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I86i X_N Vinidnia - 9ni3i_

Date: Apr 1981
Length: 13 pages

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Abstract

TOBACCO'S NEW LEADERSHIP TEAM: From left to ri.¢ht. Horace R. Kornegay, Tobacco Institttte chairlnan: EdwardA. HnrriganJr. vf R. J. Reynold¢. chairman of Tl's execalive t'ommiltee; tttvJ Stmnlel D. Chih'ote Jr., The Inatitnte' s new president.

Fields

Named Organization
American Journal of Public Health (periodical)
American Medical Association (physicians group)
Professional trade group representing American physicians.
Associated Press (AP) (National Uniform Press Service)
Boston Globe
Civil Aeronautics Board (Ruled on smoking in U.S. airplanes)
Commodity Credit Corporation (Lender to tobacco farmers, part of U.S. Dept. of Agriculture)
Lends money to tobacco farmers cooperatives, is part of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
Consumer Product Safety Commission
Council on Environmental Quality
DISCUS (Distilled Spirits Council of the U.S.)
An alcoholic beverage industry trade group that encourages responsible beverage alcohol consumption by adults.
Distilled Spirits Council of the United States
New England Journal of Medicine
North Carolina State University
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd. (Cigarette manufacturer, incorporated in U.S. in 1902)
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd.., was incorporated in New York in April of 1902; half the shares were held by the parent company in London, and the balance by its U.S. distributor and his American associate. Its overall sales in 1903, its first full year of U.S. operation, were a modest seven million cigarettes. Among the brand offered, besides Philip Morris, were Blues, Cambridge, Derby, and a ladies favorite name for the London street where the home companies factory was located - Marlborough.
Playboy
R.J. Reynolds Corporation (second tier subsidiary of RJR Industries)
R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc.
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. (Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral))
Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral)
Red Cross
TAN (Tobacco Action Network)
Organization created by the tobacco industry to galvanize "grass roots" political action from among those who work in some capacity for the tobacco industry: growers, manufacturers, retailers of cigarettes, etc.
Texas A & M University
Tobacco Action Network
Purpose was to encourage people in the tobacco industry, as well as any others who were concerned about what was happening to the tobacco industry regarding the misinformation that was being put out by government and by the private health organizations, to write and try to correct the incorrect information that was disseminated by HEW and others in the government, as well as the Cancer Society and Lung Association.
Tobacco Advisory Council (TAC) (Tobacco lobbying group in U.K.)
Association of UK cigarette manufacturers
Tobacco Associates Inc.
Tobacco Institute (Industry Trade Association)
The purpose of the Institute was to defeat legislation unfavorable to the industry, put a positive spin on the tobacco industry, bolster the industry's credibility with legislators and the public, and help maintain the controversy over "the primary issue" (the health issue).
Tobacco International
Tobacco Observer (periodical)
Tobacco Tax Council
U.S. Department of Agriculture
University of Kansas
Washington Post (Newspaper)
Wharton Applied Research Center
White House
World Health Organization (Concerned with global public health)
International organization concered with public health worldwide
Named Person
Bell, Liberty
Binford, Betty Lou
Block, John R.
Bowling, James C.
Castelli, William P., M.D. (NIH Framingham Heart Study Director)
Plaintiff
Chilcote, Sam
Chilcote, Samuel D., Jr. (TI President (1981-1997))
Chilcote has knowledge of The Tobacco Institute's and the tobacco industry's participation in public fraud and disinformation relative to health hazards of tobacco use, in the manipulation of nicotine in tobacco products and in marketing of tobacco products to children.
Chumbley, Ken
Collins, William K., Ph.D. (RJR/TI Consultant, Agronomics Expert, N. Carolina St. U.)
Columbus, Christopher (European explorer, Introduced tobacco in Europe)
Coon, Amelia
Dalton, John N.
Engelhardt, Paul G.
Evans, Thomas B., Jr.
Ferguson, Billie
Finnel, Art
Fuqua, Don (Congressman (FL))
Gay, Virginia
Gertenbach, Robert F. (CTR President)
Defense
Hart, Patricia
Hawkins, Paula
Hefner, Hugh
Helms, Jesse A.
Hobbs, William D. (Pres. RJR 72-75, CTR Director, TI Exec. Comm.)
William D. Hobbs was a President for R.J. Reynolds and a CTR Chairman. (PMI's Introduction to Privilege Log and Glossary of Names, Estate of Burl Butler v. PMI, et al, April 19, 1996). William D. Hobbs worked for RJR Industries as President & Director from 1972 to 1975, as Chairman of the Executive Committee from 1979 to 1980, Chairman & CEO from 1975 to 1980, Chairman & CEO of International Tobacco in 1978, Executive Vice President in 1980, Senior Vice President in 1971 and Vice President from 1967 to 1971. (Source: RJR Who's Who NMLRP) Hobbs served on the Tobacco Institute's Executive Committee. He was also Director, Chairman and CEO of CTR's Executive Committee. (N.M.'s CTR Who Who)
Hopkins, Harry
Horrigan, Edward A., Jr. (Several RJR, Liggett and CTR Top Positions)
Director for RJR Tobacco Co. 1980-1989, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer 1979-1983, President 1979-1980, and Chairman & Chief Executive Officer 1987-1989.
Huber, Hans
Hurl, Patricia
Island, Marco
Jones, James R.
Kasten, Robert W., Jr.
Keep, C. Everett
Kelly, John D., Jr.
Kloepfer, William J., Jr. (TI Public Affairs VP, c. 1988)
Senior Vice President of Public Affairs Relations for the Tobacco Institute
Kornegay, Horace R. (TI President and Exec. Director)
VP Leaf Ops (RJR), TI Chairman (1985)
Leaf, Golden
Lipton, Thomas J. (Council of Better Business Bureaus)
Loo, Betty
Lumpkin, Edith
Merryman, Walker (TI VP in 1994; Dir. of TI Communications, 1988)
Vice President of the Tobacco Institute in 1994. (L.A. Times 3/26/94).
Millhiser, Ross R (TI Executive Committee, PM Pres, 1968)
Ross Millhiser was Vice President of Philip Morris in 1952, VP and Director of Marketing at PM 1961-62, President of PM USA in 1970-72, President of PM Inc. in 1977, Chair of the Tobacco Institute Executive Committee and Vice Chairman of PM Inc. in 1979, Chairman of the Board of PM in 1980. The above information is gleaned from correspondence found within the Philip Morris collection of documents. The assumption is made that Millhiser worked at Philip Morris the entire time between 1952-1994, based on his correspondence during those dates, however nothing has been found in the documents verifying his positions at PM during the gaps in time noted above. President of Philip Morris in 1968 Millheiser was with Philip Morris in 1983 in New York. Knew that profitability of PM derived from addictive nature of nicotine. Why risk multi-billion dollar business for your rats, Victor.
Morgan, Harry
Myers, George A., Jr.
Pinney, John Mercer (Policy Expert, Pinney Assoc., Inc., Anti-Tobacco Expert)
Plaintiff
Price, Samuel
Price, Samuel W.
Raleigh, Sir Walter (Introduced Virginia tobacco to England)
Sir Walter Raleigh introduced Virginia tobacco to England (R. Klein 1993).
Riddle, Ned
Rose, Charles
Ross, Betsy
Sen, Virginia
Sessions, Douglas
Spencer, Stuart K.
Stalin, Joseph (leader of USSR - smoked)
Straub, Richard
Thompson, Ellis
Warner, John W.
Wilson, David (B.A.T. Industries, Company Secretary)
Young, Bill
Date Loaded
18 Jul 2005
Box
0172

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Page 11: TI51341013
Cigar Maker With Special Touch By AI LOS ANGELES, C.aEf.--Victor Mig~nes, his expression intense and his concert,'arian absolute, stretches a binder leaf of Honduras tobacco onthe cuUing board, smooths it with the palm of his hand, and trims it with quick, short strokes of his chaveta. When it is the way he wants it, the way 60 years of making cigars has taught him it should be, he selects three more leaves, the fillers, and lays them atop the binder: a leaf from Ecuador, a leaf fi'om the Dominican Republic, and a Havana-sead from Honduras. "It is the blending that matters," he says in broken English without looking up from the bench where he sits hunched over a work table scattered with bits of tobacco leaves and marked by I 0,000 eats of the chaveUL "Without the right bleading~ ..." He doesn't finish the sentence, but Instead concentrates on cutting a small bit of leaf to fill a hole, so that the cigar he is making wlil pack evenly. "The most important thing," he says, rolling the tobacco tight with his palms, "is making the 'bunch." You have to put the filler leaves straight or the cigar will ~ot draw." He trims again, then adds a drop of trdgalconto--tobacco giue-to hold the bunch toge~hor, puts it into a mold and the mold into a press. When he is satisfied it has been properly molded, Migenes takes it out and wraps the cigar in an aromatic cameron leaf from Africa, adds another drop of the glue, mils it tight with the flat side of his cutter, trims the lighting end and holds it up, completed, to the fluorescent light. "Ah," he says, the words encompass- ing a mixture of emotions. "AHHH...." For that quiet and exquisite moment. 73-year-old Migenes is an artist step- ping back from his canvas to observe what he has created. One simply does not make a cigar, he will tell you, ca~fully sweeping the leftover bits of tobacco into a drawer that is pan of his bench. One must have a feeling for what he is doing, and from that feeling, il3,_at senti- micodo, emerges the creation. The cigar. Migones learned the cigar maker's art from his lathes and knew even as a boy in his native Puerto Rico that he had the feeling, a Udent passed down at least three g~nerations, maybe more. "You either have it," he says, lighting the cigar he has just made, billows of smoke around him, "or you don't." Migenes is only. 5 feet, 5 inches tall and wears a snap-brim hat at a jannq/ angle. He ~ been making cigars in Los An~:les for 41 years. Longer than anyone else, he says. For the last 29 years, he has had his own business, and the rich and famous come to his small "Tactory'" on the fringe of downtown Los Angeles to buy his victi~os, his brevas, and his internationals. Hugh Hefner is a customer, and Migenes proudly displays a letter from Playboy magazine on his wall. Actor Gencge Hamilton buys his cigars fnan the shop Migenes calls La Plata, the Silver. $o do Harry Morgan, who plays CoL Potter on television's M *A*S*H,"and a~or Donnis Weaver. "'1 could name you politicians too," he says, "but maybe they don't want to say, you know? And women. A lady from Pasadena and one from Beverly Hills. More and more women .... " Migenes° combination factory and shop is in an o1[I 1,500 square-foot building. It is a place rich with the aroma of tobacco and the music of four Cuban cigar makers that Migenes employs. They sing all day, he says, songs from old Cuba, the soft and easy melo- dies that predate Castro, and they drink strong black coffee frem shot glasses. "'1 treat them good," Migeaes says, "because they are artists. You cannot find good cigar makers anymore," He names them: Juan, Lorenzo, Manolo, and Manuel, and the woman Hilda from El Salvador who strips the tobacco leaves of their stems and puts them in cylindrical callophane containers. "'We call Lorenzo "modio polio'-- half a chicken - because he is so small," Migenes says. "Lorenzo!°" he calls to the worker. °'How many inches are you "FiRy-nine!°' Hag-a-Chicken calls back in Spanish, and everyone, includ- ing Lorenzo, joins the boss in laughter. "Media polio!" Migenes says, and they laugh again. Migenes is in his eighth marriage and runs his business with the help of hls 19-year.-old son, Tito. Tito, he explains with perhaps a touch of sadness, does not make cigars. "1 don't have the feeling," Tito Migones would I~e the boy to take over La Pla~a when he retires. He doesn't know when that gall be. '°My own father worked until he was 93," he says, "then went into the hospl- hal for three days and died. I liked him very much.That's why I started making ¢igm's. ! wanted to please my father. He was a good marl." But, he observes, peering through the billowing smoke of his cigar, he does not intend to work until thr~ days he- fore he dies. He intends to travel and dine in fine restaurants and spend time at the beach, in the warmth that reminds him so much of Puerto Rico-"the Island"-sipping ~ and watching the sunlight on the waves. The likelihood, Migenes explains, is that he will live long because he goes to bed early and doesn't eat too much and limits himself to six cigars a day, never more. Also his father lived until he was 93 and his mother, still living, is 99. Migenes visits herat least once a year in San Juan. Also once a year, he ';ravels to Florida and New York to buy the 50 bales of tobacco he uses each year: the This is~6T'a'~/i~la~ffmlertnKmg, uut' the miss/on of a vintner selecting the best grapos for the finest wines. "A cigar without good leaves is noth- ing," Migenes explains. "Where it is grown is important and whether it is fested with bugs. This year the entire Cuban crop had to be destroyed he- cause of bugs.'" Seeds of Havana tobacco, he says, and the rich soil of Cuba. but the tw bacco is never the same. It is never quite as g~xt. A regular customer, a large pink- faced man, comes in and Migenes offers to let l~m choose a free cigar from the display case_ "Which one is the bestT' the cus- tomer asks. "The one you get for nothir~;' Migenes says, laughing heartily at his own joke. He has 300 customers, whose names and orders he keeps in a tldck book on a cluttered desk, and thousands of oth- ers who either come into the store or order ciga~ from places across the country. Migenes" workers make a~ut 1,200 cigars a day and he sells almost all of them. In his pr~e, M~genes could roll 400 a day. "'My customers axe gt~d friends;' he says, nodding approval for another cus- tomer to go into a temperature-con- trolled humidor room to select his cilpu's. His ci~'s mng~ in price op to $ |.95, less expensive than most places, he says, because he sells them in bundles, not in boxes, and because he does not use labels. "The taste of my cigars is my label," Migeaes says with casual ira.modesty. Hc adds quietly. "My father knew that." "~ltAs a mn, d llfe "" Mh=~.~ ~=,,~ '21 ~OUlU not cl~oo~e to do anythJngdn'ter* ent. Perhaps at one time .... " He doesn't finish the sentence 10ut instead shrugs and asks, "Who knows?" For a moment he stands there, cisar in hand, staring out thm~h ~ big window in front of his store at tho t~fi~. "! am grateful," he says finally, "that i have had the feeling." The sunlight is on his face. In the back are planted in different countries and room, the Cubans are singing. efforts are made to match the weather Victor Migenes has "'the feeling." He has been making cigars in Los ~qngeles for 41 years. 10 The Tobacco ObserVer Ti51341013
Page 12: TI51341014
Tobacco Program: It's Widely Misunderstood The tobacco price support program. It is so misunderstood. Industry critics denounce a Federal bureaucracy that encourages fa~ners to grow the leaf while ~iscouraging the use of tobacco products. End this tobacco "subsidy." critics urge; cure this government "schizo- phrenia." in fact, tobacco is not subsidized. A g~vernment price support program guarantees farmers a minimum price for the tobacco they grow. And, throughout America, their corn, rice, peanut, and cotton crops - 13 different commodities in all The U. S. Deparlment of Agrlculture aximinlsters the laws to assure an ade- quate supply of tobacco and the other crops, and to provide a reasonable re- torn on investment. tobacco program, a grower must g~aro antee not to produce more than specific acreage and p~unda~ allotments. More than 95 percent of tobacco farm- ors, through periodic referendums, have continued to favor these voluntary production and marketing quotas. Under the program, the Commodity Credit Corp. (CCC), an agency of the Federa~ government, makes }oans to farmers dh-ough their cooperative as- satiations, with tobacco as collateral. The money isn't a ~tL It's a loan, re- paid with interest. If a grower's tobacco fails to bring an auction bid of at least one cent above the predetermined support price, a gmwer-ov~ed cooperative takes the leaf and uses the f~nds from CCC to make the farmer a loan equal to the support price. The cooperatives process and store the tobacco, among the most imperish- able of farm crops, and when demand increases they sell the tobacco, thus repaylug the loan plus accrued interest. Cost Of ~he Program Legislators in the nadon's capital today are more cost-conscious than ever. The worth of Federal programs have to be proven. And Congressmen are learning that the strong tobacco price stabilization and production control program is the most successful of all government farm commodity programs. Since it was begun in 1933, when the Great Depression threatened to de- stroy the American economy, the bacco cooperatives have handled a total of $5.5 billion in loans. Tobacco's loan repayment rate is about 99 percent. During these past 47 years, untraid trams htwc amounted to $57 million. That's less than 0. I percent of the cost of all the 13 farm commodity price sup- ~3rt programs. Put another way, the net cost of the tobacco loan program over 47 years represents about what the Federal gov- ernment spends every 45 minutes. indeed, the underlying philosophy of the tobacco prog~an is that tobacco growers will operate and administer it It is naive to believe that cigarette advertising is the cause of smoking, writes Reinhold Bergler, in his new. scholarly book, Advertising and Ciga- rette Smoking: A Psychologictd Sit/d),. (1981: Hans Huber Publishers. Bern, Stuttgart, and Vienna; soflcover. printed in Switzerland.) Bergier, a professor of psychology. writes that cigarette ads are seen by some as a scapegoat for the continued popularity of cigm'ettes. But he stresses that smoking was al- ~yady an accepted practice among adult males in the lgth century. "'Cigarette advertising as such," he writes. "did not exist at the time." Bergler's book isn't easy to read. It cites literally hundreds of studies, mak- ing it thoroughly slow going. Bergler believes, "Whether a person takes up smoking in the first place is largely a question of life-history and personality," Just because a nonsmoker learns, through advertising, about ciga- rette brands does not, of course, mean that he will smoke, Bergler says. Part of the message of the book is that cigarette advertising bans "are based on false premises and miscon- ceptions-and they fail to take account of our current state of sciendllc knowledge.'" These bans are not an effective de- vice for influencing behavior, he says. He points out that in those nations where cigarette ads have been banned, this has "failed to achieve any signifi- cant and lasting reversal" in cigarette consumption. ".There are certainly no g/~unds.'" Bergler concludes, "for regarding ad- vertising as the essential factor which 'triggers off' cigarette smoking." It's time to plant that tobacco. Turner Gilmer, Costlewood, Va.,favor8 burley on his hillside farm. on a self-sustalning basis at no cost to the U. S. Department of Agriculture. During the life of the tobacco pro- gr',an, approximately $130 billion has bees collected by the national, state, and local governments in cigarette Tobacco also contributes favorably to this nation's international trade bal- ance, netting nearly !;2 billion in foreign trade in 1980. Smoking And Health Criticism of the Federal government for operating a tobacco program while warning citizens about the alleged haz- ards of smoking is unwarranted. In fact, as government officials have pointed out, the program keeps to- bacco lea/" prices higher and domestic tobacco supplies lower than they would be without such controls. With no price supports, cigarettes could cost Ices. John Pinney, director of tim govern- ment's O@ice on Smoking and Health, said in 1980: **We've reached the ~n- clusion that the price support prot~tm in no way affects any aspect of clgareRe smoking. It doesn't have anything to do with whether or not people start, It does not in any way affect whether or not they quit." And Joseph A. Callfano Jr., then- Secretary of the Departmem of Health, Education, and Welfare, testified fore Congress in 1978:"1 do not be- lieve that anyone smokes or doesn't smoke or decides to begin or continue or stops smoking because of the bacco subsidy," He gave the program the wrong name. He's not alone in that. But Ca]i- fano's assessment was-and is-- accurate. "So far as I'm concerned, the people have spoken, unless there's something I don't know. Hell, the people don't want it," said a Kern County super- visor about an attempt by California anti-smokers to have his county ap- prove a smoking restriction measure. California voters have twice re- jected a statewide smoking restriction law, but proponents of the most recent statewide effort are now attempting to persuade individual counties to restrict smoking. Bakersfield Californian Editorial "Given the magnitude of the prob- lem, and the dearth of current efforts to control environmental hazards, it is an affront to pose smoking cessation as an answer to our current occupational disease epidemic," writes a Maryland union o{~cial, David Wilson. in a letter to the American Journal of Public Health (1/81). An e~rlier editorial in that journal had urged work place smoking restric- tions. Wilson wrote, "To confuse this private behavior, practiced by large and varied segments of the population, with the environmental conditions in the work place, is a serious error with grave implications for remodial action." "Smokers of a pack or more of ciga- rettes daily had only a fourth as much colon cancer as nonsmokers," The Washington Post (1/I 6/8 I) reported on a government study of residents of Framingham, Mass. The researth paper, published in the Journal of the American Medical As- sociation {I/16), called this a "statis- tic.ally significant invoke association." "Ever since the memorable day when two of Christopher Columbus' sailors reported seeing natives who "drank smoke: tobacco has been an inseparable part of America's history and economic progress....'" '.This native American plant may have been a 'bewitching vegetable' in the eyes of Sir Walter Raleigh and his friends, but in terms of economic inv portance today, it is truly "the golden Article: Focus: The Tobacco in&~stry Profits: A Bank of Virginia Business P#bllcation Winter 198 I The Tobacco Observer I I TI51341014
Page 13: TI51341015
Top Tan-Activist Feted In Capital "1 don't want to wake up some morning and find out that you can't smoke in most public places;' says PauIG.En~glhardt, 1980 Distinguished Tobacco Action Network Activist of the Year. Increased voluntary membership in TAN is croc~al to help avoid unwar- ranted public smoking restrictions, he believes. Engelhardt, a sales r~presentative in Flodda for Lorillard, recently was hon- ored by TAN in Washington, D. C. He is the first to be chosen for what will be an annual top activist award. Engelhardt was sc[ected from a membership that is currently mo¢¢ than 38,000. Douglas Sessions .TAN Florida state director, who r~commended Engelhardt for the award, calls him "consistently responsive, cooperative, dependable. and enthusiastic." Says Sessions, "Paul wants to be sure the task is completed. He epito- mizes tic level of concern and dedica- tion it takes to defend successfully and enhance the image of our industry." John D. Kelly Jr., The Tobacco Insti- lure's senior vice president for state ac- tivlties.stressed in presenting the award that volunteer activists such as Engel- hardt are "the backbone of the industry." Kelly explained that five TAN mum- hers in each of 31 states were named "'distinguished TAN activists," with each receiving a plaque. A top TAN volunteer was named in each of these states, receiving a framed set of to- bacco leaves. Engelhardt was chosen from the statewinners. TAN was formed to ho[p preserve the tobacco industry, protect joba, am] defend individual freedoms, Kelly said. Candy Store Owner E~gulbardt, a native o~ G¢=~nany, grew up in New Jemey. He was once a Fuller Brush Co. salesman, and owned a candy store for 12 years. He and his wife, Peggy, moved to New Smyrna Beach, Fla., eight years ago. Three years ago, Engelhafdt joined Lorillard as a sales representative. His territory is Florida's sunshine-blessed Atlantic coast, from Ormond Beach to Cocoa, including famous Daytona Beach. "I make 65 stops," he says, "check- ing our products at supermarkets." "The main idea is not to run out of a brand. Also, you rotate stock and pre- pare for special sales." H~ says he's now ~veeted as a celebrity at some of the stores there in Volusia County. Engelhardt was contacted by mall in June 1980 and asked to attend a TAN training seminar in Orlando. He drove 50 miles-decided he wanted to be an advocalc for the program--and called S~ssions the. next week to ask how he could contn~but¢. "1 think all Floddians who smoke should he memhers," h¢ says. "'It's imo portent to keep tabs on proposed new regulations.°" Engclhardt has enrolled 525 "rAN members himself. "1 take a minute to talk to them," he says. "| find many poo- pie are tired of too much government interference." Engclhardt is persuasive. "If you took my lips away." he says, "I'd be unemployed." This was the EngelhardCs first trip to the nation's capital "Having a candy store,opon 7 a.m. to I I p.m. seven days a week., plus having five kids, you don't go far sway," he says. He and his wife were given a VIP tour of the White House and the Capitol, including a meeting with their U.S. Senator, Paula Hawkins. "We ~oved it alL" the proud TAN activist of the year says. Paul G. Engelhardt (right). the Tob,cca Action Network's distingoished activist for 1980, was nominated by Douglas Sessions. TAN's Florida state director. Sessions carefully holds the winner's trophy, a symbo! of the dedication Engel- hurdt has for ~he fobscco industry. under a flood of knported cars, elec- tronics, and other Items, one Ameri- can taata has managed to carve out a leaclershlp po=ltioo in the world market," begins an a~cle In the Gmenevllle (Tenn.) Sun (1/19/81). "American-blend cigarettes, fea- turing a variety of tobacco~ and vorlngs, now account for more sale= than any other type of retie--about 40 percent o! the mated world volume of 4.4 trillion cigarette=," the stow, date,ned W~nMon-Satem, N.Co, say=. "~e to~ac¢o Industry's commit- ment to research on ~noklng and health now totsls $91 mill(on, an dated T0bB~o InMttote release on More than $(M million of the fund~ h~ beam comndtted by ~ Council for Tobacco Rnseamh, which pro- by |ndiperKbflt =clentists IMo many pha~s of tobacco use and health. Ddnldng frequently Is Involved In what It total= d~l~tte-mlat=d time that cause death, ~¢¢ordiog to • e=w report by the U. S. Fh'e Adr~nl=- tmUon. I"M r~xt ~ tlal fires In Amedca In 1979. "'Cigarette= bear the highest tax of any Item th~ Amedcan consumer bu~;' ~ys an updatnd r, port on clgamtt~ taxation from ~ Tobacco Tax Council, Richmond, "If It were not for the~ burde~ ~ tm~l," the ~ped ssys, '1he conaumer mid pay 34 c~nts peck or $3.40 per olden lot Id= alga- retted" A canon of popular brand the Tax Coundl IN THIS ISSUE OF __ e Cc e Ter • Women Farmers Win Respect (Page 6) • "There Is No Tobacco Subsidy" (Page 11) • Tobacco In Cartoons (Page 8) Apdl 1981 The Tobacco Observer 1875 ~ Street. Northwest Wash=ngton. O C. 20006 T151341015

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