CC: Denise DePalma, MA, CHES -- President, NJSOPHE
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JUL 2. '9® 1E1:c?AM PESP1' & REUJ S4C5 rC11 bs3 608.4 ThePrudentiel Mrs. Janice Marshall N.w Jersey State Department of Health Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Re: Project ASSIST 2000 Program Dear Mrs. Marshall: Carfton L. Anderson Vice r•eaider•. Acrr nisrratlon Rescanual ano a.location Sernces Grouo Tne Pudermei tnsure^eeCompany ot Ar*menca 751 Broac St:eeL Newark, NJ 07ti92•377•7 20' 802-4234 Fax 2C' 843-8084 July 27, 1390 p.2.3 The Prudential is the leading lite-insuranc. company in America. It - .mploys over. 100, 000 persons • iYi- the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia :and..ls the fifth largest employer in the State of Naw Jersey. The Prudentiai-has recognized the dangert•ot cigarette smoking in several ways: o Prudential offers lower rates on individual life insurance to insureds who do not smoke. o Prudential's Group Department distributes information to our client companies on the "Costs and Dangers of SmokingN and "How Employers Can Help". o Each year most offices of the Company participate in the "Great American Smokeout" during which employees pledge not to• smok. for a day. o. Medical Staff around the country sponsor informational Smoking Awareness programs. o The Prudential strongly supports the resolution of the American Council of Life Insurance and the Health Insurance Association of America calling for companies to initiate smoking cessation and prevention programs among their employees. o Prudential has developed and implemented a written company policy regarding smoking in the work place. In general smoking is prohibited in all common areas, including lobbies, waiting areas, corridors, cafeterias, lavatories, and recreation rooms. Several of the large business units and departments have prohibited smoking any where within their buildings.
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P.3/3 -2- o Prudential is represented on the New Jersey Commission on smoking or Health. We strongly support goals of the ASSIST 2000 program and know that the New Jersey Department of Health, the NQw Jarsey Division of the American Cnncer Society, and the state and local eoal.itions will carry out the t4rms of the contract. There is a very definite need for the project and we will support the Department of Health to the extent possible in the administration of the contract. Sincerely, a~ . aJU- ~ VicePresident, Administration CLA: an a:ca3#12 a
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I /HE /USPRATORY 1EALTHASSOCIAH4N 55 Patanius Road Pu'emus. NJ 07652 •(201) 843-4111 April 25, 1990 A Mr. George Wasser New Jersey State Department of Health Box CN 369 University Office Plaza Trenton, New Jersey 08650 Dear Mr. Wasser: The Respiratory Health Association fully supports the ASST_ST' project and its goal to reduce smoking prevalence. since smoking has been recognized as the single most preventable cause of disability and death in the United States, it is imperative that all appropriate resources be harnessed in a national effort to change this picture. The coalition model is an effective way to coordinate and strengthen the efforts of organizations currently involved in smoking control. The Respiratory Health Association would intend to play a vital role in ASSIST as we have been doing in the COMMIT project in Paterson, New Jersey. Our organization serves on the COMMIT Board of Directors and contributes to the work of several task forces. The Respiratory Health Association has also trained smoking cessation moderators in Paterson and provided a cessation program at a hospital located in Paterson. With the American Cancer Society and American Lung Association representatives, we are about to plan and implement further cessation programs within the city using a coordinated schedule of courses. New Jersey has been•a leader in smoking control legislation. The New Jersey State Health Department is clearly committed to the national goal of a smoke-free society demonstrated by the inclusion of smoking prevention and cessation programs into the Minimum Standards of Performance as mandated activities. We are pleased to endorse the New Jersey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society in the effort to secure funding for this project. We would be eager to participate with the state and, local coalitions in carrying out N the terms of the contract. Q Sincerely~,.,~~ , ~ Joan K. Schroeder, R.N.,M.A. Program Director JKS:SH
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30 THE RESPIRATORY HEALTH ASSOCIATION The Respiratory Health Association (RHA) is a voluntary, not for profit health agency serving the community for 85 years. Our goal is to promote respiratory health and prevent and control respiratory disease. The organization, governed by a voluntary Board of Trustees, has four classes of members: regular, corporate, sustaining and honorary as defined in the bylaws. Members of a program and medical committee function as an advisory group for the educational and preventive services related to smoking and chronic lung diseases. Our program staff has extensive experience with a range of approaches to smoking prevention and cessation. including formal classes, clinics, individual counseling and the first smoke free maintenance support group in New Jersey. Programs are offered in community and corporate settings. Our success rate is over 50% for both quitting and remaining smoke free. As active participants in the Paterson, New Jersey COMMIT Project and on the Governor's Commission for Smoking or Health, The Respiratory Health Association considers this serious public health issue a primary agency responsibility. We will continue our coordinated planning and implementation activities with the other coalition members while expanding intervention efforts through the ASSIST Project. The present RHA contacts, including corporations, community organizations such as the YW and YMCA's, school faculty and student populations, other health and social service agencies, will be used to reach and promote prevention and control programs especially for the specific target groups. The Respiratory Health Association will consider appropriate in- kind and possible direct support contributions as needed in order to achieve the Project's goal.
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tiEW )IERSEY University of Medicine & Dentistry of. Mpw /ersey May 16, 1990 Department of Psychiatry Untversitv H,2tghts 201/456-5425/4956/6565 30 Bergen Street-Room 1522 Newark, New Jersey 07107-3000 Ms. Janice Marshall N.J. State Department of Health Division of Epidemiology 3635 Quackerbridge Road Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0360 Dear Ms. Marshall: I was pleased to learn that the New Jersey State Department of Health and the New Jersey coalitions of the American Cancer Society are submitting a proposal for an ASSIST center. As you know, I am a strong advocate for anti smoking activities, and I am hopeful that ASSIST will bring to New Jersey the capability to truly eliminate smoking in New Jersey as public health issue by the Year 2000. As a faculty member of the New Jersey Medical School, Principal Investigator of COMMIT, and member of the New Jersey Commission on Smoking and Health, I can assure you that I will personally make every endeavor to support your efforts and to help make ASSIST a success. I would be pleased to serve as a volunteer and consultant. I hope you will feel free to call upon me. In closing, let me add that I have been involved in anti smoking activities in New Jersey since the early 70s. I served as Co-Investigator of the New Jersey Medical Schooll site for the MRFIT, a volunteer for the American Heart Association, principal investigator on several federal grants having to do with smoking, and now, Principal Investigator of the Community Intervention Trial. I believe my staff and I can contribute to ASSIST in many ways, ranging from support of legislative issues, carrying out media events, to implementation•of smoking cessation programs. I believe ASSIST will provide an important forum for expanding upon these activities in New Jersey. I truly wish you luck in your grant application, and I hope to work with,you closely in the years to come. I enclosed a copy of my resume for your file and use. Very truly yours, Norman Hymowitz, Ph.D: Clinical Associate=°s~Jor ThF O1n,.er5itv ti an , ttirmati~e aet onreqpat opportunrty empluver 2li2tJ67V'#44
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~iJtiV'~ }Ss .~.. [; ~% jStatt ,vf Nefu 'jerseyl DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN 360 FRANCES J. DUNSTON. M.D.. M.P.H. TRENTON. NJ. 0862550360 STATE COMlMSSiONER OF HFAt.TH August 21, 1990 Adewala Ttoutiten, M Medtcal Ltirector, Newark Deparbnent of Health and Fiuman Services 110 Wf Uta++s Stseet, 2nd Flocs Atawsric, NJ Q7102 Dear Dr. Tsiout7man: In the fall of 1985, the Departme~ of Health appointed me<n6ers to the Qmnnission cn &Dkirsg CR Health to a3~ the probiens creatgd by tdbaoco, use In New Je=sey. It is oamprised of msnbess whC xeptev9ent hea.2th tare providers ai7d vansuners, and also serves as an arlviscuy board to tlhe Department of Health in mattexs eonaernirrg paE.i,cy, legisl.ati,on and educatiCnal Sntervpntions Felatad to snokitig and tobaooo use anc2 oocttral. ne Qmudssion wishe5 to incrai4e its membership in order to broaden its soope. AdditionaZ members are bei ng invitgd fx+t3a dvfc o~raizatiorLS and the business aamaaiity. Hecacise of yatr expertise, I think you wosid be a valuable asset to this Canafssian, aryd an thernfcuQ requestin3 1'o= par'tic'.ipaticn. Zhe Camtission oeetings are beld quarterly, and a descc-ipttan of Cmmiission activities ani a list of manbers are ar.].osed. Plsa.se Con1:aCt Mrs. JarLioe Nlarshal I at ( 609 ) 588-7470 if you d=ee to participate cxr wtuld like aaditiona.l jnfornatian. g; r,ce*+oly Frances J. DunsbCn, M.D., M.P.H. State Conmissirnes of Health n-AG asures N ~ W C~? ~ ~ ~ tJi New Jersey Is An Equal Opporrunity Employer
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FRANCES J. DUNSTON. M.D_ M.P.H. STATE CO6iMISS1ONER OF HEALTH ,*tatx nf Wrfu jrr$eg DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN 360 TRENTON: N.J. 08625-0360 August 21, 1990 Lawrenoe A. Meinert, ND, MPH Associate Director, Warldwide Clinical Operations Bri.stUo1-Myez^s Squibb Oorporaticui P.O. Boot 4000 Prirloetoa7, NJ 08543-4000 Dear Dr. Mejnert: In the fall of 1985, the Depaztrtent of Health appainted membpss to the Conmfssion on Smking oR Health to address the problsms craabed by t~obaor~ tme in New Jersey. It is oampri.9ed of tteabe.rs who represent healtft care providers and oonsumers, and also serves as an advisory board to the Depaz-tment of Health in matters oonoeznfng policy, legislaticn and educationa]l jnterventi.ocis relatied to ssmking and 'hoUaooo use and aontsol. The Cartnissitn wishes to i*Y'rease its manbership in order to broaden its sc~ope. Addittional aembers are bP,.3ng invit®d fxvn civic o~ganizatiot~ and t3ye bus.iness occmunity. Because of yaQ' expertise, I think you wou].d be a valuable asset to this Cmmissian, and am ttpsefore zequesting your participati.on. The Carmissi©n meetings are held quarterly, and a descsiption of Ca:misslori activfties and a list of manbers are enclosed. Please crntact Mrs. Jani.oe Marshall at (609) 588-7470 if yoa dioose to participate or would like additict131 infocnati.an. Sinoerely, /ZJo FYances 3. Dunston, M.D., M.P.H. State Ccemissiarer of Health EnC1owZ'es New Jersey Is An Equal Opportunity Employer
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,*txfP vf Weftr jjervieg DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN 360 FRANCES J. DUNSTON. M Q. M P.H. STATE COMMISStONER OF HEALTH TRENTON, NJl 08625-0360 August 21, 1990 Robert J. Zu11o, M.D. 0=pazate h9ed.ic:a1 Director Me=cc & QD., Inc. P.O. Hox 2000 Rat*ray, NJ 07065 Dear Dr. Zu].l,o: D In the fall of 1985, the Deparlment of Health appointed nembers to the Comnission cn Seoking CR Health to add*pss the prvialesRs ©reated by tobacco use in New Jersey. It is acuVmised of rtiembers taho Iepre9ent h+ea.tth Care providers and a'31S11ner5, ffiY1 also serves as an BdViSOry bOcZrd to the D2p3rU[Ieclt of Health in matt+ers corp•,,i ng polic.'y, legfslaticn ard ectxcationa]l intezvent3uLs r+eLated to smdting and totaaoaD use and Qantrol. The fXirmissicn w.ishes to i*+crease its nenbexshig in order to broadm its 9oDPe. Additional macibezs are being invited fran civic rugaa+; 7a+tians and the bus3rnss aamunity. Becau,9e of yaLr expertise, I think yw wauld be a valuable asset ta this Commdssion, and an thexefore requesting yaxr Paz'~Pati.an. The Commission meetings are held quarterly, aryd a des=ipti,on of Coannission activities and a list of manbers are errlosed. Please mntact Mrs. Janim Yk*shall at ( 609 ) 588-7470 if you dcose to participate or weulc3 like additi.onal inforrmatian. Sincezel.y, Frartiaes J. Dunston, M.D., M.P.H. State Camdssianer of Health F7nc^.losures New Jersey Is An Equal Opporrunrty Employer
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FRANCES J. OUNSTON. M.D.. M.P.H. STATE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH ~S#x#r- of We€a lerseg DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN 360 TRENTON. NJ. 086254360 J ` tyti~^f r t :.rt J August 21, 1990 P®ul. Desjarli.ns, LNn, PhD cr4W, New Jersey Dental sc3hao1 i]eparbmecrt of Oral Patl»Iogy, flfalogy and Mag)stic Scianoe 100 Herggi SLzeet PJerrdrk, NJ 07103 Dear Dr. Desjaitiins: In tha fall of 1985, the Department of Health appointed members to the Comnissicxi czt SmddrV CR Health to address the problems crsated by t~aooo use in Now Jersey. It is comprised of ntatiberst who represent bealth care pmovidPSS and oorgmxrers, and atso serves as an advisory boaxd to tfie Departmeot of Health in mattexs Qcrcetriimg policy, legislaticn azx3 edirationai interventicns ze7:ated to stnking ard t~o~aooo use and ©ontrnl. The Camiission wishes to increasie its manberstiip in order to brroaden its scqpe. Ar3ditiocs3l menbezs are bP_ing irnvited fran civic o=ganizati.ons and the business QOi[iRULity. Hecause of yair eape= ti.se, I think you would be a valuable asset to this Camai.ss,ion, arr3 em tYerefore req+es-i ng yasr p~Paticn. The C7annissian meetinils are held quarterly, and a desQiptirn of C:cnmission activities and a list of members ax+e enclosed. Please contac-t Mrs. Janiae Ma*st,atl at (609), 588-7470 if you doose to participate or would like ac33ttional inforntiatiun. Si nrera7 y. inQ Ftaines J. Dunston, M. D. , M. P. H. State Cazmissioner of Health Enclosvres New Jersey Is An Equal Opportunity Employer
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FRANCES J. DUNSTON. M.D.. M.P.H: STil1TE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH ,4tx#e pf Wefii jPrs¢g DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN 360 TRENTON. N.J. 08625-0360 August 21, 1990 Ms. Jennffer Austin liaalth FAtrabar G1muoesbar dounty Dept. of Health Carperzter Street & A21ens Iane hbocIIxuy, NJ 08096 OBax Ms. Austi.n: t :!-' •t:f In the fall of 1985, the LDepartment of Hea].th appointed manbers to the Qomni.ssian on 9mdd.irg OR Health to, addrrnss the pzoblems created by mbaooo use in New Jersey. It is ocmpOC1..9ed of mal I s wha represent health care providers and aortsumexs, and slso sexves as an advisory board to the Departroent of Health in nettYrs oanoeining polic.y, legislation and educaticna7, intexventicns xe].ated to srddrxj arrl totar~oo use and oontno.l. You are m*d+At ly invited to beoome amembe.r of the Commissian because of yoXs ~tzaticn's impox-bacr.e to Atew Jersey's citizem. Your paxtidpatjan will be invaluable and we we].care ydu to serve cn the Camtission. '1he Commission meetings are held quarterly, ard a description of Comnission aetivities and a list of mambezs are errlosed. Please ocntact Mrs. ,7anioe Ms » at (609) 588-7470 if ycu choose to participate or would like ack3itlonaL infarmation. Sincerely, Fraices J. Durzstcri, M.D., M.P.H. State Canm.issioner of Health Fnclosures New Jersey Is An Equal Opportunity Employer
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FRANCES J. DUNSTON. M.D.. M.P.H. STATE COMMISSIONER OF HEJ1LTFi ,State af 'Nefr Terseg DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN 360 TRENTON. NJ. 08 6 2 5-03 60 August 21, 1990 [ds. Chr3s Kelly ~59~ S~yta~mfw~c~ti~l F/'i~o~a~d,/'~ liRlr. ii f l1/ \/OLTi7 Dear Ms. Itelly: in tfie fail of 1985, the DDeepartzment of Health appoinl,~ed menbers to the Cannissiat os 9ndting CR Health to ~ the prablelns creatgr3 by tcb&= use in New Jersey. Yt is amprissed of menbeLs %;hD repnesant health care providers and aansumwss, and aL~o serves as an advisory board to the Department of Health in nmatters ooccetniirf policy, legislaticn and edtraticanal inteivesntiens related to snoicing and toUaooo use and anYtrnl. ft You are rnr.ii a11 y invited to beoome a menber of the Comiissi.on be-ause of your cQrlanix.atiai's inpartaxce to New Jersey's citiz,ens. Your P~Pation will be invaluable and we weloome you to serve on the Cammissi.an. The Coamdssicn meet3ngs are held quarterly, arr2 a description of t7oRinissirn activities arxi a list of mmbers are elrlosed. Please oontact Mrs. Janice V+rsha> > at ( 609 ) 588-7470 if you cloose to participate or waild like actditicnal infozmat.ian. St nrp*+At y. Frances J. Dunston, M.D., M.P.H. State Caanissianer of Health Prliclosures New Jersey Is An Equal Opportunrty Employer
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FRANCES J. DUNSTOty. M.D.. M.P.H. STATE COMMISS{ONER Of HEALTH ,Sta#E Df W8fit JEXSeig DEPARTMENT OE HEALTH CN 360 TRENTON. NJ. 08625-0360 August 21, 1990 Ms. Lydia Valencia Ekecutive Dir~.~bcior Auerbo Rican Cacygress 515 South Broad Street 4i-erstan, NJ 08611 Dear Ms. Val.encia: In tbe fall of 1985, the Depa:.-t3cent of Bealth. appointed Is>anbers to the Caanissian on Sroking CR Health to address the panblems cseated by bob~ooo use in New Jersey. It Is oatQrised of membPSs who represait health care pavcriders and oonsuneis, and a1sQ serves as an advisory boaxd to the Degartmerct of Fta3l.tth in matters oarcerning polt,cy, l.egis].aticn arxi educational intP,cvmnticns zplated to smoking and tnbaooo use and aorrtsal_ You aze i All y invited to beocme a manber of the Comnissian because of yair ozganizati,an's imQoztanoe tc New Jersey's citizens. Your P3rtid.Paticn will be invaluable and we weloame yvu to se,zve on the Qomnissian. The Courtission meetings are held quarterly, and a descrigtiat of 0anatssion activities and a list of mmbPSs are enc7.osed. Please oontact Mrs. Janice MaTst,atl at (609) 588-7470 if you dhoose to participate or would like additional information. Sirirr• r'nly, ~..., ,.~ Franoes J. Dunstan, M.D_ , M.P.H_ State Ccminissioner of Health Er,clasuies New Jersey ls.4n Equal Opporrunuy Employer
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FRANCES J. DUNSTON. M.D.. M.P.H. STATE COMMISSIONER OF HEAL'TH ,S#xtE uf Neftr jErsev DEPARTMENT OF HEA LTH CN 360 TRENTON. NJ! 0862Sd360 August 21, 1990 Mr. James Morars Emecutive Dix+ec.rUot', New Jersey Associatian of Sdx)ol Administrators 920 W. State Street TrEntrn, K7 08618 to Dear Mr. MDZan: r t 3 . . w.... In the fal.l of 1985, the Degartrent of Health appDin'bad me.ntess tD the (7bmdssian ai Siroking OR Health to acldress the grob.leas csvated by tiobaocr~ use in New Jersey. It is oamprised of inembers who represent health care prw.i.deis and consumexs, and also se=ves as an advisDry board to the DeparGment of Health in mattex" concerning policy, legislation and e8ucatianal intp.xventioeLs related to sooisixg and tot~ar~oo use and ocntrol. Ycai are cordially invited tD beoare a mimbes of the Conriissian because of ylxlt' E~dtl~Zat~QC1tS inpOrtanO@ to Di2W J@X9eyF3 GitizC[L4. YQTf partj p3t~Q1 W~.~. be iJNaLUable and we WPJ.OD111C YOIl to 9P.Yv@ Ctl the co7ifds'si:Ql. lhe Comnissi.rn meetinqs aze held quarterly, and a dessiption of Carmissicn acttv3ties and a].ist of nembess are plrloeed. Please contact Mrs. Janioe Mars+all at ( 609 ) 588-7470 if yau choose to participate or would l.ike add.itirnal inforaaticn. Sitcarnsy, FranoP.s J. Diuzston, M.D., M.P.H. State of Health F11C1O6112'e5 New Jersey Is An Equal Opportunity Employer
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FRANCES J. DUNSTON. M.D.. M.P.H. STATE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH jitafe d Wefu Trrseg DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN 360 TRENTON. N:S. 086250360 August 21, 1990 Mrs. Joati Scduoede=' C/O OC"W Respi.iatacy Iieal.th Associaticn 55 Paraanis Fio2d Pezanus, NJ 07652 Dear Mrs. Schroedex': 8/~4o. .. In tfie fall of 1985, the Departsmnt of Health appDinted nmlx-zs to the Cbmissirn an Snoking CR Health to addxess the panbl,ems treated by bob3m~ use in Wew Jersey. 1*0 It is oomprised of members wha represent health cars providers and eorsunefs, and also serves as an advisoxy boaa=ci to the Departtmt of Health in matters oanoexrd.ng poli.qr, legislation and educational inteivpntiow rel.3ted to srnoking and bobaooo use and oontsvl. You are oordially invited to baoame a mgmber of the Caatmission because of ytxs aa~izatian's tmportanoe to New Jeisey's citizens. Your P~Fati~ai will be itnraluable and we welcame yvu to serve cn the mantnissicn. The Caunissiocs meetings are held quarterly, and a c3escs-iption of C.amnissi.az activities arrl a list of mgnbers are enclosed. Please oontact Mrs. Janioe marsha' 2 at ( 609 ) 588-7470 if yvu cnoee to participate or would like additicnal infoznsaticn. s; nce**>> y nW Frarces J. DuLstcn, M.D., M6P.H. State Caamissioner of Health E,c-t rsuries New Jersey Is An Equal Opportunuy Employer
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rW jf txtt of Nefu Terseq DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CN' 360 FRANCES 1 DUNSTON• M D.. MP H. STATE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. TRENTON. N.J 08625-0360 .t~ . tir~,rfs / ._s August 21, 1990 Ms. Lydia Trjaiidad Execut.fve Direcbar Puertu Rican A.S9oci atioa for Hunan Developaent, Inc. 100 First Street Perth Amboy, N,7 08861 Dear Ms. ZSeinidad: In the fall of 1985, tthe DeparUment of Health appointed manbP.rs to tfie Camdssia3 cn blmkUV OR Health to addrass the pidblens created by tohx.nD use in New Jersey. It is vomparised of snenbers wln represent health care pmavidess and oonsumess, and also serves as an advisory board to the Deparbaent of Health in matbers ocmernirig policy, legisLatian and educatioasal interventians ie3•atied to stnhing and tc~Eaaoco use and ccntrol. Ycu aore oFxLtli a> >y incvited to beoome a nlenber of the Cammissiaz because of your ~nizati~'s iaQortarce to New Jersey's citizens. Yvur partirripatie~n will be invaluabble and we weloonte yau to serve on the Qamiissi•an. The Cannission meetings are held quaazrterly, and a description of CamLission a,ctivities and a list of inembers are enclosed. Please aontact Mrs. Janice p+tarct,a77 at (609) 588-7470 if yai dhoose to participate or wnuId like additiccal informaticui. Sircerely, Frdcces J. DuLston, M.D., M.P.H. State Camaussionec• of Health Pinclosures New Jersey Is An Equal Opportunity Employer
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40 OMcES 1"41.+1 r...1e.a nAa„ta•He, h..se.w-EJ.u Roba•t.t Wmta• s.auwy David H. Muyc T`sss" enw e.10ct,o ,.W iwre.w ttikh.rd r. sua l.MMdw D6.ar Jamrs A. Moran 1lrR8fBK1'ASNFi Atl..tlt CaA-E Sdmets 14ymo~J ~baro Antliafy Al M.nq4a s-rr,r.. Jom M SAmy Glam T. OiaY c..... caalfs JL Kilkcr+ Danid F. HkJcs c,ar. >.a RidMrd At &r.ws cr.ti.r.r L Willin Martis ...M John P. Pryor c1o6o.w.. Hoyd A. Sands Nad.e. cnax,ncinw A. sm•eo Str.a» Besn.rd T. O'Briai Kwa.r Fk;e A. Ciahetti .c.r.+: Rondd F. LrWn Wim.m W. sudano w....rr Wobam & rda. E.'lean J. SnnQrStevene .r.s JaM F. Fnmiq Oe... Dommic J" Catopw Robat Cilimto !r.{c James J. Hrb 5.1.sa WJtant H. Adaeu 3a..w.w John A. l.are L...a Wayno l-Threikdd V.f.. James At Caulfield W..,.. John IA Frey r.nrw.t-:..r. K.rcn4H.Y Cw&tY S"j- Rq- Yvttnu L &uvon Urr.. Rq....Mau.. Eugene C CamAMl AAtA NoU.N ,Uns W. a.usen AA.A r,r rV.r..a John a Csnunscr ;G. J(-. f:""t i^7Tjew Jersey Association of School Administrators ' 920 West State Street, Trenton, New Jersey 08618 Tetephonc (609) s99-2900/FAX (609) s99•te93 September 5, 1990 c. :•- .... :J t_ F' r Frances Dunston, MD., M.P.H. Si:are Cuimzd,sionet of Health State of New Jersey Department of Health CN' 360 Trenton, NJ 08625-0360 Dear Dr. Dunston: c=r;C= ~ 6P In response to your invitation to Mr. James A_ Moran, Executive Director of New Jersey Association of School Administrators, regarding his invitation to become a member of the Commission on Smoking OR Health, please be advised that he has asked me to serve on this panel in his stead. I am most happy and honored to become a part of this Commission, as I feel that matters concerning policy, legislative and educational intervention related to smoking and tobacco use are of utmost importance for our youth. Please send any information regarding meetings of the Commission to my attention. Thank you very much. Harriett S. Thomas Assistant Executive Director HST:nhw rn
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N E\\' Jlf R S E Y University of Medtcitle & Uemlastr\- ol New Jersey RoherLV\'ooc3 Johnson tileclical Schocl) St. Peter's htec•licaI Cenwr 2•5-1 Ea,,tcltl AvCnuc• 1'C). Boe itl•1 New Brun-.% icl;, Npa• )ersey 08903' /3011 745-8600 FAX (:t)1) 21d-05(>G iDepartment ofiMedicine Mr. Robert V. Andrews Director Corporate Communications Johnson & Johnson One Johnson & Johnson Plaza New Brunswick, NJ 08933 Dear Mr. Andrews, September 12, 1990 Thank you for your recent letter about participating on the Commission on Smoking OR Health. Dr. Watson contributed a great deal to the early years of the Commission, and we will miss him. JDS:jw cc: William Parkin, DVM, Dr.PH. ~ v de, ~f. / J n D.Sa D., F.A.C.P. Ch irman, Commission on Smoking OR Health lurrnt rlt knrn-n .t% Riatt;r•rc hk•ri'c.iJ tic hnr~l f j'tlu VlRmxt•rstln n. .1rt d.nrm mn r.u linn r•r1U. { t+ly+n~U~~~t~ t•inltttn.t•t.
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ROSEMARY CUCCARO, R.N., B.S., M.A. THE VISITING NURSE Executive Director AND HEALTH SERVICES 354 UHION AVENUE • P O. BOX 170 • ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY 07248 • PHONE: 201-352-5694 June 15, 1990- Janice Marshall New Jersey State Dept. of Health• Division of Epidemiology & Disease Contol Cancer & Tobacco Use Control Program CN 360 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0360 Dear Ms. Marshall: Enclosed•please find the Visiting Nurse and Health Service's proposal as the lead agency for the Union-Essex County Coalition of ASSIST. Along with the concept paper is a biographical sketch of our proposed project Director. We have already begun coalition building for the project and have enclosed letters of support from the community. There is much interest and enthusiasm. Please contact me with any questions. Sincerely, Rosemary Cuccaro Executive Director RC/jdm Enclosures U-w ww A United Way AREAS SERVED_ Accredited by The Agency National League Clark, Ctanford, Elizabeth, Fanwood, Garwood, Hillside, KenilwortH. Ianden for Nursing Mountainside, Rahway, Roaelle, Roselle Park. Scotch Plains, SpnngfielH, Union, Vauxhall Westfield, Winfield and•other Union County Muntctpaltties
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VISITING NURSE AND HEALTH SERVICES The Visiting Nurse and Health Service is a voluntary non-profit community health, agency serving all of Union County, New Jersey. Philosophy The Board of Trustees and staff of the Visiting Nurse and-Health Services are committed to providing comprehensive, professional, family-centered nursing and other therapeutic services. Patients and families are cared for regardless of sex, age, race, color, creed or financial status. Services and care will be administered-effectively and economically. Fees are adjusted to the patient-family ability to pay. The Board of Trustees and the staff will remain responsive to trends in the delivery of health services. Community needs will determine initiation, revision or deletion of agency programs and services. The Board of Trustees and staff will insure that the Agency shall be accountable for a sound statistical and financial reporting system. Agency policies will comply with State and;Federal regulations. Goals 1. To provide, under medical direction, nursing and other therapeutic services, (physical, speech and occupational therapy, Homemakerl Home Health Aide, Medical Social Work, Nutrition, Mental Health Nursing and Health Education Consultation) to individuals and families at home, school, work, clinics, nursing homes or other settings, on a part-time intermittent basis by qualified personnel. 2. To collaborate and coordinate with other professional, official and consumer groups in studying, planning and executing action programs for the health of the community. 3. To participate in educational programs for nurses, allied professionals and auxiliary workers and community groups. -K
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The Visiting Nurse and Health Services has previously participated-in and is currently involved with numerous grant and contract programs which have enjoyed both private and public funding. The Visiting Nurse and Health Service has always met its contractual obligations with these programs and frequently continues the services after the grant has expired. Here are a few such programs: PROGRAM FUNDING SOURCE . Psychiatric Outreach NJSD of HumamServices Division of Mental Health & Hospitals . Medical Day Care for Infants & Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Toddlers . Home Care, Health Maintenance Union,County Division on Aging & Home Health Aide Training . Public Health & Prevention Municipal Contracts Services We believe the Visiting Nurse and Health Service is the appropriate agency to lead the Union/Essex County Coalition because we have a strong presence in the community, have a long history of working j;ointly with other agencies and community groups and because we have shown fiscal responsibility with our granted programs. The VNHS agrees to provide direct support to the ASSIST Program by assuming the lead in the Union/Essex County Coalition.
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The Visiting Nurse and Health Services Experience with Major Smoking Related Programs and Program Success.. New Jersey State mandated minimum-standards for local health departments, include Smoking Cessation and Prevention as one of its required seven areas of core activity. For the past 12 years the Visiting Nurse and Health Services has contracted with 14 towns in Union County to provide health education activities in this area. Currently 10 well organized long running smoking cessation programs in the County, have a 25% 1 year success rate. They include the followings Union County Dental Society G.A.S.P. Program Merck Corporation AT & T Corporation, "Freedom from Smoking - sponsored by the Central Jersey Lung Assoc. At Union Hospital, Elizabeth General Hospital and UTnion County College. Westfield Y Hypnosis Stop Smoking Program, Smokeless System at Overlook Hospital. American-Cancer Society Smoking Cessation Program. ON Therefore, our focus has essentially been on prevention programs Sor all levels of the community. Preschools and Headstart levels "Starting Free" American Cancer Society Program materials are used. Elementary School level "Smokey Sue Demonstration" and American Heart Treasure Chest. Middle and High School level - Smokeless Tobacco filmstrips for various sports teams and boys health-classes. Great American Smokeout Day - Respiratory Lung Capacity Tests and Smokey Sue Demonstration along with distribution of American Cancer Society materials. Adult and Senior Citizen Level - At hypertension screenings, film• on the role of smoking in•blood pressure elevation is presented and materials distributed. Community groups such-as PTA's, Visually Impaired Support Groups, and the Rotary have had programs presented on Smoking Dangers. At Child Health Conferences, a program on Smoking Cessation is presented to parents in the waiting room. Experience with similar public health or public interest issues. The remaining six minimum standards areas include alcohol and drug control, physical fitness and exercise, A.I.D.S., Nutrition and Safety and Accident Prevention. Four years ago, we received a grant from the Public Health Association to promote Infant Care Seat Safety. Toys 'R' Us became a sponsor and parents attending programs were given-discount coupons for seat purchase at their stores for infants. Programs were held in 43 preschools and kindergartens. The grant has ended-but the program continues as the materials are still usable. Alcohol and-drug addiction workshops were held i,n 15 elementary schools this year in conjunction with the Union-County Council on Alcoholism. The nutritionist has provided 44~programs in-the community. A.I.D.S. programs 1•
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were held at 34 sites. Long standing cooperative ventures and liaisons with community non-profit organizations are presently in place and have been on- going for a number of years. Rational for Coalition Membership and how you have worked-with the other members. Coalition,Membership will be sought from the following groups: - Worksites with large numbers of employees in Union and Essex Counties, such as Schering-Plough, Merck and Co., Inc., Macy's Credit Corporation, Dun and Bradstreet, Exxon Corporation, Bristol-Myers, Ciha-Geigy, Etc. - Hospitals, whether or not they currently have a smoking cessation program. There are 7 in Union County and 12 in Essex County. - Community Organizations with an interest in health promotion in Union County and Essex County, such as Dental Society, Union and Essex Medical Society, American-Heart Association, Planned Parenthood. Union and Essex County Council on Alcoholism and Drug Addiction, GSA, BSA, Etc. - Education Institutions, i.e., Kean College of New Jersey, Essex County College, Union County College (4• sites) Rutgers, Headstart and County Superintendent of Schools. - Minority Groups, i.e., PROCEED, lia Casa De Don Pedro, National Council of Negro Women, NAACP, Black Man's Health Network, Family Health Center. - Clergy Associations of Union and Council of Congregations. Programs in the above sites are in progress, have recently been completed; or are in the planning stages for all seven areas of minimum standards. How specific target groups will be reached. The target groups for prevention programs will be the youth~of the community. Currently in both public and-parochial schools with special emphasis on the black and latin population, since smoking is usually the gateway drug that the youngsters first try. Seeing no immediate deleterious effects they are convinced they can go ahead and try other drugs with-the same degree of safeness. The Young Black and Latin population are the fastest growing segment of U.S population and have been earmarked for smoking promotion by the tobacco industry. The young people not in school will be reached through such groups as Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Union County, Teen,Parents at Elizabeth Counseling and Testing Center, Vauxhall Single Parents of Family Health Center, Planned Parenthood, ESL Programs, Child Health~Conference and W.I.C. Sites, Black and Hispanic Church•groups, etc. Special emphasis will be placed in those areas with more than,207Z of households living below poverty, namely Elizabeth, Vauxhall, Lindem and Rahway, Newark, Irvington and E. Orange. Demonstrate that you have created a mechanism that will work. In order to target limited financial resources and utilize them to the maximumy a pairing of successful cease smoking programs will be made with each minority group_ For example, Schering-Plough in Union may be paired ~
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with the Family Health Center located in the Vauxhall area. Possible activities may include financing the printing of a Smoking Prevention billboard in that area and stating on the billboard that they are the sponsor of it. They may provide ex-smokers to conduct programs in the Vauxhall Churches, provide printing of bus posters announcing a program, provide pizza and soda for a teen-health fair at the Family Health-Center or provide a meeting room. This pairing or sponsoring may change each year of the grant. Monies from the grant can then be used to purchase materials, i.e, audio- visuals, low level reading materials, Spanish material or to underwrite fees for entering cease smoking programs. The need for this funding was recently demonstrated in Irvington in ajoint Cancer Society-Irvington Health Department Cease Smoking Program. A$25.00-fee was required and 5 people signed up (not enough for a class) and when the fee was waived, 17 people signed up. 0 3
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A GEORGE BATTEN Executive Director West Caldwell BOARD OF DIRECTORS: JOHN FARRELL President West Caldwell LISA LABOLD Vice President Cedar.Grove MARY.DOUGHERTY Vice Presldent Cedar Grove JEANNE BYRNE Treasuret Essex Fells JOHN ZINGALI. JR Asststant Treasurer Verona PAULINE PAYNE Secretary WesbCaldwall LOUIS ANELLO Uiving.tton BARBARA BENJAMIN Glen Ridge JACOUELINE BICKOFF Fairfield DOROTHY BINDER Lrvinpston, KATHRYN COLLERD West Caldwetl ' THOMAS DURKIN. III Essex Fells MICHAEL FESTA Verona LILLIAN FOUT Roseland REED HAGELIN Caldwell JAMES HENKLE Bloomfield PHILIP KINZEL Caldweu KAREN KLEPPE LEMBO Caldwell MITCHELL MARTIN' Verona JAMES MASTERSON, North Caldwell ROBERT NASH Nbrtfi Caldwell LOUIS PILAS West Caldwell• RAT POWELL Fairfield CHARLES SEELINGER Roseland WILLIAM TAMBURRI Liv npston PAUL TOMASZESKI North Caldwell LEA WOLFF , ct,Caldwelll WEST ESSEX COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES 122 Clinton Road, Fairfield, New Jersey 07006 May 10, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, M.S.N. Coordinator, Smoking Control Program NJSDH-- Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN - 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: Telephone: (201) 882-1616 Recogni,zing the seriousness of the publlic health threat posed by cigarette smoking-in this country, we, the Board and staff of West Essex Community Health Services acknow- ledge the need,for a project such as ASSIST and pledge our support at the local level. Our Agency is prepared to work in concert with,the Visit- ing NUrse and Health Services of Elizabeth, as part of the Essex/tinion County Coalition to participate in the develop- ment and implementation of the terms of the contract. We understand that the N.J. State Department of Health and the N.J. Division of the American Cancer Society are ultimately responsible for the preparation and administration of the grant. We also endorse the designation of VNHS of Eliza- beth as the lead agency in the Essex/Union Coalition. As a community health agency with a commitment to publ,ic health promotion and education regarding optimal; health behaviors and reduction of risk factors, we are enthusias- tic about our involvement with the Coali-tion. As an Essex County organization, we also recognize that both the volume and demographics of the popul-ati-on identify a need to tar- get our area for this project. If we can provide any further information or be of addi- tional assistance at this time, please do-not hesi,tate to contact us. Sincerely,~ Dorothy Binder, President WECHS 08 akb Servrnng• BECLEVlLLE1BLOOMFIELDlCALOWELL/CEDAR GRO VE/ESSEX FELCS FAIRFIELD/GLEN RIDGE/UVINGSTONIMONTCLAIR/NORTH CALDWLrLL NUTLEY/ROSELANDIVERONA/WEST CALD WELC/ WES T ORANGE
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UNION COUNTY HEALTH OFFICERS AssoL'~Ai.'ItoN '. 1976 Morris Avenue UNION, NEW JERSEY 07083 (201) 688-2800 T?eAnt,s San 1Fki&ppQ Presidertt John Su.rm" Vice Praeldant June t. 1990 Mrs Janice Marshall. MNN New Jersey Department of Health,. Divfsion of Eplldemiology and Ousease Smokino Control ProCram CN 369 Trento•n. New Jersey 08625-0369 D,ear Mrs. Marshall: Kim-Derzsak Sectecary Kevin Schuerman Traasurer The Union County Health Officers Association voted unanimously at its last regular meeting on May 15. 1990, to support the loint effort of Essex and Union County to apply for the American Stop Smoking Interven,tion Study Grant (ASSIST), As President of the Union County Heal-th,Officers Association, 1 look forward to assisting with project plans to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by'designin,g smoking cessation programs that work and aVe accessible to the populat,ion at risk. The health officers in Unlon• County have expressed their desire to work with the State Health,0epartment, the Amerocan Cancer Society and local coalitions in a cooperative effort to successfully achiev-e contract goals and objectives_ At'so-, as the Hea{th:Offi~cer of ih~e Township of Union Board of Health. 1• assure you that you,willi receive the same cooperation and assistance from our DSF:p,sg. cc: l:ornaine Kowa/'ski VNHS, Health Educator UCHO fi. I e municipality. c e r e l y. ~,~ F . v President, Union County Health Officers Assoc_ ennis San 1I1ppo
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~~ Kmm~ d&a Oce ~~. ~~. Mrs. Janice !Sarsha•11. MN\ New Jersey Depti. cf Healtl. Div. of Epider.:iologartd Disr.a!~e Smol:irtg_ Contt•ol Pro2_1•am CX 36", Tr•entott. \J. 08625-0369 yz,i•11• 13. I:i`:;`) Dear Mrs. Marshall. As President of the Esse:. H-,~-a1tl, C rfi ~ r'. assoc•iatiort:. I aut kriting tl,is lt:tter o_° efforts k,einq made to cbtai•rt t1,e Americarn Stop Smtiking Intervention Study Grant (ASSIST) foi EsSe:. and. counti.es. The itnplemetttat ion of the ASSIST Zrs:,-t coulltlC``s to d8'\elo'+ tobRict: col.tro.L prozI"<21:Si witltlrt C•lti• commt2rirties to reduce the cancer inorbicjit`' ~tliCl i•tGtes tl:r-u the effort-s cf reducing the pret•ale,icr of The Esse,, County Health C`>fficer•s tiill coooerute L:v yr•ovid'irig the assistance of their local health deuartme.rt personnel to help t.itlt tlitY implrmejitatiorr of tlae utoxia::: 'Al-d the co•ntinued success of this grant if fundit.= _s recei.G::. We feel tlizrt thru our efforts in corujiuncr.ioli, t;ith- tl« `:ct. Jerse'~ - Dixtsiota of the Americat: Cancer Soc•iet. a•rid the : a e Dr_partment of Health th.:s grant t.ill greatly b,>>ic-f L t.otli ~ Esse2: and C'nion Courrtie= residents. A AV Si•ncer-e' ot/v-~Y•rl P f~Q ~ ~ Lou•.i s E. .':nE 11 .: U: ._. Q1 i rE--si•lent :..~,r:t . FA Hea] tl, Cf f tc~•r CA cc : `i<.de3 in • t:id~ Coordiua' cr. Ccnsultati;;n BeBevdle - BbortH4fif -~ftWlAll 6edkEGrbile - East Orange - Essex FeNs - Feyfield - Glen Ridge - Irvinpton - Livingston - Maplewood - Milibum Montclair - Newerk - North CaldweU - Nudey - Orange - Roseland - South-Orange - Verona - West Caldwell - West Orange
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REGIUNAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT 71 SUMMIT AVENUE $UMMYT. NEW JERSEY o79p1 7t7-eU riOAR.DS OF HEALTH t9muntt . N... Ptovtdeao. B.rkeiey Heighta . Sqtlbgfidd June 1,, 1990 Dr. Henry Birnr Director To: The American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Fm: Dr. Henry Birne, Director, Summit Regional Health Department This is to advise that I support the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study. I support the goaIs of the project which are clearly needed in the communities we serve. -r
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Township of Cranford 8 Springfield Avenue • Cranford, New Jersey 0Wit - -, (201) 709-7200 June 1, 1990 Ms. Janice Marshall, MNN New Jersey State Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: By this letter, I am giving my support, on behalf of the Cranford Board of Health and the Cranford Health Depart- ment, for the A.S.S.I.S.T. Program being proposed for Essex and Union Counties in order to address Smoking as a public health concern. Very truly yours, Warren J. Hehl, R.S. Health Officer WJH: jk
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Westfield Regianal Health Department . 425 East Broad Street Westfield. New Jersey 07090 Tel.it (201) 789-4070 Telecopier (201) 789-4076 june , Mrs. uorraine KowaiiGi: - Visitinq Nurse & Hea i•tr: Serv-1cwt7 354 Union Ave. .,erse•j i^.a .e~ted' ..1. lil sUJ~.O.^1: U' .-~•t~ '~•L-. ...L't..'i~ i::F_°.. .... Ofticers Associations' aociica:-:or fo c c^a: e~:~t e ASSI•S- aimeo a+_ eroviciinc, smoK-r..c ^.ass~: ;on ae ocret~nti.,c _ Tne pro;;ect ic to Dc coord incytec t:r~rouc^ conciu_-, .,c hfe211tt1 CCl:cariOn cSct'.vit lE'.s d.r.e65:C ::`.C nc'.tvin.^.. DOSSilDie '1mDact on mo.rU~'.ciZV_ clr7C assoclai.eQ w:L- ...:'tQ c 8tlct--, a.t.'.... 'Jn .:;571 .`.cuY:t, OU" OEDdrtmer.t w' [ i wOrK in sUDpQ-z •..' En° oromotin,c nt i:o . L-.-,ccnt> wic,1a-1 oc.. ca,znrr.enr_ ,. ....-. i - •ocert rvi-. Sner-. F'i.A_ fiecit.. C"'Tic,er Providing Health Services to Fanwoad', Garwood, Mountainside and Westfield
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City of Linden Union County, New jersey BOARD OF HEALTH ROOM 5, CITY HALG. - 301 N. WOOD AVEN, E LINDEN, NEW JERSEY 07036 THOMAS MCCREEVY PRESIDENT June 8, 1990 Ruth E. Odgren Director of Professional Services Visiting Nurse & Health Services 354 Union Avenue Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208 Dear Ms. Odgren: HENRY F GAVAN, B S. HEALTH OFFICER (201) 474-8409 PAUL SAMALONIS SENIOR SANITARY INSPECTOR (201) •.7a.®. T3 NANCY KOBLIS SANlTARYINSPECTOR (201) 474-6422 JOSEPH J. TRAVISANO SENIOR HOUSING INSPECTOR (201) 471-8411 KENNETH HERGENHAN HOUSING INSPECTOR (201) i17L8t27 Numerous studies have indicated that tobacco has deleterious health effects on both users and persons associated with tobacco users. The Linden Health Department will participate in any programs that will reduce the number of people exposed•to tobacco use. The Linden Health Department is currently contracted with the Visiting Nurse & Health Services of Union County, which will be the lead agency for Union County, New Jersey, in the "Assist" Project pending approval of the grant application. The New Jersey Department of Health and the American Cancer Society have always worked on Projects to improve the quality of life of the resident of New Jersey, and the "ASSIST" project will once again give them this opportunity. Sincerely y ~s. tjFG: sd "Dedicated to the Preservation and Advancement of Local Public Health"
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UNION COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY OF NEW JERSEY MOUNTAINSIDE CROSSING SPRINGFIELD AVENUE MOUNTAINSIDE, NEW JERSEY 07092 JUN - 11990 May 311, 1i990 Ms. Lorraine KowalsRi, Health Educator Visiting NUrse and Health Services 354 Un.i on Avenue Elizabeth, N.J. 07208 re: ASSIST Dear Ms. Kowalski: The Union County Medical Society is pleased to see the initiative shown by the Visiting Nurse and:Health Services with project ASSIST, the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention. As physicians, the members of our Society continuously see and' combat tobacoo-related,problems, from emphysema and-asthma to blood vessel constriction and cancer. We feel that there is indeed a need-for such,a project, and we fully support your appllication for same. Should you require any assistance, the Society refers patients to private physicians and would be happy to assist you should the need arise. Sincerely, Om-P: -"Sawhney, M. D. , President OMP/ir (201) 789-8603
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300 North Avenue. East Westfield. New Jersey 07090 201 /233-8810 °01/233-8892 (V/TDD) Union County Council on Alcoholism June 1, 1990 he Lorraine Kowalski, Health Educator Visiting Nurse and Health Services 354 Union Avenue Elizabeth, NJ 07208 Dear Ms. Kovalaki: Pro-ulc•nt ( hac I.•-Ji !:c•k hner Trea.ur c•r l{'illaamAf .9iclta ell IJ I at•rretar} Rarlcara (yranal F:-wt utne Direttnr (.tAdt. Keacn. The Union County Council on Alcoholism and Other Drug Addictions, Inc. is pleased indeed to see the Visiting Nurse and Health Services taking the initiative in becoming the lead agency for Union and Essex Counties in the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for cancer prevention. Review of the literature points out several prime concerns for those of us working toward the prevention of addiction to mood altering drugs: .40 -"Nicotine," according to John Slade, P[.D. of the UHDHJ, and a member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, "...use clusters at the earliest tage of drug probletas." It is a gateway drug, *... whose use commonly precedes the use of other drugs.* - The increased carcinogenic effect of regular tobacco use in concert with alcohol dependency has been noted repeatedly in the alcoholism literature. We look forward to working in cooperation with your agency. Toward that end, I have enclosed a copy of the Council's 1990 Summer Institute brochure. You will note that Dr. Slade is conducting a six hour certified course, for the Institute, "Tobscco in Chemical Dependency: A Chemical Collusion," on Wednesday, July 11. I an pleased to offer the opportunity to you to attend as a guest of the Council. N ~ Sincerely yours, ~ Gladys Kearns, MA, CAC '~ Executive Director ~ GK:nm ,~ pc: John Slade, ![.D., F.A.C.P T~.
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AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL NEW JERSEY, INC. t "THF CHRI.STMAS SFAi DFf1FI F"• 206 Westfield Avenue. Clark, N.J. 07066-1539 Telhphone (201).388-4556 May 8, 1990 OFFICERS Maria 11 Velez•tnpez. Esq. President Dolores C. Hermann Vice Presidene )acqueline A. Rogers Vice Presrdent Robert L Zanni, M.D. ViCe Presldent Muss Ann Lown, R.N: Treasurer Richard H. Guess, D.D.S. Assrstant Treasurer Kathleen C. Wendowski Seaetary GOAROOF DIRECTORS HUDSON COUNTY Joseph B. Bagley Dolores C. Hennann Maria I. Veitz-Lopez, Esq. Kathleen C. Wendowski MONMOUTH COUNTY Paul E. 8ilou• David W. Clark Peter A. E6os. Esq. Gloria R, Filippone Dorothea K. HbUnes. R.N., M.A. Marit Ann d.own. R.N. Elaine Tatantin At Turnswi Janice Volk, P.T. Robert L Zanni. M.D. UNION COUNTY Bnan•/. Collins, M 0. Richard H. Cuess. D.D.S. Manuel Rey Eugene E. Rodgers Jacqueline A. Rogers Gay Steinbrick, Pharm.D. Ruth Ann Wiggrns. R.N. AT LARGE Gary L_ Gross. M D HONORARY MEMBERS Morton,W. Ballinger George elin Robert I Gaul, Jr. Roberta Fox Bernard R Lyons Lou s 0. Magarel6 )oseph E. Scerbo. M.D Susan.Stearns MANAGING DIRECTOR A1oc Wysession Seroing Hudson. Monmouth and- Unton, Countaes Janice Marshall, R.N., M.S.N. New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control 3635 Quakerbridge Road CN 369, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Janice: The American Lung Association of Central New Jersey stands solidly behind your proposal to•bring the ASSIST project into New Jersey. Furthermore we are prepared to become a major participant of any co- alition that will implement the ASSIST project in any part of the area we serve. Currently there are a multitude of groups and agencies providing a variety of smoking prevention•and cessation opportunities. We need a planned and coordinated program to bring the most appropriate intervention methods to specific groups of people, especially those known to have a high risk of lung cancer. We have long been involved in coalitions, when it comes to smoking prevention and cessation. We were a charter member of the New Jersey Interagency Council on Smoking and Health which gave birth, among other things, to the strong smoking legislation that now exists in New Jersey. Our first Freedom From Smoking Clinic was a cooperative effort with Union County College and the Union County Health~Officers Association. Currently we have 12 fully trained-and certified Freedom-From-Smoking Clinic facilitators conducting cessation programs within the community and workplace. Our "Be Smart Don,tt Start" program has reached over 'I00,primary schools. We are part of the national Heart-Lung-Cancer effort to keep children who will graduate in the year 2000 free from cigarette smoking. We have held two-Symposiums for 4th, 5th and 6th graders to develop peer group leaders to help deter the smoking habit in youngsters. Our new•Pre-Teen smoking prevention program is gaining momentum. We are prepared to bring this experience and:expertise to the ASSIST coalition. ~ ~ Qlease Rememtej ~ YOUR LUNG ASSOCIATION m ~ In Your Will AFFILIATED WITH AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION'
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-2- Our organi;zati,on has become an unquestionable leader in our community to•help. people quit smoking and to prevent young people fromistarting the habit. We are ready to join the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society andthe state and local coalitions to carry out the terms of the ASSIST contract. AW/abm
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American Lung Association of Mid-New Jersey 3u1 Sauerland, Jr. Elaine R. Fisher Nresident A Managing Director April 26, 1990 Janice Marshall, MSN, Coordinator New Jersey Dept. of Health Division of Epid. and Disease Control Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, NJ. 08625-0369 Dear Ms. Marshall: This letter is to inform you that the American Lung Associe:tion of Mid-New Jersey (ALAMNJ) supports New Jersey's application for the ASSIT Project contract. We believe there is a need for the project and will support the contract ALAMNJ can provide a variety of community smoking education and cessation programs. We are willing to provide faciletation training for community volunteers who will work with teens and adults through cessation programs. We are also willing to help publicize the project through our media contracts. We know that the New Jersey Department of Health, the NJ Division of the American Cancer Society and the state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of the contract. ALAM-NJ strongly support the contract and look forward to a rewarding working relationship in,our effort to help New Jersey become smoke-free. ERF/ct 29 Emmons Dnve, P.O. Box 2006 - Princeton, New Jersey 08543-2006 - 609-452-21 i 2 Help Fight Lung Disease in Burlington, Hunterdon; Mercer, Middlesex and Somerset Counties
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2550 U.S. Route It1 t, ^Brunswick, NJ 08902-4301 201f821-2610 FAXlf 201/821-2736 American Heart Association New Jersey Affiliate Headquarters Office June 7, 1990 se.errK John Kttef4. M D. ch.r+wrR of rn 40" JenSdtlMinpu Etq. r,.MSanit4R.et Wflllam Tanwy, UI, M.D. t.fidmtwEfrA Rabert Ede4on, Tewlrm John W SaunEan,St.CBA AaYp.M Tnrrrw Anuatry L+«t.tt ~aaskvr Jan.c ARetwer, M.D. rr.~rt..a.m John Orepory, M.D. •a.t,421.1et11e Ropat CWt, Esq. ta.eullw taa. H..IUwR su+dca FoaNmen bwi ./ DU.o1q. Jaqph J. Amato. M.D. Joeept Aseion., Esq. Tnvor AIW rley, M.D. Jo/hn,Bnnati M_D. Mary Joan BarQar. PhD../.1.D. aearye Bola.r, Esq. John Chtntl4 Esq. Anthony Chiqounie 6na d.Hw. OSo, PE warten Oennfe. Ph D. Chnstine DannMly, M D Frank Douplte, M.o. HenryL Dresiwr, M.D. Dorotlw Dunn. R.N Nancy Elkd John EsysK.. CPA Albaet F.mia Jb..ph Fertip, D.D.S Step„en Flaahl, M.D. Anthony T p,uw Mark Hochbarp, M.D John Hutchinaon, M 0 Renee Kaneytert Chnstina Koxmor, R N Muk KnNt. M D. Joseph LaFernrs Elana"wmha/, M.D. 0.ntem'n NaNaon. M.D. Thomas NeaF Bertnm Nuubaum, P.eD Mark Oleenwky, M D: Victor Panonnet, M D. Nancy Redeker, R N. C. M SN Klaus J Sdwl1. M D Ew E. Slater. M 0 , yTG+ RN. MSN ,ov.y Waxman. M D. Carl A Whisner, Lorraine 1Cowalaki visiting,Nurse and Health Services 354 Union Avenue Elizabeth, NJ 07053 Dear Ms. KrnraLski, ) jU,l 1 >,199t The American Heart Association, New Jersey Affiliate, is pleased to be invited to participate in the Request for Application (RFA) for the National cancer Institute that is being compiled by the New Jersey State Health Department and American Cancer Society, New Jersey Division, We support, both in principle and concept, the initiative called the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST). We would be interested in providing more active support, but can not be more specific until we receive a clearer understanding of the provisions of the initiative. As coalition membership is requested, we would like more information on our potential role and tasks as a coalition member. The American Heart Association is a strong advocate of anti- tobacco activities and would be willing to support any local or statewide programs through anti-tobacco coalitions regardless of our membership on•the ASSIST coalition. Sincerely, Kevin R. Sorge -k- Vice-President, Programs WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE
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i ;. , ..,.. _.~,_.. -. May 29, 1990 *14 Ms. Lorraine Kowalski Health Educator Visiting Nurse and Health Services 354 Union Avenue P.O. Box 170 Elizabeth, NJ 07208 Dear Lorraine: Schering-Plough Corporation commends the Visiting Nurse and Health Services for their application to the National Cancer Institute and desire to establish ASSIST. As a pharmaceutical company, we are well aware of the vast number of health issues and particularly cancer-related ones. We feel there is a need for a coalition. We have worked with both the Visiting Health Nurse & Health Services and the American Cancer Society. We welcome the opportunity to continue those partnerships. As in the past, we would consider in-kind services, space and financial support. Continued success with your projects and future endeavors. Sincerely, Joan Henderson Community Affairs Manager JH:lc K633.lw
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CO { M ti vllpa!if9 JOHN N. SURMAY DIRECTOR KcNNcTN J: SANOOR NCALTN DfI1OCR CITY DF ELIZABETH, NEW .JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTIi. WELFARE AND HOUSING WLSL`['1JNC, KIIW['1= HFALTH, IDi7CATOR VISITING NUR.SE & HEALTfi SERVICES 354 Uni<n Avenue Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208 Dear Mrs, Kowa.lski: JUNE 25,1990 TNOMAS G. DuN+a YAYOR 6199G' 23umierous studies have indicated that tobacco has deleterious health effects cn both users and persons associated with tobacco users. The Elizabeth Health Department will participate in any progratns that will reduce the rnanber of people exposed to tobacco use. The El»abeh-Health Department is currently contracted for Health Education with~the Visiting Nurse & Health Services of Union County, which• will be the lead agency for Union County, New Jersey, in the " ASSIST " project pendyng approval of the grant application. The New Jersey Departmmt of Health and the Amexican Cancer Society have always worked on Projects to imgmve to quality of life of the residents of New Jersey, and the " ASSIST " project will once again give them this opportunity. Since.rely yours, i 1 Kenneth J. Sandor Health Officer 3/mt
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650bitierty Avenue Unron. NJ 07083-8107 June 20, 1990 201 651-2200' Mrs. Lorraine Kowalski, Health Educator Visiting Nurse and Health Services 354 Utnion Avenue Elizabeth, NJ 07208 JUN ~ ~ 1994 Dear Lorraine: As the staff coordinator of a health and promotion program at AT&T, 650 Liberty Avenue, Union, New Jersey, I am delighted to learn that the Visiting Nurse and Health Sorvices, in conjunction with the American Cancer Society, is making application to undertake the project "ASSIST." Our organization has supported tobacco control activities for many years by scheduling "stop smoking" classes, assigning designated smoking areas, participating in "The Great American Smokeout" annually, etc. More recently, we have precluded smoking in the entire building with the exception of one small area. This has resulted in some of our employees taking a serious look at their smoking addiction and attempting to do something about quitting to improve their general health. Needless to say, however, we have a great challenge ahead of us. Therefore, a project like "ASSIST" is so vital to those of us who know the dangers of smoking. My concern also is the secondary smoke issue which has become a major problem to innocent individuals who are in daily contact with the primary smokers. It is with pleasure that I reinforce our Company's support toward the initiation of this project. Lorraine, you have done such a wonderful job in promoting health and educating our employees that I know you will attack this program with the vitality and enthusiasm you exhibit to make it a success. When the program is underway, I think we will have a better understanding of where help will be needed. I'm certain you will keep us abreast of the latest developments. Much success in this worthwhile endeavor, and we look forward to working with you to rid our community of this serious "disease." Sincerely, HARRIET STRUMEIER Staff Coordinator Total Life Concept Program
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PO:8ox431 510-Watchung Avenue Plaintiefd, N.J! 07061 No July 1, 1990 Ms. Lorraine Rowalski Health Educator Visiting Nurse and Health Services 354 Union Avenue P.O. Box 170• Elizabeth, N.J. 07208 JUI 10 `t9r Dear Ms. Rowalski The City of Plainfield supports the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. There is a need for this program in the State of New Jersey, each year almost 12,000 citizens die from smoking attributable diseases. Many studies has shown that tabacco use among teenagers and young adults increase each year. The morbidity and Mortality rate for Black Americans still lags behind, the rates for White Americans. The City of Plainfield is 60% Black and is in need of a program of this nature. The City of Plainfield will work to incorporate this program into other existing health programs. Sincerely
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NATIONAL COUNCIL ON ALCOHOLISM : ,%cerS NORTH JERSEY AREA, INC. ~ :sident Donald Sandin Pres.. Donald Sandin & Assocs. lst Vice President James Beal United Way of Westchester Co. Charles Brand, Esq., CPA Pcrs., Hut A Iliff Recording Secr= Marcy Sullivan Exec, Dir Amaicum Lung Assoc. p_ act_ President Michael R. Oliver V. Pres» Kidder Peabody 60 SOUTH FULLERTON AVENUE MONTCLAIR, NEW JERSEY 07042 ROOM 211 (201) 783-9313 July 30,1990 Mr. John Festa Health Educator Department of Health & Welfare Township of Irvington NEWARK DlVISiON OFFICE (201) 242-T406 (7), FzecLtivC ireetor Civic Square Ngncp Brach ILrvington, NJ 07111 Board Members Jean Beeson Dear John: Jean Clnte Prudential D. F. Moore Cratg, Esq. Joseph Devaney, CPA Bass d: Devauey Michael Festa, Ph.D. Essec County Health Depuunecrs Barbara GIHe Commusity Foumdation of NJ Gio'sa Kay Dir.. Rrsearch & Applied Psychology Eentm Audrey McCoy, ACSW Dicecaor, CHOICES, Inc. Dr. Sheldon Miller Chairaun. Dept. of Psychiatry. UMDNJ Martin Parker Healtricu>= Assistant Dr. Bereard Reilly PSE&G Jean Stein Auxiliary President Thomas F. Swan Thocnas F. Swan t Associates John J. White Managa. NJ Bell NCA has recently changed its name to: National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence. This extension of our mission reflects the importance we attach to prevention of drug misuse, a well as prevention of misuse of alcohol. Nicotine is known to be an addicting drug and the damage created by smoke to human tissue is well established. One of our progratn5. Teen Institute of the Garden State, a wellness program for youth, includes sessions on smoke cessation. Some Irvington High School students will be attending TIGS-Summer and, for your infomiation, I enclose the brochure. The purpose of this letter is to endorse and applaud the efforts of the ASSIST Grant for Essex and Union Counties. If there's any way this agency or, more particularly, TIGS/NCA can work with you, please let us know. NG:kmq enclosure Nancy Brac~ J Executive ~j~eG~ {or iG~k.:'! A Urnt.•A•Wav MamhP, Anonrv
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Telephone (201) 450• 3507 BELLEVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 190 CORTLANDT STREET BELLEVILLE. NEW JERSEY 07109 .~.rfea~ ~ . /Vaad'ella Superintendent of Schools August 2, 1990 TO WHOM IT MAY CONCEEtN: Mrs. Mary Springer, a member of our local health department, visits our 7th grades on a regular basis during the school year. She covers many topics with the students one of which is the nerils of smoking. She also has much cross over with our school nurse and teachers. She is a great resource for our school district. Michael D. Nardiello Suverintendent of Schools MDN/gc
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Belleville Public Library, V lufornialion Ccnler ku .6 - 7 1930 221 Washington Avenue -Bellevilfe, New•jersey 07109-3189 •Phone (201) 450-3434 - FAX (201) 450-9518• August 1,1990 Iyorrai.ne Kowaisiti, Health Educator 354 Urnion Avenue Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208 Dear {4s . t:oxals Id : 14+or the past several years Mary Springer, Belleville Health Educator, has run many workshops at the Belleville Public L,ib2sizy and Information Center for• parents of our preschool children and also the community. This summer she ran a stress pr.evention, workshop for the community. In many of her worStshops, Ms. Springer emphasized stress reduction and giving up smoking. Her workshops have been well-received at the 2•IaSn- Library, 221 Washington Avenue, as well as the Shafter Branch Library, 30 Magnolia Street, She has also effectively handed out literature on non-smoking. If she were to become involved with an anti smoIdng grant, the Bell'eville Public Lihrary, one of the most active program libraries in Essex County, would also try to help by providing workshops at this location. If you have any further questions, please call me at 4'50-3431+. Sincerely, l.v-~~?~~ Adrea G. Cohen Assistant Library Director
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CH0.A HEALTH CUMC DExTAL CUNIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT HEALTH EDUCATIQN RENT LEVEtJNC BOARD SANiTATION TRANSPORTATION VITAL STATISTCCS WELFARE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS 383 WASHINGTON AVENUE BELLEVILLE, NEW JERSEY 07109 450-3400 / August 8, 1990 0~i~'Ei~LtF Lorraine H. Kowalski, M.A. Health Educator VNHS 354 Union Avenue Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208 Dear Ms. Kowalski: JOSEPH T. FORNAROTTO Commissloner Although the numbers of people in some groups who smoke cigarettes is dropping, smoking still remains a serious public health problem, especially since it affects so many of our young people. There is a need for more and better programs to enable all of us to• counter the problem. Here in Selleville, we incorporate education about smoking into our school and clinic health education programs, demonstrating the relationship existing between, smoking and hypertension, heart disease, and cancer. In sessions conducted with various clubs and organizations, information about smoking statistics, effects, and methods of quitting is presented. Pertinent materials are, of course, distributed in all instances. we realize, however, that there is a need for a total program that would provide help in: 1. developing a mechanism for prevention interventions. 2. demonstrating the impact of this interaction on changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. 3. reducing the incidence of morbidity and mortality that can be attributed to smoking. If such a program were to undertaken by you, we should be happy to do what we can to cooperate in implementing its goals. Sincerely, Thomas J.~ngo Health Officer 'J G i ~ mQ TJL/cd
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! F z : k - ll~ x FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP OF FAIRFIELD 125 FAIRVIEW AVENUE, CEDAR GROVE, N.J. 07009 MICHAEU FESTA. FH D Health OJhcet (2011239-40101 June 18, 1990 *4 Mr. John Festa Health Educator Department of Health and Welfare Township of Irvington Civic Square Irvington, New Jersey 07111 Dear John: Due to the numerous studies that have been conducted to indicate the health effects of tobacco on both users and persons associated with tobacco users, the Fairfield Health Department will participate in any programs you can offer that will reduce the number of people exposed to tobacco use. The Fairfield Health Department currently contracts with the West Essex Community Health Service for community health services, and has always maintained a working relationship with the American Cancer Society and New Jersey State Department of Health. You can be assured of our full support of the program as we are always eager to assist our residents to improve the quality of their lives. Very truly yours, U_A . ~ Michael Festa, Ph_D. Health Officer MF/sls
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TOWNSHIP OF IRVINGTON ~ DLPARIAIENT QF SF.AL'EH APtD WII.FARS MUNICIPekL BIJILDING -CIVIC SQUARE QtVINGTON, NEW JERSEY 07111 Michael G. Steele Etaine M_ Dougher Michael Festa, Pn J. Mayor Director Health Officer August 1, 1990 Mr. John Festa Health Educator Department of Health, 6 Welfare Municipal Building Civic Square Irvington, New Jersey 07111 Dear John: As the Director of the Department of Health and Welfare, I offer this department's full support of the ASSILS1t Grant for Essex and Union Counties. As a local public health agency, our main goal is the prevention of disease. One of our objectives is to educate teenagers of the documented health risks associated with tobacco so that they do not begin smoking and to help the public already smoking, to quit. By pooling our resources through the proposed ASSIST Coalitions, a wide variety of smoking prevention, control, and• cessation programs can be offered for the citizens of Essex and•Union. Counties. We offer our full support and assistance to ensure that the project goals are met. Respectfully, L) Elaine M. Dougher Director N A ~ EMD:ejf W ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
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01 uarns4iv uf mttplewnub MUNICIPAL 6UILDSNG 574 VALLEY STREETi MAPLEWDOD. NEW JERSEY 07040 TEUCPwowc./2011•7G2 e120 ROBERT D. ROE FAX 72011 7{2-1Y94 N[AtTM O"Ic[R August 9, 1990 Ms. Lorraine Kowalski Health Educator Visiting Nurse and Health Services 354 Union Ave. P.O. Box 170 Elizabeth, N.J. 07208 Dear Ms. Kowalski: Thank you for your efforts thus far in co-ordinating plans for the participation of the Union and Essex County Health Departments in the ASSIST project. The Maplewood Health Department has always considered smoking cessation programs to be an integral part of our health education activities and we welcome the opportunity to expand and develop these programs. The ASSIST project represents such an opportunity, in which our combined efforts will strengthen our individual tobacco control activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking in our community. Please be assured of the complete co-operation-of the Maplewood Health Dept. in any activities relating to the approval andror implementation of ASSIST in Union and Essex Counties. Yours truly, Robert D. Roe Health Officer cc: 8. Carr, Health,Edceator
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THE TOWNSHIP OF MILLBURN MILLBURN, NEW JERSEY 07041 Ms. Lorraine Kowalski Health Educator Visiting Nurse and HealthiServices 354 Union Avenue P.O1. Box 1,70 E1 izabeth,, N'.J. 07208 Dear Ms. Kowal'ski: _AtlG ?i 19x August 10. 1990 Thank you for your efforts in-co-ordinating plans for the participation of the Union and Essex County Healitti Departments in,the ASSIST project. The Millburn Health Department has always considered~smokinq cessat%on,programs to be an integral part of our health education activities and we welcome the opportunity to expand and develop these programs. The ASSIST project represents such an opportunity, in which our combined efforts will strengthen our individual tobacco control activities, to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking in, our community. Please be assured of the complete co-operation of the Millburn Health Deoartment in any activities relating to the approval and/or implementation,of ASSIST in Union•and;Essex Counties. ~ L u,... I 1'_t .wrd r~ William R.. Faitoute klealth. Officer• WRF:mf
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THOMAS A. RESTAINO DIRECTOR AU ti 1 -t '1yyG TOWNSHIP OF MONTCLAIR DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES 205 CLAREMONT AVENUE MONTCLAIR. N.J. 07042 (201) 744-1400 L'orrraine H. Kowolski, M.A. August 13. 1990 Health Educator The Visiting Nurse and Health Services 354 Union Avenue Eli-zabeth, N.J. 07028 Dear Ms. Kowolski: Please be advised that the Montcllair, Cedar 6rove and Verona Health Departments support your effort to seek funding to develap coalition initiatives for the prevention and controb of tobacco use. It is apparent that community involvement such as coalition, building can serve to enhance the success of a program desi,gned to prevent and contro•1 tobacco-usage. The Health Departments look forward to utilizing the coalition as a valuable resource. Through the activities•of the coalition. it is anticipated that some impact will be made on public health interventions such as the quality and number of pub•lic education programs, antitobacco legislation and smokiing cessatilon programs. Again, the Health Departments lend their full support to the proposed coalition and if I can be of any assistance in the future please do not hesitate to call. Montclair is an equal opportunity employer
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American Red Cross August 6, 1990 Mr. John Festa. Health Educator Department of Health & Welfare Township of Irvington Civic Square Irvington,, New-Jersey 07111 Dear Mr. Festa: Essex Chapter 106 Washington Scrccr P.O. Box 838 East Orange, N.J. 07019 (201) 676-0800 Throughout much of our history, the American Red Cross has participated im and promoted programs designed to improve indivi'dual health and safety, Although we have not developed programs specifically geared to the risks of smoking, we have actively encouraged others who have. On that basis we are happy to support your proposed program and'can assure you of our active effort to make referrals as it develops. Each year we work with several hundred local businesses and community groups providing First Aid, CPR, and other related courses. We know that there is major interest on the part of many of these groups in proqrams to help people stop smokiing. IT would be helpful to have your group as a referral resource. Please keep us advised on your progress. : You support RED CROSS when you give the UNITED WAY
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American Red Cross Glen Ridge Chapter 219 Ridgewood Avenue Glen Ridge, New Jersey 07028 (201) 748-5433 August 7. l990 Mr. John Festa Health Educator Irvinaton Health,& Weifare Civic Square i rv i nat on . New Jersey 0'7111 Dear Mr. Festa: We. in Safetv Services. reali•ze that there is a oia_ problem with smokina and that there are peopl:e who wan•t ana need help to kick the habit. We would happily support ASSIST of Essex ana Union Counties bv sending people who need help from the coalition and by backing the princi~pies unaer whi,cfi it is formea. Please keep me informed as to when. where. and to wnom~ the reterals can be sent. R. Keith Eionaman Safety Service Chaiirman
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+ Amenkan Red Cross Plainfield Area Chapter .332 W. Front Street Pluui6eld. Ne~. Jerse~ U7U(iU 1?(ili 756-641-} Au u i U ty90 Ms. Lorraine Kowalski Healith Educator Visiting Nurse and Healith Services 354 Union Avenue P .0. Box 1170 Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208' Dear Ms. Kowaiski: August 9, 1990 The Plainfield Area Chapter American Red Cross strongily supports the Ameri can,Stop• Smoki ng Interventilon Study (Assist) for Cancer Prevention. Sincerely, Mrs D. Kenneth S•ias Executive Director SERVING RLAiNF{ELD; NO PLFD, SO PLFD. WXiRREN, WATCHUNG. SCOTCH' PLAINS. FANWOOD DUNffLLEN. GREENBROOK PART OF EDISON
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i NEW JERSEY GASPINC. Gr~oup Against Smoking Poiwtion Ms. Lorraine Kowalski, Health Educator Visiting Nurse and Health Services 354 Union Avenue Elizabeth,, NJ 07208 8/ 8/ 90 105 Mountain Avenue Summit. NJ 07901 201-273-9368 Dear Ms. Kowalski, The New Jersey Group Against Smoking Pollution (NJGASP) will gladly help and support the Visiting Nurse and Health Services with Project Assist in any way possible. The growing evidence of the harm done by tobacco•to nonsmokers, as weLll as to smokers, makes us eager to see this project started as soon as possible. Please, call me personally if I can be of any service. sincerely, .k. Douglas Lee Chester, D.D.S. President
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Newark D.p.rtmant of H.akA and Human Serrkp 110 WIHiam Street Newark, New Jersey 07102 I2011733-6430 - August 29, 1990- Mrs. Janice Marshall, MNN New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology and Disease Smoking Control Program CN 369 Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0369 Dear Mrs. Marshall: Sharpe James Mayor Bobi Ruffin, Acting xWovatlM6KtW Director Smoking has long been cited as the single most avoidable cause of death in our society. In 1989. the leading causes of death, in the City of Newark were due to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and chronic lung disease, diseases for which smoking is a risk factor. It has been estimated that 30% of all cancers are caused by smoking. Newark would certainly qualify as a major metropolitan area for intense intervention. As Health Officer representing the City of Newark, I welcome the opportunity to work with the State Department of Health, the American Cancer Society and local coalitions in this effort to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. We support this joint effort to reduce the mortality and morbidity of smoking related diseases. Sincerely, f Festa Michael Health Officer Newark Division of Community Health, MF/CP:a
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sex c msP.rorcommerce ~~ .~i 3 FAIRF[ELD AVENUE • WEST CALOWELL, NJ 07006 • (201) AVENUE WEST (201) 226-5500 3 FAIRF[ElD CALOWELL NJ 0?006 226-5500 ~ September 12, 1990 Augie Sabia West Essex Community Health Services 122 Clinton Road West Caldwell, NJ 07006 Cear Mr. Sabia: The Board of Directors of the West Essex Chamber of Commerce at their meeting today voted unanimously to support your application for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to develop tobacco con- trol activities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by reducing the prevalence of smoking. Since there are still a great number of people who, smoke and since the incidence of smoking among teenagers is again rising, we feel that there is defifiitely a need for this project. The West Essex Chamber of Commerce will be glad to support you in these endeavors by helping to inform business people of the programs available. West Essex Community Health Services is an active, respected organization that has been helping people in our community for many years with all phases of health information and services. We feel that they will do an additional service to the community by participating in the NCI tobacco control ntroi activities. JM/m cc: George Batten, WECHS
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z -a ~~~ ~u~,~ n ai ii al III ill tll %I UI 1 J~' CITY OF VINELAND William E. Parkin, DVM, Dr. PH. Assistant Commissioner Div. of Epidemiology and Disease Control NJ State Dept. of Health CN 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Dear Dr. Parkin: DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH Community Nursing Service (809) 794-4261 III NORTH 6th STREET, ViNELANO, N J. 08360 June 15, 1990 The Cumberland County and Vineland Health,Departments are pl'eased to have the opportunity to participate as part of the demonstration project in the New Jersey State Department of Health.'s application for Americans Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) for Cancer Prevention. After discussion, it was decitled that the City of Vineland Health Department will be the lead-agency for all of Cumberland County. Our concept paper is enclosed,as well as letters of support from various institutions, agencies, indastry. We hope to include evem more representation of people who are involved with the target groups when we develop our Uoca1 coalition. The Vinel~and Health Department is eager to be involved in this project and feels it has the experience and expertise to assist the New Jersey State Department of Health and American Cancer Society to carry out the goals and terms of the project contract. PL+ease feel free to contact Alice Hart, 794-4272, or myself if you need additional informatiom. Best wishes on your application. cc: Warren Martinelli, Health Officer Cumberland County Health A1ice Hart, Director CNS
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CITY OF VINELAND VINELI.ND NEW JERSEY 03360 1. History Goals and Purposes The local Board of Health of the City of Vineland was established by Ordinance 7 which was adopted according to law on Jully 15, 1952. The local Board of Health which is required-by TitLe 26 of the revised statutes functioned as an autonomous board untib the passage of Ordinance 133'in July of 1954. Legislative functions of the Board will be exercised by the City Council with administrative and executive functions to be exercised by the Department of Health's director and employees. The department continues to function in accordance with Title 26 and the Minimum Standards of Performance for Local Boards of Health, Title 8, Chapter 51 of the Administrative Code and is commonly known as the "Recognized Public Heal-th Activities and Minimum Standards of Performance for Local Boards of Health in New Jersey.•" Since the Formation of the Department of Health in 1954until present, there has only been one major structural change by Resolution of City Council (Board of Health). In June 1966, in preparation,to•meet Social Security (Medicare) requirements for home health care, Resolution 3522 was adopted. It established the new objectives for the Community Nursing Service to provide skilled nursing and other therapeutic services on a visiting basis, in addition to carrying out the preventive and health supervision services within the program areas of the Department of Health. The Director of Publlie Health Nursing of the Community Nursing Service, as a subdivision of the Department of Health,, is responsible to the Director of the Department of Health,. The Director of Nursing receives advice and oversight from the agency's Professional and Lay Advisory Committee through quarterly meetings and various committee activities. The Director of Health also serves on•this "Committee" and provides a direct link to the Mayor and City Council. The members of this Committee are nominated at large and approved by the Mayor. The Director of Nursing may approach the Mayor and Council (as a Board of Health) with budgets, problems, needs, new programs etc. either through the Director of Health or along with•him to assist with information. Advisory Committee Meetings are open to the public and both city council and the Mayor have knowledge of meeting dates and times.
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PURPOSE AND PHILOSOPHY-DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH The Department of Health of the City of Vineland is one of the chief divi,sions of the city administration. It has the responsibility of executing the statutes and laws of the State of New Jker•sey as•well as the health-related ordinances of the City of Vineland. The total environment of the community affects the health•of, its citizens, which is ultimately a community affair. The Department of Health has an obligation to establish health services as designated by community need and demand. It has the responsibility to protect the environment by establishing necessary services to accomplish this end. The purpose of the Health Deoartment is to provide those services which should promote a healthy environment and, prevent disease. To accomplish its purpose, the Department is divided into personal healith (CNS),, environmental health, and statistical services. lit also maintai;ns- proper facilities, up to date personnel, and efficient record and statistical systems. COlfliUNITY NURSING SERVICE Care of patients in their home environments is an essential part of the health care system-providing an efficient and more economical means of meeting health needs--preventive, curative and rehabilitative. The public health nursing staff should responsibly provide nursing service on a family-centered basis for individuals and-groups, at home, aa work, at school and in public health clinics. Public health nursing includes all aspects of teaching, counselling, guidance, curative and preventive care, and, mobilization of family and community resources for solving of individual and famiLy health probbems.
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1 GOALS-COMMUNITY NURSING SERVICE Dts purpose is to enable the citizens of the City to reach and/or mai,ntain their maximum health potential by providing health services for the prevention of disease and the treatment and/or rehabitbi,tati®n of those to whom illness and/or its complications have aDready affected. 1. To provide skilled; public health nursing to ind=viduals in the City of Vineland in their home, workplace, school or clinic facility. 2. To collect data regarding health status of individuals or populations and make this data accessible, recorded and easily communicated to health care team members. 3'. To promote, maintain and restore patient's or populations'we11 being through-approved nursing actions based on the plan for service. 4. To involve patient/community participation in his health promotion., maintenance and restoration. 5,. To evaluate, reassess and revise the initial plan and goal achievements for patient and the community. To accomplish its purpose the Community Nursing Service provides Public Health Nursing services in accordance with community needs. It maintains facilities necessary to administer these programs and employs•and maintains a staff of qualified professionals and para- professionals to administer and carry out these services. Professional nursing and other therapeutic services are rendered in clinics, conferences, school or place of residence of individual receiving the services. By Cooperating and coordinating services with other agencies and institutions, it promotes health in the community without duplication. .
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3. SMOKING RELATED EXPERIENCE (CONT) In, ApriU, 1988 the Vineland; CYty Health Department received a grant from the New Jersey State Department of Health for a Smoking Preventilon Project in the Vineland City SchooLs. During the 1988-89 and b989-90 school year all 7th grade students in public and private schools were reached with a four to five d'ay smoking prevention program. During the 1988-89 school year all students were given a pre and-post test survey to determine smoking prevalence. It was found that approximately 17% of the students were already smoking in the 7th grade. During the summer of 1989 an-ad'd-itional program was added to the grant and a total of 575 preschool children in Vineland were provided with a smoking prevention program. As a result of the post test survey it was indicated that many students (617.) who smoked were interested in-quitting. During this period, the Governor signed into law a bill which would require all public schools to become smoke free before December 14, 1989. The Vineland Health Department offered smoking cessation programs to the faculty and staff and secondary school students during the 1989-90 school year. A total of 12 programs were offered to the faculty, staff arrd; two programs were offered to the students. The Vineland Health-Department worked with the staff of the Board of Education to bring more visibility to the smoking issue by sponsoring a school assembly on cigarette advertising at three of the schools, providing a table of anti-smoking materials on Great American Smokeout Day at four local schools and working with a group of students to offer a S&ve a Sweetheart campaign for the American Heart Association at three high schools. As a result of offering smoking cessation courses to the community for a three year period., many participants of these programs expressed an ongoing need for support to stay off cigarettes after the course had ended. The staff of the Vineland Health Department was instrumental in the develop- ment of a Smokers Anonymous support group. The group serves a two fold purpose: 1) to help those who have recently quit smoking remain nicotine free. 2) to help smokers quit who have been unsuccessful at other methods. 4. Experience with similar public health or public interest issues This department has been involved in public health i.ssues since its inception and in the past ten. years to a greater degree, even on a county-wide level. More specifically, two major health problems, diabetes and childhood lead poisoning, were addressed. State health department grants were received. to carry ou•t these programs to some extent county-wide. The diabetes.program cook on a regional dimension with the development of the South Jersey Educationat Consortium which involved; four counties (hospitals and health departments) and provided educational programs for health~care professionals. This group N continues to function and the diabetes programistill reaches the entire a county even 'hou?h the grant expired in 1988. The childhood lead poison .V prQventior program has allowed this health department to interact with all ~ types of providers of children-'s health care as well as housing authorities, ~ landlords, school systems, hospitals, and day care facilities. ~ ~ Fp ~ ~
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4. EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR PUBLIC HEALTH OR PUBLIC INTEREST IISSUES(COBT) This grant has been in effect for almost seven years. Although the remainder of the county, outside of Vineland, has its own public health nurse carrying out the lead program, the tests are paid for by Vineland's grant and Vinelandl's lead nurse provides consultation to-the county health department's program staff. CANCER PREVENTION AND EARLY DETECTION The Vineland Health Department has participated;in the past with other cancer prevention activities. Eaich year the health department works in cooperation with the American Cancer Societyto provide a pap screening clinic to the community. The Vineland Health Department has recently received a grant to expand this screening program to include a comprehensive gynecological examination and mammogram free of charge to 100 women per year. A special emphasis will be placed on outreach to minority communities. Two clinics per year will be devoted to the Spanish speaking population. Two representatives from the health department are on the American Cancer Society public education committee and participate in the speakers bureau on the following topics: Nutrition and Cancer, Breast Self Examination, Fresh-Start Smoking Cessation•and colorectal cancer preventiom. CARDIOVASCULAR The Vineland Health Department had worked in cooperation with other agencies in Cumberland County to provide a Cardiovascular Disease Program to the community. The health- department provides blood pressure screenings to Vineland City residents and followtup all individuals who have elevated levels. As a part of the screening process a risk factor assessment is provided for all individuals screened. A member of the Health Department staff participates in the Cumberland County Unit of the American Heart Association and participates in the Speakers Bureau. 5. RATIONALE FOR COALITION MEMBERSHIP AND tiOW WE HAVE WORKED WITH THEM 6. HOW TARGET GROUPS WILL BE REACHED YOUTHS - each major school district superintendent will be represented on the coalition. Both health.departments have established previous rellationships with the county's schools, public and private. As stated previously the Vineland Health Department has worked within the schoob system curriculum to teach smoking prevention. The school based health service obviously addresses health needs and-probliems in youth. A representative and possibly a studene will serve om the coalition. Martin Luther King Academy for Youth will also represent the interests and issues of youth and especially the Black youth. Several employees of the MLK Academy are deeply involved with the NAACP and; Black Women's organizations. The Teen Outreach Program at Family Planning Services will also be represented on the coalition. Th-is group covers three counties-Salem, Gloucester and Cumberland. This service has developed programs to specifically address the problem of teenage pregnancies and prenatal needs including smoking and drug abuse during pregnancy.
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. ~~~~t1Y AND HOW WE HAVfi WORKeD tJITH THEM(CONT) ~~ tltcOUPS W7.LI: BE REACHED SMOKELESS TOBACCO USERS - since we are not sure of the exact location of this group, we are making two assumptions for our specific county- They are, that most smokeless tobacco users are mal•e and many are associated with sports teams and can therefore be reached through the scHoo.b system. The coa•lition members mainly addressing this target group are the school system,, school based health service, Martin Luther King Academy and possibly CASA PRAC. This target group has not been as actively pursued.in the past, as the teenager or adult who smokes cigarettes, cigars, etc. BLUE COLLAR WORKERS - one of the largest industries employing blue collar workers in Cumberland County is Wheaton Industries in Millville. Coalition member- ship and a letter of support have been requested from management and the factory physiciam. Since taaagratent has requested smoking cessatiom imformation there has been some previous contact. More attempts will be made to involve all county industries, either directly or via each Ctamber of Commerce. This department has two employees who-sit on the Vineland Chamber of Commerce Health and Safety Committee. It is also expected that this group will be addressed through contact with other target groups such as women, youth, minorities and the less educated. MINORITIES - The two major IDs.uoriCy groups in•Cumberland County are the Hispanic and Black communities. The primary agency of outreach within the Hispanic community will be CASA PRAC. CASA PRAC's mission is to provide specialized services which link the Hispanic community with the resources that are needed to resolve problems. CASA PRAC's programs target Hispanics of all ages with specialized needs including senior citizens, women and children. Special programs are offered for AIDS Prevention, Drug and Alcohol Abuse . Prevention and Women's Health. The Martin Luther King Academy and Outreach Center is the primary agency of outreach for the Black community of the coalition. The King Academy is a multi-service agency serving Cumberland County. Services include Crisis Intervention, Youth Activities, Community/Neighborhood Development, Nutritional Assistance and Counseling. WOMEN - Several agencies and organizations will be involved with the coalition which serve and provide outreach to women. Both Newcomb Medical Center and the Cumberland County Health Department have a prenatal clinic. Pregnant womem wi•ll be a major target group among women for smoking cessation_ Young women, especially teenagers will be a specific target group among women of all ages. The School Based Health Services located in Bridgeton will participate in the coalition. Family Planning of Cumberland County aLso provides education and• outreach on drug and alcohol abuse and fetal alcohol syndrome through patieint counseTling and a Teen Theatre Group. The Board of Education of the three major school districts will be represented- on the coalition. Teenage girl•s will be targeted for smoking prevention/cessation using the school system as primary access to these young womem. The Vineland Health Department has worked closely with~aYl of the above agencies in the past.
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S. RATIONALE FOR COALITION MEMBERSHIP AND HOF! WE HAVE WORKED WITH THEM{CONT) 6. HOW TARGET GROUPS WILL BE REACHED LESS EDUCATED - In 1986 a task force of the Human Services Advisory Council was formed to study the reasons why Cumberland County had the highest drop out rate in New Jersey. It is estimated that 20% of the students who enter ninth grade each year drop out of school by the end of 12th grade. The Task Force came up with several recommendations, one of which was to identify students at risk of-droppIng out and provide preventative measures. At the current time, CASA PRAC•has been funded to run a pilot project on drop out prevention. Another program exists in the county to identify ilLiterate adults and:teach them to read. The coalition will work cLosely with the above agencies and programs to target the less educated in Cumberland County. 7. CREATION OF A MECHANISM THAT WORRS The Vineland Health Department has a history of working with target populations utilizing their homes, schools, work sites, places of worship and recreation. Consumer participation on advisory committees and dialogues with special interest groups have allowed us to get to the people we seek and design programs to meet their needs. We will go wherever we need, at the time of day or night that will get us the population we are addressing. We are not just a nine to five, weekday department. Our programs have utilized volunteers as well as professionalls. We enjoy trying out systems that have worked in other places and will do some new things that look like they might work. S. IN KIND CONTRIBUTION ESTIMATED TIME Alice Hart, Director of Public Health Nurses 0.5 days/week Mary Ann Cooney, MPH; Health Educator 2 days/week CLerical staff (2) 1 day/week Office supplies ie. copying, postage Office space and accompanying furniture and equipment currently in use.
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COUNTY OF CUMBERLAND OFFICE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 790,EAST COMMERCE STREET BRIDGETON. NEW JERSEY 08302 rAnoi dF'a_-3 1an tl:, June 6, 1990 WARREN MARTINEW O{RECTOR MANUEL OSTROFF NEALTN OFFACER BOARD MEMBERS ROBERTJ. MCCORMICK F1IEENOLOER CLAIR MILLER IREENOLOER DR. STANLEY YAGAN ARMAND DET}4OMA5 JOSEPH MORITZ EZRA Cox REY_ THOMAS E. SUGGS LOIS UGGINS PAULA RING Alice Hart Vineland Health Department 6th and Plum•Streets Vineland, N.J. 0836•0 Dear Alice: The Cumberland County Health Department is in full support of the American Stop Smoking Interventions Study (ASSIST) for cancer prevention. Since Cumberland Cou,nty has one of the highest cancer rates im the state there is definitely a need• for this project. The Coun,ty Health- Department will support this project in any way necessary. We will be able to assist in this p-roject by provid,ing, a Health Educator when necessary. We will also take an active role in developing coalitions. From past experiences I know that all organiZation,s involved wilv be able to carry out the terms of the contract. Since this is a cooperative effort and-all organizations involved have woked well together in the past this should be a very successful project. If I can be of any furthur assistance please contact me. cc: Anne McGuigan Sincerely, 1 " QikJ&'C' Warren• B. Martinelli Director
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! i SOUTH JERSEY HOSPlTAL SYSTEM BRIDGETON DtVISION HOSPITAL SY ~ ..f Mr. Louis Cresci Health Officer City of Vineland 111 North 6th Street Vineland, NJ 08360 Dear Mr. Cresci: June 11, 1990 Thank you for inviting us to submit a letter of support for the State Health Department's application to the National Cancer Institute for the purpose of reducing the adult smoking prevalence rate, and to reduce the initiation of smoking among youth. Our hospital system and•related corporations have joined other organizations nationwide in adopting a smoke-free policy. We certainly support the demonstration project since many of the clients we serve• have been addicted to tobacco products. We have been offering cllasses. to our employees to encourage behavior modification through education and support in their efforts to reduce their addiction, with the goal of total abstinence. The success varies, primarily because this sort of program does not deal with the total community environment they associate with. The Bridgeton Division of South Jersey Hospital System will support the program in any way that we can - including hosting meetings and educational programs. We will be pleased to have a representative on the community-based coalition, knowing that the force of the NJ Department of Health, the National Cancer Institute, and state and•local coalitions are best equipped to have an impact on this public health conern•. If I can.be of any further, direct help, contact me at extension 2202. Sincerely, Ann M. Budde Vice President, Administration N A ~ ~ ~ AMB/jLs ~ ~ ~ 0 t FP SRIDGETOIV DIVISION: IRVING b MANHEIM AVENUES • BRIDGETON, NEW JERSEY 08302 •(009)1451F6600 MlLLYILIE DtVI51ON: HIGH SiREETdr HARRISON AVENUE • MtLLVftLE, NEW JERSEY 08332 •(609) 825-3500 VI+A. Mem[ferolWlurnaryFbspaaisdAmer,ca,inc.
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SOUTH .f ERSEY HOSPITAL SYSTEM M/LLVILLE DIVlSION June 11, 1990 Mr. Louis Cresci Health Officer City of Vineland Department of Health 121 North 8th Street Vineland, New Jersey 08360 Dear Mr. Cresci: On behalf of the Millville Division of the South Jersey Hospital System, I would like to offer this letter in support of the demonstration program the City of Vineland Health Department is applying for, entitled "American Stop Smoking Interventions Study". As a regional cancer treatment facility, we strongly support the project and feel a need exists within our community, as well as our service area, to encourage adults to stop smoking. As you are aware, South Jersey Hospital System voluntarily became a smoke-free institution on May lst of this year. This clearly demonstrates our institutional goal to prevent smoking and encour- age the community as to the hazards of smoking and how it affects your health. Through my past affiliation with the City of Vineland Depart- ment of Health, I am sure that the City of Vineland will far ex- ceed the goals established by the State Department of Health in implementing this project. You can count an the support of South Jersey Hospital System - Millviile Division in any way possible during the 7-year project that this grant will cover. .Should you require any additional letters of support from our organization, as always please feel free to contact us. ~71 onald P. Sbtak Vice President/Administration RPS/jaf MOLLVILLE DIVISION: HIGH STREET & HARRISON AVENUE • AdILLViILE, NEW JERSEY 08332 •(609) 825-3500. ARID6ETON DIVISION: IRVING b MANHEIM,AVENUES • 8R10GETON, NEW JERSEY 08302 •(609).451-6600, VKA. Member ot WWntary Hosprtais 0 AmMiCa. M[ .
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R'~-:; na I A Newconab Health Services Corporation June 6, 1990 . ° 9~ N , 41 ~~1 h n W City of Vineland Department of Health ATTENTION: Louis Cresci, Health Officer ll1 North 6th Street Vineland, NJ 08360 Dear Mr. Cresci: Newcomb Medical Center 65 South State Street Vineland, New Jersey 08360 (609) 691-9000 FAX (609) 692-2308 ~-%k21314 ! ~ s 0~11 Cq E ~` `` ~ , - t+ h 0 ; G,~~ 4 , `~~ Cti e .e^- H f •rez tt 4i-~. Thank you for advising me of Vineland Health Department's desire to participate in a demonstration project entitled American Stop Smoking Interventions Study (ASSIST) for cancer prevention. Newcomb Medical Center enthusiastically supports Vineland Health Department's initiative to participate in this study, and looks forward to working with the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey Division of The American Cancer Society and the many other community organizations. As you already know, this type of project is greatly needed. At the Medical Center, we see a large smoking population that consists of women who receive prenatal care services in our obstetrical clinic and the youth, who are now using smokeless tobacco. In addition, I am pleased of our working relationship with you in providing educational programs and services to our community. Newcomb Medical Center is committed to reduce the incidence of smoking and the prevalence of cancer. The New Jersey Hospital Association recognized Newcomb Medical Center as a pacesetter in being one of the first seven New Jersey hospitals to go smokeless. Newcomb Medical Center looks forward• to panticipating with you~ and other organizations for this needed project in our community. Sincerely, Joseph A.Ierardi President and Chief Executive Officer JAI/jok 0
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Vineland Public Schools 625 PLUM STREET • VINELAND, NJ 08860-3796 •(609),794-6700 • FAX (609) 794-9464 DR_ RICHARD PROCHASKA Superintendent of Schools RICHARD F. FLAIM Assistant Superintendent for Education THOMAS A. THAYER Asststant Superintendent for Business and Board Secretary DR CHARLES VALENTINE Assistant Superintendent for Mandated. Auxiliary and Federal Programs FRANK FREDERICK Assistant Superintendent for Adult and Community Educakon !$etations Supervisors o(Instruction - BERNICE SEIBERT MARIE ADAIR MILLIE RAMOS DR BERTHA BURCH-HENSON DIANE FISCHER FRED ROSI ALMA SESSA JOYCE PROCHASKA FARRELL LYNCH CONCEPCION SIMONE MARIA LABOY WADE ANASTOR MELVIN R. SCOTT Superuisorof Compensatory and Federally Funded Programs JOAN FAIRESS ~ Head Sehoot Nurse THOMAS RONCHETTI Assistant= Busiruss Adm:ruatrator CLARA SHELDON• Assistant Board Secretary VINCENT SPINNATO Coordinator Pupil Tfansportation Sernices KARLA S. HOLT Directorof Food Services DONALD HUGUES Maintenance Superintendent Mav 25, 1990 Mr. Louis Cresci, Health Officer City of Vineland Department of Health 111 North 6th Street Vineland, New Jersey 08360 Dear Mr. Cresci: I am writing to indicate mv support for the community based program to reduce the adult smoking rate and to reduce the initiation of smoking among youth.. Even though our district's educational program addiesses the harmful aspects of smoking, it is clear that a community effort is needed to reinforce the importance of a tobacco free Life. We recognize that the network of the N.J. Department of Health, the N.J. Division of the American Cancer Society and state and local coalitions will implement the terms and condi- tions of the ASSIST project. However, as the major educa- tional agency in the community, the Vineland Public Schools would certainly be willing to cooperate with the network. Please keep us informed as the project develops. Sincerely yours, Ol. G?...r .~- Ri•chard Prochaska Superintendent RP:jb
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"THE CHRISTMAS SEAL PEOPLE" AMERICAN = LUNG ASSOCIATION OF NEW JERSEY ;i 10 West Main Street • Mays L;.anding, NJ 08330 •(fi09) 625-01011 Sr'R17NG aTC.1N.',i, CAN!DEN CAPE MAY CUMBER?.AND uL0l1i,EST=R Cc:c"Ah a SAL_ 4Y,:0dlh.TlES OFFICERS Jos.ph P. Padula, M,D. President Laues J. Lamanna lrrct Presrdent Carol A. Meter, R.N: Secretary Tina M. Freeland Program Director REGIONAL BOARD Gary A Agia. D.O. Kenneth Better, M D. GA FinkeLstain Diane Fbmaez, R.N. Edna S. How+e, R N: Mrs. Thomas H: McGladip ManuN ostroH Gene Peters Rgbart C. Roy Mrs. Donna Shmip Jbasph W. Sokotowski. Jt.. M O. Katherine T Umtrid, R.N. Philip H. Vamer, 0.0. June 8. 1990 Louis Cresci . Health Officer City of Vineland Department of Health Vinelanda NJ 08360 Dear Mr. Cresci, The American LunQ Association of New Jersey supports your application for the ASSIST contract. For many years it has been a priority of this organization to make every citizen aware of the dangers of smoking. An estimated 390.000 Americans die each year as a result of cigarette smoking, and: we are just now beQinnina• to realize how seriously non-smokers are being affected by tobacco smoke pollution as well. There is an urgent need for the ASSIST prolect in southern New Jersey at this time. We will continue to work with the Vineland Health Department in disseminatinQ information to the public about smoking and related health issues. We wouid be pleased to•be a member of the coalition to work on the ASSIST•pzoiect in southern New Jersey should the contract be approved. We know that the New Jersey Department of Health. the New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society. and the state and local coalitions will carry out the terms of the contract. Please feel free to contact me if you need more information about our support for the pro)ect or our willingness to be involved in a South Jersey coa•lition. Sincerely, va,r`-z Tina Freeland Pro4ram Director TF\wa cc: Bob Corso. Manacrincr Director Kathv Adeisheim. State Proaram Director
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} 1* "Para Cada Farnilia Un Hogar" Alice Hart, CNS Director Community Nursing Services Vineland Health Department 111 North 6th Street Vineland, New Jersey 08360 Dear Ms. Hart: CASA PRAC, INC. 511 Grape Street Vineiand; NJ 08360 (609) 692-2331 June 14, 1990 I am writing to fully endorse and support your effort to get funding for a demonstration project for cancer prevention. I believe that there is a great need for the proposed project, ASSIST, as its primary objective is to reduce or prevent smoking. Hispanics in Cumberland County are the poorest, younger, least educated and fastest growing population in comparison to the other ethnic and racial groups. These condiitons put Hispanics at risk of illnesses, which left untreated can become disabling. Smoking has become more prevalent in the Isatino community due to the fact that we are targetted by the alcohol and tobacco industries. There are often more promotional materials advertising these products in Spanish,than there are educational materials that would help Hispanics. Casa P.R.A.C., Inc.'s mission is to improve the overall quality of life for the county's Hispanic population. Health is one of our concerns. We have eol- laborated•with the Vineland Health Department, the Cumberland County Health De- partment and the New Jersey Department of Health. I know that all of these entities, together with the American Cancer Society, will competently carry out the terms of the contract. Our organization will assist you in whatever means possible to carry your efforts to the Hispanic Community. One such effort can•be use of our radio,pro- gram in the local Spanish radio station. EVA DOMINGUEZ, : Executive Director (I ED/vp
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A1AERKJ4N f~ r.CANCER /WG 1 T NEW JERSEY DIVISION, INC., CUMBERLAND COUNTY UNIT May 31, 1990 Mr. Louis Cresci Health Officer City of Vineland Department of Health 111 North 6th Street Vineland, N.J. 08360 Dear Mr. Cresci: It is with great hope that I write to you regarding the seven year project entitled American Stop Smoking Interventions Study (ASSIST) for cancer prevention. As I am sure you are aware, there is an ever increasing number of people who are dying every year from smoking related diseases, not the least of them cancer. It's hard to argue with the figures which are provided by the health care providers nationally and the need for this project is obvious even to the layman. I would like to let you know that you will have the full support of the American Cancer Society. Our office is available to provide educational materials, audio-visual aids, trained facilitators, media coverage, use of our conference room, speakers bureau, etc. Also, whenever possible, we would like to conduct seminars, teach-ins and educational programs for the public as well as the professional community. Further, our educational resources are available to small businesses, schools, hospitals and large corporations, and to the individual members of our community. I know we can count on the New Jersey Department of Health to make these same provisions, and the state and local coalitions to carry out the contract terms which are in•the best interests of our community. The New Jersey Division of the American Cancer Society will be very instrumental in planning and delivering interventions as required by the National Cancer Institute. This program of intervention is long overdue, and is some- thing which should not be further delayed. As I noted before, the figures are staggering and rising steadily. It is time a community-based coalition takes an active part in preventing the unnecessary pain and suffering visited-upon the victims and their families by smoking related diseases. As in the past, it will be a pleasure to-work with your office to achieve our common goals. Thank you for inviting our 1400 W. LANDIS AVENUE, P.O. BOX 239, VINELAND, NEW JERSEY 08360, 1 rv^nu r1GC1!`C [`.C17-i'2R/{ - T4JF QA4C1AMC2 I IAIF 1-R(1(1->77-7Zd~i
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organization to become a part of this very important task force. We will do our best to assist you in meeting•the health care needs of our citizenry. If there is anything that I or this office can do for you, please feel free to contact me. Yours, Judy A. Sabella Program Director JAS / 1p
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W W HEFiTOl1 ItiDUSTRIES r.U_LVILl.c.1VcL: ..:Ge+`co_• TELEPt1OtVE 609 825 1400 June 14,. 1990 Loui s Gresci, Heal'th Of f i cer Ci_ty of VineI and 111 N 6th Street Vineland, NJ 08332 Dear Mr Cresci: As a practicing physician and Medical Director of Wheaton Industries I have first hand knowledge of the detrimental effects that cigarette smoking has on the Mealthh: of individuals. This experience has brought to my attention the need for a coordinated~ response by al Y sectors of our• commun.i ty to educate peop 1 e about smoki nq-and the r i sks it involves. After careful study and thought the Medical Dept of Wheaton•Industries will support the ASSIST demonstration project as much as possible in accordance with our staff and time availabili•ty. I feel that a community based coalition is the best way to approach the smoking/cancer diLema. We at Wheatons are already pursuang this problem bv providing no smoking/cancer risk literature,designated no smoking areas and one om one counselling in the Medical Dept. I am sure that this company, along with the Dept of Health, American Camcer Society and the local coalition will be able to adhere to the tier•ms of a contract and help develop am, e-ffective program. Si ncer•el y, WHEATDN MED I CAL DEPAnTMEs.:T Fr•an 1-_ L Nuer, Mll Medi,cal Director FLN: ml
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: t r . z 4 I w 0 S Family Planning Services of Cumberland and Gloucester Counties 6 South Laurel Street, Bridgeton, New Jersey 08302 it June 13,1990 Mr. Louis Cresci Health Officer Department of Health ill North 6th Street Vineland, New Jersey •08360 (609) 45{-3339 Dear Mr. Cresci, On behalf of the Board of Trustees and staff, please accept this letter of support and-commitment in your effort in cooperation with the Cumberland County Health Department and New Jersey State Depart- ment-of Health to obtain grant funds to initiate the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST). We are excited about the pro- spect of joining a community based coalition that will bring the efforts together of many agencies/programs in addressing the smokinF problem. Cumberland County has a long history of cooperative effort through coalitions and networking. This Coalition will build•upon a tradition of caring and cooperation-established in the County. Regarding the Coalition, please be advised that we are prepared to commit staff time and resources to the development, implementation : maintenance of the Coalition. The uniQue focus of the Coalition wi7, be an effort to that is not being addressed by any group in the County presently. With the presenting health problems of the County it is exciting to conceptualize that we may develop a program throug a'community based effort that will have a significant impact on the health and welfare of our families. In consideration of the proposal, please be advised that we are willing to support the program in a variety of ways- Through the Coalition we will assure that there is regular representation. and leadership as needed. On a limited basis, we may provide manpower -support to the program for clerical support. During implementation strategies our clinical and community education staff are interestec and willing to support your efforts through their daily activities. These areas may include but are not limited to: counseling patients while receiving family planning services, educational materials•in the agency locations, staff training and development on the effort and their role to assist and incorporation of ASSIST information in community education presentations. We feel confident of the level of commitmemt of your organization, tht, New Jtersey Department of Health and the New J,ersey Division of Proul dtnQ repro0uelfue hcalt h ca re to t he resfden h of Cum Dcrlan d and Oloucester Cou n eies
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Mr. L. Cressi June 13,1990 Fage 2 the American-Cancer Society and all state/local coalitions in which they are participating to meet the goals and objectives of ASSIST. We congratulate you on the effort you have undertaken on behalf of the County. We look forward to our continued work together. Should you need-additional information, please call. c .0 P
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~.~ ~~... 633 ELMER SiR:C: ~ vGtvELArvD. NEW ,,ERSEv 03360 iELEPHOv3 (6091692-60t2 FAX (609),692-9465 ALBERT D PQRTER DcECl1TNE DiREC7pR PATRICIA A BUVTON ASSOCIATE EXECtJTNE JIRECTpR June 4, 1990 Mr. Louis Cresci Health Office City of Vineland Department of Health 111 North 6th Street Vineland, New Jersey 08360 Dear Mr. Cresci: M. L. King Academy for Youth wholeheartedly endorses the City of Vineland's application for the demonstration project "American Stop Smoking Intervention Study" (ASSIST) for Cancern Prevention for the following reasons: 1. MLKA Target Population and ASSIST Project population match youth: our youth truly are the future and we must protect and provide leadership for them. 2. MLKA is aware of the tug of war that is taking placee throughout this nation and the minority community over select targeting of cigarette advertisement. Mr. Cresci, our agency is willing to be an active participant in the ASSIST Project by providing the Health department with a forum to present information concerning project ASSIST to MLKA's target population. 3. Excellent working relationship with your department. I am excited about this seven year proj,ect to curb another health threat in-our community and am fully prepared to assist your efforts. -f~l •• `% /' A9'P3ert D. Porter Executive Director ADPfine
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Youth Services Program Bridgeton Iiigh Schooi west•Avenue idgeton. lYew Jersey 08302 June 8, 1990 Mr. Warren Martinelli Director Cumb. Co. Office of Health & Human Services Administration Bldg. 790 East Commerce St. Bridgeton, NJ 08302 Dear Mr. Martinelli: The School Based Youth Services Program at Bridgeton High School is in total support of the development of a community based coalition for the purpose to reduce smoking by adults and youth. At Bridgeton High School we see many teens who continue to smoke in spite of efforts to educate them about the serious health consequences. Unfortunately, the desire to be perceived as an adult often leads a young person to begin smoking. Clearly, more intervention is needed to effectively reduce adult and adolescent smoking. The American Stop Smoking Interventions Study (ASSIST) appears to be a step in this direction. I am confident that the New Jersey Department of Health and the New Jersey Division of the Cancer Society will work cooperatively with the state and local coalitions to plan and implement an effective intervention program, which will result in a dramatic reduction in the number of our citizens who smoke. The School Based Youth Services Program will provide support in this effort. Please contact me if I can be of further assistance. Sincerely, ~.~... Gail Biedermann Program Coordinator A Cooperatlue Prof ect o/ the 8rldgeton Nlgh School and Brldgeton Area Ytealth Seru/ces r609)451•4440
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BRIDGETON PUBLIC SCHOOLS BRtDGETON' BOARD OF EDUCATION Admmistration Buddmg, Bank Street Brid'geton. New Jersey 08302 (609) 455 - 8030 THOMAS C. CANE. IV' DORQTHY E. PETERSON Superintendent of Schools Assrstant Superintendent of Schools June 11, 1990 To Whom It May Concern: Please be advised that I am in complete support of the demonstration project acronymed, ASSIST. The school system has already established a policy that prohibits smoking in alb areas where school activities take place. Therefore, our school system will assist in any way possible in carrying out the activities that are undertaken by the community based;coalition,. Lane, IV Superintendent of Schools TCL/gd
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V. PUBLIC FC" EZE3CF5 -488-
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2()236'76519 I li : r I
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MF,MR'FR'S .,.M4ISSICN Cf: St-Y7KIhiG OR FEALTt? Mrs. T.*~ Kean Dr. Lee RuichTSai: Mxs. L. 8auvais - Godwin. Mrs. Regina Carlson mrs. Jane DeMaio t,trs. Jolanda Gaglioti mr. R i rh?_rr7 Gardiner Mrs. Sh•i.rley Greene Dr. Narman Hymowitz Mr. Daniel Jordan Mr. Lester Kurtz Mr. fdwarrl' Iawson ~ Mr. Richard Llayti Mr. Octavius Reid Dr. John Slade Mrs. Beulah Walter Dr. Richard Watscn _ Dr. Elizabeth Wilson - , Hor•.orary Chai,r~es son Cha•trperson, University oti Medicine & Dentistr• New Jersey Chapter - Society For Public Health Educaticm, Paranus New Jersey GYaup Against Smoking Pollution, St¢tmit New Jersey State Departtnent Of Education, Trenton New Jersey Congress of Parents and Teachers, Denville New Jersey State Department of Treasury, Trenton New Jersey Interagency Camcil on Sanking or Health, North Brunswick University of Medicine and. Deatistry, Newark New Jersey Health Officers Associ.ation, Basking Ridge New Jersey 8usiness and Zn&ust'ry Associa- tim, , Trenton Prudential Insvrance Cortpany. Newark Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Jersey,• Newra=k New Jersey Schnol Boards Associati.art, Trenton St. Peter's Medical Center, New B=vn.,~wick New Jersey Chapter: American Assxiaticn of Retired Persons, Thorofare Jotznsan and Johnson, New Brunswick New Jersey State Nurses Associatitn, Trentcrl For reprints of this report pbease contact: New Jersey Department of Health Smoking and Tobacco Use Control Prozran Gti 360 Trenton, New Jersey, 08625-0360 NA ~ Cj O'y ~ OS CR N O
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f FOREWORD Smoking and other forms of tobacco use are the leading cause of preventable illness and death in New lersey. Over 11,000 of our fellow citizens die each year as a result of diseases -caused by smoking. Thousands of others endure the slow agony of illnesses produced by sinoking such as emphysema and heart disease. The economic toll of tobacco use in the form of lost productivity and increased health care costs amounts to more than two billion dollars each year in New Jersey. The magnitude of this public health problem should call us to action. We must move forward irt. a collective effort to reduce and prevent unnecessary illness due to smoking. The challenge is great, and our response will have to overcome three hundred years of cultural and economic dependency on tobacco. In recognition of the complexity of the issues that surround all attempts to eliminate•tobacco related illnesses, an advisory Commission on Smoking or Health was appointed in February 1986. This Commission is comprised of outstanding leaders from many walks of life in New Jersey. They have spent the past year examining ways that we can prevent childhood and adolescent tobacco dependency. The Commission's report provides a series of recommendations based upon evidence of the potentially harmful effects of tobacco smoke and patterns of tobacco use and addiction in the United States. It is our hope that further debate and public policy change will be stimulated as a result of the Commission's findings. The Commission has given many hours to the development of this report, and the Department would like to express their respect and gratitude for the Commission's efforts. Mollyaoell Coye, M.D , M.P: State Commissio of Health
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EXB=Tlvr- SZJ~S+SI~*fi' Nl CD N CJ ~ fl~ EJi N N
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Commission on Smoking or Health was appointed by the Department of Health in 1986 to advise it on strategies to deal with, the probiems created• by tobacco use in New 3ersey. The Commission has identified three major areas for action: 1. Preventing tobacco use in children. 2. Protecting nonsmokers from involuntary smoking. 3. Encouraging and enabling smokers to quit. This report deals with the first of these areas, preventing tobacco use in children. The basis for much of the Commission's findings and recommendations is the testimony presented at a public forum on childhood and adolescent tobacco use held in the State House Annex, November 19, 1986. Information from published sources and the expertise of the Commission members supplemented the public com rnents. The findings of the Commission focus on these major areas: 1. The magnitude of the public health problem posed by childhood smoki ng. 2. The lack of public awareness and understanding about this issue. 3. The extensive cultural and social influences which encourage children to smoke. 4. The easy access children have to cigarettes and other forms of tobacco.
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5. The present inadequate efforts to combat tobacco use by children. 6. The heartening leadership displayed' by a variety of citizens and' organizations in New 3ersey. Based on the findings, the recommendations of the Commission are: 1. Increase awareness and understanding concerning: (a) Integrate tobacco education and prevention into drug education curricula. (b) Target education to health professionals who are in direct contact with children. (c) Improve data collection on childhood tobacco use. 2. Counteract adverse cultural and social influences that encourage tobacco use: (a) Persuade sports facilities to refuse to hold tobacco sponsored events. (b) Eliminate the marketing of candy and bubble gum, in the forms of cigarettes, cigars, and pipes. (c) Eliminate the marketing of toys bearing tobacco brand trademarks. (d) Designate all primary and secondary schools as tobacco-free. (e) Halt the sale and advertising of tobacco on state properties and facilities. (f) Promote tobacco free lifestyles by role models attractive to children. -2-
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3. Restrict children's access to tobacco (a) Ban free distribution of tobacco products. (b) Ban the sale and distribution of clove cigarettes. (c) Raise the age of sale of tobacco from 16 to 18. (d) Tax smokeless tobacco at same rate as cigarettes. (e) Raise cigarette excise tax by at least %. (f) Prohibit cigarette vending machines in locations accessible to minors. (g) Educate tobacco retailers about the illegality of selling tobacco products to minors.
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2Q236'76526 A
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FINDIN GS 1. Magnitude of the Public Health Problem Tobacco is the leading cause of avoidable illness and death in New Jersey. Every year nearly eleven thousand deaths are caused by cigarette smoking in three categories alone: (a) Thirteen percent of cardiovascular disease deaths (4,300) are attributable to smoking cigarettes. (b) Thirty-two percent of cancer deaths (5,000) are caused' by smoking cigarettes. (c) Eighty-eight percent of chronic lung disease deaths (1,600) are caused by smoking cigarette.1 The annual economic impact of tobacco on New Jersey is immense. (a) One billion dollars are spent each year to purchase over 880 million packages of cigarettes in New Jersey.2 (b) An estimated 790 million dollars are spent each year3 as the result of increased health care costs2 created by tobacco use in New Jersey. (c) An estimated 1.3 billion dollars are lost each year3 to the New Jersey economy by decreased productivity and earnings due to illnesses caused by tobacco.2 Tobacco use has declined among all age groups except children.4 A 1986 high school survey of 10th, 11th and 12th grade students in New Jersey indicates that almost forty percent smoke; and half smoke every day. This data is unchanged• from 1980. -4-
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Although data are incomplete, it appears that smoking prevalence among those who drop out of school is higher than it is for those who remain in school. The reported, prevalence figure of 40 percent for hi& school students probably underestimates the size of the problem. In New Jersey, about 50 percent of teenagers who become pregnant smoke.5 The effects of cigarette smoking may account for 25 percent of the low birth weight deliveries in this group.6 4 Nicotine produces a chemical dependence (addiction) in exactly the same sense that other drugs, such as heroin, cocaine and alcohol, are dependence-producing.7 About seven out of ten people who use tobacco reRularly_are addicted to it. Most smokers start smoking as children. Studies indicate that the younger one starts to smoke, the harder it is to quit. When smoking is started at a younger age, many of the diseases produced by smoking are manifested at a younger age. The younger one starts, the more likely one will become ill from smoking. 2. Lack of public awareness and understanding of smoking issues. The present public concern about the use of alcohol and other drugs by children has not included tobacco. There is a lack of awareness that tobacco is an addictive substance. While most adults and children believe that cigarettes are harmful, the public underestimates the enormous magnitude of that harm. -5-
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3. Extensive cultural, and social influences encourage children to smoke. Although• tobacco companies claim their advertisements are not directed at children, the themes employed in their $2 billion annual marketing effort are clearly appealing to a youthful audience. Sporting events such as car races and tennis tournaments are promotional vehicles for cigarettes.8 Slim models seem to promise "sexy" vitality from cigarettes. There are toys which bear cigarette logos. Candy cigarettes and chewing gum cigars are still found in our stores. The most popular brand of bubble gum is an imitation chewing tobacco.9 Students learn that smoking is the "adult" thing to do when they are not allowed to smoke on school grounds but teachers are permitted to smoke. (The fervor with which adult smokers cling to smoking lounges only testifies to the addictive nature of their tobacco use.) Government agencies warn against the dangers of tobacco but allow it to be advertised and sold on public property. 4. Easy access to tobacco by children. - A New Jersey law prohibits selling or giving tobacco products to anyone under age 16,10 but the Commission was unable to learn of even one complaint or court case brought under this statute. The absence of regulatory action is certainly not indicative of widespread compliance with the law. !t has been documented that an eleven-year old readily purchased cigarettes in 19 of 21 attempts without difficulty.ll Most tobacco retailers claim unawareness of what their legal obligations are. Cigarettes are readily given to minors during free sampling promotions by cigarette companies. Minors frequently win cigarettes offered as prizes at fairs. ~ ~ C3 ~ ~ CA N Go -6 -
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Sales of clove cigarettes, which are a mixture of cloves and tobacco, are growing. This product's main use may be the initiation of new tobacco users. National experts believe that virtually all clove cigarettes are consumed by minors.12 Mail-in post cards for free tobacco cigarettes are found in magazine ads from time to time. Children can readily fill out these cards and receive free cigarettes in the mail. Studies indicate that raising the retail price of tobacco products reduces tobacco consumption by children.13 The use of smokeless tobacco is rapidiy increasing, mostly due to a growing demand by males age 13 to 16. The average age of first use is 10 years.14 At the moment, smokeless tobacco remains free of any excise tax. Cigarette vending machines ace easily accessible to children. 5. Present statewide effort to combat tobacco use in children is insufficient. Tobacco is still an entrenched part of our culture. Effective protective strategies require resources. Current public expenditures or programs aimed at discouraging initiation of tobacco use by children are miniscule. Private sector expenditures, while larger, are not substantial. 6. Encouraging leadership displayed by a variety of citizens and institutions in New Jersey There is a growing interest at a grass roots level to develbp and; implement innovative programs to prevent tobacco use by the young. Parents and, teachers are working toward smoke free environments for their children and. students. It is believed that the testimony on November 19, 1986 indicates a change in public attitude which favors new public policy initiatives. -7-
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'"i RECOMMENDATIONS Based upon the findings, the Commission makes the following recommendations: 1. Increase awareness and understanding of smoking as a major threat to the health of our children. (a) Incorporate tobacco education and prevention into drug education curricula. Along with the increased coverage of other substance abuse issues in school texts and curricula, tobacca and smoking should be addressed. The portion of the curriculum allotted should reflect its enormous importance relative to other drugs. Curriculum content should emphasize developing skills to resist pressures to smoke and the immediate adverse consequences of tobacco use. (b) Education for health care professionals who are in direct contact with children should be undertaken. School nurses, counselors, family physicians, pediatricians, obstetricians, and dentists should be taught how to counsel a young patient to quit or to avoid tobacco use. (c) lmprove data collection on children and their tobacco use. The Commission was struck by the paucity of data on tobacco use by young people in New Jersey. The Department of Health should assist the Departments of Education and Law and Public Safety in expanding the coverage of smoking in the Drug and Alcohol use surveys of New Jersey high school students. Focused surveys should be undertaken by the Department of Health to answer speci,fic questions of importance to program development and- monitoring. -8-
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2. Counteract cultural and social influences that encourage tobacco use. (a) A vigorous media campaign, promoting tobacco - free l:ving should be promoted. Ridiculing tobacco advertising is one innovative approach. Role models appealing to youth, such as sports figures and rock stars might be utilized. Such a campaign would need to be large enough to effectively reduce the use of tobacco by young people. (b) Persuade sport facilities to refuse tobacco-sponsored events. We believe telecasts of these events may circumvent the Federal restrictions on radio and T.V. cigarette advertising. (c) Eliminate the marketing of candy or bubble gum cigarettes, cigars, pipes, and chewing tobacco in New Jersey. These products help teach children how to use tobacco products. Mock beer, wine or liquor packaged as facsimilies of real products would not be tolerated on the shelves of our stores. Imitation tobacco products should also not be allowed. (d) Eliminate the marketing of toys and promotional items bearing tobacco trademarks. States have the legal authority to restrict the rnarketing of a wide array of consumer products. Products targeted to very young children which accustom them to tobacco use are unacceptable. (e) Designate all primary and secondary schools as tobacco-free. Physically separating smokers from nonsmokers within the same enclosed environment diminishes but does not eliminate the exposure of nonsmokers to environmental tobacco smoke.15 Allowing anyone to smoke at school's sends a mixed message to children. Allowing teachers to smoke at school reinforces the -9-
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impression that smoking is an• attractive, "adult" thing to do. A double standard is obvious to all when. what is said about the drug nicotine and what the faculty is seen to do are inconsistent. (f) Halt the sale and advertising of cigarettes on state properties and facilities. A state has the authority as a land owner to regulate commerce on its property. Public agencies should have no part in promoting products which are the leading cause of death and which have no socially redeeming value. 0 3. Restrict children's access to tobacco. (a) Ban the free distribution of tobacco products. Similar actions have already been taken in Minnesota, Boston and Atlanta,16 and, have not been challenged in court. (b) Ban the sale and distribution of clove cigarettes. Some experts believe that clove cigarettes may be more toxic than conventional cigarettes. The major market for this product is children. States such as New Mexico, Nevada, Indiana and Florida have successfully banned their distribution.! 7 (c) Raise the age for legal sale and distribution of cigarettes to age 18 in New Jersey. Current law bans the sale of tobacco to minors 115 years of age and younger.18 A bill has passed the Assembly amending the law raising the age limit from 16 to 18, explicitly including smokeless tobacco, and raising the fine to $250: The Bill also requires posting signs which summarize the law wherever cigarettes are sold, or displayed. Provisions should be added to the law that explicitly state that it is legal to use a minor to purchase tobacco for the purpose of monitoring compliance and enforcement. The penalty should include -10-
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A provision for the suspension and/or loss of license to selt tobacco products. This activity would be administered by the Department of Treasury. (d) Raise the cigarette excise tax by % (from 26~ to, 31~) per pack of cigarettes. Tobacco consumption by adolescents experimenting with tobacco is price sensitive.13 The Commission agrees with the observation that, in the narrow economic sense, excise taxes are regressive.19 However, a higher excise tax is justified in light of the enormous societal cost and disease burden produced by smoking. The excise tax is one available tool to reduce tobacco use by children. "Buttlegging" to avoid the excise tax is of concern, but a tax increase of only %. should not make too large an impact because of improved enforcement capabilities in recent years.2fl This would generate an estimated $40 million in revenue,21 part of which could be used to implement these commission recommendations. (e) Tax smokeless tobacco at the same rate as cigarettes. A 25 cent per unit price rise will reduce consumption of these products by the children and teenagers. An estimated $5 million might be raised by this tax.22 (f) Prohibit installation of cigarette vending machines in locations accessible to minors. The National Automatic Merchandising Association estimates that more than 20 percent of New Jerseyrs cigarette vending machines are in places easily accessible to children.23 That represents approximately 5000 machines. The Commission was shown no evidence that the vending industry's voluntary program to reduce sales of cigarettes to -1.1-
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N g- children has any effect: The only way to insure that vending operators obey the law forbidding the sales of tobacco products to minors is to regulate where such machines can be located or to eliminate them entirely. Educate tobacco retailers about the illegality of selling tobacco products to minors. Like the general- public, tobacco retailers have a poor appreciation of the addictive nature of tobacco, the true magnitude of the harm it causes, and the harm from childhood onset tobacco use. The Commission knows of no systematic effort to educate tobacco retailers about the importance of not selling tobacco products to, minors. A program to educate tobacco retailers about tobacco and youth should be developed. A variety of methods could be employed: newsletter and trained volunteers visiting individuals and stores are two approaches which could be employed. The measure of success for this undertaking would be an improvement in the observance of the sale-to-minors law.
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SLA.:ok ir.ct - Re? ated, Deaths a.: cFi--a:_cial Costs Of_ice of Tec-'Lno_ogy Assess^.e.^t Ca*g-ress of the L7^ited States Wasr.ii+gto^•, D.C. 205!0,, 1965 2. ?ow Hea? tky Are ueur Je_ seyars ? New Je_rsey CepartAe.nt of s?ealt^_ TM^e^_toNJ ^8625, _98 = 3. Op. cit., Smaki_-~.* -Related Deaths and F°~a*:cial Costs 4. Drtw arx.' Alcohol Use A.^or= New Jersey H-1e`j Sc_^oo? Stzd---tts New Je=sey D=artnert of Law ar.z °ubl:c Safety, Tz'en:on, I¢: 08625, 1987 5. New .Te*sey State WIC P_oc:-ar.: NIew Je_rsey Deppa_Ttae*_?t of Health '=`= e^^•_tor_, VJ 08625 5. The Health Co:^secuerces of Sm?ci*x7 for W=er A report of t~se Sr--Ser--- C-ers±^a1, LTS 3epar'me^t of uealt~- ar.d Human Services, Rub'_ic Health Service, Off_ce of the Assistant Sec=eta_-p for I?ealtt:, Office on Smo~^.g and -Healt::, ?~caville , NS, ? 981 .. Acr;4ctive 9rocess '_._'o^acco - Reia:ec Oisease ti'=A Addiction Researc.'^ Ce^_te_, 3a1:?mo:e, 1-140, I987 8. WaxTer, Y., SeZl-'-:L- Srxskirx_ Cygarette Adve_ =sir-q and ?,,:.bl:c vea=th American ?c:blic H1ea? t"r_ Associatioe_, Washington, C.C., =986 9. Testimony of *^s. Patti Van w.et=e, before the Co.»'^'1:ss_o.'1 on Si"•.Okiz".g or vea? t}l. ~"e.^.toP_, ~:.. November 19, :986. :fl•. *?.j. S.A. 2A: 170-51 "Sa1e of C-452ettes, Ci~ette Papers or Tobacco to *g.rA_s" Jo'-r= 0. Slade, M.D. St. Peter's !^edica: Ce^.e_ New 3_swick, NJ 08903 12. "_l.Lriesses Possibly Associated W:th Sro:^~ C=ove Ciga_"ettes",*`Arb_d'_ ty arAl Mmcta'_'; tcr Weekly Reoo: _, -May 3:, :985, 34: 3_.
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13. Test:imor•yo of Eugene L2sa_tt, ?r.D. , Univers'_ty of YedicL-ne =^t Dentistry, New Je:sey ^_^e?ir„a: Sc:~.oo:, Ye-qank, IN.;, before :he Comiss'_o^ or_ Smoking or 3ea= t`t,_= er _o^ , NU, Nove=:oer 19 ,1986. '14. Testimony of the u.an. Cht:ci: Barcwic'.t, S'~. eaker, Neoa Jersey nsse.::o_y, before the Cio.w~ssiG:L on. SK101~.^g or Health, '.~T, NroVe^,Der -G, IL986. 15. The ??ealth Corsec,:erces of 1_^_voI•,:._tzry Smo.tiino, a repo;t of the Surgeon Ge.rs_ra1, U.S. repa: =ent of F.ez'_th a*e- 3--a^. Sezv--ces, L_ea? th Se=vice, Centers for D_sease Control, Ce:^_ ter for Health Pzor.otior_ ard 3di:catior., Office on Smo:*+r and Health, Roc.Lwille, Ma.-y.aT.d, 20857, 1986. 16. Snaking a^.d Health r'2smo:te., Vo_~. 4, No. :, Fall =986, al :.':terHge_^-cy CoLi.^c~~ Q.„ Smk1Z`g 3-4 Fle2 i t"`_, Center for u.ealith and Safety Studies, 31oomiz.gtoT.:, It'jdiara. 47405 17. "122-nesses Possibly Associated with Smollc.,L^.g C:ove Cigarettes", nrbjdity and Moz-talitY Weekly Reoort, My 31, 1985, 34:3:. w 18. Senate 8;11 Number 1276 Nmq Jersey Serate, '?'renton, NJ 08625. 19. Test~ of Eugene Lewitt, °h.D., U:+iversity of `4ecii,c::e a_^.d~ Dentist:y, New Jersey Medical Sc:^ool,Newa_rk, _V,'•, befo_ e the Canmissior•_ or_ Slm-le-4-4 or Health•, Tre_ntor_, November 19, =366 20. Cigarette Tax Evasion: A Secor_d =oak, Advisory ComMj:ss.:o.T on In.te_*gwe_^.metital Relations, Was,`+i^s3to^., D.C., 1,985 21. CiCarette Tax Data, 1986, EstIttsate based on p=o;ectior_ by 'lbbC-.ccc Irst:'7ute, Wzsh:rsstor., D.C., 20006. 22. Testi.ny of Ms. Cathy Triverio, Vew Jersey Oe^taI ~_e.^_st `s Associat_or_, before the Ca=issio_*i on Sa.okiryg or .:eai t.k., Trenton, NJ, November 19, 1986. 23. :estimoryo of Mr. ?,zne ~~*_a.rald, before the Ca.^:^..=ss=o- cn- S.mo14.-1j or Health, Trenton, ~.~r , NoVe:m..be"' :9, 1986.
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NEW JERSEY'S CLEAN INDOOR AIR LAWS A PROMISE, BUT LITTLE PROTECTION A Report of the Commission on Smoking OR Health A aETTfR STATE OF NEALTli ~ ~ ~ W ~ ~ 25 May 1989 CA 7renton. New Jersey W GD
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Members, Commission on Smoking OR Health '0 Mrs. Thomas Kean. Honorary Chairperson lohn Slade. M.D.. Chairperson Carol Scott. Vice Chairperson Carlton Anderson Regina Carlson John Craig Iolanda Gagliotti Richard Gardiner Shirley Greene, M.Ed. Norman Hymowitz, Ph.D. Daniel Jordan Maureen Lopes Richard Lloyd David Rataiack. M.P.H. Lee Reichman. M.D. Carolyn Turner. R.N. Richard Van Hassel Richard Watson, M.D. Elizabeth Wilson. R N.. Ed D. Medical Society of New Jersey New Jersey School Boards Association The Prudential Insurance Company New Jersey Group Against Smoking Pollution American- Association of Retired Persons New Jersey Congress of Parents and Teachers New Jersey Department of Treasury New Jersey Interagency Council on Smoking OR Health American Heart Association New Jersey Health Officers Association New Jersey Business and Industry Association Blue Cross & Blue Shield of New Jersey New Jersey Chapter of the Society for Public Health Education University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey New Jersey Department of Education New Jersey Hospital Association Johnson & Johnson N6-w Jersey State Nurses Association For copies of this report please contact. New Jersey Departrnent of Health. Smoking and Tobacco Use Control Program EN 360 Trenton. New Jersey 08625 609-588-7470 c
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EXECUTtVE SUMMAR e The Commission on Smoking OR Health was•appointed by the Department of Health in 1985 to advise it on strategies to deal with the problems created by tobacco, use in New lersey. The Commission has identified three major areas for action: U. Preventing tobacco use in children. 2. Protecting nonsmokers from involuntary smoking 3. Encouraging and enabling smokers to quit. This report deals with the second of these areas, protecting nonsmokers. (ln November..1,987 the Commission issued its first report, Preveiiling Tobacco Dependence in New Jersey Ckildren.l. FINDINGS 1. Knowledge about tobacco smoke pollution has advanced greatly•since 198.1 and t985;when the existing New Jersey laws were enacted: 2. Tobacco smoke pollution is a cause of disease. including lung cancer and heart disease. in nonsmokers. Involuntary smoking is especially hazardous for children. In the United States as many as 46.000 people dieannually from tobacco smoke pollution. The death toil'in New )ersey may be as high as 1,400 per year. 3. Separation of smoking and nonsmoking areas does not eliminate the hazards if the areas share a common ventilation system. 4. New Jersey's current laws are grossly inadequate and extraordinarily ambiguous. Tihey do not protect the public health, 5. The public feels betrayed by this lack of protection. The laws created expectations. but did not fulfill them. 6. Resources for implementation of the laws within, the Department of Health, are almost nonexistent. 7. Within the constraihts of its resources. the Department of Health has displayed a commitment and: leadership in protecting the rights of all New Jersey citizens to breathe clean air. RECOMMENDATIONS Current laws should be amended. new laws shoulld be passed, and non-legislative changes should be made by governmental- bodies to ensure the following: 1. Places where children are present, health care facilities. educational institutions, and government facilities and functions should be entirely smokefree. 2. Most privately owned places where people must go - workpla.:es, restaurants, stores - should be smokefree in- all areas people must use. but owners may provide enclosed, separately ventilated smoking-permitted areas. 3. If casinos. bars and nightclubs permit smoking, signs warning of tobacco smoke pollution hazards should be required 4. The Department of Health should set standards for maximum levels of, tobacco smoke pollution which are alaovred to pass between residential units in apartment houses arad other multiple-unit residences. 5. The Department•of Health,should award grants and: contracts for pubiic health related services only to recipients with smokefree premises. 6. The legislature should appropriate funding for implementation of clean indoor air laws and for an Office on Smoking OR Health within the Department of Health 1
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BACKGRO4JND The Commission on Smoking OR Health- of the New lersey State Department of Health helkf a public forum on New Jersey's clean indoorair lhws f,Nov. 28..1988, Hughes (ustice Complex. Trenton I. The Commission heard a full day's comments on the existing laws and on the health hazards of tobacco smoke pollution. Oral testimony was presented. by more than 25 individuals. including Dr. Coye. the State Commissioner of Nealth..organizational. representatiues, scientists. physicians. teachers. businesspeople and members of the general public. More than 50 letters were received from people unable to attend the hearing. The forum constitutes part of the Health Department s investigation fora report to the legislature on the effectiveness of the laws. The Department has also commissioned scientific studies of the laws; the preliminary results of those studies were presented at the hearing. Additionally, Department staff have compiled a report on requests for information and on complaints received about the laws. and that information was presented at the hearing. FINDINGS 1. The Existing Laws "In my prepared text 1 was going to say the present legislation has served as an excelle nt start..l5ut, frankly. it is extraordinarily weak and ineffectave:' said' Molly Joel Coye. M D.. M.P H. The State Commissioner of Health was the first speaker. but throughout the day other presenters were. unanimously, in agreement with her that the existing laws are: . • inadequate • ambiguous • unimplemented • and unenforced. Regina Carlson. Executive Director of the New Jersey Group Against Smoking Pollution IGASPI. testified that GASP receives as many as 1.000 complaints per year about problems with the existing laws. Carison reported thatcitizens complained most often about the workplace and restaurant laws. but added that recently schools and nursing homes are also the sublect of a growing number of complaints. Patti Van Metre, speaking on behalf of the Respiratory Health Association. Pararnus. reported that their organization gets many complaints, most of them focusing on the workplaceand restaurant laws. Similar reports were offered by the American Lung Association of New Jersey and the American Cancer Society, New Jersey Division. One of'the last speakers of the day. Scott Goldman. of Livingston, was direct and dramatic: "So• what is this businessperson"s opinion of the present state of laws in New Jersey on clean indoorair? Horrible. Awful. Abysmal: Shameful. In New Jersey. forall practical purposes, there are no meaningful protections from the smoke of others:' Despairing about the restaurant law, he said. "_ .. you don't have to do a damn thing if you post a sign that says you didn't. If this isto be our policy toward public health, then I propose this sign: This restaurantdoes notwash itsdishes. and our employees do not wash their hand's. as provided by law." Mr. Goldman thereby articulated a recurring refrain. that citizens believed the passage of the laws promised them protection, so they were doubly disap- pointed by the lack of protection. A number of organizational representatives and'individuals described how nonsmoking citizens feel ignored..insulted: even disenfranchised. by lack of protection Janet Neufeld. a school nurse from southern New Jersey. said. ".. the tyranny of the minority is at work when as few as five people control the literal,aomosptiere and hold hostage a building with-more than 600 adults and children. ' i~ Alice Baranik. Vernon Tbwnship. described how secondhand smoke makes her a second-class ~ citizen: "I am not a free person. I have difficulty going to shopping malls and have to'hold my breath' ~ a great deal of the time. btany umes 1 cannot go into a restroom because people are smoking or have ~ beensmoking,'"WiiliamClark..DirectorofRespiratoryCare BayonneHospital speaking on behalf ofi the New Ilersey Society of the American Association for Respiratory Care. explained. " over 68 ~ million people suffered from chronic respiratory problems and 181 million people suffered from ~ acute respiratory problems . Is the t!egislature condoning the disenfranchising of people who yQ suffer from respiratory ailments by allowing the smoker to dictate where a person can eat. work, or~ ~i enjoy leisure activities?" hMore specific find ings about ihd ividual laws. with-representative citizen comments. are included in the Recommendations sectioml 2
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it. Tobacco Smoke Poi ion "The number of cancer deaths from passive smoking is estimated:to-be 100 times as large as It}ie number of d'eaths froml all the other hazardous pollutants we now-regulate " Thus hmes Repace made clear the magnitude of tobacco smoke pollution and: the inconsistency in our society's response to this pollutant. compared to other toxic substances in the air. Mr. Repace is a physicist in the Indoor Air Program of ttie Environmental Protection Agency and has studied tobacco smoke pollution since 11976 He and fiiscoileague. Alfred Lowrey. are internationally recognized:as leading researchers in the field Mr. Repace and other witnesses described the hazards of tobacco smoke pollution. The Commission also• had access to the 1986 Surgeon General's Report. The Health Consequrnces of Involuntary Sntoking. and the 1986 report of the National Academy of Sciences, Environntentaf'Tobacco Smoke. Neither report had been published when the existing laws were passed. Therefore. in the words of Palma E. Formica, M.D., President of the Medical Society of New )ersey, in her letter to the Commission, "The present laws were written, and passed at a time when the data were less persuasive than they are today that tobacco smoke is a serious pollution problem." Based on worldwide scientific evidence. it is established that tobacco smoke pollution isa cause of disease, including lung cancer, in healthy nonsmokers. Simple separation of smoking from nonsmoking areas does not eliminate these hazards, so long as those areas share the same ventilation system. Indeed. Mr. Repace testified that ventilation rates would have to be increased 250 times to eliminate the risk. This, of course, is technologicaily•infeasible and would turn,indoorr spaces into wind'tunnels. Tobacco smoke pollution is a particular risk for children because they inhale two to three times more pollutant per pound of body weight than adults. Tobacco smoke contains 4.000-chemicais. 50 of them known carcinogens. Recent evidence links tobacco smoke to heart disease in-nonsmokers. Tobacco smoke is also synergistic with other pollutants. Smoking also results in 1.500 fire fatalities and 3.400 persons injured in fires in the United States each year. In New Jersey it can be estimated that 45 people a year will die in smoking-related fires. and that more than tU0 people will be injured in fires caused by smoking. Risk analyses place the total death toll among American nonsmokers from tobacco smoke pollution at 16.000 per year. New )ersey's share of this toll would be approximately 1.400 people. In addition to internationally recognized scientists. New Jersey physicians and health leaders, the other experts who testifie6about the health effects of secondhand smoke were ordinary citizens. Employees. teachers. dining patrons. and other New Jersey citizens described being made uncomfoRable. ill. or unsafe at work, in schools. in restaurants. and in other public places in New )ersey. Gloria Liberstein. Paramus. was quite clear: "It causes me to gag and inflames my sinuses: " G loria and Alfred Gary. Bordentown, wrote. "As senior citizens. we are particularly prone to upper respiratory iilness, which makes us more uncomfortable being around smoke at anytime Surely, with the growingg population in our age bracket, some consideration should be shown for our health :" Chilldren. too, understood the problem. School' nurse Janet NI'ufefd quoted fourth-grade student Brian Warner: "People can get sick from smoke and you could make other people sick also." In another school. wrote Deborah-Hubes of Oldwick. a teacher insisting on a"right to smoke" smokes in a workroom where volatile chemicals are stored. Marc Liebeskind. Bayonne, wrote. "I have to work for a living I d'on,t see why I am less entitled:to clean airand must be forced to breathe someone's cigarette smoke because I1work foran employer who has less than 50 employees. ... my mucus membranes and eyes become inflamed. causing dryness in the nasal passages which can then result'sn bleeding, excessive phl'egm production and causes me to become very tired. Additionaily. I hate the smell and resent having to wash, and dry-clean my clothes and ta ke an extra shower because of the lingeri ng cigarette smoke I also resent having to function at an impaired level because the legislation does not go far enough- 4,%oman where hwork is a nonsmokerand is pregnant She is concerned about the effect the smoke will ha~e on her babv She recentl~ ti%entt to her doctor .~ho after e\am,niny her, asked her if she smoked because her throat was infiamed: The inflammation came from the smoke in the office ...' Severall speakers commented on the inconsistency of pollution controll in New )ersey Linda Benjamin. a health educator in Middlesex County, asked. "is it fair that people who do not'smoke are exposed to chemical5. indoors. that we have outlawed outdoors?" liudith Shelton. a high school ;,.
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counselor, described the .,urous efforts her schooli system. is m.. .ig to eliminate asbestos exposure and! wondered why herdistrict did so little to protect her from tobacco smoke pollution, Teri Manes. speaking on behalf of the New lersey Society of Public Health, Educators. explained that health education theory encourages social change as a way to eliminate hea Itfi problems •'If we do not strengthen our llegislationl .e we are polluting our children's air and their minds. as well." Additional effects of tobacco smoke pollution in New Jersey are unemployment and d•ecreased business. Mrs. Baranik is a registered nurse and a licensed real estate agent, but she testified she doesn't know where she can work in New Jersey and be safe. Other citizens gave similar reports. Of course, our state (as well as individualicitizensf suffers financially•when willing people cannot work. Numerous people testified bhey avoid New Jersey restaurants because of smoke. Richard Gardner. M.D.. of Cresskill, declared the restaurant law-a " 100 percent farce;' especially compared:to laws in other states. James Katz, Ph.D., Morristown. wrote. "... I would be spending over 51,500 annually in North Jersey restaurants if there were ones with good nonsmoking areas available. As it is. I'm forced to drive to New York City..which does require nonsmokingi areas, and spend my money there." lane Blackman. of Bridgewater, wrote, "Many people like myself... find ourselves forced to go out to•eat mostweekends in NewYork City, which, itappears,cares moreaboutthe health of itscitizens:' Scott Goldman said."When I go out to eat. I take my business associates, my guests. and my family to New York because there, unlike New Jersey, we can dine in separate. comfortable. smoke-free restaurant seating." 41 CONCLUSIONS The existing laws do notguaranteeclean indoorair in New Jersey. New lerseycitizens are suffering discomfort and•disease from involuntary smoking while evidence continues to accumulhte on•the magnitude of the health hazard. Many citizens feel confused and even cynical, and believe that there has been an insulting lack of concern for theirwetlbeing, and are disappointed thata promise made to them•has been broken. RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendations are made for amendments to existing laws, for new laws, and for non-legislative changes by government bodies. The recommendations rest on three premises: First, there should be. in the words of Dr. Coye. "zero tolerance for secondhand smoke" incertain public places. Places where children are present, educational institutions, and health care facilities should be entirely smokefree. Smokefree means there is no smoking or tobacco smoke pollution. Other places where there should be zero tolerance are government facilities and functions. Unpolluted air should be the standard in government facilities because government must maintain a high level of citizen protection and a high level of accessibility to citizens. Testifying before the Commission. Dr. Lawrence Meinert of the Health Department. said "... a completely smokefree environment is the only type of acceptable environment that protects the health, welfare and comfort...." Furthermore, it is inappropriate to use public money to enable addictive behavior. Second. privately owned public places where citizens must go fworkplaces. retail stores. restaurantsl should be smokefree in all areas people must use, but proprietors should be free to create smoking areas if they wish, provided that pollution from smoke does not enter the common ventilation system. Third. certain public places, such as casinos. bars, nightclubs, should be encouraged to provide clean indoor air, not required to do so by law This exception is made for two reasons. Nonsmokers need not frequent these public places. (An exception. of course. is nonsmoking employees ) Furthermore. there is a social reality that sites for gambling and alcohol consumption also-have a high incidence of smoking. Increased ventilation is recommended for, these sites. to reduce the health hazards and to promote user comfort. However, with great sociaf'change taking place about smoking, certainly there will come a time when this exception will no lbnger be acceptable. For the present,•signs warning of the tobacco smoke pollution hazard's should be posted in such places. a-
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f. Amendments to exist...g laws (. Funding is needed if these laws are to be effective. There is a need for public ed'ucation on the lhws, for training for agencies and individuatk with enforcement responsibillties. and (orthe treatment of nicotine dependence. Health Department staff reported they are responsible for 145.000 locations. including 30;000 restaurants., but have zero budget. The Commassion recommends the Assembly fund an Office on SmokingOR Health in the New Jersey Department of Health. im ? 2. Most of the laws contain a preamble which has several inaccuracies. The preamble posits a "eight" to smoke although neither the Constitution, norcase law; nor legislation supports such a right. The preamble declares the state has no policy to deny anyone the right to smoke. but. clearly, the State does wish to stop children from smoking. Finally, the preamble states that tobacco smoke is asubstantial, health hazard to a'"smalf segment" of the nonsmoking public. when current data indicate that it is toxic to all. All these inaccuracies could be eliminated with thisversion of the preamble:'"The Legislature finds and declares that in addition to the deleterious effects upon smokers, tobacco smoke is a substantial health hazard to the nonsmoking majority. Therefore..:' 3. Combining all the existing laws into one clean indoor air code is recommended. This would be simpler and would create uniform control of the hazardous substance. with little variation by site. This is how the State usually controls pollution problems. for instance, sewage. 4. The private workplaces law, P.L 1985. C. 184 A. Smoking should be eliminated from all work areas and common areas which employees must use. Steve Rome. who works at Educational Testing Services,.d'escribed how he is exposed to tobacco smoke pollution atwork, even though,his employer is in compliance with the law. ln fact, Janice Marshall. of the Department of Health,, reported'that an employer can be in compliance with the iaw merely by designating any area nonsmoking. even the end' of a halfway or one bathroom. B. Smoking-permitted areas need not be provided. If they are, they should be outdoors or in separately ventilated indoor areas. C. All private employers in New lersey should be covered by the law. Alice Leavy. of Towaco. was one of a number of people who work in such uncovered sites and wrote. asking for help. Testifying before the Commission, Dr. Eugene Lewitt. UMDN}. who studied the law's implementation forthe Departrnent. estimated that one-third to one-half of all employees in New Jersey work for employers of fewer than 50 people, and so are not protected,by the law. D. The law must say "establish and implement" nonsmoking policies. instead of merely "establish: " E. There should be protection against retaliation for employees who seek enforcement of this law, as there is in thecase of other occupational health protections. Tobacco smoke pollution in the worksite is a hazardous working condition. F. The immunity from employee lawsuits given to employers should be eliminated. G. Enforcement should be through citation by state or local health departments f enalties should be fines in local-court. As with other public health nuisances. the fine should be S25-$200 per violation, per day, with higher penalties for repeated offenses. 5. Restaurants..PL 11985 C. 185. The bitterest, citizen complaints were evoked by the restaurant law and restaurant industry noncompliance. THis is not surprising. Dr Lewitt reported that bb o of surveyed resoaurants have of not complied with the minimum standard of the law, posting signs, and more than 86%f surveyed fail to provide nonsmoking dining areas In response to Dr. Lewitt's report. Dr. Lee Reichman. Commission rnember..said. "... I think that's horrendous and appalling "' -5-
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A number of corre ndents agreed with Dr. Reichman . and taur;e Legnante of Monroeville. wrote. "Please DO,NOT let the tobacco/restaurant industry take liberties with our lives. We live in an era where tobacco and second-hand smoke have been prot•clt harmful." Alan E. Kligerman. President of Lactaid. Inc. in Pleasantville, wrote. "A restaurant operator has no more right to serve up noxious air than he; she has to serve up polluted water or food'" Dr Katz, of, Morristown: noted an• inconsistency in state policy: "Although it is at, times inconvenient for restaurant owners. we do require that their kitchens and premises be sanitary. We even pay inspectors to go around and check up on them. Why? To protect the health of tffe public But for some reason the same rationale is not applied in terms of harmful fumes in restaurants that are generated-by smokers." Several writers suggested a stronger Il3w would "get the restaurants off the hook" with,the state's assuming the authority for the decision. And Doris Woolf..of Pine Brook, describing a meal ruined by smoke. reported. "The waitress confided that she, too, hated the exposure, but she was forced to breathe the befouled air or leave her job!" A. Nonsmoking should:be the law in restaurants except that smoking-permitted areas would be allowed if they were physically separate and on separate ventilation systems. B. The person in charge oEthe restaurant must be required to tell a person who is smoking in a nonsmoking area to stop smoking. C. There should' be better enforcement and' a stronger penalty. Enforcement could be incorporated into Chapter 12•of the State Sanitary Code. D. The preemption.of stronger Ibcal laws should be eliminated: 6. Educational Institutions. P.L 1481. C. 320 Citizens who cited problems in schools included students, teachers. staff. ad'ministrators. board members, and. parents. The primary concern was tobacco smoke pollution and how it harmed students and teachers. A graphic example came from the Bridgewater- Raritan school district. Enid Bloch. Ph.D., member of the Board of Education, told this story: ".. - a teacher had been demonstrating levels of carbon monoxide in-the lungs. Breathing into the machine, the teacher showed the class that his own level was zero, because he was 'a nonsmoker and an avid joggec' He asked.a secretary. who was a smoker, to take the test also: andher readingwas 15 to 18 on the meter. The teacher attempted to repeat the experiment in his third-period class, telling the class,' Now you'll see the perfect lungs of a jogger, a track coach-and a nonsmoker' But to his great embarrassment. his own readingd now stood at 6 or 7. What had happened is that.this teacher had: spent the second period of the school day in the teachers' lounge:' Concern about compromised educational goals was expressed by Linda Benjamin: "Would we allow cocaine lounges in schools?" Her concern was shared by school nurse (anet Neufeld: Mrs. Neufeld asked. "Hbw can the school nurse, teacher or other adult truthful ly a nswer the chi ld who asks:'Vdhy is my teacher telling me it's bad for my health and yet it's okay foryou to smoke?':' Donald Merachnik. Ph.D... Superintendent. Union County Regional High School District. and Enid Bloch. Bridgewater-Raritan School District, testified' how ambiguity in the current law has forced their school boards.. which want to create smokefree schools, to defend their actions before the Public Employment Relations Commission. Both school distnctsare currently unable to implement their new policies_ A. All educational institutions, from preschools through professional educational institutions, should be smokefree in, all educational and administrative facilities. B. Residentiallfacilities in educational institutions where the stud'ents are adults may establish smoking-permitted areas. so long as the tobacco smoke does not-enter the common ventila- tion s«tem Note: Some educational institutions are extending their nonsmoking policy to includ'e the out- doors. The Commission endorses that decision for~ educational reasons and for consistency 6-
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'M. 7. Health Care Facilities a. - Offices. PL 199 1. C. 319. A. Allisites should be h00% srnokefree!' B. Nursing homes should be included. Nursing homes that are primary health care factlities should be entirely smokefree. Nursing homes that are matnly residential facilities rather than health care facilities may establish smoking-permitted areas, so long as the tobacco smoke does not enter the common ventilation system. C. c-entists, chiropractors and psvchotherapists should!be inciud`ed in the law 8. Government Buildings. P.L 1985, C. 381 loan Gelber. a deputy attorney general. working for the State Department of~ Law and Public Safety. Professional Boards Section in Newark, wrote to the Commission, including copies of her correspondence attempting to have herworkplace free of the health hazards and discomforts of tobacco smoke po llution. Many other state and lbcal government faci lities are not in com pliance with the law. A. All' government facilities, local and state. and all government functions held in non- government sites should be entirely nonsmoking. One exception could be ailowed: government-owned residential facilities where the residents are all adults could create smoking-permitted areas for the resident if the tobacco smoke pollution is confined to• those areas. Nbte: Government institutions are often reqffired to meethigherstandards than other segments of society. but given fewer resources to meet those standards. Toprevent this problem..the Commission recommends funding to help government entities create smokefree conditions. This funding should includ'e resources to treat nicotine dependence in affected employee groups. 9. Retail food stores. P.L 1985. C. 186 Beatrice Chambers, of Summit, wrote in dismay about smoking in the Welsh Farms store where she shops "because my husband likes Welsh Farms milk and that store has the freshest tnilk:' She would-iike to have the law applied to small stores, especially since, in the convenience store she uses, sandwiches are also prepared. A. All stores, regardless of size, should be nonsmoking in all areas, except that management may-create a private. separately ventilated, smoking-permitted area for employees. B. Management must be required to tell customers who smoke in violation of the Itaw to stop smoking. C. Enforcement could be incorporated into Chapter 12 of the State Sanitary Code. 10. Indoor Public Places, P.L 1985, C. 318 A. In all structurally enclosed areas generally accessible to the publ ic. the authority in contro l of the public place shall designateas nonsmokingall areas which people must use to conduct business or participate in the activities of the place. B. Smoking-permitted areas may becreated, but only•if the areas are separately venti lated and not areas people must use to participate in the intended- purposes of the public place. C. Specifically named public places shall inclltde department stores. all other retail stores except tobacco stores, malls, banks, savings and loan institutions. churches, synagogues, other places of religious assembly, retail optical outlets. gymnasiums. and ltiundromats The current exceptions and inclusions shall be retalned. Current efforts to create smokefree health,care facilities often incorporate a lim,ted etcepuon,whrch permits smokrng b% npatrents und'er certa n circumstances Generallv. such e.ceptions require the concurrence ot medical and nursing personnel and may only be considered in certain s tuatrons for instance in the case ohconfused or terminally i1/ patients The CommrsSron acknouledges the appropriateness of these limited exceptrons in some hospitals at tfi s time In pramce the etception to policy is rarely m.oked:and s functionally nearlv equivalent to the facility s be ng smokefree Rsvchratnc inpatient facilities and inpattent chemical dependencv treatment umts hate been relhu.e{, reluctant :o became smokefree There are no data whrch rndtcate thamhese factl,ttes should be e.empted Gom smokefree oohc+es and there is a grov.,ng number o6e\amnies of psychtatnc and drug treatment facd tres wHich,have suocesslutlh be nme smokeiree .7.
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I1. Areas Unprotected by Existing Laws I. All' indoor educational, recreational. and; custodial facilities where children are present. including day care centers. licensed after-schooll facilities.. nursery school. YMCAs. YWCAs. YMHAs. teen centers, places of extracurricular instruction Idance schools. sports schoolsl; and: Police Athletic Leagues. shallibe entirely smokefree. 2. HoLeis and motels shall designate all their common areas, for example lobbies. hallkvays. e«.. as nonsmoking. except for dining areas, which shallibe subject to the restaurant law, and bars and casinos, which should be separately-ventilated and'have warning signs posted. Hotels and motels must set aside a number of guest rooms as nonsmoking, in quantity sufficient to meet the demand. lMore than three-quarters of, the population do not smoke.) Ventilation systems should:be adjusted to keep tobacco smoke pollution from nonsmoking areas. 3. Control of tobacco smoke pollution in apartment houses, condominiums. and other multiplle- unit residences shall, be under the jurisdiction of local health departments. The State Departmentof Health shall set standards for maximum.levels of particulates. carbon monoxide and other components of tobacco smoke pollution: including detectable odor, which shall be allowed to enter one unit from another unit. 4. Any indoor area where smoking is allowed' except for homes and private clubs must post warning signs reading "Warning - Hazardous Area - Tobacco Smoke Pollution:' IIE. Non-legislative Recommendations 1:. Federal institutions and interstate authorities in New lersey. particularly the Port Authority.. shall be asked to adhere to the standards established in New /ersey law. 2. The New lersey Department of Health should award• grants and contracts for public health related services only to recipients with smokefree premises. s.
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49 Design. typesetting and! printing of this report funded by New )ersey GroupAgainst Smoking Pollution.
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VI. ShtVEYS A- -319-
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AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETf, NEW JERSEY DMSION, Ihc. ~~ 2600 ROUTE 1. CN 220+6 • NORTN'BRUNSIMCK NEW JERSEY08902 : TO: Members of thrr New Jersey School E3oard:; As:;ociatlon, FROM : .7ohn 31adc>, MD , FACF, Cha i r St,irlE•y Greene, Ml{4d, Chair, Education Committee Nt:w Jersey Commission on. Smoking or tleal~th RE: Towards smoke-tree schools: Survey Results ------------------------------------------------------------------- La6t May, Octavilus T. Reid Jr., Executive Director of the New Jersey School Boards Association sent each president a copy of the report, "Preventing Tobacco Dependence in New Jersey Children"' along with a regiest for your assistance in a survey we were conducting among school nurses about tobacco• and smoking in. New Jersey Schools. Attached is the report of this survey. As you know, nicotine dependence is the most ccnvnon form of drug addition among the young, and its prevention and treatment is a key challenge for health officials and educators a;.ike. Further:nore, tobr,cco smoke pollution is an importantt health problem for nof,:;:nokers wherever smoking is permitted. The evidence of harm from this pollutant is better docu:rented than harm from envi~ronmPntai Fxposure to clther asbestos or racion. The major firrdings in our report on the survey or school r:urcF•s include the following: - All secor,dary school:: and 93% of elementary schools which resEx:,ndpd permit smoking in schooll by teachers and other adults. - Nearly ha_f of the secondary schools, and;even one el.enrentary school, permit smoking ons campus by students. - Despite th<: growing av,iilability of services for students wi~th other druq problems, hel•p• for those with ni,cotine dependence i; virtualily absent and nurses identified this as a major need. o addrF~:, r.hcse prc,ble^s, thr Cumr:ission r•>commen3s that all distr:.. ., adQt~~ pv_icies to 1>Pcome tcbacco-i ree and develop sfr. je •> tu ":c,:E, st u cents, taculty and staf : wno are addicted to toba'••:o. Major progress has beer, made towards these goals in a number of districts in New Jersey, dr.d many d•istricts in other states, ~ have e::-qentially accomplished these tasks. natably in Minnesota ~..~ . ~ ~ A1'so encl'osed wjth~ the survey report is a llist o5 resources ~ and a 1i:.t of Nr.w- 3ersF f scirocls and dis'.ricts whuch have already ~ adopted sr:oke-frne pol icies. The Commission, is available to help you as you cons,dcr your own sit•uatior.. ~ Page 1
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1n clo5ir,c, r.e vGnU to ~o: '.`,a^ks to he N,:S2't fo- it_ r•uyport a^i CNOOEra*_.;on. !iL is onli with the helc• of ti:e :+ssociat.or• t::at «e nave been acie to collect anc 3nea•:zz the da«a reported here. T::e tsJSBA repres: ntative to the Coarnissicn cn STo%i^i or Health, Carol Scott, Policy Associate, has re::e.n.tiy been e:ecte3 its ': i=g-Cha:r . Trrre is muc, wt::ch needs to be done about tobacco in our a_:coca. Tne CoR-issicn stands ready to help you deal with t:ais i:.pc:tant 'r.ealt;^h z-rch_-e^. :.et us know how we can assist you. =~~ 2
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PROGRAMS AND POLICIES REGARDING SMOKING IN NEW JERSEY SCHOOLS Survey by: New Jersey Commission on Smoking or Health, Education Comnittee 0
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Education Committee Members: Shirley Green, M.Ed. New Jersey Interagency Council on Smoking or Health, Chairperson Regina Carlson New Jersey Group Against Smoking Pollution (GASP) Elizabeth Wilson, Ed.D. New Jersey State Nurses" Association Carol Scott New Jersey School Boards Association Carolyn Turner State Department of Education Margaret Sheppard, M.Ed. New Jersey Society of Professional Health Educators Laura Beauvais-Godwin, M.A. New Jersey Society of Professional Health Educators Thanks to: New Jersey School Boards Association for data analysis Margaret Sheppard for report writing October 14, 1988
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INTRODUCTION Tobacco education is an important part of the health education of younq people. There are many resources to assist teachers and health professionals to teach the health risks that arise from smoking and to prevent initiation into smoking. It is important to know the extent to which educators use the resources and what further needs they have in order to update resources and provide needed training and development. METHODOIAGY A survey questionnaire was mailed to a random selection of 402 school nurses (from a total of 2,178 schools). The nurses were asked a series of questions about the smoking prevention programs in their schools. This survey sought to determine if there is a need for smoking cessation programs for school-age children, to determine the quality of support for smoke-free schools, and to assess the need for additional curricula assistance. -over- October 14, 1988
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RESULTS one hundred and sixty-eight schools (42%) responded to the survey. Of these 61% were elementary schools, and only 1% (n=1) was a vocational school (Table 1) . The majority of the schools (64%) were suburban in nature (Table 2) and 72% had between 200 and 1000 students (Table 3). Overwhelmingly, tobacco education is taught in the health program (Table 4), however, the vocational respondent reported tobacco education was part of the substance abuse curriculum (Table 5). Grades 4-6 are the most popular grades for teaching about smoking (26%) but the other grades are almost as popular (Table 6). Most of the schools agreed that the time allotted to tobacco education is sufficient (Table 7), but 26% of the respondents from middle schools disagreed. The majority of schools agreed that the tobacco education programs help to discourage students from starting to smoke (Table 8). Some respondents did not agree the materials used do a good job demonstrating risk of smoking (Table 9). The major source of material is the American Cancer Society. The American Heart Association materials were used second most often and the American Lung Association ranked third. The majority of schools believed, that there is a need for smoking cessation programs and these programs should be held during school hours (Tables 10 and 11). Ten percent of the school nurses reported their schools have smoking cessation October 14, 1988
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programs. Many respondents were undecided about the issue of separate cessation. programs for pregnant smokers (Table 12). The respondents from the miqdle schools and the junior high schools were ambivalent as to whether peers should lead tobacco education programs. Fifty-eight percent of the elementary school respondents said that peers should lead programs while only 494 of the high school respondents agreed (Table 13). Ten percent of the schools reported they had a smoking cessation program. A majority of schools do not permit students to smoke anywhere on school grounds. of the high schools, only 56% have eliminated student smoking (Table 14). The majority of schools allow staff to smoke in the schools. Only 7% of the elementary schools and 6% of the middle schools said that smoking was not allowed by staff (Table 15). -over- October 14, 1988
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DISCUSSION The returns appear to reflect the make-up of New Jersey, and therefore the results can be generalized to the total population. The majority of students in Jew Jersey schools receive some formal education about smoking, especially in Grades 4-6 where smoking behavior is initiated. Respondents are unsure of the effectiveness of the materials available for teaching smoking prevention. This points up the need for further staff development in use of smoking education material. A further focus can be ways of integrating smoking education into the overall curriculum for example as part of science (dealing with the pharmacologic effects and physiologic risk) and social studies (dealing with economics, advertising, peer group and decision-making skills). School nurses are unsure about the utility of using peer educators in smoking programs. This new area could benefit from further investigation. There is a strongly voiced need for smoking cessation programs for students, being held during school hours. WE RECOMMEND THAT SPECIAL CESSATION PROGRAMS DESIGNED FOR THE YOUNG ADDICTED SMOKER BE DEVEL(?PED AND IMPLEMENTED• IN THE SCHOOLS. There is a contradiction in school systems. Although formal ante-smoking messages are delivered in health education, many schools enable students' smoking behavior by providing smoking areas for students. Furthermore, a disconcerting number of October 14, 1988
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schools allow modeling of smoking behavior by teachers and other influential adults in offices and staff lounges. There is"a need for more staff development regarding smoking education., development of policies for smoke-free schools and smoking cessation programs for both staff and students. 0 October 14, 1988
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b e Grade Level of School Schoo ls in New Jerse y Returns N ~ N ~ Elementary 1558 72 78 61 Middle School I 234 11 16 12 Junior High School 25 1 3 2 High School 298 14 31 24 Vocational 20 1 1 1 Regional 43 2 Total 2178 129 ab e Community of School N urban suburban rural 32 105 26 2a 20 64 16 Total 163 -over-
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TAble 3 Size of Student Population of School T # students N ; ~ 1 - 200 23 14 201 - 500 69 41 501 - 1000 52 31 1001 - 2000 22 13 2001 and over 2 1 Total 168 Tab e 4 Part of Curriculum in Which Tobacco is Taught. N ~ substance abuse 20- 16 science 6 5 physical education 1 1 social studies 3 2 health 96 N 76 Q ~ individual counseling 1 W Total 127 ~ ~ ~
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Table 5 Place in Curriculum of Tobacco Education - by Grade Level 4 Substance. Abuse Science i Physical ', Education !Social 'Studies Health Individual Counseling v " elementary 21 4 - 4 71 - middle school 7 7 - - 86 - junior high - - - - 100 - high school 12 - - - 84 4 vocational 100 - - - - - Zable 6 ' Grade Levels for Smoking Programs I N Grade Level K - 1 50 13 2 - 3 62 16 4 - 6 101 26 7- 8 1 73 1 19 9- 10 58 15 N 1z 11 - 12 44 N 11 ~ Total 388 ~ (more than one response could be circled) ~ ~ -over-
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Table 7 Attitude - by Grade Level to "time allotted is sufficient" Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree or Disagree Disagree Strongly Disagree v . elementary 9 35 ~ 20 I 30 7 ~ middle school 25 43 6 13 13 junior high 33 33 33 - I- high school 20 47 13 10 I 10 vocational - ~ - 100 - - able 8 Attitude - by Grade Level to "programs help discourage students from starting ~ to smoke" Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree or Disagree Disagree Strongly Disagree ve t elementary 20 44 23 8 5 middle school 7 53 ; 27 I - i ~ 13 junior high 33 33 I 33 i - - N ~ 0 high school 17 17 35 10 21 N W f ~ vocational I - - - 100 - ~ C
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Table 9 Attitude - by Grade Level to "materials do a good. job demonstrating risk" Strongly Agree Agree Neither !Agree or Disagree Disagree I Strongly Disagree v . elementary 16 46 25 9 ~ 5 middle school - 69 12 i 13 6 junior high 33 - 67 ~ - - high school 14 38 28 ~ 17 3 vocational - - 100 - - Table 10 Need for Smoking Cessation Programs - by Grade Level Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree or Disagree .Disagree Strongly Disagree Cur_ade Level A A A ~ A elementary 65 i8 12 2 3 middle school 57 36 7 junior high 67 33 I - N high school 60 30 3 3 N 3 ~ vocational 100 CA 9 -over-
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Table 11 Programs Should be Held During School Hours - by Grade Level Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree or Disagree Disagree Strongly Disagree d v . elementary 58 21 ~ 14 7 - middle school 36 29 29 - 7 junior high 33 - 33 ; - 33 high school 35 41 7 ~ f 10 I 7 vocational 100 - - ~ - - Table 12 Pregnant Smokers Need Separate Cessation Programs - by Grade Level Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree or Disagree Disagree Strongly Disagree Grade Level I I --:t 3 ~ I I elementary 42 21 28 8 2 middle school 36 9 18 9 27 junior high 50 50 N high school 38 21 25 4 13 N ~ vocational 100 ~ ~
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Programs Should be Led by Peers - by Grade Level Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree or Disagree Disagree Strongly Disagree v elementary 26 32 26 9 7 middle school - 31 69 - - junior high . 33 - 67 - - high school 21 28 31 17 3 vocational 100 - - - - Table 14 Student Smoking Areas - by Grade level Indoors Outdoors With Parental Not Permission Permitted Grade Level N t ~ N i N ~ elementary 1 1 70 99 middle school 16 100 N N junior high :1 100 , ~ high school 1 3 11 31 4 lr 20 56 ~ CA a) vocational 1 I1ao CA
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Adult Smoking Areas - by Grade Level Grade Level bfilices N Lounaes N t thtr INQt Permitted 0 N N elementary 4 5 ! 48 58 25 30 6 7 middle school 1 6 10 63 4 25 1 6 junior high I 25 3 75 high school 10 I ; 20 4 . 24 48 6 12 i vocational 1 E 100 94
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TaJN-U5-' 9Lj TUE 15: a7 ID: ' -,8P - TPEENTON TEL N0: 1-c•0G-t" 'FT,.31 ; tt?FC3 np. New Jersey School Boards Association on Headquartera; 413 West State Street, P.O. Box 009, Trenton, New Jersey 08805 Telephone (OD9) d95-7eDD Fax 60"95-04i3 January 9, 1990 Dear Chief School AQministrators: Chapter 96 Public Law 1989 is now in effect banning smoking in all board of education buildisus. To ensure that your district policies are in compliance, you should review them to determine if revisions are necessary, As a service to your district, and on behalf of the New Jersey Comsission on Smoking OR Health and the State Department of Health. the Now Jersey School noards Association would like to provide you with information regarding district implementation of the new no-smoking law. We are aware of concerns some districts have about compliance and enforcement of policies which go beyond the scope of the no-smoking law, and we feel it may be of value for you to know how boards of education are implementing ths new law. Please take a few minutes to answer the following survey and return it to NJSBA by January 26 in the posta6e paid envslope enclosed. We would also like you to enclose copies of both your district no-smoking policy and your state mandated regulation. Also include a copy of your district's progressive disciplinary pYeesdures for both students and staff if your new no smoking regulation does not include thera. NJSSA will be sending out the eurvey results as soon as a tabulation is complete. Again, on behalf of the Commission on Smoking OR Health, the State Department of Haalth, and the New Jersey School Boards Association we want to thank you in advance for your time and cooparation. We are always looking for ways to increase our services to you. Sincsrely, Octaviua T. Rsid, Jr. N O Executive Director NJ School Boards Association N W ~ ~ William E. Parkins, DVM, DrPH ~ Assistant Commissioner ~ NJ Department of Health ~ ~ John Slada, MD Chairman NJ Commission on Smokinq OR Health
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~. =UN-05-''?0 Tl'E !S:-3& TFaENTQu TEL NO=U-5t9-b"'--141_) NO•SMOKING SURVEY P1eau re.ltotad to Qaestlotu I through 4 by circling eltber Yes or No ln the appropriate columns. xiG8PC~= ,lt• - -- - 1. As of December 14, 1939 ssmoking hat been banned in a11 Doard of Education buildlnp. In additlon to Board of Educatton buildtn=t have you banned smoking outside of district buildings speettlcally: YES NO During whool, hours only YES__ NO During school hours aod during extracurricular events (including sporting events) YES NO On 4 Srounds 24 houre a day 7 dayt a week 2. If your no-smoking policy inoluda out of doon area, doaa It apply to: Yl.S NO Dedsnated artu for students YES NO Dai=nated areas away from uudant population YES NO Motor vehtcku YES NO Visitors to achool district 3. Does your reiulation• Include the ban of a1l tobacco produas, l.e. chewing tobacco and snuff? YES NO 4. Is the t.eact of your prop'etiive disdppne procedure laduded In your no-rmoking reaulation for: Board of Ed. employees YES NO Students YES NO S. PleaK circle the one number that best deseribes your district grade plan and student population. B--Non-Operatins Districts I-Eiem.ntsry districts with ettroilttuat 1-499 Z-Ztsmentary districts with ettrollment 300-999 3-Elementary dlatricts with etuollment 1.000-1,499 4-Ekwentary, ddistricts with enrollment 1,500•-1,999 7-Elesaontary districts with enrollment mora than 2,000 6-K-11 with enrollment 1-2,999 7-K•12 with enrollment 2,000-5,999 E-•K.t2 with enrollment of more than 6,000 9-Serondary dlraicu with enrollment 1-2.999 10-Seeondary districts with ettroilnat more than 3,000 11-Yocatiotutl districts regardless of enrollment 12--Spatal Service Cottsmlatons 6. Please ckrcle the number that best reflects the number of employees currently working for your board of edundon. 25 or less 26-100 101-I00 J00-1000 Over 1000 7. Ptease check the appropriate column to indicate district provisions of =aattion programs. Sesvlcsa offered duri" implementation No Service of oo-rmoktn= taw only On poine: Board of Ed. Employees [~ 0 C3 Students C~ C1 C3 lkroe retqru to: Name of District Pol1ry & Information Servica, New Jeriey School Boards Assodadon 413 West Stair Street, P.O. Box 909, Trenton. New lercay 0E60]-0909 T4tM of Person Comaialna Survey
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J[:v-t,C-'9D TUE 75c.19 - iREtri':Nai TEL N0:1-b0?-G"--0a13 t~SS' pO.a~ G's New Jersey School Boards Association HeedQuartea: 413 West atat. atreet, P.O. Box 909, Trenton, Nsw Jeney 0M TelNphone (e091E95-7'600 March 28, 1990 Dear Chief School Administrators: The no•smoking survey tabulations are now completi. Due to the overall participation of New Jersey school districts, we are able to present you with statistics that reflect a true majority of school districts: 423 districts- responded to the survey. The survey focused on what districts are doing re: enforcement beyond the scope of the no-smoking law. Such information has been compiled and is being provided to you in the statement attached. Many di•stricts sent in their copies of board adopted• policies and adminis- trative regulations which address the no-smoking legislation. If you desire to see how other districts are imptementing this new legislation, please contact the New Jersey School Boards Associatton Policy & Information Depirtment. This project could not have been successful without your support and cooperation. So, again, on behalf of the N'ew Jersey School Boards Association, the Comnission on Smoking OR Health and the State Department of Health, we want to thank you for taking part in this process. Sincerely, Qctavius T. Reid, Jr. Executive Director NJ School Boards Association William E. Parkins, DVM, DrRl1, Assistznt Comnissioner NJ Department of Health /',"-i./ John Slade, MD Chairman NJ Commission on Smoking OR Hoalth. Attachment ~U 2 dm
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NQ:i-oE~9-6?~_ua~~ d°8? F'E~5 ~n _ruN-0s-'q0 Ta_E i5:5LI I.D:W1i=.Ea - TRENTUta, TEL i is "raIr•r• B amoxsn a Ba o vuLnoln A survey of all NeK Jarsay-peAlie schools shows that within 10 weeks of the effective date of a law banning all smoking izu ids schools, man3r schools have included school property outside school buildings in their nse no-smoking poli- oies. A survey of 606 school districts in the state (with 423 reporting) reveals that alaost one-third (31.6%) of districts have banned smoking outdoors during school hours only. Mora than ona-quarter (26.6t) of school districts have mada their grounds non-smoking 24 hours a day, seven days a week. A12 board of education buildings were required to be entirely smoke fres beginning December 14, 1999 (Chapter 96, Public Law 1989). Many districts have made amendments to existing district policies since the passage of this new law. In addition, districts are now required to have no-smokin6 regula- tions in place. School districts that extsnd their smoke free areas to outdoors were asksd to describe th.ir policies. The questions and the results were: Have you banned smoking outdoors during school hours only? Elementary districts Yes 26.3• No 73.7% K-12/secondary districts Yes 40.1% No 59.9% Vocational districts Yes No 1001 Have you banned smoking outdoors during school hours and extracurricuLar events (including sporting events)? Elementary districts Yes 23.81 No 76.34 K-12/secondary districts Yes 14.0` No 86.0` Vocational districts Yes 10.0% No 90.0• Have you banned smoking outside on all grounds 24 hours a day ssven days a ssak? Elementary districts Yss 22.2% No 77.8• K-12/secondary districts Yes 32.2% No 67_8t Vocational districts Yes 35.7% No 64.3% The survey was coaducted by the Ne.+ Jersey School Bosrds As.ociation, in cooperation with the Nsw Jersey Commission on Smoking OR Health and the New Jersey Department of Health. 3/90 3S33a (over)
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3l~!-FlS-' ?0 TUE 1s : 51 I D' N iSBA - TRENTtJN TEL N0: 1-n0@~ti`1-0a 1 z tt9~ ~• Pl tr• Cb . 1' .2. A Schooll district raspoa.e to the survey was overwhelming. N.TSBA tebulared returne from 423 diatricts and reported that district responses continued to come in wea after tabulations were aonpleted. Amon& school districts extending their no-smokin= rule to outdoor areas, 63.1% include areas that are used by people other than studsnts, including visitors, and 46.7% includa a ban on emoking in motor vehicles. Sehoola were asked wheth.r their regulations included a ban on the use of all tobacco products, including chewing tobacco and snuff. Almoet two-thirds (64%) of districts reported they includad all tobacco products in their regula- tions. Suxvey results sho•w that 47.51 of th. schools incorporatad their usual discipline proc.dtsres in their new snokiA6 regulations for staff and 55.6% incorporated Qiscipline procedures for their naw smoking regulations for students. Effective implementation of the Iaw and local school policies is helped when districts include the smoking regulations in their progressive discipline proeedures for employees and students. Another aid to impl.aentation of non-smoking policies is the provision of smoking cessation programs for trsatment of nicotine addiction, to assist students and teachers who amoke. Survey results show that 21.7% of dis- triets reported offering cessation services for employees during the imaediate implementation period; 6.8• of districts offered cessation pro- trams for students.

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