Jump to:

NYSA TI Single-Page 3

A closer look at G6 powder Responding to the demand for

Date: No date
Length: 42 pages

Jump To Images
nysa_ti_s3 TI56261356-TI56261397

Abstract

Rhodia AG has developed a versatile HE (high efficiency) filter with improved filtration capacity-- especially for partile and gas phases --and which has demonstrated specific retention of certain smoke content substances. The development is entitled the G6 Filter.

Fields

Named Organization
American Brands
American Tobacco Company
Associated Press (AP) (National Uniform Press Service)
Astra (Drug company)
European Community
Filtrona (Manufacutre Reynold's Filters)
General Cigar & Tobacco Co. (Manufacturer of pipe tobacco.)
a manufacturer of pipe tobacco.
Institute of Psychiatry (London)
Lancet
Lehigh University
Liggett & Myers Inc. (Pioneer in the generic cigarette business)
Cigarette manufacturer; Pioneer in the generic cigarette business; L&M is the manufacturer of Chesterfield, Decade, Dorado, Duke of Durham in 1958, Eagle, Eve, L&M, Lark, Pyramid and Stride cigarettes
Liggett Group Inc. (American cigarette manufacturer)
American cigarette manufacturer, was the first to start selling discount brands (GPC)
Marine Corps
Navy
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd. (Cigarette manufacturer, incorporated in U.S. in 1902)
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd.., was incorporated in New York in April of 1902; half the shares were held by the parent company in London, and the balance by its U.S. distributor and his American associate. Its overall sales in 1903, its first full year of U.S. operation, were a modest seven million cigarettes. Among the brand offered, besides Philip Morris, were Blues, Cambridge, Derby, and a ladies favorite name for the London street where the home companies factory was located - Marlborough.
Philip Morris Companies Inc. (Parent company of Philip Morris USA, Kraft, Miller)
America's seventh-largest industrial enterprise in 1993, owns Kraft, Miller Brewing, General Foods, and more.
Philip Morris U.S.A. (See Philip Morris Incorporated)
See Philip Morris Incorporated
R.J. Reynolds Corporation (second tier subsidiary of RJR Industries)
R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc.
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. (Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral))
Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral)
SEITA (Societe Nationale d'Exploitation Industrielle des Tabacs et)
Societe Nationale d'Exploitation Industrielle des Tabacs et Allumettes
Tabaqueira (Portuguese subsidiary of Philip Morris Int'l)
Tobacco International
United States Tobacco Company (Producers of Copenhagen/Skoal chewing tobacco)
Producers of chewing tobacco
Universal Leaf Tobacco Company (United States leaf tobacco merchant)
United States leaf tobacco merchant
University of Colorado
Warner Lambert
World Health Organization (Concerned with global public health)
International organization concered with public health worldwide
Young & Rubicam (New York-based advertising agency.)
Was awarded the assignment for advertising Philip Morris' Dave's low-priced cigarette brand. Y&R lost RJR Reynolds' Camel cigarette brand account in 1991 when two Y&R Executives resigned to form Mezzina/Brown, which remains Camel's ad agency (1994) (WSJ 9/13/94).
Named Person
Buck, John E., III
Burgess, Alan
Burns, George
Chalmers, Andrew
Collier, Philip R.
Collier, Phillip R.
Domingo, Santo
Dutch, Royal
Fowler, Newton O., Jr.
Gartland, Neville
Harris, Jack E.
Harrison, Benjamin
Hill, George Washington (ATC President 1929)
Defense
Latham, John R.
Lloyd, Nathaniel
Miles, Phil
Milnes, Roger
Overton, Dolph (once potential buyer of Liggett)
Pettigrew, Thomas P.
Player, John
Port, Virginia
Simmons, Tim
Swiss, German
Van, Jan
Whitwell, Joseph E.
Date Loaded
18 Jul 2005
Box
0541

Document Images

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size:

Page 1: TI56261356
A closer look at G6 powder Responding to the demand for sophisticated filter technology, Rhodia AG has developed a versa- tile HE (high efficiency) filter with improved filtration capacity-- especially for partile and gas phases --and which has demonstrated specific retention of certain smoke content substances. The develop- ment is entitled the G6 Filter. The G6 uses the Rhiakabel® base matrix, a Rhodia product that is described as offering specific re- tention of phenol, optimum uni- formity (for general characteristics such as draw resistance, weight, diameter), potential for highly porous plug wrap, neutral taste, physiological harmlessness, and filter shape. The filter is named for the powdery additive that is placed on the Rhiakabei® , and to which it adheres, during filter pro- duction on the filter rod machine. The powdery additive consists of certain silicon and aluminum oxides. It is very fine grained, white and opaque, with extremely low apparent density. It has quasi- liquid, trickle-and fluid properties. A stable powder agglomerate is achieved because A1203 crystals are enveloped by the smaller amorphous SiOz particles. The characteristics of G6 are determined by a number of physi- cal, chemical and crystallographic factors such as SiO2 to AlzOa ratio, specific surface, angle of re- pose, ramming volume or pH value. The workability of the pow- der is related, in other words, to the angle of repose, or the ram- ming volume values, whereas the retention capacity is mainly sub- ject to the quantitative composi- tion and the specific surface. Nicotine retention With coatings of up to approxi- mately 5~/0 in weight of powder applied, the retention capacity of G6 filters is said to be virtually proportional. In one example studied, retention to 68~/0 for nic- otine and 65~/0 condensate were achieved when 2.80/0 G6 was ap- plied, whereas with conventional filters it stood at about 50%. According to this example, with the G6 additive, the retention of nicotine is slightly higher than the condensate retention. Initially, this phenomenon was difficult to account for, since the amount of nicotine is determined by the con- densate deposit on the Cambridge filter and, consequently, the con- densate/nieotine relationship should remain constant if the same kind of tobacco rod is used. The company offers two possible explanations for this el- feet of the G6 filter on retention: "It has also been found that, depending on its structure, each filter shows with regard to the smoke particles a certain selectiv- ity towards the size of the drop- lets. Assuming that through the application of G6 powder the re- tention peak were to be shifted towards larger or smaller pdrticle sizes, this should also bring about a change in the chemical composi- tion of the retained particle phase, i.e. in the condensate/nicotine re- lation. "G6 filters--unlike conventional cellulose acetate filters--also have a particular retention effectiveness in respect of organic constituents in the gas phase of cigarette smoke. Since nicotine is one of the sub- stances known as semi-volatiles, the gas phase also contains a cer- tain amount of nicotine which cannot normally be measured. It has been possible to ascertain through gas-chromatographic analysis that the use of G6 fil- ters also reduces the nicotine con- tent in the gas phase." Rhodia tests on the G6 filters indicate that both retention mechanisms could exist simultane- ously, resulting in this specific nicotine retention. Specific retention of the organic gas phase, which averages 10 - 15e/'0, differs widely depending on the individual chemical compo- nents. There i~ a preference to re- tain polar substances. The table shown here gives the measured results (GC analysis) obtained with three representative com- pounds of this group. The table TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--45 T!56261356
Page 2: TI56261357
also shows the high synergistic effect of the G6 powder, con- sidering that the tv,'o mixing com- ponents SiOz or AlzO3 on their own have virtually no filtration effectiveness in respect of these compounds. Smoking tests, as conducted by various manufacturers, have con- eluded that despite its high levels of retention, the C-6 filter does not ad- versely affect cigarette taste. This was a surprise to the company, the assumption being that as with other high retention filters, some taste loss would occur. Rhodia pro- poses as explanation that as the G6 offers the same order of mag- nitude for increases in condensate and gas phase retention, the quan- titative relation of the particle phase to the gas phase remains largely unchanged--hence taste stability. The company cites this as a distinct advantage over other acetate filters. Although the powder additive has passed German food law regu- lations, the company does stress the importance of firmly fixing the powder to the Rhiakabcl® base. Stressing adherence, the company has developed special apparatus for laboratory testing of the G6 adhesive strength. The equipment simulates the smoking process and subjects the filter to considerable rough treatment. In this procedure, detached particles of powder are gathered on a dia- phragm filter and measurements arc made to determine aluminum or silicon contents by means of X- ray flouresccnce spectroscopy. Tests show that cvcn under ex- treme conditions no appreciable amounts of G6 powder cotdd be detached from the filters with a coating of up to 5070. No change in the height of the coating could be measured and the maximum per- ccntagcs of powder measured in the main smoke stream were more than one magnitude below the per- missiblc safety level. As aircady indicated, the com- pany rccornmcnds no more than a 5°70 application of G6. Tests have shown that coatings of between 1 and 3070, equivalent to an average quantity of 3 to 8 mg G6 powder per filter plug, are sufficient to ob- tain desirable retentions. With more than a 5°70 coating, findings reveal that G6 begins los- ing phenol retention, is generally less effective in improving reten- tion values, may suffer adhesion difficulties, and can no longer be formed into single or homogeneous filters of acceptable quality (the last because hardness of the G6 filter decreases as the percentage of G6 powder is increased). Range of use The G6 filter and powder offers considerable versatility. They may be used as a mono filter, in dual filter structures, to replace paper filters on black tobacco cigarettes, and, a most interesting possibility, in conjunction with ventilated fil- ters. As a rnono-filter, G6 can be used without altering the ciga- rette's appearance, achieved by either retaining the draw resistance and increasing the nicotine and condensate retention by approxi- mately 20°70, or by retaining the Gas phase retention of RHIAKABEL~ filters with a 3% G6 coating, SiO2 06 AI203 Retention in ~ for Acetic aldehyde Acetone nitrile Acrolein 4 0 0 20 32 22 1 0 1 48--APRIL4.19~0 condensate and rffcotine contents in the main smoke stream and using G6 filters to obtain a con- sidcrablc reduction in the draw resistance. In dual filter structures, the powder coating may cxcccd 5070 because dus~ng of smut[ amounts of powder would not matter. In such cases it might bc possible, the company suggests, to" derive maxi- mum benefit from the powder in the gas phase. With black tobacco cigarettes, the G6 has tested out as highly superior to the traditional paper filter, with a particular advantage in phenol rctcntion--a cellulose acetate feature fully preserved in the filter. According to Rhodia tests, the G6 is a distinct possibility for link up with ventilation filters. At the moment ventilation is the only possible method of effectively re- ducing the CO content in cigarette smoke, extensive test measure- ments on ventilated cigarettes have shown that for this purpose venti- lation degrees as low as 10 - 2007o are sufficient whereas, to have an appreciable effect on the conden- sate and particularly the nicotine content, ventilation has to be above 4007o. Unfortunately, at such levels taste can be consider- ably affected. The company claims that by using G6 filters, in conjunction with ventilation of 15 - 20070 to effectively reduce CO contents, high retentions of nicotine and condensate are also achieved with- out taste loss due to the ventila- tion. In other words, via G6 pow- der, the relation of condensate to nicotine in ventilated cigarettes can be largely restored to cor- respond to that of non-ventilated filter cigarettes. Another probable and important use for G6 is in controlling flux in tobacco content. If for example, the nicotine and condensate con- tents in the smoke should tem- porarily exceed normal values, a solution could be to apply small coatings of G6 to the filter, with- out affecting taste. Continued on page 73 T!56261357
Page 3: TI56261358
! -t
Page 4: TI56261359
48~APRIL4, A Brief History of SEITA 1621 Cardinal de Richelieu became the first person to conceive the idea of a tax on tobacco. 1674 Louis X[V reserved the privilege of the herba nicotiana, and established a general Authority to sell it. This first monopoly lasted for a century, despite numerous vicissitudes such as a fight against fraud. 1789 In its enthusiasm for liberalism, the French Revolution abolished the monopoly. The famous chemist Lavoisier, last General Administrator, was guillotined during the Terror, a victim of the unpopularity of his predecessors. 1811 Napoleon re-established the monopoly to help defray the mi[i- taw expenses of the Empire. By making effective tax inspection possible, the monopoly game to include control over cultivation, manufacture, and sales. Thereafter the monopoly survived various political systems. 1926 Establishment of an autonomous fund for repayment of the public debt. Income from the monopoly went into this fund. 1935 The Service d'expioitation industrielle des tabacs became S.E.I.T.A. when the management of the matches monopoly was turned over to it. 1959 An order of 1959, supplemented by a decree in 1961 transformed SEITA into an industrial and commercial public establishment with the mission of operating a tax monopoly. I.ts personnel, who pre- viously had been government employees, now came under an au- tonomous sta(ute. In its new form, SEITA has modern production and management methods, and a new position as a public company. This change came at a particularly opportune time, since the application of the Treaty of Rome (1957) gradually made SEITA a competitor of the manufacturers of the five other countries in the Common Market and also of the large companies of other nations (the United States, Great Britain, etc.) that had installa- tlons in the Federal Republic of Germany, in Belgium, and in the Netherlands. Jan. The Customs barriers among the six partner countries were 1970 completely abolished. Feb. The authorities of the European Economic Community in Brus- sels made the following decisions: --The first decision determined a.joint agricultural policy, which in the case of the Iobacco seclor led to a Community market for leaf tobacco. By means of a system of premiums, this market enables the manufacturers o[" the si× Member States to purchase their tobacco in France or in haiy on the same terms as those of outside countries. Tobacco prices are not set in Brussels. Freedom to cultivate and sell leaf tobacco is governed within this market. --The second decision ensured freedom of importation and wholesale distribution of tobacco products manufactured no later than the beginning otr 1976. --The third decision represented an effort to coordinate the tax systems of the partner countries. Application was to occur in stages from 1970 to 1980. A homogeneous European market will ultimately be achieved only through continual efforts at adaptation by the French and Italian monopolies on the one hand and coordination of the tax and social-welfare policies of the Six on the other hand. 1971 Two hundred eighty-five brands from the Common Market countries and 57 other brands imported from other countries joined the 80 SEITA-manufactured brands sold in French tobacco stores. T!56261359
Page 5: TI56261360
~ favored 3 .Iv 1 ov~ higl7 tar brarKls m tests ~ taste and tar level.. M erit Smokm's fred the taste ot" low tar MERIT matches that of high tar dgam~es. New taste tests with thousands of smokers prove it. Proof." A significant majority of smokers rate MERIT taste as good as-or better than-leading high tar brands. Even cigarettes having twice the tar! Proof." Of the 95% stating a prefer- ence, 3 out of 4 smokers chose the MERIT low tar/good taste combina- tion over high tar leaders when tar levels were revealed. MERITsmokers rate low tar MERIT satisfying taste alternative New nati~nzl smoker study results prove it. Proof.-The overwhdmi.g r~jori~" o~ MERIT Warning: Th~ Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health. MERIT smokers polled feel they didn't sacrifice taste in switching from high tar cigarettes. Proof.: 96% of MERIT smokers don't miss former high tar brands. Proof.- 9 out of 10 enioy smoking as much since switching to MERIT, are ghad they switched, and report MERIT is the best tasting low tar they've ever tried. Filter You've read the results. The con- clusiort is clearer than ever: MERIT delivers a winning combination of taste and low. tar. A combination~that's attracting more and more smokers ever3, day and-more importandy -satisfying them long term. MERIT Kings & K)O's TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--49 T156261360
Page 6: TI56261361
Turkey is bulging with delayed exports ANKARA, TURKEY--Turkey's ex- ports of tobacco during the first tour months of the 1979/80 mar- keting year (Sept.-Aug.), are esti- mated at less than 13,000 tons, valued at about $31 million. This compares with exports of 69,000 tons, valued at over $200 million, during the same period last year. Private tobacco exporters have de- layed exports pending government review of an export fund, estab- lished in October 1979, that re- quires a contribution of 10 Turk- ish life for every dollar of tobac- co exports. Because of the delayed export shipments, stock.s of leaf tobacco have reached an estimated 324,000 tons--an all-rime'record. Private dealers hold about 274,000 tons, and the Turkish Tobacco Monop- oly holds an estimated 50,000 tons. Some observers believe that the funding system will remain in- tact. They predict that the ex- change rate will restore private exporters' profits even after con- tributing to the special fund. Ex- ports are expected to total 85,000 tons during the current marketing year. This is slightly above the 81,000-ton export average for the past l0 years. Alisados grades are threatened in Colombia BOt.;O rA. COLO.XlBIA-- Export- grades of the type Cubita of the present crop 1979/80 have reached a quantity of approxi- mately 17 million kilos. Farmers' prices for filler grades increased considerably towards the end of the campaign and should be stimulating for the planting of the coming crop. These 17 million kilos have been sold to an international clientele, thus proving false earli- er fears that 2-3 million kilos could not be sold due to absence this year of the French monop- 50--APRIL4. 1980 oly from the Colombian market. PaticuIarly disappointing, however, is the yield of wrapper- material for the production of Alisados--2oT0 at the utmost. This low yield may have been influenced by the industry's in- creased demands for quality this year. Can't resist another look at the world's larg- est cigar (TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL, August 10, 1979, p. 17), made by I. P. Schmid! Jun. o| Denmad( and on display at the Nice exhibi. lion. I! that man were really smoking the cigar, he would need about 93 hours to finish it, though it might finish him first. I I:,: In addition to the 1o~ yield ol" AILsado tobaccos, the explo- sion of costs in Colombia for wrapper manipulation is alarm- ing. The increase in costs during the last four years has been averaging 20°70 annually, reckoned on US$- basis. Many exporters are delib- erating whether to reduce produc- tion of the grades considerably due to disappointing sales pro- ceeds. To prevent this, discussions have been suggested to be held between the industry and the Colombian exporters, to ~tlppo:',' Alisado productions, and in or- der to induce farmers, by means of better prices, to produce a more readily dried product, and to improve their handling of Capa tobacco, Bahian rains fall too late for crop SALVADOR, BAHIA--After two months with practically no rain in the state, the weather finally turned towards the beginning of January, and during February heavy rainfalls resulted in inunda- tions in some areas. Unfortunately, the rain came too late to make any significant change in previous estimates for the new Bahia crop (TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL, March 7, p. 145). Only in lrara and Mata Notre will there be a small increase as the plants ther,.e have a better re- sistance to dry weather. The qual- ity of this tobacco will reportedly not be very good and will give a small percentage of greenish leaves in the crop. Estimates remain that the crop from the traditional dis- tricts will yield less than 1(30,000 bales. Although little tobacco is for sale now, the initial purchase level has been high, and Ihe follow- ing prices are being paid by the ex- porters: Irara--Cr$ 540 per arroba; Mata Norte--Cr$ 630; Mata Finn and Sul--Cr$ 650. The demand is strong. Most ? l T!56261361
Page 7: TI56261362
TOBACCO INTERI'~lATIONAL--51 TI56261362
Page 8: TI56261363
---
Page 9: TI56261364
farmers held back early in expecta- tion of higher prices later in the season. Actual purchases started on a bigger scale late in March. Due to the dry weather during the growing season the quality will tend to be to the heavy side, but it is hoped that the crop, with a strong fermentation, will yield good FL types for export. The small size of the crop neces- sarily means a big reduction in turnover for the various exporters. This in combination with the high purchase prices is expected to cause an increase in FOB prices as compared with last year's level. Bahian, getting scarcer, looks good SALVADOR, BRAZILwDue to the extradordinarily long-lasting drought, from the beginning of August until the end of Decem- ber, 1979, the size of the Bahian crop has been reduced consider- ably. in addition, less planting took place to varying degrees in the various tobacco zones. Thereby, a crop-volume--not in- cluding Sertao--of only 60,000 to 80,000 bales is now expected. The first two cuts or early plants produced tobacco which is strong in smoke, but of good quality. This type seems to represent the greater share of the crop. Later cuts produced na- turally heavy bodied and short tobacco. This Bahia crop needs a very careful fermentation. Out of crop 1978/79 there are still stocks of mainly FL2 grades available in the warehouses of the Bahian exporters. This helps reduce the extreme scarcity of tobacco out of that crop. It has to be assumed, how- ever, that prices for crop 1979/ 80 will surpass those o|" the previous year. Paraguay has great crop, unhappy farmers ASUNCION, PARAGUAY~The new crop is very small and expected yield is less than 100,000 bales. There are, however, unsold stocks of about 50,000 bales from the 1979 crop, and the total quantity available during 1980 should there- fore be sufficient to cover the de- mand. The quality of the new tobacco is reported to be excellent and maybe even better than the quality of the last crop, which yielded very good tobacco. Farmer prices ao: Ihc ~zunc a:, last year's but wages and other expenses have increased, for which reason it seems likely that the sales prices in US$ FOB will go up slightly. In connection with the above it should be mentioned that the farmers are very dissatisfied with the prices paid for the new crop. Therefore it seems likely that planting of the next crop will be curtailed, which would mean an even smaller 1981 crop. Cuban cigar industry crippled by blue mold HAVANA, CUBA--Blue mold is taking a heavy toll not only in the fields, but in the Havana cigar factories. Cigar rationing has been in effect in the country for several months--at one time smokers were limited to one cigar a day. Even President Castro is not able to get his favorite Cohiba brand cigars.. The dearth of cigars in a usually cigar-rich nation stems from the blue mold devastations which have so short-supplied leaf stocks that the Corona factory in Havana has closed. Production of Romeo and Juliet, Partagas, H. Upman and Heroes dei Moncada cigars has been halted. lhc critical leaf shortage ~ill not be alleviated soon, another outbreak of blue mold is now sweeping Cuban fields, with a staggering 50-75% loss. Argentine crop is called best ever BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA--The 1980 crop is being proclaimed as the best ever grown in Argen- tina, attributable to the farmers who have been using better seeds wSpeight, Hicks, Coker and Mc- Nair~and adapting to improved field techniques such as wider spacing, topping and sucker con- trol. In Salta, the crop is ripe and CARTIERA Cables: PAPROSSI~Vicenza Phone: 45966 Telex: 430627 ROSPAP ROSSI SPA. -- Vicenza (Italy) ESTABLISHED 1878 P.O. Box 799 15 Motion S. Lorenzo Sir. Cigareffe Paper in substances going from I0 grs. upwards Filter plug wrapping papers--tipping papers TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--53 T!56261364
Page 10: TI56261365
LAVINO at HAMPTON ROADS WE'RE MORE THAN YOU THINK Lavino has a reputation second to none in the ports of Hampton Roads, operating out of Norfolk, Portsmouth, and, as of a year ago, Newport News through Peninsula Terminals Ltd. Lavino and its subsidiaries offer a complete network of services in these fine ports for all your cargo needs. Starting with 500,000 square feet of enclosed storage space served by the Chessie rail system and modern highways, Lavino also provides complete packing facilities in a modern 70,000 square foot building through its transported alongside the vessel, and loaded on board by Nacirema Operating Co., Lavino's stevedoring arm. Shipping arrangements are prepared and executed through the agency, Lavino Shipping Company. With even terminal fumigation facilities available for the processing of tobacco products, the Hampton Roads complex of Lavino facilities is ideal for the transport of all types of cargo. May we have the oppor- tunity of using our knowledge, capabilities, and expertise to help in your next ship- Shipside Packing Com- merit? We invite you to call for a free con- pany division. Cargo is sultation with one of our experts. L VINO SHIPPING COMPANY Suite 750, Law Building, Norfolk, Virginia 23514 Telephone: (804) 623-4525 ~#X: 710-881-1181 54--APRIL 4, 1980 TI56261365
Page 11: TI56261366
uniform in appearance with some shine to it and a noticeable ab- sence of flat close-grained leaf, as has been found in past crops. Expectations are for a crop of approximately 19 million kilos. Dry weather affected the Jujuy crop and estimates now are down by 2 million kilos from a previous target of 20 million. However, the quality is still reported to be quite goodmthough not at par with Salta's. Farmers are receiving an aver- age of peso 5,200 per kilo (US$/kg 3.25). The Salta and Jujuy cooper- atives will be exporting, since they are prepared to do so at a loss. No tobacco from the 1980 crop is like- ly to be exported by the cigarette industry and the leaf merchants. Total 1980 green weight produc- tion is now placed at 37 million kilos, up from the 27 million pro- duced last crop year. Dominican report is encouraging SANTO DOMINGO--Pianting of the new crop has been finalized, fav- ored by continuous but slight rain- falls. La Vega/Moca type tobacco has been increased in planted area by 15O7o. This is the result of the top prices paid during the last third of the 1979 campaign to farmers who expect even better prices for the whole season of the 1980 crop. Primings and sand- leaves already partially harvested and presently hanging in the sheds for drying represent a very positive impression. First deliveries of to- baccos by farmers began at the end of February. In Bonao, a traditional tobacco growing zone, planting cannot be extended due to lack of suitable soil. Planting here has also been finalized. Due to favorable wea- ther, the plants are developing well. Traditionally seedlings are planted into the fields 4 weeks later than in the Vega/Moca-area. A good crop is now making first deliveries. Tobacco from this dis- trict is in great demand. An above average Bonao crop is expected with yields up 10-15~0 from last year's 27 million kilos. First signs good from the Philippines QUEZON CITY, PHILIPPIHES~ Weather conditions in the Ca- gayan Valley continue favorable with regular rain showers. This has greatly helped the growth and development of the plants in the fields. First and second priming have taken place in some districts, most Endless Tapes for Cigarette and Filter Production Please contact for details Max SCHLATTERER !)-7922 RO. Box 44/46 plants are growing healthily. Leaf from the first and second primings is well developed. Quantitywise, this year's crop is placed at about 150,000 bales, provided the weather continues to be favorable. Variety, compost studies conducted QUEZON CITY, PHILIPPINES--The Philippine Tobacco Administra- tion (PTA), state agency in charge of supervising and developing the native (cigar-filler) tobacco, has intensified its research activities in TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--55 TI56261366
Page 12: TI56261367
improving cigar leaf tobacco and in producing compost from avail- able raw materials. The PTA has established a re- search and experimental station around its two-storey building in Diliman area, Quezon City, for variety research and improvement of tobacco and compost experi- mentations. Some 15 varieties of native- grown and foreign cigar leaf to- bacco are being grown simultane- ously in the experimental station for purposes of germplasm collec- tion and maintenance of diftcrent varieties and lines under each type of cigar leaf tobacco. Mrs. Ditas Lopez, supervising tobacco breed- er, is in charge of the station. Among the varieties being grown are Havana 503, Repollo, RH 211, Simmaba, Marky, Bar- sam, 448, and Tabije,which is a crossbreed of Vizcaya and 448 varieties. The agency i~ using rice hull, bagasse, rice straw, banana stalk, and water lily (hyacinth) in coming up with an economical but effec- tive compost not only for tobacco but also for other agricultural crops. Tobacco cropping comes under fire MANILA. PHILIPPINES--A soil sci- ence professor from the Univer- sity of the Philippines. in Los Ba'~'os, Laguna, has pointed out some alleged "bad" effects of the Virginia tobacco cropping system in the llocos region. Dr. lgmidio T. Corpuz claims that the inter-cropping of Virginia tobacco with dee is not "'desira- ble", with its "greatest bad ef- fect" as the denudation of forests. According to Corpuz, this sys- tem reduces water supply from the watersheds, dries up rivers and re- sults in a long dry season, fre- quent floods and soil erosion. If Virginia tobacco remained in the cropping system for the next 25 years, he is quoted as pointing out, the llocos region, center of the Virginia tobacco growing in- dustry, would become a dry area. Garlic was mentioned as a bet- ter crop than tobacco, after rice, with garlic needing rice straw for mulching. Corpuz pointed out that tobac- co became a major crop after rice not because it is best adopted after rice, but because it enjoys a good price support. He suggested the discontinu- ance of the tobacco price support. Australian tobacco will be dearer SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA--The Agricul- tural Council has approved the Australian Tobacco Board's (ATB) recommendation that the average minimum prices be in- creased for the 1980 selling season to 54.06 per kilogram (US$4.51). this is an increase of 29 cents over the 1979 minimum average prices. The ATB, in a recent price review, found that average cash production costs for the industry had increased by 29 cents per kilogram and that this increase had to be reflected in higher returns to growers. The new price will apply to the entire 1980 selling season. Draconian measures proposed in Finland HELSINKi, FINLAND--A govern- ment committee on smoking has presented a program to boost prices and ban cigarettes in offices to cut consumption by 3°70 a year. The program would include rais- ing the price of all cigarettes by 5°70 a year and raising the price of cigarettes with high tar and nico- tine content by 15070. Allegany breaks ground on third Dutch warehouse FLUSHING-EAST, THE NETH.-- Allegany Warehouse Europe B.V. (A.W.E.), a fully owned subsidi- ary of Allegany Warehouse Co., Inc. of Richmond, Virginia, has begun construction of its third giant warehouse on the quay at Flushing-East, Vlissingen, The Netherlands. The new warehouse will be of the same construction as the two existing houses, however, the dimensions will be larger-- Tobacco & Dart. The Perfect Blend. Weekly Transatlantic Service 5S--APRIL4, 1930 VISANEX INTERNATIONAL S.A. Exporters of all types of Greek and Off-shore tobaccos Head Office: Geneve (Switzerland) ~es Tuiledes, Bellevue Telephone: 741934/36 Cables: VISANEX Telex: 22374 Athens(Greece)Office: 100Othonos Str. Telephones: 3229874-3226203 Cables: VISANEX Telex: 21.5456 Th~ssaloniki (Greece) Office: 1, Ikonlou Sir.. Stavroupolis TeIephones: 656833-656389 T!56261367
Page 13: TI56261368
133.8 x 120m (16,656 m2). The existing houses are I38.8 x 96m (13,324 m2). According to the cur- rent plans, the first section will be operational in September/October, the second and third section in October/November and Novem- ber/December respectively. A modern sprinkler-installation meeting with the standards of the NFPA and the FOC, and a de- humidification system, controlling the relative humidity, will be in- stalled as well in the new ware- house. Next to the third ware- house another Phostoxin-Fumiga- lion facility will also be built. Heating elements in these facilities will enable A.W.E. to fumigate tobaccos throughout the year. Allegany's first Flushing-East warehouse was completed in April 1973, the second in 1974. Winston and Camel licensed in Portugal LISBON, PORTUGAL--R.J. Reyn- olds and the Portuguese tobacco monopoly have finalized arrange- ments that will lead to both Win- ston and Camel Filter being intro- duced into that country. According to the joint venture agreement, Portugal's Tabaqueira will manufacture the two brands under license. Marketing of the products will be handled by a joint company set up by R JR and Tabaqueira. Current plans call for both Camel Filter and Winston to be available nationally during the first quarter of 1980. Distribution of the products will be through a private distribution company. Portugal is a significant tobacco market. During 1979, about 13 bil- lion units were sold and the mar- ket is growing at 2% annually. With Tabaqueira controlling virtually 100% of the market, there has been no advertising of cigarettes during the past five years. However, both Winston and Camel Filter will be intro- duced with multi-media cam- paigns. The Winston and Camel Filter tobaccos will be cut and blended by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco in Win- ston-Salem, N.C., and sent to Portugal for making and packing. Both Winston and Camel Filter will be marketed in king-size, crush-proo f boxes o f 20 cigarettes. Lords rule against Imperial promotion LONDON, ENGLAND--Imperial Tobacco's controversial "Spot Cash" instant lottery promotion for cigarettes has been ruled un- lawful by the House of Lords. The scheme had involved the distribution of more than 260m packets of cigarettes under the John Player brand, each contain- ing special cards. An area of these cards, after being rubbed with the edge of a coin revealed whether a prize of up to £5,000 had been won. The ruling has considerable re- percussions for the tobacco indus- TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--57 TI56261368
Page 14: TI56261369
try. With the probability that tougher controls on advertising would b¢ announced soon, pro- motions such as the "Spot Cash'" instant lottery had been seen by the tobacco companies as an portant means of promoting sales. The dispute over Imperial's "Spot Cash" scheme arose in the autumn of 1978 when the British cigarette price war was at its bit- terest. Imperial, which had been late in switching its production to King Size cigarettes in line with the change in consumer demand, developed an instant lottery as an- other means--apart from prie cuts --of boosting sales. John Player's cigarette sale, s in- creased by more than a third after the scheme was introduced. London has doubled its take off tob,a., .cco LONDON, ENGLAND---British ~ emment revenue from tobacco is reported to have more than dou- bled in the last years. In 1978- 1979 receipts from excise duty and VAT were £2,750 million, com- pared with £ 1,275 million in 1973- 74. During the year, which ended in October, 1979, 125,812 million cigarettes were sold, compared with 125,996 million in 1978 and 126,133 million in 1977. Last year duty and VAT from cigarettes alone mounted to about £2,450 million. Huge increase in EC leaf imports LONDON, U.K.--Data recently re- leased from the EC Statistics Off'w.e shows that the European Community's gross imports of un- manufactured tobacco in 1978 to- talled 678,548 tons. This was a 28070 increase on the figure for the previous year. Special factors leading to this unusually large increase were: replenishment of low stocks by the manufacturers; the generally high quality of leaf available from the 1978 harvest from the U.S.; favor- able exhange rates; and the avail- TOBACCO ~ INTERNATIONALI~FkNTERS CORPORATION P.O. B~ 4027, Rl~mond 2/,, V~. C~t~:n Ave. at 12th Cal;~e "INPLA.~IS" Telephone 232.8375 58--APRIL 4,1980 ability of certain kinds of stocks at discount rates. Intra-community trade in raw tobacco increased markedly in 1978, to a total of 106,000 tons. A major factor here was the ex- panding United Kingdom re- exports to other Community countries, especially West Ger- many. The principal supplier to the European Community in 1978 was the U.S. at 171,509 tons dry weight, which accounted for some 3007o of the total. Other major suppliers were Brazil at 53,035 tons (9.3070); India at 41,289 tons (7.2070); Malawi at 36,634 tons (6.4070); and Canada at 33,588 tons (5.9%). Total imports from non-EC countries were 572,552 tons. Gulf + Western offers cigar machine consulting SHIPHAM. ENGLAND--Gulf & Western, New York, has created a consulting and customer service office here under the management of T.H. Gethin Lewis. The office will be home base for G&W's marketing efforts for its auto- mated, high speed cigar making equipment and decorated wrap- per. The office is to be reached at Gulf & Western Corp., Swellwood House, Shipham, Somerset, BS25- IRA, England. The telephone number is 93-484-3727. Lewis will serve in a consulting capacity throughout Europe, hav- ing retired from his position with W.D. & H.O. Wills as techni- cal engineering manager-ciga- retts, cigars, and pipe tobacco in December, 1979. Snuff is not to be sneezed at LONDON, ENGLAND--Snuff is be- ing touted these days as a replace- ment for cigarettes following the recent publication of a study in T!56261369
Page 15: TI56261370
YOU COULD PRODUCE CIGARS LIKE THESE AT SPEEDS TO 500/min! (Straight shapes to 1500/min) TEL;212-6~7575 UTI LIZE TH E WORLD RENOWNED DEVELOPMENTS OF General Cigar & Tobacco Co. • HTU~ BINDERS • ULTRATM WRAPPERS • SUPERFILLER TELEX. 126202 AND CIGAR AUTOMATION BY Culbro Machine Systems • SRW-N SHAPED ROD WRAPPING WITH NATURAL LEAF • SRW SHAPED ROD WRAPPING WITH MANUFACTURED WRAPPER • ICWCIGAR FILM OVERWRAPPER • HSC FLATBLANK CIGAR PACK CARTONER CABLE CULBRO CORF'NYK TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--59 T15b--'261370
Page 16: TI56261371
The Lancet, Britain's noted medi- cal journal. The article claims that snuff is as "satisfying and less harmful" than cigarettes. Particu- lar emphasis is placed on the fact that snuff provides considerable nicotine to the user's blood, thus making the product an attractive alternative to heavy smoking. "Switching from cigarettes to snuff could have enormous health benefits," say the researchers who compiled the study, representatives from the London Institute of Psy- chiatry and also the New Cross Hospital. The report declares that snuff inserts no harmful byproduct into the user's body such as tar, car- bon monoxide or oxides of nitro- gen. It cannot be inhaled into the lungs. Once a fashionable and im- portant tobacco product, the world market in snuff is now con- trolled largely by a few British firms. In the U.S., sales of the product have been stagnating for years. The heyday of snuff came in the 18th century when the English, in particular, almost abandoned smoking in its favor. Smuggling cigarettes-- could it be a Red plot? DARMSTADT. W. GERMANY--The trial of seven truck drivers ac- cused of smuggling 105 million Swiss-made cigarettes from East Germany to Italy and France re- vealed the traffic is backed by East German authorities. At the trial, which uncovered an East German-Swiss connec- tion, the question was asked: "'Why would Communist East Germany indulge in cigarette smuggling?" The answer was that East Ger- many needs the foreign currency provided by the racket. Expert~ said the smuggling was worth more than $7 million in evaded West German taxes alone. Ozoned tobacco may lead to safer smoke ATHENS. GA.--Scientists at the SEA Tobacco and Health Labora- tory here are investigating a possible means of furthering the production of safer cigarettes. The treatment is called ozoniza- tion, and is intended to reduce the lipid contents of tobacco leaves: when burned, lipids produce tar in cigarette smoke--tar in turn contains polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons IPAH) which are prime suspects as cancer causing agents. The method consists of treating the tobacco with ozone (O~), which is produced from oxygen (O:) by an electrical discharge. The ozone causes PAH producing compounds to oxidize and decom- pose. meaning less of the suspect agent in cigarette smoke. Ozonization of tobacco in an aqueous or methanol suspension produced decreases in solanesol content from 44 to 100%. in certain fatty acids from 45 to ~I('P ('()('()A 2500 Broadway Camden, New Jersey 08104 609-881-4000 Tele,~ 831 442 Cull Buck ICP Cocoa Extractors of fine cocoa perlectll~ suited for tobacco products. We welcome and will service inquiries trom anywhere in the world. 93%, and in major sterols from 21 to 83%. depending on the tobacco and also the reaction conditions used. These decreases in turn. re- duced the amount of the PAH fraction by 21 to 70%. Phenols and nicotine were also signifi- cantly reduced. All of this may some day mean quite a lot to smokers, manufac- turers and gro~ers--ulthough the scientists are quick to warn that the research is far from complete. L & M announces brand ~romotion plan DURHAM, N.c.--The long slide of Liggett & ,X, leycr, ma.~ have hit bottom according to recent state- ments by company president K.v.R. Dey, Jr. who sees a more positive attitude emerging at the cigarette manufacturer since ~al¢ negotiations collapsed la.~t year be- t~een the parcm group and Dolph Overton III. According to Dey, while the company is not making 10 year plans, it is pursuing the promotion of its brands. Another sale rumor was denied by the pres- ident. The L&M plan calls for a very low profile, with national adver- tising cut back to the bare bones-- $11,000,000 were spent last year on cigarette advertising. There is to be little if any print advertise- ment this year. Promotion will be stressed in those market areas where the Watch for the Special Africa Issue of TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL May 30 60--APRIL4. 1980 T!56261371
Page 17: TI56261372
It takes imagination based on a total knowledge of the world tobacco industry to weigh up the supply and demand of leaf tobacco today. To look at one area at a time will not do. "his ever-changing world requires calm responsible r tanagement and investment decisions in order to secure the flow of raw materials for the future. The Standard Group, with guaranteed leaf supply, processing factories and offices in all the important tobacco growing countries, is best able to serve you today. Come to new horizons with the Standard Group. Trans-C, ontinental Leaf Tobacco Corp.. Werkhof GmbH - Eryk~ International A.G. - Transhellenic Tobacco S.A. - Transconti S, FLL • Spierer Fr~res & Cie S A. Jas. L Miller Tobacco Corn pany, Inc.- Andrew Chalmers International Ltd." Thondwe To bacco Co. Ltd.- Kortec Ltd.. Siam Tobacco Export Co rpo ratio n (Ste c) Atitransco S.P.A. • Siemssen. Threshie &.Co, Ltd.. Leafco .MS - Standard Tobacco PaGkers (Malawi) Ltd. STANDARD COMMERCIALTOBACCO COMPANY ~~ NEV'/YORK OFFICE 500. Fifth Avenue. New York. N Y. 1_r~36 Telex 2240'78. Te~.=ph~ne 1212) 244-1573 RICHMOND OFFICE 6520. West Broad Slreet. Fbchmond. Va 23230 -Telex 828379,Telaphone (804) 28B-320¢ TI56261372
Page 18: TI56261373
SAVE MONEY BY TRANSFORMING LOW GRADE TOBACCO INTO A MILD, NEUTRAL FILLER. TAMAG BASLE LTD. HAS DEVELOPED A NEW, SIMPLE TREATMENT METHOD FOR CIGAR AND ClGARE'I-rE TOBACCOS. using the TAMAG SYSTEM you can reduce SHARPNESS IN LOW' GRADE TOBACCOS, ESPECIALLY IN AIR- CURED TYPES. THE NICOTINE CONTENT (SIMULTANEOUSLY OR INDEPENDENTLY) BY A DESIRED PERCENTAGE. AS BY-PRODUCT YOU RECEIVE NICOTINE THAT CAN BE UTILIZED IN MANY WAYS. TAMAG BASLE LTD. STERNENFELDSTRASSE 16 CH-4127 BIRSFELDEN / SWITZERLAND Tel.: 061/52.01.43 Telex: 63403 Cable: Tamag Basle 62--APRIL 4, lg~0 T!56261373
Page 19: TI56261374
brmxds are stronger. Twenty-two district profit centers have been created, tasked with what is rather mysteriously defined as --selling cigarettes in a way that is most profitable for the company." Dey says the sales managers have a profit incentive to sell more ciga- rettes than are designated to be sold in their region. Brands to be stressed are Eve, Lark, L&M, Decade and Chester- field. Vello and Eagle have already been discontinued. The Strude brand, an ultra low-tar brand that the company intended to market against American Brands' Carlton and R.J. Reynolds' Now is not being mentioned. Decade is, which is another small sign of life at the 107 year-old company. The misfortunes connected with the Decade brand represent L&M's fall from grace--the brand was introduced in 1976 with a $28,000,- 000 testing and rollout campaign (virtually nothing was spent on it last year). The low-tar entry did Waterman Steamship Corporation's recently.launched S.S. Benjamin Harrison, the first of two new LASH/container vessels built for the company, will be added to the company's fleet serving trade routes, including Gull and East Coast to Far East. not make a place for itself, even in an age when sister low-tar brands promoted by other manu- tacturcrs were earning a combined 42°70 share of the overall cigarette market in the U.S. Failure to win a slice of this growth market has been cited as a sign of L&M's market collapse. The inability to introduce suc- cessful new brands to compete in the changing market, the continu- VACUDYNE! TobaccO Conditioners From The Experts Vacudyne tobacco conditioning equipment is available in sizes and with features to meet all your needs. Convenient to install, factory tested, packaged units are provided with capacities to 10 hogsheads, Custom b.uilt designs have no limit and have exceeded 22 hogsheads. Features include steam saving vac- uum pump evacuation systems, probes, manual or automatic con- trols and many more. For further details, contact Craggs, Inc., 10 E. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202, LI.S.A. Phone 301/539-4005. Cable "CRAGGS" Telex 8-7658 II FROM LEAF TO LIGHT-UP TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--63 T!56261374
Page 20: TI56261375
ing growth of other subsidiaries in the Liggett Group at the expense of the cigarette division, the con- tinuing slide in market share-- these are reasons for L&M's dif- ficuhies. As for corporate contribution, the cigarette division's sales ac- counted for almost 600/0 of group sales a decade ago. They repre- sented only 29.20/0 last year. The company's share of the na- tional cigarette market has )'allen from 5.2% in 1967 to 2.8o70 cur- rently, this as against 32.6% for R JR, 280/0 for Philip Morris U.S.A., 14.4°"/0 for Brown & .Wil- liamson, 11.6% for American Brands and 9.8% for Lorillard. The plight of the cigarette divi- sion is amply evidenced in recent developments that feature laying off 25070 of the Durham manu- facturing force and 86 of the com- pany's marketing and research staff. Group headquarters were relo- cated from Durham to Montvale, New Jersey last year. Corporate philosophy towards the cigarette 64--APRI L4,197,0 division has been hardening over the past few years, and it is now widely asumed that the parent company will continue to milk profits from the cigarette brands without making any further capi- tal outlays for market growth. U.S. Tobacco co-sponsors Academic All-Americans NEW YORK, N.Y.--The 1979/80 Skoal/Happy Days Academic All- American Basketball Teams were presented by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) and U.S. Tobacco at- the recently held National Invita- tion Tournament (NIT) in Madi- son Square Garden in New York. The Women's Academic All- American Basketball Team was presented during the semi-final round of the NIT, March 17. The Men's Academic All-American Team was presented during the intermission between the NIT championship and third place games on March 15. Both pre- sentations were carried live on na- tional television. Tim Simmons, sports informa- tion director of the University of Colorado, who heads the CoSIDA selection committee, explained that a student, to be nominated for the Academic All-American Team, had to have been either a starter or important sixth player; must have had at least a "B" or 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) grade-point average for the entire collegiate career or the preceding academic year at the present school and, if a transfer student, must have been a sophomore or higher. Chewing leads off in U.S. sales gains NEW YORK, N.Y.--Chewing to- bacco output and sales, according to the Tobacco Merchants Assoc., surpassed the 100-million mark in 1979, for the first time since 1946. This fast-moving product racked up a 9.3% increase in sales in 1979, a gain of 8.6 million lbs. The loose-leaf segment of the industry advanced 11.1%, to total close to 70 million lbs while sales of the fine-cut type moved ahead by 16%. These gains more than outweighed moderate declines for plug and twist/roll chewing to- bacco. Declines throughout the year brought snuff production to 23.7 million lbs, off 4.5% from 1978, and slightly on the downside of the range that became customary during the decade of the 70s. Sales of snuff totalled 23.9 million lbs in 1979, down a modest 1.6% from the year before. The market for smoking to- bacco continued to shrink, with invoiced domestic sales of Ameri- can-made pipe tobacco totalling 28.8 million lbs and roll-your own amounting to but 3.5 million lbs. These totals were respectively, 8.2% and 10.2% below the comparable 1978 aggregates. In the ease of pipe tobacco, .export sales, while representing only 3% T156261375
Page 21: TI56261376
H~lpiitg you on both sides of the ,Atlantic! Alleghany Warehouse Europe. is now operating its second modern tobacco storage facility on the quay at Vlissinge.n-oo.st (Flushing)~:.Netherlands. The two warehouses have a combined area of 28,00Q sq. m. (3CO,.000 sq.'..ft,)~:and~,~gtbrage Capacity of 32,000 M.T. of~tobacc~b..iThat's 70 million pounds-- packed in all.types of C6htainer~l~bgsheads, cases and.bales! Fire protection is a fresh ~vate¢ sprinkler system. Fumigation ~s availab!e[ Let Alleghany store your tobacco inEurope. We will deliver it promptly--. . .... When you.need it! Where j~oo r~e~d iti " By truck, rail or barge! For more information, Contact:" In the United States-- ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE COMPANY,INC. P. o. Box 4027, Richmond. VA 23224 .... Cable: BLUENOUSE, Richmond Telex~ 82-7341 Phones: Office: 8041232-1241 .Warehouse: 804/231-6238 In Europe- ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE EUROPE BV P. O. Box 1020 Phmze: (1184) 17530 Oost-Souburg, Netherlands ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE COMPAN¥,.:IHG~ P. O. Box 2516, Rotterdam, Netheila~ls .... " .... " Cab!~ BLUEHOUSE Telex: 25128 (BLUE NL) :~~L~GHANY WAREHOUSE ~22~~: ...:~~ ! T!56261376
Page 22: TI56261377
THARRINGTON POT-TYPE CURER • MADE OF HEAVY GAUGE STEEL = VAPORIZED BURNER FOR ECONOMICAL USE • NO ELECTRICITY IS REQUIRED • DUAL VALVE CONTROLS TWO STOVES • ALL HARMFUL FUMES GO UP STACK Manufactured by THARRINGTON INDUSTRIES, INC. P.O, BOX 4226 ROCKY MOUNT, N.C. 27801, U.S.^. Positive smoke signals thanks to I~GIVAUDAN i0' ~2 4 ~g. J, lic aN ~ uS~ 6~--APRtL 4, lgs0 Ti56261377
Page 23: TI56261378
of production, showed a counter- trend gain of 16.4%. Indicated total pipe tobacco consumption (invoiced domestic sales plus imports, with no adjustment for inventory changes) of 3S.8 million lbs showed a downtfirn of 11.4% for I979. The severity of the drop stems from the wide year-to-year swings customarily exhibited by imports entries. Philip Morris outlays billions for expansion NEW YORK, N.Y.--Philip Morris has announced that its capital ex- pansion programs are projected to amount to approximately $3,5 bil- lion from 1980 to 1984, of which approximately $850 million is plan- ned to be spent during 1980. For the five years 1975 through 1979, the company spent $1.9 billion on capital projects. The projects for the company's tobacco business include construc- tion of a new Administrative and Technical Center in Richmond, Va., which will support the com- pany's international cigarette busi- tiess. (Construction began this past January). Through. the year construction will continue on a new cigarette manufacturing facil- ity, located in Cabarrus County, N.C. In the international sector, .the company in 1980 will continue the expansion and modernization of its cigarette production facilities in several areas, principally West Berlin and Bergen op Zoom, the Netherlands. China signs with RJR for major Camel deal WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.--R. J. Reynolds Tobacco International, Inc. and the People's Republic of China have signed an agreement for the manufactuf6 and sale of Camel Filter cigarettes in China. The agreement also provides for the development of a new, jointly owned brand to be sold in the Far East. Under the contract manufactur- ing arrangements, Camel Filter will be produced in China with equipment supplied by Reynolds Tobacco International. Initially, the brand will be manufactured with tobacco supplied from the U.S. using the same blend as has been used in Camel Filter in America. According to the terms of the agreement, the new, jointly owned brand will be produced in China using both Chinese and American tobacco. Reynolds Tobacco Interna- tional and the PRC will work together on such items as factory site selection and layout, tobacco blend development, equipment, quality control, pack design, and sales and marketing strategies. Reynolds Tobacco Interna- tional and the PRC initiated talks in April 1979. 50 years ago: Associated Press re- ported, April l, 1930, development of "a nicotineless tobacco leaf which produces both salad oil and cigars.., said to be of fine flavor and...to ha~e a pleasant aroma.'" George Burns has put his hands, feet and his cigar prints in the forecourt of lhe world. famous Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. Assisting Burns were two movie actresses, Dorit Stevens and Rimberly Bos. The ceremony also marked Bums' latest film, "Going In Style," as evdenced by the T.shirts on the actresses. Burrts's cigar is an El Producto. TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--67 Ti56261378
Page 24: TI56261379
Delta Leaf Tobacco Company Ltd 100% Canadian Owned & Operated EXPORTERS OF CANADIAN FLUE-CURED TOBACCO CUSTOM BUYING & PACKING OUR SPECIALTY P. O Bo~ 12S.dO Bruc~ St E Cable OELTAB. Tele~oee 519-642-8797 e,h,~,~,oneootn~Se SAMPLES UPON REQUEST v ASTRA Harambasiceva 19 41000 Zagreb Yugoslavia Cables: ASTRA-ZAGREB Telex: yu agroim 21584 Phone: 219222 P.O. Box 1 Yugoslavia's new leaf tobacco export organization specializing in Flue-cured virginia Burley Herzegovina type Leaf tobacco and cigarettes f T156261379
Page 25: TI56261380
POLY~ROP~ENE~from p~ 14 in adequate supplies for the petro-chemical industry where high value-added possibilities make the market attractive. Also, some of the companies are developing other methods for making polypropylene, using natural gas in some instances as a feed stock. While biaxially oriented poly- propylene film probably will not be in short supply, cellophone may well be. Cellophane is a renewable resource, but it is very expensive and energy-intensive to make. There are other uses for cellulose (cellulosics) which are not so expensive for the cello- phane makers and from which they can derive a greater profit. Also, as the demand for cello- phane weakens and production drops, the cost per unit increases, which makes the demand even less and the cost gap between it and film even greater. The price of biaxially oriented polypropylene film has not in- creased on a parity with oil (having increased at a far lesser rate) over the last decade and will no doubt act similarly in the future. There are several things affecting the price of the film in addition to the ever-increasing of oil. The cost to refract the pro- pylene gas has nothing to do with the price of oil. The oil companies have learned to refract it more efficiently. So, beyond the normal inflationary expenses, the cost of gas refraction and film manufac- ture has not increased. Biaxially oriented film pro- ducers are running at full capacity now and are continuing to ex- pand. Competition is very strong. As the price of it rises, it will be worth the while of the oil com- panies to recover all the pro- pylene gas they can recover, something they do not do at present. This should help to hold the price line. OPINION REPLY--from page 27 quence of the extravagances of those who have mounted them and the resulting skepticism. This would almost certainly be an immoderate ]udgrnent. The smoking habit is now several centuries old and whether one likes it or not, there are not only negative aspects to it but positive ones on which very little has been done in the way of research. How else to explain the spread of the habit throughout the world irrespective of race. reli- gion, nationality, sex, and age? In ten years, scientific research has enabled product innovations, which 'the Medical Authorities consider to have substantially reduced the risks associated with smoking to be made. One is thus led to the somewhat paradoxical conclusion that the tobacco indus- try. arraigned as the guilty party in these campaigns, has in a relatively short time by using this research achieved very positive results. Excessive smoking may still involve a risk for health, hut is there really any point in this witch-hunt? At a recent congress on the problem held in Stockholm, Pro- fessor Schievelbei a member of the Committee of Experts on Smoking and Health advising the World Health Organization, drew the following conclusions which the Committee welcomes. --The problem of smoking and health calls for a scientific ap- proach, not ill-informed contro- versy and prohibition for its own sake. It is a scientific problem that must be kept out of the hands of fanatics and demagogues. --It is a serious health problem, especially where children and young people are concerned. At the moment the approach must be: to make sure that smokers are better informed so that in the light of what they know, they can decide whether they wish to continue smoking or not: and to encourage the industry to manufacture "less harmful" cigarettes: because among all the preventative measures this is the one offering, the best prospects of Success. FERTILIZER--from paga 2~ "Some of the benefits were expected, and are the same as those experienced by other agricultural products. Of course, it goes without saying that growth was increased substantially. But the usage of insecticides also dropped substantially--properly nourished plants in well balanced soil have little attraction for predatory insects," said Hadsell. "The root system of the plant is enlarged, because this is not force-feeding for the plant. It is a demand system, and the roots seek out the nitrogen. In so doing, they become larger and more widely spread, which has excel- lent side benefits. The plant becomes more resistant to ex- tremes in weather--hot or cold, wet or dry. "In the case of tobacco, the leaves are larger and a richer color of green, which means they bring premium prices, But the side-effect that we do not fully understand is that tobacco leaves grown with Planterra fertilizer take less drying time. "When the tobacco farmers who were experimenting with Planterra reported this to us, we did a lot of thinking about it. We believe that the residue left in the leaves from chemical fertilizers and pesticides slows the curing time, but we don't know this for sure. The product is so new that we haven't had time to investi- gate all these side benefits." Of course, shortened drying time would mean less expenditure of diesel fuel, since furnaces in drying barns are powered by this petroleum product. The complete Pianterra pro- gram involves the use initially of another Planterra product called Ni-Cal PIus (pH Plus outside the United States). Ni-Cal is a cal- cium-saturated, organic liquid chelating agent. Its purpose is "~o give the young plant a shot of instant nitrogen to tide it over until Planterra's "'bacteria fac- tory" can swing into full produc- tion; to adjust the soil pH to the correct level, lowering or raising TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--69 --" T!56261380
Page 26: TI56261381
---
Page 27: TI56261382
---
Page 28: TI56261383
CURED QUALITY VERAFUMOS LTDA. P.O. Box 191 Santa Cruz do SuI-RS-Brazil Cable address: CUBANOS PORTO ALEGRE BRAZIL 72~APRIL 4, 1980 TI56261383
Page 29: TI56261384
~ed; and to release calcium and improve the solu- bility of o~er important plant nutrients. It further improves the friabilil7 of the soil by increasing calcium on the base exchange, making the soil easier to work, with better aeration and water movement. The product has also been shown to enhance the effectiveness of triazine herbi- cides, apparently due to its pH neutralizing power. Ni-Cal is a temporary treat- ment, however, and can be discontinued after a few years when the damage done by synthetic fertilizers has been corrected, and organic matter in the soil has been built up. Planterra is also said to in- crease the germination rate as well as rate of growth--a fact of particular interest to producers of tobacco plant seedlings. Green house operators have reportedly been among the most enthusiastic users of the product. The company, based in Dallas, Texas, is currently marketing Planterra on a worldwide basis. FUNGUS CONTROLwfrom page 34 30 - 50 days after transplanting. Choice of dose rate and frequency of application will depend largely on incidence and severity of dis- ease. Ranges are 450 - 900 gm active ingredient thiabcndazole per hectare applied at 7 - I0 day intervals with a total of 5 - 8 ap- plications. There are certain practical con- siderations which have to be taken into account in relation to field applications of fungicides to to- bacco. Although conventional back-held spray machines can give good coverage of the plant, espe- cially at the site of infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum they arc relatively heavy and need to be re- filled up to 25 times for each hec- tare sprayed. There is also the factor of the amount of time needed to spray relatively large areas, and the need to use labor which is otherwise needed for har- vest and curing operations. Never- theless, when Sclerotinia aclero- tiorura is a major problem, there is every justification to spray with thiabendazole. G6 POWDF_R--f~om page 46 Generally speaking, coatings can be applied to any kind of Rhiakabei® and need not depend on denier per filament or filament cross-section. However, since the application of G6 causes some loss of hardness in the filter, it is ad- visable not to use single filaments of less than 3.3 dtex (3 den). As with other filters, the quality of G6 depends on the draw re- sistance, weight of acetate, diam- eter and hardness. To check these characteristics, the customary measuring instruments can be used. Owing to the very small quan- tity of powder used for each coat- ing (15 - 25 mg per rod) it is not possible to measure the coatings in relation to the weight of the filter rods as, for instance, in the case of triacetine contents. The company advises, however, that no time- consuming test analyses are need- ed to supervise the application of G6 coatings during production. According to Rhodia, production control by measuring the draw re- sistance is usually a sufficient check on any given two specifica- tion. In production, the G6 powder can be placed on RhiakabeP via the usual type of filter rod ma- chines. Rhodia offers accessory units to insure that the coating is constant and evenly distributed, that adequate adhesion occurs-- powder to matrix--and that un- due dust pollution in the produc- tion area is avoided. The Rhodia rod production ac- cessories are said to fit any type of machine suitable for HE produc- tion. The equipment includes a bag feeding station, storage bin, sorting system, dosing unit, con- veyor, and coating and recycling station. Application takes place between the ~looming unir..and. garniture. R'ep~rtedly, no Special types of plug wrap or glue are needed. Rhodia's Filter Engineering De- p~/rtmcnt offers Hauni DKF 1 and KDF 2 machines already equipped with the necessary accessories. The company will also supply limited quantities of G6 filters to meet clients' specifications. Furthering its marketing ef- forts, the company is prepared to offer production licenses, includ- ing service packages that would offer engineering, delivery and in- stallation of all parts r~quired for the equipment, supplies of G6 powder, start up assistance, tech- nical services and technological consultation. "'Take the whole pack ...'" TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--73 TI5b--'26138'
Page 30: TI56261385
PACKAGING AUTOMATION FOR THE '8O's ... Custom-designed machines and attachments for special packaging iapplications. SERIES 700: High-speed turret-type wrapping machines for single packages. SERIES 300: "Tray Topper" houdini; and crimping machines for applying foil covers to frozen food I SERIES 600: Adjustable high.speed fully automatic wrapp{ng machines for single and multiple packases. SERIES 500: Low.price(] wrapping machines for single packages, mu|tiples and bundle-wraps. SERIES: 400: Ful|yautomatlc cartonlng machines. ACCUMUI~TORS * BANDERS * BUNDLERS * CARTONERS * HOODERS LABELERS * MULTIPACKERS * MULTIWRAPPERS * SHRINK PACKAGING SCANDIA DESIGNERS & BUILDERS of AUTOMATIC PACKAGING MACHINERY&SYSTEMS SCANDIA Packaging Machinery Co. P.O. ~Box 575, Allwood Sta., 180 Brighton Rd. Clifton, N. J. 07012 74--APRIL 4,19~0 TI56261385
Page 31: TI56261386
Applicator is made for high speed side-seaming SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND--An ad- hesive-application system from C.B. Kaymich and Co. for side- seaming cigarettes allows fluid starches of high solids content and high viscosity to be applied through a simplc gravity feed and nozzle. The Kaymich system also ex- tends the choice of fluid starches that can bc used in cigarette man- ufacturing. A heater manifold fits on the control-valve body of the applica- tor and reduces the viscosity of the adhesive to a point where it flows freely, without reducing its solids content. This is said to increase its tack, so that it can form a firm, continuous bond, even at the top speeds (some 5,000 cigarettes/ minute) of the latest cigarette- manufacturing machines. Rated at 200-W, the electric heating element is a changeable cartridge; the entire hcatcr mani- fold can also bc removed. Tem- perature can bc either fixed or variable and, in each case, thermo- static control maintains the set level. Feed is by gravity from a tank Ventilation meter tests cigarettes LONDON, ENGLAND--The latest addition to the Fiitrona range of microprocessor controlled auto- Firm, continuous bond, even at top speeds--the word from Kaymich on its adhesive application system for side-seamlng clgamtlo~. that can be replenished with ready- to-use starch without interrupting production; starch preparations areas are therefore unnecessary, as are special adhesive containers (which can be changed on the ap- plicator only if the making machine is stopped) or pressurized feed sys- tems. The applicator has a pneu- matically-operated needle valve for clean shut-off with no drip- ping or splashing: A diaphragm seal prevents leakage and keeps air out of the adhesive, thus pre- venting breakout on the side seam. A micro-adjuster controls the flow rate. Inquiries concerning the prod- uct should be directed to C.B. Kaymich and Co. Ltd., 81 Leigh Street, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England $9 2PR; and in U.S., to Molins Machine Co. Inc. (Con- tact: A.B. Colquhoun), 3900 Car- olina Ave., Richmond, Va. 23222. matic gauges is the Filtrona Auto- matic Ventilation Meter. This instrument is designed to measure the percentage tip ventila- tion and percentage envelope ventilation of cigarettes. Indi- vidual results are displayed at time of measurement and recorded on a printout roll. Calculation of the mean values and standard devia- tion is carried out automatically after the measurement of the last cigarette of each sample batch of between five and 100 cigarettes. This meter is said to handle batches of up to 100 cigarettes in about 15 minutes. Accuracy is quoted as being better than +_ 1 °70 ventilation. The principle of operation is for three separate airflows to be meas- ured sequentially by means of lamina flow elements, in conjunc- tion with a low pressure trans- dueer and electronic circuits. An outlet socket can be provided which, with suitable interface, al- lows storage of test results in a computer. Details can be obtained from Filtrona International Limited, Friendly House, 21-24 Chiswell Street, London EC1Y 4UD, England. Tobacco moisture analyzer can handle six products HOPKINTON, MASS.~Moisture Systems Corp. has recently intro- duced its Quadr.a-Beam Model 476 Tobacco Moisture Analyzer. The Model 476 is an adaptation of its predecessor, the Beam Model 475, and enters the infrared moisture analyzer field TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--75 T!56261386
Page 32: TI56261387
60NZALF.Z BUYS AND SELLS USED TOBACCO MACHINERY ALL OVER THE WORLD 28 AJlegheny Aven~e IIII B~ltlmore. Md. 21204 U.S.A. '~.,J Phone: 301 321-r577/e Telex: 87-629 Cable GONZALIN Dealers and processors o| Burley and Dsrk ;..~ LEAF TOBACCO Modern Processing and Storage Facilities NATHANIEL LLOYD.AND COMPANY PRE-COATED TEAR TAPE For over forty years NATHANIEL LLOYD have been leading supphers of tear tapes to the world tobacco industry, and through contznual research. the company has kept pace w~th the developments demanded by ~ts customers. Ahhough changing fashzons and tile cost of printed film have resulted in an increased share of the market for w,de multz coloured tapes carrying brand names and promouons, the problems surrounding ndheszon of tear ta,oe to overwrap film are sbll very much zn evzdence. Indeed. the more recent move mid unco~:ted polypropvtene film as a wrapping medium, has only served to h~ghhght th~s area. Following two veaJs research on a w,de range of adhesives and m;~tenals. NA]HANIEL LLOYD havo developed a pre co~ftect heat sealable tear lal)e for use w~th celluluse and polypropylene film. both coated and uncoated, and it is anticipated that the company will be in a position to market its product dunng the summer. Adhesion ~s high. the coating can be applied to an,/film, and ~t will be avai!able at a very competitive price, making it substantially cheaper titan most pre-coated tapes currently available. The new tape is undergoing extensive tr, als on a w~cle range of wrapping mach,nes ~n several countries. In a short t~me. solvent baths and wax pots coulcl be a thing of the past ,n your company. If /ou would hke to carry out your own tests please write or telephone for a sample reel. If you would prefer to talk to someone directly. we can be contacted through the BRITISH CELLOPHANE STAND at the WORLD TOBACCO EXHIBITION, NICE, FRANCE FROM APRIL 21st-25th. NATHANIEL LLOYD B- CO. LTD., ST. OLAF HOUSE, LONDON BRIDGE. LONDON SE1 2SB TEL: 01 407 2247/9 TELEX: 8951368 76--APRIL 4. 1980 T!56261387
Page 33: TI56261388
For further information, con- tact Moisture Systems Corp., 120 South Street, P.O. Box 97, Hop- kinton, Mass. 01"/48. New overwrappers in ME4-12 series up and complete changeover is possible in a few minutes. There arc no exposed moving parts, pneumatics and electric circuits being fully protected. For further information con- tact the company at Ferndown Industrial Estate, Wimborne, Dorset, BH21 7 PD, England. The Model 476Tobacco Moisture Analyzer is said to require no operator involvernenL following the company's method of measurement. The analyzers have many user oriented features, such as digital display directly in percent moisture, fault detection, circuitry, all-plug in circuit boards and three analog outputs includ- ing milliamperes. The Model 476 also provides instantaneous calibration for up to six different products. This fea- ture enables the tobacco processor to analyze leaf, cut, reconstituted and stems with no operator in- volvement. No internal calibration is required. The Qua&a-Beam Analyzer is reportedly unaffected by conveyor belt speed, product depth, or height variations. The analyzer is able to resolve moisture levels within a tenth of one percent in- stantaneously and provide outputs for both analog and computer control. Watch for. Leaf Dealer Issue of TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL May 2 WIMBORNE, ENGLAND--Cold Adhesive Sealing is the new Marden-Edwards system for overwrapping rectangular prod- ucts in paper. The KAP 100, overwraps rectangular products in a variety of papers using PVA type adhesives. The ad- hesive is applied in a dot pat- tern which ensures effective posi- tioning for security and presenta- tion. Another new machine is the PSB Stretch Bander. It has facilities for quick film thread- KAP 100, by Matden Edwards. LITERATURE Belt Fasteners and Cleats for Agrleulture is a new agricultural equipment brochure from Flex- ible Steel Lacing Company. The two types of fasteners described are: Alligator (R) lacing fastener--hammered into the two=.', ..- ¢ belt ends; and Alligator staple fastener--installed with hammer and portable applicator tool. Copies are to be had from Flexible Steel Lacing Co.,- 2525 Wisconsin Ave., Downers Grove, Ill. 60515. Chemicals informalion Hand- book, 19"/9-80 is now available from Shell Chemicals. The book, printed in Great Britain, contains nearly 100 pages and updates information given in earlier editions on the chemical industry and the chemical business of the Royal Dutch/Shall Group of Companies. A charge of £1.50 per copy is made for orders of six or more. Copies are obtainable from Shall International Petroleum Company Ltd. (PA/012), Shell Centre, Lon- don SEI 7NA, England. Eastern Regional Office 901 Old Marlton Pike Marlton. N.J. 08053 609.933-0908 TabKoa Inc. Specializing In Fine Cocoa Flavors For the Tobacco Industry Main Office 6445 W. Grand Ave. Chicago, IL 60635 312-745-1890 TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--T/ i TI56261388
Page 34: TI56261389
Edga~ M. Cu]lman, Jr. Edgar M. Cullman, Jr., has been named president of the General Cigar and Tobacco Co., New York City. He succeeds Joseph E. Whitwell, who was appointed executive vice president of the parent company, Culbro Corp. In a related move, Lawrence !. Marks was named executive vice president-finance of Culbro. Cullman began his career with the Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. in 1971. For the past two years he has served as General Cigar's executive vice president and chief operating officer. Cullman's father, Edgar M. Cullman, is chairman and presi- dent of Culbro. His uncle is Joseph Cullman, I11, chairman of the executive committee, Philip Mor- ris Inc. Kimberly J. Kelser has been promoted to director of planning at R.J. Reynolds Tobacco. He will be responsible for the overall planning function for the com- pany. Keiser joined R JR in 1967 as financial manager of R JR Foods. Subsequently, he held the posi- SPRINGFIELD REDRYING COMPANY Saao I. Miller, 3r~ i~re=ide~t LEAF TOBACCO MERCHANTS Dmders AIg T~'pe~ Spdn~e]a, KT. U.S.A. A.C ~ P.O. ~ 72 Telep~ ~959 78--APRIL40 1£~0 tion of director of planning and development, R.J. Reynolds In- dustries, Inc. Maritime Terminals, Inc., Nor- folk, Virginia, has announced the appointment of John E. Buck, III as customer relations representa- tive. Before joining the company, Buck was employed as a sales representative by Norfolk Port and Industrial Authority and later represented the Virginia Port Authority in the same capacity. John E.Bucklll Philip R. Collier Phillip R. Collier has been ap- pointed manufacturing services manager and Darc,.l R. Brickey has been promoted to assistant manufacturing services manager at the American Tobacco Com- pany's Department of Research and Development in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Collier, succeeds Thomas P. Pettigrew, who is retiring after 42 years of service. Collier joined the company in 1957 and has served as assistant manufacturing serv- ices manager since 1974. Brickey joined the company in 1964. He was appointed gen- eral supervisor-manufacturing services in 1978. Jack E. Harris was recently ap- pointed manager of the mat belt division of Rexnord, Inc. The mat belt division is located in Savannah, Ga. and is subsidi- ary to the Milwaukee headquarters of Rexnord, whose machines in- clude tobacco processing among their industrial applicat ions. Harris was president of La Porte Mat Belt Co., La Porte, Ind., a firm acquired by Rexnord. Collapsible Contaim" Co., I¢ TI56261389
Page 35: TI56261390
Newton O. Fowler, Jr. has been named general manager for Philip Morris U.S.A.'s Cabarrus County, N.C. manufacturing facility. Fowler will assemble and direct the management team which will operate the Cabarrus manufacturing facility when it begins production in late 1982. Fowler joined Philip Morris in 1955 and has served in a variety of supervisory and management assign- ments in the company's Richmond, Va. plants. His most recent position was that of general manager, Richmond factories. In another company appointment Alfred Open- gart has been named director, engineering opera- tions. He was previously director, planning. Opengart joined the company in 1974 as manager, industrial engineering and was promoted to director, industrial engineering in 1975. He became director, planning in 1977. Prior to joining the company, Opengart was a consulting engineer and vice presi- dent of Dasol Corporation in New York City. Also in Richmond, George W.B. Taylor has been appointed director of engineering development. Taylor was previously chief design engineer. Two multiple-operations managers have been ap- pointed to W.D. & H. O. Wills' new U.K. accounts organization. They are Alan Burgess, for- merly district sales manager based near Reading, and Idris Woudfine, formerly a national accounts executive. Burgess will be multiple operations manager (Lon- don) and will have four key account managers reporting to him, dealing with accounts based in London and the southeast. The four will be Chris Bantoft and George Whiskin, both London-based national accounts executives, and two multiple- account executives, Neville Gartland, from Wills' northern sales division, and Clive Willey, from London. Woodfine is now to become multiple opera- tions manager (Bristol). Four key account managers reporting to him will deal with accounts in the rest of the country. They are all multiple-account execu- tives-Derek Breadmore (Midlands), Roger Milnes and Doug Nendick (Northern), and Phil Miles (Southwest). OBITUARIES Robert F. Bnlger, vice president of manufacturing at House of Windsor, Inc., principal cigar manufacturing and marketing subsidiary of United States Tobacco Co., died at his home February 13, after a short illness. He was 59. Bulger joined House of Windsor in July, 1977 as director of engineering and was named director of manufacturing in December of that year. He moved up to the post of vice president of manufacturing in June, 1978. Prior to joining House of SWmdsor, Inc., Bulger was associated with the Bayuk Cigar Co., as senior vice president of Bayuk Caribe, Inc. and vice president of engineering. Educated in the New York City school system, he served in the South Pacific during World War II with the U.S. Navy. He was appointed by Pennsylvania Governor Milton Shapp as commis- sioner on the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission and was elected chairman of that commission in 1972. Bulger lived in York, Pa. He is survived by his wife, two sons, and three daughters. John R. Latham, former president of American Cigarette and Cigar Co. and creator of American Tobacco's "Sold American!" radio jingle in the 1930s, died February 21 at his home in White Creek, N.Y, He was 72, Latham began his career at Young & Rubicam advertising agency in the late 1920s. upon graduation from Lehigh University. He became known as the Father of the Radio Jingle after he sold the idea of a tobacco auctioneer's voice in a commercial to American Tobacco's flamboyant chief executive, George Washington Hill. At one point in the 1930s, Lucky Strike was the nation's best-selling cigarette, achieving the honor by outselling R.J. Reynolds' Camel and Liggett & Myers' Chesterfield. Latham became president of American Cigarette and Cigar, an American Tobacco subsidiary, in 1938 and introduced Pall Mall, the first king size cigarette to be marketed nationally. During the Second World War, Latham was a Marine Corps major, assigned to the Office of War Information. After the war, he joined Curtis Publishing Co. as a sales executive and then returned to the tobacco business as advertising manager of Philip Morris. During the 1950s, he created the Philip Morris country music radio show, which toured the South and Middle West. He left the tobacco business for good in 1960, when he became senior vice president of a Warner Lambert Pharmaceutical Co. subsidiary. In later years, he was a securities broker in New York and at the time of his death was affiliated with the financial firm, R..L. Day Co. Apart from business, Latham was an expert yachtsman who often participated in sailing competition in the Atlantic and the Caribbean. He was also a master carpenter and restorer. Among his achievements were restorations of 18th century dwellings in White Creek, the Washington County, N.Y. town where he lived. Latham is survived by his wife. two sons. and a daughter. TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--79 T156261390
Page 36: TI56261391
Marlboro and Camel going strong in Germany MUNICH, W. GERMANY--Difficul- ties are indeed present in the Ger- man cigarette market. As in other industrialized nations, sales here have tended to stagnate in the past few years--hovering between 120- 125 billion units. Taxes and health warnings have also taken their toll. It is a difficult country in which to promote a new brand, since more than half of the market sales are effected through some 700,000 cigarette machines--due to a national law that closes all stores at 6:30 p.m. Machine sales automatically restrict the number of brands to be offered and there- fore leave little room for new brands. Of the 200 brands intro- duced in the past decade, only four have achieved more than a 1% market share. Despite these conditions, two American manufacturers have been doing fire-sale business in the country for the past few years. In 1979 R.J. Reynolds had 7.8~0 of ttte market; Pltilip Morris cap- tured l 1.2(o. Both manufacturers have seen their product sales steadily grow. RJR's sales grew by 11.2070 in the past year. Philip Morris had a sales gain of 31070. Unlike their brethren in other western markets, the Germans have been returning to high tar and nicotine cigarettes--a phe- nomenon that helps account for the exceptional performance of RJR's Camel and Philip Morris' Marlboro. Camel sales jumped by a healthy percentage this past year, while Marlboro had an amazing 31070 gain. Both brands are in the top-ten sellers and of those are the only brand on the W. German market to have made con- sistent gains in the course of the past six years. Besides the appeal of their American-type blend, the brands are also heavily promoted via their rugged outdoors images--adver- tising know-how that has proven as good as gold. Dunhill introduces Golden Hours NEW YORK, N.y.--Golden Hours, a pipe tobacco, is being intro- duced by Alfred Dunhill of Lon- don. The blend has been developed for the soft-smoking aromatic market. The product contains what is termed top grade Virginia blgnded by hand with black caven- dish and burley. Golden Hours will be available in the standard 50 gram and 100 gram tins. Suggested retail prices are $2.70 for the smaller size and $5.20 for the 100 gram tin. Golden Hours is a pipe mixture Irom Alfred Dunhill of London. 80--APRIL 4,1 RJR pushing sales through new programs WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.--R.J. Rey- nolds Tobacco Company has an- nounced that it will increase credit terms in all sales areas, and test a new Distributor Promotional In- centive Program in three states.- The incentive program gives direct cash payments to distributors and sales representatives in return for program participation. Credit terms will be extended to 20 days on selected brands. The Distributor Promotional Incentive Program will be tested for six months, beginning in April in Clifornia, Arkansas, and parts of Michigan. To participate in the incentive program, distributors must have sales representatives who call on at least 50 retail outlets per week. Retail calls may be averaged to meet that requirement. Qualified distributors must buy at least 25~/0 more than the aver- age week's purchase of several selected brands for sales during a designated "push" week each month. The distributors' sales rep- resentatives must work those brands. Reynolds Tobacco will pay dis- tributors $150 per qualified sales representative for each monthly "push" week, with $30 of that to- tal designated for payment to the sales representative. Representa- tives have already begun calling on distributors in the test areas. TI56261391
Page 37: TI56261392
~F Another part of the world of Universal Leaf. Universal Leaf Tobacco (~. INCORPGRATI=O RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 23~60-U.S.A. T156261392
Page 38: TI56261393
perforated stainless steel tapesfor c~garette making machines from :::' belts life stainless steel 391,.I" "~t~' "~ "},~,l;J01 tl6." MK ~D 99305-652 R EPRESEN3"ATIVES EUROPE USA & CANADA bachmannweg 20 8283 mont,,chard C, telex 538~7 THAILAND PHILIPPINES le,ex 9420107 ~CASALEE BELGIUM N.V. Jan van Rijswijcklaan 76 B-2000 Antwerp--Belgium Telephone: 031/16.00.40 Telex: 35355 Casa B Cables: Leecasa Antwerp T!56261393
Page 39: TI56261394
.rind never zcill Telling lhe truth is an old tradition at JOB. Our cigarette paper has been doing it for over a century and a half. Which is why nowadays with all those tar and nicotine figures appearing on ~e pack, we're very lucky. When it comes to telling the truth, we have a tot of experience. The experience it takes to keep the dalivefies constant and all those figures accurate. At JOB we give you cigarette paper with the precise level of air permeability you specify. And then we make dam sure that that precise level never varies. Of course "never" is a very long time. But then in the cigarette industry a century and a half is a very long lime too. our name is job, our job is yours. JOB. 83. Bd Exe~rn~ns / 75781 Paris Ced~x 161 France Phone: 651.4~38 ! Te!sx 6~(k320 i C~es:. Jobex ~ L o Ti56261394
Page 40: TI56261395
POWELL SOLVES TOBACCO PRODUCTION PROBLEMS. For more than 20 years, Powell has been pioneering total tobacco mechanization - in every phase from transplanting through curing. The result - the toughest, most dependable equipment, available! Hi-Tmc~" S~ay~ with AmToppera TRANSPLANTING Powell's heavy-duty transplanters are tough, low- maintenance mac.hines. The transplanter operates simply, with each plant set in the ground straight and supplied metered water. An accurate auger fertilizer distributor system is available with each transplanter. For the best start up for your transplants, one-row, two-row or four-row units are available. TOPPING/SPRAYING Save hundreds of dollars per acre by topping early - at the proper timel Fans depress the top leaves while a rotary blade cuts out the top cleanly and quickly. Top up to 2 hectares per hour with a four-row topper and spray up to 6 hectares per hour with the !5 meter spray system. Three-wheel drive and four-wheel drive machines available. HARVESTING This machine has been proven to be one of the best, most dependable on the market. It is rugged, yet its belt conveyors handle leaves gently. Growers say it out-primes, out-performs any other machine! Clearly the one to buy in '80. Powell offers both one-row and two-row combines, plus other machines for hand har- vesting. CURING Fully insulated to save energy. Growers repor~ Powell MaxiMiser'" bulk curing systems use only about half as much fuel as others. This, in combination with auto- matic controls and a furnace that uses less electricity, is why growers everywhere are switching to Powell. Systems are available in four sizes. All save fuel, elec- tricity and laborl POWELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC. Write for New Intem;)t/onal Brochum to: POWELL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION Post Of tic: Orawer 707 Dept. TW~-809 P~ennettsv~lle. Sou t h Carolina L>cJ5 t 2 US& Telephone: 803-479-6231 Tele.x- 57.3332 84--APRIL 4,1980 T!56261395
Page 41: TI56261396
~- Chilean fertilizers get young tobacco plants started ~.~ faster. This fast action promotes early uniform maturity ~... ol high- quality tobacco, ~: ~" .~ Umvers~ty tests show that as the percentage of How to get more high-quality from yore- tolmeeo Bulldog Soda or Chilean 15-0-14 with 100% nitrate nitrogen start' produce early uniform maturity and bigger yields Nitrate nitrogen is the only form of N that's immediately available to tobacco plants--even in cold, wet, acid or fumigated soils. • That's why almost 50% of all flue cured and hurley is fertilized with Bulldog Soda or Chilean 15-0-14 when transplanting or sidedressing. Because they contain 100% nitrate nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen in [erti! the rate of tobacco, direct prop Don't be switched. Insist on or Chilean 15-0-14.7 To order, contact Sociedad Quimica y Minera de" Chile S.A., Castilla 260-V Santiago, Chile; Chilean Nitrate Sales Corp., One World Trade Center, N.Y., N.Y. 10048, or Nitrate Corporation of Chile Ltd., Chile House, 20 Ropemaker St., London EC2Y 9AP, England. :-Nil-nitrate nitrogen makes all the differene÷~ T15626"1396
Page 42: TI56261397
DieTabak.Feuchte exakt besfimmen and direkt ablesen: BRABEHD|R'-'Feuchtebesfimmer. Des idaaf~ Testger~,t f~.r Labor und Betdeb: • Genau[gkeit tier Messung 0,1 °[o • Robuste Konstrukti~n und gule Verarbe~tung • Gutes, dlrektes Able~en der Pr~zisionswaage • Niedr/ger Preis der e~nzelnen Analysen • Rationelle Durchffihrung Yon Serlenanalysen • Einfache Bedienung • Tischaufstellung Aus diesen GrOnden empfohlen for dieTabaklndustrlevon COMMISSION DES COMMUNAUTES EUROPEENNES - Informations internes sur I'Agriculture Nr. 91, Oktober 72. AuSerdem ASTM Standard E-145. Gute Grfinde, mit BRABENDER~ zu sprechen. BRABENDER~'-~ -- 50 Jahre Ihr Partner in Labor und Betrieb. Exad and direct determination of the moisture in tobacco: BRABEHDER~MoisIure Tester• The ideal test instrument for laboratory and plant: • Accuracy of the measurement 0.1 • Sturdy construction and good finish • Good and direct lecture of the precision weigh-in balance • Low cost of the single analyses • Rational pedormance of series determinations • Simple operation • Table installation These are the reasons why the instrument has been recommended for the tobacco industry by the COMMISSION DES COMMUNAUTES EURO- PEENNES -- Informations internes sur I'Agriculture Nr. 91. October 72. Also ASTM Standard E-145. A good reason to speak with BRABENDER~. BRABENDER~ -- 50 years your reliable partner in laborato~ and plant. BRABENDER~ OHG DUISBURG C.W.BRABENDER~|NSTRUMENTS, INC. 41 Duisbunh Kult~r~tr. SI-SS, 50 East Wesley Stl~et, $|UtJI West Germzny. Telef~ 0203 ~T 09 51 N~w Jer~y. 076~6 U.S.~A. Telex 08 55 603 Tel. 201 343-8425 • Roanoke Automatic Tobacco Primers • Roanoke Tobacco Curing Equipment • Hus:ler2000 Peanut Combines • Roanoke Peanut Drying Systems ~ Roanoke Hustler Li~t Trucks Serving Manufacturers of • Roancke Grapple~ • Roancke Tree Shears • Roanoke Rotary Cutters • Dare IV Wood Stoves • Harrmgton Modular Homes You Since 1922 TI56261397

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size: