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I would like to express my appreciation for your

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nysa_ti_s4 TI12780319-TI12780376

Abstract

I would like to express my appreciation for your kind attention at the field staff meeting last week. I hope you found our discussion to be helpful and informative.

Fields

Named Organization
Aetna Insurance
AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor/Congress of Industrial Organiza)
Labor Union
American Bar Association
American Cyanamid
American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees (AFSCME)
American Iron & Steel Institute
Bacardi (Alcoholic beverage company)
Benton & Bowles (Advertising agency)
Bethlehem Steel Corporation
Blue Cross Blue Shield
CIGNA (Health insurance provider)
CIGNA Corp.
CNA Insurance (unit of Loews Corp)
Colgate University
Committee on Agriculture
Committee on Energy and Commerce
Control Data Corporation
Daniel J. Edelman, Inc. (public relations firm)
*Department of Education (use United States Department of Health, Education & We
Diamond Shamrock
Dow Chemical Co. (Marketed Nicoderm patch)
Dow Chemical is a 72% owner of its Marion Merrell Dow Inc. unit in 1994 (WSJ 7/29/94). Marion Merrell Dow markets Nicoderm brand nicotine patch, used to help people stop smoking (Reuters 5/9/94).
Duke University
DuPont
E.I. du pont
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Exxon
Federal Communications Commission (U.S. government agency regulating TV, radio)
Enforced the Fairness Doctrine against the tobacco companies; required time be provided on TV, radio for anti-smoking commercials.
Federal Railroad Administration
Federated Department Stores Inc.
Finance Committee
Florida A&M University
FMC Corp.
Food Marketing Institute (Serves as tobacco industry ally)
Ford Motor Company
Fortune
General Electric Company (appliance company)
General Mills
George Washington University
Georgia State University
Hercules
House of Representatives
Howard University
Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
ITC (India Tobacco Company)
India Tobacco Company
J.C. Penney Co. Inc.
Levi Strauss
Monsanto
NASA
National Conference of State Legislatures (Group representing state legislators nationwide)
National Education Association
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
National Home Corp.
Olin
Oxford University
Pennsylvania State University
Philadelphia Inquirer
PPG Industries Inc.
Princeton University
Procter & Gamble
Defense
Republican National Committee
Sears Roebuck
Senate
Shell Oil
Temple University
The Shield (anti-tobacco and alcohol publication of the 1920s)
Tobacco Institute (Industry Trade Association)
The purpose of the Institute was to defeat legislation unfavorable to the industry, put a positive spin on the tobacco industry, bolster the industry's credibility with legislators and the public, and help maintain the controversy over "the primary issue" (the health issue).
Travelers Insurance Company
Trucking Association
University of Arizona
University of California at Los Angeles
University of Maryland
University of Pennsylvania
Virginia Commonwealth University
Westinghouse
White House
Named Person
Bagley, Lester
Beam, James B.
Benjamin, Adam, Jr.
Blair, John H.
Bonner, Jack
Bonnet, Jack
Brand, Patricia
Chilcote, Samuel D., Jr. (TI President (1981-1997))
Chilcote has knowledge of The Tobacco Institute's and the tobacco industry's participation in public fraud and disinformation relative to health hazards of tobacco use, in the manipulation of nicotine in tobacco products and in marketing of tobacco products to children.
Cohen, Sandra
Fletcher, Lynne
Glickman, Dan
Goldwater, Barry, Jr.
Heinz, John
Howell, Henry E.
Lieberman, Sandy Cohen
Martin, Andrea
Mink, Patsy
Mitchell, George
Reynolds, Russell
Rostenkowski, Dan
Defense
Schuessler, Janet
Shannon, Cliff
Shouldice, William
Walker, Hiram
Type
Letter
Date Loaded
18 Jul 2005
Box
9718

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Page 1: TI12780319
Mr. Samuel Chilcote President The Tobacco Institute 1875 I Street NoW. Washington, D.C. 20006 Dear Mr. Chilcote: I would like to express my appreciation for your kind attention at the field staff meeting last week. I hope you found our discussion to be helpful and informative. The tobacco industry has many tough battles ahead of it and I am firmly convinced that the only chance for victories is by broadening your base of supporters. I have taken the liberty of enclosing our company's informational folder. I hope you will take a few moments to review our successful track record, assisting clients win some very tough issues. Thank you again and I hope we have an opportunity to work together in the near future. P~s~dent Enclosure T112780319
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Bonner & Associates Grassroots Management & Communications T!t2780320
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Bonner & Associates 1625 K Street, NW Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20006 202/463-8880 T112780321
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Doyou want to win your next legislative battle? Bonner & Associates Grassroots Managemen~ & Communications Ti12780322
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Bonner & Associates grassroots programs that help you win What really influences a member of Congress on an Issue? in our democracy, it is the constituent--the voter--or, rather, large numbers of them, who have the most influence on the way a Representative or Senator will vote. Lobbyists know it is one thing to tell a Congressman his voters care about an issue, but it is much more important to prove they care-- and care enough to get involved. Grassroots support has the same positive effect on s~ate legislatures. Also, the Federal Communications Commission, Environmental Protection Agency, International Trade Commission and all other regulatory bodies ask for public comment on issues up for decision. A sub- stantial number of messages---especially from the districts of key members of Congress, with copies sent to their offices--will be given great weight. If you can generate significant, on the record, grassroots support, you are well on the way to winning the battle. Bonner & Associates can deliver this critical grassroots support. ~(le are a results odented firm with a strong tested track record of success on behalf of Fortune 500 corporations, trade associations and business coalitions. Bonner & Associates Checklist of Tested Services • Educate and recruit on-record constituent supporters (100-10,000 per congressional district) depending on your needs and budget. • Organize local coalitions of supporters from groups that count with the Congressman. • Place editorials and news stories with hometown media that confirm strong local support for your position. Gain on-record support of key local and state groups to show your issue has potent broad- based support. • Arrange meetings in the district with Congressmen or Senators and educate articulate constituent supporters of your issue. Names, addresses, phone numbers retained on computer for immediate access on future legislative Initiatives. • Create and produce brochures, news releases, op-ed articles, fact sheets and other issue materials. • Create and place effective issue ads in local newspapers. • Build client in-house grassroots capability. • Cost effective response rates of 40-50%. -1-112780323
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Bonner & Associates geared to help you win PROFESSIONALS with many years of hands-on experience working in politics at all levels, including top aides in Congress, regulatory agencies and "in state and city government. 30-PHONE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM. which operates during all acceptable calling hours in every time zone. COMPUTER BANKS, which can retain critical information for your future use. TESTED AND PROVEN TECHNIQUES to generate effective grassroots support to fight and win tough legislative and regulatory battles. COST-EFFECTIVE RESPONSE rates of 40-50%, substantially above the average response rate. QUICK RESPONSE. We have successfully conducted grassroots campaigns in as little as five days; other campaigns have lasted several congresses. PROGRAMS tailored to your timetable and your resources. QUALITY CONTROL. Pdl services performed in-house by experienced specialists. WE CAN DO IT ALL FOR YOU. A complete communications program: from the grassroo~s individual voter, to local groups to national organ- izations; from local newspapers, to syndicated columnists to television networks, all geared to support your goals. As you plan your next major initiative, we would welcome an opportunity to let you know how Bonnet & Assodates can help you win. Bonner & Assodates Grassroots Management & Communications 1625 K Street, NW Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20006 202/463-8880 T!12780324
Page 7: TI12780325
Bonner & Associates Grassroots Management & Communications 1625 K Street, NW Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20006 202/463-8880 T!12780325
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NEWS ARTICLES: Results Achieved Bonner & Associates T!12780326
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Honolulu Advertiser . :: .!~. • ..... FinM Edition Oct. 25, 1985 Beyond Oahu: Deducting of state, local taxes won't be changed, He#el sags By Je~ry Burris If a tax reform bill gets out of the U.S. House this year it "absolutely" will not call for an end to the deduetibiilty of state and local taxes, Hawaii Con- gressman Cec Heftel said yes- terday. Heftel, a member of the tax. writing Ways and Means Com- mittee that has been privately hashing out a reform bill for the past five months, said there is no chance that the panel will agree to eliminate deductiblllty. The original tax reform plan proposed by President Reagan would have ended the right of citizens to deduct state and local taxes from federal income taxes. That would have pro- duced as much as $130 billion a year in fresh tax income for the national government. ~Heftel received a sudden rash telephone calls on the topic sterday following publication a local advertisement that arns the cost of owning a me would go up if property xes could not be deducted. "Do you want to pay more to own your own home?" the ad asks. "If not. call Congressman Heltel today." It's not going to happen, Her- tel said yesterday. "We will maintain total de- duclibflity or state and local taxes." Heftel said. For a while, the committee appeared headed toward a com- promise where some, but not all, of the deductibllRy would be wiped out, Heftel said. But now, he said, '°I just think it's over." He!tel said he came to his conclusion after conversations with Ways and Means Chair- man Dan Rostenkowski and after measuring the drift o! opinion during private meetings of the 3~-member committee. The key, he said, was a group or committee "moderates" (in- c|uding himself) who had been willing to talk compromise on all Issues In order to get a fin- ished bill to the House floor. Deduetibillty of state and local taxes is no longer a compro- mise issue, HeRel said. "Absolutely," he said. "I say that with no reservations. A number of us had felt we had to be willing to compromise. but now the conclusion is that one (elimination of local tax de- ductibility) no longer comes under the umbrella of fairness." Rostenkowskl has been warn- ed that the entire ~x reform el!oft "will sink from the at- tack against it (elimination or Rep. Coo He!tel Not a compromise issue deductibllity) for not being fair," He!tel said. The "toughest nut to crack" in the tax reform effort today. He!tel said. is preserving some kind of tax breaks for alternate energy. "It's as though we can't remember what happned In 1978 and 1979 and we don't understand what is h,,appenlng in the Middle East, He!tel said. However, there are hopes of ,preserving some portions of Me tax credits for solar equipment :and for ethanol-added gasoline, He!tel said, since these forms of alternate energy directly fect "voters." The half-page newspaper ad that generated more than ~ to He!tel was pare tot oy me national Coali- tion Against Double Taxation. It was signed locally by a number of labor leaders; Guru Hokama, president of the Ha. wall Association o! Counties: City Council member Patsy Mink; and Mayor Frank Pasl, Mink said she had been proached to lend her .name to the ad by sponsors who were targeting key Ways and Means committee members "who had not taken a stand on saving state and local (tax) deducttbil- ity." Fasi's participation in the condemnation of the original Reagan administration proposal represents a departure from his overall support for the White House tax initiative. When the plan was first re- vealed in May. Fasi acknowl- edged that some elements could hurt smaller, high-tax states such as Hawaii. but he insisted "it's time to begin to forget re- gional interests and start think- ing about the country as a whole."
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WICHITA, KANSAS 67201, IHURSDAY. APRIL 26, 1984 ¢) t~ w,c~ta E~ ~ ~ ~e~,e~ Co Price ~ Cenl! Glickman Gets the Picture From VCR Owners BV Angelin Hen~n W^SIIIHGTON -- D~plle what ~lCnllS~ M~ I~Ul Ih~ p~ive ~h~vlor ol television vttwen, Rap, D~n Gllckman of Wlchlla his found Ihll ownen of vlde~ castile recorde~ don'l I~ s(I ~ck and wglch when CanF~ Izm~ wllh ~ W~n~y. Ghc~ ~emov~ ~1~ ~ ~ I ~ of ~e profit ~ (O c~r ~e hill I~ ~m~. kl ~ ~ H~I~ n cut of "If.'-. a p~r[eCt example of learning whll Ihe people wnnt -- ud knowln~ Gllckman Is ~ t~e only mem~r Con~r~ cz~l In Ihe mille of I lobby. the fl~t of lhe bltl's ~ c~ to annouece he's s~it~In~ ~d~. eniy ~m who sl~ed ~e bill in ~ ~e ~ sad ~te. Holly- w~ ~ p~hlnR for a £han~e that wo~Id a~l~b a provl~on in the federal ¢op~ filet law, knowo ~ "the h~t~te d~- trine." wkic~ ~yS ~tt copyri~t owne~ orl~lnll ~ovl~ Iobby~ ~y the ~le Ihem Oul o( Ih¢ ¢~lle renlll b~in~. which now zccaun~ ~or more ~rccnt el the vld~ movie ~rket. "It's o perfect exam. ple oi" learning what the people want -- and knowing that's what you're here to repre- sent." -- Rcp. Dan Glickman ins~ thsat sallowing Hollywood Io like l share ef rent~ proh~ woulds'l, necessar- ily increase reoe,l (e~ and could lower • e ~te p~ce of ~tl~ whlck now ~n But VCR ~nuMc{urc~ ~llem sod c~(le della..y thai Hollyw~ is j~ ¢reafed Ihree yel~ 8go by p~clnl ~ ~n~ Oal o( the ~n~ ol m~ ~ume~ Rental pnc~ would skyr~kel with ~¢ change, they say, sand stud[n, might band together to ~uee.ze eYe.one el~ OUt of Ihe tenL~l m~rkel. ~e ~d~ Ind~ ~ ~11~ ~o~ .le~r-~ ~m~ ~t ~Uon ~ ~ ~e bom~ ~wa ~ of the b~'s ~bby~ on ~th sid~ trekked regularly to Glickman's offJc~ and to th~ of othe~ the ~ien(e and Tecbnolo~ ~m- mltz~. In GlicZman's lat~t cam- ~i~ finance re~ there were $5~ con~butio~ ~rom ~th Jack ~alenti, head of the Motion ~c- lure ~tatlon, and J~! Jan. kow~ky, a lobbyist with Akin; Gump, S~raus~, Hauer & Feld, a W~blnglon firm wh~ ctlen~ i~. elude Hollyw~'s Motion ~clure ~lation. ~ cont~buto~ "pro~bi~ ~en't t~ happy with me" no~, ~ys Glickman. But after holdln~ an e~ day of heo~n~ on ~e bill I~t month, he ~ys. Ihe opp~]. lion convinced him that the copy. ~t d~trlnc should ~ le~ ~ ~t "They made a ¢o~ ~lnl, by showing ~at t~e movie Ind~l~ but ~al cben~ng (he rul~ h~d ~len~al for ~n~n~ lhe deale~ out o~ b~ln~," ~ld ~llc~an~

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