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ME _ROF_LIIAN ,_E_ How to keep weft

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Abstract

By T~ . expect results ove~t; ~ a r~ ~s~ ~ ~ h~pi~, ticu~r pi~e of ~ipment. M L.

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Named Organization
American Cancer Society
Army
Charlotte Observer
Chicago Tribune
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Imperial Tobacco Co. (Determined optimum nicotine levels for cigarettes)
Did testing pre-1972? of U.K. smokers and concluded that the optimum nicotine delivery for the cigarette, and that stepwise reductions in delivery caused progressive rejection by consumers (see Project Wheat)
Lancet
New York Daily News
Washington Post (Newspaper)
Named Person
Auerbach, Oscar, M.D. (Research Scientist, VA Hospital, E. Orange, NJ)
Dec, Dale
Delle, R. Van
Dellen, R. Van
Dellen, Van
Goldsmith, John R.
Hammond, E. Cuyler
Martell, Edward A.
McBride, Virgil L. (RJR public affairs)
Reisner, Ronald M.
Senkus, Murray (RJR Director of Research c. 1968-early 1980s)
Shea, John P.
Smith, Eddie
Terry, Luther Leonidas, M.D. (Surgeon General, 61-65, U of Pennsylvania, Anti-Tobacco Expe)
Luther Terry was former Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service from 1961 to 1965. Terry was emeritus professor of Research Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1984 (E. Whelan 1984).
Van, Dr.
Van, Theodore R.
Wayne, John
Wood, David A.
Date Loaded
18 Jul 2005
Box
5302

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Page 1: TI09141072
24.743-- ME ~ROF~LIIAN ,~E~ How to keep weft • o late.-to stop smoki.n_ _ By T~ . expect results ove~t; ~ a r~ ~s~ ~ ~ h~pi~, ticu~r pi~e of ~ipment. M L. mS~ ~- it ~y ~e five or ~ y~ I wo~d ~nly vote wi~ smokes two pocks of clgaret~ a day and every morning has n terrible hack- Ing cough. He says th~ the cigarettes help him to clear out the mucus from hie lung~ and he doesn't care whe.th~/ or not he get~ lung c~nee¢. because John Wayne .had It and was cured. Do you have any suggestions on how I might convince him t.o stop?" Although lung cancer is the most common, fatal cancer in' men and the incidence of lung cancer seems to be increasing in both men and women, it is still imp~ssible to convince many individuals" to stop smok- ing. However, you might wish to point out to your husband that John Wayne's cure is the exception rather than the rule. Many unfortunate persons develop lung cancer that is NOT detected early and where the chance for surgical cure is much less likely. From what you describe, your husband may well have chronic bronchitis. Chronic bronchitis often appears to be related to cigarette smoking and is characterized by a hack- ing cough, which produces grayish or white sputum. In- dividuals • suffering from chronic bronchitis can be ex- pected to have these coughs and, also, they may be more prone to respiratory infections throughout the year. In general, cue can expect their health to deteriorate through the years as lung damage progresses. You might point out to your husband that it is not too late to stop smoking because studies have demonstrated that signifi- cant reversibility .of" lung dnmage can occur, ln,~Jn- dividuals even.thch'gh they smoked for a long period .of time. Unfortunately, he cannot~ Having done that, however, he may not be so prone to respiratory infections. You might .ask him if he would prefer to have subse- quent ~bility from this dif- ficulty in breathing and in chronic recurrent infection as he gets older, or if he would consider stopping cigarette smoking to prevent this. Since most people are more concern- ed abeu~ lung cancer as a result of cigarette smoking, they tend to forget the equally serious complications of chronic long infection and ultimate lung damage with respiratory failure ~ind insufficiency. In either case, continua~tion of cigarette smoking could cause one or the other, and your h~- band sh.ould not feel com- fortable because John Wayne in such good health. Unior. tunately, few victims of lung cancer have John Way~e's luck A reader .from .Arken~s Write~: "1 am prelident of the Women's Guild of our com. munl~ hospital. We ~erve e population of-about 12,000 people end our hospital has 135 beds. We -,re making plans for a new fund-railing drive, end ~lnce we do not have an artifl~el kidney, some gulki members would like to make ihat our next goal. "We have already ral~ the money for a mobile coronary unll end for s children's playroom. We have a good medical st~ff but some of the doctors ~m to ~ that an ~rt]f]c'fal kidney would not be very practical. Whel Is your opInioc)';'" ~.Unless y6, l~v~ .u ~'iaiizt o.'~ ~our'medl~! ~ff trained to u~e an artificl~l:kidncy, and un- le~s you co,ld n~e .use of it ~ munity hospitals all over the United States that are in closets gathering cobwebs because doctors on the staffs lack the skills required to use them or because there is no need for them in the community. Judg- ing from the size of your com- munity and hospital, you would be better off transferring the occasional patient who might need this form of treatment to another hospital. Besides, un- der the new federal funding regulations, your hospital may no~ meet the specifications re- quired t..~ ourcha.se this par- ere UUd lecV A frt~nd of mlne Is laldng these drugs." Peritrate is a long-acting "nitrate compound that is used in the treatment' of angina pec- torts (chest pain). It is classified as a coronary artery vasodilator. Antispas also dilates blood vessels. There are many more drugs of this kind on the market; the best known are nitroglycerin and amylnitrate, and they are often taken to i'elieve the s.vmp- toms of hardening of the cor- onary arteries. • :--:XINGTON. '(', LEADER T109141072
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THE WASHINGTON POST SEPTEMBER 28, 1976 Heahh A harassed mother ~rit~-old son just of our family has cancer of the throat. Cart this dis- got over a bed-wetting prolBl~m. ~ f-year-old ease be transmitted to anyone else? Should the daughter still sucks her thumb and now my young- est, a 4-year-old, has taken to scratching his bottom. Can't I have at least one kid who doesn't have a problem? What am I doing wrong?" I suspect that you~ youngest son's problem may have a simple explanation and solution. He has the classical symptoms of pinworm infestation. This should be taken care of right away because pin- worms have a tendency to spread rapidly to other members of the family. In fact, I wouldn't be sur- prised if the time you read this you and your entire family will have started scratching. The remarkable thing about pinworm eggs is that they find their way into just about everything. They are so tiny they can float in the air and get on your skin, clothes and the food you eat, There are several excellent medications, including pyrvinium pamoatc, which should do the trick. But you will probably have all the members of your family take it. dishes and silverware that he uses be.sterilized? The answer to both your questions is "no," All ~ ou have to do is wash the dishes and siverwa~e with hot water and a detergent the way you wash any other dishes. There is no way that anyone can "catch" cancer from someone else. Q. Is a persistent sore throat a sign of cancer? I am very worried about my husband who has had a sore throat for about six or eight weeks. He is also hoarse. He has been a heavy smoker for years, and he attributes the hoarseness to cigarettes. But l'm afraid it may be more serious than that. A. You may be right. Persistent and progressive hoarseness and a sore throat are the mo~t common symptoms of cancer of the larynx. And this tYpe o£ cancer is most common in heav~ smokers. I urge you to have your husband see a doctor as soon as possibh-. ; 19q6, The Chicago T;lbu|le T!0914107'3
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Chicago Tribune, Saturday,, ,~,ugust 14, 1976 ° How to keep well By T.R. Van Dellen, M.D. MRS. D.W. from Canton, Fulton County, writes: '~VI husband and I are ~on~mokers, buC we often find • ourselves in smoke-filled rooms. I have heard that breathing in this seeondhand smoke is more dangerous than smoking. Is this true'.'" It is not so bad as firsthand smoke because it i:; more diluted. Statistics do show that it increases the ,'isk of bronchitis, emphysema, and lung cancer, but not to the degree that occurs in the heavy smoker. I, too, have been in smoke-filled rooms that have left me coughing, my eyes burning and tearing, and my head aching. I heartily applaud the movemetJt for separate facilities for smokers and nonsmoker.~ ar, d the increased attention to the health and rights ,,[ non- smokers. "Living wit[~ ~Arthritis," Dr. Van Dellen's latest provides practical advice [or coping with this painful disease. For a copy, send $1.35 to "Van Oellen- Arthritis,'?. e/o The C/ffcago Tribune, Box 259, NoJ'~ ood, N.J. 07648. Make checks payable to Newspapert, o,ks. TI09141074
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POMPANO BEACH, FLA, SUN-SENTINEL -D. 44,496-- FT. LAUD[RDAL~ M£'~ROPOLITAN to keep well stop smoking, and st~ ~ to ~o s~, many times. But she was a nervous person who was miserable unless she had a cigarette in her hand. Can anything be done about this terrible disease short of pa~ing a law ban- rfing cigarettes ?" You are right in saying this is a familiar story. Lung cancer has a very low cure rate - only about 10 per cent. By the time lung ~.aneer can be seen on a chest ~:-ray, it is already well ~stablished.' At the time of sur- B~r' T. DELLEN, M. D. A mart [r wife jtmt I suppose you Ibis story many times: She was a heavy smoker -- more than two packs a day for the last 17 years. For sever~l years, she had a terrible cigarette cough and frequent attacks of bronchitis. I insisted lhat she have a yearly checkup, which included chest x-rays. These were always negative until a year ago when the first spot appeared. She had surgery almost iramediately, but it was too late. gery, we find Ihat 1!~ ttwnor usually "For years I tried to get her to has spread to the neighboring glands. There als0 is a good possibility in at least haft of file victims that the cancer cells have entered the blood- stream and have metastasized, or spread, to the liver, bone, brain or other parts of the body. However, there are ~evernl dif- ferent types d lung c~er, and what applies to one does nor nece~trily apply to another. In a typical c~e, the lesion originate~ in the lining of a bronchus and grows until the pas- sageway is blocked. The tumor then spreads into lung tissue, neishboring organs, neck glands and more distant structures. The earliest symptom is a cough.. But this may be overlooked because the .m~jo~ of lung-cancer victims are beav~.~mokers who have swcalled cigarette Coushs and fro- quent bouts of bronchitis. In filese patients, file first clue usually is a parent reach.
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THE WASHINGTON POST JULY 5, 1976 ........+..._ ~_ ..+"-,+,m.+,~-v".,++P,o..,m-e../w,,s shown to have an • ~ " "~.~ .... ~"+ verse effect. F~r example, Mrs. S.A. ffo~ego, men who skipped breakfast Calif., writes: "I ~ke vita- min pills every day and visit my doctor regularly for a ehecku.p and Pap test. I do this because I am a firm be- liever in preventive medi- cine and would, like ~o ],ive a tong and ~heal~hy Dfe. The other day, my ~eighbor told me that the most impol~tant guarantees of a long and healthy life were not things that doctors had to offer but clean living. W~hen I tried {o argue, she said it was a sci- entific fact that .had been proved by medleal research. How can. you prove some- ~hing like this?" Your frien~t is probably ~eferring to a study con- ~luctod.by a team of Calilor- via researchers, which came to the conclusion ~ha#~men and women ca~ add 11 and seven years to their ~ves re- spectively, provided they ob- serve several golden rules of behavior. These include eat- ing three balancect meals a day, getting eight hours of sleep each night, not smok- ing and not .having mo~'e ~han one er .two drinks a day. These conci.usions were based on studies conducted since 1965 on approximately ?,090 residents of Alameda~ County, Calif. As far as diet is con- cerned, eating three meais a day without inobetween snacks was shown to be im- portant. Skipping breakfast and ate between meals had mo,re ,than twice the mortal- ity r~te of those who eat ,breakfast daily and did not snack between meals. Main° taining a normal weight was also important. One findin~ to emerge ~rom ~his study was that adu.lts who were 10 per cent or more under- weight for their heigh¢ and body build had ~igher death rate. Increased mer, tality was also observed in men or women who were more than 20 per cent overweight. The" a&verse effects of smoking were, once again confirmed in \this study. Nonsmokers had ~he lowest risk of" early .death, wh~e men who smoked two or more packs a day had" the highest risk. An interesting and unexpected finding was that moderate + drinking-- that is, not more than one .or two drinks a day--was better than total abstinence. Heavy drinking 'had the op. posite effect. Bad health hab.its tended ~o be related, so that severa~ frequently were found in the same per~on~ For ex~m- pie, heavy drinkers usually smoked, and .those who smoked usually skipped breakfast. Despite this, R was still shown that a poor habit had an adverse ef£ecL even when occurring by it- selE .%s £ar as sleep was con- cerned, lower death rates were observed in men who ~lept eight ~hours a night than in men who slept more or less. Seven ,~ov, rs seemed e~o be the optimum sleeping ~ime for a woman. Regular_exercise was als6 conducive to longevity, and men who engaged in active sports on a re~lar basis bad. lower ~- mortaMy rates than ~hose who' onl~ oc~a- siona, lly engaged in such ac- tivites. The conclusions of this study are not meant to put doctors out of business, bu,t to keep ~JRn~s. in. .their proper perspective. In short, the general, conclusion was t.hat-goo~t'li~ing lmbits can do more ~or.~e ~eaith of the population as a whole ~haR car medical services. R.C., an 11-year-old reader from Columbia, Mo. writes: "I want to go to ,b~U~t school, but my mother says I have to wait until I am in high school. ~ Is there any- thing I can do.in meantime?" You could get a book from the 1.ibrary showing some of the basic balle~ steps and exercises, and t~y practicing them on your own. Or you could ask your physical edu- ca, tion teacher to hel.p you by recommending certain exercises, or even offering instruction in creative move- ment and dance as part your physical education pro- gram. ~ 1976. L"hlca~o T109141076
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TAMPA, FI.ORIDA TRIBUNE -i1 IAMPA MEIROPOLI]AN AREA - Moti ati0n Key To St 6pping Smokin. g hypnosis, and ! am tempted to try it. What is your opinion? Do you think it might work for me?" FIRST, LET ME emphasize the portance'of your quitting sm~ing, espe- cially since it sounds as if you have ready developed o~ disease related to your cigarette habit. ~amely. chronic bronchitis, which often precedes emphy- sema. Also.' since your cough pattern has changed. I would urge you to get a chest X-ray immediately to make sure that you haven't developed something even more serious. As for methods of quitting the ciga- retie habit, many things have been tried. including hypnosis with posthypnotic suggestion.. A recent study showed that hypnosis worked only in those patients who were highly motivated. In my opin- ion. people whe really want to stop can do so regard)ess o~ the methods they use. If you can abstain for ten days, you should be able to abstain for a month. Then three months, and then indefi- nitely. The trick is to take each day as it comes, If you are really serious about wanting to quit. you will be able to do it. Keep saying to ),ourself: "One puff and l'm a smoker again." P. S. It sounds as if your doctor needs a little kelp too. ',"..'A I~EE.FROM Ev~ville, Ind., . ~titCs:.~ "I am .4~ yean otd aM ~ve ~ ~i~ ~et a ~ ~ ciga~ttes a ~ of mm~. my ~lng ciga~tte ~gh has ~ g~t~ w~ ~ my • ~ me to ~ s~i~. I am weil aWa~ of t~ d~e~ d ea~er and .Ma~ diRa~, a~ i w~ld t~iy like to ~, in ~act. ! ~ve tfi~ at least half a ~n limes, but I am really ~ed. 1 ~ve ~ver ~ ~ to go ~ger than ~ '~y~ wlt~t a ~ga~tle. My ~tor ;~ ~lp ~ ~ ~s t~ ~me ~lem. I ~ a f~ w~ was re. ~t!y. able...to k~ ~ habit thigh ~ ~:~.,. :~ ,,'; ,,~ ' , .... HowTo :
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V.L. from Walla Walla. Wash.. writes: "I realize that scientists have not pin- ned down the exact causes ot cancer, but I keep hearing about new suspec.ted causes all the time. Could you list some of the factors that pre- dispose one to cancer?" Yes. First and foremost on the list is smoking, which has a very strong statistical association with lung. throat and mouth cancers. Other types of air pollution, fumes. and dusts from metals and asbestos also are high on the list as causes of lung cancer. There is a strong associa- tion between skin cancer - our most common form ot the disease -- and excessh'e exposure to the sun, X-ra.vs. arsenic, tar and petroleum products. Some recent studies have shown a correlation between ~onorrhea and later cancer of the prostate In men and genital herpes and uterine cancer in women. Breast :nots occur more ol'ton in women with previous mam- mary disease and a family history of he condition Women wtlo nave not borne children or who had theu" first baby after the age of ,-,'0 are also more likely candi- dates for breast cancer. There is a hereditary tend- ency in carcinoma of the stomach, especially among those with type A blood: per- nicious anem:a and lack ,Jr hydrochloric acid alsn a:'e believed to play ~mportaut r~ies. Parasites. cirrhosis ~hard- ening~ and nutritional deft- ciencies often precede a malignancy el the liver. And it is rare to find a victim of gallblad.der cancer who does not hmm gallstone~.. P.olyps. ulceral~hre eolitl~ .all. ~ ~aml- Woman Asks Abe\ ly history of these conditions are mentione6 frequently when the colon and rectum are affected. The excessive use of certain aniline and related dyes als. is an ele- ment in cancer ,ff the blad- der Q. "'Two of my children came home from school with head lice. I alerted the school and was told they should be kept home until they got rid of the ]ice. But I am uncertain what I should use to treat them. A neigh- bor suggested an insecticide, but this doesn't sound very safe to me," A. You're right• Forget about insecticide, and in- stead, get a prescription Kwell Lotion or Ointment and Kwell Shampoo. These products contain benzyl ben- zoate ,,r benzen( hexachlo- ride and are muc!t safer and more effechve than inset-h- cidt,s. Use a special steel Derback comb to -emove the nits T,) keep Ihe infeslation Item ~pl-eadlng to oth{.r members of vmw family. ,,r your ciuldre~s f)'tends, ~ou kvill have to [aunoer all 6ed- ding and ~earmg apparel, and of course, all combs and brushes should be washed thoroughly with the Kwell Shampoo ~Copyright, 1973) CHRISTMAS TREES WHOLESALE Last gulling Dale Dec. 9 Order Now Cull Eddie Smith Br t 1724t84 T!09141078
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oking Areas ~;~tudenl~ ~t the city's high Th,e p, olicy. '~.has ,b..e.en __._+~fliools~ ~till are smoking in grossty, nansen," the. penuon ,t~e' traditional locations -- said. "Students daffy smoke lavatories -- despite a new tobacco and marijuana" pbli.cy .designating outdoor both inside and outside the " ..m._._._._._._._~a. s wher~ they can smoke school. . wilbur fear of punishment. The principals of Bulke- d, .I'n.a report presented ley, Weaver and Hartford Tttesday to the Board of Edu- Public high schools also re- ". cation, [~riacipals at all three ported assaults and extortion " ..idty high_ schools predicted attempts had occurred in , that indoor smoking would school lavatories despite • l~crease as the weather monitoring efforts. ',' ~ colder. . Asst. Supt. John P. Shea, '. :.:,,.~eboarii last .spring'ap- who collected the principals' • "proved the designated smok- reports, said that verified in- ' taga~eas ~#here Students cidents of assaults of extor- ea~fld smoke before and after tion attempts this school school and between class pc- year total one each at Bulke- riods, ley and Weaver and four at . ,~pe~.tion. sig~ed by 152 Hartford Public. ~eacaet'S. am staff members The board took no action ~'t~.,Harffoi'd ' Publ|c HI h on the re:~ort, but asked $cho0t.:a~l nresented to ~e Supt. Edyt e J. Gaines to board',.:~l~ay, ,~t. make x,.e¢ommendations on .'.the at it,.DeC. 'i Cigarettelead¢ ncer cause BOL~DE~R, Col~. (UPI) - Ci~ strokers may get lung t'~cer more often than noasm~ers because cigarette tobacco c~t~ins radioactive lead; aeheadst says. Dr. Edward A. Martell said his tests also indicate minute amotmts of ]cud spread to other parts ,of the body and cause eotfld accumulate theinsoluable absorb small amounts of the lead-210 particles via the blood lead while they are growing. He stream or the lymph cireulato- said the radioactive substances ry system," Martell said emitted by smoking lodged in Sunday. lungs and give off alpha rays, Martell claims tobacco pla~ts which destroy lung cells. Oops... 'suicide' nearly was hone, stomach,and liver can- TOKYO (AP! -- A 19-year-old They said t.he explosinn cers. woman turned on the gas t~ day destroyed the two-story "lt~is quite consistent with commit suicide after a quarrel apartment house 1~ a Tokyo my.._.~theory that m~st interval with her husband, changed her suburb and i~jured the young can'~,~. :~Wg:: _k~.w~.o[ "7 .b~ve, mind but forgot to turn off the v~'oman and another resident. stoma, ch~!i~ ,#~ .',~._~-(..~ &e ga~.bcf~ce lighting a cigarette, The wife's identity was not re- . ;. :;.~-.....,..- .... , ----.~.~.~,,~ T109141079
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scientists have not pinned .... down the ~xact"'caases of cancer, but I keep hearing about new suspected causes all the time. Could you list some of the factors that : predispose one to cancer?" Yes. First and foremost on the llst is smoking, which has a very strong statistical assoeation with lung, throat and mouth .cancers. Other types of air pollution, fumes. and ,dusts from metals and a~.be~tos als~.a3"e high on the Th~ is a s~'~g association m~ ~m~O~[9~ra. o f the ~'nic', ta~ ~'~'d petroleum p~o~.dcts. " ~. ~: : . S~e recent studies havc . shown ~ correlation bctwce~ gonorrhea and l~.r cancer of the prostate.~fi~ men. and genital herpds and uterine cancer in wo~en. Breast tumors .occur more o[|cn women with mammary disease and a family h/story of the con- dition. Women who have borne ckildren or who had their first baby after the age :;0 are also more likely didates fer breast cancer. There ~s a hereditary dency in carcinoma of stomach, especlp/ly those, v,'~th .:{yp,e. A blood: per~ficious anemiaand lack of hydrochlor~c acid also art, believed to play import.m roles. P~rasites, cirrhosis ~h:,r- denlng~, . ands" nutritio.al deficiencies Of tea precede a malignam:y of lhe liver. And it i~:~'are ~o t'|n~l. -a victim of ~h'I~.adder-c~h~er ,who does ' not .ha.re gaIIs~ones. Polyps. ulcerative colitis ~id a family h~ory of th~..aditioas are me~tioned f~'eatly: when c~rt~in aa[lj ~i'elated T!09141080
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A hear t-~/man from Danbury, Conn., writes: "Once in a wlule notice that my heart seems to skip a beat I tan tell when it happens, b,,._'ause I get a funny feeling in my chest followed by a pause, and rhea my he~'= beats again. "I am only 32 year~ old and as far as I know i never had anyt~ng wrong wi~ my hea~. I passed my Army physicM bo~ going in and getting out. I can d~, just about ~ 1 v.aat ~o and I play a lot of tennis. Can the~ s~pped bea~s lead to a heart condiu,m? Do you ~i~ 1 should see my doctor about ~em?" Most norm~ people w~ have some slight ~reguJar- 2ty of hea~ rhy~m at some time or other d~in= lives, and these carely ever cause auy ~Ia~' people have these reg~acJdes w~oz,~ aware o~ t~em, bu; e~k~:s ~e yourseH, arc % er:. cc s~ous o~ ~hem. ~~ey tend be more common in peopie who ~ t~ much or who smoke heavdy pie who are ~nder a deal of nervous [{:~H~I: seem more ~u~cep;ii)..~ to minor Jr~eg~2r:L ey ]~ heart Deut. Oi coupe, c/stut'b.m¢ ~'s., the heart's rhvtmn ~IS,, ~*..- heart disease, a ~, h:ch they may requ.re treJ~ment.. But so long as t},ey t.nl> oc- cur occasionally m a persoa ~'ho i~ o~erwise he~, ~ey ace nothmt to a'bout. You m~ght tr) ..utting dowa on cigart.tte~ and cof- fee if ~ott use these exce~ si~ ely. Hegular p ,ystcal checkups m'e a good u/cafor eteryo~e; but these o,~ca- sJonal skipped heartb~ a' ghemseh'es do not ~a) :a,~t tl'Jp to }our T!09141081
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Management Information Clipping Corporate Public Relations Dept., Room 113 E.'~. 7271 Publication: THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER Date: 9/16/7 5 Page: 16B C. B. WADE H. C. ROEMER J. S. DOWDELL C. D. DURDEN V. L. McBRIDE MURRAY SENKUS F. G. COLBY ,./-- ~. KORNEGA~-'" : "" thy Hear ~;~., a~ seereta~ and fatigue. #y t~e .same toke~, i ~i~s: "Ac~g to my last don't keep anger bottled up inside , p~ysicM exa~nation, I am healthy you; let it out. " :- ..... " " arid.mY weight is normal.-I do not. ~moko and I e.xereise regulaxly.. "'~S..till, I can't seem to overcome a f6~r'~'hat I am doomed to an early death from a heart attack, bly fatho 4r.died of a heart attack at 44 and also lost an uncle, great-uncle, and gr~i,ndmother from. cardiac prob- lems, Do ~ou have ,any suggestions on how I might avoid f.ollowing their, foo.tsteps?" .,Yes,-and the first: one is stop ~oyrying and concentrate more on the joys of living and less on the fea.r=s_qf dying. Here are i0 simple rules for a healthy heart: 1, Have, an annual physical examination,'with special attention paid.to the heart and blood pres- 2; Eat sparingly of animal fats, eggs, cheese, butter and other dairy ' products high in cholesterol. Your physician or dietitiar~ can advise yo~ on this. : i 3,_DO~'3ETAKE u~ smoking, or things. 5. Don)t allow yourself to get fat. 5. Get ample sleep and take far vacations, 7. Continue to exercise reguIarlyo . :-~8.. Try to avoid situations that. 9. Learn to relax, and achieve a balance between business commi[- merits and things you do [o~" per- sonal enjoyment. " " 10. Join the Coronary ClubJ~'ou can 8el their timely information by writing to the Coronary Club Inc., 20310 Chagrin,, Blvd.,. Cleveland, Ohio 4412~ .... T109141082
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THE"WASHINGTON POSI ..... ADVICE, ~7~'~' ~ Friday, August 15. I0:5 A nsmoker's Lament - ~- . - .~ ..... eve the ven~a~on to pre- '. ~e~e the peace and your Conn., ~tes: "I am a n~n- As for smokers in your smoker who is .allergic to to- bac¢o. Whenever I enter- tai~ I practically have to move out of my apartment bev~e it reeks o~ ~moke. "~o women I work with are~_hain smokers,.and they rna~ my life miserable. Ev- ery night i come l~ome with a headache..anc~ :an upset stomach. I'm" sure the pol- luted air .I !breathe every d~y is.driving.me to an early grav~!:.. :"Please don~t suggest quit- til~g my job; I love my work. a~i Ihave ten~re.~vith my pt.eseht company.. Leaving w~add mean giving up bene- fits that I've worked years to..acc~mulate. But do you h4ve any other,-suggestions?" '.An antihistamine might help if you re.ally .vx.e aller- g|c to smoke. You might also consider getting a sinai! desk fan to blow away the s~oke/Remember, too, that such problems can be soh'ed bF an understanding boss, w,ho may want to establish a nbnsmoking section or ira- ,. apartment, ~is is your cas- tle and you have every right to ban smoking. Put up a '.~'hank .You for Not Smok- .ing". sign-and get rid of all ash trays. If this doesn'~ Work, ..~imply~ ..ask your fri~ndsito do 'their smoking outside. It .may cost you a guest or..two, but at least y~u'll have one smoke-free haven. : Int.~estiugly, yours is a problem tlmt is gaining im creased sympathy and atten- flop. b~..th so~ially and scien. tlfl~all~: Several ~cities and states"h~;v~ passed laws re- quirlng, restaurants and other p'dblic places either ~o ban smoking'br to reserve a section, for nonsmokers. All interstate airlines, buses and trains are ,required to have a .nonsmoklng section. • Numerous groups devoted to the rights of nonsmokers are being formed across the country. Scientifically, several stud- ies are underway to deter- mine what harm, if any, may result" from inhaling other people's smoke..In- deed, preliminary results suggest that some,, smoke, especially .that from -cigars, may he more harmful to thbse nearby than to the ac- tual smoker. T109141083
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Health ~ ago, I discovered lwo ~a~¢~ ~wen~ to my ~hysi- ~ who did a mammogram. Hes~d I had fibrocys~c dis- ~a~d not to wo~. AI- d~ he assured me that t~ps are not "~ncer- o~ still wonder whe~er I ~a~d~ave a biopsy just to make sure. W~at'~do: you ~? ~Iso, are these lumps l~e~ ]to develop into cancer?" ~brocystic disease is n co--on breas~ disorder that ~ usually caused by cessive fibrou~ :car) tissue. cysts or enlarged miik glands. Fibrocystic changes nsu~y ~e brained on the ~cl~c activity o~ estrogens. the female sex hormones. Ho~bna ~herapy for the disorder usually is ineffec- five, aRhough th~ndition does ~provo during pre~- nancy. ~nd lactatip~ Women wflh ~ibr~ystic • ssa~. are amo~ t~ose c0~idered sli~htly~" ~ore lik~ to develop ~st ~n- car..(O~¢r risk ~cto~s in- ~st cancer, not "~aving a chfid~'a first ~re~nncy at'- tar,~e a0, .and pr~9~ breast c~t~o~vever,.~e, cysts ~eT~'~;O~ no~tdr~ into .You wRl. probably be most col~e-.ious of firs~ coupl~ '~f days of mdhstruation, wl~en ~-breasts are modt,apt td'l~ ~nlarged and tender. At thi~ ~ne, the ]~reasts seem "lum.pi.er" than r.]~s..ual, and many.omen are a~raid that the~h~ve can- .~.. Although eq.ery breast l.l~mp should ~be seen ~b~*omptly by a doctor, hap- ])~ly the vast ma,~l"tt~ prbve to be noncancerous. • Many of me.~..~umps, or cysts, are soft bP~ause the:." are filled with fluid, whiciz ca~ be drained ,ef~ with a hollow needle. "~)thers are solid, and if a ni~rnmogram. the special brea~; x-ray that your~doctor tool~l;t%a Xero- tli~. b~st, show~tmy suspi- cious:areas, you~eetor will w'a=t to do a bi@_sy/~ust to b~sure., If .the~ttmpm~are i~. ~a~. ~l~ your ph~ ~e~n~znend a careJqlly~ifit- ted.izra to relieve pressur~ and "give "Proper support., If t~rbblem persists, the d~J~t~.'ay be removed surgi- Az~bther common syrup. tom o'~ fJbrocystic ~isease Js a sti~ht discharge,~rom the n[pt~.e. Any un~Jual" dis- ch,a~s from tl~ nipple sh6t~d be seen by a doctor" to',rl~[, e out cancer. Q. Could bronchial -----~- as~ttma cause emphysema ~ ~!person who " doesn't "-~ ~- -~hr o ~[~chia l T109141084
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CHICAGO, ILL- D. 681,~59--S. 1,151,590 CHICAGO METROPOLITAHAf~.A Sliding hernia not serious wake up with pain.. "I've had , results L. M. WRITES: "For several years. I have had Irequent bouts of heartburn and upper abdominal pain. When I bend over, I invariably bring on the pain. I have to sleep with several pillows, and even then often X-rays and tests, but the However, when I doctor had me lie on my so my head was lower the X-rays, he saw that above the diaphragm. He hernia amJ the cause of : "He ~ and prescribed antacids. He. suggested "~, smaller meals and "told me to ,ever. He also told me to put of my bed so g~avity w/H help place. "Is this can do? Do you bare any other thoughts on ~ Yes; ~n fact, I a/so have a hiatal hernia, and f know all the symptoms you have described. Your doctor's advice is sound, and I t~'ge you to follow it. Surgery is seldom needed beca~b hhtal ber~a usually responds to diet and medication. Only when the disc, omforL is severe and cmmot be controlled is stwgery recom/ve~ded. • To help you better understand your condition, let nze descr~ibe the physiology of the hia~al herah,. The esophagus, wh/ch can-ies food do~ the thro~t,' How to ~cstomach at t~e level of the diaphragm, When Lion occurs above the diaphragm, part,of the stomach protrudes into the chest~ cavity. The Lu'~us the opening in the diaphragm thru wh/ch the esopha- gus passe~ to reach the stomach. ~, hernia there usual- ly sUdes up and down with .changes in posture and movements of the diaphragm. Irritation of the lower end of the e~ophagus causes the stomach's acid content to ba~k up and probably thecause of your heartburn. J. WRITES: "I have arthr~s in my Imees. told me that elastic stockings would help, hut.ndght cause phlebitis. Are support hose a help or hindrance lee ~meone like me?" They are a help. In ~act, they were devised ~,~ a treatment for pbleb/t/s and other venous disorders. They also lend some supporz to arthritic knees and might be worth a try. __ ' A READER V,'~RITES: "'Some of the women in our office have given up cigarees "hut have started ~ use little cigars..Are ~hey le~ll~rmful than cigarets?" Little cigar~ are-less harmful only if the smoker does not inhale. Since cigar tobacco cont~/ns more tar and nicotine than cigarets, inhaling this smoke actually may be mor~ harmful than smoking eigarets. Of course; ~ew cigar smokers inhale, but many for, zner cigaret smokers find it dif~cul~-i£ not impossible --to avoid inhaling. Cigar and pipe~rnokers also" more prone to cm~cer o~ the mouth and larynx. Dr. Ya~t Dei:.en has n~t~en a comprehensive guide o~ circulation. ["o~ a cop~. zend 50 ~ents and a $tamped. ~elfaddres~ed envelope ~o Van Del~ Circulation. Chiccgo Tribune-New York Hews 8yndicare, P. O. Box 3585. New Yor?r. ~. Y. 10017. ~ake payable to b'ewspaperbooks. T109141085
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Health • ' to .auger a lot'=l~rom hea~- English study was done o~ ~ave a s . bg~ ~d ~g~on. 1 ~ad 36 pa~ who were con- ca~e. ~y ~at ~e m~n ~nc~ ~t i~ges~o~ was ~ of" ~fion a~ in~ble a~er ea~ng eer- Q. I ~as ~ f~, cu~e~, cer- ~ foods. But o~y four of tender beca~ ~ p~, ~e~es, c~, ~em developed distress af- c~a~on. ~'. my "o~ ~d ~r~ Do you terthey~d consumed ~e~ ~ere ~ a~?" "~ges~bles" in di~g~sed problem? Yes, u~ to a po~t. ~e f~: S~eh ~d g~blad- ~ There f~s you me~oned are der X-rays ~ken ~ee ~r ~or ~ubl~ome for some pe~ ho~s Mter the me~ ~d not hands; ~ome ple, but ~ere ~ much more demonstrate the slightest o~ers ~e not to ~e~on ~n ~e types abnormal, can ~ preset yore from ~u~, ~e~d of f~ds one ea~. The per- The exponent concluded cold a~ or soR who sudde~y develops that no ~e ~ood causes neeessi~tes we~on I g~, ~o~M ~stress ~ in.gosHen; ~stead, a com- glove~ when ~u "~ ~- ~e~bU~e last ~g ~ ~kelYhe ate.t°picklesblame hination of foods is the doors. ' or cucumbe~ may appear to more l~ely e~prit. The most eo~ndi- cause the ~ouble one day, However, n~erous other Hen ~ ~own ~ ~d's and ,be eater ~th ~punity ~aetors may ~uence our Disease, w~eh ~e next, diges~ve proc~s. For e~m- ca~ed ,by an ~de~s- However, it is true ~hat pie. the person who is tense order and shodd ~ti- cer~n foods do disagree at ~e s~rt o~ a meal quite gated. ~g with some people. Although often experiences discern, man w~o smoker.s most of us can follow Mark l'ort after o~y a few fork- tona,cc~~- ever you Hke and let the fore a meal, or boltin.~ your known cure is to food fight it out after it food without chewin~ it habit. ~aches the stomacl~." and property also may br:ng on If you return never even realize a battle mdtges~on, rag, we~ a pai~ ~b~r is being waged, others :~e lndigbstion that develops..,g[oves over,~e.~ (~es. I definitely sensi~ve lo cer- one to t~ee hem's alt~r #at-~O~. ~ ~ ~ ' ~. often:, ste~ fro~'~'~~~'g .... ~,s,- ~ ta~ I~s and sho~d avoid ~bladd6r, a fo~ ~er~ ~~~ .. them, T!09141086
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® ¢ltl¢&GO, ILl. TRI|gNE D. 681,759-S. 1,151,590 CHICAGO MEIROPOU~AN ARk Fainting spells are blamed on 'nerves ,By@~:~:'Va¢f~Dellen, .M.D. A CONCERNED nmther from Vancou- vet writes: "Ore" L~e~r-old dsmshte~ ~~,~she~a~. o~ e~. How t~ ~o~e~ ~ ~,,, u~ ~ o~ ~ ~. ~ ~en abl~ Yo~ ~ ~e ~er ~ ~ w~,-~d t~y ~ ~ ~ ~emselves ~ef or fe~ of go~ ~ the d~. I m~ ~ ~ ~ m~ ?rg~c ~flex ~on ~vo~g ~e ~on ~d ~ ~ ~ by ~ e~on~ d~n, epees-, ~nd low bl~ • s~ar. ~ ~ long ~ one p~ may ~d ~ ~ o~ ~e b~ ~ ~e ~ e~ ~d the e~g lack ~ b~ ~ ~ br~ ~Im can re~t ~ ~e. ~n ~ cam~d ~, the ~ ~ ~ ~ sid~ of t~ ~k, may~.ca~ f~g, ~y t~e. I ~~ y~ phy~ ~. M~e, if she s~ ~ ~.~ ~ ~ ~th f~ ~eva~ How to keep well . 4 to s Indaes; open[tlm : loosen ~ clothing. A whiff Of.spLits.of amn~tla should bring her around. MRS. B. FROM Housion, TeX., w~It~s: '~ly busband has bsd B~erge~s disease for many yen~So We thought R w~ de.r control, but lately his right ~rm has been pa~ful and lost much of its cle. Do Sou think the Buergc~'s tion is spreading?" Buer~er's disease Js an uncon~o, n diso~er ~h~ch occEs only in young male tobacco users. It is ch~acf~-ized by inflamma~on o~ ~e~J.s and nerves in the a~ms and legs. Poor cimulat~on causes c~ots ~ the a~er~es and veihs, leadi~ to h~!amm~n and even to The only l~ible cure is to" complete- ly stop the u~e of.._t~l];~r,c~ Cam also must be taken to avoid ezi~eme temper- at~e and injury. If ~ou~ husband has continued to smoke o~ chew tobacco, the Buer~er's disease ~sy be But 1~ condition also may stem from some othe~ fo~m of nerve damage, or from ha~e.nin~ of the arteries. Dr. Van Del~e~ ~zs ~ff~en a hensive guide on psori~. For a o/~his booklet, ~e~ ~0 ce~ts att~l o long, DeH..e'~--Psori~, Chic~o Tn'bmle-l~eto New York, N. Y. 10017. M~ka-e,,~ecks T109141087
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~or several yea~. Don't you think~ it would be s ~ood idea to have these X-ray units again ?" Mobile X-ray units are not the solution to combating lung cancer. Although lung cancers can be detected through X-rays, by the time the tumor i~ largo tu ~h~w ~q~ -~ an X..rav it has spread tv other pa~ts el the body. Also, needless and frequent itself a health hazard. A in~ch better and more bl~ solution to the proi~lem of snmldng~r, better, m~t to start srno~nff in the firsL place. It no~v been II years ~incc the Ckro~/c Cough A chronic cough is one of the ~arly symptoms of both lung •.ancer and emphysema, yet many ;reekers ignore the cough and • ttribute it h~ smoking rather :hun possible cancer or other ~erious disease. ~aneer is very luw---oldy about tO%~becau~e by the time dia- ~suaHy is far adwnced. Our bes~ :cmcdies~surgsry, radiation and :hemotherapy--are o£ little value )~ce" the cancerous cells have ~l,r.ad through the ~dy. [ am sure you will agree that .'c.mving Lhe ~uading cause ol rear. COLD MILK FOR BABY Mrs. A., a concerned great° randmother from Erie, Pa., 'rites: "Is it harmful to give a i-month-ohl baby cold milk?. This IS in}' gl.andsoo's first baby anti he and his wife tell me that their lector said it was all rig, ht to give him enid milk. "Aft.at the mother makes ];he formula, she puts the bottles in the refrigerator. Later she *,ekes ont a bottle and lets it [ztand on the l, itchen counter for }a while before feeding. I think I ]should be waruled up a little, but ]~he insists tbut it is not neces- sary. i~'armed, What do you think, | REPLY • ,I ~t is not necessary to warm|~ :)aby's f~)rmula before feeding,| In fact, many babies ~eem to ~refer tbe cMd formul~ ~o bottles that are warmed. ~dfles, takln~ a bottle directly ~rom .the refrigerator is a time- meet, especially when baby wakes up for a 2 a.m. feeding. THE MOON AND MEANNESS A reader from Boston writes: "Gmda p~rson be ~ffected by the moon? One of my goud friends becomes as belligerent as the . Jevil when the moon is full ] do ~ll T can to help hhu at these S~cCeS~It i. , REPLY AIthough the occult I~t~ enjoyed I ~n upsurge in popularit~ in recent ?ears, med[ca[ scieucc no longer looks to the ninon as a cause ~ehavioraI disturbances. Why not ~uggest that your friend see a ~sychiatrist, especiall~ if these ~pclls occur with regularity and /or no apparent rcasoll ?
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE D. 68L759-S. 1,151,590 How to A. P. FROM Philadelplda writes: "Cigaret smoking is so universal, It almost is impossible to'e-~e-- the fumes in r~tmm-ants, meeting rooms, and while visiting friends. Could years ef inhaling this smoke second-hand cause cancer in a nol'lsmoker?'" Dear A. P.: As far as I know there is no proof that sitting or working in a smoke-filled room leads to malignancy in a nonsmoker. It may, however, contribute to bronchitis and may influence the rate at which you develop arteriosclerosis. Second-hand smoke is inhaled, and bleed tests have revealed that nicotine gets into the bloodstream of nonsmokers. Some restaurants have tried to .segregate smokers, but this is not practical when, say, one o£ four people at a table is a . smoke~. Trains and airlines also set aside special sections for • people who smoke. New York City recently passed a law which prohibits smoking in supermarkets and elevators. It would be a good idea if more cities and states passed such regulations, You would be amazed at how much carbon m~ noxide a nonsmoker inhales just standing in a theater lobby during intermission. /~or readers with questions about ~t~or circuIotion. Dr. V=n Dellen offers a comprehenswe guide. F'or a copy tarite: "Ciro aviation," Dr. T. R. Van Dellen, Chicago 2'ribune-//em Yor/¢ News S!/ndieate, P. O. Bo~: 3585, New Y'or/¢, ~. Y. 10017. Enclose 50 cents in coin or check [payable to Newspaper- books/ and a stamped, sel]-addrensed long envelope. T109141089
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.TI~ ~VASHLNGTON POST Heart A tt ack Preven tion Mrs J ~band~ who is 42, recently , had a- heart attack. Several • months before it occurred ,~ he was warned to go on a , low-fat diet; out'doctor said ~his blood fat (cholesterol) t level was higher, than it ~should be. We have four ~¢hildren, three of whom are ~b~ys. Is there anything that ~.c~u be done to prevent, their ~having a heart attack at a :young age?" ~ It's true that heart disease ~,may occur in families, but b just ,because your husband -~l~s had a heart attack does. ".,.nor necessarily mean that 'y6u~ sons are going to have o~e, too. • Certain types of "high-fat content ,n the blood" are he- reditary. But most types are not. Coronary heart disease, or narrowing of the arteries (arteriosclerosis), begins at an early age, particularly in d~is country. Th/s alarming discovery was made as a sult of autopsies performed on many soldiers killed dur. ing the Korean and Vietnam wars. It was found t~at pla- ques of fatty material mixed with calcium clogged their coronary arteries even though they were only in their teens or early 20s at the time of death. This may be a conse- quence of the high fat.con- ~tent diet most of us eat in the United States. It therefore important to do the following things: Tr,~n your chilch'en to ea~ les~ a.,nmai fat, that is~ less bee~, pork and cuts of lamb that are high in fat. Intro. duce lots of chicken, veal and fish in their diets at an early age. Don't make steak the special treat all the time. Don't "reward" them wi~h fat-ladened ice cream and rich malted milks, Sub- stitute sherbet for ice cream and hT to stay away from cakes and cookies made with lots of eggs. chocolate or :vpped with whipped cre~l~]. 5se skimmed milk if at all possible; use margarine ino stead Of butter. Cut down on the number of eggs you We your boys every week. All of ~hese c~anges, accomplished at an early age, will help to kee:.: r.heir bhmd fat conten~ iow and will ;diet at ieas~ one of ~he risk factors caus- ing heart attacks. Encourage your children to learn a sport•that keeps them active and that they can continue to enjoy in later li~e. It has always sur- prised me that physical edu- cation programs in schools stress baseball Although it is an enjoyable sport, it gives a child very littld exer- cise unless he is the star pitcher. Encourage your children to swim, run or. play basketball, soccer or tennis. These sports will get ~them to move around. ' _Do everything Y~U can to p rev_en t _y 0Ur_ chiYdr e n from~ ~moking, (r bA c .~ "-~1' you do these simple things, you will greatly re- duce the odds of their hav- in~; a heart attack. .'~ 1975, ClllCago T!09141090
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IIIBtI~ YORK, H.Y. D. 2.10:].363~S. 2.893,0~,1 flEW YORI{ C]T'~ M~.'[f~(]POL|TAN AREA Advice for emphysema victim ~,--'--~-- ~ .,, : ~ .,, "~,.:_....,-,-"~ - yo~ are in the same room j~st how sig~i~iean~ his em- R/I"S. J'. ]3. t'~om Chi- with him or a~yoa~ ~'ith am- phys~ma is. There a~e certain physema since inh~atlon of cago writes: "Du~ng my smoke ol any kind "#ill in- breathing exercises that may husband's physical last crease the degree ~f l~g be helpful. He has many yea~ the do,or ~]d him damage, g o o d peam ahead ff he that he "~s developing Emphysema occurs when spares his lun~ by avoiding emphysema. No recommends- the elastic qualities o£ the air air pollumn~ and treating sa~ in our lungs is Im~. ~e tion was ~de a~ to treat- lungs become les~ ~]e of" infections promptly. ment ormedi~tlon. Are expanding to ~ke ~ o~gen ~ .... ~ ......... ' there medi~nes tha~ he and con~cfing to get Ed of should be ta~ng~ Should he carbon dio~de. Gradually, be under the ~e of a lung over the y~, the s~ b~ doctor or some other special- come more Egid, and a~r ge~s ist? trapped within the lung ~d "He wheezes and has some ~ h e trapp~, . s~ .air shortness of breabh when he preven~ fresh air from does hea~ work but, all in en:ering the lungs. ~e ensu- all, ~or a 65-year-o)d man, he ing lack of ~g~ ~uses is healthy and strong. Is era- shortness of brealh. physema transmitted from Emphysema is no~ con~- person to person? I'd like to gious; i~ cannot be tr~smit- know as mu& us possible ted. Patients with emphyse- about die~, alcohol and corn- n~a, however~ are ~tr~ely plications." susceptible to lung i~e&ions, Since this man. has early and when they get an ~- emphysema, he mus ~ do tion. it should be treated • ve~thing possible to p r e- vigorously w i t h antibiotics sere his fang I~ction. This and decongestants. m~ns tha~ he mus~ avoid There is no specla] diet for areas where a~ ~llutlon is emphysema. ~hol is not prevalent, and abo~'e all, glv~ forhMden, hut ~IcohoI excess ' ~p smoking if he is a shouIdcer~lybeavoid~, ~ ;' smoker.. Your husband shoed c o n- ~ you ~oke, it would be sul~ a ~est sp~a~st since it ... " ~ :~-,., , T109141091
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is hard to shake A. B. WRITES: "Mark Twaia hit the nail on the head when he said it was easy to stop smoking because he had done It a thousand times. So have l, and as yet, I have not been able to kick the habit, Do you have aqy pills or tricks that will make me give up eigarets.°'' Giving up cigarete is not easy. It takes will power and plenty of it. It also requires motivation. No known drug or .combination of drugs can help you overcome or eliminate the desire for tobacco. There are many heavy smokers who suddenly decide to quit and seem to accomplish their goal quite easily. Others are able to cut down. Still othezs switch to cigars or a pipe. Those who stop buying cigarets often become moochers. And despite these shenanigans, most people continue to smoke. ,Sort o£ discour- aging, isn't R? If you are serious about quitting [and with a hack and cough, you should be] try to set a specif£e hour or a predeter- mined day for quitting. Make it a major moment: Quit cold. Always remember, one plli."--just one--and you are on your way to being a smoker agaz~1. People have different reasons for stopping. Fear of chronic lung disease or a heart attack is a major one. A spouse who o--b~ects ~s another: just having bad breath is a third. If you do stop, you can expect to fed irriiable and short4empered for days or even weeks. You also may gain some weight for ~he first few weeks after slopping. You will yearn .to hold something in your hands or mouth, since fi/~gers and hands in the smoking habit play an impotent role. The urge for a smoke will be especially irkspme a~ter meals or when driving the car, playing cards, or "¢~orld~g at your desk. THE ORAL satisfaction of smoking thit yon ~ dm'ing your first few days of abs~ine, nce can be somewhat abated with gum, mints, lozenges, or the use o~ a substRute clgaret. Smokers' clinics that spe~a/ize in helpi~g people to kick ~e habit work for mine, but da~ on emi resuRs ~re lacking. These programs, which am somewhat ]~ke Weight Watchers, use group psychology to get people to ~op. Cigars! man~acturers continue to search for c~ with less tar and nicotine and l~tter filters. ,0~ cour~ ~one of these will eliminate the danger o~ f~om ~e mote ~, and t~at'~ ~.~r~. ~~. ~ the damage to blood vessels. There is no qutstion tltat y~u will eventually .~eel better if you s~op smoking ~nd de~."telylive longer. T109141092
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE D. 681,759--.9. 1,151,590 CHICAGO METROPOUTkN AREA DEC: t4 |97g~-", , Increased co..ugh,ing part of aging process COUGHING |S common older people whose lungs have been damaged thru the cumulative effect of air lution, colds, and years ~n.Tbis may explain c~i~ is 10 times more frequent in clderly city dwellers. Lungs age and degenerate as do ot~er organs o! the body. ~e air sacs a~d bron- chi lose .elasticity, and the lining membranes dry out as the mtlcous, glatldS become less productive. The mtmcles of th~ chest wall and the diaphragm atrophy when the circulation is poor. Because these muscles are not exer- cised enou~, they lack the strength to do a first.class job of cleansing thru cough- ing. Many hmg diseases of lat- er life are associated with cough. A dry cough follow- ing exertion or lying fiat in bed may he caused by hea~ : rouble. AN OCCASIONAL cough is harmless, but severe, un- controlled coughing is espe- cialiy weakening when it Icderes with rest. rupture o! the blood vessels in the br~fin, Itmgs, or eyes mayfollow the strain~ A • 'ere cough has fractured a rib or blown out an a|r sac ~qtb.in the lungs. For these rc.~ns~ .the cause o~ a se- vere :c~h sl~uld be d~ter- ~.dn&l and, if posslbl~,-cor. J ( Cough mixtures contain bronc.~re |axa~lt r" d.~q~g-~ tO lidve ~pasm and to open the passageways, an~ expec- tora~ to .ljqtte~y a~ it.ea~er to hring t~p ~ptltum.. A eotlgh .d~pre.s.W~ u#tla~ly is add~ ~ m~ the hang. ~e~ produ~ ~e ~f~ ff ~ey do not depress the ~dual for ~s and make ~ drowsy. Sometim~ the products are ~troduced via positive pre- sto ~ac~es that ~so stretch the narrowed bron- cO. Not o~y do these s~ c~ mac~es o~ up passageways, b~t they ~ c~ he ~ed to provide gen, carbon dioxide, and me- dications. A reader writes: Are any foods especially good for the brain? DF~R RE~DER: A hal- ance~l diet provldea Wherev- er ~e b~ n~, Fo~ had R that fish was brain f~d, le~cc en~c~ sleep, and b r o t h s promoted strength. Mode~ toed fad- I ~sts endorse yogurt, honey, .-your chances O| brown sugar, molasses, heortdfsease, z~ope yot~..~ nllzc that the ]~arsley, alIeHs, a~d water-.. ~one'Its ~_~. • .cress. Should yoh ~ P. B. writes: ~ince a .thro~t~ penl.,cl~x., should_~be bout of"rheumatic fever at taken for at ]east ~0 days. the age of 8, I've taken pen[- Mrs. L. Y. V. writes an 81-year-oId woman who is too fat. I also have high blood pre:zure. Would going on a reducing diet help me? DEAR biRS. L. V. V.: r Perhaps it would, but stay • away from fad and crash diets. At your age, a loss of three pounds a year should be enough. cilltn. I am now 20 and have been told by my doctor to take penic/]lin until I am 3o years old. Could I become sterile from prolonged use o~ penicillin? DEAR P. B.: No, peekll- lin does not cause infertility. In your case It has prevent- ed a recurrence of rheumat- ic fever and has lessened T109141093
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE D. 728.760--& 974.869 CHICAGO M~ROPOLITA~ ~RE~ ~UG 14 t,974 T109141094
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NEW YORK, N.Y. NEWS O. 2,103,363-S. 2,893,041 HEV~ YOR~ CI~ METROPOLITAN AREA JUL 29 IB74 Bronc th to emphysema o~cbron~hiMs just mentioned is not meant ~ tfl~, but The ye~r~ Bur- simply to point out what is in store for spends three months ths increasin~ n~m~er of ~op]e wi{h chrome fering from coughing bouts. When his lungs are betLer, the hacking is con- fined to cleaning out the bronchi in the m0rnin~ and a few times daring ~he day. But the moment he catches co!d, the bronchitic coughing returns. The hacking and expectorating that last several weeks often are blamed on a persist- ent respiratory infection "ghat he .just can't shake." He "can't shake it" because the true cause of his problem is overlooked. The microbes have landed in already disabled territory. And when bronchitis stems from allergy or too many ciRarets, the hacking tends to be more persistent. Furthermore, it is likely to get worse unless the offender~ are eli- minated. Before leo Ion~, the coughing periods get longer and the periods of improvement shorter and shorter. Ultimately, complications such as emphysema with cough and shortness of breath d~velop. We know how to cure bronchitis, but the advice usually f~lls on dent ears. The example bronchitis. We refer to individuals who refuse to do anything about the c~usativs faetor~ Those willing to cooperate can be helped, but they cannot procrastinate. Vigorous treat- ment during the early stage of broncMtis wilt definitely help the lungs. Neglect or delay in seeking treatment amy result in irreversible damage. Specia~ pulmonary Iunction tes~ ~nch ag the spirometer will determine the ttege og the disorder. Following a eare~l 'analysi~ o~ pulmonary function, bronchial irritation must be kept to a minim~tm. This mea~ no smoking and avoiding dusty or toxic air. Antibiotict are the best treatment in bronchial infec~iogs. Sputum tests thould be conducted to deter- mine Cne most suitable medicine. One of my favorites, tetracycline, a~8o can he used as a preventive among those who are especially susceptible to respiratory infections during the ~in~er. Bronchodilators (aminophyllinc or nebu- lized isoproterenol) help to keep the Mrvm~ys open. Intermittent positive pressure breathing therapy (iPPB), u~ed with the broa~od~lato~ opens up the ]>ronc~i and air.~ and allow~ ventilaC:~r, of the lung. "" AD~*E RTISEI~[NT "~_ T109141095
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LANCASTER, PA. HARIFORD, CONN. NEW ERA COURANT -O. 59.363- D ] E6.~'62-S. 209.~G87 L~.NC,~TER METROPOLITArl AREA HARTFGRF..' '&~ "I~OPQUTA~I A~Ea - 4 jL;L t,. . : - 'F~., . ~..,:%" : "" I De~th ra:es ,)'om heart'our ~rc,en~th ~ ease. our No. I k~ller, peak6~ -~uld be }I~3 and have g.'a(luallv dec-not. ned since. The National Cen:er Hoe{ people a "e f~) ~) ~ar wi~ ~:~ ifor Health S:atEstics INCI-/S) :says there has been a 15 per 'cent drop in d:..,,~lhs from he.nrt i disease. We do not know why. :but the d~'crease in mortality il may be due. to a cer;a:,n extent, ~ to the S~rg~on General's Report on Smoking and Heal;h and the vig~ e~ucational program .:(p r o m o t e d by the Americ'.an ' Heart Association. Ti~e NCHS has based ils cnl- cuDtions on a~e-acliustcd rath- er than overall, de~:h rates. Age-adjtsted death rates have bean going down in a:[ 10-year categories from 35 to g5 years ned have o~]y ingre:~s~ b~yond the hu:.'.arJs thut increase the risk of arte:'iose'er.~sis, the main ca':se o~' he.::rt atta:'ks and stroke. For a de::Jde or more, the No. I risk facto: ~.:s aa ele- .rated c'~olesteroi lcvtl fi'om a diet Sigh in ammal fats and dairy p:'ofluets, llype:~ens;on has a~a been diseaver~ as a common eat~se, und physicians are encmwaging peg.pie to have their blood pressures taken reg- ularly. Through .hv~}erlensive sion hones to de:e~t millions who md~nmvir dv h:.ve t~-'' d~s- ease. Early detection and ~reat- meat may prolong me hves ¢ff vic::.ma. T;'ea:mem a~sa p:e- ven~ other cardiovascular corn- age 115. In even this last .~e cat- p!ieations. c.~.~ory, they a,-e expemed to de- Ofl~er risk fqctors cline. • arctic smokier and ;:e"sonali~y. These /igures, th:)u~h enconr- The a~-"c"~'' Lard.driving. a~)ng, are obsolete d~e t) corn- overactlever fits into the pc- p.ex methods involved in eom- ture because h:: h~s nGt lem-ned picas s~atist~es, the NCHS is hmv to coge. tie also ',en6s to T109141096
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CHICAGO, ILL TRIBUNE D. 7Z8,760--S. 974.869 CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA dressings; pickles; and olives; all pre- pared cereals; any food made with baking soda or baking powder; regular bo.ti~l..on eul~; snae~ foods such as pop- eorn~-potato el~ps, end pretzels. Celery ~alt~garlJe saiL, and onion salt are ob- ~ ,~ eriean adults consume from 8 to ~s of .salt a flay, which is far ~an the~ need. The people of i!!inds do very well on 1.8 grams '~-~even tho they live in hot ~,~,.;, | .eoasiderahly with bay leave~, ~. r, paprika, horseradish, tarragon, -b.~.'_.,; thyme, dill, "sage, dry m.uetard, ~:garliq, oregimo, onion, lemon, • ~egar,.~end one of the fine fie. ~ ~" ,~.. . • . : • ~,~.~, ~L~.-- .~. ..-~., ~e~ ~, ,~" TlO9141(~.q7
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.. : Synchronize weight _lo.ss and- al size A New Ybrker writes: ' There.iS 25 per cent mo~ of me than ~e_~r~bould be. I've tried hal. d_ie_~s,~b~ they have not produced miracles. Obviously, there is no such thing as instant slender. If I do lose a few pounds, back they come when I resume normal eating habits. Do you have any suggestions?" This person did not tell us if he was a man or woman. Nor did the letter mention present weight. However, he or she can lose weight if properly moti- vated. The problem is to. keep weight at a normal level. If this person wants to reduce his present weight by 25 per cent, he should eat 25 per cent less food. We say this assuming he iS now eating a balanced diet that contains necessary nutrients. Apparently, the problem is quantity. By eating too much, he is taking in more ¢~dories than his body CHICAGO, ILL. D. 728,760-S. 974,869 " CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA needs. The excess is stored in living adipose, cells which contain mainlyfat the smaller amounts~ of protein and water. If weight loss is his goal, this must be burned off. For example, one pound of 'fatty tissue is equivalent to 3,500 calories. In order to lose one pound a week, he must cut down 500 calories a day. My suggestion to eat 25 per cent less food is offered in hopes that once on' this regimen, he will continue. When he learns to eat properly, the pounds los~ will not return. However, this is dif- ficult to do unless the individual pays strict attention to the amounts and kinds of focds he eats. A three- ounce hamburger pattie contains 310 caIories; a five-ounce burger contains 510. Need I say more? The same plies to servings of fruit juice, potatoes, and ice .cream, etc. Another plan is to eat only three- quarters of each item en the pIate. This may seem wasteful, but if it is not done the food turns into more fat. An approach such as this is more mean- ing~ul if the person learns all he can about foods, calories and nutrition. he goes off his d/eq the Ieast he can do is avoid high-ca]or.~e edib!es. Balance is the key to the plan. Eat a lktle of eve .rything, rather than all pro- teins or all carbohydrates. Ample ereise, done regularly, is a must in any reducing program. TOMORROW: Diagnosis, prognosis ezpicu~ed. Dr. Van Delien welcomes reader. questions. While t:e cannot reply ~o indu~idually, he u':;.lI answer those of gen- era$ interest it. his column. Write to Dr. Van Dellen. c, o ~hls paper. Raynaud's syndrome B. A. writes: The six or seven doctors I've consulted all say I have Raynmld'$ syndrome. The only advice I've received is to quit smo_~9_~_g. Do you know o[. any cure? I've had it ior 4 years. REPLY Raynaud's syndrome varies in severity and, like many other circulator~.--~dis- orders, is controlable, but not c~r~I~Io." Wearing warm clothes, including heavy " ho~e and glove~, may be,all-the, is .: [~eeded when t~e disease is'~ ing tobacco will help. 8o will that dilate th.e blood vessels, .~g.. . T109141098
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NEW YORK, N.Y. NEWS D. 2, I03,363--S. 2,893,041 NEW YORE CITY METROPOLITAN ARk ~. . ,..~ Air pollu~a.p~ble~lmos~~t ~ are ~e millions a~d millions o~ moor vehicles [ ~ pi~vdl~~n=~ +h~ . spew~g out thousand~ of ~ of to~e ga~s. -I ~'~ ~~~"~'~ ,~ ~ ..... To this we can add the e~au~ f~m t~eks, t~,oou .......... ~zereq~ ~mz~x paddles nave ~a~, je~s. vlanes,boa~,,~ . e~th moving eq.pu[ ]been zde~tifie~in the air, ~ it is doubt- ment and buses. ~wn mowers and bu~mg rf~ whe~h~ t~. ]ong-~ effects o~ leaves ~e trivial no~e~. ~11 o~ us con~ibute Ithese substances a~e actually known, There is increasing evidence that they are !more of a nuisance than ~health hazzard. We ~need air to sustain life and everyone wants it clean. However, th/s is difficult to do if we xefuse to give up modern conveniences. Exfra work, money ! Most women object to the extra work and mone~" spent to keep the home dean. Airborne .~ermeals and dirt producers pi'obably cost • ~!llions annually in terms of damage to prop- ~rty, plants and animals. : Communities have different problems, ~ending on their particular industries, energy ~quirements, vehicular traffic, and weather "'. ~nditions. In some areas, the most annoying .-.. :~-:;:,~ ~lde effect of air pollution is the irritation "'J~" ~A ~f eyes, nose and bronchi. • ":~ :'-,'~J,,~.'":: The most worrmome ts that the Irntants ".~ .',~:~:,~U-a~ravate chronic lung diseases or may prove • :": "i~'~ ~o°~b~ carcinogenic, Ci~_ret smoking is concen- ' , '"~,~"tra,_t~_ ~ air pollution, y~'~ so ~ew have done :':,,:~[~,;~i ,anYthing about it. ~'~¢~.~; W~or~:loes aerial garbage come from? "-'~!-'~Some~ontatnln~nts originate in blast ~urnaces x~and .,other ~ndustr~al processes. Thousands of chin~eys on.~omes, commercial buildings, and Ifag~0~lel belch out soot. i But 'in many areas the main offcndezs a smidgen here and there, and there are just . " tOO many of "US." At present, those concerned with motor vehicles ere, perhaps, the least practical. Ac- tually, there are too many cars. One solution might be more car pools and preferably, small- er ~rs. Bicycles are pollution free. Better mass transportation systems also help. In my opin- ion, something also should he done about the hundreds of thousands of large trucks on our streets and highways. We have plenty of railroad lines; so why no~ expand "piggyback" transportation in order te get most of these trucks off our highways? Trains that carry autos also should be encouraged. DANDRUFF AND SWEETS - A reader writes: Can eating too many sweets cause dandru£f ? REPLY: Not as a rule. Foods that aggra- vate ache may aggravate the oily type of dandruff. Dr. Van Delian will answer questions regarding hea th and hypiene in this column and by mall. He w}l) not make di.a.gnoses, o¢ pr~.fi~ ~ Individuzlz. Enclose stargp.ed, self- EL EN, THE NEWS,. P.,O. BOX 1452,-GRAND ¢EN'[RAL STATION, NEW YORK,, I~/.Y. ~m~7. . .- " , ~. -;.:, ~;~ .; . ,.,,.~ . . - .. ~,.~.,~ ~.. .......... --,:....::. : _~'-j:..-.-,_':; T109141099
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ORLANDO, R.A. SENTINEL-STAR D. 140,491--S. 193,139 ORLkNO0 METROPOLfI'~.N AREA /~PR B 1974 ~ t. mOl e ' Fears Of Cancer Lessen Publ~c-'aCian_.af~:~ Sur- Pt~g O~Z tqoMl;t4 2 tar cigarettes help a little, but the latter constitute only ~ per cent of the market. However, even these types of cigarettes aggra- vate the heart. ~is is due to the carbon monoxide that is inhaled and not to the F I LTER CIGARE~E$ are of limited value cause the best filter is one through which ~e smoker gets no~ing but clean, fresh air. Smokers who kick the habit lessen the risk of getting lung- cancer. Fu~emore, eve~ mon~ of abstinence lowers the risk. According to the Ameri-. can Cancer Society, the risk fails to the same level as nonsmokers w i t h i n five years for one pack a day users. Giving Up cigarettes is not e~y. For m~y p~ple, ..... physician hears the blood THEY USE cigarettes to returning into the arm. combat anxiety, d e p r e s- sion, and emotional inse- curities. Dr. Luther Terry be- lieves the desire to smoke is greater than the threat of a dreadful disease. Y. D. writes: Why do doctors put a rubber tube around the arm when tak- ing the blood pressure? THE TUBE is filled with air until the pressure is high enough to shut off the flow of .bloodtthrough the arteries. At this point, the pressure in the tube and arteries is the same and corresponds to the systolic blood pressure. A reader writes: What happens when a lung is removed? Does the cavity fill up with something? THE CHEST wall con lapses somewhat and the lung on the other side shifts over to fill in most of the space. Serum fills the r e m a i ntng space which ultimately is r.eplaced by scar tissue. L.K. writes. Does aggravation cause the su- ; gar level to rise in a diabetic? NO. On the other hand, the level ..cazx-be lowered-, ., by exercise; when aggravated take a walk. geon General's Report of 1964 linking cigarette mo~ with the rising incidence of lung cancer, emphysema, and heart dis-~ ease ~not.ivated almost 10 million people to give up the weed. (Only 18 per cent of physicians now smoke.) Since then, the curve has leveled off and there is evidence that the habit is now on th8 increase. F U R T HERMORE, al- to o st as many teen-age girls as boys are smoking. At this rate, it ~von't take long for adult women smokers to catch up with adult males. In all pro- bability, the incidence of lung disease will increase. Why do people continue to smoke when the serious consequences of the habit are so well-known? Although it is true that not all smokers develop lung cancer, emphysema, or heart disease, the use of c i g a re~tes increases the risk. Apparently, many ~mok- ers are willing to take their c h a n c es. Unfortunately, nicotine has intense habit- forming qualities. THOSE WHO inhale are in greater danger. And, d~e hazards increase with the numbers of years the per- son has smoked an d ~he number of cigarettes used daily. Teen-ager~ who take up the habit shou[..d keep thi~ in mind, :gflttrt ~ Io~. • ~ T109141100
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CHICAGO, ILl.. TRIBUNE D. 728,760-S. 974,869 CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA NEWS D. 2,103,363--S- 2,893,041 PlEW YORK CITY MEIROPOLITA~ ARF.~ How to keep well Cigaret smoking is as rmm qualiLzes __...'. '~,:'~ : ....... ~."~/"., Those w~o inhale are ia greater dan- _~c~u~, ~ ~m~on~e~'s ger. ~d, the ~az~ incre~e ~ the ~.~ o~.~. ~ ~,~ sm~g numb~s o~ zeus ~e ~e~on has smoked ~ ~e r~ ~aence o~ ~g c~r, and ~e n~er o~ dg~ ~ed d~ly. emphysema, and heart disease moti- Teen-agers who take Ul~ the habit should va~ed almost IO million people to give up the weed. [Only 18 per cent of pby- ' sichms-.now "mnoke.] Since 't~e~,- the curve "has leveled off and there is evi- dence..that the habit is now on the in- crease. "Furthermore, almost as many teen-age girls as boys are smoking. At ' this rate, it won't take long for adult women smokers to catch up with adult" males. In all probability, the incidence of lung disease will increase. Why do people continue to smoke when the serious consequences of the habit a~e so well-known? Altho it is true that not all smokers develop ]zing cancer, ecaj)hysema, or heart disease, the use of cigazeLs increases the risk. Appar- ently, re, any. smokers are willing to take their .. chances. Unfortunately, nicotine keep tiffs in mind. l~lters and low tar cigarets help a little, but the latter con- sfitutd only 6 per cent of the market. However, even these types of cigarets aggravate the heart. This is due to the carbon monoxide that is inhaled and not to the tars. Filter cigarets are of limited value becaus~ the best filter is one thru wI~ch the smoker gets nothing 'but clean, fresh air. Smokers who kick the habit lessen the risk of getting lung cancer. Further- more, every month of abstinence low- ers the risk. According to the American Cancer Society, the risk falls to the same leve..~, as nonsmokers within five years for one pack a day users. Giving up cigarets is not easy. For many peo- ple, smoking has become a way of life. They use cigarets to combat anxiety, depression, and emotional insecurities. • Dr. Luther Terry believes ttiat the desire to smoke is greater tlmn the ~hreat of a dreadful disease. Tl09141101
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CHICAGO, ILL. TI~i|UNE D. 728,760-S. 974,869 CHICAGO METROPOUTAN AREA APR 6 t974 ; , How to keep well , .~ := ....~ • Chronic bronchitis R Cht6nic corn- ; mon in middle-a ~otder men. The incidence is ,greateSt in ¢igaret ~ compared " with nonsmok- ers. MU~.h depends~ _U_l~,n .the.number of years:and packs a day the person has smoked. Attho the exact ~ne~hanism that pre- disposes the victin~ to~ ~onchitis is not clear;'it is belJe~ .~a~ tobacco irri- tates the bronch~1 membranes and lessens the action of the cilia [hairlike projections] that help,~,leanse the inner lining of the alrw~, s. ~". • t A~r ~dlution alsb~i~ Implicated, bu :[~ .~ O~ce broncl~tLs is eslab~shed, a vari- •., ".'"e~'.i~of microorga~Isms play a role in • -~i.~.~ the inflan~atory and de- i ~:"~ =d~t~ve changes in the broncl~al wall. f ~,"Tb~ is a marked increase in the .- , :, m~r of mucus-secreting glands lead- -',~. ~%~the production of mucoid or pu- T109141102
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE CHICAGO M~ROPOLITAN AREA .How to keep well Carbon monoxide aggravates the heart In this country, carbon monoxide is found mainly in tobacco smoke and the exhaust of automobtles and trucks. There is no doubt that the gas aggra- vates a~a pectot, d.s by lessening the amount of exertion a victim can do bdore chest pain develops. Normally, the' hemoglobin in blood picks up its oxygen in .the lungs and delivers it to the tissues of the body. But whenever ,hemoglobin has a choice between .b.~..bon monbxide and oxygen, it will select monoxide 200 to one. Fur- thermdre,. CO remains in the blood for" several hours and the ill effects usually stem tro~i ,the tissues being robbed of much ne~dod oxygen..'.. " The situation is somewhat similar to having a narrowed hardened artery that fails to .deliver enough blood [and oxygen] to an organ. This oxygen defi- ciency is no different from blood con- raining too little oxygen [due to CO flowing thru normal arteries]. The trouble begins when the arteries are al- ready varrowed and the individual in- hales too much monoxide. This is why CO exposure aggravates angina pector- is. Air usually contains some carbon mo- noxide. A..sa~e limit is 35 parts per millldn [ppml. When inhaled, this leads to lev~.bt 'iip'to .one.per cent in the hemoglobin content of the blood. On Los Angeles ~reeways the CO in the air reaches as high as 147 ppm. Driving with the windows open leads to blood levels up to 5 per cent--still low enough to prevent a,:ute poisoning in a normal porsen. ~moke has been called con- cen~i~ted air pollution. Inhalers' get about 475 ppm per cigaret. Pack-a-day " smokers subject their systems to con- siderable monoxide. In fact, CO levels of up to 90 ppm. have been measured • passing across the faces ofpeople seat- ed next to smokers. Breathing 50 ppm CO for four to five hours raises the CO content of hemo- globin from 1.3 to 2.9 per cent, an amount thaL Ls enough to alter the ex- ercise performance of a person with angina. And ff this person is a smoker, the blood level may go up to 16 to 18 per cent CO. TOMORROW: The new vegetations. Dr. Van Dellen welcomes reader questions. While he cannot reply to them individually, he will answer those o~ general interest in his co|utah. Write to Dr. Van Dellen, in care o] this news- paper. Major illnesses W. writes: I'm going to give a 10 minute talk on our club's current events panel. My topic will be the three major.diseases. However, I need to know what they are. REPLY Cardiovascular disease, cancer, and. infections. Aeddents .also ;~;~ ...-".-.'." cerated area usually is the cm~t. T!09141103
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NtW YORK, N.Y. NEWS N£W YOR~ CITY IdF:'IROPOUTAN They vxe f~i~tr~..ted .because ,the read- ings.vary :eac~t-.fime a blUff.test;is d6ne and they:feel ~o differenL whether the ehole~ol. ]eve.l.i,~ h~h or low. " . Ma~y o~ t~e~'4~-oplc do not re~liz~ tlmt s high: blood e~61esterbl is only one of several • isk ~aetor~-Heavy .cigarette smoking, an elevated blood pressure,--~--~" little exercise, obesity, and stress also increase the risk o£ having a heart arrack. To do the job tight, these also must be avoided, Lowering the cholesterol level is not enough. Aging tends tb increase the cholesterol level. A reading above 260 rag. per cent is said to contribute to hardening of the arteries and to increase the chance of de- veloping coronary thrombosis {heart attack). Yet, many people l~ave lived to a ripe old age with levels higher than 260. The amount ot cholesterol in the blood varies considerably ~th changes in weight, diet, stress, and exercise. Furthermore, there are Wide, unexplained fluctuations in le.~els when people are ~ested periodically, even ~hough they are not dieting or on medication. Readings may also vary in different labors- rot'lea. • These ]~oints are mentioned because too many 1~eople are overly concerned about the problem. We are not underestimating the ~m- .portanee of cholesterol, but trying to put i.t in its propdr perspective. Gluttonous eating !~ obesity .6in be corrected by eating spar- :~ng~ .6f anlmai fats, eggs, and dairy products. ~Ulm'~more '~egetahle oils, exercise daily, and .ltvo~d ~.cesses. ~l~terol-lowermg drugs, certain vita- m .[tl~.':~.~ thyroid hormones, etc., will help ]o~~.~l~ ~rovided the physician thinks :i_ti~[~(ll~ll[[l~_'~Glofibrate As widely used for ~~[~Mi_~ol, ~ ~vew "~ithetie~.bile L .~Jt~fl~_" tested. It is well to rem~m- _I~~ goes up when these medi- cations are stopped. Above all, do nothing that milrht do more harm than the cholesterol. Eating habits are difficult to :~hange~ but it .is our hop~ that Americans will learn to eat less a~im~l fats, khd do their, best..to mhlntain a hormai weighL i.Have your blood pressure taken and be sensible about smoking. E~NZYME AND NEURITIS . - B.A. w~ite~: What.do pro~amlne injectig~i~ do for cervical ~rthritls? REPLY: This prod£tct tS an enzyme ces~ed ~rom the membrane o~ an animal stomach. The manufacturer claims ~t relieves pain from different forms of neuritis. ARCS ON S. I. writes: Is there any ~reatment presenile arcs on the iris of the eyes? REPLY: No. ~n ~is condition, the outer edge of the colored circular shutter (iris) ~hat surrounds ~he pupil becomes gray. It cannot be tinted like gray hair except with a special corneal lens. There is some evidence that the condition is associated with an ele- vated hlood cholesterol. • FACIAL PALSY Mr. ]3. writes: How long does an attack of Bell's palsy last.* REPLY: Some begin to recover within a week whereas others go for months before improvement is noted, A small percentage never get well. Send stamped, seLf-addressed envelope for leaflet on Bell's palsy. COURSE OF DIABl~TES B.E. writes: If a man develops diabetes ia his fi/ties, which is controlled by diet, will the disease worsen as he grows older ? REPLY: I'm no prophet, but the condition usually remains stable unless weight is gaine~, infection develops, surgery is done, or the dia- betic goes off his diet. hygiene in this column and by mail. Ne will not make di~- DELLEN, THE NEWS.:P~~~. T109141104
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE D. 728.760 -- S 974,869 CHICAGO METROPOLII'AN AREA HOW to keep well Coronaries--Can they __be a ided? By T upporting evidence obtained from orldwide studies showed that most of Can . .c~o~ be these risk factors were not a problem prevent~:'~a~L~ne~n-orgamza~ons . such as the American I.,I(~c~rt As~_~cia- m countries where there was 1Rtle cot- ~ion believe it can be avoided, but oth- er physicians are not so sure. Preven- tion depends upon avoiding or treating the .high risk factors beLieved to play a role .in causing atherosclerosis, the forerunner--of heart attacks .and strokes. Obvionsly, the sooner this is done, the better. Long-term studies were conducted on thousands of people to determine what factors existed in those who suffered heart attacks in the years they were under otw~ervation. Eighty per cent of those who had heart attacks also had high cholesterol levels; a vast majority were heavy~ smokers, had hy- pertension, were obese, sedentary, or bed diabetes. The investigators con- eluded from thiz study that there was a causal relationship between these con- difions and coronary artery disease. 'ffney called-these conditions "hitch risk tactors." Since that time, some of the risk factors loomed as more risky onary heart disease. On the other side of the c~in are those who dbubt that coronary heart disease can be prevented by eliminat- ing or correct'rag risk factors. ~here is no doubt that all could he eliminated, but human nature is not easily changed. Lowering the cholesterol level requires a diet low in feeds of a~imal origin such as dairy products, meat, poultry, eggs, and seafood. Animal [saturated] fats are replaced to a de- gree with vegetable oils. Hypertension is easily treated, but this is not true of giving up cigarets or losing weight. And, except for smoking and obesity, eliminating all risk factors seldom makes the individual feel any different. Furthermore, some physicians be- lieve that the role of a certain person- ality type is responsible. Individuals most likely to develop coronary heart disease are tense, driving l~eple who T109141105
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Emphysema blamed too much sm " By T..R. Van Dellen, M. D. Co~siderabl~" .evidence ..shows tha~ ~..~k.ing.~too much, and for too long a ~ this c~o~ resp~a~ ~st~b~ce, ~e air sacs are ba~n~ o~ because of a io~ of elasfici~, ~d the bmn~ are n~wed and ~e~ed, had~g to partial obstmc~on. Appar~fiy, all d this fo~ows the c~onic bmnc~tis ~at ma~y smokers develop, which is als~ responsible f~r the hac~g cough. ~ther form of emphysema ~at is centred to ~e l~g bases ~ i~eri~d ~d develops at an cartier age. It ste~ from a ddid~cy of ~e e~e, ~pha ~fi~sh. ~ ~e be- comes active whm ~n~ or o~ uefy, ~g~, ~d e~ate ~ bact~ ria, d~charge, ~d o~er debr~ created by the ~a~afion. ~ does not oc- cur whoa ~e ~z~e h lack~g and, since man wa~ upr~t, ~e i~ec~d materi~ gravitates to the bases of ~e lungs. T~s t~e of emphysema may seem ~o be un~dat~d to the use o~ tobacco, bu[: this is not necessarily true. In report involving 2B patients, all had been smokers. Other reports conf~m this link between smoking and emphy- sema. As prod, some persons who lack the enzyme escape emphysema so long as they do not smoke. Those in the enzyme-deficient group nsually develop lung disease 10 years sooner than the ordinary smoker. In some, the em- physezna developed shortly after an at- tack of bronchitis. Cough and shortness o~ breath are the most common symptoms ~orms el emphysema. IC is the latter that causes so much distress. Medi- cines containing broncbodilatezs help for m~nths or years. So do breathi.ug exercises. But, in time. the victims be- come short o{ breath while walking across the strut or d.mvn the hall. Two o( my {riends carry a portable oxygen mask and tank whenever they go visit- ing or out to dinner, tm ordinary in ,a person with emphysema requires penicillin or other antibiotEcs, beca.u~e the i~fection usually settles in the lungs. It is surprising how many these p~ple re{use to gtvc up smoking. TOMORROW: Hoiiday ~uu for ~he chil- drea. an,zwered by moil i] ~amped, ...... .: :.~.~- Ti09141106
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CHICAGO, II.L TRIBUNE D. 745,210-S. 993,865 CHICAGO METROPOLITAlY AR~ DEC 9 1973 W t°wel/ Van Dellefi,M.D, hap.oy... forget you'reYat THRUOUT' CERTAIN periods in history, fat has" b~ea. .admired and desirable. For example, ~ t~..,V~~c~ort~n era, . the more attractive Women were from ~ to ..~ p0~d~ heayi- ed plump Womeh. And even t~.d. ay, in many foreign countries, the men prefer' their l~dies on the heavy side. The same applies to women. ~,t one Lime, fatness was considered a sign o! wealth and aMuence. A b~om wee and daughter meant that the man the house was a good pTov!~er. Bankers and politicians were portrayed as portly men with large pot beM~. ~ey had the money and time to, enjoy large gourmet, meals .~d fancy For severaldecades, ~e' slim fi~ure.' has ~b~e~' "in" even tho ha~ our population is said to be overweight. Slenderness is popularized by the medical professi~m, insurance compa- rdes, and the e]oth~,. ~shion, ~ood: and ~ .industries. • From. time to time, there is tebeMon among tl~se of us who believe we have gone too. far on the lean side. There are c~aims that people can be fat and healthy. In. addi.tion., the war on /at h~ mado many overweight people feel )iko EVEN A MODERATELY tat person beco~,ee ~o ~'alerie c~ous that he fee]~ pangs o! guilt with eve~7 bite".i0t. 'Large amotm~ o~ money are spent on diet beeks,~.drinka, pi~, and in reducLing salons. In my p~nion, tho~e .thdm~elve~. Bet.tot overweight than neurotic"and .l~ddldt with problem mainly ¢o. pe0pl~ with hea~::.~:.b.h~_ ~.bl.oed . pressure, d/ahetes," and arthritis of the~e~.g~. ~ in~,l~ding the back. On. ~e other hand, it 'yod are ,~ct~p~; what di~ere~ce does it make0,, ft. obesity, cut~• ~ .:few y~" 1Re? At any rate, Li~e ~ not /ire at ~H wxthout delight.'" T109141107
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE :. ~,~.:~:O-S. 993,865 .. (:,(;() u, ~OPOLITAN AREA ; : r~OV 27 1973 How keep well Danger when your leg harden ~ been linked to intermittent clafidica- Hardenin~ of ~ arteries rarely is troublesome until the circulation is reduced 70 toXll~___r cent. The early manifestations resembIe ~ose that oc- ~ cur in fiat feet, but the diagnosis is J unmistakable when intermittent claudi- cation develops. The latter is best de- scribed as a cramp, ache, dr sense of fatigue that develops in the thigh or ca]~ after walking a certain distance. To obtain relief, the individual usually stops walking for a few moments; he need not get off his feet to relieve the distress. Intermittent claudication was first described by a veterinarian more than a century ago. He noted that older . horses stopped walking after going a • ~ distance and would not proceed lun~.~.~,eady to do so, despite coaxing abd 'even whipping. After covering a slmilar =. distance, they stopped again, When one of these anLmals died, he • disse~.' ~he legs and found hardened • and obstructed arteries. t.ion. When the disease progresses, the pain develops when resting. The dis- tress is usually located in the bloodless toes and foot, and the victim sits at the side of the bed fondling the extremity hoping to obtain relief. Gangrene is the next step• Intermittent claudication may pro- gress so slowly that the individual learns to live with it. But treatment is advisa- ble because the bloodless extremities are in a precarious state. The slightest injury or infection might precipitate gangrene. Applications of strong anti- septics or exposure to extreme cold or to a hot bath or heat treatment may do the same. In other words, when the circulation is poor, handle the legs with "kid glove~." !'Rest pain" is eased with the use of analgesic ointments, aspirin, or. strong- er pain killers. Reliel also is obtained by inject:ng the nerve with alcohol or crushing the nerve to produce numb- ness in the painful area. As a rule, these measles are poor substitutes for modern surgical procedures in which the obstructing segment of the artery is bypassed with a venous or plastic graft. Now and then it is possible to clean ou, :.he obstructing gtmk on the inside o[ [he vessel. It also may be necessary to cut certain nerves in the back [sympathectamy] to relax the ar- teries and allow more blood to enter the extremity. T109141108
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Cfl|CAGO, |LL. D. 7?_8,760 -- $- 97~,,869 OGT 28 t973 ..',,/,O_1~ -~RD OF ALL women in the United States smoke ~~. AL least 40 per cent are between tbe ages of 25 ~nd I.~ ~ there are indications that mote and more women are ~.~ the habit Lu their teens. Unfortunately, the younger a~ is when she starts, the more likely she is to become a ~r and heavy.smolcer_ ]~u'thermore, she also wiR be ~ to the ensuing~mlth hazards. . • ~re. is no end to ~e number of risks that have been ~including many that lack proof. The incidence of " cer "is rising faster tha~ any other cancer among' ~e~.." According to one study, it has tripled in the last gen- eration. Women smokers also have a greater risk of dying at an e~ller age from heart disease, stroke, emphysema, bron- chitis, cirrhosis of the liver, and cancer of the lung, mouth, throat, larnyx, and esophagus. This applies mainly to women who ,f~hale and smoke more than one,p~, ck a day. '~ AND disabilities are i'epbrted to be more com- mon among beth men ~nd women smokers. Most of this stems from bronchitis, emphysema, flu/sinus infections, and peptic ulcer. Furthermore, when :a woman smoker develops a cold or other r.espiratory infection, she cou'~h~ more and bringsup "more qmtum. Smoking is s~d ~o interfere with sexual and reproductive fLmcLions of l~th sexes. It may even lower lt..b~. ~.l~md impair fertility. As stated previously, some of ~, ~/~'~o~ clarions are di~fJc,,~t to prove. c: In 'bddition, a pregnant woman who smokes "affects two lives." Th~s is important because one-third of all women in.~..hildbearing years are users o£ tobacco. The main ob~ ~has been that babies born to mothers who smoke v~h tbout 5 to 8 ounces less than those born to women who abstain during pregnancy. The reason for thi~ ~s not known, Imt;#~g~kin, there are several theories. If tobacco is at fault, per~ ~e carbon monoxide ir~aled with the smoke affects the ~nborn baby's oxygen ~pply. :Do the various chemicals and gases in smoke increase Hazards for women ..5"~T. R. Van Dellen, M.D rnex chances of a birth d.e~et?.'~nere is evidence en~t it does c a u'~e~_r t .~_in__kincis--o f ~defects. I.N. WRITES: Nine years ago two-thirds of my stomach Was removed because of aduodenal ulc¢r..A~te~ ~e ,.oI~ra. tion, my W~ight dropped from I~0 to 146. Re~ntlY Z t~'~O.~'~t~ blood for a friend but ~as turned down b-e'ca'tt~." • was too low. Can I attribute this to the itlcer • Yes. Iron deficiency anemia is.~.ommen =aeh is re=ore.. =ay =s=t f== • ~mdivldual may develop a penflcloi~s"idiem~.~u • oecanse thereis not enough gastric secretion to"~aetur~ the substanca that helps in the prodm~tion of ~[ blood A READER WRITES: Please define an alcohollc.~ . • There are many definitions @f al~holism.-M] fawrl~ An alcoholic is a person wh~ is ~.o~ered by ~0hol"~ file e...~ent _that.it interferes with Iris .work and family s.mps, uur ~eaflet o~ alcoholism can lm obtain~l'=l~y,jmi .~ g stumped, selLaddressed envelope with request.:' .-': " "• W.R. ~EITES: Is it possible to get gout from wearing shoes belonging to a gouty man? No, gout is not an in~ectlon. Nor ~. R ~4~g~ous, It~i~ caused by an internal distttrbanoe,involvlng the metaboll~m o! certain proteins and the accumulailon of ~at~s ]n ~" blood and tissues, especially of the Jolnts. A READER WRITES: How" does actinom~cosi~ Does~!t &ffect the glands around the neck? Can it be _...'Hd.~ funga! Infection begins ,suaHy ,s a pa~ • =r-me law that comes to "a head and ruptures ihru small openings. The disease often extends into the ~l~l~'~_~ hRestine. ;,xvolvement of the glands is not a characte .rl~.. tim ~m~ o! penicillin or the tetracycline drugs. " T109141109
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'Tobacco Alcohol Suspe l ' ~R. Van Oe|,~n Manor dentists now .exaralne By Dr. Thee the mout.~ for evidence of can- (s.e~/e'~nd, it is ho/--ou~~ ~er. Dr. A~e Rotaries made a ed ~at ~e card heifer ~o~gb. search of my ~ps, ~ms; ton~e, ~ee~ ~ .~e nor ~eel any tumor, ~st~rs, ~xams, more ~r end r~ of ~~sage- or ~cers. Denfis~ have been more m~gna~cles xdH b e way, ~er doing so be.~. doing ~is for the last ~ew years de~ected zt an e~rly - " ~ " An examination o~ the oral ~IEW YORK, ~. 7. NEWS : ...:~.1~1-~. 1.~7~.27~ "~E'.7 " -'~" " "" '.~'~OP~LI~','bN .~E.~ cavity should also include a history of smoking and dr~nk~g habits. Zn th-~6untry, tobacco and alcohol bhve been suspected as causes of a number of dif- ferent types of oral cancers. Several ~eports along this bare appeared ~n the medical journals, A recent nne came from the Stale University of New York fBrooklyn), wBere medical team examined the bead and neck o~ &O07 alcoholics from four di£ferenc treatment centers. The subjects were ques- tioned about their dr/nk~g, smoking, and dietary habits for an average week during the three months before the inter- view and during ~e five years before this period. Meanwhile, similar studies were in progress ~n 2358 nonalcoholic subjects attending.another screening pro- gram. Bo~ groups ttere examined ~horoughly ~or cancers extend- ing from the lips ~o the voice box. Physicians used ~he ectuipmen~ ~o study ~hese parts. la addition, ~hey palpated the hyroid and salivary glands for ~td~nc~ o[ a tumor.'A Pap smear was taken from susp~:icm~ lesions. ~en l~ead and neck Cancers, " were found in the ~de~olie groap, but none izt the nonal- coholic CO~.~'OIS. ~ig is a" si~icaut ~e~nce. ~ a m~t- ter of fact, ~ alcoho~cs, incidence ~ c~cer wa~ higher ~aa for the g~eml ~a~on {~&~ ~o Z3.9 ~ 1~,~). But ~fs i~ not ~. ~e 1~ wi~ c~c~ had been heavy drinke~ and smoke~ for a much longer time ~an cohofics ~oet he~d and neck abhorrences. ~at ~e resear- chem were not able mhe was ~he~er a[~hol or tobacco ac~s ~e~d~ whe~er one ae~ as a '~t~ in caus~g ~e m~n~cy, TI09t41110
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NEW YORK, N. Y. NEWS D. 2,103,363 -- S. 2,893,041 NEW YORK CITY METROPOLITAN AREA 1~ mily Doeto ''" ":: ' a ]'~ ,~: .-. " ............. " Teag . rookie. . is p D i du b en e s n m . ~-~ " By T~N~.~...,. " emp~sem~, ehronig bronchitis, and .h~~'~: ~ ~ay: trouble, d~elop after ye~s of heavy mo~. " W~verhe~d "I smoke because several of my friends do. My parents disapprove, even though my father smokes. In my opinion, I am master of my o~n destiny, inasmuchlas my body is mature, people tell me I use good judgement, and I have a slightly above average I. Q. If anything happens, I can always quit because of my will power. 'Live now,' I always say. Nothing personal, .but fooey on doctors." You may be master of your destiny, but I have very little faith in the captain of your ship. Many teenagers are at an age when they feel they know it all Actually, it is dumb .to get-hooked on a habit that is difficult to break. Ask anyone who has smoked cigarets for five or more years. *Health frap ~n addition, as e~pensive as they are, eig- arets are .likely to get more expensive. Fur- therm, ore, ~b~cco is one of the first items • to b'~ ~ed.~itn our government needs more money. An':~bne ~terested in 'cheating' the ;~overnment Sh o ~14,~lh..~t ,s mo kl ng. Any l~.~._.a~ts to smoke in his teens at.~ ,t~*~q~t~ trap. Most com- p!ication~ 6.~.:~.¢~"~ts lung cancer A person must almost start as a teenag~ to .meet the l~rerequisites for trouble ahead. Most young people became two-pack-a-day smokers within a few years, mainly beca~sa they feel no harmful effects. After a decade, cigaret cough develops, followed by mor~ permanent damage to the lungs and heart. These complications usually take place before age 50. l~fos~ teenagers regord 50 as old age and too far off for them to be concerned. As a rule, it is a waste of time trying to convince them to look ahead and build a good founda- tion for the future. This is unfortunate, cause after 35, life can be most enjoyable l~ro- vided you have your health. Sex ]s the greatest and there are no worries about .things that turn out to be trivia. H you want to smoke--go ahead--it's your life. But it is the only one you will ever get. And when you reach 40 and are disabled Irom a cough or shortness of breath, don'~ cry or complain. Those who were more intelli- gent will be there to remind you how dumb you really were when sweet 16. Dr. Van Dellen will answer questions regarding ~eal~ and hygiene in this column and by mail. He will not make diagnoses or pre.~cribe for indlvidual~. Enclose stamped, self- addressed envelope and address to sr~0~. ~E~V.~i'..~'~'"-=~:.;::~ ~,~,.,~ '.~ ".".V T109141111
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CHICAGO, iLL. TRIBUNE 0. 728.760--$ CHICAGO I~ETROPOLqAN AREA SEP 18 1973 .. flow to lCeep well .When dental sphntlng gn e?- ssary and why ~" ra~ p~c~ure because, unless ~e G.W.P~t~e~is~ [in- cause ~ corrected, the teeth w~ loosen • ....~lu~ng my o~, who recently re~red] • ~ter the wir~ are removed. bare given me ~ dd~itions o£ den- Tempor~ relief aLRo c~ be ob- t~ sp~t~g ~ a $I,5~ price tag for ta~ed wi~ ~pl~ts made from ~oft ~ front teeth. If ~is is the only way plast~ t~t bar~en aro~d the t~. to save my p~eious ivories, I'd ~e to Removable appliances o~ t~s type also lea~ more about it. Dent~y E not ~e. ava~able. exactly yo~ fie]~, but I'd appr~ate ~e be~ sp~ts also ~e the most your help. I'm at a loss and very nero- , expensive. F~ sp~ts are excellent, ous." but ~ey ~uaHy r~u~e a den~t The a~wer t~ed up i~ Dr. Sy~ey sp~ia~ ~ ~ t~ic. The teeth ~e G~lield's book, "T~th, Tee~, Tee~:' trea~d as a s~gie ~gid ~t, eons~t~g [Simo~ and Scb~eL New York]. He. of new crow~ or jackets ~a~ d~es sp~t~g as... "~e ~o~g of o~ cover each t~. The teeth look t~ toge~er so ~at ~ey mutua~y nat~al ~d ~parace, even ~o ~ey are sup~rt each o~er." ~e proced~e ~ ~o~ed toge~er and can be m~de ne~ by people w~th periodontal ~s- support ~d rep]ace missing teeth. ease, ~ which the tee~ are decayed Each jaeke~ covers a~I the cy~'.vn and loosened ~eause ~ec~on h~ se~ expos~ root to the gums. In arat~ ~e too~ from the surro~d~g to being cosmeficaEy attractive, the bones and g~m~. I~ other words, the jacket can be s~aped to deflect food for tissu~ that ~old the teeth in p~ce ave maximum ~yg~en,.. eroded, and the structures m~t be rein- Sprig is ouiy one pha~e of ~'e- Iore~. ~erv~g te~ endangered by pe~odoncia.. Ac~rd~g to Dr. Garfield. ~ere are Surgical t~hnics :~].io are available. m~y t~es o( dental ~plints, and I but ~ere is no ~ubstitute [o~ keeping a~e ~at it is here ~at ~e costs the tee~ clean an~ ,'isiUng the dentist va~. The s~plest is wiring the wobbly regularly. ....... ~ TOMORROW: .: cd ~calth repor~. ~ . i answered by maz. / stamped, aclJ-ad- [ dressed envelope c:compaRies request. ~.." ~elephone inquir:cs will not ~ Pregnant , ~. C. wri~s: Will smo~ag d~ing p~gy lead to a defocmed baby? REPLY ~;-~a~er babies. Nicotine passes ~ ~ placenta in[o lhe baby's cir- -, but, to the bes~ of o~ ~owI- "~ge, d~ little h~. abo~o~ ~ ~d to ~ gma~r ~r~-~ who . TI09141112
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE D. 728,760 - S. 974,869 CHICAGO MEIROPOI ITAN AREA qUG 21 • ow. to keep weZl | • rltlsh to market tg itute By T. ~.\VsR [)el]eG, ~. ~. ~ not be a problem, because the tar con- / ~ / tent of ~e substitute will be one~uar- The c~£~ ~e~- ter that of na~al tobacco, and filters continues to carry a high risk. Medical authorities here and abroad say it is harmful, mainly because of its relation- ship to chronic bronchitis, emphysema, lung cancer,, and coronary heart dis- ease. To avoid some of these, new smoking materials are introduced peri- odically. None, however, has the appeal of dried tobacco leaves. Other plant leaves, even lettuce, never have been popular. Bethat as it may, a lOOper- cent tobacco substitute ~s a long way off. According:to a British medical jour- nal, The Lancet, the Imperial Tobacco, i~s decided to build a chemical ~.produce commercially a tobac- [titu.te. Derived from wood pulp, modified cellulose, which is also consti.tuent of tobacco. It will ~acco substitute from Which all le ingredients except cellulose :}red. , w:)t contain nicot£ne, but on ~dt will 1~'od~ee some tar. [Tar is ~rmfRl than nicotine.] The man- ~rS are confident that this The British government views this with mbced emotions. Optimists want the factory built as soon as possible, because if this is a real tobacco substi- tute, smokers will want to switch. Pes- simists are not so sure the substitute is free from toxic constituents not found in natural tobacco smoke. In other words, will it present new health hazards? But history is likely to repeat itself. For generations, smokers have rejected substitutes because they lack flavor or provide inadequate smoking satisfac- tion. It is diHicult for cigaret smokers to switch to cigars and pipes, evcn tho the tobacco in the last two is stronger. Inhaling makes the difference. The al- ternative is to convince smokers that it is a had and dangerous habit that, once acquired, is difficult to break. The best policy is not to start at all. TOMORROW: Otitis medhz. Questior~ on medical topics will be answered by mail if stamped, sell-ad- dressed envelope accompanies request. T!09141113
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CHICAGO, ILL. ~HI(~.~GO ~EI~OPOLtTIkN A~ k~G ~ ~7~ ru es, vite disease Bx, ~R Van Dellen M D ]definitely linked to hea~ ~g. " "~: ' " " /Physicians cannot prevent teen-agars Ever~ne~cl~ng ~Hfl~, ta~s/ from ~g~n~g ~ smoke nor can they about ~ase~evea~on, b~ each~ . stop adul~ from continuing to smoke. ~a t~ of ~~~ We all ~ow that alcohol is the com- ~d ~ri~ic ~aflo~. Va~ines men denomhator in c~hos~ of the liv- have ~o~ct~ us aga~st ~n~gious er, ~sted as forth cau~ of death disff~at ~ l~ger ~e a problem, patients over 40. And the complications ~- ~ db~ not a~ly ~ o~ main of obesity are too n~erous to mention. ~--hea~ ~e~e, s~ke, c~cer, It is a d~couraghg condition to ~eat ~ mccid~ts, became everyone who loses weight ~y, facets that ~e the risk gains it back. ~ develop~ ~sclero~the ha- This does not mean that we should .~ cau~ of h~ a~acks ~d8~k~ not t~ to t~e a morn sensible attitude ~ we~-~o~ ~d corre~ab~e. But toward ~sitive health. Many ~rsons ~t ~ple are not ~te~, even beli~e we a~d a better educa~onal ~ ~e p~ hvolv~ s~plv measles, program. Perha~ so, but we have had ~h as changes in di~, avoi~g obesi- a conc~trated ~ucational program for ~, co~g h~r~on, ~d cir- many years and it h~ not chang~ the • .~mven~g situations t~t br~g on health habi~ of millions of ~rsons. ~, "~ety, ~d ove~a~e. As one Our governm~t plans to spend bilSons of my ~en~ said, "I ~w the risk on health m~ntenance organizations fac~rs, but I am gohg ~ Hoe and not which will be motivat~ to prevent s~nd the ~t of my ~e ~ng." e~e. Even our Prudent is quoted as L~g cancer and emphy~a are sang, "Educate and en~u~age each ~ ci~ to develop sensible heal~ ~evention can also ~ ~plement~ ,-~ ~o~c physical examinatioM. "~ ~ true provided the in~vidual ~ the advice of hh physician. ~ m~ic~ profe~ion has found that it .~ic~t to change a p~son's habi~ and ~s: ~d to date, it h~ ~t ~ . ~ble by passhg laws ag~t them. TOMORROW: Unwan~ed sterility. T!09141114
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUHE D. 745.210--S. 993.865 CHICAGO MEIROPCLI~AN ~REA How to keep well Asbestos in air tied to lung cancer rate -.-=')By T. R. Van Dellen, M.D. Asbestos is mined chiefly in Canada, the Soviet Union, and South.Africa, but the United States is the largest con- sumer. The tim-resistant, flexible fi- bers are finer than spider silk, but stronger than steel wire. Its thousands of uses add to man's safety, quiet, and comfort. But the soft fibrous mineral is also risky to work with, especially when the very fin~ fibers are inhaled. Prolonged exposure is followed by ex- tensive scarring of the lung tissue [as- bestosis] which is associated with a high incidence of lung cancer, especial- ly in cigaret smokers. Once the fine fibers are airborne, they tend to remain for a long time. Asbestos fibers also have a slow rate of decay, a iact that has led some author- ities to believe they may remain indefi- nitely in the air. Asbestos was well named by the Greeks because it means "'inextinguishable." Several years ago, ti~e snostance ac- quired considerable notoriety when re- ports showed that the fibers could be detected in air samples in most large cities. The concentration was not h':gh enough to do harm. but it could be hazardous if the level continued to crease via new construction and dem- olition of old buildings. To control asbestos dust, a unique cooperative ven- ture was started among industry, la- bor, medical science, and governmen:. Disposable masks and respira~ors have been developed for chose v..:~ work wi~h the mineral. When asbestos ~s used for insulation, it is sprayed on sceei ~irder~. :. :ontro| tl:e ,~;:s~. area being trea~ed must be enclo--'ed completely by ~arpaulins. ~e~ore enclosures are dismantled, the)" n=.,~ be cieaned oi wastes to prevent "snow. falls- c.f the feathery insulation male- ria;. N. one questions the relationship ".v,..e ', ',m~:;lnd~3g e::po:ure to as!-es- smokin;~. In .l survey cor.ducte~ asbeslus workers ',vi~ a history oi ular cLaaret smoking, 24 died o[ cancer. But none of 87 nonsmokers with equal exposure to asbestos died of "aa]ignancy. it was calculated tEa~ a combination o~ asbestos exposure and cigaret smoldng increased the risk of dying irom ltmg cancer by almost 92 times. T109141116
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CHICAGO, I'LL TRIBUNE D. 745.210--S. £~1~ .265 .HICAGO METROP~L,'.a:~ JIJL 2~ '~.73 How to well Lung cancer cases 5-fold" 30 years up By~T. R. V.an D Lung cancer now is the most com- mon malignancy in males in this coun- try. According to Doctors Heine H. Hansen and Oleg S. Selawry of the Na- tional Cancer Institute, it has increased more than five4old during the past 3 decades and will take 65,000 lives this year. It is unlikely that the mortality rate will drop, despite our knowledge about the relationship between and rids form of cancer. The outcome/s poor. because the di- agnosis usually is made too late. When X-ray and other studies detect an earty lesion, less than one of four victims has a chance. However. even in this group~ the S-year survival rate varies between 20 and 30 per cent. "Overall mortality from lung cancer--both early and late, with and without surgery--is 90 per cent. Why is inng canccr in its early tinges so dlfflcult to diagnose? Cough, ant oI the earRest manifestations, also is a common symptbm of heavy smok- ing. In other words, ti:.: :ic'Jm believes he has smoker's cougi: as a result' of bronchitis. He is unaware of the subtle changes that occurred whoa the irrita- tion from his cancer was added to that of his smoking. Suspicion is aroused when he begins to cough up blood or develops chest pain. But by.this time, it is too late. Semiannual X-ray screening of mid- dle-aged men for lung cancer does little to improve the dutlook. This was the conclusion reached by a team of Phila- delphia physicians. More than 6,000 men had chest X-rays twice a year for 10 years. During this time 121 new cas- es were found. Eight per cent survived after the cancer was detected in this way. Bronchogenic lesions may exist for severai months before they are large enough to detect on the film. This is why the medical profession stresses prevention by discouraging cigaret smoking. When a teen.ager be- gins to smoke, it is difficult for him to look ahead 20 to 25 years, As one boy said to me: "'By that time, I won't care because I'll be an old man." TOMOREC::': Gout-rel~ed backache. Questmns ,~.:~ medical topics will be answered by mail i[ stamped, dresscd en...c~.oze accompanies request. T109141117
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CHICAGO, II.L TRIBUNE 745.210-S. 993.865 c~lc_,,~Go M~ [~IOPOtlTAN AREA JJil i4 iS73 How to keep well Em h- e -a: inhaling easy, but exhaling... By T. R. Van Dellen, M.D. Emghysema is on the indrease, i~ our mail is any indication. We are receiv- ing more and more letters about this chronic lung condition from readers who are tired of coughing, wheezing, nnd shm'tness of breath. Emphysema [em-~i-se-mah] is a bal- l~ning out of the lung tissues. The ccrndition is best explained bY imagin- bag what happens to bJae air-sacs when a person blows ha~d on a fhumpet or saxophone. Emphysema seldom devel- ops in wind-instrunaent musicians, but victims el asthma and ch~nic bronchi- tis are ideal candidates. In these individuals, the bronchi are narrowed ~1 ir~lamed. Air comes into the lungs easily, but has difficulty get- ling 9ut. Wtte~ expiration "begins, the ~t~l~.may close com0letely, acting like a ¢l~ck valve o~i an auto tire. This obstruction leads to mechanical stretch- ing of weakened air sacs, which is em- physema. Lung speeia~ts have noted the wide- ~ assoclation between smoking, a~tltma, and emphysema--espe'~ly after age 50. Tobacco does not cause the disease, but aggravates an existing bronehRis that is weakening the air sacs. Improvemer~t often occurs aRer cessation of smoking, but those who continue to smoke usually get worse. The emphysema sufferer should have a good nebulizer to inhale the medica- tions used for treatment. Epinephrine- like drugs open up the bronchi, where- as enzymes, steam, and other wetting agents liquefy the sputum, making it easier to expel. Antibiotics eliminate in- fecl~on. Breal~bJng exercises are ttelpful in strengthening the accessory breatl~ng muscles, such as those o[ the abdomen. In thhs way, the diaphragm is forced upward which helps the lungs expel the trapped air. Pursing the lips during expiration encourages the bronchi to remain open. [Our leaflet on emphyse- ma cab be obtained by sending stamped, sel~.addressed envelope with request.] TOMORROW: Dozing t# the dinner table. Questions on medical topics wilt be answered by mail il stamped, self-ad- dressed envelope accompanies request. Eggs, chocolate, migraine B. L. writes: Cottld eggs or chocolate bring on migraine headaches? REPLY Yes, if migraine is caused by an al- lergy to these foods. Stop eating them for a while and see whether the head- aches disappear. Send stamped, self-ad- dressed envelope for our leaflet on mi- graine. Longevity and abstinence N. N. writes: Do men who drink and smoke get more heart attacks than those who don't use alcohol or tobacco? REPLY • Yes, according to many statistical Kindles. This may bedue to alcohol and n/cot~ or to the emotional reasons wire meu drink and smoke. TI09141118
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NEW YORK, N. Y. NEWS D. 2,125,18] -S. 2,978,270 NEW YORI(. ClfY MEIROPOIIiAN AP,~ 17 1973 Family Doctor. s..to cede cholesterol' villain in the fight against coronary.he~ disease and stroke. In my opinion, its role, has been overemphasized because it is only one of several risk factors. Nothing is gained if the cholesterol level in the blood is low- ~'~d unless something is done about smoking, • ll~ertension, lack of exercise, obesity and stress. "~haps these are the reasons why death rates ,~f~m coronary artery disease continue to rise. ~sf Experts|re Most authorities recommend a d~et to lower "t~tO cholesterol level in the blood. This approach fm "the least expensive, ~but is not easy for those ~l~ love meats, eggs and dairy products. At _~.~tg tim% I told my patienta to avoid gluttonmts and prescribed medicine to. lower the eho- ~1 level. But the recommended approach ~.is a diet low in saturated fats and eholes- .Im"t~! (meat~, eggs, dairy products) to which ~ ridded foods hish in polyunsaturated fatty ~kl~, such a~ vegetable oils, special margarines ,,~ fish. • ~ far, so good--unless the individual con- ~J~es on polyunsatarates and avoids eating ~..~l~tt~.~eggs and dairy producta. This means that .liil ~ consume up to 15% (4 to 6 is normal) ~f h~ diet in polytmeaturates. According to some .~it~ too much of the latter may be harmful. are reports of a relationship with cancer, liver disease, intestinal irritation, gonadal dam- ag~ and hypertension. • Polyunsaturates used properly may lower cho- lesterol, but when abused may encourage atharo- sclerosis. They also tend to raise the urge acid level in the blood. What else reduces the blood cholesterol l,vel? W.eight loss and exercise will do this rega~dles~ of the type of fat consumed. It also helps to avoid stregs and anxiety. We have many drug~ and hormones to lower the cholesterol level. Among these are Clofibrate, D-thyroxine prod- ucts, nicotinic acid, sitosterols and cholestlrra- mine. Some of these inhibit cholesterol abs,?rp- lion, others discourage the s~;nthesis of the l~td within the body or aid in the breakdown and excretion of cholesterol. THREE HERNIAS REPLY: Can a person have a hernia three times in the same place~. REPLY: Yes, especially when the tissues have been overstretched for many years and, like old cloth, are not strong enough to support the abdominal wall following surgery. If an- other operation is needed~ the surgeon may use a nonirritating vitallium or steel mesh to rein- force the area being repaired. Our leaflet on hernias can be obtained by sending stamped, self- addressed envelope with ~'equest. Dr. Van Dellen will answer questions regarding health and hygiene in this column and by mail. He will not make diag- noses or p~scribe for individuals. Enclose staml~l, self-~- dressed envelope and address to OR, THEODORE R. VAN DELLE~, THE NEWS, P.O. BOX 1452, GRAND CENTRAL STATION. NEW YORK, N,Y. 1l~017 T109141119
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NEW YORK, N.Y. NEWS D. 2,125,181--S. 2,978270 NEW YOR}{ CITY METROPOLITAN AREA aPR I0 ~ , . ~ ~ ~n outdoer's:u~a, • ~ports enthusiast, farmer, However. today we are ~oin~ to irate rm men, because there are certain it you have f:~i~ skin and red or blond hair. facts of which they should be aware, pre- vention is the key word because some malgg- nam:ies are preventable. Lung cancer, the great- ~.at. caReer-killer o~ American males, could bs .~revented if the cixaret habit were eliminated. A2cordi~zg t,~ American Cancer Society pro- ~st~cuz, ~t" ~h~, 69.000 people who died of lu,g cancer last year. 5B,O~ were mere "gg~men Rot f~l smug. a~ they are catching up. nancies of t~ lungs are killing 18 times a~- m~y men as they did 40 years ago. Every ~uo~r shotlld perk up his ears at this state- men~ It is true that many people who smoke l~e chimneys live to a ri~ old age. My ~e~ "Don't bank on it, ~aose once cancer develops, the chance of cure is less than ~oki~g Is Pollut;o. . Thoze whD wish to make air pollution the ~apegoat should' kee~ in mind tha¢ smo~ng i~ concentrate~ pollution. In addison, cigavet ~oking is strongly tmpli~t~ in emphFsem~, eh~aic bronchitis, and di~rdezs of th~ cavdio- Y~CU[~r By3 Letn. 8kht eancec, another avoidable fo~ Ss cau~d ~[en are le:,s health conscious than women, probably because it is the "masculine thing to do." VVhatcve¢ that may be, it keeps men frDm havh~g regat~c examinations and the best way to safegaar~ ~gaiast cancer is though regular checkups. Carelessness along this line may ex- plain ~'hy 55 men to every 45 women die cancer. Bowd ~d te-.~1 cancer ar~ goo.~ examples, Both se~es sre equally susceptible, yet Xhese condigions a:~ highly curable when detected early and treated prum~tly. The "procto" is the name of aa exaad:ut[oa used to detect this type of cancer. Bu~ ninny men are too embarrassed to have i~ do~e. A~ a result, 47,000 people ~1 d~e ~f this form of ckncer. VITAMINS, ARTHRITIS M. ~ K. writes: What vitamin is good arthritis ? REPLY: At[ those found i~ a well-balance~ normal diet. Vitamin D iu extremely large doses was advocated some years a~o in arthritis, but was discontinued because of dangerous side reac- tions. W~mia C also i~ used with questionable ~suits. T109141120
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CHICAGO, ILL TRIBI./NE D. 745.2]0 --& 993,865 CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AI~F_A Hew to keep -W y most cancer tims are men , ,Bv T. R. Van Dellen, M. D. Cancer ~as no regard for age or sex. Hdwever, today we are going to con- ee~tr$~o on me~, because the~e are ~ facts o~ which they s~Id be am~re. Prevention is the key word be- eltmm ~o~ n~d]ipnmeie~ are prove~t. laller ~/t~ male~, eoald lm pre- vetoed If ~ _.~Imbit were e~i- ~ ~, ~ ~ ~,~ ~ who m ~ ~ ~g ~.] ~cies .~~ ~ ~y ~ ~ ~ ago. -~~~k up ~ ears ~~ ~ ~~,Uve to Those who wish to make aw pollution the scapegoat should keep in m:nd that smoking is concentrated pollution. Ia addition, cigaret smoking is ~trongly implicated in emphysema, chrome bronchitis, and disorders of "he c3rd~,- vascular system. S~n cancer, another ~¢mdab,e ~s caused largely by ox erexposure ' the sun. If you are an ontdoorsman, a s~r~s enthusiast, farmer, sailor, lgeguard, prot~t yourseff wita a hat and a long-sleeved shirt Be e~peciaHy careful if you ha~e fair ~kin ~d red blond hair. Men are less health consciu~ women, pr~ably because it is "m~c~ne t~g to do.'" Wha~ver ~hat may ~, it keeps men from hav~g reg- ular exam~atio~ and the besL way ~o safeguard ag~st cancer ~ thin regu- .at checkups. Carelessness along this line may explab~ why 5F men to every 45 women die of cancer. B~-el and rectal c~cer are g o o d examples. Both sexes are equally sus- ce0tible, yet these conditions are h~hty curable when detec~d early m~d treat- ed promptly. ~e "proeto'" is tae name of an examination used to det~t thh ~ae of cancer. But many mep arc cml)arrassed ~ have it. done. As a re- ,nit. 47.~0 people wi}l die , f this f,~rm JJ • "0310RROW" ~ :mbol c ' tC(u~,~9, ,'~ 4uestions on medical (op~cs w:It be m~swered b# man il ~am#~, nell~d- ~I~ essed ~ve~e ~eom~ien req~. NEW YORK, N.Y NEWS [. 2 125.181 S 2.91&~ (} ~4~%' ,t ~Rll E "Y ~IIlHOFO.,raq ~.'t" T109141121
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NEW YORK, N.Y. ~EWS D. 2.!25."--~i-s. 2.978.270 NEW YORK CI:": METROPOLITAB AREA Doubt The Pill Causes Cancer By THEODORE R. VAN DELLEN. M.D. ...........~o~hl~ confusl'on and concern//'~Sometimes it take~ years before the cancer- ^..~.. ~,,. ..... ~ ~.u ~etween ~/¢auaing potentaal ........... e / all, it takes 25 to 30 years for roger_eta to cause oral conzracep~lye pros an~ cel~aln ~yp of cancer, l~iuch of this stems from the~ slightest inkling that the "Pill" is a cancer l~ro- fact that the research is done in dffferen{ d..uce.r._ _ ." n ls ~ ~o~ App[|¢able ~o H~mar~s countries, using products on different aima . ,\ " The Food and Drug Administration seldom According to some reports, women using "the considers rats because these rodents are prone "Pill" develop.ed slightly more cervical cancers to develop breast cancer under any circumstances. When rats are given birth control pills in dosages several hundred times greater than the human dose, some are bound to develop breast and uterine cancer. Doses for Dogs This does not occur when comparable doses are given zo dogs or monkeys--animals used more often in experiments done in the United States. And many authorities still believe that dogs and n~onkeys are too sensitive for cancer research. Others believe that ~he results of animal studies are not applicable to humans. Investigutors in other countries may als.~ use hormones thac have not yet been approved for general use in the United States. Con~'us~on reigns when European findings are reported in our newspapers and over radio and TV. By virtue of the test time, oral con~racendves have aimosu been exonerated as a possible cause of cancer. Since their discovery in the early 1950s, they have been used by millions of women. Physicians have given this matter high priority and the latest available statistics on the incidence of and mortality from cancer among users of the ~l~lll" have shown no increase to implicate the~ormones now in use. than those using a diaphragm. A certain type of contraceptive pill was taken off the market because it caused breast nodules in beagle bitches. But these findings ~re not applicable to "humans. The exception is ~he post-coital (morning a~- ter) contraceptive pill. This product (diethylstil- bestrol or DES) prevents pregnancy when given in extremely high doses within 48 hours of unpro- tected coitus. It is sa£e as an emergency measure, but probably not ~-i~en needed ev, ery morning. ALLERC, I(" DISORDER M. M, writ~.~: I -'!:ooze 30 to 40 times a day and my no~e ~-r.s ~,ongested. Allergy pills give relief but ma~t, me dopey. Can this con- dition be cured ? REPLY: It sound~ F.ke an allergic disorder of the ~ose, and cure Js possible if a cause is found that can be elimina~t.d or corrected through de- sensitization, Why no~ consult an allergist? Dr. Van Oel!en w~;! a.~: vet qu,'stions regarding health and hygiene m this column ar,:~ by mail. He will not make diag- noses or prescribe for ino,v.a::,s. Enclose stamped, self-ad- dressed envelope and a0oress to DR. THEODORE R. VAN DELLEN, "i'HE NEWS, P.O. BOX 1452, GRAND CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK. N.v 19017. .j T109141122
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"7 CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA ;E~ 2 ,'.97:.; ® NEW YORK, N.Y. NEWS D: 2,129,909 - S. 2,948,786 NEW YORK CITY ME'I'ROPOLITAN AREA ;:EB .!_ ':373 .- route breathing compressed, purified air, this .did not take place. What did the CO do to their hearts? All had narrowed coronary arteries and suffered from angina. On returning from the trip, they ,exercised on the Collins bicycle ergometer and-the pain devel- oped much sooner while the carbon monoxide" was in their system. All o~ this took place without blood pressure or pulse changes. No before-and-a~ter differences were noted when the-experi- ment was repeated after pure air was inhaled. The carbon monoxide in ~smcke also aggravates angina because ~ robs the heart mascle of oxygen. One Cali- fornia epidemiologist believes that the tobacco industry should pay as much attention to a .cigaret 'that produces a low output of carbon monoxide as the3~ now do to the tar and niceti~e content of their products. Alterations in the type of tobacco or the filter might do the trick. The epidemiologist, Dr. John R. Gold- smith is of t h e opinion that cigar~t smoking makes the greatest proportion- ate contribution to deaths from coronary heart disease before the age of 60. The mortality ratios among smokers are doubled. TOMORROW: "/Yew" knees. answered by mail i] stamped, set]ad- dressed envelope acco~npa=ies request. TI09141123
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CHICAGO, II.L TRIBUNE D. 745,210--S. 993,865 CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA ,;~,~ :~S ..-~.7~ How to keep well Pregnant women . s houldaot sm ok_e... ( ^ ~ ....... into[her ways. Cigare~s and matches bearing years are cigaret smokerst)ne'tn~ra oz a~l w~v~au~--~. ~e highly dangeroas items "~ the When expecting, many will want to quit smoking because we now know that the habit affects two lives -- that of the baby and the mother. Nicotine retards fetal growth. In addition, those who smoke have a significantly greater number of unsuccesslul pregnancies due to .spontaneous miscarriages, still- births, and death of the infant during l'ds first month of life. This is not intended as a scare cam- paign. Actually, nothing happens to most pregnant women who smoke ex- cept that the baby is likely to weigh in at less than the normal average. This fact, plus the other possibilities, how- ever remote, is reason enough for the expectant woman to quit smoking or cut down. But why smoke at all? After the hands of a child. Furthermore, the smoking habits of one or both parents influence the child's decision on smok- ing. Statistics from one survey revealed that two years ago, 8.4 per cent of girls in the 12 to 18 age bracket were smokers; today, the number has jumped to 11.9 per cent. This has seri- ous implicetions because it is harder for women to quit. Most of the health hazards develop after many years o~" heavy smoking. Furthermore, women should not he lulled into a false sense of security by the propaganda that ',hey are immune to the bad effects of smoking. The American Cancer Society esti- mates that 11,000 American women will die of lung cancer in 19,'2. Mouth can- cer, bronchitis, emphysema, and heart disease in female smokers also has in- creasea. Lung cancer :~ six times more common in men than in women, but this does not mean that cigarets are less harmful {or the fairer sex. The incidence of cancer of certain or- gans is different in the two sexes. For example, stomach cancer is more com- mon in men than in women, even tho both eat the same foods. Women also have more malignancies o~ the colon. The big question is. "~.i~, y?'" TOMgRROW: " ~.um~mg," an unusua~ reaction. Qsestion~ on medica! topics ~il$ be answered by mai! iJ stamped, sel~(ul- dressed envelope accompan~e,~ request. T109141124
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NEW' YORK, 19. Y. NEWS D. 2.129,909-S. 2,948,786 NEW YORK CITY METROPOLITAN AREA /FAMILY DOCTOR ention ~Iost of the criticism aimed, at the /" Conversely, no one will deny that reforms are , r.~de~l nrofession is nolitlcal btick-nas~~ needed in the delivery and financing of medical x~~ ........ --~ ell~s c._a.re for early detection of disease and the treat- ~~,*'-~-~" ~"~",~"~ merit of those already ill. In many areas, there is shou---l-d-~/ot be blames on physlClaIls, DriP; On a shortage of physicians, but there are also life style, behavior, habits, diets and living shortages of plumbers, carpenters, and tool and conditions. The primary causes of our major health prob- lems are obesity, old age, automobile accidents, drug and alcohol abuse, cigaret-induced cancer and lung disease, venereal ~ lack of ptfysi- eal fitaess and gluttony. The high incidence of mentnl illness stems from upbringing and li~ng conditions. It has been said that millions go to bed hun- gry, but again, this is a social, not medical, prob- lem. In-f~lons ~ttqw-trbm uncleanliness and par- eats1 failure to have the ~hildrea inoculated. And, we might-~d~l, that people are the main cause of pollutio~n".~_~..-_greate~ the population, the greater the. ~'l~'flutibn: New 3reed Needed Perhaps we need a new breed of physicians called '~eale~'-teachers" who can instruct (as we try to do evemy day) patients how to stay healthy. In my opinion, the majority of people are not that interested in preventive medicine and the govern- ment will have just as much trouble converting them as does the medical profession. And I ~loubt if any man or woman running for Congress will dare campaign for better health by advocating laws to eliminate cigarets. restrict fatty foods, stricter jail sentences for drunk driving, and making it a criminal offense to have a venereal disease. Few will campaign for limiting families to three children in order to help. control overcrowding and pollution. die workers, etc. Last year more foreiga MDsentered the . United States than were graduated from all the medical schools in the nation (10,949 foreign ver- sus 8,974 of our own). Perhaps Congress should enlist the aid of these doctors to correct the poor distribution of medical care. FABRIC SOFTENER AND HAIR C. G. writes: The girls have started rinsing their hair in fabric softener. They say it softens coarse hair better-than a creme rin~v. D.) you think this practice is harmful ? REPLY: I assume there is no harm if the user's hair is the texture of fabric. However, an inexpensive creme rinse xvill cost less than some of the fabric softeners. SAGGING BREASTS Mrs. T. R. writes: Is plastic surgery recom- mended for sagging breasts ? REPLY: .Not unless the breasts also are large. But this does not mean that plastic surgery • cannot be done. Correction is possible, bur why undergo the risk when falsies or uplifts usually solve the problem in most instances ? Dr. Van Dellen w~ll answer questions regarding hea~th and hygiene in this column and by mad. He wd! not make diag- noses or prescribe for individuals. Enclose stampeo, self- addressed enve ope and address to D.~. THEODORE R. VAN DELLEN, THE NEWS, P.O. BOX 1452, GRAND CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK, N.Y. 100~7. Ti09141125
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By DR. THEODORE R. VAN DELLEN : Smoker's dise~.se continues to be ~merica's greatest epidemic. If ~mallpox or typhoid fever killed 300,000 annuaIly, our. government ~ould take a definite stand and ~ry to eliminate lhe pestilence. Each year cigaret-inducvd di~ease~ lake 300.000 American live~, hut ve~'y little action is taken. Perhaps Congress has n fear of anta~'onizing v.~ters or losi.~ revenue. Some pro)~r¢.ss h~s been made but. Sn gen- e~hl, we have been p6wer]ess ~o counter the sinoking epbh, mie. The causative link between cigaret smokin~ ~nd ]t~n~ vanc(.r has been veri- fied in a d,~yen diff, r(,nt ~yp(~ (.f fzu,'ie~. ~ore than a s~'ore ~.f e~.vn(rh.~ cad in hu)~,h-~ds of reports, b)nKs between smoking and other diseases ~)~o ~.):ve sironF ~u~port. ]t is 8url)t'$sin~, h) xvh)~) e~lenl 1he h#~',it a drop in the bucket. Many Diseases (London) ~h~ted a ~umm:~ry o~ the ~c)uded ea))cer ,)f the hmg, c~re)fie ~cluded. T~e dead~ rate )~mon~: vk.tJm~ <,f p('D)~e To )b~se, we caO.c~ .the &mhs .c~.u~ed. bY falling asleep with a elgaret. Fireman often find the victim asphyxiated in a smoke-filled room from a blaze started by a care]~.ssIy dropped cigaret. Our lawmakers might be ~stounded at the suppor~ they wouhl receive fre, m sm~ers who are unwilling victims of their cravinffs am[ ashamed of the e~ample they st.t for their children. CREEPING PARALYSIS C. P. writes: What is creeping parv]ysis? REPLY: This unusual form of ~r~H~'sis due to a polyneuritis. It l~e~i~)s as a r(,~I'iratnvy and head. There is minimal ]o~s of ~en~ation. Pro~'rcsMon lnay cease t~t any poiot of the rli~ease. Adrenal steroids. sane, arc used and skilled nursh+g +s hnperatJve. ~ecovtq.)- occtl+s ~)~ 1~0 per cent (,t" +1:t. x+cthns, ~ut convalescence may require mcnihs. CONSTI PATEI ) CH ~ I,D C. P. writes: How do you cure constipation in a youngster? REPLY: First. determine if a pbyHeal defect Is responsible. ]f not, the cause usually is dietary or faulty elimination habits. Our ]e~dlet on (his subject can be obtained by sending stamp((i, self- addressed envelope ~v]th request. Dr. Van Del{en w;{I answer questi~n; rEyaraing addres~d enve)cpe and address to DR THEGDC'EE ~. VAN DELLEt~, Tfl[ ff['¢~S, P.O. ~ .1~52~ G=aad T109141126
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HEALTH Smokor's disease ues to epiderc lc.'~¢,. phoid fever annuaii'<, our would take a and try to eiimi: tilence ~ach induced 000 Ameri, littte acuon haps Congres antagonizing ~g revenue. Som,~ made have been counter ~he demic, The: between and ltm4 verifleq in types than :. ~cor ~okers. And moth- during preg- retard the fetus. we va|] add :he ~used by falling T109141127
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TRIBUNE D. 74,~,210-S. 993,865 CHICAGO M [[ROPOLITAN AREA Lung Cancer A reader writes: Is lu~ng cancer al- ways the fast growing ~at causes death soon .after it is d/scovered? REPLY The growth oE bronchogenic lung can- cer/s variable, but R may appear that it is fast growing because most ol thee lesiSns esc~ detection until it is too late. Tobacco is not only causative, but the most common sYmptom--coughing-- usually is blamed on cigaret smoking rather .tlmn the malignancy. It is no wonder that lewer than 20 per ,cent o~ .those with cancer d the lung survive. T!09141128
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reader write~: "I ~-and. nt worst, affects 45-year-old politician with a gripe, Last year I quit smok- ing~ but my work takes me into many smoke-filled rooms. On leaving a meet- ing, ,my eyes burn and I cough as much as I did be- fore I quit smoking. Is there any health hazard in inhal- ing secondhand smoke?" There is no agreement on this ~problem. A room or car with several smokers can raise the carbon monoxide concentration of the air to and over the limits set by the government for occupa- tional levels. Smoke fumes may create temporary alter- ations in vislon and hearing, but nothing serious. The car. bon monoxide replaces the the heart anti breathing. In- haling secondhand smoke has not beer, shown to in- crease the r:sk o~ develop- ing lung cancer, chronic bronchitis, emptlysema or heart disease. According ,o me surgeon general a recent Japanese study of 265,118 men con- firms what we aiready knew --cigarette smoking is deadly. The mortality from lung cancer shows a direct relationship to the number o~ cigarettes smoked daily. For those who smoke less than IO a d~y. the chances increase ~ror.: 2.~ times in nonsmokers ~,o 24.8 times among two-p~ ck a,day users. T109141129
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NEW YORK, N.Y. NEWS O, 2,125,181-S. 2,978,270 N[W YORK CITY MEIROPOI_IIAN .aREA SEP 2 0 19Y2 I MILY DOCTOR WillSu ive Air Pollution but Life Style Will Suffer our ~em in Southern C~liforn~a and now potent role. In addRi~n, ~m~erature many other urban areas are affected. new airborne disease, People are causative germs and as the popu- lation ~ncreases, so does efivironmental smoke and chore;cola. The intensity of pollution has r, ot increased in the large cities, but the "move to suburbia" has widened the area of dirt and grime. Man will survive, but contaminatiou does af- fect ht~ quality of life and wellbeing. Photochemical air pollution consists of hydr~ca~,bon vapors from combustion engin~s~ oxides of nitrogen and sunlight. The latter reacts with the others to pro- duce many chemical compounds (includ- ing aldehydes), ozone and nitrogeu diox- ide in the a~nosphere. This is the prob. The pollution interferes with visibility, damages vegetatl,n, irritates the eyes and xespiratory tract; and may have a aarmful effec~ on the heart. It may also irritate the skin. Sky Is c~ L~b Other pollutants include carbon mon- oxide and lead (from leaded gasoline). Sulfur dioxide levels are the customary indexes of photochemical pollution. In the atmosphere, it is oxidized to sul~ur trioxide and ;t i.~ the hydration of the latter that produces the very toxic furic acid The skies are massivd chemical labo- ratories in which the sun plays.~an_~ ira- immersion keeps the upward diffusion of pollutants rest.tiered to a few hun- dred feet. A Spec|al yarlety To this we cau add a more special va~ety of pollution that occurs near large power plauts, factories, and smelt- ing and metaUurgicaI operations, There also is an interaction between cigaret smoking and air pollution. Smokers are alfected more severely pos- sibly because the habit impairs the de- fense m~hanism against air pollution. And if the a~oaphere is polluted with carbon monoxidh, .the smoker has mo~ difficulty exhallu~ carbon ,~maoxide be- ~,een ~.
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NEW YORK, N. Y. NEWS D, L129.909 - S. ~,948,786 ,flEW YOt~K CITY METROPOLI'IAN AR,£A ! FA ,M, ELY DOCTOR, To.,S _o Not, to Smoke is a Weighty Matter By DI~THEODORE R. VAN DELLEN anal hot, smokers. Smokers older than 40 o__X'~;'.-~:~-~__: ..... .._L .... ~ _._ averaged 15 pounds heavier than accept- ~m~opm g~~-.~weighLstandards, more than doubles among men 25% they stop smoking. Numero~s reasons al~ given for the increase, but the e:mct cause is not known. Unfortunately, the extra pounds are used as an excuse to start again or to continue smoking. Weight gain is easily controlled by eating less food and avoiding snacks when the urge to eat or smoke comes oil. A survey ot steel workers in South Wales revealed a considerable difference between the body weights of smokers • For unknown reasons, those who never smoked were taller and nearly 30 pounds heavier. From this, we are tempted to conclude that these men ate too much, regardless of their tobacco intake. But ~0% of the men tried to stop smoking. All gained weight and, in time, were as heavy as the nonsmokers. Was the risk of cigaret smoking worse than being obese? This waft important be- cause, in Britain, smoking and obesity. are major health hazards. Among male cigar..___eL smokers, the' risk of dying from hear~ disease is more than twice that of nonsmokers. The risk above average weight. In other words. the obese smoker stands a much greater chance of developing coronary heart trouble than the fat nonsmoker. ~ This report did not go into the in- creased mortality from lung cancer ~nd emphysema among smokers. Nor did it consider that the obesity of heavy smok- ers might also be related to their drink- ing habits or sedentary life style. It was found that 50% of youths age 15 to 19 were currently smoking. Did this explain why nonsmoking steel workers were taller than the others? Perhaps the admonition of our parents~ "Smoking will stunt your growth," has a grain of truth in it. VIN:EGAR AND VEINS B. H. writes: Will application of vine, gar to the surface veins on my legs do any harm ? REPLY: No, nor any good, Or. Van De(ien will answer questio~ regard/n] health and hygie/~e m this column and by mail, He will not make diagnoses or prescribe for::individuals, Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelo~ a~ld dress to DR. THEODORE R. VAN DEI,LEN,,T~IE NEWS, P.0. BOX 1452, GRAND CENTRAL STA- TION, NEW YORK, N,Y. 10017. t,
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIBUNE D. 767293 - S. CHICAGO METROPOLITAN :,-:E-~ How to Keep Well Cigaret Additives .. osease tings looked as haled liquid parafflli°~r a"~:~tlar .... " wel~-narn~cd~ it is mineral oil. both black and fatty. After process~g, Apparently the oily.::materia] lea invades the areas of fatty years, t~ere is tissue to disable the ~~. medical condition a light mineral oil [canopns oil] and petroleum jelly are added resulting in an atmost black, heavy moist leaL The leaves which are sold intact, are cut into strips and r~lled in cigarst paper. Since 1870, blackfat tobacco has been ~nperted into Guyana [formerly British Guiana] from Kentucky. And as might be expected, for many generations, In- dian immigrants and East Indians and their descendants developed a chronic lung disorder exhibited by dry cough and shortness of breath on exe~ion. These were the people .who smoked blackfat tobacco. Those who chewed or smoked it in a pipe never developed lung disease. Furthermore, this pattie- ular lung disorder did no~ occur in those who used unadulterated tobacco. The causal relationship of the tobacco never was suspected, even tho the blackfat tobacco smoke~s"]~g.' ....... The Iesson to be learned ~s th~lddi- rives i~ cigarets may 'Val~"ize '~ue" to the heat of the burning tobacco: It the chemical in the vapors that does the harm. In many countries,-.it is ille- gal to add a~.ything to tobacco except water. As with other tobaccos, :many years elal~e before lung changes occ~, .The .damage is minimal, but con~u~. Apparently these people do not :]iv~ long enough to develop Some authcrifies believe the hmg can- cer is a co,,'n[ licauon of the bronchitis that develop~ after heavy smdl~.g. Others beliew that smokers devel.op .a microscopic iipid [fatty] pneumoma that leads lo the malignancy. TOMORR')" . ~. :a::h Status and Travel. Questions ou medical topics ~ be answered b~ taail ~] stamped, self,ad. dressed enp,'k ~c a:'companies request T109141 I32
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YORK, IL Y. NEWS ti0n Much Woi+se dhl ~ ~r Old Days Too many half-truths and ex- ~ .t~,.g'er-ttion.~ pervade the field ~ho persist I~ ptlShlll@ the begins as one man's ophdoh and ~ni~ button as ~ncerns en- is not based on fact. The medical ~mnmen~! pollution, Ecology profession sees very little of the f~rs We reached an emotional harmful effects o~ air aml water' ~k ~nd haw ~on~ hovond r~.x- po}}~tion, it will be happy to go a~-~ g~fi~&: ...... b~ into history and lell Amcri- ~" t t" a o '~ ~cans about pollution that wa~ ,,~_A h~. s~ f the ~ame ,: _. ~tipoll~tmnmts have produced a [ pollution. ~r~lobby that could come I En[demjcs ~n Pas~ ~ a ~d end. Some reform pro-I r "-- --- ~mal+ ~erely ~garcoat our im-I Mere titan 70 years ago, our media~ needs, but of&.r n,~hi,+l w;d.<.rway+ may have been cry~l.~] for the future. '.'l,.;~r and ~l,,ckcd wiLh I'i.db but ]~. Yam Delhm will answer column and hy mail. He w~ not mak~ dlu~oses or prescribe for ~d~idutls. Enclosa stamped, se~.tddres~ed enve- lope. and address DR. THEODORE R. V~N DELLEN, THE NEWS, P. O. Box 1452, GRAND CENTRAL NEW YORK, N. Y. 10017. the water was also loaded with microbes that caused epidemics of dysentery, cholera and typhoid fever that killed thousands every year• Nowadays we go into hysterics when a tiny bit .of mercu~ found in our water. No ~ne wants to see our rivers filled with debt ris, oil slicks and bther chemlca]s~ hut we must admit that few they wash in or drink. At the turn of the century, the soft coal used in furnaces really made our air dirty, Air is cleaner now, but loaded with chemical gases and fumes, mainly from motor exhausts. The quality of the air may be irritating~ b.I, il. is not h,l, hal. Mos~ deaths attributed to air pollution occur under unusual weather conditions and involve the old and those with chronic lung and lteart dis- But where is the disaster lobby when we tell of the 50,000 people who die annually of hmg cancer from heavy ej_K.Lre t smoking7 Smoking is eon~nlratcd air poll- ution, but medical warnings are meaningless to the people be- cause they lack emotional appeal. Meanwhile, m.sl~ individuals ~'~d to believe tho~e1'%h~:|ud- denly have an ax to grind ziither than those who have spen~ ~l|fe- time trying to improve and.:pSo- long life, ".~,~ EYEBALL PRESSURE L. W. writes: What is the ~iled. ical term for increased ~n the eyeball ? REt'I,Y G]aucome. (glaw - ko - mah), Send stamped, self-addressed en- velope for our leaflet on thl~ condition. BRANDY AND THE HEART Mr. T. K. writes: Is brandf good for the heart? ,, REPLY It doe~ no harm when ,1t; used in moderation and is a good~ first aid measure shou]d a heartl attack develop.
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CHICAGE, ILL. TRIBUNE D. 767.793 -S. 1.0].6.275 {.HICAGO MEIROPOLITAN AREA HOW to .eep, Well ,Cancer Is Caused '.: ~..~'~. ...... " ..... ea# with tar.induced cancer. The meth- ~ "-.4~.~z~lgln womlm wrl~m: "want .d was extended to rats and m/ce and ~. ~elde Igim~? ~' t~y are/~b~ca~e a simple test for carcinogens. : ember pred~ , e The active ingredient in tar was found to be benzpyrene, a polycyclic hydro- carbon. A large variety of tumors can be produced in animals when these hy- drocarbons are applied or injected. In man, this is the active carcinogen in industrial skin cancers of men working with coal tar, pitch, soot, asphalt, pe- troleum, and paraffin oils. It is also in- criminated as the canCer-producer from ~obacco. The relationship o£ hormones to breast and pelvic cancer is well-known The azo dyes may produce bladder tu- mors. Many other chemicals also have carcinogenic activity. Natural' sources of. carcinogens include certain plant foodst~fs and contamination of food by fungi [Aspergillus fiavus]. X-rays, radium, and Ultraviolet radia- tion also are carcinogenic for the skin. Malignant tumors in animals and man have also been linked to parasiLes and bacter/a. And since the turn of the cen- tury, viruses have been implicated in certain cancers. Herpes viruses are h/gh on this list. TOMORROW: Avoiding :rick Fever. Questions on medical topics will be anszoered by mail iJ stamped, selJ.ad- dressed envelope accompanies request. T109141134
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CINCINNATI, OHIO ENQUIRER D. 195,433 -- S. 297,430 CINCINNAII METROPOLITAN AREA APB 5 1972 "Your Health Early Treatment '" "~ave been implicated. Can- ~ ..... ~" cer of the esophagus Is as- )~'~. ~-~,~vm ~, ~soclated with heav~ alto- • _t~t~en~ o~. c a n.c e r.'~ hol intake. The h~blt of .... ~..s~.am_a~.a asa~, chewing betel nuts and to- ~ .~Is l~ IIo~ always ~o o n • ~,~. ...... bate leads to an ! - : ~,~.a~_.._~_~ , ~. cer of the tongue and , ~reemn~. r~ lot cancer mouth. • h~volVi~ man~ o r g an.& H e r e d i t y also offers !. ~ ¢lue~ help us lde~- • ~, la~. vi~ua~ who • '~-, ~ av~e ch~e of dev~op~g some ~I~- • . n~i~. - ~' ~r ~ple, ~r~ ~d ~ ~o~ c~ ~ shoed ~ wa~h~. c~ful~. ~e ~e ~ ~on~ ~ers e~ .ra~oac~ve ma~[~, el, e~ma~, ~y~, ~, ~d co~ wr pr~ ~" & d t s. ~ut ~al~ ~g, e~mo~ ~carcinoma more co--on ~ci~ of'~e ~ ~e m~e common .. clt~s. There are more than 30. not so common malig- nancies with a definite ge- netic linake. Several of these have skin manifesta- tions that should be easily recognized. CANCERS of the bresst, colon, s t o m a c h, uterus, prostate, and lungs ,also have ~n hereditary predis- position. Studies in human cancer genetics are more complex than similar stud- les In animals. Humans have a long lifespan with long generation interwls. Mating cannot be con- trolled, and most dOuples have a small number of progeny. . ]~ut all that the physi- cians asks is co-operation when cancer runs in the ~amily. A third clue centers on early recognition and t~Jl~atment o, lesions that ~ht become mmigmant. "~'y~oical examples of pre-. cancerous lesions are the polyps that develop in the colon and white patches (le~koplalda) that are ~n in the mouth. . T109141135
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CHICAGO, ILL. TRIgUNE D. 767.793 - S. 1.0]6,275 CHICAGO METROPOLI]AN AR~A MAR ,20 1972 ~ also scaly the lestott may'be ~oted especially apparent whenever n~,essad- possi~iIRy inj~ and t~ p~7 a of aluohal, sh~p Pi~ $mok- a cau~ o~ of th~ may ~- when highly, seasoned, foods are eaten. ~n' tlmb t~ere i~ bleeding axut dlf~iculty ht speaking, eating and drL'dd~g. Now and then thb ~st clew is a lump in the neck thaiIs ~raced to a tumor in the mouth. In'adistion and/or surgery are the ~emedies for these types of ca~r. Sur- gical methods include removal by mean~ o! a scalpel or destr~tio~ via elec~ocautery of cryosurgery [freezing with liquid nitrogen]. The procedure used depends upon the location, size and duration of the lesion along with the victim's age and phy$ical condition. TOMORROW: Bo~e Lo.~. Que.~fio~ o~ rnecl~al ~c~ie~.~il! be d~'essed envelope accomp~nie~ ~'eque~. T109141136
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WORCESTER, MASS. TELEGRAM D. 62,326 -- S. 107,539 wORCESTER METROPOLIIAN AREA FEB 20197~ .I-Your• "Skin Take a Beating Over- a~ skin ..takes. a beating and sur- pr.i~ingly, it holti~ up well.. It, is: exlaOsed, to .the sun, wi~d,.. ~iheat,;.,;co.ld. and all ~rts ,of,. ~e.,m~als'.including dye~ de-. ::tergents, harsh soap,s, cosmet~,. :: ics; ~iad perfume:~, re this .we :might add self-injury from rub- bing..'picking, and scratching. I,ast. but nut.least, is nurmaJ deterio.rat'io.n, a natural result of the .aging process. Cosm~e aspects'of aging. • are the mo~t difficult to ac- • e@t. That daily look in the mirror is eh6ughto cause des- pair. But thls t~peet is amen- .t~able to ,plastic surgery and .chemical l~ling. In addition. ui~lgh(ly '~Iiots arid ttil~df~ "earl be rehioved b~, means 6t' trodi~ssicafion. Skillis qtli'ri~d, because "we never kfi0w when one of these"le- sions is pPecancer.us ~i" ma- lignant. Keratoses ~liver spots~ can be bleached. Or removed with liquid nitrogen or dry ice. The results ale 'nor always per- manent and occasio.nally must be repeated. Lesioias caulked by overexl~sure to the ~un .may ,result' ia permanent 'damage. NevertheleSs, it:is wi~ ~ .mi~iLni.ze expgsure ann' ap'pl~' a ~reen lotion. • ~her~ going ~td0or~..TI~: ~ho pla~ a trip. to Florida: or 'AriZona ~oul.d .keep. this in. mind. According" to Doer's~ :Thbmas H.. Sternberg and Ronald M. Reisner. Los An- .g e ! e s. dermatologists, flou- rourac~l"is t.he. latest remedy fo.r ~v.ere sun damage .to the face. The l ~.5 per cent fluor- oracil ointment is applied twice a week 1,~Iing to red- , Health -!'ile~'~ and discontft.rl. Alt,,r .a. curti~onP ~)ir~tl|lenl is Hp - piled until complete healing occurs. Keratose~ slough off, • but skin cancers mus~ ~ r~ ~oved surgically. All of this , leaves the skin sm~er and Eounger ]~king. • .;:'~. ~. wee~: x~y ~ to-" ~. ~cn denied to cardtacs? ' • -",The effects uf tubacco on " the heart vary from ~rson I. ~ person. II may cause irregula- " ~Ries of the beat. ~ reduce fl0w o1' bl~d tim:ugh the ~ronarv arteries. S~ tab~; when it aggravates ~hearl lhruugh lhe~ met:ha- ;nisnls "['()hklcO) alsb has ~adverse effect on the normal • ;~eart. m that heart attacks are fzll- more common among sm{~kers than nt}nsr~okers. Mrs. B.M.(;. writes: My 15- ye~Jr-cdd boy, who plays trum- pet in the sch~l bane often c,~mcs home lired and with a Int.ada,'he. ('.uhl I)la3 ing I)ril)~ q,rl I hi'>{.' Pn~,,~ihl3. htJ! Iht,r~r ;-tre III;III.V I:;.ttL~e', Jut latlgue alad headache, that it is not fair blame his Irumpe~ playing un- til other factors have ~en vestigated and ruled out. ,~, N.T.A. writes: Is there any pill or. injection to prevent hrthritis? . Nnt at :presetit, unless you refer to lhe prophylactic pills Ira" ~IHII)" ;wthritis. Mean- x~hih.. ,alr I'('H'HI'cllPr~ are uxtakiu~ c(msitleral)[e progress iH ¢h'h'rmiHIH~ file basic l~'/ll hi" arlhril." patients. Evenlually Ihe vut~me may :be a preventive vaccine or pdl. TI09141137
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NEW YORK, H. Y. NEWS D. 2,1.29,909 -- S. 2,948386 NEWYORK CITY METROPOLITAN AREA J~N 31 i972 AMI,LY DO,C,,TOR Smo Wr,'nkles THEODORE R. VAN I~LLEN . posed to long, hot summers. Smokers of both ~ ~xes were equally affected. O]~W'~J~.~ ~ Following prolonged exposure to the sun, W~4~Ir]~ ~so~ . , ~o~moking women had few crow's-feet. Accord- ~-m~*~M ~ ~*~ ~'*~ ~* '*~n ~u~ ing to Dr. Daniel, prominent wrinklin~ was noted ~ the list of diso~ers though~ to be among smoking women who had lost over 30 caused by smoking. This conclusion was ~mched by Dr. Harry W. IYaniell of Red- dlng, Calif., following, a study of 1,104 per- ..... He concentrated on crow's-feet, 'the wrinkles extending outward from the .eyes. Smokers and nonsmoker~ were photographed and the area in q~tion was thoroughly inspected. The wrinkles were graded according to their number, length and depth. On the~e flndings, e~eh person was a~signed • wrinlde score, and grouped by sex and in a 10-year age span, In each group, smoker~ Im~ mere wrinkles tha~ non smokers. In fac~, the most heavilyowrin- kled individuals in each age-sex group were all • mokers. Smokers in ~he 40 to 49-year age group were a~ prominently wrinkled as nonsmokers who were 20 years older. Dr. Daniell to.ok into account the traditional ~el.~tiot~sh~p of wrinkling to .e~poaWe to wi.nd ana ~ me aging process, ana massive weight A~dtmtlon, According to his report in the Annals of I~rnal Medicine, there was " . . . a more ~tl~ltial association between skin wrinkling am:I" eigaret ~moking than,, between wrin.k.ling .,.nd outdoor exj~sure . . . even...~9,..n~ .C.ahforman~ pounds. There was less pronounced wrinkling among nonsmokers with a similar we|ght loss, This may be of interest to obese women plan- ning to go on a diet. There also was evidence that the wrinkles exhibited by cigaret smokers differed from those df nonsmokers. Crow's-~eet in the smokers were narrow, deep and sharply contoured. Their skin had a yellow-gray pallor of contrast to the flesh pink coloration of nonsmokers. These changes led Dr. Daniell to conclude that smoking is associ- ated with metabolic changes. AUGUST BABIES Mrs. P. M. writes: Why did you once state tha~ the best month to be born in is August? REPLY Babies born in A.ugust escape most of the summer ailments, such as diarrhea. In addition, the early and more dangerous months of their ]ire are spent during the fall and early winter when respiratory infections are less common than in late winter and early spring. Dr. Van De[Ion will answer questions reqarding health and hyglene in this column and by mail. He will noL make dtagnoses or prescribe for individuals. Enclose stamped, self-addressed enve[ope and a~dress t.o OR. THEODORE R, VAN DELLEN, THE NEWS, P.O. BOX t452, GRANO CENTRAL STATION, N, EW YORK, N,Y. 10017, TI09141138
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CHICAGO, ILL TI~IBUNE D. 767.793 -- S. 1,016.275 CH=C~GO MLTROPOI ITAN AREA JAN 2 0 Ig72 is no perfect preventive for and other respiratory in~ecfions. Opinions on this may differ, because' almost everyone has a pet way of ward- ing off colds. These "cures" vary from tak'mg vitamins to a slug of whisky. Colds are contagious, and avoiding peo- ple with the sniffles helps cons/derably. Ample rest and a nourishing diet in. crease r.esistance. Add/ng moisture to ~e room aiso is benoficial, because low hum/dity makes the nasal membranes more susc.eptible to viral and bacterial invasion. We have no cures for these infections, but several d~ugs are availa- ble ~o bring quick, tho temporary, relief of symptoms. TOMORROW: Colo;tomy. Q~estions on medical topics will ~e ans~oered by m~il i[ stamped, self.sd. dressed envelope accompanies request. Nicotine and the Heart E. P. wRtes: Why is tobacco denied to cardiacs ? REPLY The effects' of tobacco on the heart vary from perso--a-tW'--person. It may cause irregalarities of the beat, or re- duce the flow of bloat thru the coronary arteries. Smoking is taboo when it ag- gxavates the hear~ thru these mecha- nisms. Tobacco also has an adverse e~eet on the normal heart, in that heart attacks are far more common .among. smokers than nonsmokers. T109141139
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CRIC~.GO, IlL. TRIBUNE D. 775,416 - S. 1,045.176 CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA JL:!.. ?~ '¢'-"; T109141140
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FAMILY DOCTOR arters #et/rement Age ("E~'DR, TI.iEODORIE R. VAN DELLEH p~crlbe for individuals. Enclose slam,d, lelf addre~ed and add~s DR. THEOOORE R. VAN DELLEN, • T~E+N~S, P.O. BOX t452+ GRAND CENTRAL STATION. ~0RK, N.Y+ 1~17. By definition, anyone 10 years older than you are is old. This applies to the 15- year-old as well as to those who are 55. do not mfl~scribe to the idea that a~ter 65, age d~,es not matter and beyond th~s everyone is ~,cient. It was Bismacck who set the retirement age ~t ¢~5. Nowadays more workers reach this stone tba~ ever before. It w~]l be interesting lo follow f~t~re tales or r~m~ms relative to ( irement age. ~ Drag on the Economy? ~tm~e m~t}torhies hP}icve that our labor ~oree ;~ too la~e ~ow ~nd the 65-year-olds are a drag m~ the economy. Certain unions ~]rge their mere- hers to retire at 55 and some organizations are {aiking abont retirement ~t 4~. ~is may he one way to get a pension and another job, too. From a med~val point of view, we are inter- e~ed in keeping Mder people healthy so they can ~,joy s richer aml nmre men~ingful life. Our cal- m.at.tonal system is aimed at youth but with the passing years, what many of us learned ~n school is outdated. Perhaps more adult edt~cation neuded ~, eurich the golden yea~. The idea l.bnl. ;tge d,es m)t antler after is mea++inghfl if we separate the 10rocess o~ h'om the diseases and disabilities o+ the aged. example, two men of ~5 retire ~rom the same company after working 40 years. Both look hale and hearty hat a month later one of them dies st+ddenIy ~rom a heart attack. The other long, healthy life. Was the man who died years of age 100% old or was he just xmforhmate to have coronary heart arteries that became ob- structed at that particular time ? The lo.~'(,r ~ person livvs the m ]+UN~ CANCER ~. G. ~'ri~us: Can a .on-smoker d~velop enncer ~ REPLY: Yes, but this is an ancommoa rence ia m~n. There are diffc£'ent types of bron. chogenic cancvr, but the most common form de. veIops ~n the walls of the bronchi, ~sually from ehro~e irritation brought on by heavy smoking, Cancers a}ong the edge of the lung are'-d~e. fated to smokh~g. The next t}me you hear of nonsmoker d,,vt, l~p~g a hag malignancy, ask where the ~vsh~n was lm'nled and what kind of t~mmr it was.
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".HICAGO. TRIBUNE • - -:~M[-.~':" "='~=.::. HEART AND SMOKING A reader writes: Does smok- ing affect rheumatic heart? REPLY The effects o£ tobacco on the :heart [normal or rheumatic] ~are so variable that each case ~must be considered iudlvidu- • ; ally. Smoking does no harm in • the majority. Some persons de- . velop irregularities of the beat,. a symptom that is more un- • comfortable than serious. T109141142
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Cancer Death Ra e Da a half people in the United States have been cured of cancer for at least five years. This was accom- plished by early detection. surgery, radiation and che- motherapy. But the de~th rate from cancer remains high and many authorities bel/eve we should '~oncen- trate more on the preven- tion of the disease. Some vestigators believe that at least 85 per cent of hu- man cancer is due to carci- nogens that we touch, in- hale, eat or drink. Some are known troublemakers and others are suspect. We must be careful not to assume that substances capable of causing cancer in animals do the same in humans. Even if known tumor-prod- ucing agents vanished to- morrow, cancer would take another 50 to 70 years for those exposed to these agents to die out. Finding carcinogenic agents is difficult and time- consuming. Dr. David A. Wood, San Francisco, be- lieves we should do more re- search on migrant popula. tions. Especially tho.-e ,I groups who develop more or perhaps less cancer in their new location. In Japan, the incidence o£ stomach cancer is high, but Japanese living in the United States do not have a high incidence of gastric carcinoma. Why? As yet, no one has come up with the answer. Another example is the in- creased incidence, of intesti. hal cancer among Poles who migrated to New England cities, rather than to rural areas. In these circum- stances heredity does not play a role. Cancer rates vary from country to country. Ameri- can women have seven times more cancer of the breast than do Japanese women. Nursin~ customs may play a role. Cancer of the colon occurs more often m urban, than rural commu- nities. Esophageal cancer is 10 times more prevalent in Puerto Rico than upper New York state. ~'~mong the carcinogens considered pos.~ib:e culprits are food addii:'.'o.:, tobacco. alcohol, chemical:. cides, air and water poilu- tants, and infection. You may suspect that a certain item causes cancer but be- fore you scare other people or malign an innocent prod- pr~..fuct or industry., be sure your will stand up. ls it possible for a child of 12 to have heartburn? A: Yes. Heartburn is a form of indigestion, not a cardiac condition. A young- ster may develop heartburn because of emotional upsets or dietary indiscretions. X- rays of the stomach are sug- gested if the symptom per. sists. Q: Please tell me if it is dangeroas to take gas for tooth extraction. A: Not in gg per cent of the cases. Medicine and den- tistry are not exact sciences and the rare complication occurs when least expected, Q: Is it true that if s woman is having her period and bakes a cake it flops? .\: No. This myth is as il- logical as another oldie that flowers wilt if touched hy a menstruating woman. Q: Do babies breathe fas{er than adults? A: Yes. The respiratory .-a~,, of a new~o,'n is 44, in ~,dt::Is. it is 18. ~ 1971. Chl¢~O T109141143
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CHICAGO, ILL TRii~UHI~ 0.775,4t6 -- & t.045,t76 CHICAGO METROPOLITAN J~.~ 2 ! 197t - ~ SB~OS IS n~t com- mon, de~ite the ~de- • spread ~age of asbestos in industry. Because of i~ heat insulating ..-~ • prope~es, as. ~ ~] bestos is used ~ ~ extensively ~ ~ ~ bu~ngs. Ex- W?~ ~ c o n t a ~te f~'~ many city.~ ~ dwellers ~ve ' -4 ~- added ~bestos to the 'g~w~g lis~ of poHu~ts they ~ale, despite ~e fact that m~u~e amoun~ are ~volved. Contrac- tors c~ mi~e the d~t for ou~iders by enclos~g ~e area berg sprayed. Asbes~os~ ~ a l~g ~sease wi~ m~y faces. More than h~ ~e world's supply of complex s~cate o~ ma~esium, calcium ~d iron is ~ed North America. S~ce the turn o£ the c~tury, ~e outpu~ nsbestos has ~creased tremen- dously. The compound becomes: a health hazed oniy when it ~aled ~ h~vy concentrations: for a period of t~e. M~y p~ple have ~b~tos~ b~es ~ ~e~ ~U~ ~d l~g t~ue ~cat~g ~at ~ey ~ve~ ~a[~ ~e substance. ~ese' par~cles are ~stick-~a~, .yellow rods. ~en asbestos ~fib~s get ~to ~e l~gs, ~ey, ~e coated wi~ a prote~ ~st~ce ~t" r~uc~ -[capa~ty to ~i~te ~e bron- "~ wa~. To ~ ~owl~ge, • ~e b~es do no h~m~ Prolonged exposure to high concentrations leads to definite ~ritation of ~e lungs with :diffuse fibrotic [scar tissue] !changes. Shortness of breath, ~ the most common symptom, is out of proportion to the physi- cal and X-ray findings. A cough Today's ~atth Hint-- '~ ~"~':~;,~r'~ '?~"S:.'-.",': . ;.~. -~. &~.," ~':~ "'~4; ~,-~:* ...... ~ attack of migraine :may be aborted by ly~g do~ ~ a darkened room. may be present, and repeated attacks of pleurisy are not ~nusual. When seen ca the X-ray, scarring in the lungs ha~ a ground glass appearance especially over the lower half of each side. Studies show that approxi- mately one person in five with asbestosis develops lung can- cer. We know now that the malignancy develops mainly among asbestos workers who are heavy ~ smokers. Cancer of the lung is rare among those with asbestosis who do n~t smoke. T109141144
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LUNG CANCER G. G. writes: Can a non-' smoker develop lung cancer? ~ REPLY Yes, but this is an uncommon occurrence in men. There are different types of bronchogenic cancer, but the most common form develops in the walls of the bronchi, usually from chronic irritation brought on by heavy smoking. Cancers along the edge of the lung are not related to smoking. Cancers along the edge of the lung are not related to smoking. The next time you hear of a. nonsmoker developing a lung' malignancy, ask whe re the lesion was located and what kind of tumor it was. T109141145
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THE WASHINGTON POST B 8 " , LEISURE , Obstructi .Emphysema Remedies Health baetCria thrive is difficult to bring up because coughing~ is less efficient than usual. This is why these individu- als must avoid people with respiratory infections and take antibiotics, such as am- plcillin or tetracycline inter- mittently. Shortness of breath oc- curs because the bronchi tend to collapse durinc expi- ration. By pursing the lips when exhaling, the pressure increases within the bronchial tubes and they are less ::.kely to collapse. Breath- ing exercises also keip. The sufferer should learn to use the abdominal muscles to squeeze out trapped air during expiration, He also should pull in lhe abdorneR whcn exhaling to ra~.,e ti~e diaphragm. Bronchodiiators inc.udi.ng nebulizers relax the nar- rowed bronchi and aro used at the first sign of ti~hu~ess, such as occurs in lhe morn- ing. Those containin~ isc.pro- ~ an Dellen Obstructive emphysema is suspected in people over 40 who curb. wheeze, and suf- fer /tom shortness of brea~, The earlier the con- dition is detected, the better the outlook. The first step is | to eradicate the causative| tae~ors--tobacco smoke and~ air pollution. | The next step is to keep the lungs free of infection. Victims of emphysema have narrowed bronchi due to swelling of the inner lining. The excess mucus in which terenoi or epinephrine should not he used more often than every two or lhree hours. Drugs that liq- uefy :hc sputum at.~ of value when trying to clear the lungs of mucus. Water, one of the best remedies, can be taken by mouth or inhaled as steam or mist from a humidifier. intermittent positive pres- sure breathing [IPP3: pro- vides air or oxygen during inhalation and pressure when exhaling. Thus. at the end of a breath, additional air is forced in allowing the person to breathe more deep- ly. An attachment for aero- solized medication aiso is available. The device is most helpful when carbon dioxide accumulates in the lungs and blood leading Io nar- cosis, T109141146
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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS July 31, 1970 ~ ~ gAN D~ hy~ema O~er causes include hmff ia- / E.B. ~r~tes: "Not too ~onff ago, we :purcbasod a very expensive horse.. ~ot.iced that.after pullinff a load, the • nin;al had difficulty breathing. When ~'e called a vet~rhmrlan, be said the horse had emphysema, but could work wifhout further ill effects, even though ~hort of breath." Our reader went on to say: ~'Today, smoking is blamed f.r humans suffering frcn', eml)hyset, m and o~her ailments. But ~hese condo:ions were as preva]ent in the pas~ as they are ~oday, and form- er]y there wvre fewer smokers. Scientific evhtence is still lacking, and doctors vately deny proof of these accusstlo~s ~gab~st smokh~g, but will not be quoted." Hor, e~ DeveJop Emphysema heSS of %he wall of the ai : sacs. Increased 9r~ssure within the lu,gs, because of frequent straining, also may su-eteh the ~r s~es. Why don't you vent your spleen on %~ guy ~ho sold yuu :t si=k horse stead of on the mcd~eal profession 7 The ho)se is ~he onb" animal which develops a naturally ~cc~rzin~ ~au]monn~T em- physema comparable to man. It is said ~o stem from poorh' cured hay and der on which vhl e['goz ::ungu[ grows. • i1._
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PHILADELPHIA, PA. ~EWS - D. 231,762 -- PHILADELPHIA METROPOLITAN AREA ~PR 27 iS7:~ Your Health DogSmokers Further Link utt.s C r smoking produces lung cancer in dogs. ]]eagles were taught to smoke through hollow Te- /~on tubes inserted into the These experiments (using nonfiRer and filter-tip cJga- rats) lasted for m~)re than two years. The animals were classified as heavy and light smokers. Those in file heavy smoker group consumed nine cigarets a day (equivalent to 40 a day /or a 150-pound man). DOCTOIIS Oscar Auerbach and E. Cuyler Hammond re- ported their findings at s meeting of the American Oaneer soc':ety. :Eighty per- cent of the heavy nonfilter smokers developed lung tu- mors. The percentage was 58.3 among light smokers and 33.3 among heavy users of filter-tipped cigarets. Smoking dogs developed lung changes similar to those found in humans. These in- cluded emphysema and scar tissue..Less extensive damage was seen among users ~f fil- ter-tip cigarets. However, even filter-tip cigarets, when used for ~ longer time, dam- aged the lungs. We may ~ave found the missing link in the cigaret- lung cancer controversy. While many authorities ac- cepted the statistical proof at the zelationship between ~g and health, they" laboratory proof thai cigarets could induce hmg cancers in E'.'!r~" :.-~:~: ...... ANI~IAL STUDIES on cancer and smoking have been limited because of the _technical problems Nvolved in inhalation experiments in small animals. Lung cancers have been produced in ham- stars by ~nst/Iting aerosoJized chemicals into the windpipe. but this does not duplicate smoking per se. Furthermore, months and years must elapse before changes occur In the bronchi- al membranes after heavy smoking. In this respect, the research Just reported may represent a breakthrou~. / T109141148
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WASHINGTON POST PAGE B4 4-1-70 S okrng ueshon. • . . g cluing ~eg,an~y a~ect f~he child? A: Nicotine is absorbed through the placenta. As a re.sult, pregnant women are advised to use cigarettes in moderation. It would be bet- ter if they stopped smoking. The: babies of smokioJ~ T109141149
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How To Keep Well Need For Greater Effort Cff oking Cited y R.'~R. VAN DELLEN_.~W is definitely too late if he . ~ Waits until there is weight Unless fewer e~p---'p'l~ smoke, it is unlikely that the number duced. We say this in gocxt faith because the chance of making an earlier diag- nosis of bron- chogenic careinoma is remote. How- ever, consid- of deaths from lung cancer will be re- ~.~ .... ering the mot- Van Dcllen tality, this is not soon enough. At the time of diagnosis, then lesion must be localized in order to have a 50-50 chance for survival. The figures are food for thought. The over-all five-year survival rates (or all lung me- ? lignancies, regardless of size and extent, are 9 per ce~t in males and 12 per cent in fe- males. On the other hand, when detected at an early or localized stage, the rates are 24 to 34 per cent respectively. But only the minority are lucky, because only 20 per cent of lung cancers are diag- nosed while the tumor is still localized. breath. Ironlcaiiy, there are so many ways to diagnose this disease if the victim would only report to his physician. These include Pap smears of the sputum, biopsy of the neck WHY IS early detection so difficult? The n~am reason is that the symptoms of heavy smoking are the same as seen in an early malignancy. If the individual did not smoke, he might become suspicious when he begins to cough or a chest cold fails to clear within a few weeks. He probably would have a chest X-ray. And, if a small shadow was found, addi- tional tests could be done to determine whether the lesion represented tuberculo- sis, pneumonia, or a tumor. But the smoker with chronic bronchitis cannot tell when the change occurs because he coughs constantly. Occasion- ally, he detects a change in the pattern of his cough, but this is unusual. Months later, he may really become sus- yicions when he has blood in the sputura or chest pain~ By ~x_t~_" tim~, it is usually too ..~.te. glands, isotope screening, and bronchoscopy. On the other hand, when ~ definite diag- nosis is not possible, we rec- ommend an exploratory op- eration on the chest. The risk is low and the problem is~ solved. . TAMPA, FLA. TRIBUNE D. 155,715 ~ S. 179,534 TAMPA METROPOLITAN AREA T109141150
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ATLANTA, GA. CONSTITUTION -- D. 203,790 -- ATLANTA METROPOLITAN AREA .'IAR 2 ~970 ~ood Health Cancer Contro ju~.t around the corner, provided the causative virus is isolated and a vaccine can be pre- pared. Many ol o~ best re- searchers a r e convinced that v~ruses are linked to can- cer. We have gone as far as we can with early detection and treatment with drugs, radiation, and sur- gery. Prevention is already practic- able in a limited way. It in- .,dudes avoiding physical and chemical agents known to start malignancies, suc~ as radiation, sunlight, certain dyes, cigaret sm~e, and air pollutants. A cancer vaccine would be the an- swer to our wildest dreams -- if a.single drug would immunize us agains~ all malignancies. Most cancer research has cen- tered about three viruses. One of these, ~e Egstein-Barr virus, causes cancer in African chil- dren. It has been found also in vlctims of Hodgkin's disease and is blamed for infectious mononucleosis (mono). The sec- ond is a herpes virus found in a h~gh l~rcentage of women with cancer o! the cervix. T!09141151

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