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Fields

Named Organization
A.C. Nielsen
Albertson's (grocery, pharmacy, convenience stores)
American Express
American Marketing Association
Backer, Spielvogel & Bates
Baxter (national foodservice distribution program directed to needs)
national foodservice distribution program directed to needs of hospital market, created an alliance with Kraft Foodservice in 1989
Bellomy Research (Did marketing research for R.J. Reynolds)
Burson Marsteller (Tobacco industry PR firm)
Tobacco Industry public relations firm.
Census Bureau
Chapel Hill
CIA (Central Intelligence Agency)
Citadel
Compaq
Decision Research (consultant firm)
Fortune
Goldhaber Research Associates
Gordon S. Black Corporation (Social Science Research Firm)
Harvard University
Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union (HERE)
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Kellogg (Cereal Company)
Market Facts (Research Contractor for B&W)
Market Research Institute
Marketing Research Services
Mission Viejo
Motorola Inc.
Mutual of Omaha (Insurance Company)
National City Corp.
New York University
Olin
Opinion Research Corporation
Papter, Allied-Industrial, Chemical and Engineering Workers International Union (PACE)
Research Corporation
Response Analysis (survey conductors located in Princeton, N.J.)
Roper Organization (Consumer Research/Public Relations Org.)
Interested in finding out what drives consumer behavior; surveys consumers on their prime areas of concern; assists corporations with reputation-building and public image based on its findings.
Sherwin-Williams Co.
Southern Illinois University
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Sprint
Switzer (developed process for reconstituting tobacco)
University of Arizona
University of Georgia
University of Texas
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Von's
West Wayne (Florida Advertising Comany)
Young & Rubicam (New York-based advertising agency.)
Was awarded the assignment for advertising Philip Morris' Dave's low-priced cigarette brand. Y&R lost RJR Reynolds' Camel cigarette brand account in 1991 when two Y&R Executives resigned to form Mezzina/Brown, which remains Camel's ad agency (1994) (WSJ 9/13/94).
Named Person
Abramowitz, Deanna Springer
Abrams, Judy
Adams, Bob
Adelman, Susan
Aguirre, Beth
Allison, Neil
Alpert, Ann
Anderson, Rich
Andrews, Peter
Ann, Mary
Arce, Carlos
Baker, Dinah
Baker, Martha
Balaban, Myra
Bale, Carrie Cardinal
Barret, Ernest
Bay, Francisco
Berg, Joan
Bergemann, Carl
Blalock, Louise
Bonneville, Linda
Bridge, Barbara
Brisbane, Terry
Burgess, Scott
Burns, Dennis
Caldwell, Shirley
Camille, Cathy
Carter, Jerry
Cartwright, Philip
Champagne, Debbie
Christman, Judy
Cohen, Saul
Cooley, Steve
Cotton, Portia
Crimmins, Paula
Cromwell, Jennifer
Crowder, Linda
Cunningham, Nancy
Davis, Rhoda
Dean, Michael L.
Deibler, Suzanne
Donnell, Christine
Dunn, Trish
Engelhart, Michael
Fagan, Sandi
Fail, Forest
Fairchild, Elayne
Falk, Jill
Fedele, Douglas
Field, Anderson
Field, Cleveland
Fields, Maureen
Fischer, Beth
Flores, Colleen
Foley, William C.
Defense
Forcade, Karen
Fraley, Diane S.
Francisco, Sam
Fritz, Tom
Fry, Jess
Galloway, Patrick
Gate, Golden
Gates, Roger
Gibson, L. Tucker
Glass, Judy
Golas, Judy
Gorin, Phyllis
Goto, Ed
Graham, Polly
Green, Michael
Greenbaum, Thomas L.
Greene, Joan
Guss, Annette
Hammer, Linda
Harbison, Martha
Hardesty, Donald
Harris, Bob
Harwell, Jeff
Heiman, James R.
Heiman, Ted
Hicks, Margaret
Hill, Carole
Hill, Dennis
Hill, Karen
Hill, Murray
Homer, Julie
Hopkins, Cleveland
House, Pauline
Howard, Dennis S.
Howell, Dianne
Huber, Betty
Huls, Phyllis
Ingalls, Anita
Jacobus, Carol
Janzen, Marcia
Johnson, Matthew
Johnson, Paul
Keller, Mitzi
Kirby, Brian
Kothe, Beverly
Kramer, Robert
Kulp, Dale
Kwasny, Ann
Lake, Jewel
Lawn, Willow
Lefkowitz, Stanley
Leibowitz, Teri
Levin, Martha
Levine, Nancy
Levinson, Randi
Light, Jean
Light, Jean M.
Lipsitz, Susan
Lopez, Jo
Lucas, Mary
Lyons, Elaine M.
Maben, John
Mabry, N. Dale
Magid, Frank N.
Maher, Helen
Mall, Almeda
Mall, Charlotte Eastland
Mall, E. Springfield
Mansfield, Ginger
Marchione, Sharon
Market, Lucas
Market, Riva
Market, Ruth Diamond
Market, Tom Dale
Marquis, Anthony
Martin, Joan
Maxwell, Val
May, Greg
Mccarty, Tom
Mcclure, Robin
Mcdonald, Brad
Mcgill, Carol
Mcmahon, Gregory J.
Mcmillion, Sandy
Mender, Sue
Meyer, Fred S.
Michelson, Mark
Mile, W. Ten
Mills, Cameron
Mole, Doreen
Moler, James
Moore, Benjamin
Moreland, Molly
Morgan, Donald
Mullet, Gary
Munger, Betty
Nelson, Ruth
Ness, Van
Nichols, Mimi
Nitta, Clyde K.
Olson, Tara
Orchard, S. Pear
Osborne, Alice
Pacheco, Patty
Pappas, Katherine
Petitt, Norman
Philip, Daniel
Pierce, Sharon
Podolsky, Harvey
Pope, Michael
Potocki, Irene
Prairie, Eden
Prince, Barbara
Prost, Deborah
Rader, Bryan J.
Radford, Valentine
Rakow, Pamela
Rast, Anne
Redo, Karen
Rey, Marina Del
Rife, Mary
Rissman, Lynn
Robbins, Jeffrey
Roberts, Roy
Robertson, Ingrid
Rodgers, Alice
Rogers, Jill
Rosen, Judi
Rosenthal, Betty
Runyon, Rita
Ryan, Lori
Savala, Vicki
Sawyer, Patricia
Scharf, Jody
Schlesinger, Steven
Schreier, David
Schultz, Mary
Schwarcz, Betty
Schwartz, Charles
Scutt, Lana
Sears, James M.
Selz, Marcia
Serrano, Dorothy
Sessions, Lora
Shamblin, Ellen
Shames, Shirley
Shank, Ginger
Sharpe, Sharon
Sheff, Garry
Shewmaker, Fern
Shur, James F.
Siegel, Jill
Siegel, Mark
Silver, Eric
Silverman, Harriet
Simon, Dorothy
Simon, Marion
Slater, Pat
Smith, Dawn
Smith, Emerson
Smith, Ester
Smith, Keneth F.
Smith, Kevin
Smith, Melissa
Smith, Sheba
Snell, Joyce
Spanier, James
Spencer, Betty
Spencer, Dwight
Springs, Coral
Stegner, Jane
Stegner, Jane L.
Stensrud, John R.
Stockman, Pat
Stuart, Winston
Sullivan, Tony
Tarallo, Anita
Taylor, Vivian
Thigpen, Debbie
Tobias, Mark
Tooley, William
Tudor, Stephanie
Vanderveer, Nancy
Vega, Susan Morrison
Walker, Annette
Walsh, Doris
Warner, Paul A.
Warren, Jana
Warren, Lucy
Wasserman, Laura
Wassil, Laura
Watson, Rebecca
Webre, Lena
Weinberg, Irwin
Weinstein, Lois
Weise, Jackie
Weiss, Susan
Whitney, Bill
Yaeger, Sylvia
Yarbrough, Margaret
Date Loaded
18 Jul 2005
Box
1614

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Page 1: TI08571044
Quirk "s ~iew 1991 Focus Group Facilities Directory T108571044
Page 2: TI08571045
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/MEET SHERI THE KNOW-IT -ALL With your computer, Sherlock can tell you everything you need to know about data collection in general and your projects in particular. If you've got a question - and a computer - leave it to Sherlock to get you the answer. You see, Sherlock is simply the most technologically advanced client service computer system ever developed. With Sherlock you can: • Leave bid specifications and get a bid back within, an hour. • Leave messages for one Equifax Quick Test Opinion Centers office - or 50! • l_earn everything about any - or all - of our locations nationwide including demographics, directions from the airport, even popular restaurants in the area. Sherlock works like an electronic brochure, • Retrieve the status of any job you're running. • Arrange for the transmission of data and reports. Information Source In other words, Sherlock is the ultimate in client service and ordy Equifax Quick Test Opinion Centers has him. What's more Sherlock never takes a vacation. And he won't talk back to you - unless you ask a question. Of course once you get to "know how valuable Sherlock can be for you, you and Sherlock will definitely be good friends. So call today and we'll tell you how easy it is for the two of you PHILADELPHIA BOSTON 215 -564-1670 508-872-1800 FAX. 215-568-3279 FAX. .,~-875-4"/19 NEW YORK LOS ANGELES 212-682-1221 818-995-1400 FAX: 212-867.3212 FAX: 818-995-1529 to meet. QUICK TEST OPINION CENTERS T108571046
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Using an in-house sales panel to enhance a total marketing research program by Debra Hansen and Christine Rix Editor's note: The authors are market- ing research specialists with Mutual of Omaha Insurance Co. Know your customer. Keep your fingers on the pulse of the mar- ket. Identify new opportunities. Marketing managers often rely on the marketing research group to support these activities. AtMutual of Omaha Insurance Co., individual insurance and financial products are sold to the consumer through a distribution channel of approximately 3,500 agents. This field force represents for the company a core deposit of infor- mation waiting to be tapped. With this thought in mind, the research group set out to establish an on-going agent panel that could be used throughout the year to solicit opinions and feedback on a hum- bet of key issues, such as advertising effectiveness, product concepts, sales ideas, market/buyer characteristics, and other marketing-related issues. Why use an in-house panel? Consumer panels have been used suc- cessfully to gather and record data on the behavior of consumers. In general, con- sumer panels have provided marketing researchers with speedy turnaround, above average response rates, the ability to conduct longitudinal studies, and re- sults that can be projected back to a popu- lation. Companies using panels herald the efficiency and cost savings. The set- up and maintenance costs are spread over several studies. The same rationale for consumer pan- els can be applied to a sales group panel. The panel provides the benefits of a corn- mitred, representative group of sales agents that are willing.to .serve on the panel for a period of time. The primary objectives are to have a group assembled and "ready to go" at short notice and willing to complete and return surveys despite disruptions, work schedules, and other required company paper work. When would an in-house panel be ap- propriate? The size and location of the field force are governing factors. At Mutual of Omaha. the agent force is spread over 50 states and Puerto Rico. A census of all agents would be costly and time- consuming. The agent panel is an eco- nomical research method. Mailing and duplicating costs are the primary hard- dollar expenses. However, the panel does require the investment ofstaffand com- puter time. One analyst spends nearly one-third of their time coordinating and supporting the agent panel. The success of an in-house panel is influenced by three factors: rewards of- fered for panel membership, degree of interest panel members have in partici- pating, and the ease with which members can supply the required data. So far, the agent panel members have not been given any remuneration or gifts for their mem- bership. However. a thank-you letter giv- ing a brief synopsis of the research find- ings is sent after project completion. Sales agents have demonstrated a willingness to complete the surveys with response rates averaging 70 percent. Agents com- pleting the surveys have written well- thought out response.,; to the questions. Every attempt is made to streamline the process of survey completion--all with the objective of making the panel a worthwhile experience. Establishing a panel The idea to establish an in-house panel continued on p. 48 Qu rk's Market~qg ResearchRevie~ T108571047
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Ebony Marketing Research We'll ,show you ethnic markets from the insight out. Ebony Marketing Research will give you an inside look at New York's thriving black, hispanic and asian markets. Evaluating the preferences and buying patterns of ethnic respondents demands a special brand of skill. Skill that probes beneath surface perceptions to uncover valuable insights. The kind of skill that has made Ebony Marketing Research New York's foremost specialist in reaching ethnic markets. Experienced and professional, we've got the facilities, the staff and the know-how to explore the market segments you want to study. And to deliver the data you need. Our newest location in northern New York City provides' an ideal environment for respondents and clients alike. Our spacious conference rooms and fully equipped test kitchen are designed to put respondents at ease. Here, working with our bi-lingual moderators, they can relax and devote their full attention to your products and services. And, to meet your business and personal needs, we offer discreet viewing rooms, state-of-the-art recording facilities, a comfortable client lounge and a full range of food services. Set in the hgart of the Nation's No. Ebony Marketing Research, Inc. Focus Group Facility 2100 Banow Avenue * Baychester, NY 10475 Phone: (212) 320-3220 o FAX: (212) 320-3996 or 193-34 85th Road, Holliswood * Jamacia Estates, New York. 11423 Phone: (718) 217-0842 * Fax: (718) 217-8165 1 market, EMR's new facility is just 30 minutes away from any of the region's five major airports. We're within easy reach of the area's major highways, and there's always plenty of parking space. This ideal location enables you to take full advantage of the unparalleled resources of New York without the congestion - or the prices - of Manhattan. Whatever your research requirements, from focus groups to q'uantitative sampling, call Ebony Marketing Research. Because, when you need to reach ethnic markets... We've got the insight track. ~Your key to ethnic marketing T108571048
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Qualitative Research Regaining a foothold Research and innovative packaging by Joseph Rydholm managing editor The Spreckels Sugar Company was founded near Salinas, C'alifomia in 1898 by Claus Spr~ckelsr a German immigrant who had been a pioneer in the Hawaiian sugar industry. His idea was to create an indus- try on the mainland as strong as that of Hawaii's. using locally grown sugar beets instead of sugarcane. It worked. As the California sugar in- dustr.v grew in size and importance, Spreckels became a well-known name in branded sugar. In the late 1960's, after 50+ years on grocers" shelves, the Spreckels name disappeared, following the company's purchase by the American Sugar Co.. ~ hich turned Spreckels into a manufacturer of private label sugar for the house brands of West Coast grocery chains such as Albertson's, Von's, Ralph's. and Safeway. In 1987. Spreckels management orga- nized alex eraged buyout and decided to revive the brand name on the West Coast. But. says Tom Fritz, marketing manager, Spreckets Sugar Co.. the company knew that re-entering what is essentially a com- modity market---one containing estab- lished and private label brands--would be difficult without some kind of value- added feature to differentiate the brand. "'It's very hard in any business to gain a foothold these days ~ ithout spending a great deal of money, and x~e knew ~,e had to offer some value to lhe consumer and to the trade to get them to accept our product." To help with the reintroduction of the brand. Spreckels turned to the RAM Group. an Oakland-bascd marketing and sales organization ~.hose subsidiar3,. Vista Marketing Research. supplied research services. Tom McCarty. managing direc- tor. Vista Marketing Research. says that the research focused on finding a way to make the product stand out in the minds of con_-umers. "'There were already price brands and cstabli~hed brands on the market. We kne~ that Sprcckels couldn't just go on the ,,hell ~ ~th the ~me product, it would guide sugar T108571049
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maker's re-entry into a competitive market get clobbered. The world doesn't need another bag of sugar. So the question when westarted was, how can we make a better product?" The answer to that question turned out to be packaging. A year of intense testing and researeh-- including several rounds of one- on-one interviews in which con- sumers expressed satisfaction with sugar itself but complained about the problems of existing sugar packaging--produced a devilishly simple answer to consumer needs: the "Easy Pour & Seal" package, a milk carton-like container that pours, seals, and stores easily. "Three-quarters of all the sugar sold is in five-pound bags, which break very easily, pour very poorly, and don't store well. So it was pretty obvious that packaging was our way to regain a foothold in the market," Fritz says. One-on-ones After the decision to reintro- duce Spreckels was made, several one-on-one interviews were con- ducted with across-section of both light and heavy users of sugar, to delve into their attitudes and be- havior towards sugar. The inter- views included questions on the purchase process, home usage and storage, and impressions of vari- ous brands. "We decided that there might be several opportunities for different product ideas relating to sugar, one of which was packaging. People told us that sugar is messy, it spills, and it gets knocked over," McCarty says. Based on this information, sev- eral new product concepts were developed and then tested in a second round of one-on-ones. Re- spondents discussed the concepts and rated them, and this informa- tion was passed on to Spreckels management and to the staff of RAM Graphics, who constructed mock-ups of different packaging concepts designed to solve the problems uncovered in the re- search. These mock-ups were then subjected to in-home use tests, which eventuall2~'sirigled out the milk-carton style container as the most promising option. Critical information Mock-ups of the milk carton container were made and tested to find the best ways to communi- cate critical product information to the consumer. "It was important to test again because an in-home use test where people rave about the product is one thing, but getting people to buy it is another. We wanted to come up with designs that would communicate effectively and get people to try the product," McCarty says. For example, because the Spreckels brand name was once well-established in California, Tom Fritz says, it is featured prominently, along with the tagline "Since 1898." "Though 20 years had gone by since the brand was last available, we knew we had some equity left. We have a very old history in California and we wanted to communicate that to consumers so that they know there's a new kid on the block aside from brands like C&H and the private labels," Fritz says. There were also other packag- ing considerations due to the container's unique design. Though it eventually unfolds into a gable topped container just like a milk carton, when the package is on store shelves, the top is folded continued on p. 50 T108571050
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Customer Satisfaction Research Speed dialing Automation helps U S Sprint respond quickly to The intense competition in the long-distance industry has forced telephone service pro- viders to fight to retain their customers, who are bombarded daily with ads full of reasons to switch carriers. One long-dis- tance company, U S Sprint, knows that keeping customers satisfied is one of the best ways to stop that defection. The company has maintained an ongoing cus- tomer satisfaction measurement program for threeyears, interviewing nearly50,O00 customers annually. Prior to beginning its satisfaction tracking program in January of 1988, Sprint conducted focus groups with its various residential and business customer segments to make sure the program would measure service attributes that were im- portant to customers. That information was used to construct the telephone sur- veys which sample the opinions of 4,000 Sprint customers each month. The surveys (administered by Indianapolis-based Walker: DataSource), ask residential and business customers to assess Sprint's ser- vice in two areas. First, a random sample of customers is contacted and asked about their satisfac- tion with on-going service in areas such as the quality of transmission and billing. Second. the program follows up with Sprint users who have recently called customer service, to get their reactions to the Sprint customer service personnel. In addition, customers who have had a re- pair or new service installed are con- I0 tacted to gauge their satisfaction. Continuously monitor Dennis Burns, director of market re- search, U S Sprint, says that one of the ways the research data is used is to con- tinuously monitor the performance of the Sprint customer service function. "We measure satisfaction with service repre- sentatives, their knowledge and under- standing of problems. We ask about the customer's perception of how quickly the call (to customer service) was an- US Sprint, swered, along with an overall rating of the quality of the handling of the call. From that we can identify areas where we should be putting more resources. If cus- tomers express concern about how quickly the calls are answered, we make sure that we do a better job of staffing up and anticipating when the heavy loads are going to be. "We have some very elaborate proce- dures in training customer service reps how to handle various types of calls and the proper way to deal with customers in a courteous manner. If there is any slip- page in those areas, we know we have to emphasize them with our service reps. Those are the kinds of things that allow us to tailor our training programs and rein- force some of the concepts we've taught our people." Maintain consistency Because the program is a tracking sys- tem, Burns says the question naires change very little. "We try very hard to maintain consistency in the sampling process and questionnaires so that we can have com- parability. We do make changes, but we do so because we think we can improve the measurement enough that we're will- ing to give up the historical comparison. We'll add a question here or there so that we learn something new that we hadn't thought of before, but we resist modify- ing the procedures unless it's for a good reason. "The power of the system comes from being able to compare the results from month to month, quarter to quarter, and year to year, to make sure that we're improving, by how much and in what areas. By tracking customer satisfaction, you set goals for yourself as a company. Our organization has been very good at establishing goals at the beginning of the year and working toward achieving them, in terms of the evaluations from our cus- tomers. That process begins to change the O~irk's Marke*Jng ResearchRev~ew T!08571051
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customer needs uncovered by satisfaction research way that everybody thinks about their job. They really start thinking about what it is the customer wants. If you get the whole organikation thinking that way you can make some fundamental changes that are very beneficial to the company in the long term." Action comment Like many similar programs, Sprint's customer satisfaction program incorpo- rates an action comment procedure, which allows the company to respond directly to specific customer complaints. If, dur- ing the course of a customer interview, a Walker: Research interviewer learns that a customer is particularly upset or con- cemed about a service problem, he or she will fill out an action comment form which contains the customer's name and phone number and a description of their problem. What sets the U S Sprint action com- ment procedure apart from others is the speed with which the company is able to respond to customers. The action com- ments are sent electronically to Sprint early each business day, and once in the Spdnt~zomputer system, they are distrib- uted to the proper departments for han- dling. "Walkercollects these action comments and each morning they electronically transmit them to us," Bums says. "An analyst in the market research depart- ment then reads the action comments and decides who should respond to each par- December. ticular customer's concern. Our analyst doesn't have to key the comments in or reproduce them, all she does i~ put a routing command ,into the system and it automatically sends it to the'right area for action. If it has to do with a billing prob- lem, she'll route it to our billing people, if it has to do with a particular product, she'll route it to one of our marketing people." That person then appends to the mes- sage a description of the action taken to answer the customer's needs or questions and returns the "form" to the marketing research department. "Each of these communications is time- stamped so we know how long it took for people to follow-up and what was done. My department puts together a tabulation of the action comments, how many were received, how quickly they acted on, and the types of action comments we're ob- serving." Closing the loop The most important part of the process, Bums says, is that the company "closes lhe loop" and responds to the customer. "'The interviewer doesn't make any promises to the customer, other than the fact that they'll pass the comment on to Sprint, but we'll usually contact them within two days. With the automated action comment procedure, we're able to resolve problems and do it in a way that in many cases surprises and pleases cus- tomers. So what starts out as a negative situation turns into a positive one. We make sure that none ofthe comments fall through the cracks, and that they get resolved. And if there are particular prob- lems that keep coming up, we make sure that we work to solve them once and for all." Mike Huser, senior account executive with Walker: Customer Satisfaction Measurements, says that following-up is important, because telling the customer that his or her comments will be for- warded sets up e~pectations. "Just the fact that we're taking an ac- tion comment means that the account may be in jeopardy to some degree. If someone is upset, we like to make the client aware as soon as possible so that they can rectify the situation. The quicker you can follow-up, the easier it is to effect a recovery,." Bums says that the volume of com- plaints handled in the action comment procedure isn't much when compared to the overall Sprint customer base, but it offers an excellent way to let customers know that the company cares about their opinions. "We may deal with a hundred custom- ers through this system over the course of a month, which, given the fact that we have millions of customers, is not a lot. But it is something that I would definitely recommend to a company that is thinking about putting together a customer satis- faction measurement scheme." ~l II T108571052
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Getting the most from demographics: things to consider for powerful market analysis by Charles Schwartz Charles Schwartz is principal of Los Angeles-based Demometrika Analytic Services. Demographic analysis has become a fact of life in market research. By linking sales, survey, and local markets, it provides a powerful tool for market plan- ning, segmentation, and target marketing. Readily available in user-friendly PC databases and predigested into lifestyle clus- ters, it is a quick and relatively painless way to provide quanti- tative prescriptions for marketing programs. As is true in almost any kind of research, there are many ways to do demographic analysis. Each has different degrees of difficulty and often different underlying assumptions. These differences will influence both the cost and effectiveness of any demographic-based project. This article will look at some of these issues as they relate to demographic market segmentation and penetration analysis. Population at risk In demography, the first step of almost any analysis is defining the population at risk of the event under study. A man cannot give birth, for example, and a 40 year-old cannot die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Consequently, comparative fertility studies base their birth rates on the number of women of childbearing age; studies of infant deaths base their rates on the number of persons under I year of age. In market analysis, as much as in formal demography, popu- lation at risk is a crucial concept. Market potential must be defined in terms of the population "at risk" of buying the product. This can be in demographic terms--Medicare must go to people over age 65, luxury cars for the most part are sold to those will sufficient incomes to pay for them. It can also be in terms of factors related to previous marketing efforts. A bank's customers are by and large confined to those living within the trade areas of its branches and responses to direct mail cam- paigns can come only from those who received the mailings. While population at risk sounds basic, it is often ignored. For 12 example, the canned lifestyle cluster analyses available from most vendors will compar~ the percentage of sales by cluster to the percentage of the population in each cluster. The higher the ratio of the sales perce.ntage!o the population percentage, the more favorable is the cluster. If the product under analysis is relevant only for a particular group--those with high incomes or those over age 65--then all the cluster analysis will succeed in doing is identifying clusters with high percentages of their populations in the relevant age group or income category. It would be better to use age or income directly and then think about cluster analysis. If you have prior knowledge of thc demographics of your market, use it. Such knowledge can be structural (only those over 65 are eligible) or it can be based on clear results from primary, or syndicated research (90% of respondents who would buy the product have incomes over $50,000). Instead of using the entire population as your basis for comparison, use the population over age 65 or the percentage of those with incomes over $50,000. You may find that your Medicare supplemental insurance sells to retirees who live in non-retirement commu- nities or that your luxury car sells best to people whose incomes are high in comparison to the income of their neighbors. Combining this information with the size of the population at risk will result in more accurate market potential measures. In addition to demographics, location limits population at risk for any product or service that relies on a network of retail outlets or branches. In many cases this factor can be controlled by limiting the analysis to the trade areas of the outlets, but often such controls are inadequate. For example, a company may have targeted particular demo- graphic groups in the past, whether by policy or custom. Sales will be high in areas with high concentrations of these groups simply because they have been served the longest and are located closest to the outlets. Conversely, some high potential groups may not be present in the trade areas or may be unfavorably located. Sales will be lower to these groups due to their location, not their potential. Location',d problems are particularly important to consider O~rk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571053
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for analysis b~ed o,a lifestyle cl~ Since any area ca~ be classified in one and onIy one cluster, it is virtually cenairt that many clusters, even the majority, will not be represented in a set of trade areas. In this situation it will be impossible to assess the relative ~vorabtlity of the omitted clusters. Expanding the analysis to include customers who live outside the trade areas only makes things worse. It includes populations from more clusters, but those populations, being outside the trade areas, most likely suffer little "risk" of purchasing the product. The low potential of these clusters will not be one of lifestyles but one off location. ProbIems of omission are compounded when ZIP codes are used for analysis. Since ZIP codes are larger than census tracts, fewer will be included, seriously limiting the number of clusters under study. Even worse, those that are included may be coded to the wrong cluster. Because of their large size, ZIP codes often include several neighborhoods belonging to different clusters. Your sales may go to one cluster while the ZIP code is classified to another. Finally, even though you may have significant sales in a ZIP code, the majority of that ZIP code's population may actually live outside of your trade areas. While potential may be superb, the penetration rate and favorability index will appear moderate or poor. The moral is to use census tracts if possible. They are smaller, and by design more likely to consist of a single demographic group. The cost of geocoding to the census tract level is modest and should be more than recouped in increased sales. Locational problems in general demand a more sophisticated multivariate approach to demographic analysis. Distance mea- sures such as travel time (often available from regional plan- ning agencies) or mileage can be used in conjunction with techniques such as multiple regression to control Iocational factors. Likewise length of time in the market, competitive environment, and store characteristics can be included to con- trol for sales differences resulting from these factors. On the demographic side, using individual demographic variables in conjunction with factor analysis and multiple regression will allow results to be more easily generalized to new markets. If your stores now serve only the "Pools and Station Wagons" cluster, there is no quantitative way through lifestyle analysis to assess the favorability of the "Movers and Shakers" group. On the other hand, high scores on median years of education and median income and low scores on median age may be common to both groups whether or not both are currently within your market areas. The analysis of demographic dimensions in the served area would lead to new targets in areas as yet unserved. The bias of cluster analysis is to target for future service only groups that have been served in the past; the multivariate analysis will be more likely to isolate dimensions characteriz- ing current markets which are also present in potential markets. Ecological correlation In demography, ecological correlation refers to making infer- ences about individuals based on properties of the social envi- ronment in which they live. The concept dates back to studies done in the 1920"s which concluded that Jews were more likely than others to commit crimes because neighborhoods with large Jewish populations had high crime rates. When rcanalyzed, the data showed that most of those Jewish neighborhoods had very high levels of poverty. When poverty rates were statistically controlled. Jews were found to have lower crime rates than their neighbors. Poverty, not ethnicity, led to crime. While similar problems arise in the analysis of survey data, they are particu- De~ember. 1990 State-of-the-Art Focus Group Studios? Market Interviews offers nothing less...Three focus group studios design.ed to provide the serwces you need. Focus Group Room Amenities: * Two ' conference style- studios (accommodates 30 to 50 classroom style) • LARGE studio accommodates up to.100 respondents. • Floor to ceiling mirrors • Ad display panels • 12, x 12 One-on-One Room (with Viewing Room) • Viewing rooms combine tiered seating and writing tables with living room style comfort-with wet bar and private office • Remote controlled A/V equipment • Moderators on staff • Audience Feedback System available for instant analysis , Fully equipped test kitchen , Suburban Detroit Location located 25 minutes ~rom the airport • Constructed in 1991 In Addition Market Interviews Offers: • Professional recruiting: of "fresh" respondents • 170 WATS/CRT equipped interviewing stations (offices in Livonia, Sterling Heights and South Bend) When you need state-of-the-art professionalism... Call Market Interviews. We offer nothing less. Market Interviews (A Division of MOR'PACE) 1-800-878-7223 CL~Je Ho. ~ (xl Re~:~r Card 13 T108571054
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!i You Don't Have to be a Genius to do Conjoint Analysis :.. Leading Conjoint Software Since 1985 Bretton-Clark 516 Fifth Ave., Suite 507, NY, NY 10036 212-575-1568 Circle No.805 on Reader Card Take Control of Your Focus Facility With Your PC and the Power of F~$ Manage your facility's scheduling, respondents, recruiting and clients with an easy-to-learn and use PC system. No programming! The system is completely menu driven. Let your computer help you manage your facility, faster, easier and more effectively. Search thousands of respondents on up to 60 demographic criteria, 40 of which you define to meet oyg.~ individual needs, in minutes instead of hours. Make unwieldy card decks a thing of the past. Eliminate respondents attending groups again for the same client. Eliminate problem respondents and professionals. • Automatically print group sign-in sheets, confirmation letters and much more. TO learn more contact: =___. =~__ ~ ~ F.CF Systems Development F IV[ ~ 31955 10th Ave. Laguna Beach, CA 92677 Focus Facility Management System 714-499-5135 I£)emonstratlon D~sk Available) 14 lady severe when using dm'a on tl-m general popularron. An extensive literature has developed on precisely this point. Ecological correlation is almost a mainstay of market analy- sis. This does not invalidate the analysis, but does raise caution flags. A prime example is lifestyle clustering itself, a technique which tends to raise ecological correlation to the level of social theory. To quote from the blurb on the cover of"The Clustering of America," Michael Weiss' recent book on the subject:"Your neighborhood speaks volumes about what you eat drink, drive-- even think." That is, you are where you live--the classic definition of ecological correlation. Clustering, like all demographic analysis, is a form of data reduction. Hundreds of census variables are reduced to eight or ten dimensions which are then used to identify 40 or more clusters. Some of those clusters may show clear statistical relations with their defining dimensions and offer true insight into the populations which they are meant to describe. Others may be statistical artifacts or even products of the subconscious biases of'the St~tis~cihn who devised them~hat is, no more than ecological correlations. In assessing the results of any clust.er analysis, first look at the clusters the_r0, se.lves and their relationship to the demographiCs that define them,~ Are the demographic index values high? Do they make rational sense? Do they reflect the vendor's characterization of them? Are there alternative explanations of the cluster? For example, do they identify regions of the country like the deep South or the rural Midwest? This can be a sign that the clusters are residual products of the analysis rather than representative of actual demographic groups. Do the clusters identify product usage differences that are nok more easily explained by other factors like age or income? Are those differences big enough to be both substantively and statistically significant given the data they are based on? In general, if you have reason to believe that use of your product is related to an underlying demographic dimension like age, income, social status, home ownership, or family structure, it is better to use that dimension directly in assessing potential markets or segmenting current customers, if only in the frame- work of defining the population at risk. The categorization scheme you will derive will be more closely related to the forces that drive your market (and could differ in significant ways from a canned lifestyle analysis). On the other hand, if your product is driven by complex market forces, if its use is highly dependent on image, or if the clusters to which it is related are well defined and make sense, you will be better off to use the clustering system and its built-in relationships to other products and media habits. Even more serious than ecological correlation sometimes is "reverse" ecological correlation. This is making an improper inference about the population from what is known about the individual. It is usually the product of inadequately considering all the possible demographic determinants of individual behav- ior. It can, in some cases, be more harmful than using no analysis at all. Suppose, for example, a company sells health coverage to manufacturing workers. If it were to target ZIP codes with high percentages in manufacturing it would find many manufactur- ing workers, but they would tend to be poor, liable to bouts of unemployment, young, and unlikely to live in family house- holds (at least in major urban areas). In general these people cannot or will not buy health coverage. By not considering other dimensions like income, the company would target a very low potential market. In the actual case oft which the example is Quirk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571055
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based, percent in manufacturing turned out to have no predic- tive use even in the complex demographic model that was eventually developed. What may seem simple when looking at individ~ customers does not necessafi,|y transfer di~c:~y to demographic analysis. The problem of "reverse" ecological correlation can arise when attempting to apply survey results to the population. For the sake of simplicit)', assume you have a survey which tabu- lates sales by age and education. Suppose sales turns out to be determined by the two variables. If the effects are independent, you can use the survey to estimate actual sales very closely if you have a tabulation of sales by education and one of sales by age. You do not need to have the crosstabulation of sales by age and education. On the other hand, suppose age and education arc not independent. For example, those aged 65 and above with college educations are twice as likely to buy the product than would be predicted by" age and education alone. If you can crosstabulate sales by age and education you can get an almost perfect estimate of actual sales. Sales tabulated by age alone and by sex alone will help, but, depending on the nature of the interaction, may not do a very good job of estimation. Demographics in most cases consist only of marginals. You have the population by age and the population by education, but not by both variables. Now there are two possibilities for interaction. Not only may age and education not have indepen- dent effects" on sales, but they will most certainly not be independent in the population. If your sampling scheme was complicated or did not draw from a universe representative of the population as a whole, then your sample will not show the same relationship between age and education as exists in the data underlying your demographics. If the interactions are serious, a weighting scheme based on a simple use of survey marginals could be highly misleading. There are four solutions: • Obtain a crosstabulation of the demographic data and apply specific rates estimated from the survey. In our example, obtain the crosstab of the population by age and education and apply age- and education-specific penetration rates estimated from the survey to each age and education group in the population. Most demographic systems have data crosstabuIated by age and sex, age and income, and often age and race, which can be used in this way. In particular, age and sex tabulations are extremely useful in any health care application. Use of age- and sex- specific rates in these areas will almost always outperform other techniques short of having actual population information avail- able. • Perform more detailed analysis on the survey data itself. Techniques such as loglinear modeling will identify both inde- pendent effects and interactions and assess their relative strengths. They can then be used to estimate marginal effects adjusted for the interaction terms. If the interaction terms are not overwhelming, these estimates can be used to construct ad- justed rates which can be applied to the demographic marginals. To do this, you must have some confidence that the sampling technique is adequate to reflect the population demographics. • Geocode the survey responses, append population demo- graphics from each respondent's census tract, and create a model relating the demographics to the survey responses. Since the model is based on population demographics, it can be applied to population data directly. The technique is relatively expensive and not always possible. But it will produce superior results in any situation where the determinams of buying continued on p. 55 December. 1990 Find out what they're really thinking... ...and get the numbers to back it up. Introducing the Epley PROBETM. A unique qualitative methodology offer- Lng the insight of a focus group with the confidence of a survey. MARKETING SERVICES INCORPORATED Cedo~ Rc~pids, IA Minneopo:is, MN Coil 1-800-733-1539 15 TI08571056
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Focus Groups Focus group workshops and championships assist new product development process by Steve Bemstein Editm-'s note: Steve Bernstein is man- ager, market research at Consolidated Freightways, Inc. in Menlo Park, Cali- fornia. Focus groups are an effective method to help marketers gen- erate new product ideas, ideas for product reposit[oning, new marketing programs, and the like. But as all skilled market researchers know, focus group results are always tentative, never defini- tive. Results come in the form of new hypotheses .about underlying forces at work in the marketplace. These hypoth- eses are supposed to lead marketers to a range of alternative new product, service. or program possibilities. Thus focus group data are most appro- priately used as input to the design of another research project, ultimately some sort of quantitative test, the results of which can be projected to the whole tar- get population. As an example of the way the process should work, imagine that a small company wants to spur growth by introducing a new product into a new market. As a result of information gleaned from focus group research, they develop five alternative product concepts. They test them all quantitatively, rolling out the one that has the highest probability of maximizing profit. The company is so happy with the results that management decides to apply the process to every new product investi- gation. Despite testing, once in a while they introduce a product that disappoints them. But their success rate meets their goals, so they stick with a consistent approach. Ideally, the process works that way. The dark side of focus group research, however, is when companies rush to market with a product based solely on focus group data, neglecting follow-up quantitative testing. Only through blind luck does this approach succeed. Not nearly as harmful, but probably very common, is the partial breakdown of the process at the point where the focus group data are used to design the quanti- tative test. Several obstacles impede the consis- tent, efficient translation of focus group data to promising, fully-refined, testable marketing concepts. First, the data from the groups are often subject to distortion and misuse. This problem is widely un- derstood among market researchers. They strive to eliminate the pitfalls by prepar- ing observers in advance and providing proper warning during the presentation of results. Despite best intentions, how- ever, it is impossible to avoid some mis- use. Second, because of its loosely-struc- tured nature, qualitative information is prone to loss. Some focus group sessions are stupefyingly dull; attention spans lapse. The seeds of many new ideas are never noticed; others are simply forgot- ten. Though a well-trained market re- search analyst can reap more from a set of groups than an untrained observer, the problem still exists. This becomes all the more important when one considers how expensive the information is. In the world of business- to-business market research, focus groups typically cost $400 to $750 per respon- dent. The average amount of "'air time" each respondent gets is about 12 to 15 minutes. The final obstacle to the efficient trans- lation of focus group data is the amount o f time that passes between the completion of a series of focus groups and publica- tion of the research provlder's report. Enthusiasm and energy, the horsepower of creativity, often wane during the en- suing weeks. Early"topline"findings are a partial solution, but they are necessarily sparse, compounding the loss-of-data problem mentioned above. Follow-up workshops and champion- ships can help solve these problems by getting focus group observers to discuss in an organized fashion what they saw and heard in the focus group, with the ultimate goal of creating workable new product concepts. How do workshops and championships work? If qualitative and quantitative research are the muscle and bone of new product research, then workshops and champion- ships are the tendons that bind them to- gether. The following recipe for work- shops and championships may need to be modified to accommodate diverse com- pany cultures. The general idea is this: using the focus group moderator's guide to shape the follow-up workshop discussion, a fa- cilitator leads thc observers through two exercises in parallel. The first exercise debriefs them on each section of the moderator's guide, asking them to inter- pret and react to what was said in the focus group. The second exercise is cre- ative idea generation--brainstorming. The workshop produces many new prod- uct concep~ but by the end, the best five Qu~k's Marketi~.q Resea~chRe~ew T!08571057
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or ten am left. After the workshop, volun- teers*'champion" each alternative, refin- ing each into a well-considered, viable new ~uct concept ready f~r qu~mita- tire testing. Workshop structure All focus group observers should be required to participate in the workshop and championship. Many marketers love to watch focus groups: setting participa- tion in the entire process as a prerequisite to focus group attendance is an effective way to get cooperation. The workshop should be conducted two to five days after the final focus group. Sessions can last from a balfa day to two full days. When picking a date for the workshop, strike a balance between letting participants digest what they learned and debriefing them while the experience is fresh. Of course, they should bring notes they made during the focus groups. The workshop facilitator should use the first ten rhinutes or so to describe the entire process. Everything, including the purpose of the focus groups, the work- shop, the championship, and finally the quantitative test, should be covered. The facilitator must make clear that the ulti- mate goal is to produce one very promis- ing new product concept, but that the intermediate goal--that is, the goal of all steps leading up to the test--is to produce "finalists.'" This is very important. The truth is that if the workshop and cham- pionship steps end with only one prom- ising idea instead of several, the exercise has been a waste of time. At the end of this introduction, the facilitator must establish two important ground rules: • During debriefing, participants should limit their comments to what they learned during the focus groups only. Otherwise the workshop can too easily digress into a forum for demonstrating how much people think they know about the market. Encourage the participants to keep each other honest. • While brainstorming, participants should help create an environment which encourages the creation of ideas and dis- courages the evaluation of ideas. This is essential to productive idea creation-- don't won3' about redundant or seem- ingly absurd ideas. Immediately after the introduction, a brief warm-up exercise will help loosen up the participants. Participants should bring a list of the five most surprising or continued on p. 52 December. 19~0 QUANTIME V:flue Added Reseller The Maximum from Market Research 545 8th Avenu e, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10018, (212) 268-4800 4010 Executive Park Drive, Suite 236, Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 563-8800 ~iJ'cie No. ~38 on Reader C~d 17 T108571058
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Money isn't everything Respondent reasons for focus group participation - Phase II Editor's note: Alice Rodgers is president of R odgers Market- ing Research, Canton, Ohio. This article reports on the second phase of an ongoing research project about respondent motivation for par- ticipating in research, especially focus group sessions. The first phase (published in the May, 1990 issue of Quirk's Marketing Research Review) presented the tabulated results of questionnaires completed by 634 people who participated in a focus group session with Rodgers Marketing Research between March and December of 1989. That research discovered that many people participate in focus group sessions because of the gratuity paid. However, that is not the only reason, and for some, it may not be the main reason. When respondents were asked, "'Why did you accept this invitation to participate?" (and allowed to indicate more than one reason), there were some surprises. The results from this quantitative study by type of group: Household Products Insurance/Banking Gratuity 79.9Sub jet'1 5(].0 Enloyed prev. group (s) 78.9Graluily 43.7 Like to participate =n research 61.1Enjoyed prey. group (s) 43.7 Subject 27.5Like to pa~¢pale in rsch. 34.4 Do-it-yourself, liras, eprtg, goods Prolessionel/Job Related Subject 64.3Subject 63. I Gratuity 60.3GratuiW 50.0 Enioyed prey. group (s) 59.tLike to parlicipate in rsch. 39 5 L=ke to parhc.gate in research 50.0Enjoyed prey. group (s) 35.5 Food Baby Products Enjoyed prey group (s) 68.2Subject 80.0 Like to participate in research 67.4Enioyed prey. group (s) 80.0 Gtalmty 60.5Gratu~ly 45.7 Subject 51.2L&e to participate irl rsch 14.3 Media Luggage Enjoyed prey. 9roup (s) 100.0 Graluily 70.4 Gral'Jdy 67.3IJke to pattie=pate in rsc~. 51.8 Like 1o parhc~pale ~n research 55.1Enjoyed prey. group (s) 50.0 Subj~-I 42 9Subjec~ 26.5 These 634 people were also asked if they would participate in a focus group session on various topics without being paid. Less than half said they would not participate in a focus group without being paid on any subject. Note that between 20 and 30% for all subjects said they were not sure. Interestingly, between 25 and 64% (depending on the subject) said they would participate in a focus group session without being paid: 45% said they would participate in a group on public service issues without being paid and 44% said they would participate in a group on community issues without being paid. Phase I1 Intrigued by the expressed willingness of people to partici- 18 pate in a focus group without being paid, we decided to do two focus groups on community issues where one group of respon- dents would not be paid, while the other group would be paid. Essentially this phase was to explore in more depth respon- dent reasons forparticipating in focus groups. Wasmoney such =art overriding consideration that people.simply would not accept an invitation to a group unless they were paid? In addition, it was thought that if it is possible to do an unpaid group, it could provide an opportunity for moderators and facilities to work together on philanthropic projects. That is, moderators, facilities and respondents could donate time to do groups that otherwise would not be done on issues like homelessness, teenage pregnancy, etc. Recruiting specifications Nineteen facilities around the country were called and asked to bid on these groups. The specs were: • Recruit for ten participants in each session - 6 and 8 PM. • Recruit 4 men; 4 working women and 4 nonworking women for each group. • All to be 25 years and older (mix of ages). • All to have household income of $15,000 or more (mix of incomes). • Would like mix of education. • No one to have done a focus group in the past year. • Recruit two "virgins"(virgins refers to "virgin respon- dents") ; and two people who have done 6 or more groups. The subject was national issues of importance including: • the environment; • the savings and loan situation/budget deficit; and • personal concerns, llke cholesterol. One group would be paid $30. The other group would not be paid. Reactions from the field Many of the facilities commented on recruiting people who have done six or more groups. Some comments of interest from the facilities: • Just m.o virgins - sometimes we have all virgins. • Six or more? That will give us a chance to use our "'Dead Meat list'" - the folks that we have on a list not to use! • We will have to go look for the professionals! • It willprobably take us longer to get the ones who have done six or more tocomeforfiee than it takes to get all the rest. They are so used to being paid, Nine of the facilities contacted bid on the project. Ten declined to bid. One facility in each of the following areas declined to bid: Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Michigan, Orlando. Canton, Ohio, New York, Cleveland and Quirk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571059
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Chicago. There were however, two facilities in Chicago which did bid and one in Cleveland also bid. In addition, one from each of the following areas also bid on uhis project: San Diego, Seattle, Tampa, Columbus, Akron, and Dallas. Some reactions from the field services (negatives first, fol- lowed by the positives): • I would not want to be held responsible if no one showed up for the unpaid group. • There is no way we will do a group withourpaying them an incentive. • Pay no gratui~ to the group? I would neverget them here. I don't think people would come. • I could bid on it, but it would be so expensive it would not be worth it. People have so little free time that I don' t think they wouM do it unless they would be paid. • 1 can't cost it. I don'tknow what the rate would be. I have no idea what the qualified refusal rate would be. We can't do it. t don't know whatwould happen. • You are asking for m,o people who have done six or more, who know the), are going to get paid - so why should they do it for nothing? • I don't want to start it. Those people when they are. contacted again will ask, why were they paid for one and not for the other? Did l pocket the money? it reflects bar'k on me. • That sounds like fun.r This is real interesting. • I think whbt will happen is that it will be easier to getpeople who have not participated. Can we have more than m'o people who have not participated? • I will (gulp). OK - let's see if we can do it.t • We do personal interviews at their offices without theh" being paid and we do telephone interviews all the time without being paid, but having someone come and give two hours of their time without being paid. . . driving 2O miles or so. . . ltwill be brteresting to see what happens though...I will take a shot at it. l figure if anybody can do it, we can... Many of the field services raised some issues that are clearly a concern here. Just about everyone mentioned the probability of a high number of no-shows for the unpaid group. Some also made some suggestions to facilitate the project, including: • Do the nonpaid group at 6:00 p.m. and feed them. • Do the nonpaid group at 6:00, because many are already out and it is easier for them to come. Getling people to come out without being paid at 8 p.m. may be more difficult. • Think about some way to thank participants: a t-shin, coffee mug, etc. • Nedd to be able to tell them something when you recruit, so they will be interested in coming. That will cut down on no- shows. " Since our original intent was to see if a group could be conducted without being paid, we did not offer any tangible thank-you. We did, however, hold the nonpaid group at 6:00 p.m. and we did feed them. We also told them a bit about the subjects that were being discussed. Results Given the scope of this project, only one location was to be chosen and it needed to be within easy driving distance for the author. Accordingly, Quality Controlled Services in Colum- bus, Ohio, was chosen to do the work. It was somewhat of a biased selection, because our firm has been repeatedly im- pressed with the overall quality of their work, their attention to detail, and their willingness to try a difficult recruit. The groups were done on Tuesday, June 26. Absolutely no extra efforts were made and recruiting ,,,,'as done asit usually is. December. 199~ A list of people in the Columbus area who had indicated on the questionnaire from Phase I that they would be willing to do a group on community issues without being paid was given to the facility. They were asked to recruit some people from these lists. They were also asked to try especially to recruit two people who had done six or more groups for the unpaid group. Otherwise, the only difference in the invitation for the two groups was : 6:00 group only - May we include you in this discussion? Please try to arrive by 5:45 so that you can enjoy a light buffet. 8:00 group only- May we include you in this discussion? As a token of our appreciation each participant will be paid $30. Those recruited for the 6:00 group who asked were told that there would be no gratuity paid for this session. If necessary, the facility was allowed to tell people in the unpaid group that they were being called because they had indicated awillingness to participate in a group on cpmmunity issues without being paid. The screener included questions about their feelings regard- ing the environment, the savings and loan/de firit situation, and health concerns. A sheet whidh had a list of questions for them to consider before the group was to be included with their reminder letter. There were five questions: • one about the environment and their personal concerns; • one about how their taxes are spent; • one about the census; • one about their personal health concerns - cholesterol, etc.; and • one about participating in surveys - telephone as well as round table. Unfortunately, this sheet was inadvertently not included with the letter. When this was discovered, the facility notified us. We jointly decided that the best thing to do was for the facility to call all the people who were coming to the session and ask if they could read them the questions over the phone. If anyone said there was too much to write down, the sheet was hand delivered to them (only a couple requested deliver'). Report on recruiting from the facility The person in charge of recruiting was asked to submit a report on their experiences with this project. The report: "When recruiting from the 6:00 p.m. group, the majority of the respondents who qualified and refused did so because of other time commitments. Often I was asked if the session was being held on another date because it sounded so interesting. One woman reluctantly refused at the conclusion because she felt she needed the money she could get from being in a paid group. She was later recruited for the 8:00 p.m. group. One woman went through the study and then had to have me recall her to confirm her availability. She had to rearrange a dinner party. She knew the group was not being paid but was willing todo this ifl thought she was qualified enough on the topics. 1 only had one woman who initially asked me what date the session was on and how much it paid. When I told her that it did not pay anything she was very upset and stated that her time and opinion were worth money. 1 did have two other people - one woman and one man refuse because of no money. The 8:00 PM group was easy to recruit. The majority of the people were initially hesitant in that they felt that they were not equally informed or knowledgeable about all three topics. Once reassured that they qualified they were eager to participate. Again in this group, the majority of qualified refusals ~ere due continued on p. 42 19 T108571060
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Thomas Van Aman has been pro- moted to executive vice president by In- formation Resources, Inc., Chicago. In addition, Karen Snepp has been pro- moted to senior vice president, client service. Gregory J. McMahon has been pro- moted to vice president at Market Facts, Inc., New York. P. Jeffrey Franke has joined Winona MRB, a Minneapolis-based market re- Here's What's Great at Taylor research • Two Spanking-New Focus Group Suites, each having Con- ference, Viewing, and Client Office Rooms • Test Kitchen, 200 + Square Feet designed and used specifi- cally for market research • Video feed to Permanent Monitors in Client Offices • Viewing Space for up to Twenty-Five • Airport Close, just Seven Minutes by Taxi or Rental-Car • Walk to Hotels, Late-NiteRestaurants, Shops and Galleries Each Focus Group Suite contains o~,er 600 square i'eel, d~qded evenly bet~,een Conference. Viewing. and Chent Of lice. Taylor research 3990 Old Town Ave, Ste 201A San Diego, California 92110 Phone: I_QOO_")~')_Azl.9~ In Calitbrnia: 1-619-299-6368 Facsimilie: 1-619-299-6370 Circle No. 809 on Reader Card 2O search firm, as senior research manager. Previously he had been with IDS/Ameri- can Express as marketing research project manager. The Association of American Geogra- phers Microcomputer Specialty Group has designated Strategic Mapping, lnc.'s Atlas*GIS as "Product of the Year" for 1990 in the corporate software category. Robert Sechri~t, professor of geography at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, in Indiana, PA, and chairman of the judging committee, says that the product won the award for its capacity for processing spa- tial data. its power and capability in pro- viding the essential components of a geo- graphic information system, and its ease of use. Maria Friedman has been named manager, research services of Teenage • Research Unlimited (TRU), Northbrook, IL. CustomerlnsightCo., Englewood, CO, has promoted Alien I-I, "Skip" Balch to national manager, sales. Patricia T. Crowley has been pro- moted to group account manager at Ar- lington Hrs., IL-based CIJ Research. Barbara Griffith has joined Minne- apolis-based Leon Tyler Marketing Re- search as business development man- ager. Jodie Wehrspann has joined St. Paul- based RockwoodResearch as market re- search analyst/editor. VF Information Service, Langhome, PA, has promoted Michael Highberger to vice president of project management. Dale Benedict has been promoted to vice president of market strategies at Fitch RichardsonSmith's Columbus, OH of- rice. He is responsible for developing marketing strategies for new'and existing products as well as coordination and analysis of market research for clients. Ouir~'s IV~Ung Re~ea~chRev:ew T108571061
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A new focus group facility has opened in San Francisco: ConStat, Inc., 450 Sansome St., Ste. 1100, San Francisco, CA, 94111. Telephone: 415-274-6600. For more information contact B dan Kirby, vice president, marketing. VF Information Service, Langhome, PA, has opened a new WATS interview- ing facility at 8101 Castor Ave., Philadel- phia, PA, 19152. Telephone: 215-745- 9894. Fax: 215-745-9894. Gail Rapoport has opened a qualitative marketing research and consulting firm called RapSessions, located at 2000 Lin- coln Park West, Ste. 504, Chicago, IL, 60614. Telephone: 312-477-8030. The firm will specialize in focus group mod- erating and marketing strategy develop- ment based on qualitative research. St. Paul-based Rockwood Research has opened a branch office in River Falls, WI, at 208 .S. MaimThe office will ini- tially employ30 part-ti~e research inter- viewers, who wilt conduct agriculture- related telephone research studies. "We chose River Falls for our first branch office because we were impressed with the quality ofpgtential employees, by the fact that people in the area understand agriculture and by the warm welcome we received from the community," says Ken Becker, vice president of Rockwood. CJrc~ No. 810 on Read~rCacd December. ";9~0 21 T108571062
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Software program creates customer surveys Insync Corporation has introduced the Customer Manager, a PC-based software package of four surveys designed to make it easy for organizations to track levels of customer service and satisfaction. The four surveys are: an internal survey to gauge employees' perceptions of how to maximize customer service/satisfaction, a survey for customers of product-ori- ented businesses, a survey for customers of service-oriented businesses, and a sur- vey designed to determine why former customers were lost. The program allows users to customize these surveys and also has the ability to develop surveys from scratch. For more information, contact Mike Dulworth at 202-452-9678, or at Insync Corp., 2100 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W,, Ste. 765, Washington, DC, 20037- 3202. Newsletter on European markets Market: Europe is a new monthly newsletter designed to provide informa- tion about the demographics and lifestyles of European consumers. For more infor- mation contact Doris Walsh at 607-277- 0934 or at W-Two Publications, Ltd., 202 The Commons, Ste. 410, Ithaca, NY, 14850. Book profiles U.S. Hispanic population The demographic, political, economic, social and cultural impact of the burgeon- Find out why Prestigious and Successful Researchers Depend on Stephanie Tudor for their Focus Group Transcriptions "The only way to see the difference is to tly me for the first time." CALL FOR MY COMPLETE REFERENCE PACKAGE Inquiries 1-800-747-1110 o Customer Service 212-879-0560 Some of my clients are: AC&R Advertising, Inc. Backer Spielvogel Bates Burson-Marsteller Rosenfeld Research Total Research Corp. Young & Rubicam Richard Zeller, Ph.D. Stephanie Tudor 1202 Lexington Avenue - Suite 200 New York, NY 10028 Focus Group and In-Depth lntem'iew~ My ~pecialtv Created Ewlu~trely to Sem'e the Market Research Conmltalit)" ing U.S. Hispanic population .is por- trayed in the Statistical Handbook on U.S. Hispanics~ published by the Oryx. Press. The selection of recent statistical data was collected from various divisions of the U.S. Bureau of Census, other government agencies, and private orga- nizations, and compiled into one volume. Contents include details on demograph- ics, immigration and naturalization, sg- cial oharacteristics, education, health, politics, labor force, and economic con- ditions. The Handbook is scheduled for publication in January, 1991. For more information, contact the Oryx Press at 800-279-ORYX or at 4041 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ, 85012-3397, New guide details European business information sources Euromonitor has published a new business directory aimed at anyone re- searching the European market for prod- ucts and services. The European Direc- tory of Business Information Libraries provides a detailed guide to the top 500 business information services in Europe, from national and public libraries, chambers of commerce, to embassies and trade associations. Each entry con- tains information for locating and choosing business information services: stock details and special subject areas, library services, contact name, opening times, and accessibility. Contact Euromonitor, 87-88 Tummill St., Lon- don, EC 1M 5QU, England. Telephone: 01-251-8024. Fax: 01-608-3149. Quirk's Marketing ResearchRev~ew T108571063
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Breakfast food for thought Breakfast consumption away from home, which accounts for 10% of total breakfast foods eaten,jumped 25% since 1984, accnrding to new data from MRCA Information Services, Stamford, CT. "In'" when eating out are sweet baked goods (donuts, sweet rolls, and toaster pastries), eggs, sandwiches, and breakfast meats, with shares of 14%, 13%, 12%, and 11%, respectively. By contrast, the top four at-home breakfast foods are ready-to-eat cereal, loaf bread, eggs, and fruit, with shares of 22%, 19%, 10%, and 10%, respectively. "'Despite differences in foods eaten at home and away, there is a common trend toward healthier, more nutritious foods," says Diane Marpe, senior account execu- tive at MRCA. "While eggs, breakfast meats, and bread lost share in away- from-home eatings between 1984 and 1989, cereal, fruit, and muffins posted significant gains." As to beverages for breakfast away from home, coffee is the dominant choice and, with a 55% share, more important than at home, where it has a 39% share. Juice, meanwhile, holds a 19% share away from home, compared to 34% at home. MRCA's breakfast market data shows that males over the age of 35 and people with annual incomes over $30,000 are most likely to eat out. Further, "As people grow older they eat an increasingly large share of away-from-home breakfast foods at restaurants," Marpe says. The share is 26% for people underage 18, 41% for 18- 34 year-olds, 51% for 35-54 year-olds, and 60% for those age 55 and over. "Sincethe 55+ age group will continue to grow," Marpe says, "look for increased competition between restaurants and in- home convenience products." It's amazing what a coat of paint will do In the past year, 74.4 million Ameri- cans took paint brush or roller in hand and continued on p. 11 7 December. 1990 YOUR CHICAGO AREA FOCUS GROUP CENTER Excellent location Just minutes from O' Hare International Airport, Our location provides convenient access from middle and upper income suburbs plus Northwest Chicago. State-of-the-art focus group center Three large conference rooms, Spacious viewing rooms with wall-to-wall, one-way mirrors. Professional quality video and audio equipment. Flexible areas for large displays. Available with or without recruiting, Test kitchen Fully-equipped test kitchen with freezer storage. Direct observation of the kitchen through one-way mirror. Our people Experienced staff of in-house recruiters. Highly qualified moderators available. O'HARE IN FOCUS a division of Irwin Broh & Associates, Inc. 1011 East Touhy Avenue • Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 (708) 299-6636 • Fax: (708) 824-3259 C=rc;e No. 918 on Reader Card T108571064
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How to get the most from your marketing research dollars by Jill Falk Editor's note: Jill Falk is vice presi- dent of The Research Spectrum, a San Francisco-based marketing and opinion research firm. As companies continueto become "leaner and meaner," dollars earmarked for administrative or planning tasks continue to be easy targets for budget reductions. It is therefore in- cumbent on those persons responsible for contracting for marketing research ser- vices to get the most out of every research dollar. The following advice should as- sist clients in getting the information they need to make informed marketing deci- sions. Step 1: The Inventory Often times, companies have more marketing research than they realize. The answers to their marketing questions are sitting on bookshelves collecting dust. Past studies sometimes contain valuable information either in the form of time series data or relevant explanations of market trends and consumer behavior. When reports are completed, however, they sometimes are forgolten by the cli- ent or marketing research manager who commissioned them. There have been several instances when I have been contacted to do a marketing research study for which the client al- ready had sufficient data. During the problem definition portion of my consul- tation I was showo prior studies that con- tained all of the necessary information. I therefore pointed out that an additional study was unwarranted. Given my experience both as a client and a supplier I advise potential clients to undertake an inventory of all past mar- keting research studies, those cohducted by in-house personnel as well as consult- ants. An annotated bibliography should help refresh overloaded memories about previous research projects. Additionally. such a bibliography can help orient new research and marketing personnel while preventing the same research questions from being asked over and over again (except where appropriate, as with a tracking study). Step 2: Secondary Research Sometimes syndicated or secondary research can provide information about customer usage patterns, likes and dis- likes for certain product features, corpo- rate awareness and market share. When research dollars are really scarce, a trip to the library may offer a practical alterna- tive to primary research. Trade associa- tions are also a source of valuable data about a particular industry or market. After carefully examining the assump- tions, research objectives, methodology and respondent population, conclusions from other studies may provide insights into your own particular marketing is- sues. Furthermore, using your ov, n as- sumptions, it may be possible to modify the results to more closely reflect your product, company, or market environ- ment. Step 3: Primary Research I fyou find that 1) your company has no dusty copies of old research.reports and that 2) existing secondary research is not applicable to your situation, collecting your own data should be considered. Pri- mary research, however, should not be undertaken without giving considerable thought to the study's research objec- tives, as well as how and by whom the results will be used. Often primary research is conducted in an environment where the results are needed yesterday. Given time pressures, a study can be put into the field before the objectives or scope of the research are adequately defined. Under such circum- stances, the research may either address a question that is too broad or narrow in scope. Or in the worst case scenario, it may not address the question at all. Similarly, certain sophisticated tech- niques such as conjoint analysis or m ulti- dimensional scaling may be too difficult for the actual user to interpret or incorpo- rate into product decisions. The time given to planning is very important and can mean the difference between a study making a valuable contribution or being a costly mistake. Once the scope of the study, the re- search objectives, and users are defined, Q~irk's M~,keting ResearchReview T108571065
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it can be decided whether sufficient in- house resources are available to conduct the study or whether the amount of staff or eTq~er4"i~ w~eeam a strppfier. ~f the answer is to look outside your company, then the following should help in hiring a supplier who can provide the marketing information you seek. Step 4: Evaluation of Marketing Research Suppliers To begin with, all firms are not created equal. When I was on the client side of the desk, I found that the services offere~l by marketing research vendors varied greatly. Not only did the cost of a project differ by thousands of dollars but so did the qualit7 control procedures and the subsequent reliability of the results. After managing a lot of contracts, I realized there were some basic questions to ask and procedures to follow in order to en- sure a good match between the client and supplier. 1. Who ,.ill be doing my research? Although this may se~m like an obvi- ous question, many clients forget to ask who will actually work on their project or assume that it is the person selling them the research. Although we have been told never to assume, this is especiafly true when it comes to hiring a consultant or vendor. First, quite a few suppliers, especially the large ones, have a sales force respon- sible for promoting the company's ser- vices. These people are really order tak- ers who will pass on the specifications of your project to their research staff. Con- sequently, the person consulting with you about your research needs may not be the person who either will be managing your project or providing technical inpu.t. Another scenario might include a high level consultant selling'you a marketing research study which is then managed by. a more junior staff member. This bait and switch approach to staffing happens in many consulting and service firms. It is, therefore, important to pre-determine exactly who Will staff the project team. 2. Is the supplier a full-service marketing research company?. Besides knowing who is managing your project, the client should confirm whether the field work and tabulations will be done by the supplier or subcontracted to another company. Smaller marketing re- sehrch firms, those with one to five staff members, usually contract with field companies to conduct their telephone in- terviews. Some also will rely on outside vendors for their data processing. With a full-service research firm, all the work is done in-house so there is gr.eater control over the quality of the study. The project manager can continu- ally monitor interviewing, editing of sur- veys, coding, keypunching and data pro- cessing to ensure their conformance to pr.oject Specifications and company re- search standards. When these activities are sub-contracted to other firms, there is less opportunity to che~l~ the quality of the work and less alsility to maintain and control the quality of the research. 3. Customi:ed research or a pre- packaged solution? Some marketing research suppliers ha.ve a particular area of expertise aside continued on p. 36 Here at last. Now ~ou can v~, and mterac! ~ ~" f:i~L~ ~ ~ i]'~ ~ ,.t.~';~,,-.., ','ideo~nl~lofi. Yo~ vl~,on the ~rge screen monitor of your in-office happen,..mlhecon~ortandconvemence~.yetttmmcenfin'~'r~:~a.-~'J~'Z~.,~~ ~{~ ~" .:.~ ..... t~*pt=o~ ~mo e,oontrol two zoom lens camera, m~intaJn audio con- More Producti~ Focus research. ~,Z.--.~t ~,;:,~: ,-,~, !~ ~2,~r,~:~V. ,~._t~{~ ~ %;~ "'~i~-:_la~. t .wi..'~ your m. 0de rato r, v.ideo t a~e and hold a tv,~o-~av postgmup debt eli c0mumer freight provided by focus group reseat:[i: ~0uttra*~I.~tili0ut ~'~e The Bbttora lihe. bu.s,nessd~rupt,onofbe,ngawa~,,froml~eofl'~ce, v,~.~:~.~,~.,-fl;, ,¢,., L~,F,~N~e~.~yO.. &put~,theconsumernght ,~ o the center otr your new Top Management lnterest ~'[:: ~.?~'?.~'~{ ~:~.;:~,~',': ~. ~ L ':: : "P.~!1~I~ ~lOpi~nt, s~tegic plan ning, ~J~d creative de,.elopment proce.~. ~,. . . The Focus aslon concept h~ captured, top management.m, .ltnW. ,l~-'a~me. ~~;.-t~^ .~-. ,': %B~.$affordable, Its Ix, re nou; of Ihe trnp ~ca o~ for st~i' ime conservat'on, reducttoh?li'~)l~"S-l~ ~x~'.~.q~"~;~, -4,~''.~l:~t~"n atlbn demonstration and complete hfformatton call or write and re~a~:h pr~luctw~w.. ~hn~. ~6u ahan, Pt'~ident. ^ nem'ork of existing high qualib' focus facilities is equip# fo~FO~,"Vtfit/ri" ~.~7.:.: 5~,':,..-:. ;,,;.~,':.:. : ~: ~ FOCUSVLSlO~TM It~ better ~n bang t&m Deceml~er. 1990 C.kcle NO. 812 on P, eader Card T108571066
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Focus Groups Client ground rules for observing focus groups by Naomi R. Henderson Editor's note: Naomi Henderson is founder andpresident of RIVA (Research in Values and Attitudes), a qualitative research and training services company in Bethe.~da. Maryland. Some clients come to the qualita- tive research process with years ofviewingexperience. They've seen great groups and lousy groups. They've seen respondents say things ranging from nonsensical to profound. They've seen confirmation of a corporate belief, and they've seen respondents shoot a great idea right out of the water. They've seen great moderators, and they've seen less than great moderators. Some clients may have even said "I could do a better job of interviewing respondents than this moderalor." Some clients come to the qualitative process with little or no viewing experi- ence. Some of these clients come with a great interest in what their target market has to say. Others come with skepticism for the whole "airy-fairy, "non-scientific process of qualitative research. In some cases, the viewing room holds both kinds of clients at the same time. This article is intended to give some ground rules for observers regardless of their viewing experience. However, be- fore a discussion about ground rules for clients, let's look at some issues related to the process of interviewing respondents. The constraints of the traditional two- hour focus group and the increasing re- quirement of clients to cover as many different issues as time allows, force qualitative researchers to "'make every minute count" in a focus group. The ideal group size is eight respondents. In a two- hour focus group setting, after subtract- 26 ing the time for"people logistics" (com- ing into and leaving the room, getting beverages/food/snacks, finding a chair, listening to the study purpose, ground rules and self introduction), only 90 min- utes of research time is really left! If you divide the 90 minutes by the eight respondents, the "'fair" amount of airtime for each respondent is about I I minutes apiece. The ideal number of separate issues that can be covered in 90 minutes is four topic areas. If every respondent speaks an equal amount of time on each topic area then each person will have a little over 2.5 minutes on each of the four topics. These days, however, clients often have 5-6 areas to cover in a session, and some clients feel that "'more is better" when it comes to group size. Simple math shows that the more people in the room and the more discrete issues to cover, the less time each respondent will have to talk. Anything that "shaves seconds" in a focus group and allows more airtime for respondent comments is a plus. Ground rules for respondents help the group's dynamic process by doing the following: a. Lets respondents know the "bound- aries" of behavior desired for the re- search process; b. Provides a foundation for the re- search process so that the time spent is productive; c. Provides a basis for correcting non- productive evenls that may occur in the research process; d. Gives respondents information so that they may participate fully. Respondents are told that the session is being tape recorded (audio and/or vid- eotaped), that they are being observed, that a report will be written without attri- bution to a specific speaker and that they are being paid for their time and opinions. After these logistics, RIVA moderators provide the following eight ground rules for participants: I. Please speak one at a time. 2. Please speak in a voice at least as loud as mine. 3. Avoid side conversations with your neighbors. 4. I need to hear from everyone during the course of the session but you don't have to answer every question. 5. We will observe the no smoking rule during this session. 6. There are no wrong answers--you cannot fail during this session. 7. Say what's true for you, and have the courage of your convictions. 8. Don't let the group sway you, and don't sell out Io group opinion or to a strong talker. It is OK, however, to change your mind during the course of the ses- sion because of something you hear or see. RIVA moderators deliver the above ground rules in a non-judgmental tone of voice with warmth and sincerity. The purpose of the ground rules is to provide a "climate" for conducting qualitative research so that the time set aside for the research is productive. From the client point of view, the focus group or IDI (in-depth interview) expe- O.~'k's Market~ ResearchRev~ew T108571067
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READER SERVICE CARD ~~,~~ 1~ FREE INFORMATION ON PRODUCTS AND SERVICES IN THIS tSSUE. Send me more information on the items circled 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 8.08 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 B38 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 908 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 918 916 917 918 919 920 921 922 923 924 928 929 930 931 932 933 934 935 936 937 938 939 940 941 942 943 944 945 946 Name Tit~e Please Prinf Company. Address City State Zip Tel. No. T!08571068
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PLACE STAMP HERE P.O. Box 23536 Mj.'nneapolis, Minnesota 55423 TI08571069
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fiance is mor~ than just watching respon- dents through a two-way mirror or on video. The remainder of this article outlines some "'ground roles" for observ- ers so that the qualitative research expe- rience is as rich as possible. Before the focus group or IDI: 1. Be cleat on the pro'pose of research. What are the key reasons qualitative research is being conducted? Have you read the background file on the study or the research proposal? Is your "personal agenda" in line with the written study purpose? 2. Arrive 45 m#tutes before the scheduled start of the session. Your early arrival cuts down on the chance of running into participants and heightening their anxiety about who the observers are. Forexample, if the partici- pants are blue collar workers and they see a stream of people coming through the reception room dressed in suits and ties carrying leather briefcases and then later, during the introductions, are told they are being observed, they may have the expe- rience of being "monkeys in the zoo'" because they are so different from the observers. 3. Use appropriate ino'oductions with facili~, staff when you arri~v. Introduce yourself in such a way as to maintain corporate anonymity in case the recruiting was"blind." Thi~ phrase works well: "Hello. My name is [ ] and I'm here as part of the moderator's team. Is she/he here yet?"Note: For security rea- sons you may be asked to show ID in some locations orhave yourname checked off a list. Avoid saying the following: "Hello. I'm here to watch the focus group." "Hello. I'm from the ad agency." "Hello. I'm the client for the focus group study." A dramatic example of the problems that can arise occurred during a recent study for a radio station in New York City. The purpose of the research was to assess the image of that station among light and heavy listeners. The recruiting had been "blind;" respondents didn't know which radio station was paying for the projdct. An early topic intended for each group was: "What's your impres- sion of W ? What do you think of the station?" These questions were to be asked about three stations in the New York City area. It was critical to see what descriptive wo~ls were used about each station. The focus group facility was small, and there was only one door to 6ae suite so that clients and respondents alike had to come through the same door. At 5:45, fifteen minutes before the group was due to begin, two observers from the radio station came into the suite, briefcases in hand, and marched up to the reception desk. One of them said, in a voice loud enough for every one of the t I respon- dents to hear: "I'm the station manager for W--.and I'm here to watch the groups?' The cat was out of the bag...every respondent now knew which radio sta- tion was paying for the research, and any opportunity to get unbiased answers about the image of the station was lost. This sorely compromised the research opportunity, and the advertising agency and the moderator agreed that the disclo- sure would adversely affect the research. Therefore, the group of (light) respon- dents were paid and sent home. That "'gaffe" cost the radio station $3500 and a lost opportunity. 4. Prior to the start of the first session, review the moderator's guide and become farailiar ,:ith the "intended flow" of the focus group. DON'T TAKE OUR WORD F()R IT... ~Ci2 System for Computer Interviewing "I can state unequivocally that Sawt0oth Software has the most re- sponsive and the most uniformly competent support organization --Peter Andrews Decisions Center~Research International "Ci2 works directly with all of the tabulation and statistical software that I've used for years. There was no need to switch or upgrade and no long software learning curve for me or my staff." --Jess Fry New Directions Marketing Research, Inc. ~CCA System for Convergent Cluster Analysis "The print-out is so easy to read that clients love to pore over --Tom McNulty McNulty R~search, Inc. 'qNe find that CCA's mix of starting-point strategies and pre-process- hag options allows us to consrruc~ the best-fit solutions more effi- ciently." --Pat Futlmer The Gilmore Research Group ~ --~ACA System for Adaptive Con- joint Analysis "I like the adaptive nature of the interview. It results ~ the most efficient use of a respondent's time, meaning. I get more information for my research dollar.~ --Neil Allison McKinsey & Co. 'q-he new ACA simulator interface..makes the simulator so intuitive, even the president of our company has no trouble using it." --Tom Pilon lntelliQuest, Inc. ~APM System for Adaptive Perceptual Mapping "1 have been able to produce perceptual maps within an hour of com- plethag data collection. This allows for more emphasis on the inter- pretation of the results." --Steve Cooley Motorola, Inc. "APM's simulation capability is unique, it lets us go beyond "just plain mapping" and explore the impact of repositioning." --Rich Sterner Dotu Chemical For additional information or demo disks write or call: Sawtooth Software 1007 Church Street, Suite 302, Evanston, IL 60201 • Telephone: 708/866-0870 Fax: 708/866-0876 December. 1990 29 T108571070
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Get inside San Francisco. We can offer you lwo points of view in the Bay Area. One conveniently close to San Francisco International Airport. ,And the other downtown, in the heart of the financial district. Either way, you'll have our 220 South Spruce Avenue, Suite t00 ~ll & ASSOCIATES Soulh San Francisco, CA 94080 [415] 871-6800 Circle No. 917 on Reader Card P :of.it from the Power of Direct BuslnessContact "Easy to Use" --Booklist All-In-One Business Contactbook alphabetically lists over 10,000 leading companies, including Fortune 500 and Business Week Top 1,000. Each entry provides address, CEO, sales figures (when available), and several dial-up listings, including fax, telex, and cable--as well as voice lines such as direct department lines, special recordings, and hotlines. Find the companies by name, geographic location, or product/service group. 1st Ed. Edited by Karen Hill. 540 pp. Softcover. ISBN 0-8103-7674-1. Order #030400-M94922. $49.95. Ready December National Fax Directory 1991 provides an annually updated list of approximately 89,000 highly selective fax numbers of America's most important companies and organizations--financial institutions, law firms, government agencies, media and publishing organizations, manufacturers, libraries, and associations. Complete address is included with each entry and a company "Yellow Pages" section lists companies based on some 150 SIC codes. 2rid Ed. Compiled by General Information, Inc. Approx. 1,800 pp. Softcover. ISBN 0-8103-7636-9. Order #004016-M94922. $75.00. The Gale Guarantee: Use these books for 30 days with no obligation to buy. If you're not satisfied, just send them back. (Full refund on prepaid orders.) ~--~Gale Research Inc. Order these comprehensive, accurate ~.o ~,~ uJ~z~-~t7 business contact references today. M94922 Call 1-800-877-GALF_ ~rcle NO. 814 on Re~:~er Card 30 Be clear on the key issues to be cov- ered and the tasks that group respondents will be doing. During the focus group or IDI: 5. Altow for moderator flexibility. Do not expect the moderator to ask every question in the guide or to ask the questions in the same language or order as the written guide. The qualitative process is not as rigid as a survey, and good moderators"follow the energy" in a discussion if a rich vein of information can be unearthed. Moderators also skip questions if respondents have already covered an area or if lime constraints exist. 6. Allow for group fleaqbil#y. Do not eapect : • Every minute of every group or IDI to be meaningful -- • Every question to have an immediate payoff in providing insi.ght • Every comment, statement, response or interchange to directly relate to the topic being discussed • Each group or IDI in a series to provide equal data or for a trend to emerge within each group or IDI Some questions, and their subsequent answers by respondents, are "set-ups" or "bridges" to move from one topic to an- other or to close down an area. Some questions work great on paper and not in real life. Sometimes respondents have to formulate an opinion, and they do that out loud rather than internally. The process of forming that opinion may sound like rambling. Sometimes the moderator is "backtracking" or "future pacing," and the questions and their answers, on the surface, do not appear to be going any- where. Expect each group or IDl to con- tribute to a whole understanding of the key issues, not necessarily to stand alone and provide "the answer." 7. E.rpect respmulenrs to forget the grou/ld rules fi'om time/o time and do the followhtg: • Talk all at once • Talk too softly at times • Stray from the topic of conversation • Have a side conversation • Fail to have the courage of their convictions The group process is dynamic -- the respondents feed and stimulate each other. In the excitement of a new idea. it's natural to blurt out and all talk at once. Fear aud shyness about revealing one's thoughts or beliefs can make someone talk softly or want to share only with someone nearby- and not to the group as a Quirk's M~J~et~3 ResearchReview T108571071
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whole. Being the only one with aposkive point of view in the face of negative reactions from others (or vice versa) can ,c~use a ~zpondent to i~se i~is/her ,cour- age. Listening 8. Listen care]idly! Listen for more than a confirmation or a validation of your own point of view. Listen to what respondents are actually saying and see it from their perspective. Be willing to listen to misinformation and find in it an insight to the thinking of respondents. 9. Listen to what is and is not being said. Be alert to thenuances of meaning and the language respondents use to present their perceptions, opinions, beliefs and attitudes. 10. Do not expect a consensus within or across groups. The degree of divergent thinking may be the trend that is reported. Observing 1 I. Avoid 'Tudging" respondents. In some ways, this type of research is "sanctioned voyeurism." While respon- dents are told they are being observed, they tend to forget that fact since they can't hear or see the observers, and they are rewarded with a view of their own faces when they look at the two-way mirror. The tendency for observers, however, is to look at respondents with no chance of making eye contact and use that "fly on the wall"experience in one of two ways: A. Some clients see the opportunity of viewing members of their target or in- tended market as a privilege because they are afforded an unobstructed view of the perceptions, opinions, beliefs and atti- tudes of individuals. B. Some clients are uncomfortable with the barrier of the mirror and may experi- ence some embarrassment during the viewing opportunity. Either type of client described above may fall prey, however, to "judging" re- spondents. Several types of "judging'" may go on: • Respondents judged as "not worthy'" to comment on the content under dis- cussion. • Respondents judged because of the way they look: this could include: body type, color of skin, type of clothing worn, speaking ability, level of articulateness, con~nued on p. 38 December. 1990 FIRST IN FOCUS RESEARCH in southeastern Eng} ,a d R.I. Survey and Research has been a leader in personal contact research in southeastern New England since 1962, particularly in focus groups. Now in new modern facilities at a freeway exit just 20 minutes from R.l.'s airport, R.I.S. & R. offers complete profes- sional focus group service, includ- ing one-on-one sessions, a highly successful moderator, and partici- pants recruited to client specifications. Respondents Room 12',~" x 16½"; seats 10-12; confer- ence or living morn style; 2 mirror-windows. Clients Room 12' x 131/z,; seats 10-12; audio and video taping avail- able; volume con- tml in room; mirror-window. Reception Room Mirror window to respondents room; at-the-door parking, Contact Dinah Baker and Pat Shakel R.I. Survey & Research Since 1962 690 Warren Avenue East Providence, R.I. 02914 401-438-4120 Spacious air-conditioned facilities with kitchen and professional sound systems. ~ No.81S o~ Re=der Cacd 31 T108571072
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More universities are offering training in marketing research by Bryan J. Rader Editor's note: BtTan J. Rader is a marketing research analyst for Market- #tg Spectrum, Inc., a full-service market- ing research and consultin gfirrn based in Atlanta. In the past, there have been few formal academic marketing re- search programs to teach the es- sential tools necessary to become a good marketing researcher. Some business schools have offered marketing research courses designed to give students a basic understanding of how the research func- tion fits into America's corporations, yet these introductory courses have not pro- v ided enough knowledge to produce well- trained marketing research profession- als. Previous generations received their training from liberal arts or social science backgrounds (psychology, English, soci- ology, etc.) or from on-the-job training. However, the demand for better training and education has recently surfaced in our industry and has required a look at the options that are available. Where are the academic and training programs that can teach our future re- searchers? Which programs are most ef- fective in teaching practical knowledge and technique? And what training is available today to continue improving our craft? As the demand for better academic programs increases, the opportunities to obtain a solid educational background in marketing research become greater. "'There is a growing demand for good marketing researchers--not just in statis- tics, but also in general business knowl- edge and practical marketing skills," says Gilbert Churchill, Jr., chair of the market- ing research program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His school has taken steps to meet this demand with the opening of the A.C. Nielsen Center for Marketing Research and a program that involves internships and research project assistantships."(The program) was designed with three foun- dations in mind: general business knowl- edge, substantive marketing knowledge, and technique courses. A good researcher must be able to understand business solu- tions and problems, and communicate and translate solutions to product man- agement. Our program works towards teaching practical knowledge." The two-year program, a Masters in Business with a specialization in market- ing research, includes a summer intern- ship and involves courses in research technique, general marketing and busi- ness. "A quality marketing researcher must have good business decision-mak- ing skills in order to conduct quality mar- keting research," Churchill says. One university noticed the growing demand for better-trained researchers several years ago. Malcolm McNiven, director of the research program at the University of Georgia-Athens, says,"The demand for better marketing research professionals began over ten years ago among both clients and suppliers. A group of concerned professionals wanted to of- fer research students practical orientation as opposed to textbook information from a single course." Thus, the university created its Masters in Marketing Research program. The program's curriculum is designed to teach students everything about con- ducting a survey, from questionnaire writing to fielding,.c_ost.ing, and tabbing. It also includes three courses on analyti- cal application. Thirty seminars on topics of current interest are given annually by industry practitioners--who are often program alumnae. Students can also par- ticipate in a research study, work with a client, and presenl results. The Georgia program has been very successful in meeting the needs of em- ployers, though McNiven says, "'There are twice as many job openings as stu- dents. At first, packaged goods compa- nies were the first ones to hire our gradu- ates. But now, large service companies and marketing research firms are also bidding for our students." With the success of that program have come other academic programs for stu- dents interested in marketing research. One of these new programs is at the University of Arizona, where, says Pro- gram CoordinatorDeborah Maclnnis."A great deal of interest has been generated from companies for continued and up- dated training of their researchers. That is why we developed our program about two years ago." The program at University of Arizona is a two-year Master's degree that covers all facets of quantitative and qualitative research, from methodological design to multivariate statistics. Students are also required to take an internship between the first and second year of the program. They typically spend a summer working on one project with a large company. "It's a win-win situation. It gives the company an opportunity to evaluate stu- dents and gives the students a chance to learn hands-on research," Maclnnis says. "We have a balanced approach of 32 Qu~'s M~,rket~ng ResearchReview Ti08571073
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teaching both quantitative and qualita- tive research. Our goal is to offer studems insight into utilizing the information af- w.r ~he e~b ~s coad~eeed. We to teach conceptualization of the market- ing problem up front to help determine what kind of conclusions can be drawn at the end." Employer demand has lead to other research programs, such as those at the University of Texas-Arlington and Southern Illinois University- Edwardsville. Roger Gates, a professor of marketing at UT-Arlington who runs the school's marketing research program, says,"We don't just teach research in our curriculum. Marketing research profes- sionals don't just do research anymore~ We have included courses to help with presentations, report design, and writing skills. We will soon be adding a course called 'Creative Problem Solving.' We are even trying to offer students an oppor- tunity to take a psychology class." The academic program at UT-Arling- ton does not r~quire an internship. How- ever, two field research classes are re- quired for students, and they also have an option to work with clients on routine projects. According to Gates, the school currently has 15 students enrolled in the program. Madhav Segal, the director of the pro- gram at Southern Illinois University- Edwardsville, reports that his marketing research program currently has 30-35 students enrolled. "Our program at SIU is a two-year program designed to teach business operations, marketing processes, and marketing research. At the end of two years, students are requi red to take a four- month paid internship. Our graduates must be able to show that they can integrate marketing information and research." As helpful as these new academic pro- grams have been for the industry, there are still quite a few limitations. Gary Mullet, of Gary Mullet Associates, a stat- istician consulting firm, says, "You don't have to worry about real-life situations in textbook cases. In textbooks, every re- spondent answers every question, sam- piing isn't a problem, and everything is ideal. Most courses only teach a handful of techniques and people tend to use them in the wrong situation." However, he says, there is a solution. "'Taking seminars and courses that touch on specific subjects of interest can be helpful. While these seminars don't offer hands-on experience, they help in pro- viding the basis for actual use." Ambar Rao, a l:rrofessor at New York University's Stem School of Business, sees the same problem."l think there is a need for _eo~ta~t ~e-ed~catio~ ~-td up- dating of skills." There are several ways to do this, including taking an executive education course from a university, go- ing to seminars offered by suppliers such as Burke or Nielsen, or attending a work- shop sponsored by an industry profes- sional organization. As the marketing research industry changes, so should the academic pro- grams, Rao says. "'Over the last few years, there has been a surge of information through scenner data. Companies are in- undated with dam, and they need well- trained people to help analyze this data. ing---better scanner knowledge---and the existing programs must adapt to suit these needs." Many business schools still have not chosen to include marketing research in their curriculum. Steve Greyser, a pro- fessor of marketing at Harvard Univer- sity, says, "'Our M.B.A. program has no overt training in marketing research and students receive limited exposure to il in continued on p. 40 Why only listen to Philade!phia, When you're at hberty to give the nation a ring? TeleFocus'-a better way to run focus groups. Single-city focus groups may give you a very narrow view. Wouldn't it be better to get the full range of attitudes, opinions, and verbatims that more accurately represents the big picture? With TeleFocus-focus groups by phone-you can. TeleFocus gives you everything you want from a focus group-plus access to participants nationwide and the ability for you to listen in from anywhere in the country. TeleFocus works-for concept evaluation, ad testing, attitude studies, or basic product research, at a significant savings over face-to-face groups. Give us a ring at (212) 599-1500. TeleFocus. Invite the nation to your next focus group. TeleFocu$ is a reg=stered trademark ol Te,'eSess~on Cctporal~on, I%'f. I~Y ¢: 1.c290. ZZ.C-I2-]02A December. 1990 CJ~ NO. 81 6 on R~d er Ca,.,-d 33 T108571074
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A common sense approach to dialing costs by Dale Kulp and Amy Starer Editor's note: Dale Kulp is president of, and Amy Starer is director of salesl marketh~g for, Marketing Systems Group, developers of the GENESYS sampling system. over the past few months we here at Marketing Systems Group have been amused at the esti- mates of"dialing costs" quoted in ads and published in trade magazines. We felt this subject was long overdue for an in- jection of reality and common sense. It could be, of course, that the person who developed those estimates had little or no data collection background, had an axe to grind, or possibly, their calculator just malfunctioned. Nonetheless if it re- ally costs these phantom research firms $.69, let alone $.90, to dial a non-working number, we suggest they have some seri- ous internal problems. What makes us think we have any better handle on these costs? Well, our staff has over sixty years of experience in market and survey research, including data collection at some large interview- ing facilities. We have also consulted with a number of WATS managers to arrive at a reasonable consensus on the cost of dialing non-working and other non-productive numbers. Those unfamiliar with data collection might be unaware of or confused about some very basic facts: 34 1) There are productive and non-pro- ductive portions of an interviewing hour. Averaging the "total cost" over just the unproductive part of the hour grossly inflates the "cost per dialing," producing unrealistic and unobtainable "savings." 2) There is a big difference between the selling price of a WATS hour, and the direct internal cost. Averaging the "mar- gin" into costs will also overstate the cost per dialing and potential savings. 3) "Non-productive dialings" are not all the same. Some involve only inter- viewer labor, others incur both labor and phone charges. The point is that one can easily inflate the costs associated with unproductive dialings by 300 to 400%, if that is the objective. Why our concern with dialing costs? We have invested significant effort in evaluating the costs associated with dial- ing non-productive sample. Just accept- ing grossly inflated estimates might make our job easier, but it wouldn't do much for our firm's reputation. The following paragraphs will focus on two methods to estimate the savings one can reasonably expect from eliminat- ing non-working numbers (i.e., the num- ber of interviewer hours actually saved by not having to dial non-working num- bers). Since there are various methods used in estimating the number of data collection hours required, our approaches may not exactly match yours. However, our common sense approaches are fairly generic and should be applicable to any operation. The first method, used quite frequently to estimate the required number of inter- viewing hours, employs a standard known as an "effective interviewing hour." Ba- sically this is an estimate of the average number of minutes in each hour that in- terviewers actually spend administering questionnaires. A consensus of research firms indi- cates that a 25 minute interviewing hour is generally applicable for RDD house- hold samples, while a 28 minute hour is a reasonable benchmark for a good list- based household sample. The basic dif- ference between these samples of course is the relative absence of non-working numbers in the latter. A strong case can then be made that the difference in the "effective interviewing hours" is due to this absence of non- workings in listed samples. One can then reasonably conclude that approximately three minutes of each interviewing hour is spent dialing these non-working num- bers. In other words, if it were possible to identify and remove all non-working numbers, one could expect a maximum savings of about 12% in the interviewer hours required on any RDD sample project. A hypothetical 100 interviewing hour project would then require just 88 hours. But, what does this 12 hour savings really represent? The hours "saved'" by not dial- ing non-working numbers have not de- C..drk's Marketing ResearchReview T!08571075
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creased any Iinc charges--phone costs do not accrue for dialing non-working or disconnected numbers. Assuming your imervie'~,ers am ~ $7,50 [~ ho~ i~- cluding benefits, your actual, direct "sav- ings" could to~al $90.00. A second method of assessing "sav- ings" would be to develop a dialing rate per hour just for non-working numbers. This is very difficult to do in practice since interciewers arc not normally dial- ing just non-working numbers for any extended period of time. However, there is again, a common sense approach to the dialing rate problem: How many dialings are made per hour? This will vary by study andproject, but a conservative estimate is about 30. If we again assume that 25 minutes out of each hour is actually spent interviewing, we are left with another 25 minutes of time spent on the phone. In other words, inter- viewers spend about 25 minutes inter- viewing live fiouseholds, and another 25 minutes finding those respondents. What if interviewers spent no time interview- ing and spent the entire 50 minutes just "dialing?" Would the dialing rate double to 60 per hour? Probably not, but a rea- sonable assumption might be 50 dialings per hour, or about one per minute. If we use the 50 per hour dialing rate and $7.50 per hour for interviewer wages, each non-working number eliminated or, not dialed, would "save" about $.15 in direct interviewer cost. Going back to the first method, we estimated a potential cost savings of 12 hours and about $90.00 for that 100 hour project. If we again assume that the aver- age dialing rate would have been 30 per hour, the project would have required about 3,000 total dialings (100 hours X 30 dialings per hour), of which roughly 600 of those dialings resulting in non- working numbers, again the result is a direct cost of $0.15 for each dialing. Eliminating non-working numbers does not decrease line costs, but one might argue that we should include supervisor, hiring, training, administration and sell- ing costs in estimating the total savings. Let's assume the real cost per WATS or interviewer hour is $16.00---thc actual cost, not selling price. If we deduct $3.00 per hour for phone charges, we are left with $13.00, or just $0.26 per dialing. Decerrd3er, 1990 Of course, there ~*re also indirect ben- efits resulting from increased productiv- ity: it may mean less overflow work, morn projects comt~ed on time, aud, assuming a constant workload, 10% fewer interviewers, or 10% greater capacity. It should be quite clear that there are significant benefits and savings possible by eliminating non-working numbers from RDD samples. However, one must be wary of non-researchers' naive as- sessments of "costs and savings." Using a marked-up selling price and dividing by an average dialing rate will of course wovide a cost per dialing---an inflated and meaningless cost. but acost nonethe- less. So .the ~ext t~ mmaeorte tries to te|l you that a"reasonable" cost per dialing is $0.90 or even $0.69, you might want to question their motivations. Using a low estimateof30 dialings perhour, the "cost" of dialing non-productive numbers is ei- ther $27.00 or $21.00 per hour. Every company in the industry must be losing money; by their logic the "costs" of just the unproductive dialings is equal to or greater than the going WATS hourrate.~l Why only test the water in Maryland, when you can net the entire nation? TeleFocus'-a better way to run focus groups. A focus group in just one area may give you a very narrow view. Wouldn't it be better to get the full range of attitudes, opinions, and verba[ims that more accurately represents the big picture? With TeleFocus-focus groups by phone-you can. The telephone setting provides our highly skilled moderators with a more relaxed, less formal environ- ment, allowing them to provoke spirited interaction, probe interesting ideas, and elicit more candid responses. TeleFocus works-for concept evaluation, ad testing, attitude studies, or basic product research, at a significant savings over face-to-face groups. Catch us at (212) 599-1500. TeleFocus. Invite the nation to your next focus group. TeleFocus is a registered trademark of Te~oSession Ce~poration. NY. NY ~ 1990 ZZO-12-102C Circle No. 817 o~ Reade~ Card 35 T!08571076
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Research Dollars continued from p. 25 from an industry specialization. There are firms that specialize in focus groups or telephone surveys while others con- centrate on a particular analytical tech- nique such as perceptual mapping or fac- tor analysis. Given their specialization, a research firm may define your problem from that perspective. Pre-packaged solutions can offer the client a research methodology, a ques- tionnaire, or analytical techniques that have already been tested and, hopefully. refinedbasedon experience. Certain types of questionnaires or test instruments also mat have reliability statistics ~;soca'a*ed with them. The disadvantage is that a pre- determined solution may besupefimposed on your particular marketing information needs. With customized research, the meth- odology, questionnaire and analytical techniques are designed to meet the client's research objectives and specific informational needs. Certainly, one of the advantages is that suppliers can be Take advantage of Herron's... Accuracy. Because we pay attention ~ll~l~to detail, we give you the information you need ~ for complete, informed decisions. And because our research and analysis of the data collected is done in-house, you are assured of complete confidentiality. Speed. We utilize state-of-the-art ~~ electronic equipment in- 2 system for computerized interviewing at our mall locations and phone center. You get accurate facts, fast. Knowledge. We don't leave anything to chance. Our in- depth, comprehensive research helps you go to market with confidence. And, you can make changes in your existing marketing strategy knowing that every avenue has been explored. Herron Associates offers the same marketing re- search services found at larger agencies. But, we do it more accurat ely, quicker, and smarter. Before you begin, or continue, your marketing data collection, call Herron. ~Herron Associates, Inc. Market research in the Indianapolis area Markel research...the right wa); since 1958 710 Executive Park Drive • Greenwood, IN 46143 317-882-3800 • Ea,.X: 317-88"2-4716 36 CircleNo~18 on ReaderCard more flexible in their approach to the client's marketing research problem. Without pre-conceived ideas, there is more opermess to create a stud~y tha~ matches the client's requirements. Cus- tomized research, however, will require the supplier to develop a new survey instrumcnt, requiting a pro-rest and more time. 4. General questions about qualification. There are some general questions that every supplier should be asked to deter- mine the stability of the company, their reputation and the qualifications of those persons who will work on the study, All of these areas are important to the success of the research. The following are the basic questions that should be asked when selecting a vendor. • How long has the supplier been in business? Do descriptions of previous and current work indicate the firm has stability and- an adequate reserve of re- sources and personnel? Does the firm demonstrate the ability to deliver results on-time and on-budget? • For what other companies has the client conducted marketing research? Does the client list contain companies that are similar to yours--in terms of industry, sales volume, or marketing is- sues? • What are the academic backgrounds and experience of those persons who will play a key role in the research project-- the project manager, field manager, and data tabulations analyst? Is the knowl- edge and expertise of the project team sufficient to complete all aspects of the research? • Does the composition of the project team strike the fight balance between top-level management and technical re- searchers and analysts? Has the firm as- signed a project director to the team? Does the project director have manage- ment experience? • Does the success of the project de- pend on the capabilities of the subcon- tractor'?. If subcontracting is necessary. Qt~irk's Marketing ReseaychReview T1085710T'/
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has Re supplier identified this other along with its qualifications? • Wh~t qt~aIity control procedures has the firm proposed to ensure an acceptable product? As part of the screening process, pro- spective suppliers should provide a list of references. Before hiring a new firm, it is essential to check those references. As a client, I once made the mistake of not contacting references due to time con- straints. Unfortunately, the project expe- rienced problems that could have been avoided had I done my homework. After the fact, I called the supplier's references only to find that the companies had expe-_ rienced similar problems with the re- search firm. 5. Quality control The reliability of the results will de- pend on the quality control measures that the supplier institutes to ensure the reli- ability, accuracy, and consistency of the data. Additionally, procedures should be implemented to reduce nonrespondent bias. If telephone interviews are being con- ducted, for example, the following type of quality control measures would ensure more accurate, reliable, and consistent data. 1. Callbacks. Some suppliers may not as a standard practice call back respon- dents who are not available when initially contacted. By not doing callbacks, the supplier may be introducing certain nonresponse biases into the sample. For example, if consumers are called only during weekday evenings and not on the weekends, you may exclude persons who tend to work late or who have a lot of activities planned after work during the week. Two or three callbacks are a fairly standard procedure to reduce nonresponse bias. 2. Supervisor/Interviewer Ratio. A high supervisor to interviewer ratio (i.e.. one to five) ensures that each interviewer's work will be monitored for accuracy and consistency throughout the project. Such monitoring can reduce interviewer bias, i.e., interviewers rephrasing questions, creating their own scripts, etc. 3. Validation. If interviewers are not monitored on a continual basis, then the supplier might validate up to 15% of the interviews to verify key .qae~i~ns. Tlds ensures the reliability and correctness of the data. Although this is not a comprehensive list of quality control procedures, it does provide examples of how a supplier can increase the quality of the information being collected. Before hiring a supplier, the client should understand what, if any, safeguards are in place to guarantee reli- able data. Conclusion Getting the most from your research dollar requ'tre~ identifying and pr~'ofitiz- ing informational needs and reviewing past studies and secondary research. If hiring a supplier is appropriate, then the client shouId check the references and qualifications of the project team. Al- though the process may seem time-con- suming, it increases the likelihood of obtaining the best data for the lowest COSt. [~ Why just cross the Golden .Gate, When you can span ti e nation? TeleFocus*-a better way to run focus groups. Single-city focus groups may give you a very narrow view. Wouldn't it be better to get the full range of attitudes, opinions, and verbatims that more accurately represents the big picture? With TeleFocus-focus groups by phone-you can. TeleFocus gives you everything you want from a focus group-plus access to participants nationwide and the ability for you to listen in from anywhere in the country. TeleFocus works-for concept evaluation, ad testing, attitude studies, or basic product research, at a significa nt savings over face-to-face groups. Catl us at (212) 599-1500. TeleFocus. Invite the nation to your next focus group. TeieFocu~ is a registered trademark of TeteSes~ion Co~'poral-o-. NY. ~',IY © 1.o::3.0 ZZO-LO2F December. "1990 37 T!08571078
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Observing continued from p. 30 style of hair or cosmetics, sexual prefer- ences, regional dialect, etc. • Respondents may be judged because they do not: --meet the internal criteria present in the mind of the observer --fit the expectations of the observer. Moderators (we also judge respondents) have learned to work under a guideline called unconditional positive regard (UPR). This guideline enables us to fully interact with respondents, regardless of Finaii]6 A Stat Package That Knows Who's Boss. StatPac Gold is a well-behaved software package for surveys and marketing research. It's fast, accurate, reliable, user-friendly and comprehensive. Basic tabs and advanced statistics with graphics. Compare. Nothing else comes close. Call Now: (612) 866-9022 Ask for our free report on Designing Better Questionnaires. StatPac Inc. 6500 Nicollet Ave. S. Minneapolis, MN 55423 .~a~ac ~s a ~tc~d tr-adema~k o; ~atFbc Inc. Circle N o~?.0 on Reader Card our dislike of their looks, speech, atti- tude, level of participation in the group, etc., as long as they are answering the questiot~s po~d and helping reach the intended purpose of the study. It would be ideal if client observers could also master UPR in the observation process and allow respondents to took the way they look, sound the way they sound, and express themselves without being judged as worthy or unworthy. How would you sound in a group dis- cussion about a brand new idea or prod- uct that had just been presented to you five minutes earlier? 12. Watch non-verbal behavior. Look for congruence be.tween what is said and how the respondent looks. Do not "label" non-verbal behavior or attach external meanings. Example: a respon- dent crosses her arms across her chest and leans away from the table as another respondent talks about a sensitive issue. Whatdoes her non-verbal behavior mean? It could mean discomfort with the con- versation. It could mean disapproval of the other respondent for having a differ- ent point of view and/or for speaking at all about the topic. It could mean an old back injury has flared up an crossing the arms relieves some of the ache. It could mean the yogurt she had before the ses- sion is now giving her gas. Because of the wide range of "pos- sible" explanations that exist, simply note the behavior and see if verbal comments are made that provide an insight to the "stance" taken. 13. Make notes. During the discussion process make notes for yourself that will be useful to you in the future. Avoid the following: a. Intruding on the observation and note taking process of others by kibitz- ing, chatting laughing at (not with) re- spondents. b. Demeaning the comments of re- spondents because of speech, demeanor, dress, lifestyle, income, race, age or de- gree of education. c. Judging respondents by your set of standards and expectations. Relationship with the facility: 14. Stay in the observation room (s) during the research process. Try to remain inside the observation room(s) during the full period of the in- terview. Repeated door openings allow respondents to: a. See backlighted silhouettes of ob- servers, b. Be reminded that the mirror is two- way. 15. Consider the facility staff as professionals. Take the work of the facility seriously. Treat the staff as research colleagues, not as maids, porters, or servants. The facil- ity is a place of business...not a club, bar or recreation room. The facility is not a restaurant; if you have a special food request, please ask for it in advance, not on site. 16. Do not abuse the rental agreement that the moderator has with the facility. Avoid the following: a. Calling long distance without using your credit card or calling collect. b. Leaving research papers or "trash" generated during the observati.on process strewn about the viewing room at the end of the research session. - c. Arriving more than one hour before the group or staying more than one hour after the last group (without prior agree- ment for either with the facility manager). Relationship wilh the moderator 17. Meet with the moderator one hour before the group and work out "agreements.'" Be sure the moderator is clear about any changes wanted since the time of your last conversation with him/her. Work out how the following will be handled: • Maximum number of notes to be sent into the moderator. (Suggestion: send no notes into the room during the first 30 minutes to allow the moderator time to build rapport. Exception: If you want a respondent excused...send the note as early as possible.) Send no more than two notes during the whole session (see "false close" below). • Approximate time of "false close." The standard practice for the industry is to set the false close at about 15 minutes before the scheduled end time of the sessions. During the false close the fol- lowing events take place: --Moderator excuses self with com- ment: "I have to step out for a moment. While I'm gone, please do the follow- ing...'" --Participants complete some task as- signed by the moderator. (The task should take 5 minutes to complete.) -- Moderator visits with one client spokesperson to obtain additional written questions observers want asked of re- spondents. (Recommendation: print and number the questions so the moderator can read quickly. Remember. the mod- Ouirk's Marketing ResearchReview T!08571079
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"Thank You. "I w~s concerned %..v~ ~omu~, d~, comp~i~ ~d ~" ":..~ 2 ~ end" Ie~l. ~e d~s ~ ~ ~d lob of ~t~g ~u~ p~tiOn." tcrestcd:' "~ ~owl¢~1¢ but h~Ic able ~ d~iy c~ He • • • 'Taa~ you.. :' "...nc~dy e_]iKdJ~tcd j;zl~on without ~o'iffcin~ Lu~dcrst~JId~ o[ key conccpt~" "He gets a lot of information across in a short lxriod of time and it is information that car, Ix put to practical urn" "I really ,--joyed tl~ oae." "Very well done, veO, helpful, thorough, "1 expected too much "TechnicaltStatisdcal" emphasis and,Or a boring ~peaker. Neither one ~was true" '"l~e SlnZ~er makes :you ttak~ volved ha dBcussion& Real, live examples keep the sembzar lntcresttag:' "'rdcwm to my job." "...not only stimulating intcllcaually, bm refreshing:' "Real-world applications. Not ]lust th¢oryl" "g,~t ~zcks!" Thank Yo ! We think you are terrific, too. It is your participation and support that helped us launch our first seminars. We couldn't have done it without you. We made many new friends this yeac And we want to make more next year. Hope to see you in 1991: Contemporary Marketing Research Techniques and Methods Los Angeles Feb. 12- 14 Washington, DC April 22 - 24 Applications and Benefits of Research in Developing Marketing Strategy Washington, DC March 12,13 San Francisco May 22,23 Applied Multivariate Techniques for Strategic Data Analysis Chicago Feb. 26 - 28 Washington, DC May 14- 16 Effective Techniques for Analyzing and Interpreting Marketing Research Data San Francisco Jan. 29 - 31 Washington, DC April 2 - 4 Dr. Gaumv Bhalla, Vice President Analytical and Consulting Services The Wirthlin Group 1363 Beverly Road Mclean. Virginia 22101 Questionnair.e Design and Effective Washington, DC March 20, 21 Data Collection Techniques ..,,.San Diego June 11,12 ..~.,~-[~ I.~wV'~ ~ 1 would like more information on your ~ 2{ ~-")') I ~ .L l~ 0 sem.iam" program. Please send me your I~(Th ~ Wir~hlin ~rn,,n~ I brochure md registration materials. T~ , Decision Maldng Infornlaffon for Intelligent Choices.I I Tid~ Phone I I I City I Or call Ms. Marian Ckidchdla at 14300-3324621. C~rc~21 December. 1L~2O TWG T108571080
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eramr is coming from a bd=~mly lit room to a dark one, and it is very difficult to read in that situation.) --Moderator returns to the room and asks additional questions. Remember 18. The two-way m#'ror in a wall is almost impossible to soundproof. The following sounds transfer easily to respondents: • Clattering cutlery, plates and glasses • Tearing sheets from note pads • Laughter • Moving furniture (rocking back and forth in ~ chak bamdles lmrr~ing into writing counters, etc.) • Rhythmic tapping (e.g., foot against wall, pencil on countertop, etc.) 19. Qualitative research is intended to provide clients with a variety of outcomes. a. Range of responses from varied groups of respondents b. Insights into the thinking of a person either in groups or individually c. Exploration of issues in detail with- out coming to closure in any one inter- view or group experience If marketing is warfare, then marketing research is an intelligence operation. That's why The Roper Organization developed the Custom Intelligence Account. To g~ve you the intelligence you need in a form you can use. What kind of intelligence? Consumer attitudes, values, lifestyles. Purchase preferences and intentions. Shopping habits and behavior. Market trends. Emerging market segments. How is this intelligence clelivered? Targeted memos. Special reports. Segmented data runs. Custom presentations. Con- suiting services Whatever form fits your tactical needs. L~ke all good tntelligence opera- tions. Roper's CIA has a very reliable source: ROPER REPOR'rS. The ROPER REPORTS database holds the results to 160 marketing surveys conducted since 1973. More than a quarter of a million personal interviews. The answers to tens of thousands of questions. It's the most comprehensive source of marketing intelligence available. And the Custom Intelli- gence Account provides un- matched support and flexibility to meet your strategic objectives. So let the CIA help you win the most important battle: for the mind of the American consumer. ROPER REPORTS The C,tstorn Intelligence Advantage The Roper C~'gaP~abon Inc. 205 East 42nd Street New York, NY 10017 1.212) 599-0700 40 d. Re~:tion after "exposure" ~ con- cepts, products, ideas, ads, etc. 20. Do not ~rpect to be entertained. The research process, while some- times i,~stk-~g ~ov~eb, is not imd~l to be entertainment. The following range of events may occur during observation of focus groups or IDI's: • boredom •excitement • anger - joy • sadness -enthusiasm • frustration •creation • disappointment •enlightenment • distraction -attentiveness 21. Qualitative research is not brain surgery. It's real people providing their points of view about products, services, ideas, concepts or advertising. Sometimes it's funny: ("The Census Bureau knows from its data banks how much liquor we drink.") Sometimes it's sad:-~"I never expected to be a widow at 34...I thought Charlie and I would be married forever.") It can be tiresome or enervating or exciting and enlivening. However the process goes, it's always about people. You have a :'window" into the lives of respondents. Enjoy the view!l~ Universities continued from p. 33 their management practices. We teach application to the marketing management issue at hand.'" There are other problems. There ap- pears robe a lack of students interested in a career in marketing research. There are more internships available than there are students to fill these positions. Rosann Spiro, vice president of marketing educa- tion for the American Marketing Asso- ciation, says. "There needs to be more involvement in promoting the academic programs and the career itself. This can help create an adequate supply of stu- dents." Another concern among industry ob- servers is that a select few companies have dominated the internship alliances with the universities. This has cut down the number of choices for research stu- dents and has also hurt employers inter- ested in offering internships. Still the new marketing research aca- demic programs are providing employers with betterqualified research profession- als who have the practical knowledge necessary for a successful career in mar- keting research. The demand is being met. Now it's time to work on increasing the supply of prospective researchers.IS] Ouirk's Marketing ResearchRev~ew T!08571081
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December. 1990 TM What GENESYS ID Will Do • IDentify up to 50% of the non- " productive phone numbers in RDD samples • IDentify Disconnected, Business, Non-working, Fax and Modem numbers in RDD samples • Increase data collection productivity by at least 10% • Reduce data collection costs What GENESYS ID Won't Do • Ring every household in your sample • Alienate households through in~usive pre-data collectiofi calls • Interfere with the statistical validity of your sample • Cost you more than it's worth dentifies connect GENESYS ID is a process that takes any generated RDD sample and IDentifies Disconnected, Business, Non-working, Fax and Modem numbers (but not households) prior to the Data Collection Phase. GENESYS ID is not a predictive dialer, but rather a proprietary software and database system, engineered from the PC board level up, to specifically IDentify disconnected and non-working numbers. The distinction may at first appear trivial, since a predictive or power dialer based service will identify non-working numbers. However, the predictive dialer will also screen and ring into every household in your sample...GENESYS ID will not. GENESYS ID is available on a Custom Order Basis or the PC-based GENESYS ID system can be installed at your location (giving you in-house capabilities). For More Information, Call The Marketing Systems Group -- (215) 521-6747 Scott Plaza II • Suite 630 • Philadelphia, PA 19013 GENF_SYS and GENESYS ]O are trademarks of the Marke~ag S.~ stems Group C~de No. ~3 or: I:=l~r Card 41 T!08571082
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Respondent Reasons continued from p. 19 to other time commitments. The actual time on the phone was easy. Everyone had some opinions on all of the topics. What did take some time was to try to get the cross representation that was needed in the group. It was a challenging group to recruit and actually went quite fast." Actual session Nine people came to the unpaid session; eleven came to the paid session. For the unpaid session there were some cancel- lations. One woman cancelled because she was going to be out of town; one cancelled because she an opportunity to work and since the group was not paid, she chose to work; one cancelled because she could not get a baby sitter. A total of eleven people were expected. There were two no shows: one of whom had done at least six groups in the past (and was on their"dead meat" list.) For the paid session, twelve were confirmed. The woman who did not attend had been in an accident earlier in the day and totaled her car. She called and said she would still try to come, but she did not make it. Three people were recruited from the lists provided and two people participated in each of the sessions, Other demograph- ics of the two groups: Men 3 4 Working women 1 4 Nonwork~ng women (includes 2 retired women) 5 3 Ret~red 4 2 25 to 35 2 36 to 45 0 I 46 to 55 2 5 56 to 65 2 1 Ovar 65 3 3 $16,000 to $25,000 4 3 $26,000 to $35.000 2 1 $35,000 to $50,000 2 4 Over $50.000 1 3 High school graduate 2 0 Some college 3 Colle~a graduate 3 5 POSt graduate 1 2 1st time participant 2 1-2 groups previously 3 4 34, groups pre~iously 4 3 5-6 gtoup~ previously 0 1 S=x plus previously 0 2 It appears that there is a greater propensity to participate in an unpaid group among those who are 45 and over. It may be that these people have less time pressures and they may be more likely to want to "give back." Note that there are quite a few retirees who participated in the unpaid session. (Phase III will examine willingness to participate in groups without being paid by age and other demographics.) Not surprisingly, the more groups participants had done, the less likely they were to participate in a focus group without being paid. In fact, none of the unpaid people had participated in more than 4 groups previously. This substantiates the quan- titative findings of Phase I. There was some concern that the paid group would be a better group as compared to the unpaid group. However, there was no real difference in the quality of the two groups. In both groups, people came primarily because of the topics being discussed. Both sessions lasted nearly two hours each. Items discussed 42 included: • the environment; • savings & loan situation; • h'¢a~,h eon~m~ (ch~smmt)/l~eB~g, e~, • surveys in general and then specifically: the census, tele- phone surveys, mail surveys, mall surveys and focus groups. Since some of these topics could be of interest to the media, all of the participants were asked to sign releases at the end of the session, These releases gave permission for them to be quoted by name in the media. Interestingly, all of the people in the unpaid group signed. Eight of the people in the paid session signed, one signed with a restriction about quoting anything about her health or her son and two did not sign. Most of the unpaid people in the session knew they were not being paid. Some had assumed that they would be paid. How- ever, there were no complaints from anyone. The people in the paid group were given an opportunity to not be paid for the session, but all of the participants decided to accept the gratuity. Participants in both sessions discussed-how they felt about participating in focus groups: - 1 like to hear what otherpeople think and'hope a lot of them think the same way I do... I enjoy it a lot. - It is very stimulating. - 1 think it makes us feel good that someone wants to know what our thoughts are. - Gives a sense of self-importance because everyone wants their opinions to be important. Something like this that you are getting paid to be here for can really validate that sense of self- importance. My opinion is so important they paid me to be here. Reasons for coming to session: - It was the topic, because when I was calledshejust gave me a run down of the things we wouM discuss and when she asked about the savings and loan, l just started talking... 1 was so opinionated. - This is the third one that I have attended here and I enjoyed the previous two. The previous ones were quite a bit different, but 1 am happy that ! came this evening. - Because I have participated in perhaps eight or ten of them before. They have all been very interesting. I go home with a sense of maybe I have contributed something. These topics are so high profile today in the newspapers, television. The>, got my attention immediately... I am retired and it is a change of pace. I am close. - I like discussions like this. That was my main reason. I like people. - Money. - I know how valuable the information is to thepeople who use it. l feel that every time that I have the chance to participate, I should. I know that agencies like yours go to a lot of trouble to find people who can express their opinions and go through these things. I will tell everybody here that I guarantee that they will all listen to everything that is said here. Participants were asked how to get people to come to focus group sessions: - We were kind of skeptical atfirst. I know thefirst time I was invited to come, I didn't come. I guess partly I wasn't sure they were legit; you have that concern in the back of your mind. - Exacdy who is doing this? Is this really okay to be doing this? Is it legal? At that point it was - "'Come on this night attd Quirk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571083
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we will pay yo~ so muck money in cash..." Are you allowed to do that? ... 1knew it was in Worthington, but I wash " t sure, was it some back door, garage? - It always hel~s ~fyou mention nmney. - The one I came to was about mayonnaise and I wouldn't come to discuss mayonnaise for nothing. I wouldn't leave my family. My husband works quite a bit and our time together is vetT valuable and in order to get me to come to discuss mayonnaise, you are going to have to reward me for that. Tonight, I thought it was more the topic; I felt it was important and I was glad someone was.finally going to ask my opinion. The people in these groups were told that often people who have participated in quite afew focus group sessions were often screened out of focus groups. Some reactions: - They would probably get a better discussion from people who have been here before, because they are not going to be afraid to voice their opinions. - 1 don't see how anyone could become professional Unless it was once every week, then you wouM really get a knack. Participants in the unpaid session were asked what they thought about participating in a session without being paid: - ! think it is real nice and I can't see if anybody had the time why they wouldn't do it because I think it is interesting and fun and nice. I would do it again. - Well, I. would think twice before coming down knowing that I wouldn't getpaid, but it_a_'ould depend o~t my schedule, if I could work it in and if l knew the material was about the same we talked about that affects federal and state governments maybe where I needed to get my two cents in. It all depends on the situation. experiences and inmmst in participating in research definit~Iy contribute to a person's willingness to be part of a session. It is information like this (from Phases I and II) which can help in setting the costs of incentive fees. It can also he an aid in recruiting. Additional phases of this research will continue to investigate respondents" motivations and the focus group experience. Phase III is scheduled to start in 1991 and will be a larger survey of focus group participants. It will be a quantitative study to determine (and/or confirm) the reasons people decide to participate in research. Companies which are interested in participating in this study or which have comments or sugges- tions should contact the author at Rodgers Marketing Research, 4575 Edwin Drive, NW, Canton, OH 44718, or at 216-492- 8880. 121 The author wishes to thank the Field Committee of the Qualitative Research Consultants Association for their strong support and encour- agement dutingthis research and Bob Harris of JRH Marketing for his comments and suggestions. This research was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA). QRCA is a not-for profit professional organization of consultants representing more than 300 research firms in 30 states, Canada, and Latin America. Its principal objectives are advancing the professional- ism of qualitative research consulting, communicating the importance of the independent consultant's role in qualitative marketing.research and bringing qualitative consultants together in a strong interdependent community. For more information, ca11212.3 ~ 5-0632 or write QRCA, P. O. Box 6767, FDR Station, New York, NY 10022. Summary To summarize, it is possible to do a focus group without paying respondents. However, willingness to participate with- out being paid is probably topic related. It can be expected then, thal few people would be willing to come to a session without being paid unless the topic is one in which they are quite interested. Clearly, it is probably wise to do just about all focus groups with paid respondents. The risks of no-shows, etc. are too high. However, this experience does offer some potential for modera- tors and facilities to cooperate to do low cost research on issues of importance which would not otherwise be done. That is, a moderator and a facility could donate time and effort to a project (maybe community issues or homelessness, teenage preg- nancy, drug abuse, or education issues) and recruit respondents who would not be paid. This gives all of us -- moderators, facilities and respondents -- an opportunity to participate in philanthropic projects. Naturally, this research must not take the place of research that would ordinarily be paid! Most importantly, from the viewpoint of moderators and facilities alike, is the finding that while money is an important consideration, it is not everything. This is especially good news for researchers. After all, many of us have long hoped that people are sharing their opinions with us not just because they are being paid. Given concerns about increasing research costs, this finding can be especially helpful. While it is important to offer a remuneration to get people to come to a group, there are other "hooks" that can be included. The subject matter, previous December. 1990 43 T108571084
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QUALITATIVE RESEARCH/FOCUS GROUP MODERATORS LLsted below are names of companies spedalizing in focus groups. Included are con~ct personnel, addresses and phone numbers. Companies arelisted alphabetically and are a}so classified by state and specialty foryour convenience~ Contact publisher for listing rates: Quirk's Marketin~g Research Review, P. O. Box 2.K536, Minneapol~ NfiN155423. 6.12/861-805I. Access Research, Inc. 8 Griffin Rd. No. Windsor, CT 06095 203/688-8821 Contact: Robert C. Platkin Group Health/Pens. P/C, AIc. Bev/Food, 15 min Airpt. ADI Research, Inc. (See Matrixx Marketing) Alpha Research Associates, Inc. 395 Smith Street Providence, RI 02908 401 / 861-3400 Contact: Anthony Pesaturo Fu//SvcQua//Quan.Ana/ysis./ Consltg&MktRes/Since 1976 AmericanPublk~ Opinion Survey & Market Research Corp. 1324 South Minnesota Ave. Sioux Falls, SD 57105 605i338-3918 Contact: Warren R. Johnson Established 1960---Fu/I Service Group--National & Intemat'/ Analytics, Inc. 999 N. Etrnhurst Rd., Stes. 15/16 Mr. Prospect, IL 60056 - -708/870-1973 - Contact: Larry Kaufman Since 1972, moderated and analyzed over2,000 groups The Answer Group 11161 Kenwocd Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45242 5131489-9000 Contact: Madbeth McGraw Consumer, HealthCare, Prof., Focus Groups, One- On-Ones The Atlantis Group 342 Fourth St. At[ante. GA 30308 404/577-8000 Contact: Charles Bazemore The difference is in the moderat- ing and the reports Barrels Research, Corp. 145 Shaw Ave., Ste. C-1 Clovis, CA 93612 Contact: Laura Wasserman Qual/Quant. Rsch. , FIG Rctg. Mod. faciL 25 yrs. exper. Brand Consulting Group 17117 W.Nine Mile Rd./Ste. 1020 Southfield, MI 48075 313/559-2100 Contact: Milton Brand Consumer, Advertising Strategy, New Product Strategy Research Carlson Research Company Cartson Parkway-Box 59159 Minneapolis, MN 55459-8211 612/449-2526 Contact: Allan Floyd Full Service Customized Busi- ness/Consumer Research Chamberlain Research Consultant., 12 East Olin Ave. Madison, WI 53713 608F258-3666 Contact: Sharon Chamberlain Full-service marketing research. Business & consumer studies Clarion Marketing and Comm. 340 Pemberwick Road Greenwich, CT 06831 2O3 / 531-3600 Contact: Thomas L. Greenbaum Clarion Offers Unique Approach To Groups; Ca//to Find Out Why Cleveland Field Resources, Inc. 6501 Wilson Mills Rd., Suite J Cleveland, OH 44143 216/473-994-1 Contact: Daniel McCafferty Modem Facilities on East & West Sides of Cleveland Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Suite 102, 3OEliot Lane Stamford, CT 06903 2031322-0083 Contact: Saul Cohen Specializing in All Qualitative Methodologies Concepts In Marketing Research 400 North Robert St. Saint Paul, MN 55101-2098 612 / 228-5667 Contact: Carolyn Ruble .Fac/ln,depth 1-on-l~s:-exec, reed, cons/Topline reporting Consumer Opinion Services 12825-I st Ave. South Seattle, WA 98168 206/241-6050 Contact: Jerry Carter Consumer, Business Groups and One-On-Ones Creative Marketing Solutions, Inc. P.O. Box 487 Lahaska, PA 18931 215/357-3655 Contact: Larry Schwarz Experienced Specialists in Qualitative Research Techniques Creative Research Associates,Inc. 500 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 60611 312/828-9200 Contact: Stephen Turner Twenty-Five '(ears of Leadership in Qualitative Research Cunninghis Associates 43 Middleton Lane Willingboro, NJ 08046 609/877-5971 Contact: Butt Cunninghis 37 Years Exp., Moderator & Moderator Training Decision Research 99 Hayden Ave. Lexington, MA 02173 617/861-7350 Contact: Peg Marrkand Over 25 Mods. Avail., Bus/Cons Grps., Offcs: NY, LA,SF, Atlanta DeNicola Research, Inc. Two Landmark Square Stamford, CT 06901 203/967-3595 Contact: Nino DeNicola Consumer, Healthcare, Financial Services. Advertising Direct Marketing Research Assoc. 4151 Middlefield Rd., Suite 200 Palo Alto, CA 94302 4151856-9988 Contact: Michael Green Catalog, Direct Mail, Bus-to-Bus, Space, Databases Dolobowsky Qual. Svcs., Inc. 94 Lincoln St. Waltham MA 02154 617/647-0872 Contact: Reva Dolobowsky Experts In Ideation & locus groups. Formerly with Synectics. Doyle Research Associates,Inc. 919N. Michigan/Ste. 3208 Chicago, IL 60611 312/944-4848 Contact: Kath/een M..Doyle Specialty:Children/Teenagers Concept&Product Evaluations Equi~ax I Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 5430 Van Nuys Blvd., #102 Van Nuys, CA 91401 213 / 872-1717 Contact: Louise Kroot-Haukka Consumer/Pkg Goods/Advertising Heavy Experience in Fast Food First Market Research Corp. 1111 W. 6th Street, Suite 220 Austin, T× 78703 800 / FIRST-TX (347-7889) Contact: James R. Heiman ~igh Tech, Publishing, us-To-Bus, Colleges First Market Research Corp. 121 Beach St. Boston, MA 02111 61.7/482-9080 Contact: Linda M. Lynch Consumer. Retail, Banking, Health Care Focus America 1140 Ave. of the Americas, 9th FI New York. NY 10036 212/302-1808 Contact: David Schreier Mid-Manhattan Loci State of the Art Fac. / 15 Seat Viewing Room Focus Plus 79 5th Avenue New York, NY 10003 212/807-9393 Contact: Elizabeth Lobrano Impeccable Cons. & B-B Recruiting/BeautifuL Facilities D.S, Fraley & Associates 1205 East Madison Park Chicago, IL 60615 31 2/536-2670 Contact: Diane S. Fraley Full QuaL Specialty:Child/Teen / In-Home/Observational Rsch Gilmore Research Group 2324 Eastlake Ave. E., Ste. 300 Seattle, WA 98102 206/726-5555 Contact: Michelle Zerbetz Exp. prof. moderators to meet yo~, research needs Greenfield Consulting Group,Inc. 274- Riverside Ave. Westport, CT 06880 2031221-0411 Contact: Andrew Greenlie[d QuaL/Quan. Rsch. New Product Dev., Finc Svcs, Toys/Games Grieco Research Group, Inc. 743 North Avenue 68 Los Angeles, CA 90042 2131254-1990 Contact: Joe Greico Marketing and Advertising Focus Groups Hammer Marketing Resources 179 Inverness Rd. Severna Park, MD 21146 301/544-9.191 Contact: William L. Hammer New Product, Consumer & I4dust- rial/Commercia~,Executive Hispanic Marketing Communication Research 1535 Winding Way Belmont, CA 94002 415/595-5028 Contact: Dr. Fe/ipe Korzenny Hisp.- Bi/ing./Bicu/t.Foc Grps Any. where In U.S./Quan. Strat. Cons. D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. 307 NO. Michigan Ave. #1214 Chicago, IL 60601 312/372-7048 Contact: Dennis S. Howard, Ph.D. Expert Guidance In Design, Implementation And Analysis Huelskamp & Associates 7734 Via De Fonda Scottsdale, AZ 85258 602/443-8708 Contact: Henry J. Hue/skamp Extensive Background and Expedence JRH Marketing Services, Inc. 29-27 41st Avenue New York, NY 11101 7181786-9640 Contact: J. Robert Harris. I/ Experience Counts: Check out the rest but USE THE BEST Kennedy Research Inc. 405A Waters Bldg. Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616/458-1461 Contact: Mary P. Tonneberger Cons. & /nd.,Te/ecom.,Hea/th, Office Systems, Chemicals, Drugs K P C Research 908 S. Tryon Street Chadotte. NC 28211 704/342-1626 or 704t 379-6342 Contact: LJ'nda Dawley Largest Facility in Charlotte, Consumer and Business Quirk's Market~ng ResearchReview T108571085
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K S & R Ce~er Teslblg Cel~ler Shoppingtown M~iI Syracuse, NY 13214 800t 289-8028 Contact: Lynne Van Dyke Intercepts, CAT, One-on-One LaScola Qualltative Research 3701 Connecticut Ave.,N.Wo Washington D.C. 20008 202/363-9367 Contact: Linda J. LaScola Public Affairs, Healthcare, Telecommunications, Financial Manhatlan Opinion Center 369 Lexington Ave. New York, NY 10017 212 / 972-5553 Contact: Jana Warren 3 Room Focus Group Facility/ Quality Recruiting Marketeam Associates 1807 Park 270 Drive,#300 St.Louis, MO 63146 " - 314/878-7667 Contact: Richard Homans Financial Services, HealthCare, Consumer, Pkgd. Goods,Agric. Market Facts, Inc. 676 North St. Clair Chicago, IL 60611 312/280-9100 Contact: Linda.Leemaster 20+ yrs. in consumer, industrial medical, business Market Navigation, Inc. Teleconference Network Div. 2 Prel Plaza Orangeburg, NY 10962 914 / 365-0123 Contact: George Silverman Mad, Bus-to-Bus, Hi-Tech, Indust, Ideation, New Prod., Tel. Groups Mar-Quest Research, Inc. 1315 Evamar Drive Midland, MI 48640 517/631-3900 Contact: Roger H. Jennings Hard Recruit/Qual / Quant /Con- vention Rsch. /Cust.Satisfaction Martin Research Inc. P.O. Box 8595 Roanoke, VA 24014 703/342-1970 Contact: Frank Martin, III Focus group facilities in Nodolk, Roanoke, Winston-Salem Matrixx Marketing-Rsch Div. 8044 Montgomery Rd., Suite 625 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513/984-247O Contact: Michael L. Dean, Ph.D. Cincinnati's Most Modern and Convenient Facilities MedProbe Medical Mktg. Rsch 7825 Washington Ave. S.,Ste 745 Minneapolis, MN 55435 612/941-7965 Contact:Asta Gersovitz, Phrm.D. MedProbe Provides Full Service Custom Market Research Michelson & Wonder, Inc. 335 Scenic View Drive Atlanta, GA 30339 8001633-1523 Contact: Mark Michelson The Retail Specialists. Experienced. lnsightfut/Thorough Devee~ Male Qualitative Research, Inc. RR1, Box 1069, Millstone Rd. Sag Harbor, NY 11963 516/'725-2160 ~s~m" ~en Me/e design. Strong advertis- ing market~ng background PACE, Inc. 28535 Orchard Lake 'Road Farmington Hills, MI 48018 313/553-4100 Contact: Pater J. Swetish Full Service Vehicle Specia/ist- OEM and Aftermark~t Experience Payne & Partners 70 West Madison, Ste. 1400 Chicago, IL 60602 31 2/443-9666 Contact: Melanie Payne Superior Marketing & Analytical Skills Performance Focus P.O. Box 723 Addison (Dallas), TX 75001-0723 214/380-6575 Contact: Judi P. Levy Strat Mkt Rsch, Health Care, TraveI, Leisure, Spec Needs Cons. PLAYLAB® Research,Division of The Creative Group, Inc. 31800 Northwestern Hwy. # 385 Farmington Hills, MI 48018 313/855-7812 Contact: Dana Blackwe/I Children, Teens, Morns, Expect.Morns, Parents, Grandparents & Families Product & Consumer Evaluations 28535 Omhard Lake Road Farmington Hills, MI 48018 313/553-4100 Contact: Paul Johnson Esxpert Moderators on Staff. tote of the Art Facility Reid Qualitative 2149 S. Grape Street Denver, CO 80222 303/758-6424 Contact: Michael Reid Consumer, Tech/Indust., New Prod., Concept Test/Refinement Research, Inc. 521 Plymouth Rd., Ste. 115 Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462 215/941-2700 or 800/828-3228 Contact: Phyllis Santoro Creative Design and Discussions- -Actionable Results Rhode Island Survey and Research Service, Inc. 690 Warren Avenue East Providence, RI 02914 401/438-4120 Contact: Patricia Shakel First in New England. Established in 1962 R J Research P.O. Box 3787 Santa Rosa, CA 95402 707/795-3780 Contact: Bob Peltagrini Full Service Qual /Quan. Most Packaged Goods & Bus to Bus 1751 W. County Rd. B St. Paul, MN 55113 612/631-1977 Contact: D~le Longfellow Bus.,Ag, Specifying Engineers Rodgers Marketing Research 4575 Edwin Ddve. NW Canton, OH 44718 216I 492-8880 Contact: Alice Rodgers Creative I Cost Effective: New Product / Consumer, Etc. James M. Sears Associates 48 Industrial West Cli[lon, NJ 07012 201/777-6000 Contact: James M. Sears Business-To-Business And Executives A Specialty Snell Associates, Inc. 941 Vernal Avenue Mill Valley', CA 94941 415! 388-8315 Contact: Joyce Snell Consumer/exec/prof focus groups conducted nationally Southeastern Institute of Research, Inc. 2325 West Broad St. Richmond, VA 23220 804/358-8981 Contact: Rebecca H. Day Est. 1964, Full Service Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis James Spanier Associates 120 East 751h St. New York. NY 10021 21 2/472-3766 Contact: Julie Homer Focus Groups And One-On-Ones In Broad Range Of Categories Dwight Spencer & Associates 1290 Grandview Avenue Columbus, OH 43212 614 / 488-3123 Contact: Betty Spencer 4'x16" Mirror Viewing Rm Seats 8-12. In House Audio/Video Equip Jane L. Stegner & Ascts. 2215 Penn Ave. So. Minneapolis, MN 55405 61 2/377-2490 Contact: Jane Stegner Bus- To-Bus/Medicat/Fncl Svcs/ Agric., Groups/1:1"s Sutherland Research Grp, Ltd 1160-B Pittford-Victor Road Pitlsford, NY 14534 716/586-5757 Contact: John R. Stensrud, Ph.D. ~p erienced Furl Service Market esearch Firm Sweeney International, Ltd. 221 Main St. Danbury, CT 06810 203 / 748-1638 Contact: Timm Sweeney Quafitafive Research. Member: ORCA lAMA/Advt. Club Telesession Corporation 355 Lexington Ave. New York. NY 10017 212 / 599-t500 Contact: Michael Gorbein Focus Groups by Phone / Medical / Agriculture / Business-toBusiness "Faome Cre~t~e Research Services 10 Columbia Place ML Vernon, NY 10552 914/699-7199 .CoequaL" Gila Theme Ideation, Teens, New Product, Ad Concepts, Package Goods The Travis Company, Inc. 509 Cathedral Parkway, Suite 8E NewYork, NY 10025 212/222-0882 Contact: Jerry Travis Qualitative Research and Consultation TRENDFACTS Research, Div. of The Creative Group, Inc. 31800 Northwestern Hwy. Farmington Hills, MI 48018 313/855-7810 Contact: Brett Blackwell Consumers, Retail, Rest., Real Est., FinanciaI, Hlthcare, lndust.,Bus-Bus Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. 3355 Lenox Road, NE Suite 665 Atlanta, GA 30326 404 / 239-0101 Contact: Robi~. Salter 25 Years of Experience in Design, Moderation & Analysis Lucy Warren & Associates 3619 291h Street San Diego, CA 92104 619/295-0342 Contact: Lucy Warren Understands / Meets Business Needs With Quality / Experience Weiss Marketing Research 27 Mar]or Hill Road Summit, NJ 07901 201/273-3952 Contact: Debra R. Weiss Strong Client Side. New Products Background Winston Stuart Ascts., Inc. 2670 Nichols Canyort. Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90046 2131851-4127 Contact: Bill Smolka New Prod, Ad~ Pkg. Goods, Ent. Cons. Execs, uus. The Winters Group, Inc. 14 Franklin St. Rochester, NY 14604 716/546-7480 Contact: Susan Morrison- Vega Info ThatWorks. Svces Inc/ PrYSec Rsch, Cnsltg, TeleMktg Wolf/Altschul/Callahan,lnc. 171 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10016 21 2/725-8840 Contact: Ed Woff Aft Consumer/Business.To- Business Qualitative Needs Yarnell, Inc. 1 Anita Drive East Hanover, NJ 07936 201/593-0050 Contact: Dr. Stephen M. Yamell Information Technology/Financial Services/Modeling continued on p. 46 December, 1990 45 T108571086
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STATE CROSS INDEX,OF MODERATORS Refer to Preceeding Pages For Address, Phone Number and Contact Arizona Huelskamp & Associates California Bartels Research Corp. Direct Marketing Rsch Assocs. Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Grieco Research Group, Inc. Hispanic Marketing R J Research Snell Associates, Inc. Lucy Warren & Associates Winston Stuart Associates, Ltd. Colorado Reid Qualitative Connecticut Access Research, Inc. Clarion Marketing and Comm. Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. DeNicola Research, Inc. Greenfield Consulting Group,lnc Sweeney International, Ltd. Washington D.C. LaScola Qualitative Research Martin Research Inc. Georgia The Atlantis Group Michelson &Wender, Inc. Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. Illinois Analytics, Inc. Creative Research Associates Doyle Research Associates D.S. Fraiey & Associates D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. Market Facts, Inc. Payne & Partners Maryland Hammer Marketing Resources Massachusetts Decision Research Dolobowsky Qual. Svcs., Inc. First Market Rsch(L~ Lynch) Michigan Brand Consulting Group Kennedy Research Inc. Mar-Quest Research, Inc. PACE, Inc. Product & Consumer Evaluations TrendFacts ! Playtab Minnesota Carlson Research Company Concepts In Marketing Rsch. MedProbe Medical Mktg. Rsch Rockwood Research Corp. Jane L. Stegner and Ascts. Missouri Marketeam Associates New Jersey Cunninghis Associates James M. Sears Associates Weiss Marketing Research Yarnell, Inc. New York Focus America Focus Plus JRH Marketing Se~ices, Inc. K S & R Consumer Testing Ctr. Manhattan Opinion Center Market Navigation, Inc. Doreen Mole QuaL Rsch. Inc. Sources For Research, Inc. James Spanier Associates Sutherland Research Group, Ltd Telesession Corporation Thorne Creative Research The Travis Company The Winters Group " Wolf/Altschul/Callahafi, Inc. North Carolina K P C Research Martin Research Inc. Ohio The Answer Group Cleveland Field Resources, Inc =M~=trixx Marke'l:ing Rodgers Marketing Research Dwight Spencer & Associates Pennsylvania Creative Marketing Solutions Research, Inc. Rhode Island Alpha Research Associates, Inc. Rhode Island Survey, Inc. South Dakota American Public Opinion Survey & Market Research Corp Texas First Mariner Rsch(J. Heiman) Perforr~ance Focus Virginia, Martin Research Inc. Southeastern Institute of Rsch. Washington Consumer Opinion Services Gilmore Research Group Wisconsin Chamberlain Rsch. Cnsltnts. SPECIALTY CROSS INDEX OF MODERATORS Re fer to Preceeding Pages Listings For Address, Phone Number and Contact ADVERTISING Analytics, Inc. Brand Consulting Group Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Chamberlain Research Cnsltnts. DeNicola Research, Inc. Dolobowsky Qual. Svcs., Inc. Doyle Research Associates D.S. Fraley & Associates Market Facts, Inc. Doreen Mole Qual. Rsch. Inc. PACE, Inc. PlayLabFFrendFacts Product & Consumer Evaluations Research, Inc. Rockwood Research Corp. Southeastern Instituteof Rsch. James Spanier Associates Sweeney International, Ltd. Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. Winston StuartAscts., Ltd. AGRICULTURE Market Navigation, Inc. Rockwood Research Corp. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Access Research, Inc. TrendFacts Wolf/Altschul/Callahan, Inc. APPAREL/ FOOTWEAR Brand Consulting Group PlayLab/l'rendFacts 46 AUTOMOTIVE Matrixx Marketing-Research Div. PACE, Inc. Product & Consumer Evaluations TrendFacts Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. BIO-TECH D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. Market Navigation, Inc. Med Probe Medical Mktg. Rsch Yarnell, Inc. BLACK JRH Marketing Services, Inc. Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. BUSINESS-TO- BUSINESS Chamberlain Research Cnsltnts. Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Consumer Opinion Services Decision Research First Market Rsch(J.Heiman} D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. Greenfield Consulting Group, Inc. Kennedy Research Inc. Market Facts, Inc. Mar-Quest Research, Inc. Payne & Partners Research, Inc. Rockwocd Research Corp. James SpanierAssociates Strategic Marketing Services Sutherland Research Group, Ltd Sweeney International Ltd. TrendFacts Yarnell, Inc. CANDLES D.S. Fraley &Associates PlayLab Research, Inc. CHILDREN Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Doyle Research Associates D.S. Fraley & Associates Market Facts, Inc. Malrixx Marketing-Research Div. PlayLab Research, Inc. Rhode Island Survey, Inc. CIGARETTES Research. Inc. Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. D.S. Fraley & Associates James Spanier Associates COMPUTERS/MIS Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. First Market Rsch (J. Heiman) D.S. Howard Assoco, Inc Market Navigation. Inc. Research James Spanier Associates Sutherland Research Group, Ltd Sweeney International, Ltd. TrendFacts/PlayLab Yarnell, Inc. CONSUMERS Anatytics, Inc. Chamberlain Rsch.Cnsltnts. Consumer Opinion Services De Nicota Research, Inc. Doyle Research Associates First Market Rsch ( L. Lynch) D.S. Fraley & Associates D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. Kennedy Research Inc. Rodgers Marketing Research Thorne Creative Research TrendFacts / PlayLab DIRECT MARKETING Direct Marketing Research Ascts. EDUCATION/ NOT-FOR-PROFIT The Winters Group ENTERTAINMENT D.S. Fraley & Associates PlayLab/TrendFacts Research. Inc. Sweeney International, Ltd. W'L"~ ton Stuart AscLs.. Inc. C~Ji~k's Market~ng Rese~rchReview T108571087
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EXECUTIVES Chamberlain Rsch. Cnsltnts. Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Do~et~ov~ky QuaL Svcs~ |~¢~ 'Fi~lMarket Rsch(J. Heiman) Kennedy Research Inc. Market Views Research, Inc. Mar-Quest Research, Inc. PACE, tnc. Product & Consumer Evaluations Research, Inc. James Spanier Associates Sources For Research, Inc. Sweeney International, Ltd. TrendFacts Winston StuartAscts., Inc. FINANCIAL SERVICES Access Research, Inc. Cleveland Field Resources, Inc Saul Cohen &Associates, LTD, Dolobowsky QuaL Svcs., Inc. First Market Rsch(L. Lynch) Greenfield Consu Iting Group, Inc. LaScota Qualitative Research Marketeam Associates Matrixx Marketing-Research Div. PACE, Inc, Payne & Partners Product & Consumer Evaluations The Research Center Rockwood Research Corp. Southeastern Institute of Rsch James SpanierAssociates TrendFacts PaulA. WarnerAssociates, Inc. Winston StuartAscts., Inc. TheWintersGroup Wolf/Altschul/Callahan, Inc. Yarnell, Inc. FOOD PRODUCTS American PublicOpinion Survey & Market Research Corp Analytics, Inc. Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Doyle Research Associates D.S. Fraley & Associates PlayLab/TrendFacts Research, Inc. James SpanierAssociates Thorne Creative Research TrendFacts Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. Weiss Marketing Research HEALTH & BEAUTY PRODUCTS American Public Opinion Survey & Market Research Corp The Answer Group Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. D.S. Fraley & Associates Greenfield Consulting Group,lnc Market Facts, Inc. PlayLab [l'rendFacts Research, Inc. Thorne Creative Research Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. HEALTH CARE Access Research, Inc. Chamberlain Rsch. Cnsltnts. SaulCohen & Associates, LTD. Creative Marketing Solutions DeNicola Research, Inc. Dolobowsky QuaJ. Svces., Inc. First Market Rsch(L Lynch) Greenfi, eld Consulting Group.Inc. D.S.Howard Assoc., Inc. Kennedy Research Inc. LaScola Qualitative Research Marketeam Associates Market Facts. Inc. December, 1990 M'-~rket Navigation, Inc. Mar-Quest Research, Inc. Matrixx Marketing-Research Div. MedProbe Medical Mktg. Rsch Per[ormance Foct=s Ptotfuct &ConsumerEvaluations Research, Inc. Southeastern institute of Rsch James SpanierAssociates Strateglc Marketing Services TrendFacts Weiss Marketing Research The Winters Group HISPANIC Hispanic Marketing Communication Research IDEAGENERATION Brand Consulting Group Saul Cohen &Associates, LTD. Decision Research Dolobowsky Qual. Svcs., Inc. D.S. Fraley & Associates Matrixx Marketing-Research Div. PlayLab/TrendFacts Research, Inc, Rhode IslandSurvey, Inc. Sweeney International, Ltd. Thorne Creative Research Paul A.Warner Associates, Inc. INDUSTRIAL First Market Rsch(J. Heiman) D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. Kennedy Research Inc. Market Navigation, Inc. Mar-Quest Research, Inc. Sweeney International, Ltd. TrendFacts Yarnell, Inc. INSURANCE Trend Facts/P lay Lab MEDICAL PROFESSION Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Creative Marketing Solutions D.S. Howard Assoc, Inc. Marketeam Associates Mar-Quest Research, Inc. Matrixx Marketing-Research Div. MedProbe Medical Mktg. Rsch TrendFacts/PlayLab MILITARY American Public Opinion Survey & Market Research Corp PlayLab/TrendFacts Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. MODERATOR TRAINING CunninghisAssociates NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Analytics, Inc Brand Consulting Group Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Creative Marketing Solutions Dolobowsky QuaL Svcs., Inc. D.S. Fraley & Associates First Market Rsch(J. Heiman) Greenfield Consulting Group,Inc. D.S. Howard Assoc..Inc. Market Facts. Inc. PlayLablTrendFacts Product & Consumer Ev~uations The Research Center Research, lnc.. Rhode Island Survey, Inc. Southeastern instituteof Rsch. James SpanierAssociates Strategic Marketing. Svces W'.~n Stuart ~,, Inc. PACKAGED GOODS Access Research, inc. TheAnswerGroup LTD Saul Cohen & Associates, . Doyle Research Associates D.S. Fraley & Associates Doreen Mole Qual. Rsch., Inc. PlayLab/TrendFacts The Research Center Research, Inc. Thome Creative Research Paul A. WarnerAssociates, Inc. Winston Stuart Ascts., Inc. PARENTS Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Doyle Research Associates D.S. Fraley & AssOciates PlayLab/TrendFacts Research, Inc. PETPRODUCTS Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Rockwood Research Corp. Reseamh, Inc. Thome Creative Research PHARMACEUTICALS TheAnswerGroup Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Creative Marketing Solutions D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. Market Navigation, Inc. MedPrebe Medical Mktg. Rsch PlayLab/TrendFacts James Spanier Associates Weiss Marketing Research TheWinters Group POLITICAL RESEARCH American Public Opinion Survey & Market Research Corp Chamberlain Rsch. Cnsltnts. Cleveland Field Resources, Inc LaScola Qualitative Research Doreen Mole Qual. Rsch. Inc. Weiss Marketing Research PUBLISHING Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. First Market Rsch(J. Heiman) D.S. Fraley & Associates PlayLab/TrendFacts Research, Inc, Thorne Creative Research RESTAURANT/ FAST FOOD PlayLab/-I-rendFacts RETAIL Brand Consulting Group Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. First Market Rsch(L. Lynch) Research, Inc. TrendFacts/PlayLab Paul A. Warner Associates. Inc. SENIORS Saul Cohen & Associates. LTD. Research, Inc. SnelIAssoc~ates. Inc. TrendFacts Weiss Market~ng Research SMALL B USINESS / ENTREPRENEURS Access Research, Inc. S'au~C~hen & ,Asseei~s,, LTD. Research, Inc. SOFT DRINKS, BEER, WINE American Public Opinion Survey & Market Research Corp SaulCohen & Associates, LTD. D.S. Fraley & Associates Greenfield Consulting Group,lnc Grieco Research Group, Inc. PlayLab/TrendFacts Thorne Creative Research Paul A. WarnerAssociates, Inc. TEACHERS D.S. Fraley & Associates PlayLab TELECOMMUNICATIONS Creative Marketing Solutions CunninghisAssociates Decision Research First Market Rsch'(J. Heiman) D.S. Howard Assoc., Inc. Kennedy Research Inc. LaScola Qualitative Research PlayLab/TrendFacts Research, Inc. Southeastern Instituteof Rsch. Wolf/Altschul/Callahan, Inc, Yarnell, Inc. TELECONFERENCING Rockwoqd Research Corp. TELEPHONE FOCUS GROUPS Market Navigation, Inc. Research, Inc. Telesession Corporation TrendFacts TEENAGERS Saul Cohen & Associates, LTD. Doyle Research Associates D.S. Fraley & Associates Greenfield Consulting Group,lnc Matrixx Marketing-Research Div. PlayLab Research, Inc. Rhode Island Survey, Inc. Thorne Creative Research TOYS/GAMES Research, Inc. TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Sweeney International, Ltd. Paul A. Warner Associates, Inc. TRAVEL Saul Cohen &Associates, LTD. Mar-Quest Research, Inc. Research. Inc. Sweeney International, Ltd. TrendFacts/Playlab UTILITIES Chamberlain Rsch. Cnsltnts. YOUTH Doyle Research Associates DoS. Fraley & Associates PlayLab Paul A. Warner Associates. Inc. Wo tf,.tAltsch,t.,~'Ca~a,h an, Inc. 4"/ T108571088
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Mutual of Omaha continued from p. 6 originated with a desire to incorporate the opinions of our insurance agents with the development and enhancement of pro- grams to support their sales activities. Since no attempt had previously been made to solicit agent participation in an on-going in-house panel, there was no precedent to indicate the interest in being a member on a panel. The primary concern in the establish- ment of an in-house paneI was that the panel be representative of the agent That's why more and more researchers ore turning 1o ACS-QUERY for computer-aided interviewing and A-CROSS for cross tabulations. A~-QUERY Programs questions automatically Manages sample Tracks calls Controls quotas Produces data in report-ready format A-CROSS Displays tables as you write Generates weights, nets, stats, and ranking Accepls ASCII, column binary, and dBASE inpul Oulpuls prinled tables and ASCII or LOTUS.WKS tiles Q-LINK The bridge program that writes A-CROSS specs from your ACS-QUERY queslionnoire Analylicol Computer Service, Inc. 434 Sandford Avenue. Westfield. NJ 070913 (201) 232-2723 SERVICE. II's not just in our name...trs in everything we do. Citck~ No.825 on Reader eatd 4S population.There were three characteris- tics in the agent population that needed to be reflected in the in-house panel: length of association wi~ the compm~y, mix .of business, and sales production level. The sampling techniques considered for se- lecting the panel members were various types of probability samples. Probability sampling is based in the concept of ran- dom selection which assures that each population element is given a known nonzero chance of selection. The prob- ability sampling techniques evaluated for the in-house panel included a simple ran- dom sample, a stratified sample, and a systematic sample. The systematic sampling technique was selected because of e.ase of administra- tiara simplicity, flexibility, and cost ben- efits. In this approach, every nth element in the population is selected after a ran- dom start. To randomize the starting point for selecting the sample, the agent popu- lation was first sorted in agent identifica- tion number order. This identification number is unique for each agent. In order to use systematic sampling you deter- mine l) the total number of elements in the population, 2) the sampling ratio, 3) the random start, and then begin drawing the random sample. Mutual of Omaha has approximately 3,500 agents. To create a viable panel representative of the entire agent popula- tion, an in-house panel of approximately 400 agents was desired. Based on known characteristics of our agent .population, such as agent retention and willingness to participate in other agent-related activi- ties, a 50 percent response rate was as- sumed from solicited agents. Thus, 800 agents were canvassed to yield the 400 agents desired for the in-house agent panel. Once the 800 member systematic sample was drawn, a short survey (see above) was used to determine agent will- ingness to be a panel member. The survey consisted of 12 closed-ended questions, including one question indicating desire to be on the panel and eleven questions identif.ving descriptive characteristics about themselves and the markets they work. This information was used to de- velop profiles of the responding panel members. The agents were provided with computer-readable answer sheets, capable of being scanned when returned to cor- porate headquarters. A computer data file of the survey responses v, as automatically generated when the answer sheets were scanned. The data could be analyzed us hag either time-sharing or a personal com- puter. Solicitation Survey 1. Are you intereste~d in partwipating in the Agent Research Panel on on ongohlg basis? 2 H~" ~v )~ars hm'¢ ~ he~ seging i~ 3, Ho'a" mm~v years have you been selling in- suran~ fi~r Mutual of Oma~ ~ 4. Which ofthefolloaqng market~doym~primat~v sell to? 5, Where are you primarily lacated? 6. Hoa'many mile~ b your o~ce fi'om the cus- tomers you primari~t" sell to? 7. ls your o~ce located in aa urban or non-re'ban area? 8. Which of the following Honor Club &vels are you on-schedule for this year? 9. Ho~¢ many Home O~ce schools hare you attended while workb~g for Mutual of Omaha? 10. Which ProfessionallFinancial designations do you have? . I 1. What isthe h~ghest brelofeducation attained? 12. How aM are )~te3 Mainienance needs of an in-house panel The primary maintenance activity with the agent panel has been keeping the panel member list up-to-date. Because the retention rate of our insurance agents has bebn less than desired and some agents move from agent status to manager sta- tus. housekeeping activities are conducted quarterly. These activities include delet- ing terminated management level agents from the panel, comparing the panel characteristics (with new deletions) against the entire agent population to gauge if it remains representative of the entire agcnt population, and soliciting additional panel members if necessary. If new panel members are needed, oversampling or undersampling is con- ducted to correct differences between the panel and population. If the characteris- tics of the panel still represent the popu- lation after any fall-out of members, but the total is less than the target of 400, then another systematic sample is conducted to add new panel members. The goal of on-going maintenance activities is to en- sure the integrity of the panel. There are currently 600 agents on the in-house agent panel. This is well above the target of 400 and results from the multiple occurrences of housekeeping activities, as well as participation response rates that were different from the 50 per- cent assumption. We are pleased to have more panel members than the target.These extra panel members provide some cush- ion against fluctuating panel response rates, which can be difficult to predict. Application of an in-house panel Dunnt, t • ~. he first yearofits inception the objective x~ as to utilize the panel a ,nini- mum of t'ive times. Infrequent surveys Quirk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571089
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would cause p~nel members to become apathetic, while too many surveys would become burdensometo abusy sales force. Staff analysts of the Marketing Research Group promoted the agent panel to each of the accounts they service. Product managers, advertising managers, train- ing managers, and others were all given an introduction to the panel during yearly planning sessions. Surveys have been done on prospecting, incentive trave[ awards, and the use of point-of-sale ma- terial, to name a few. The panel is promoted and marketed to the customer areas that the Marketing Research Group serves. These customer areas are the "drivers" that have dictated how often the panel is used and the topics that are used. Initially, the panel has been used to address one-time questions and topics, such as: Are agents satisfied with local advertising? Are agents satisfied with the current leads programs? What is the most popular point-of-sale material? Ideally, down the road, the agent panel will be used to estabIish a benchmark in behavior or attitude in a number of key areas, with yearly follow-ups conducted. The agem panel is not meant to replace primary consumer research, but to serve as an adjunct. The agency system is a distribution method using commissioned agents to sell and deliver insurance poli- cies. The agent is the interface between the company and the consumer and there- fore marketing research endeavors to understand the wants and needs of both the end-user and the distributor. The Advertising Division commis- sioned the development of a prospecting survey for the agent panel. After a needs assessment, the survey is written by an analyst and approved by the customer. The prospecting survey was designed to be completed in 5-10 minutes. A cover letter, survey, answer sheet, and return envelope were mailed to the home ad- dress of each agent on the panel. A re- minder letter was mailed after the first week to encourage returns. Agents were given 4 weeks to complete. Sixty-eight percent of the panel members responded. All of the questions, except for two open- ended questions, were on answer sheets and scanned by an optical scanner. The open-ended questions were very general in nature and simply asked for overall comments on prospecting programs. The survey covered the general topic area of prospecting and local advertising. asking agents to ~ve feedback on their satisfaction with various prospecting programs and local advertising, their source of information on prospecting programs offered by the companies, and the prospecting approach they would rote December. 1990 as most effective in generating quality prospects in the companies' target mar- kets. After the rcsulm were summarized, the report was presented to the Advertising Division. The survey yielded some im- portant information. Agents expressed the need for more local advertising and more information on Home Office pros- pecting programs. Referrals, active policyowners and orphan policyowners were considered to be the highest quality leads. Panel members reported that their primary source of information is the gen- eral manager or district sales manager, not published prospecting materials. Conclusion In-house panels do not replace com- municating one-on-one with the field force or field management. Panels should not supplant direct consumer research. Panels should be an additional tool in the research toolbox--an adjunct to a total research program. Even though the agent panel is still in its infancy at Mutual of Omaha, the value is evident. By using the agent panel, the Marketing Research Group provides our customer groups with hard data on field opinion in a timely and efficient manner. ~1 © 1990 Mutual of Omaha St. Louis* Consumer Opinion Search, Inc. 10795 Watson Road St. Louis, Missouri 63127 (314) 965-0053 *Outstanding Focus Facilities* 2 Focus group Rooms with Professional Filming Recruiting To Your Specifications 12' Triangular Table Seats 12 Respondents Plus Moderator Tiered Viewing Room Comfortably Seats 12 Separate Entrance Insures Client Security Permanent Mall Test Kitchen.Audits Monitored Central Telephones Concept Testing Executive Interviewing In Home/Mall Placements Pre-recruit Taste Tests *"Designed with the Client in Mind." Circle NO.826 oe Reader C.ard 49 T108571090
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Spreckles continued from p. 9 down to allow for better stacking, so an i~k.~n'ation ~o~4ng the "~Easy Peter & Seal" feature was placed in the upper right comer to show the product in use. "'We needed to make sure thai they understood that this wasn't some weird little box. It's something they're already comfortable using, they just had to know what it is. We wanted to communicate that this is a carton that you can pour from The final test of the product was a series of projectable in-home use tests in various parts of the West Coast to mea- sure performance underd~e~ ,weather and regional conditions. "We wanted to make sure that the product did provide all of the features people said they wanted and that it would work under home use overan extended period of time," McCarry says. Survey cards During test-marketing, survey cards One-on-ones offer in-depth look The reintroduction of Spreckels sugar to the West Coast market was a research-intensive project that re- lied on one-on-ones, says Tom McCarty, managing director, Vista Marketing Re- search. He says that though one-on-ones aretime consuming and labor-intensive, they pay off by providing an in-depth look into the consumer's thoughls and actions. "If you are willing to take the time and energy to talk to 30 people for an hour each onaoneqo-one you get a complete un- derstanding of the thought process of 30 consumers. "As products and ser- vices become more and more specialized, you have to search for niches and go more and more in-depth to find the sublle differences in consumer perceptions. I think you can do that so much bel- Ier in a one-on-one inter- view." The interviews were usually conducted by McCarty and one person each from the RAM Group's Consulting Divi- sion and Spreckels. One of the strengths of the technique is that it allows the client and researcher to talk among themselves and raise additional questions, and then get an immediate response from the consumer, McCarty says. Participation of the key people in the project is critical. "If the team members don't participate, it is not as valuable, because part of the value is the interchange between the team members, the research person, and the consumer. The one -on-one approach allows us to cut down on the time it takes to relay all the information obtained to the decision-makers. "The team members get 1o know their consumers and can start to determine what is needed to successfully compete in the marketplace much better and iaster than any other research technique we know of. For the Spreckels project, the team mem- bers included peop!e from Spreckels mar- ketlng and package engineering, RAM Group marketing consultants, and designers from RAM Graphics. For other projects, the team has included copy writers, new product man- agers, product development managers, technical engineers, etc. "There is a skill to making sure that the team members don't influence the outcome of the research. I, as the interview leader, must instruct the team members about at what points in the interview they may interact with the consumers and at what point they must re- main quiet. "The Irade-off, and Ihere are always trade-offs, is that some of the clients can't afford the time it takes to participate in the interviews. 1"he team has to be willing to commit a little more time and energy to the one-on- one method because of the more active participation required compared to focus groups. Clients just can't popin and watch one ortwo of the interviews because they tend to make assump- tions based on only one or two people." Also, this one-on-one in- terviewing process is harder on the researcher because so much more information is obtained and it is harder to objectively record the information and report it accurately. "1 try not to knock focus groups, because we do a lot of them and they do serve a purpose, but we feel that one-on-ones are the most effective way both to get a thorough understanding of the consumers as well as a great way to segue into quantitative re- search." And, he says, respondents enjoy the pro- cess. "You get some people that blush at first when they walk into a room and see three business people and no other respondents, but they warm up quickly. The respondents love the process--they get to ask questions and they enjoy the dialogue. They like the fact that we pay so much attention to what they have to say. They almost teel guilty when we pay them." 5O ~ere distrit~aed ~o get reaefons from consumers in the marketplace. McCarty says that doing a large-scale telephone study, forexample, or mail panel was not pes~bl~ because of time a.rtd budget con- straints, so the returned survey cards served as a valuable, albeit non- projectable, source of information. "You shouldn't trust a response card survey to give you actionable results, because you can't control the nonresponse bias, and you can't view the people that send back the survey cards as representa- tive of the people who are buying your product. But we felt that as long as people could use the information responsibly, it could be a helpful tool." Loglcal solution Putting sugar in a milk carton is a logical solution, to many problems that should have been..introduced years ago. And judging by the tremendously posi- tive response the new Spreckels con- tainer has earned in test markets, it seems many consumers agree. But Tom Fritz says that though it's a great idea, in the California sugar market at least, there was no need for it until Spreckels decided to re.enter the market. "Necessity breeds a lot of things. For years here in California, the sugar market has been the private labels and C&H. There was no need for anyone to change anything because each of them had half of the market and life was cozy. The only way for us to get into the market was to offer the consumer something different. We simply set about through research to find out what consumers wanted versus what they were getting. And what we offer now is what they told us they wanted. It answers consumer concerns with is- sues of messiness, storage, and pourability." Tom McCarty: "I'm sure it's some- thing that other sugar manufacturers probably thought of before. But they probably looked at certain numbers and what their heavy users were saying, and decided to forget it. We went beyond that by spending more time with the con- sumer, the people who make the ultimate choice, really. "People have said to us it seems like such a "no-brainer," like it's an easy thing to have done. but it wasn't. Because we each had, as I'm sure most companies do, our own pet ways of improving the pack- age and there were all sorts of different considerations and trade-offs---environ- mental, social, price. We had to come up with something and consumer research was the main thing that drove that choice."lS) Qu:rk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571091
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Exp ence Is The B est Teacher We cordially invite you to learn marketing research methods and applications from the professionals who have done more customized marketing researc~h and have ta__ug~it to more people than ~___vone else in the world. When you attend a Burke Institute semina~ you participate in more than an exciting, on4arget learning expexience. You learn from what we have learned by doing tens of thousands of marketing research studies. Our seminars reflect this invalu- able depth of real-life expertise, not available to you anywhere else. It is just one of the many reasons for the rave re- views we have received worldwide from past par- ticipants at more than 1200 marketing research seminars conducted by us during the past 14 years. Here are just a few verbatims from recent seminar evaluations: I. Super -- best 2 day seminar I've everhad! Totally targeted --very well done. Best (seminar manual) I've seen in terms of walking away with a great memory jogge~" Manager, 2. Out~tandlngl Will recommend for theentire professional staff at Ford. Extremely helpful for doing my job. Excellent, well laid out (manual). Pro]ect Manager, Fo~d 3. Fabulou~ seminac Covered a wide range of difficult informa- tion in only three days. I feb a very personalized learning ex- perience -- all due to the (speaker's) vibrant, one-to-one cornmtmication style. President, M~-'ket/ng Consnlffne Comn~.._~y 4. Excellent -- Covered more information in more detail and certainly more immediately useful methodology than the two semesters of business research methodulogy that I had just eompieted in an MBA program. Exciting, energetic. knowledgeable and effective presentation. Opportunity Ana~yst, Dow CtwmJcxl 5. Fantastic! Even though I have an M.S, in stats, I have never had such a clear picture of how to apply star techniques before. Wonderful examples to explain the theories, ideas, philosophies -- superb (speaker)! Helped to motivate me to expand my use of different techniques and explore more possibilities. Market Research Analyst, (;on.~ttmcr Power 6. Great seminar Concentrated-- practical--directed. Engaging (speaker) --it is exciting to have direct contact to such talent Market Ollicer, Marine Mldland Bm~k 7. Excellent-- exactly what I ~,as looking fox No doubt that (the speake r) knows material inside and out. easily access- ible, applied situation in real life to what we were learning. Proiect Manager. lh,octer & Gamble 8. I can't nay enough. ! am much more prepared to understand the analysis ne ads and in terpret the results effectively. Thank you. Nothing was a waste of time. Assistant Manager. 9. Outntandtng semlnan I learned a great deal and this seminar tied together a great deal of information that I had been exposed to but never trained in. Outstanding (speaker) used a lot of analogies that helped with the understanding of alot of concepts. This course made marketing research more interesting to me. Market Planner. C.ornlng Glasa Works 10. Covered exactly the Idnd~ of I---ue-, we farein advertising rc- search, and more important, the material was made very un. derstandable because of the context in which each tool was described. The speaker can't be beat. V I?., Group Research Director, ben Burnett Advertt~[ng BASES Burke Institt~te. Inc. 800 Broaclway. Cincinnati, 0hio45202(800-544-73731 ©1990, The Burke Institute The Burke Institute Partial Schedule of Seminars July 1990-April 1991 10L PractlcaI Mm~ketlng Re,arch Cincinnati ..... July 16-18 New York ...... Aug. 8-10 Cincinnati ..... Sept. 5-7 Boston ........ Sept. 24-26 New York ...... Nw. 5-7 SanFranelsco..Nov. 12-14 Cincinnati ..... Dec. 10-12 New York ...... Jan. 7-9 Toronto ........ Feb. 11-13 Chicago ....... March 18-20 Seattle ........ April 1o3 Cincinnati ..... April 15-17 104. Ouastlonmflre Construction ~rlmbep Los Angeles .... July 31-Aug. 1 Cincinnati ..... Sept. 11.12 Boston ........ Dec. 4-5 New York ...... Jan. 14-15 Chicago ....... March 5-6 Cincinnati ..... April 23-24 I08. Questionnaire Design: Applicaflon~ and Enhancements Los Angeles .... Aug. 2-3 Cincinnati ... : ~Sept. 13-14 Boston ........ Dec. 6-7 New York ...... Jan. 16-17 Chicago ....... March 7-8 Cincinnati ..... April 25-26 201. Focus Groups: An Introduction Boston ........ Sept. 27-28 New York ...... Jan. 10-11 203. Focus Group Moderator Training Cincinnati .... Aug. 14-17 Cincinnati .... Sept. 18-21 Cincinnati .... Oct. 23-26 Cincinnati .... Nov. 27.30 Cincinnati .... Feb. 5-8 Cincinnati .... April 2-5 301. Writing Actionable Marketing Rasear~h Reporta Cincinnati ..... Sept. 20-21 Cincinnati ..... Dec. 13-14 blew York ...... Jan. 24-25 Chicago ....... March 21-22 401. Managing Marketing Rese~xch Cincinnati ..... Sept. 26-27 San Francisco..blov. 15-16 New York ...... Jan. 31-Feb. 1 901. Four-~eek Certificate Program Cincinnati ..... Sept. 5-25- New York ...... Jan. 7-Feb. I Other seminars currently available: 501. Applleatlon~ of Marketing Research Cincinnati ..... Sept. 24-25 New York ...... Nov. 8-9 New York ..... Jan. 22-23 Cincinnati .... .April 18-19 502. Product Re~.arch Cincinnati ..... Oct. 4-5 New York ..... .April 8-9 503. New Product Forecasting New York ..... .Aug. 21-22 blew York ..... .April 10-11 504. Advertfs|ng ~h Cincinnati ..... Oct. 18-19 New York ...... Fc.b. 28-Mar. 1 505. Posttlonlngand • Segmentmloo Rasearch " New York ..... Aug. 21-22 Cincinnati ..... Oct. 16-17 " blewYork ...... Feb.26-27 506. Customer Satl~fitctlon Re, arch New York ..... July 12-13 Cincinnati .... .Aug, 23-24 .Boston ........ Nov, 28-29 Tomato ........ Feb. 14-15 507. Pricing Strategy & Regearch Cincinnati ..... Feb. 21-22 601. Tabulation& lateri~retatlon of Marketing Re.search Data San Francisco..Aug. 6-7 New York ...... Oct. 29-30 Cincinnati .... .Dec. 17-18 Boston ........ March 11-12 602. Tools mad Techniques of Data Analysig San Francisco..Aug. 8-10 Cincinnati ..... Sept. 17-19 New York ...... Oct. 31-Nov. 2 Cincinnati ..... Dec. 19-21 New York ...... Jan. 28-30 Boston ........ March 13-15 603, Practical Multl~rlate Analy=ia blew York ...... July 25-27 Los Angeles .... Sept. 11-13 Cincinnati ..... Nov. 19-21 blew York ...... Feb. 18-20 701. International Marketing Renearch Cincinnati ..... Dec. 4-5 702. Business to Budness Marketlnl~ Re-~ea rch Cincinnau ..... March 25-27 • Introduction to Marketing Researoh • Marketing Research for Decision Makers • Focus Groups: An Applications Workshop • Effective Oral Presentation of Marketing Information • Using Multivariate Analysis: A P.C. Based Workshop Experimental Designs for Marketing Research : Industry Specific Seminars • Healthcare • Financial Institutions • Pharmaceutical • Public Utilities • Telecommunications • Automotiverrransportation Planning Marketing Strategies and Tactics Using Actionable Research iEffectively Selling Marketing Research Services Negotiating Marketing Research Contracts All Of The Above Seminars Arc Available For In-House P~entation. Please look over the list of our current seminars, then call us. We will help you select the best seminar or other educa- tional opportunity to meet your specific needs. Please call Lisa Raffignone, Marketing Manager, or Dc Sid Venkatesh, President, at 513-852-377& Decerr~er. 1990 51 T108571092
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Workshops continued from pA7 in1~sti, ag poims they h~rd fl~rin~g the focus groups, as well as the five most important points. The workshop facilita- tor allows ten to twenty minutes for an open-ended, perhaps even chaotic, dis- cussion of what participants bring in with them. After the warm-up, the workshop par- ticipants review what they learned as the respondents were discussing the first topic of the guide. Then the participants brain- storm new product concepts based on the review. Next, the group discusses what was learned in the second section of the guide, then it brainstorms that section, aad ~o ~m. Tlxe moderate's guide sl~eutd be broken up so that each section can be debriefed and brainstormed in about 40 minutes or less. Generally, debriefing takes longer than brainstorming. Experience shows that side-by-side debriefing and brainstorming tends to produce many more new concepts than debriefing the entire moderator's guide first, then brainstorming. During the discussion, the facilitator should keep legible notes of the debrief- How to unlock the pleasures of doing qualitative work in Chicago without getting trapped by the Loop-O'Hare crunch It's easyi Focus your groups in the "suburban downtown." You needn't fight bumper-to-bumper battles, just to stay at a first- rate Hyatt, Hilton, or Marriott. They're aII nearby at Kapt~ler! At Kapuler you can combine great recruiting, a state-of-the-art facility, and hostesses that are experienced in all client needs. Add to this a client dining room with closed-circuit TV lat no extra charge) because making clients relaxed and comfortable is an important part of our service for you. You don't have to put up with the Kennedy Expressway bumpathon, just to shop at Nieman-Marcus, Marshall Fields, Saks, or Lord & Taylor. They're close to Kapuler, too! If you love the city's great eateries---places like Nick's Fishmarket and Morton's Steakhouse, Carlucci's, Gino's Pizza, and those cute little ethnic spotsmyou needn't lose your appetite on the way. They're also in our neighborhood,t There are things we can't offer you: ten-mile-long traffic jams, dirty air, cracked sidewalks, litter, and the unexpected excite- ment of big-city life. All we can deliver are the benefits that really matter to you, along with fresh new respondents, peace and quiet, and comfort. For competitive bidding and a fresh outlook, call us for your next set of groups. KAPULER CENTER 3436 North Kennicott Avenue 121Arting ton Height~, IL 60o04 O 708-870-67o0 52 ing and the brainstorming on a flipchart. (A better tool is a scrolling dry-erase board that allows the facilitator to make c-~pies 4, irony f~ fl~e wrid~g s~a~) It is not necessary to write out new prod- uct concepts in detail. Capture just enough of each idea to remind everyone of it later. If the workshop is run correctly, the group will end up with a long list of new product concepts, ranging from the ordi- nary to the absurd. Many ideas will be redundant, or at least overlapping, be- cause during the workshop, evaluation of ideas was inappropriate. At the end, how- ever, the group should reduce the list by combining redundant ideas and discard- ing unfeasible ones. The facilitator must keep participants honest. Before discarding unfeasible ideas, be sure they are truly unfeasible, not merely unpopular. A seemingly poor idea can often be crafted into a commer- cially appealing concept if someone is willing to champion it. Try to weed the list down to between five and ten new concepts. Because of the structure of the championship, there must be at least as man2( participants as con- cepts. Also, if the group cannot in good conscience reduce the list to ten, then concept testing may be restricted to mul- tivariate approaches only. This really depends on how your company does its quantitative testing. Generally, the fewer 'alternatives you must test, the wider the range of market research approaches from which to choose. Championship structure The last task in the workshop is to assign champions to each of the surviv- ing new product concepts. The term "'champion" is used in the classical sense, as in the story of the Trojan War. when Achilles was the Greek champion and the Trojans advanced Hector as their cham- pion. Each new product concept must have its champion. Rather than assign participants to champion particular concepts, first ask for volunteers. The process will work much better if people are allowed to work on concepts they like. If there are enough participants, try to get teams, rather than individuals, to champion ideas. Keep teams to about the same size, and if you have participants from different levels within the organization, maintain a mix of higher and lower level people on each team. During the one or two weeks following Q~irk's Mmk.eting ResearchReview T!08571093
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tim worksl~p, each ctmwpion tel'rues his or her alternative into a well-considered, viable, new product concept, ready for quantitative testing. Inform your cham- pions that, unlike the workshop, sources of information for this exercise are fair game. including video and audio recordings of the focus groups, flipcharts from the workshop, data from past mar- ket research projects, secondary infor- mation, etc. They shouldn't feel limited at all. The only restriction is that champi- ons aren't allowed to change the funda- mental idea to which they've been as- signed. The refined concept, in other words, has to resemble the original idea from the workshop. The championshipphase culminates in a meeting where each champion presents a fully-refined concept to the other cham- pions. No outsiders are allowed at the meeting..At the end of the presentation, the champion must defend the concept while the other participants uncover and explore weaknesses through question- and-answer. , Despite the intensity this arrangement may produce between the presenters and the other attendees, the environment is relatively safe for two reasons. First, ev- eryone will be vulnerable when present- lag their o~¢n ~ew prod~ ~ dur- ing the meeting. Second, because they have made it this far through the process together, the participants will have formed a common bond tln, ough the shared expe- rience of the focus groups and the work- shop. Though the intensity may be high. personal risk is naturally modulated. The feedback is meant to be used for final refinement, and the ultimate output from the whole process is a set of fully-refined, ironclad alternatives, suitable for final quantitative testing. Any of the alterna- tives should be viable, since each has been considered so thoroughly. Benefits of the workshop and the championship Recall the three problems often associ- ated with focus group research described at the beginning of this article: • Focus group data are subject to distor- tion and misuse. • Because of the loosely structured nature ofq ualitative research, focus group data are prone to loss. • Full analysis of focus group data takes time. In the interim, the enthusiasm of the participating marketers can wane, diminishing the quality of their work. The workshop process addresses these tm~t~ems. Fir~, by forci~ ~ to debrief"publicly," that is, in the presence of the other observers, they tend to be more responsible about what they say and ~i~k ~bom ~-e experience, tf in de- scribing respondent behavior or opinions they go beyond what really happened in the focus groups, the other participants, including the facilitator and the researcher, will keep them honest. This minimizes distortion and abuse. Second, by airing all that was learned during the focus groups, participants benefit from each other's perspective. Any one observer is likely to miss much while watching a focus group. Taken together, however, the observations of all the participants should capture almost everything said. An open .debriefing makes the focus group a much more effi- cient and rich market res.~arch tool. Finally, by conducting the workshop and championship on the heels of the focus groups, your group takes full ad- vantage of the enthusiasm and energy generated. Anecdotal evidence suggests that a typical concept test of several alterna- tives almost always includes at least one candidate that is ngt truly viable. A mar- ket researcher only learns this when, to HOW TO FIND THE BEST DEAL ON A RANDOM DIGIT Whether you're in academic or ~r',~ • market research, Scientific Tele- ~.~ phone Samples can help. 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Suite 221. • CA 926g0 Tustm, - SAMPLE. by randomly shuffling the numbers within each replicate. 8o you won't need to work out eomplieat~l distri- bution schemes-just open the packet and begin. We can provide random digit samples based on almost any type of geographic coverage and with a varie%, of sampling frames, including: ~tl~ ~nal C. Zip code [] Bxchangef~Vorking" blocks [] State [] County [] City • [] ADI [] Census Regions [] Census Divisions [] PMSA/CMSA/MSA [] Weighted in proportion to number of listed households in area [] Unweighted so everyone has equal chance of being selected regardless of population F] Your desired cut-off or efficiency level [] Customized sample design specifications (e_g., single stage, multi-stage, stratified, etc.) Add it up. The best samples. The best service. And a staff thath happy to help you with any sampling aspect of your study. Then call STS for a quota • Prices sub,~vt't ~ c~ge ~.ithout nouce. V, hsranty is ~imhed to a.nx.~mt paid by client to S'I~ ~or u~e right t~ u~e the pa.rt k'ular ~,-tmple in qut-~ol:ion. P k-~-~e ask for z copy o~ o~r de~l mf~rrt~uon ~.~et for exact pnc~ and ~.-arr-an~..~lx~.-l~tion~ December, 1990 C3rc~e No.8~ on P~ade~ Card 53 T108571094
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everyone's surprise, tree of these "filler" alternatives wins the test. When this hap- pens, the cred~ility of a valid test is often undermined because Marketing cannot rol~} am tt'~ win~-er (simee i~ is not v-idle), and the highest-scoring viable ahemative is tarnished by losing. Worse yet, this type of disaster usually reflects poorly on the in-house market research staff, and rightly so. It should be the market researcher's responsibility to test only well-considered, workable al- ternative concepts. In advance of the test, the marketing staff should be made to grasp the possibility that any of the alternatives may win. The market re- searcher must ensure this, because a test that includes unfeasible alternatives is ihapropedy designed. This is the purpose of the champion- ship. The output from the championship is guaranteed to be viable. Furthermore, each alternative has at least one strong supporter in the marketing department. This loc,~s in the design of the quantita- tive test and greatly enhances the likeli- hood th~/t the result can and will be imple- mented~ In addition, because the fundamental reason for doing any market research is to reduce uncertainty, untrained focus group observers (aka impatient marketers) can find focus groups to be frustrating. Focus groups do not really resolve anything. Because they urgently want to eliminate any tmcermi~ty, tlmse ,ob,~-v~, ace often tempted, inappropriately" of course, to boil down their observations into one message or one product idea. This prob- lem is skirted in two ways. First, at the beginning of the workshop session the facilitator describes the process, so par- ticipants should expect to enter the quan- titative test with several strong alterna- tives. Thus they should be comfortable with some uncertainty. Second, after the championship, the remaining alternatives will be strong. Though everyone may have their personal favor- ite, no one will be able to simply assert that one alternative is the one that cus- tomers will like best. Possible risks and disadvantages That the qualitative research provider's analysis is not available during the idea- creation phase is a possible weakness of the process. The in-house researcher should decide whether the value of im- mediate debriefing outweighs the loss of the fresh perspective and thorough analy- sis provided by a good qualitative re- TRAINING INSTITUTE FOCUS GROUP MODERATOR TRAINING Custom 3 day Basic Level and 4 day Advanced Level Courses delivering practical skills for researchers through: • Intensive Course Work • Multiple Practice Sessions • Video.taping of You Leading a Focus Group with Real Respondents • Private. Debriefing and Coaching Sessions Learn a systematic and success- ful approach to moderating that uses proven techniques and merges them with your own style! 4800 Montgomery Lane Suite 1000 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 652-3632 RIVA Training Institute A Division of RIVA Market Research. Inc. Orcle Uo~ S30 on Reader C~rd searcher. Depending on tiring, the provider's analysis could still be used to kindle creativity during the champion- ship phase. One possible sol.m4on is to have the qualitative researcher facilitate the work- shop and the championship. This at least reaps the advantage of his or her fresh perspective. However, the market re- search staff should carefully consider providing this service themselves. It is an opportunity that should not be passed up lightly. Insider offers advantages An in-house facilitator's vantage point is much better than that of an outside facilitator. The in-house person will be more in tune with the way the company works and the personalities of the partici- pants. Participants will feel more at ease discussing sensitig~ new product con- cepts in front of an insider. An insider tends to be more available to help the participants than an outsider, who may be distracted serving other clients in other industries and markets. tn the description of the workshop/ championship process, there is a pre- sumption that market researchers and marketers participate side-by-side in all aspects of the research process up until the quantitative test. For many firms, the market research and marketing functions are well-integrated. In other firms, espe- cially those that sell products and ser- vices to other businesses, the two func- tions may not be accustomed to working closely together. The benefits of drawing market researchers and marketers together in such firms are obvious. A well-man- aged workshop/championship is a contri- bution to the firm. Managing the process and facilitating the sessions is a way in- house market researchers can add value beyond presenting study results and making recommendations. In these times of handowringing about the real value of market research, we need to demonstrate the power of the market research process. Contrary to what many in-house market researchers might think, the value added is not solely in being a conduit of inlbrmation, but also in the management of this process. In- house researchers are uniquely positioned to provide this service since it is the only thing missing from the array of services offered by most full-service research firms.I---I The amhor thattks Darid Shaw of the He ~lett-Packard Company fi)r his valu- able input to this article. Ouirk's Marketing ResearchReview T!08571095
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Data Use continued from p. 15 behavior are complex and actual sales are scattered sparsely over a large geographic area. If proper statistical techniques are used, the method will produce very powerful segmentation models and direct estimates of penetration rates, • Use the survey only to refine the population at risk. Then use actual sales information in conjunction with lifestyle clusters or demographics. This will work well in situations where you are well established in a market or for analysis of direct mail campaigns where actual response rates b, re available. In particu- lar, demographic modeling of direct mail response rates will almost always produce significant benefits through target mail- ing. I. Fully supe~'ised on-slte recruiting. 2. Luxurious suites- seating 20+ clienls. 3. Conference or living room settings. 4. Separate client meeting rooms. 5. Test kitchen with viewing. 6. Simultaneous viewing capability for interviews. 7. Full service fielding. 8. Complete business support services. 9. Fabulous restaurants, world class hotels, discount designer shopping & gourmet catering Statistical specification Statistical specification of demographic models is complex. Major areas you need to consider include: • Specification of the model. Demographic penetration models are more often than not nonlinear. Penetration can only vary between 0 and 100 and is usually more resistant to change at very high and very low levels. The effect of the independent variables may be reduced as a multiple of distance from a retail site. Logistic transformations of penetration rates work and usually justify their added complexity in the results they get. • Correlation. All demographic variables are highly corre- lated both between variables and between locations. Education and income are always highly related, for example, and neigh- boring census tracts will be more similar to each other than to those at a distance. These correlations are much higher than those you will find in survey data and will make it extremely difficult to develop a useful regression model. As a first step, then, any demographic modeling effort needs to start with a factor or principal components analysis. The purpose is to reduce the number of independent variables to those represent- ing significant sources of variation in the population statistics. Because of Iocational correlation, this analysis will be sensitive to the definition of the market area and may have to be performed each time that definition changes. - Weighting. Demographic variables are heteroscedastic. That is, their accuracy varies with the size of the population on which they are based. In a census tract with five people, the difference between 20% and 40% is one person. In a tract with 2,500 people, that difference would be based on 500 people. Certainly the data from the second tract will be more stable than those from the first. In particular, models which relate popula- tion demographics to individual responses must use adequate weights to account for these differences. A final word Demographic data available now, no matter how it has been updated, estimated, or projected, is ultimately based on the 1980 Census. Despite its age, the data provides powerful marketing information when applied correctly. With the com- ing of the 1990 Census, this power should take a quantum leap. The technology is in place to make use of the data while it is current, technology that was just being developed when the 1980 Census was released. This technology has created a cheap and abundant source of marketing intelligence. With planning and familiarity with the techniques of analysis, this information can become even more central to the market research process in the next ten years than it has become in the last ten. I~ December, 1990 You have reasons to... d~s~gned with yore- professionM needs ~ m~dl & more.... For more information, call Janis M. Wagman .. . (201)865-49~0 Fax (20]) 865-O408 C Meadowla on umer u|J Just 3 miles from mid-lown Manhattan and minutes from La Guardia and Newark Airports. ClrcleNo.831 on Reader Card RIFE MARKET RESEARCH, INC. 1111 Pa~kCenter BbxL, Suite 111, Miami, FL 305-620-4.244 Since 1957 Cird~ No. ~2 on R~¢ Card 55 T108571096
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Washington D. C. 's best fieldservice has just become the area's la~es HOUSE MARKET , INC. "where excellence and elegance unite with market research" -estab lished1968- "'i • ~ POTOMAC, MD CONFERENCE CENTER Our newly expanded state-of-the-art facility now features four lavish conference suites with viewing rooms, some accommodating up to 25 clients,t Each room offers: ** Full wall one way mirrors ** Private client lounges ** Individual controls for heat and AC ** Tiered seating and illuminated writing ledges in client viewing rooms ** Technologically advanced remote controlled audio and video systems ** Satellite transmission capabilities Pauline House, her daughters Karen and Elaine, and their professional staff guarantee exceptional recruiting, service with a smile and a sincere desire to cater to your every need!,t HYA'VI'SVILLE, MD MALL FACILITY traditional enclosed mall facility with kitchen and focus group capabilities For further information, please call us today !![! 1201 Seven Locks Road, Suite 200, Potomac, MD 20854 - (301) 424-1930 - FAX (301) 424-3128 T108571097
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960~Zg9011 L~ 066 I. "~aqmaaao XHO, I,DFI IICI
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ALABAMA BIRMINGHAM Connections Inc. 4 Office Park Cimle Suite 310 Birmingham, AL 35223 Ph. 205-879-1255 Fax 205-870-3502 Contact: Rebecca Watson 1,3,6,7B Polly Graham and Associates Inc, 3000 Riverchase Galleria, Ste. 310 Birmingham, AL 35244 Ph. 205-985-3099 Fax 205-985-3066 1,3,4,6,7B New South Research 700 So. 28th St. Ste. 106 Birmingham, AL 35233 Ph. 205-322-9988 Fax 205-322-8608 1,3,6,7B Scotti Bureau Mktg. Rsch, Brookwood Village Birmingham, AL 35209 Ph. 205-879-0268 1.3.4,6,7A HUNTSVILLE Polly Graham & Associates, Inc. 5901 University Dr., #111 Huntsville, AL 35806 Ph. 205-830-0146 1,3,7A MOBILE Polly Graham & Assoc. Inc. 3289 Bel Air Mall Mobile, AL 36606 Ph. 205-471-0059 1,3,4,6,7A MONTGOMERY Nolan Research 3661 Debby Drive Montgomery, AL 36111 Ph. 205-284-4164 1,3,6,7A ALASKA ANCHORAGE Dittman Research Corp. 8115 Jewel Lake Road Anchorage. AK 99502 Ph. 907-243-3345 Fax 907-243-7172 Contact: Lisa Bullion 1,3,6.7C 58 ARIZONA PHOENIX Angeletti Marketing Research Interviewing Service 4015 A North 16th St. Phoenix, AZ 85016 Ph. 602-956-2500 Contact: Beverly Foster 1,2,3,6,7A Arizona Market Research Services 9606 Metro Parkway East Phoenix, AZ 85051 Ph, 303-758-6424 or 602-997-7221 Fax 602-944-0130 Contact: Ruth Nelson 1,3,4,6,7A Arizona Market Research Services 10220 North 31st Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85051 Ph. 303-758-6424 or 602-944-8001 Fax 602-944-0130 Contact: Ruth Nelson 1,3,4,6,7B Ask Adzona Div. Bergo& Assoc. 1948 W, Main St. Mesa, AZ 85201 Ph. 602-464-5885 Fax 602-464-9284 Contact: Beth Aguirre 1,3,4,5,6,7A Behavior Research Center 1117-No. 3rd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Ph. 602-258-4554 Fax 602-252-2729 Contact: Bruc~ Hernandez 1,2,3,6,7C Fieldwork Phoenix Inc. 7776 Pointe Pkwy. West Ste. 240 Phoenix, AZ 85044 Ph. 602-438-2800 Fax 602-438-8555 1,3,4,5,6.7B (See advertisement on p. 96 ) Friedman Marketing/Phoenix Colonnade Mall 1889 E. Camelback Rd. Phoenix. AZ 85016 Ph. 602-264-1133 Fax 602-266-9051 Contact: Paula Cdmmins 1,3.4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Gikas International 5515-1 North 7th St. Phoenix, AZ 85014 Ph. 602-265-2890 Fax 602-234-3955 1,3o4,5,6,7A 8687 E. V'ra De Ve,qtura, #309 Scottsdale, AZ 85258 Ph. 602-483-7900 Fax 602-957-7045 Con~ct: 3ay M: .E~ycer 1,3,6,7B Market Verdicts Inc. 3930 E. Camelback Rd. Ste. 207 Phoenix, AZ 85018 Ph. 602-957-9640 or 800-726-9640 Contact: Sharon Sharpe 1,3,6,7B O'Neil Associates, Inc. 412 East Southern Ave. Tempe, AZ 85282 Ph. 602-967-4441 Fax 602-967-6122 Contact: Michael O'Neil 1,3,4,6,7B Quality Controlled Services 6360-3 E. Thomas Road " Scottsdale, AZ 85251 Ph, 602-941-0048 F~,x 602-941-0949 Contact: Dorothy Simon 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 59) Response Research 5220 West Indian School Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85031-2610 Ph. 602-277-2526 Fax 602-247-4477 Contact: Michael Engelhart 1,3,4,6,7A Time N Talent 5725 N. Scottsdale Rd. #105 Scottsdale, AZ 85253 Ph. 602-423-0200 Contact: W. endy Walker 1,3,4.6,7B Valleywide Research Inc. 1107 S. Gilbert, Ste. #110 Mesa, AZ 85204 Ph. 602-963-1953 1,3,4,6,7A Walker: Data Source 4515 South McClintock, Ste. #101 Tempe, AZ 85282 Ph. 602-831-2971 Fax 602-838-8856 Contact: Nancy Haysletl 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 79) Walker: Data Source 5730 W. Hayward Avenue Glendale, AZ 85301 Ph. 602-247-2560 Fax 602-931-6058 Contact: Susan Anderson 1,3A,6.TA (See advertisement on p. 79) Codes: Location: I Conference Style Room] 7A S.hopp=ng Mall 2. I iv~Kj Room St~le I 78 CXt;ce Buil~ng 3. Observaaon Room 1 7C Free Sland'ng 4. Test Kitchen J 70 CXher 5. Test Kitchen tw" Obs. Room 6. Vi~eo Equ~wnent Avadable Quirk's t, brketJng ResearchReview T!08571099
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QCS UNDERSTANDS THAT. The right respondents can make all the difference when it comes to your focus group. That's why we at QCS pay so much attention to quality recruiting. QCS follows strict s~:reening procedures, and our recruiters have the experience quality recruiting takes. They know where to look and how to fill your group with only qualified participants. Even when they're of the "difficult-to-find" variety. Plus, QCS offers quality facilities nationwide. We have 42 focus group suites across America. Each one is staffed by veteran professionals who attend to every detail. Quality recruiting, quality facilities and an experienced staff.., it all adds up to success. Call one of out'branch managers today, or call our toll free number for focus groups anywhere in the USA. ~Quality Controlled Services~ NATIONWIDE MARKE TING INPUT FOR MARKETING IMPACT (800) 325-3338 December. 1990 C~c~ No. BSO o~ Read~" Card 59 T108571100
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TUCSON Field Market Research 6045 E. Gran~ Road Tucson, AZ 85712 Ph. 602-886-5548 Fax 602-886-0245 Contact: Bruce Fohr 1,3,4,5,6,7B Luth Research Inc. 6369 E. Tanque Verde Rd., #190 Tucson, AZ 85715 Ph. 602-886-3071 Fax 602-290-8074 Contact: Helen Maher 1,3,4,6,7B Pueblo Research Assoc. Inc. 3710 S. Park Ave., #706 Tucson, AZ 85713 Ph. 602-623-9442 Fax 602-623-9`143 Contact: Jackie Acorn 1,3,4,6,7B Quality Controlled Services 4500 N. Oracle Tucson, AZ 85701 Ph. 602-887-3502 Fax 60~-326-0790 Contact: Annette Idso 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 59) ARKANSAS FORT SMITH Cunningham Field Services Central Mall #,tON Ft, Smith, AR 72903 Ph. 501-484-5637 1,3,4,5,6,7A LITTLE ROCK Arkansas Answers 8720 Stanton Little Rock, AR 72209 Ph. 501-568-0260 Fax 501-568-5232 Contact: Ginger Mansfield 1,3,4,6,7C Miller Research Grouplnc. 10 Corporate Hill Dr. Suite 100 Little Rock, AR 72205 Ph. 501-221-3303 Contact: David F. Miller 1,3,4,6,7B Sygnis 10825 Financial Pkwy., Suite 401 Little Rock, AR 72211 Ph. 501-661-7000 or 800-345-7984 Fax 501-661-7099 Contact: Vance McConnell 1,3,4,5,6,7B Cite3e lie,. ~1 o~ P,~ade~Catd PINE BLUFF Friedman Marketing~Little Rock The Pines M, all 2901 Pf~es Meil D~ive Pine Bluff', A~ 71601 Ph. 501-535-1688 or 313-569-0444 Fax 501-535-1754 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73) CALIFORNIA BAKERSFIELD Marketing Works 1311 California Ave. Bake(sfleld, CA 93304 Ph. 805-326-1012 Fax 805-326-0903 Contact: Debbie Duncan 1,3,6,7B FRESNO AIS Market Research 2070 N. Winery Fresno, CA 93703 Ph. 209-252-2727 Fax 209-252-8343 Contact: Patricia Alviso 1,3,4,6,7C Anthony Marquis and Switzer 213 N. West St. Visalia, CA 93291-6011 Ph. 209-627-3995 Fax 209-733-4630 Contact: Nick Anthony 1,2,3,4,6,7C Bartels Research Corp. 145 Shaw Ave. Suite C-1 & 2 Clovis, CA 93612 Ph. 209-298-7557 Contact: Laura Wasserman 1,3,4,6,78 Barrels Research Corp. 130 West Shaw Clovis, CA 93612 Ph. 209-298-7557 Contact: Laura Wasserman 1,3,4.6.7A LOS ANGELES Adept Consumer Testing/Beverly Hills 345 No. Maple Dr. Ste. 325 Beverly Hills. CA 90210 Ph. 818-905-1525 Fax 818-905-8936 Conlact: Mark Tobias 1,3.4,6,7B Adept Consumer Testing;Los Angeles 17323 Ventura Blvd., Suite 308 Encino, CA 91316 Ph. 818-905-1525 Fax 818-905-8936 Contact: Mark Tobias 1.3,4,6.7B Adler Weiner Research Company 11911 San Vicente Blvd., Su=te 200 Los Angeles. CA 90049 Ph. 213-440-2330 Fax 213-440-2348 Contact: Phyl!is Gordon 1,3,4,6,7B QuL"k's Marketing ReseaJ'ChRev~ew T108571101
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Area Phone Bank 3607 W. Magnolia Blvd., Suite N Burbank. CA 91505 Ph. 818-848-8282 Fax 818-846-9912 Comtact: Ed Goto'ba, ur~ 1.3,6,7B C.alifomla Oualitative Center (See Ted Heiman & Assocs.) Car-Lene Research Inc. 13350 E. Telegraph Rd. Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 Ph. 213-946-2176 1,3,4,6,7A Car-Lene Reseamh 1460 E. Holt Pomona, CA 91767 Ph. 714-623-4844 1,3,4,6,7A Consumer Pulse of Los Angeles Galleria at South Bay, #269 Redondo Beach, CA 90278 213-371-5578 Fax 213-542-2669 Contact: Angle Abell 1,3,4,5,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 84 ) Tom Dale Market Research 9165 Phyllis Ave. Los Angeles, C.A 90069 Ph. 213-550-1460 1,3,4,6,7B Davis Market Research Services 23801 Calabasas Road Calabasas, CA 91302 Ph. 818-888-2408 Fax 818-888-6691 Contact: Carol Davis 1,3,4,6.7B Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 5430 Van Nuys Blvd., Suite 102 Van Nuys, CA 91401 Ph. 818-995-1400 Fax 818-995-1529 Contact: Louise Kroot-Haukka 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 3) Facts 'N Figures Panorama Mall, Suite 78B Panorama City. CA 91402 Ph. 805-272-4888 1,3,4,6.7A Facts 'N Figures 1233 W. Ave. P, #701 Palmdale, CA 93551 Ph. 805-272.4888 1,3,7A Field Dynamics Marketing Research 17547 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 308 Encino, CA 91316 Ph. 818-783-2502 Fax 818-905-3216 Contact: Nancy Levine 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 61) Fox Research 852 S. Lucerne Blvd. Los Angeles. CA 90005 Ph. 213-934-8628 Fax 213-857-0280 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B December. 1990 Gicard & Gir~d Crea~ve Concepts 20854 Laure,n¢ St. Chatswodh, CA 91311 Ph. 816-773-8801 1,3,6,7B Hea~dn Research Inc. 6633 Fallbrook Avenue Canoga Park, CA 91307 Pho 818-712-0660 Conlact: Gall Stutz 1,3,4,6,7A Ted Heiman & Assocs. 20350 Ventura Blvd., Suite 140 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Ph. 818-710-0940 Fax 818-887-2750 Contact: Ted Heiman 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 60 ) House of Marketing 3446 Madera Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90039 Ph. 213-661-1109 Fax 818-577-9647 Contact: Nancy Brestal 1,2,304,6,7D House of Marketing 95 N. Marengo Ave. Pasadena, CA 91101 Ph. 818-792-5959 Fax 818-577-9647 Contact: Amy Siadak 1,3,4,6,7B 1~ 3e N, aliooal BIlL Los A~Jel~s, CA 90064 Ph. 213-478-0826 Contact: Nicandro Juarez 1,3,7C L and J Research 1334 Third St., #304 Santa Monica. CA 90404 Ph. 213-829-7579 1,3,6,7B L.A. Focus 17337 Ventura Blvd. #301 Encino, CA 91316 Ph. 818-501-4794 Fax 818-907-8242 Contact: Jadoree Crossan 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 120,) L.A. Research Inc. 9010 Reseda Blvd. #109 Northridge, CA 91324 Ph. 818-993-5500 Fax 818-993-5864 1,3,4,5,6,7A Los Angeles Marketing Res~arch Assoc. 5712 Lankershim Blvd. N. Hollywood, CA 91601 Ph. 818-506-5544 1,3,6,7B Codes; 1. Conference Style Room 2. L~ving Rcom Style 3. Observation Room 4. Tesl Kitchen 5. Test Kitchen w/Obs. Room 6. Video Equipment Avallabk) Location: 7A Shopping Mall 7B Office Building 7C Free Standing 7D Other Los ,-, ~..An"eles 818-783-2502 Nancy Levine President 17547 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 308 Encino, CA 91316 FAX 818-905-3216 9 o..cus *~i~ng * I~afion smdi~ * car clini~ / fide & drive t~L~ o p~u~ cli~ ] t~ / p~en~ " on~n~ne ~t~ews ~EN~ l~llr • ~ste t~ ~E~ - ~ ~ • telephone i~t~ews * Span~h and ~an lan~g~ - nationwide Cir=le lto.85Z on Retider Card 61 TI08571102
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We focus on the details so you Can focus in L.A. Marketing Matdx is dedicated to providing you with the highest quality focus group support. Our facility has been designed with your needs in mind. Localed conveniently. Fashioned for comfort. Maintaining the highest quality recruiting and client services. And all at a competitive pdce. Convenient Location Just minutes from Beverly Hills and Century City, our location provides easy access to many types of respondents. Also, we're close to the freeways and to numerous fine hotels and restaurants, as well as to the airport (LAX) and downtown Los Angeles. Comfortable Setting You'll appreciate the features we've built into our facility, including: • A group room with large areas for displays and show materials. • A three-tier viewing room that accommodates large groups of viewers and pro- vides each with a writing table. • A cozier one-on-one inter- viewing room with its own viewing facility. • Large one-way mirrors with double glass for sound pro- tection, • State-of-the-art audio re- cording equipment with independent backup sys- tems and high quality video. • A pdvate entrance for clients. ~ Hollywood- _ Beverly / Hills/ Br~nt~oo~ ~ Professional Recruiting we have many years of experience in qualifying lhe types of respondents you're interested in, such as: • Consumers of all ages: adults, teens and children - Executives • Specialized professionals and managers • Technical experts • Health care professionals: physicians, nurses, support staff Client Service Whatever amenities you desire-- special foods, hotel reservations, tape transcriptions, qualified moderators, or any other needs -- we'll provide you with top-quality service. Competitive Pricing Ask us for a bid. In addition to being professional, we're cost-competitive. Just call Jennifer Cromwell or Marcia Selz. We'll focus on the details and help you focus in L.A. MARKETING MATRIX 2566 Overland, Suite 716 Los Angeles, CA 90064 (213) 842-8310 FAX (213) 842-7212 62 Circle No.85S on Reader Card MarketiR~ Matrix 2566 ~ Sure 7t6 Los Angeles, CA 90064 Ph. 213-842-8310 =ax 213-842-7212 Contact: Jennifer Cromwell dVertisement on p. 62 ) Meczka M~rketing Research 8825 A South Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 Ph. 213-670-4824 Contact: Dona Browne 1,3,4,6,7B MSI International 12604 Hiddencreek Way Cerritos, CA 90701 Ph. 213-802-8273 Fax 213-802-1643 Contact: Mary Schultz 1.3,6,7C Murray Hill Center West 2951 28th St., Ste. #3070 Santa Monica, CA 90405 Ph. 213-392-7337 Fax 213-392-8743 Contact: Sue Mender 1,3,4,5,6,7B -" National Mk'tg F~esearch of California 347 S. Ogden Dr., Suite 203 Los Angeles, CA 90036 Ph. 213-937-5110 1,3,6,7B PKM Marketing Research Services 15618 B East Whittwood Lane Whittier, CA 90603 Ph. 213-694-5634 Fax 213-947-6261 1,3,4,6,7A Plaza Research • 6053 W. Century Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 Ph. 213-645-1700 Fax 213-645-3008 Contact: Tony Sullivan 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B 'See advertisement on p. 98 ) PIog Research Inc. 18631 Sherman Way Reseda, CA 91335 Ph. 818-345-7363 Fax 818-345-9265 Contact: Shelley Sasson 1,3,4,6,7C Quallly Controlled Services 15827 Russell St. Whittier, CA 90603 Ph. 213-947o2533 Fax 213-947-0178 Contact: Carol Balcolm 1,3,4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 59) Research Tapings 1216 5th Street Santa Monica, CA 90401 Ph. 213-395-8370 1,2,3,4,5,6.7C Southern California Interviewing Service 17200 Ventura Bird., Suite 120 Encino, CA 91316 Ph. 800-872-4022 Fax 818-783-8626 Contact: Ethel Brook 1,3,4,6.7A Suburban Associates of Los Angeles 2001 S. Barrington. Suite 109 Los Angeles. CA 90025 Ph. 213-478-2565 Fax 213-444-9678 1,3,4,5,6,7B Owrk's Marketing Research Review T108571103
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Los Angeles, CA, 90025 Ph. 213-820-7007 Fax 213-820-0695 1.3.6,7B Trotta Associates 13t60 Mindanao Way Suite 180 Marina Del Rey. CA 90292 Ph. 213-306-6866 Fax 213-827-5198 Contact: Ingrid Robertson 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 63 ) U. S. Research Corp. 2157 Montclair Plaza Lane Montclair, CA 91763 Ph. 714-624-1244 Contact: Jackie Weise 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 91 ) The Viewing Room/ASI Market Research 2600 W. Olive Ave.,7th FI Burbank, CA 91505 Ph. 818-843-4400 Fax 818-843-6889 Contact: JoAnn DeLisio 1,3,6,7B West Coast Marketing Research 2021 Sherman, #109 Canoga Park, CA 91306 Ph. 818-709-1610 Contact: Carole Hill 1,3,4,6,7B MONTEREY/SALINAS Friedman Marketing.MontereylSaltnas Northridge Mall. Hwy 101 & Boronda Dr. Salinas, CA 93906 Ph. 408-449-7921 or 313-569-0444 Fax 408-449-0187 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73) ORANGE COL'NTY Assistance In Marketing Huntinglon Ctr. Ma11,7777 Edinger Ave. Huntington Beach, CA 92647 Ph. 714-891-2440 Fax 714-898-1126 Contact: David Weinberg 1.3,4,6.7A Beta Research West 14747 Artes~a Blvd., #1 -D&E La Mirada, CA 90638 Ph. 714-994-1206 Fax 714-994-1835 1,3,6,7C Discovery Research Group 17815 Sky Park Circle Suite L Irvine, CA 92714 Ph. 714-261-8353 Fax 714-852-0110 1,3,4,6,7B Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 18003 Sky Park South, Suite L Irvine, CA 92714 Ph. 714-261-8800 Fax 714-261-9037 Contact: Charlene Kaloper 1,3,4,6,7B (See advemsement on p. 3) EquifaxJQuick Test Opinion Ctrs. 500 No. Euclid Ave. Anaheim. CA 92801 Ph. 714-535-2696 Fax 714-535-8182 Contact: Unda Green 1.3,4,6,7A (See advertisemenl on p. 3) December. TROTTA Associates MARKETING IEMEAR'CH 63 T108571104
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Focus ~ 26142 Avenida Bo~aohon Mission Viejo. CA 92691-3204 Ph. 714-380-1612 Contacl: Jeanne Herds 2,3,6,7C Friedman Marketing/Los Angeles Buena Park Mall 8623 On-The-Mall #123 Buena Park, CA 90620 Ph. 714-995-6000 or 313-569-0444 Fax 7I 4-995-0637 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,5,6,7A (See adverfisement on p. 73 ) The Question Box F & M Plaza, 1224 Katella Ave #100 Orange, CA 92667 Ph. 714-744-2744 Fax 714-744-2933 Contact: Sue Amidei 1,2,3,4,5,6,7A The Question Shop Inc. 1500 E. Lincoln Ave. Orange, CA 92665 Ph. 714-974-8020 Fax 714-921-4762 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 64) QUESTION ~..~,.:d " • i'. :'.i~.~" In Soulbern California ..!., SuccessP~lly Serving Clients Si~e 1982 ..- ~. A ~mplele Field ~ice • ~]' ' ~11 Ryan Reasor ~ (714) 974~020 ..~: " Circle No. 857 on Reader Card Spar~sh Bus~ess Se,,vie~s 220 F_ Fourth St., #208 Santa Ana, CA 92701-4604 Ph. 714-568-0450 Fax 714-568-04.54 Contact: Greg May t,S,6,7~ Trotta Associates 5 Park Plaza, Ste. 200 Irvine, CA 92714 Ph. 714-251-2700 Fax 714-251-2707 Contact: Ingrid Robertson 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 63) RIVERSIDE Field Management Associates 3601 Riverside Plaza Riverside, CA 92506 Ph. 714-369-0800 1,3,4,6,7A SACRAMENTO Heakin Research Inc. 1607 D Arden Way Sacramento, CA 95815 Ph. 916-920-1361 Contact: Nancy Cunningham 1,3,4,6,7A Research Unlimited 1012 Second St. Sacramento, CA 95814 Ph. 916-446-6064 Fax 916-448-2355 1,3,4,6,7C Sacramento Research Center P.O, Box 246540 Sacramento, CA 95824-6540 Ph. 916-383-2965 or 800-235-5028 Fax on Request Contact: Sharon Pierce 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 68) SAN DIEGO WE KNOW THAT A/R L HAS THERE'S NO DRESS WHAT 1T REHEARSAL FOR FOCUS G ROUPS '"T.,~(~S"!! ...THE 1 ST ...AND TIME IS A MORE![ "TAKE. EXPERT FULL SERVICE OUALITATIVE CAPABILITY ALSO AVAILABLE Based in the 6~ largest city in the U.S.- San Diego, California ~ANAI.'~'SIS/ Skyhght P~aza. Suite 180 • 4655 Ruffner St * San Dtcgo. CA 921 l I (619) 268-4800 FAX (619) 268-4892 Ctrc]e No.858 o~Reader Card Ar~ly~ L~. Market Place at The Grove San Diego, CA 92111 Ph. 619-268-4800 Fax 619-268-4892 Contact: Adine Lowanthal "~,3,6,7A (See adverilsement on p. 64) Analysis/Research Ltd. 4655 Ruffner St., Ste. 180 San Diego, CA 92111 Ph. 619-268-4800 Fax 619-268-4892 Contact: Adine Lowenthal 1,2,3,6,7B (See adverEsement on p. 64 ) Bilingual Unlimited Research 8287 Royal Gorge Drive San Diego, CA 92119 Ph. 619-583-6243 Fax 619-583-0767 Contact: Cados E. Ordaz 1,2,3,4,6,7B Directions in Research Inc. 5353 Mission Center Rd. Suite 219 San Diego, CA 92108 Ph. 619-299-5883 Contact: David Phile- 1,3,4,6,7B Eastcoast Westcoast Field Market Research 523 North Home Street Oceanside, CA 92054 Ph. 619-721-4114 Fax 619-721-6684 Contact: Mickey McKenna 1,3,4,6,7B Fogerty Group 4915 Mercury San Diego, CA 92111 Ph. 619-268.8505 1,3,4,5,6,7A Hayes Marketing Research 7840 El Cajon Blvd., Suite 400 La Mesa, CA 92041 Ph. 619-464-8611 1,3.,6,7B Info-Search 3502 Angelucci St., Suite 320 San Diego, CA 92111 Ph. 619-583-6243 Fax 619-569-0363 Contact: Lisa Michello 1,2,3,4,6,7A Intercontinental Marketing Investigations Inc. P.O. Box 2147 Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067 Ph. 619-756-1765 Fax 619-756-4605 Contact: Rhode Muratori 1,3,6,7D Jagorda Intentiewing Sewices 3615 Kearny Villa Rd., Suite 111 San Diego, CA 92123 Ph. 619-573-0330 1,2,3.4,6,7B Luth Research inc. 3030 Plaza Bonita Rd. National City, CA 92050 Ph. 619-479-5891 Fax 619-479-4869 Contact: Patsy Trice 1.3,4,6,7A Luth Research Inc. 3456 Camino Del Rio No. #101 San Diego. CA 92108 Ph. 619-283-7333 Fax 619-283-1251 Contact: Bet~ Jo Lopez 1,3,4,6.7B Q,.drk's Market~ng ResearchReview T!08571105
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Lut~ Resemch t -6,le Cam~ De~ Rio No. #1275 San Dtego, CA 92108 Ph. 619-299-7487 Fax 619.299-0513 Contact: Sandi Fagan 1 Novick Ayres Research 2657 Vista Way Suite 5 Oceanside, CA 92054 Ph. 619-967-1307 1,2,3,4,6,7A San Diego Su~eys Inc. 4616 Mission ~orge Place San Diego, CA 92120 Ph. 619-265-2361 Fax 619-582-1562 1,3,4,6,7B San Diego Surveys 3675 Midway Ddve Ste. L San Diego, CA 92110 Ph. 619-224-3113 Fax 619-582-1562 1,3,4,6,7A San Diego Surveys 1351 E.Pennsylvania Ave. Escondido, CA 92027 Ph. 619-480-8440 Fax 619-582-1562 1,3,4,6,7A Taylor Research 3990 Old Towne Ave. #201A San Diego, CA 92110 Ph. 619-299-6368 Contact: Hardet,Huntley 1,3,4,6,7B (See adve~lisement on p. SAN FRANCISCO ConStat, Inc. 450 Sansome, Ste. #1100 San Francisco, CA 94111 Ph. 415-274-6600 Contact: Brian Kirby 1,3,6,7B Consumer Research Assocs./Superooms 111 Pine Street, 17th Floor San Francisco, CA 94111 Ph. 415-392-6000 Fax 415-392-7141 Contact: Rich Anderson 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See adverlisement on p. 65) Core.,/Canapar7 and Galanis 447 Sutter St. San Francisco, CA 94108 Ph. 415-397-1200 Fax 415-433-3809 1,3,6,7B Ecker & Associates 220 So. Spruce Ave, Ste. 100 So. San Francisco, CA 94080 Ph. 415-871-6800 Fax 415-871-6815 Contact: Betty Rosenthal 1,2.3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 30 Ecker & Associates 222 Front St., 3rd Floor San Francisco, CA 94111 Ph. 415-871-6800 Fax 415-871-6815 Contact: Betty Rosenthal 1,2.3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 30 !. Confere'v::~ S~le Room 7A Stloppmg Mall 2. Liv',ng Room Style 7B Office B=~;~ 3. ~ R~m 7C Free S~ ~ 4. Test ~t~en ~ 7D ~ ~ 5. TO~ ~n w/~. R~ 6 ~d~ E~e~ A~aMe D~em~, 19~ S A N F R A N C I S C O DEmXE FOCUS GROUP SUITES LUXURIOUS SUITES WITH FLOOR TO CEILING MIRRORS /-7 ~"1. ~.; ~~;'- LOUNGE "One of the best focus group facilities in the country." • Silent,.24-hour air conditioning system; separate temperature controls for panel and observation rooms. • Professional audio system; PZM microphones; Nakamichi recording equipment. • Comfortable one-on-one depth interview rooms. • Kitchen area for test product preparation. • Reliable recruiting from our extensive database or client-provided lists. • Sumptuous client meals catered by fine San Francisco restaurants. • Convenient financial distdct (downtown) location; close to major hotels, shopping, theaters and nightlife. Consumer Research Associates 111 Pine Street, 17th Floor San Fra~zcisco, CA 94111-5619 TEL 415/392-6000 • FAX 415/392-7141 55 TI08571106
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MARGARET YARBROUGH & ASSOCIATES, INC. FIELD SERVICES 934 Shorepoint CI., Suite I00 Alameda, CA 94501 (415) 521-6900 FAX (415) 521-2130 T108571107
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111 Maiden I_a~e, 6th Floor San Francisco, CA 94108 Ph. 415-434-0536 Fax 415-391-0946 Contact: Donald Kunstler (See advertisement on p. 101) Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 203 Southland" Mall Hayward. CA 94545 Ph. 415-785-4650 Contact: Sue Gomez 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Equlfax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 1268 Town Center Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Ph. 408-773-9777 Fax 408-739-1357 Contact: All Arastu 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Fleischman Field Research, Inc. 1655 No. Main Street, Ste. 320 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 Ph. 415-942-2600 Fax 415-989-4506 Contact: Alex Rogers 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 67) Fleischman Field Research, Inc. 220 Bush St., Ste. t212 " San Francisco, CA 94104 Ph. 415-398-4140 Fax 415-989-4506 Contact: Molly Fleischman 1,2,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 67) Friedman Marketing/San Francisco 5..800...Northgate Mall ~an Hafael. CA 94903 . Ph. 415-472-5394 Fax 415-472-5477 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6.7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Heakin Research of California 227 Bay Fair San Leandro, CA 94758 Pho 415-278-2200 Contact: Robert Kramer 1,3,4,6,7A MSI Hillsdale 14 Hillsdale Mall San Mateo, CA 94403 Ph.415-574-9044 Fax 415-574-0385 Contact: Liane Farber 1,3,6,7A Nichols Research 1155 Newpark Mall Newark, CA 94560 Ph. 408-773-8200 Fax 415-794-3471 Contact: Jane Rosen 1,3,4,6,7A Nichols Research 795 E. El Camino Real Sunnyvale, CA 94087 Ph. 408-773-8200 Contact: Mimi Nichols 1,3,4,6,7A Nict~ols Research 333 W. El Camino Real, #180 Sunnyvale, CA 94087 Ph. 408-773-8200 Fax 408-733-8564 Contact: Mimi Nichols 1.3,4,6,7B Nichols Research 1820 Galindo Ste. 3 Concord. CA 94520 Ph. 415-687-9755 Fax 415-686-1384 December. 1990 Contz¢= Sherry D~ion 1,3,4,6,7B Proview 577 Airport Blvd., Suite 130 Burfingame, CA 94010 Fax 415-344-3217 Contact: Jean Douglas 1,3,4,6,7B Public Response Associates 601 Van Ness Ste. 2056 San Francisco, CA 94102 Ph. 415-771-2525 Fax 415-931-9062 Contact: Louise Blalock 1,3,6,7D Q.E.D. Research 2815 Mitchell Dr. Ste. 118 Walnut Creek, CA 94598 Pho 415-932-3202 Fax 415-932-0499 Contact: Sharon Marchione 1,306,7B Redwood City, CA ~]4063 Ph. 415-365-1533 Fax 415-365-3737 1,3.4,6,7B Margaret Yarbro_ugh & Associate 934Shorepoint Ct., Ste. 100 Alameda, CA 94501 Ph_ 415-521-6900 Fax 415-521-2130 Contact: Margaret Yarbrough 1,2.3,4,5,6,7B ~See advertisement on p. 66) I Codes: Location: t. Conference S~Ie Room I 7A SP, opp~ng Mall 2. Uwng Room Style i 7B Office Buik:ling 3. Observation Room I 7C Free Standing 4 Test Kitchen I 70 Other 5. Test Kitchen w/Obs. RoomI 6. Video Equipment Ave+lathe I FLEISCHMAN FIELD RESEARCH SAN FRANCISCO SIMPLY THE B ST. % FLEISCHYt4N FIELD RESEARCtt provides interviewing and focus group recruiting coverage of the San Francisco Bay Area's 6 million diverse, upscale and professional populalion. Our four luxuD' focus group rooms with tiered ~.qewlng rooms seating 'avelve to fifteen (Ihree with adjacent fully-equipped client of~ces) are located in San Francisco'.~ financial district, and in suburban Walnut Creek. On-site central location super~ ision and monitoring, careful, meticulous recruiting bv our seasoned, well-educated staff, and }xoadcast quailU' audio/vlsual s3stetns are j~t some of the many I'eatures which help ensure vou a successthl tbcus ~oup. With both a suburban and downtown location, FLEISCHMAN FIELD RESEARCH is ideallv situated for e.'~ecutive,"technical and consumer recruiting ~d interviewing. Please call FLE1SCH3L~.S FIELD RESE?',RCH for a competitive bid. references and more information on our q'~alitatlve and quantita:ive serwces. FLEISCHMAN FIELD RESEARCH Stm Fra,w£,c,, ~, Premiere Fi,'[3 Ser,,i,'e 220 Bush Street. Suite 1300. Sam Francisco, CA 9-,1104 1655 N. Main Street. Suite ,520. ~'Valnut Creek. CA 94596 (415) 398-4140 • FAX(415) 989-4506 Circle No. 851 on Reade~ Ca~:l 67 T!08571108
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SAN JOSE Phase Ill Market Research 1150 N. First St., Ste. 211 San Jose, CA 95112 Ph. 4~8~947~-6~1 Contact: Nancy Pitta 1,3,4,6,7B San Jose Focus 3032 Bunker Hill Lane, #105 Santa Clara, CA 95054 Ph. 408-988-4800 Fax 408-988-4866 Contact: Colleen Flores 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 120) COLORADO COLORADO SPRINGS Brewer Research 1421 D.elaware Ddve Coloredo Spdngs, CO 80909 Ph. 719-597-9869 Contact: Esther Brewer 1,3,4,5,6,7A Consumer Pulse of Colorado Springs 750 Citadel Drive East Cotorado Springs, CO 80909 Ph. 719-596-6933 ~'ax 719-480-0176 Contact: Laura Wassil Millensifer 1 ,~3,6,7D (See advertisement on p. 84 ) Barbara Prince Assoc. Inc. Colorado Springs, CO 80918 Ph. 719-594-9192 1,3,4,6,7A LI~ S~ Resear~h,:Carp. Chapel Hills Mall, #315 1710 Bdargate Blvd. Colorado Springs, CO 80918 Ph. 719-598-8070 Contact: Norms Bumdt 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 91 ) DENVER Bernett Research, Inc. 14200 Alameda Avenue Aurora. CO 80012 Ph. 303-341-1211 Fax 303-341-4469 Contact: Patty Pacheco 1,3,4,6,7A " (See advertisement on p. 83) Colorado Market Research 2149 So. Grape St. Denver, CO 80222 Ph. 303-758-6424 Fax 303-756-6467 Contact: Ruth Nelson 1,3,4,6,7B Consumer Pulse of Denver 6810 So. Dallas Way Englewood, CO 80112 Pho 303-799-4849 Fax 719-480-0176 Contact: Laura Wassil Millensifer 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 84) Hartford Research Center New Haven Research Center Sacramento Research Center Each of our facilities is designed for 20 clients to view a focus group. Wrap- around mirrors provide a panoramic view of respondents. Clients have room to enjoy their sessions. The directors of our facilities, Mary Ann, Nancy, Gaff and Sharon, are detail- type people. They see that food is served beautifully, hotels treat clients exception- ally and respondents are recruited with precision. Fresh Respondents The Hartford, New Haven. and Sacramento markets have high per capita incomes a~d fresh respondents. Ninety- five per cent of the population in each market has never been to a focus group. When you need the best facility, detailed recruiting, and fresh respondents call ..... Connecticut (203)236-61 33 National (Except CT/CA) (800)235-5028 California (916)383-2965 Citc~eNo. 862 on neaderC~rd E~uff~.~Qu~¢k Test Opinion Ctrs. 2~3 Vgfa ~ra Ma~ kakewood, CO 80226 Ph. 303-937-0144 Fax 303-937-0502 Contact: Matthew Johnson 1,,3~4,~7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Reldwork Denver Inc. 900 Auraria Pkwy, Ste.#601 Denver, CO 80204 Ph. 303-825-7788 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 96) Friedman Marketing/Bou~der Crossroads Mall 1600 28th St., #277 Boulder, CO 80301 Ph. 303-449-4632 or 313-569-0444 Fax 303-449-1484 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Friedman Marketing/Denver 6510 W. 91st .Ave., Ste.#106 Westminster, CO 80030 Ph, 303-428-8803 or 313-569-0444 Fax 303-430-4719 -~ Contact: Pauta Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Friedman Marketing/Denver Southwest Plaza Mall 8501 West Bowles Avenue Littleton, CO 80123 Ph.303-972-8734 or 313-569-0444 Fax 303-933-0476 Contact: PauIa Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73) Information Research Inc 10650 E. Bethany Drive Aurora, CO 80014 Ph. 303-751-0190 Contact: Norman Petitt 1,3,4,5,6.7B Information Research Inc. 1250 S. Hover Road, Ste. #51 Longmont, CO 80501 Ph. 303-443-3548 Contact: Norman Petitt 1,3,,~,6,7A Message Factors Inc. 2820 So. Parker Road. Ste. #275 Aurora. CO 80014 Ph. 303-750-5005 Contact: John Maben 1,3,6,7B Plaza Research Denver, CO Ph. 201-265-7500 Contact: Jeffrey Robbins ~Os~eening Spring. 1991 advertisement on p. 98 ) Barbara Prince Associates Inc. 5801 W. 44th Avenue Denver. CO 80212 Ph. 303-458-0145 1,3,4,6,7A Quality Controlled Services Cinderella Cit~ Malt 701 W. Hampden Ave. Space R-13 Englewood, CO 80110 Ph. 303-789-0565 Fax 303-789-0573 Contact: Dunlap Scott 1.3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 59) Quirk's MarkeSng ResearchReview T108571109
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Tele~omnet 5255 Marshall St., Ste. 201 Arvada, CO 80002 Ph. 303-467-0335 Contact: Maryellen Filuta 1,3,4,6.7B CONNECTICUT BRIDGEPORT Firm Facts Interviewing 307 Kenyon Street Straflord, CT 06497 Ph. 203-375-4666 Fax 203-375-6034 1,3.4,6,7D J.B. Martin Interviewing Service 4695 Main Street Bridgeport, CT 06606 Ph. 203-371-4158 Fax 203-371-5001 Contact: Joan Martin 1,3,4,6,7B DANBURY Performance Plus Inc. 7 Backus Avenue Danbury, CT 06810 Ph. 508-872-1287 Contact: Shirley Shames 1,2,3,4,6,7A HARTFORD Beta One, Inc 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 126 Farmington, CT 06032 Ph. 800-447-BETA Contact: Marnie Honiberg 1,3,4,6,7B Hartford Research Center 1321 Silas Deane Hwy., 2nd Fir. Wethersfield, CT 06109 Ph. 203-236-6133 or 800-235-5028 Fax on Request Contact: Mary Ann Pacocha 1,3,6.7B (See advertisement on p. 68) NEW HAVEN New Haven Research Center Washington Street North Haven, CT 06473 Ph. 203-236-6133 or 800-235-5028 Contact: Gail Luzietti 1,3,6.7B (See advertisement on p. 68) Res-A-Vue 20 Commerce Park Rd. Milford, CT 06460 Ph. 203-878-0944 Fax 203-878-3726 Contact: John Kelman 1,2,3,4o6,7B NORWALK Trost Associates Inc. 585 Main Avenue Norwalk, CT 06851 Ph. 203-847-7204 1,3,4.6,7C December, 1990 STA~,RD Access Reseamh, Inc. 8 Griffin Road N. Windsor, CT 06095 'Fh. Fax 203-688-2053 Contact: Robert Platkin 1,3,6,7B The Consumer Dialogue Center 25 Third Street Stamford, CT 06905 Ph. 203-359-2840 Fax 203-327-9061 1,3,4,6,7B Focus Cenler-So. New England 1011 High Ridge Road Stamford, CT 06905 PIL 203-322-5.996 Fax 203-322-0819 Contact: Muriel Green 1.3.4,5,6,7B FoCus First Amelia 969 High Ridge Road Stamford, CT 06905 Ph. 203-322-1173 Fax 203-968-0421 Contact: Susan Weiss 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 69 ) Codes: Location: I. Conference Style Room 7A Shopping Mall 2. Uving Room St'/le I 7e Olfice Braiding 3. Observation Room 7C Free Standing 4. Test Kitchen 7D Other 5. Test Kitchen'w/Obs. R~m 6. Video Equ,pment Ava lab~ Word of Mouth says it all. One moderator after another has told us they are telling someone else about Focus Rrst ~ca, Maybe it"s our staff, a dedicated bunch who listen before they speak and have the experience to act on what they say. Might be our recruiting talent. Could be our facilities which are new, spacious and offer a variety of technical equip- merit.., a room for every need you might say. Some just like our gourmet cooking. There are probably hundreds of reasons why we are meeting the needs of one moderator after another. Most important however, is the fact we're the talk of the town. For complete information and a full color brochure describing our facilities, please call or write to us today. Ask for Susan Weiss...we promise a fast response. 969 HIGH RIOGE ROAD. STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT 069051203-3224173 A FULL SERVICE QUAUTATIVE RESEARCH FACILITY c~~ 69 T108571110
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WASHINGTON, D.C. Area Wide Market Research 16017 Comprint Circle Ga~thersburg, ME} 20877 Ph. 301-948-1920 1,3,4,6,7B Cameron Mills Research Svce. 2414 Cameron Mills Road Alexandria, VA 22302 Ph. 703-549-4925 Fax 703-549-4926 Contact: Fern Shewmaker 1,2,3,4,6,7C Consumer Pulse of Washington 8310 C Old Court House Rd. Vienna, VA 22182 Ph. 703-442-0960 Fax 703-442-0967 Contact: Tricia Barnes 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 84) Covington-Bu rgess Market Research Svce. 1921 Eleventh Street N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001 Ph. 202-745.0919 Fax 202-797-8562 1,3,4,~,6,7D (See advertisement on p. 70) • CENTRAL TELEPHONE INTERVIEWING • SUPERVISED INTERVIEWERS • FOCUS GROUPS • ON-SITE INTERVIEWING • PRODUCT PLACEMENTS • IN-STORE AUDITS • DEMONSTRATORS • SAMPLING KEYED TO FLEXIBILITY IN MARKETING COVINGTON.BURGESS MARKET RESEARCH SERVICE INC. 192} ELEVENTH STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20783 (202) 745-0919 7O C~rc~e NO. 88~ On Reader C~rd G/M/K Fetus 92715th Street Washington, D.C. 20005 Ph. 202-789-2000 Fax 209.-289-2557 Contact: Kristine Kohlman 1,3,6,7B Heakin Research Inc. 14882 Baltimore-Washington Blvd. Laurel MD 20707 Ph. 301-776-9800 Contact: Randi Levinson 1,3,4,5,6,7A House Market Research Inc. 1201 Seven Locks Rd., Ste, #200 Potomac, MD 20854 Ph. 301-424-1930 Fax 301-424-3128 Contact: Karen House-Sapp 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 56) House Market Research Inc. 3500 East West Hwy. Hyattsville, MD 20782 Ph. 301-559-7060 or 301-424-1930 Fax 301-424-3128 Contact: Mollye Meyer 1,2,3,4,5,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 56) Market Dynamics Inc. 2222 Gallows Road Vienna, VA 22027 Ph. 703-560-8400. 1,3,6,7B Metro Research Services 10710 Lee Hwy. Ste. 207 Fairfax, VA 22030 Ph. 703-385-1108 1,3,4,6,7A McLaughlin Research Interviewing Service 1118 Galloway St. NE Washington, D.C. 20011 Ph. 202-526-0177 Fax 202-526-8747 1,3,6,7C Olchak Market Research 6194 Greenbelt Road Greenbelt, MD 20770 Ph. 301-441-4660 Fax 301-474-4307 Contact: Jill Siegel 1,3,6.7A Oualily Controlled Services 6710 E. Springfield Mall Springfield, VA 22150 Ph. 703-971-6717 Fax 703-922-5946 Contact: Cynthia Dunn 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 59) Shugoll Research, Inc. 7475 Wisconsin, Ste. 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Ph. 301-656-0310 Fax 301-657-9051 Contact: Joan ShugolI 1,3,4.6,7B T.I.M.E. Ma~cet 425 Spolsylvania Mall Freddcksburg, VA 22401 Ph. 703-786-3376 Fax 703-786-3925 1,3,4,6,7A FLORIDA DAYTONABEACH Cunningham Field Services 555 W. Granada Daytona Beach, FL 32114 Ph. 904-258-3906 1,3,4,5,6,7A FORT LAUDERDALE / BOCA RATON Alenik Field Services, Inc. 1750 No. University Dr. #117 Coral Springs., FL _3_3071 Ph. 305-755-2222 Contact! Bea Alenik 1,2,3,6,7B Flodda in Focus, Inc. 915 Middle River Drive Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304 Ph. 305-566-5729 Contact: Doris Wagman 1,3,4,6,7B Heakin Research, Inc. 9569 W. Atlantic Blvd. Coral Springs, FL 33071 Ph. 305-753-4466 Contact: Linda Bonneville 1,3,4.6,7A Mar's Surveys~. Inc. 1700 No. University Drive Coral Springs, FL 33071 Ph. 305-755-2805 Fax 305-755-3061 Contact: Ronald Teblum 1,3,4,6,7B Perceptive Market Research, Inc. 2306 SW 13th St., #409 Gainesville, FL 32608 Ph. 904-336-6760 Fax 904-336-6763 Contact: Elaine M. Lyons-Lepke 1,3,6,7D Weitzman & Philip, Inc. 3251 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, FL 33021 Ph. 305-653-6323 Contact: Daniel Philip 1,3,4,6o7A FORT MYERS T.I.M.E. Market Research 4125 Cleveland Avenue Ft. Myers, FL 33901 Ph. 275-0223 Fax 813-275-9883 1,3,4,6,7A QuirKs Marketing ResearchReview T108571111
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JACKSONVILLE Tom Dale Market Research 235 Margaret Street Neptune Beach FL 32233 Ph. 212-758-9777 1,6 7B Irwin Research Services, Inc. 900 University Blvd. N, Suite 606 Jacksonville, FL 32211 Ph. 904-744-'7000 Fax 904-744-2090 Contact: Scott Irwin 1,3,4,6,7D MELBOURNE Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Melbourne Square Mail #577 1700 W. Newhaven Ave. Melbourne, FL 32904 Ph. 407-729-9809 Fax 407-729-9551 Contact: Lori Ryan 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) MIAMI BSR Field ServiCes 2121 Ponce De Leon Blvd., #1250 Coral Gables, FL 33134 Ph. 305-448-7622 1,2,3,6,7B Findings International Corp. 8885 S.W. 1 lth St. Miami, FL 33165 Ph. 305-266-9798 Fa~ 305-264-5584 Contact: Odando Esquivel 1,3,4,6,7C Jean M. Light Interviewing Service 8415 Coral Way, Suite 201 Miami, FL 33155 Ph. 305-264-5780 Contact: Jean Light 1,3,6,7A Jean M. Light interviewing Service Miami International Mall Miami, FL 33172 Ph. 305-264-5780 Contact: Jean Light 1,3,4,6,7A Rife Market Research, Inc. 1111 Park Center Blvd., Ste. #111 Miami, FL 33169 Ph. 305-620-4244 Fax 305-621-3533 Contact: Mary Rile 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 55) Codes: Loc~tlon: 1 Conference Style Room 2. L~t,~J Room Style ' 7B 3, ~bserva~on Rc~'~ 7C Free Stand:r~j =. Te~t ~=~e~ J 5. Test ~en wl ~ ~m December. 1990 ~ Market Research, Inc. 1758 NE Miami Gardens No. Miami, FL 33179 Ph. 305-620-4244 F~x 305~621-3533, Contact: Mary Rife 1,3,4,6,7A (See advedisement on p. 55) Strategy Research Corp. 100 NW 37th Ave. Miami, FL 33125 Ph. 305-649-5400 1,3,6,7B Weitzman & Philip, Inc. 850 Ives Dairy Road Miami, FL 33179 Ph. 305-467-2644 or 305-653-6323 Contact: Daniel Philip 1,2,4,6,7A ORLANDO The Datafax Co., Inc. 2600 Maitland Center Pkwy. Ste #170 Maitland, FL 32751 Ph. 407-660-8878 Fax 407-660-1730 Contact: Gordon McAleer 1,3,6,7B Pilar Ellis Market Research Inc. 500 N. Orlando Ave. Ste. #1398 Winter Park, FL 32789 Ph. 407-628-1835 Fax 407-628-0571 1,2,3,4,6,7D Equifax/Qulck Test Opinion Ctrs. Lake Square Mall 10401-082 Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL 34788 Ph. 904-365-0505 Fax 904-365-2005 Contact: Douglas Fedele 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) U.S. Research Corp. Florida Mall Room 422 Orlando, FL 32809 Ph.407-830-4542 Fax 407-830-6064 Contact: Ellen Shamblin 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 91) U.S. Research Corp. 560 Osceola St. Altamonte Springs, FL 32701 Ph. 407-830-4542 Contact: Ellen Shamblin 1,3,4,5,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 91) U.S. Research Corp. 1650 Sand Lake Rd., Ste. #213 Orlando. FL 32809 Ph. 407-830-4542 Contact: Ellen Shamblin 1,3.4,6,7B (See adve~sement on p. 91) PENSACOLA Sand Dollar Research, tnc. 5100 North 9th Ave. M-1209 Pensacola, FL 32.504 Ph. f104-478-9~f4 1,3,4,6,7A SARASOTA Start Research 8201 So. Tamiami Trail Sarasota, FL 34238 Ph. 813-925-7827 Fax 813-922-3289 Contact: Vicki Pobicki 1,2,3,4,6,7A TALLAHASSEE Friedman Marketing/Florida Taliahassee Mall 2415 N. Monroe St., #708 Tallahassee, FL 32303 Ph. 904-385-4399 or 313-56~:~)4~,4 Fax 904-385-3481 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) TAMPA/ST. PETERSBURG Adam Market Research, Inc. 4010 Boy Scout Blvd., Suite 755 Tampa, FL 33607 Ph. 813-875-4005 Fax 813-875-4055 Contact: Mark Siegel 1,3,4,6,7B Davis & Davis Research, Inc. 8001 N. Dale Mabry Hwy...Ste. 401B, Tampa, FL 33614-3263 Ph. 813-873-1908 Contact: Rosemary Davis 1,2.3,6,7B Equlfax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Countryside Mall, #832 2601 U.S. Hwy 19 North Clearwater, FL 34621 Ph. 813-797-4868 Fax 813-796-2616 Contact: Bessie Zantopoulos 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Florida Focus, Inc. 2535 Landmark Dr., Suite 109 Clearwater, FL 34621 Ph. 813-796-4957 Contact: Jackie Green 1,3,4,6,7B IDD Market Research 5706 Benjamin Ctr. Dr., # 118 Tampa. FL 33634 Ph. 813-884-0088 Contact: Isabel Dunn 1,3.4,6.7B 7[ T108571112
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~ a~d ~ Services, Ir~.. Urban Center II 48-90 W. Kennedy Blvd., #120 Tampa, FL 33609 Ph. 813-289-4500 Fa~ 813-289-3760 Contact: Gwen Weinberger 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 72) Premack and Associates, Inc. 8130 66th Street No. Pinellas Park, FL 34665 Ph. 813-544-3191 1,3,6,7B Quality C~rolted ~ 4904 E~senhower Blvd.. Ste. 160 Tampa, FL 33634 Ph. 813-886-4830 Fax 813-886-5431 Contact: SEzan'ne Lucas 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 59) Schwartz Field Service Inc. 8902 N. Dale Mabry, Ste. 102 Tampa, FL 33614 Ph. 813-933-8060 Contact: Jo~e Schwartz 1,2,3,4,6,7B WE'VE MOVED! , SUCH LUXURY AND CONVENIENCE. Just walk across the luxurious Sheraton Grand Hotel Lobby to our new focus group facilities...or cross the street (from the Sheraton Grand Lobby) and youql be able to visit our new mall facility. TWO GREAT MOVES IN ONE MONTH! We are located in the Urban Center which adjoins the Sheraton Grand Hotel The Urban Center is located within the heart of Tampa with Tampa's airI?ort being just two miles away• Across the street is the West Shore Ma~l featuring over one hundred specialty stores and three department stores, such as Maas Brothers / Jordan l~larsh, Malson Blanche, ana JCPenney. Our newest mall facility is located in this upscale mall. Just imagine, both o[our focus and mail facilities across the street [rom each other and only two miles from the airport! The Urban Center is actually two separate buildings, the Urban C~nter I and the Urban Center II. The Sheraton Grand Hotel is'located between the two buildings and gives the appearance of one large building. The three budldings are joined together so you do no t have to go ou tsid e when you leave the hotel and attend f6cus groups in our new facffity. The Sheraton Grand Hotel is a four star hotel and offers airport limou- sine service every thl _rty minutes. Just think of the convenience ~or you and your clients. You can skip the expense of a rental car. The hotel limousine will pick you up at the airport and deliver you to our hotel. Your clients can check into the h6tel, walk across the lobby into our first floor facility. MASS Cinde N<~ 865 on Reader Card 72 ~/Lssodates lnc. 4350 W. Cypress, Ste. 535 Tampa, FL 33607 Ph. 813-874-3423 Fax 813-875-6789 t,3,4,6,TB Tampa Bay Opinion Mart 3302 W. Buffalo Ave., Ste. 1005A Tampa, FL 33607 Ph. 813-876-0321 1,3,4,6,7A Tampa Market Research 3815 W. Humphrey St., #105 Tampa, FL 33614 Ph. 813-935-2151 Fax 813-932-6265 Contact: Linda Yochim 1,3,4,6,7B Total Research Corp. 5130 Eisenhower Blvd., Ste. 210 Tampa, FL 33634 Ph. 813-887-5544 Fax 813-882-0293 "" Contact: Cynthia Williams 1,3,4,6,7B WEST PALM BEACH Hazleton Focus Groups 900 Osceola Ddve West Palm Beach, FL 33409 Ph. 407-471-5310 Fax 407-471-5295 1,3,6,7B Profile Marketing Research 4020 So. 57 Avenue Lake Worth, FL 33463 Ph. 407-965-8300 Contact: Judy Hoffman 1,3.6,7B Lois Weinstein Associates 2300 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Ste. 207 W. Palm Beach, FL 33409 Ph. 407-622-4579 Contact: Lois Weinstein 1,3,6,7B GEORGIA ATLANTA Arena Research 1 Dunwoody Park, Suite 128 Dunwoody, GA 30338 Ph. 404-496-6090 Fax 404-493-4216 Contact: Steve Israel 1,3.6,7B Atlanta Marketing Research Center 3355 Lanox Rd. NE., Ste. 660 Atlanta. GA 30326 Ph. 404-239-0001 Fax 404-237-1235 Contact: Carol Smith 1,3,6,7B Quirk's Marketing ResearchReview TI08571113
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3294 Medlock Bridge Rd., Ste. 100 Norcross, GA 30092 Ph. 404-448-0754 Fax 404-416-7586 Contact: Anne Rast 1.3,4,6,7C Consumer Search 4166 Buford Hwy. Atlanta, GA 30345 Ph. 404-321-1770 Fax 404-636-3037 Contact: Barry Tannenbaum 1,3,4,6,7D Data Tabulating Service 3323 Chamblee-Dunwoody Road Atlanta, GA 30341 Ph. 404-455-0114 Fax 404-458-8926 1,3,6,7B Elrick & Lavidge Inc. 1990 Lakeside Pkwy., 3rd Fir. Tucker, GA 30084 Ph. 404-938-3233 Fax 404-621-7666 Contact: Michael Hardin 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisembnt on p. 101) Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Town Center at Cobb .400 Ernest Barret Pkwy. Kennesaw, GA 30144 Ph. 404-423-0884 Fax 404-424-5354 Contact: Barry McCoy 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Equlfax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 4205 Roswell Rd. Atlanta, GA 30342 Ph. 404-843-3807 Fax 404-843-9733 Contact: James Tackett 1.3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 3) Heakin Research Inc. 2100 Pleasant Hill Road Duluth, GA 30136 Ph. 404-476-0714 Contact: Terri Williams 1,3,6,7A Heakin Research Inc. 331 Shannon South Park Mall Union City, GA 30921 Ph. 404-964-9634 Contact: Brad McDonald 1,3,4,6,7A Kenneth Hollander Associates 3490 Piedmont Rd., Ste. 920 Atlanta. GA 30305 Ph. 404-231-4399 1,3,4.6,7B Codes: I Conferepc~ Style Room 2. Living Ro~rn Styte 3. OOservadon Room 4. Test ~J~an 5. Test Kitchen v,. Obs. Room 6. Vcleo Eq.J~pme~t Avad=hle December. 1990 7A Shopp,ng Mall 78 OffiCe Building 7C Free Starting ~ O~her Seats for Size Client of Focus Viewing State Market Room Room Arizona Phoenix 18 x 20 12 Arkansas Uttle Rock 16 × 16 12 California MontereylSalinas 14 x 16 12 San Francisco 15 x 16 14 Los Angeles 15 x 20 20 Colorado Boulder 16 x 18 14 Denver - Westminster 14 x 16 14 Littleton 10 x 16 6 Florida Tallahassee 15 x 20 12 Iowa Des Moines 12 x 10 6 Louisiana New Orleans 16 x 16 14 Michigan. Detroit (3) 12 x 15 8 20 x 40 14 16x16 12 Mississippi Jackson 10 x 12 6 New York Westchester County 16 x 16 12 Oklahoma Tulsa 16 x 16 14 Tennessee Memphis 19 x 30 12 Utah Salt Lake City 14 x 16 10 Washington Seattle 14 x 16 10 Wisconsin Green Bay/Appleton 20 x 25 12 Let Our Family Put You in Focus. With The Friedman Marketing Organization, your focus group is family business. Consider Friedman's resources: 21 fully equipped focus group rooms; 26 permanent mall facilities; 19 door-to-door markets; and 3 central Wats facilities. All this in 25 different markets nationwide. For a bid on your next focus group or further information on Friedman's full range of data collection services, call us at 313-569-0444. The Friedman Marketing Organization NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 25130 Southfield Road, Sude 200 Southfield. M148075 Tel. (3~31 569-0444 Fax (313) 569-2813 READING THE MINDS OF THE MARKETS! 73 T!08571114
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."Finally, Iclear marketing research. Thanks." The hands-on C/J research team can help clarify your marketing research, strategies--bringing your best possible alternatives into focus. Years of research experience give C/J the resources to clear through the "numbers game" fog and get to the heart of your exact situation with specific recommendations on how to act upon the findings -- so you can make informed, intelligent marketing decisions. Whether you move in the competitive bealthcare, industrial or consumer environment, don't be left in the mist -- let C/J help clear the way to sound marketing strategies. Observe the meaningful inter- action taking place in our modem fOCUS group room while you relax in our large, comfortable client viewing room, supported by the latest A/V For more complete information about our company, just write, phone or fax for our capabilities brochure. C/J RESEARCH, INC C/J Research, Inc. 3150 Salt Creek Lane Arlington Heights, IL 60005 Phone: 800/323-0266 or 708/253-1100 Fax 708/253-1587 recording equipment. Or, for fast, cost-cffectis~e flexibility without the risk of overlooking the impact of your or your competitor's special marketing efforts, a Continuous Tracking program using our 100+ position CRT equipped telephone centers may be just what you need to clarify your marketing picture. C/J Research also collects and interprets data by: • WATS Telephone/CRT assisted • Mall intercepts -- nationwide • Personal door-to-door interviewing • Ph~/stciardExecutivel Industrial interviews • Exit interviews * Central location pre-reeruited interviews ~'e sincerely welcome the opportunity" to clarify your future research needs. 74 £~irk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571115
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3acl~o~/~sociat~s Inc. 3~70 P~,idea~tal Dr. Atlanta. GA 30"340 Ph. 404-454-7D60 Fax 404-986-2828 Contact: Margaret Hicks 1,3,4,8,7B Jackson Associates Inc. 2200 So, Cobb Ddve Smyrna, GA 30080 Ph. 404-433-1533 Contact: Margaret Hicks 1,3,6,7A Joyner Hutcheson Research Inc. 1900 Century Place Atlanta, GA 30345 Ph. 404-321-0953 Fax 404-634-B131 Contact: Wanda Hutcheson 1,2,3,4,6,7B Lansdell and Associates, Inc. 5052 Clark Howell Hwy. Atlanta, GA 30349 Ph. 404-765-0936 Contact: Dods Lansdell 1,3,4,6,7B MacFadane & Company Inc. 1900 Emery St. NW., Ste. 450 Atlanta, GA 30318 Ph. 404-352-2290 Fax 404-352-2299 1,3,6,7B Message Factors 5208 Roswe~l Rd. Atlanta, GA 30342 Ph. 404-256-9405 Fax 404-256-9457 Contact: Russell Boyd 1,3,6,7C Mid-America Research 3393 Peachtree Rd. NE Atlanta, GA 30326 Ph. 404-261-8011 1,3,4,6,7A Plaza Research 2401 Lake Park Drive Atlanta, GA 30080 Ph. 404-432-1400 Fax 404-432-0730 Contacy: Bonnie Connell 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 98 ) Precision Field Services Atlanta, Inc. 3405 Piedmont Rd. Atlanta, GA 30305 Ph. 404-266-8666 Fax 404-266-0208 Contact: Patricia Sawyer 1,3,4,5,6,7B P.V.R. 655 Village Square Dr. Stone Mountain, GA 30083 Ph. 404-294-4433 1,3,4.6,7B December. 1990 Qt~a|i~-yCe~'~|led Services Ph. 404-321-0468 Fax 404-636-3276 Contact: Susan Lipsitz 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. ~) Scotli Research 1800 Peachtree Road NWo. Ste. #500 Atl~qta. GA 30309 Ph. 404-352-0686 1,3,4,5,6,7B John Stolzberg Market Research 1800 Century Blvd., Ste. #795 Atlanta, GA 30345 Ph. 404-329-0954 .Centa~,.~l~ St~zbe~j 1,3.4,6,7B Superior Researc~h 1155 Hammond Dr. A~nta, GA 30328 Ph. 404-394-4400 Fax 404-391-9345 Contact: Rhoda Davis 1,2.3~4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 75) I codes: Location: l. Conference Style Room ~ 7A Shopping Mall 2. Living Room St~le I 7B office Bmlcling 3. Obsen/alion Room I 7C Free Standing 4, Test Kitchen I 7D Olher 5. Test Kilchen w/Obs. Room~ - 6. Video Equipment Available ~ Conference 14x23 Contetence 14x20 10x12 Reception 24 x 40 SUPERIOR RESEARCH A TLANTA'S NEWEST FOCUS GROUP FACILITY OWNED AND MANAGED BY RHODA DAVIS AND DEBBIE HUNTER SUITE 5090-E ATLANTA, GA 30328 TELEPHONE 404-394-4400 FAX 404-391-9345 • THREE SPACIOUS FOCUS GROUP SET-UPS • FULLY EQUIPPED TEST KITCHEN • SIMULTANEOUS VIEWING CAPABILITY • REVERSABLE SET-UP FOR IN-DEPTH INTERVIEWS • FIXED VIDEO EQUIPMENT • LOUNGES WITH EXERCISE EQUIPMENT • GOURMET FOOD • ADJACENT TO BANKS, RESTAURANTS, SHOPS AND HOTELS • EASY ACCESS TO MAJOR HIGHWAYS AND AIRPORTS SUPERIOR RESEARCH 1155 HAMMOND DRIVE 75 T108571116
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245 Peachtree Center #308 Atlanta, GA 30303 Pho 404-578-9085 Fa~ 404-977-0833 Contact: Peggy Kane 1,2,3,6,7B GAIN~ESVILLE Jackson Associates Inc. 1285 W. Washington Street Gainesville, GA 30501 Ph. 404-536-2054 Contact: Margaret Hicks 1,3,6,7A HAWAII HONOLULU East West Institute 220 S. King St., Ste. #975 Honolulu, HI 96813 Ph. 808-528-4050 1,3,6,7B IDAHO BOISE E.S. Field Services 1111 S. Omhard, #150 Boise, ID 83705 208-343-9556 208-343-0648 Contact: Steve Swann 1,3,6,7B ILLINOIS CHICAGO 34 E. Oak St., 3rd Roor Chicago,, IL 60611 Ph. 312-463-5552 Fax 312-463-7639 Cer~. E~en De~fma~ 1,3,4,6,7B Adler Weiner Research Company 6500 N. Lincoln Ave.,#200 Chicago,, IL 60645 Pho 312-675-5011 Fax 312-675-5698 Contact: Betty Weiner 1,3,4,6,7C B. Angell and Associates, Inc. One E. Supedor St., 6th Fir. Chicago,, IL 60611 Ph. 312-943-4400 1,3,6,7B Assistance In Marketing 1650 N. Arlington Heights Rd. Arlington Heights,, IL 60004 Ph. 708-392-5500 Contact: Maureen Fields 1,3,4,5,6,7B Assistance In Marketing Route 31 and 72 Dundee,, IL 60118 Ph. 708-428-0885 Fax 312-392-5841 Contact; Maureen Fields 1,3,4,6.7A Assistance In Marketing 2828 N. Clark Street Chicago,, IL 60657 Ph. 312-477-3139 Fax 312-392-5841 Contact: Maureen Fields 1,3,4,6o7A Baxter Research Interviewing 270 W. North Avenue Villa Park,, IL 60181 Ph. 708-832-2617 1,3,4,6,7A WE'RE GONNA KNOCK YOUR SOCKS OFF! pe has a new look! Our new facilities include three state of the art qualitative suites with private client lounges and all the right amenities to knock the socks off both moderators and their clients. But we're not just another pretty face. At Focuscope you can still rely on fidl groups of qualified respondents and our famous attention to detail...right down to brimming bowls of m&m's in each viewing room. Focuscope's facilities, recruiting, service...hang on to your socks! 1 ! 00 W. Lake Street. SI~ 60 ~ focuscope Oak ParklL 60301 Phone: 708,386-5086 76 Circle No. 869 on Reader Card 6847 W. 159th Street Tinley Pa~k,, IL 60477 Ph. 708-532-6800 Contact: Bob Bryles 1 Brytes Survey Service 260 Or]and Park Place Odand Park,, IL 60462 Ph. 708-532-6800 Contact: Bob Bryles 1,3,4,6,7A Bryles Survey Servive 17735 S. Halsted Street Homewood,, IL 60477 Ph. 708-532-6800 Contact: Bob Bryles 1,3,4,6,7A Bullard Research Service, Inc. 10413 Roberts Rd. Palos Hills,, IL 60465 Ph. 708-599-2703 1,3,6,7B C/J Research, Inc. 3150 Salt Creek Lane Arlington Heights,, IL 60005 Ph. 708-253-1100 Fax 708-253-1587 Contact: Sherri Binke 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 74 ) Car-Lene Research, Inc. Northbrook Court Northbrook,, IL 60062 Ph. 708-498-1305 1,3,4,6,7A Car-Lene Research, Inc. 188 So. Waukegan Street Deerlield,, IL 60015 Ph. 708-564-1454 1,3,4,6,7A Chicago Focu's 7 E. Huron Chicago,, IL 60611 Ph. 312-951-t616 Fax 312-951-5099 Contact: Lynn Rissman 1,3,4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 120) Comiskey Research 205 W. Grand Ave., Ste. #108 Bensenville,, IL 60106 Ph. 708-860-2255 Contact: Sig Saltz 1,3,4,6,7B Communications Workshop, Inc. 168 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago,, IL 60601 Ph. 312-263-7551 Contact: Wilma M. Blagaich 1,2,3,4.6.7B Consumer and Professional Research, Inc. 3612 W. Lake Ave. Wilmette,, IL 60091 Ph. 708-256-7744 Fax 708-251-7662 Contact: Don Morich 1.3.6,7B Ou~rk's Marketing Reseg.rchReview T108571117
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Consumer Sur~eys Company Northjcoint Shopping Center 304 E. Rand Road Arlington Heights,, IL 60004- Ph. 708-394-9411 Contact: Floyd Berlant 1.3,4,6.7A (See advertisement on p. 77) Data Research, Inc. 1311 Butterfield Rd., Ste. #304 Downers Grove,, IL 60515 Ph. 708-971-2880 1,3,6,7B Dimensional Marketing, Inc, 211 E. Ontado St., 16th Fir. Chicago,, IL 60611 Ph. 312-280-0700 1.3,4.6,7B Elrick & Lavidge, Inc. 3 Westbrook Corp. Ctr., #600 Westchester,, IL 60154 Ph. 708-449-5300 Fax 708-449-4498 Contact: Jan Gebhardt 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 101) Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Ford City Shopping Ctr 7601 S. Cicero Ave. Chicago,, IL 60652 Ph. 312-581-9400 Fax 312-581-9"~58 Contact: Phil Wysocki 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 429 Hawthorne Center Vernon Hills,, IL 60061 Ph. 708-367-0036 Fax 708-367-4863 Contact: Sandy Lewis 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Facts In Focus, Inc. Highway 59 & New York St. Aurora,. IL 60505 Ph. 708-898-2166 1,3.4,5,6.7A Fieldwork Chicago, Inc. 6200 N. Hiawatha, Ste. #720 Chicago,, IL 60646 Ph. 312-282-2911 Fax 312-282-8971 Contact: Alice White 1,3.4,5.6.7B (See advertisement on p. 96 ) Fieldwork Chicago-O'Hare, Inc. 8420 W. Bryn Mawr Chicago,, IL 60631 Ph. 312-714-8700 Fax 312-714-0737 Contact: Susan Brody 1,3,4,6,78 (See adverhsement on p. 96 ) Focuscope, Inc. 1100 West Lake St.. Ste #60 Oak Park,, IL 60301 Ph. 708-386-5086 Fax 708-386-1207 Contact: Ann Rooney 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 76 ) Code~: ILocatJon: 1. Conferet',ce $.'y~e Room 7A Shopl~ng Mall I 2 Lrzu~g R~m Style 1 78 Ol~ce Bui~ng | 30"oservabon Room 7C Free 5 Test K¢chen w, Obs R~omj 6. V~o EqLupme~ A',.',~ab~e I December, 1990 I~EM,O TO; FROM: MESSAGE: AIt M~,rketing :Research Pro~,ess~als, Moderators and Clients CONSUMER SURVEYS COMPANY You Deserve To Be Pampered! You get off a cramped airplane, drive through an unfamiliar city to arrive, barely on time, at a research facility where you spend time in a cramped, too warm/too cold viewing room, craning your neck to see around a cameraman who is busily videotaping your group. Next time, pamper yourself at our new focus facility.~at the Northpoint Shopping Center. Relax in our spacious client lounge. Monitor the group in the lounge, or in our tiered, airy, observation room along with your 15 agency and corporate traveling companions. You'll feel refreshed by our separate air/heating system. View your group through an insulated one-way window stretching from the desktop writing ledge to the ceiling while a cameraman records the session from a remote video system located at the rear of the room, thereby providing you an unobstructed view. While you are comfortably watching your moderator capture every nuance, you can periodically jump up and utter those immortal words.. :'That's right! That's exactly what I've been telling you[" Come join us in a research environment designed to provide both comfort and quality research. After all, you are worth it. in Chicago, when you demand excellence... NORTHPOINT ~ SHOPPING CENTER ~ ..,o.,o...,..,. // CHICAGO RIDGE ~.~1 MALL ~ "* ILLINOIS CENTER CONSUMER SURVEYS ~ E. Rand I~:~z~..~¢e 220 F~d N Bc~lzm Circle N~-870 on ReaderCard T!08571118
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820 No. Orleans, Ste. #210 Chicago,, 1L 60610 Ph. 312-440-5252 Pax 312~_~6-1742 1,2,3,4.6,7B Heakin Research. Inc. 3615 Park Drive, Ste. #101 Olympia Fields,, IL 60461 Ph. 708-503-0100 Contact: Pat Wroble 1,3,4,6,7B Home Arts Guild Research Center 35 E. Wacker Drive Chicago., IL 60601 Ph. 312-726-7406 Contact: Roy Roberts 1,3,4,5,6,7B Illinois Center Market Research 151 N. Michigan Ave., Ste. 2413 Chicago,, IL 60601 Ph. 312-856-1697 Fax 312-856-0122 Contact: Peggy Ryan 1,3,4,6,7B Kapuler Survey Center North Arlington Atrium 3436 No. Kennicott Arlington Heights,, IL 60004 Ph. 708-870-6700 Contact: Deanna Springer Abramowitz 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 52) Marketing Services 2525 Gross Point Road Evanston,, IL 60201 Ph. 708-864-4100 1,3.6,7C k~neaca Reseemh 280 OrPand Square Shopping Center Odand Park,, tL 60462 Ph. 708-349-0888 1,3,4,6.7A Mid-America Research 999 N. Elmhurst Rd. Mr. Prospect,, IL 60056 Ph. 708-392-0800 1,3,4,6,7A National Data Research, Inc. 770 Frontage Rd., #110 Northfield,, IL 60093 Ph. 708-501-3200 Fax 708-501-2865 Contact: Val Maxwell 1,3,4,6,7B National Qualitative Centers 625 N. Michigan Avenue Chicago,, IL 60611 Ph. 312-642-1001 Fax 312-649-5812 Contact: Sandy Nidetz 1,2,3,4,6,7B Oakbrook Interviewing Center 1415 W. 22nd St,, Ste. #220 Oak Brook,, IL 60521 Ph. 708-574-0330. Fax 708-574-0358 Contact: Irene Potocki 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 78 ) O'Hare in Focus 1011 E. Touhy Ave., Ste. #440 Des Plaines,, IL 60018 Ph. 708-299-6636 Fax 708-824-3259 Conlact: Renie Vitellaro 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 23 ) OAKBROOK INTERVIEWING CENTER... in the heart of the Chicago Metropolitan area. Beautifully designed and decorated, the center has four spacious conference rooms with large, tiered viewing rooms and private client areas, and two fully equipped kitchens, one with viewing. Every need of the experienced moderator has been anticipated, including superb recruiting from a widely diverse area. And a professional staff attends to your needs throughout the most demanding day. The Oakbrook Interviewing Center...quite possibly, the finest focus group facility in the Chicago area, where warmth and comfort are evident, and attention to detail and service is the rule, not the exception. For a brochure call or write Irene Potocki 1415 West 22rid Street Oak Brook, IL 60521 (708) 574-0330 / (708) 574-9358[fax] Cire.,ie No. ~tl ¢~Reader Ca~ 78 P~za Reseat.oh 5450 N. Cumber'rand Ave. Chicago,, ~L 60656 Ph. 312-714-9600 Fax 312-714-9604 Corot,S: Holly EpstIen 1,3,4,6,7B (See adve~'sement on p. 98) Precision Field Services 7900 Milwaukee Ave., Ste. #22 Niles,, IL 60648 Ph. 708-966-8666 Fax 708-966-9551 Contact: lone Adelman 1,3,4,5,6,7A Quality Controlled Services 2000 Spring Road Oak Brook,, IL 60521 Ph. 708-620-5810 Fax 708-620-8804 Contact: Andrea Wilk 1,3,4.6,7B (See advertisement on p. 59) Smith Research 1121-P Lake Cook Road Deerfield,, IL 60015 • Ph. 708-948-0440 • Fax 708-948-8350 Contact: Kevin Smith 1,2,3,4,6,7B Smith Research 150 E. Huron, Ste. #720 Chicago,, IL 60611 Ph. 708-948-0440 Fax 708-948-8350 Contact: Kevin Smith 1,2,3,4,6,7B Survey Center, Inc. 455 E., ILlinois Chicago,, IL 60611 Ph. 312-321-8100 Fax 312-321-0607 ,2,3,4,5.6,7D Time N Talenl, Inc. 7337 N. Lincoln Ave. Lincolnwood,, IL 60646 Ph. 708-675-0200 Contact: Myra Balaban 1,3,4,6,7B Time N Talent 1400 Golf Rd. Rolling Meadows,, IL 60008 Ph. 708.806-0006 Contact: Harry Balaban 1,3,4,6,7A U.S. Research Corp. 300 Marquardt Drive Wheeling, IL 60090 Ph. 708-520-3600 Fax 708-520-7933 or 520-3621 Contact: Dennis Hill 1,3,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 91 ) View Point, Inc. 3059 W. Palmer Square Chicago, IL 60647 Ouirk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571119
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Ph. 3t 2-276-3900 1,3,4,6,7C PEORIA Scetti Bur. Mktg. Rsch. 1118 N. Sheridan Rd. Peoria, IL 61606 309-673-6194 1,3,4,5,6,7C INDIANA EVANSVILLE Gore Research and Associates Old Nat'l Bank Bldg., Ste. #1011 Evansville, IN 47708 Ph. 812-422-3221 1,3,4,6,7B Product Acceptance & Research(PAR) 1510 W. Franklin St. Evansville, IN 47710 Ph. 812-425-3533 Fax 812-421-6806 1,3,4,6.7B Product Acceptance & Research(PAR) 1139 Washington Square Mall Evansville, IN 47715 Ph. 812-473-5116 Fax 812-421-6806 1,3,4,6,7A FORT WAYNE Dennis Research Services, Inc. 3502 Stellhorn Rd. Ft. Wayne, IN 46815 Ph. 800-837-2442 Fax 219-485° 1476 Contact: Pat Slater 1,3,4,6, 7B Dennis Research Services, Inc. 4201 Coldwater Road Ft. Wayne, IN 46805 Ph. 219-484-2986 Fax 219-485-1476 Contact: Linda Hammer 1,3,4,6,7A Wallace Interviewing Service 7800 S. Anthony Blvd. Ft. Wayne, IN 46816 Ph. 317-784-0497 1,3o6,7A INDIANAPOLIS Herron Associates, Inc. 710 Executive Park Drive Greenwood IN 46143 Ph. 317-882-3800 Fax 317-882--4716 Contact: Dorothy Serrano 1.3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 36) December. 1990 Washing~n Square Me1| Ir'~anapolis, IN 46229 Pho 317-882-3800 Fa.~ 317-882-47t 6 Contact: Oorothy Serrano 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 36) Indianapolis Research Company 3037 South Meridian St. Indianapolis, IN 46217 Ph. 317-788-0861 1,3,4,6,7B 393 No. Alabama, #210 Indianapolis, IN 46204 Ph. 317-262-4680 1,3,6,7B Wall~er: Oata S'e'urce 3939 Priority Way So. Dr. Indianapolis, tN 46280 Ph. 317-843-3939 Fax 3t7-843-8638 Contact: Marlene Berwer 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 79) Codes: ]Location: 1 Conlerence Style Room 7A Shopping Mall 2. Li,~,'cj Room Style I 7B Office Building 3. Obse~zalion Room I 7C Free Standing 4. Test Kilchen ~ 7D Other 5 Test Kilchen w/Obs Room J 6. Video Equipment Ava=lable I IT'S THE THOUGHT THAT COUNTS. THE QUALITY OF THOUGHt"THAT IS INVESTED IN EACH FOCUS GROUP IS DIRECTLY PROPORTIONATE TO THE QUALITY OF SERVICE RETURNED. THAT'S OUR SINGULA[~ APPROACH TO FOCUS GROUP TESTING. FROM RECRUITING THROUGH SHOW RATE, WITH STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITIES, NO DETAIL IS TOO INSIGNIFICANTTO BE CONSIDERED ANYTHING LESS THAN MAJOR. THAT'S HOW WE'VE EARNED OU~ r~EPUTATION FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS. r~EMEMBER. IF IT'S THE SERVICE YOU'DE LOOKING FOR, IT'S THE THOUGHT THAT COUNTS, CONSIDER THE SOURCE-WALKER:DATASOURCE. CALL MAI~LENE BREWER AT 1-800-334-3939. WALKER: F 3939 pt =o~'~t*~" Wc-/$ D~ • PO ~ 8~32- ~Doi~ ~N ~a32 • 13t7] ~,~ Ck'de No. 872 o~t Reader Card 79 TI08571120
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SOUTH BEND KENTUCKY Research Centre, Inc. 103 West Wayne SL, #304 South Bend, IN 45601 Ph. 219-287-7070 Fax 219-236-6060 Contact: Rita Runyon 1,2,3,4,6,7B Sheffer Advertising Agency 115 W. Colfax Avenue South Bend, IN 46601 Ph. 219-233-6970 1,3,6,7B IOWA CEDAR RAPIDS/ WATERLOO Frank N. Magid Associates One Research Center Marion, IA 52302 Ph. 319-377-7345 1,3,6,7B DAVENPORT Per Mar Research Services 322 Brady Street Davenport, IA 52801 Ph. 319-322-1960 Fax 319-322-1370 1.3,6,7C Scotti Bur. Mktg.Rsch. 320 W. Kirnberly Road Davenport, IA 52806 Ph. 319-386-1905 1,3,4,6,7A DES MOINES Friedman Marketing/Des Moines Southridge Mall 1111 E. Army Post Rd., #158 Des Moines, IA 50315 Ph. 515-287-4744 or 313-569-0444 Fax 515-287-5937 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) IMR Systems, Ltd. 507 Tenth St.. #802 Des Moines. IA 50309 Ph. 515-282-7800 Contact: William Tooley 1,3.6.7B Mid-Iowa Interviewing 1551-35th St., #157A West Des Moines, IA 50265 Ph. 515-225-6232 Fax 515-225-1184 Contact: Betty O'Connor 1,3,4,6.7A 80 Per M~ Research Services 2901 Douglas Ave., Ste. #1A Des Moines, IA 50310 Ph. 515-255-2218 F~x 5; 1,3,6,7C KANSAS KANSAS CITY (See Kansas City, MO) TOPEKA Central Research Corp. 900 Bank IV Tower Topeka, KS 66603 Ph. 913-233-8948 Fax 913-233-8956 Contact: Donald Hardesty 1,3,6,7B WICHITA Data Net-Wichita 7700 E. Kellogg, M-3 Wichita, KS 67207 Ph. 316-682-6655 Fax 316-682-6664 Contact: Clyde K. Nitta 1,3,4.6,7A Marketing Support Services, Inc. 200 No. Broadway, #220 Wichita, KS 67202 Ph. 316-263-3949 Fax 316-292-3274 Contact: Keneth F. Smith 1,3,7B Name Services Unlimited 1786 So. Seneca, #6 Wichita, KS 67213 Ph. 316-264-3670 Contact: Linda McFadden 1,3,6,7B U.S. Research Corp. Town West Square, Store 804 Wichita. KS 67209 Ph. 316-943-1153 1,3,4.6,7A (See advertisement on p. 91 ) Wichita Marketing Research. Inc. 224 Ohio Wichita, KS 67214 Ph. 316-263-6433 Fax 316-263-0885 Contact: Esther Headley 1,3.7C LEXINGTON Wilkerson & Associates 330 E. Main St., Ste. 200 Lexington, KY" 40507 Ph. 606-231-9481 1,3,6,7B LOUISVILLE Davis Research Services, Inc. 4229 Bardstown Rd. Louisville, KY 40218 Ph. 502-499-0607 Contact: Joan Davis 1,3,4,6,7A Personal Opinion, Inc, 3415 Bardstown Rd., Ste. 206A Louisville, KY 40218. Ph, 502-451-1971 " Fax 502-451-3940 Contact: Melissa Smith 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B Southern Research Services, Inc. 1930 Bishop Lane, #921 Louisville, KY 40218 Ph. 502-454-0771 Contact: Sharron Hermanson 1,3,4,6,7B Southern Surveys, Inc. 1519 Gagel Avenue Louisville. KY 40216 Ph. 502-367-7199 1,3,4,6,7B Stevens Research Services, Inc. 3010 Hikes Lane Louisville, KY 40220 Ph. 502-456-5300 1,2,3,4.5.6.7C Wilkerson and Associates 3339 Taylorsville Rd. Louisville, KY 40205 Ph. 502-459-3133 1,3,4,5,6,7C OWENSBORO Market Research Services 4530 Hwy. 1514 Utica, KY 42376 Ph. 502-785-4033 1.3,4.6,7B LOUISIANA BATON ROUGE Gulf State Research Center 7361 Ftorida Blvd. Baton Rouge, LA 70806 Ph. 504-926-3827 1,3,4,6.7A Qui~'s Marketing Resear~Review T108571121
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J~ a~d~ 2223 Quail Run Dr., C-2 Baton Rouge. LA 70808 Ph. 504-766-4065 Fax 504-766-9597 Contact: Joan Berg 1,3.4,6.7B Saurage-Thibodeaux Research, Inc. 4000 So. Sherwood Forest Blvd., #501 Baton Rouge, LA 70816-4366 Ph. 504-293-2415 Fax 504-295-0009 Contact: Susan Saurage-Thibodeaux 1,3,6,7B NEW ORLEANS Analytical Studies, Inc. 708 Rosa Avenue Metairie, LA 70005 Ph: 504-835-3508 1,3,6,7B Friedman Marketing/New Orleans Belle Promenade Mall 1701 Baratada Blvd., Ste. 666 Marrero, LA 70072 Ph. 504-340-0972 Fax 504-340-7965 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p.~ 73 ) Heakin Research, Inc. 1401 W. Esplanade, Ste. 116 Kenner, LA 70065 Ph. 504-464-9188 Contact: Shirley Caldwell 1,3,4,6,7A Linden Research Services Corp. 197-36 Westbank Exp. Gretna, LA 70053 Ph. 504-368-9825 1,3,4.6.7A N G L Research Services, Inc. 4300 S. 1-10 Service Rd., Ste 115 Metairie, LA 70001 Ph. 504-456-9025 Fax 504-456-9072 Contact: Lena Webre 1,3,4,6,7B New Orleans Field Service Assoc. 257 Bonnabel Blvd. Metairie, LA 70005 Ph. 504-833-0641 Contact: Andrea Gereighty 1,3,6,7B SHREVEPORT DCW & Associates 2229 Beckett. Ste. B Bossier City, LA 71111 Ph. 318-742-0126 Contact: Dorothy Webb 1,6,7D December. 1990 2835 Hollywood Ave., Ste. 270 Shreveport, LA 71108 Ph. 318-631-5356 Fax 318-635-7128 Con~ct: Alone Melton 1,3,6,7B MAINE PORTLAND Consumer Research of Maine 672 Ocean Avenue Portland, ME 04103 Ph. 207-773-3849 Fax 207-871-0186 Contact: Susan W. Jordan 1,2,3,4,6,7D Market Research Unlimited, Inc. 40 Atlantic Place S. Portland, ME 04106 Ph. 207-775-7249 Fax 207-775-5223 1,3,4,5,6,7B Strategic Marketing Services 148 Middle Street Portland, ME 04101 Ph. 207-774-6738 Fax 207-772-4842 Contact: David Hill 1,3,4,6,7C MARYLAND BALTIMORE A-H Interviewing 3610 Milford Mill Rd. Baltimore, MD 21207 Ph. 301-922-9186 1,3,4,6,7B 8320 ~ Ave., Ste. 40 Ba~imore, MD 21204 Ph. 30%583-9991 Fax 301-484-0252 1,3,6,7B Chesapeake Surveys 305 W. Chesapeake Ave., Ste. L19 Towson, MD 21204 PI~. 301-296-4411 Fax 301-828-6520 Contact: Carolyn Hilton 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 81 ) Consumer Pulse of Baltimore 8200 Perry Halt Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21236 Ph. 301-256-7700 Fax 301-256-5148 Contact: Pare Jones 1,3,4,5,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 84) Heakin Research, Inc. 7839 Eastpoint Mall, Ste. 3 Baltimore, MD 21224 Ph. 301-282-3133 Contact: Alice Matheny 1,3,4,6,7A Maryland Marketing Source, Inc. 817 Maiden Choice Ln. #150 Baltimore, MD 21228 Ph. 301-247-3276 Fax 301-536-1858 Contact: Barbara Bridge 1,3,6,7B Opinion Centers America 6901 SecurityBIvd. Baltimore, MD 21207 Ph. 301-597-9904 Fax 301-760-6744 Contact: Sylvia Yaeger 1,3,4,6,7A Codes: Location: 1 Conference Style Room 7A Shoppi,'lg Mall 2. Living Room Style ~ 7B Office Budd=ng 3. Observation Room . 7C Free Standing 4. Test K=tchen 7D Other 5. Test KRchen w/Obs. Room 6. Video Equipment Availaicle CHESAPEAKE Welcomes You to Baltimore Our Services Include: • New modem focus group facility and spacious client viewing rooms. • Full recruiting capabilities. • Speciatizing in consumer and all ~reas of medical and professional. • Fully equipped test kitchen. • 25 WATS lines and local telephone interviewing. Complete telephone monitoring system. • Professionally trained intcrvie,.vers for all lypes of inte~iewmg. • New one-on-one interviewing room with client viewing room attached. Call us for a quote on your next focus group or telephone C-~rot),n Hilton Field Director CHESAPEAKE SURVEY5 305 W. Chesapeake Ave~. Suite L 19 • Towson. M D 21204 (301) 296-I411 CAtcJe No..873 o~ Reader C~'d 8] Ti08571122
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Opinion Centers Ame6ca 1410 No. Crain Highway. Ste. 9B Glen Burnie, MD 21061 Ph. 301-760-0052 Fax 30'1-760~6744 Contact: SyMa Yaeger 1,3,4,6,7B Opinion Centers America Hunt Valley, MD 21030 Ph. 301-785-5344 Fax 301-760-6744 Contact: Sylvia Yaeger 1,3,406,7A Opinion Centers America 6400 Rossville Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21237 Ph. 301-391-7750 Fax 301-760-6744 Contact: Sylvia Yaeger 1,3,4,6,7A MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON Bernett Research, Inc. 230 Western Ave., Ste. 201 Boston, MA 02134 Ph. 617-254-1314 Fax 617-254-1857 Contact: Ann Alpert 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 83) Bemetl Research, Inc, Assembly Square 133 Middlesex Avenue Somerville, MA 02145 P~,..617.~L>~.2330 Contact: Stacey Black 1,3,4.6,7A (See advertisement on p. 83) Boston Field and Focus 4 Faneuil Hall Marketplace Boston, MA 02109 Ph. 508-720-1870 Fax 508-879-7108 Contact: Shirley Shames 1,2,3,4,6,7B CSI Qualitative Research Center 400 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110 Ph. 800-227-0666 Fax 203-748-1735 Contact: Karen Forcade 1,3,4,6,7B CSI Qualitative Research Center Northshore Mall Peabody, MA 01960 Ph. 800-227-0666 Fax 203-748-1735 Contact: Karen Forcade 1,3,4,5,6,7A Qualitative Research With New Meaning Qual.i'ta'tive Fo.cus {kwol~.t~ hv fS'k~s) n. 1. The best focus group facility in New England. a. Located 30 minutes from Boston. b. Custom designed table seating 12 in a 16'x20' conference room. c. Comfortable 16"x16' 2.tiered observation room seating 15 with a 5"x15' 1 way mirror, d. Fully equipped test kitchen, e. State-of-the-art audio and video systems. 2. A division of Research Data Inc. a. Highly trained recruiters for group and in-depth interviews, b. Professional moderators available for local and national studies, c. Full-service ex- perience for complete factual analysis and written reporting. Let us help you define your objectives and meet all your research goals. ualitative focus A DIVISION OF RESEARCH DATA, INC. 624 Worcester Road, Framingham, MA 01701 (508) 875-1300 CircleNo. 87~1 on Reader Card Decision Research 99 Hayden Ave. Lexington, MA 02173 Ph. 617-861-7350 1,3.6.7B Don" & Sheff, Inc. 190 North Main Dr. Natick. MA 01760 Ph. 508-650-1292 Fax 508-650-4722 Contact: Garry Sheff 1,3,4,6,7B Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Watertown Mall 550 Arsenal St. Watertown, MA 02172 Ph. 617-924-8486 Fax 617-923-0261 Contact: Brent Wooten 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs, Dedham Mall, Route 1 .. Dedham, MA 02026 Ph. 617-326-0865 Fax 617-320-0049 Contact: Dolly Rooney 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 3) Equlfax/Qulck Test Opinion Ctrs. Hamilton Plaza 680 Worcester Rd. Framingham, MA 01701 Ph. 508-872-1800 Fax 508-875-4719 Contact: John Boni 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 3) Fieldwork Boston, Inc. 800 South Street Waltham, MA 02154 Ph. 617-899-3660 Contact: Vincent Stolo 1,2,3.4.6,7B (See advertisement on p. 96 ) First Market Research Corp. 121 Beach Street Boston, MA 02111 Ph. 617-482-9080 or 800-347-7811 Fax 617-482-4017 1,3,5,7B National Field & Focus, Inc. 190 N. Main Street Natick, MA 01760 Ph. 508-655-1926 Contact: Brenda Chartoil National Qualitative Centers 545 Boylston St. Boston, MA 02116 Ph. 617-424-8800 Fax 617-262-2156 Contact: Christine Donnell 1,3o4,5,6,7B Codes: Location: 1. Conlerence St)le Room7A Shopptng Mall 2. Uving Room Style 7a Olf~e Suild=~j 3. Observation Room 7C Free Standing 4 Test K,t~J~en 7D Oth~ ,5. Test Kitohen w: Ct)s. Room 6, "vldeo Equ~pmen! Quirk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571123
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c ck theit all out, answer is Bernett Research. I.c~tlions Full Lo.caflons Facility Kite.hen Boston HQ Boston, MA SO. Shore Plaza Boston, MA ~mbly ~ston, MA Ch~ton, SC Midd~ M~ ~. Pl~nfield, NJ M~o Focus Observa. ililies with lion Room moderators Executive In.store Central Co~ing Inter. Inter- Door to and viewing viowtnglTele,phone door Tabbing For research on the American marketplace, you need research facilities across America. And that's what Bernett Research gives you. We're in all the markets you need, with all the services you want. With more than a decade of experience meeting the needs of the nation's most expert marketers, we're ready for your next project. Bernett Research: what we have to offer is worth checking into. Boston Hdqrs. Sou~h Shore Plaza Assembly Square. Mall Ri~'ergate Mall Aurora M~ Northwoods Mall Middle.sex Mall 230 V~estern A~e 250 C, raolte Sw. 133 .Midd~es Ave. I000 "1%o Mile Pkwy. 14200 AJameda Ave. 2150 Norlkwood Blvd. Stelton & Hadley Roads Boston. MA 02134 B~tree. MA 02184 Somen]lle. MA 02145 N~bville. TN 3~I}72 Denver, CO 80012 North Charleston, SC 29418 South Pla~eld, NJ 07080 {61~ 254-1314 (617) 849-1692 (617) 623-2330 (615) 859-4484 (303) 341-1211 (803) 553-0030 (201) 548-2900 "Re-opening 1991 December, 1990 Circle No.B/'; on Rea~Jer C~rd 83 Ti08571124
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50-R Nichols St. Danvers, MA 01923 Ph. 508-774-5688 1,3.6,7C Panel Opinions, Inc. 155 Middlesex Turnpike Burlington, MA 01803 Ph. 617-229-6226 Contact: Lois Toko 1,3,4,5,6,75 Pathfinder Research Group 629 Massachusetts Avenue Boxborough, MA 01719 Ph. 508-263-0400 Contact: James F. Shur 1,3,4,6,75 Performance Plus, Inc. 111 Speen St., Ste 105 Framingham, MA 01701 Ph. 508-872-1287 Fax 508-879-7108 Contact: Shidey Shames 1,2,3,4,6,75 Qualitative Focus (Div. of Research Data, Inc.) 624 Worcester Rd. Framingham, MA 01701 Ph. 508-875-1300 Fax 508-872-2001 1,3,4,6,75 (See advertisement on p. 82) Survey and Research Service, Inc. 2400 Massachusetts Ave. ~ MA 02140 Ph. 617-854-7794 Contact:. Agnes Piandes 1,3,4,6,75 SPRIN G FIELD'/~IOLY0'KE CSI Qualitative Research Center South Maple Street Springfield. MA 01035 Ph. 800-227-0666 Fax 203-748-1735 Contact: Karen Forcade 1,3,4,6,7A Doherty-Tzoumas Marketing 75 Dwight Street Springfield, MA 01103 Ph. 413-737-6165 Fax 413-734-5321 1,3,6,7B Trends of Springlield Performance Plus, Inc. 591 Memodal Drive Chicopee, MA 01020 Pho 508-872-1287 Contact: Shirley Shames 1,3,4,6,7A Western Massachusetts Interviewing Service 2341 Boston Road Wilbraham, MA 01095 Ph. 413-599-1781 Contact: Anita Tarallo 1,3,4,6,7A WORCESTER THE 18 FOCUS GROUP AND ONE-ON-ONE Q UALITATIVE CENTERS FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE BEYOND YOUR EXPECTATIONS CONSUMER PULSE, INC. (800) 336-0159 FAX (313) 540-5498 Baltimore Charlotte Cincinnati Cleveland Colorado Sprln~s Denver Detroit Los ~l~eles Milwuakee Philadelph|a Wash|ngton. D.C. 84 F_quffme'Qufck Test Opinion Ctr.s. 275 Worcester Cen~er Womester, MA 01608 Ph. 508-754-3960 Fax 508-799-0282 Co~ct: D.e~d~ie LeGuem 1.3,4,5,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) MICHIGAN DETROIT Amrigon 2750 So. Woodward Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304 Ph. 313-332-2300 1,3,6,75 Consumer Pulse of Detroit 725 S. Adams, Ste. 265 Birmingham, M148009 Ph. 313-540-5330 Fax 313-645-5685 Contact: Mary Taras 1,3,4,5,6,75 (See advertisement ofi'p. 84) Detroit Marketing Services, Inc. 26237 Southfield Rd. Lathrup Village, MI 48076 Ph. 313-569-7095 Fax 313-569-8927 Contact: Phyllis Huls 1,2,3,4,5,6,7C Detroit Marketing Services, Inc. 29755 Plymouth Rd. Livonia, MI 48150 )h. 313-427-5360 Fax 313-569-8927 Contact: Diane Wojkowski 1,3,4,5,6,7A Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Southland Center Mall 23000 Eureka Road Taylor, MI 48180 Ph. 313-287-3600 Fax 313-287-3840 Contact: Kathy Bragg 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Friedman Marketing/Detroit Oakland Mall 3505 W 14 Mile Road Troy, MI 48083 Ph. 313-589-0950 or 313-569-0444 Fax 313-589-0271 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4.6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Friedman Marketing/Detroit French-Town Square Mall 2121 N. Monroe Street, Unit 105 Monroe, MI 48161 Ph. 313-241-1610 or 313-569-0444 Fax 313-241-6804 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Friedman Marketing of Detroit 25130 Southfield Rd. #102 Southfield. MI 48075 Ph. 313-569-0444 Fax 313-569-2813 Contact: Pauta Crimmins 1,3.4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) OJirk's Ma~ketin9 Resea[chReview T!08571125
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Gene~ IWa~,,,iew~g Surveys 17117 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ste. 1020 Soulhfield, M148075 Ph. 313-559-7860 Fax 313-559~42.I Contact: Sheba Smith 1,3.4,6,7B Heakin Research-Detroit Macomb Mall Roseville, MI 48066 Ph. 313-294-3232 Contact: Don Jezak 1,3,4,6,7A Market Interviews Div. MOR.PACE 31700 Middlebelt Rd.. Farmington Hills, M148334 Ph. 800-879-7223 Contact: MaryAnn Adams 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B Nordhaus Research, Inc. 20300W. 12 Mile Rd. Southfield, MI 48076 P h. 313-827-2400 Fax 313-827-1380 Contact: Jean Delegarde 1,3,4,6,7B Opinion Seamh 21800 Melrose, Ste. 4 Soulhfieid, MI 48075 Ph. 313-358-9922 Fax 313-358-9914 Contact: Roberta Schare 1,3,4,6,7B Product & Consumer Evaluations 31700 Middlebelt Rd.. Farmington Hills, MI 48334 Ph. 800-878-PACE Contact: Kathy Patdgnani 1,2,3,4,5,6.7B (See advertisement on p. 13) Reseamh-One, Inc. 21711 W. Ten Mile Rd. Southfield, MI 48075 Ph. 313-358-4055 Fax 313-358-2762 Contact: Gordon Kane 1,3,6,7B TRENDFAC'I'S Field Services 31800 Northwestern Hwy., Ste. 380 Farmington Hills, MI 48334-1665 Ph. 313-855-7811 Fax 313-855-2368 Contact: Paula Cornwall or Ann Kwasny 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B New Facilities Jan., 199 ~ Yee/Minard and Associates 27300 W. 11 Mile Rd., Ste. 500 Southfield, MI 48034 Ph. 313-352-3300 Fax 313-352-3787 Conlact: Lynne Goodman 1,3,6,7B GRAND RAPIDS Breakthru Surveys. Inc. 535 Greenwood SE Grand Rapids, MI 49506 Ph. 616-451-9219 1.3.6.7B Data~ad~, Inc. 161 Ottawa Ave. NW Grand Rapids, Mi ,$9503 Ph. 616-776-7230 Contact: Pamela Schichtel 1,2,3,~,6,7~ Datatrack. inc. Eastbrook Mall Grand Rapids, MI 49508 Ph. 616-776-7230 Fax 616-776-7212 Contact: Pamela Schichtel 1,2,3,4,6,7A Nordhaus Research, Inc. 2449 Camelot Court Grand Rapids, MI 49506 Ph. 616-942-9700 Fax 616-942-1325 Contact: Jean Delegarde 1,3,6,7B Western Michigan Research, Inc. 6143 112 281h St. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546 Ph. 616-949-8724 Fax 616-949-8511 Contact: Nancy Vanderveer 1,2,3,6,7B KALAMAZOO Harrington Market Research 511 Monroe St, Kalamazoo, MI 49007 Ph. 616-342-6783 Fax 616-345-7337 Contact: Adene Norman 1,3,6,7C LANSING Capitol Research Services 401 So. Washinglon Sq. 2nd Fir. Lansing, MI 48933 Ph. 517-484-5440 Fax 517-322-0640 Contact: Rachelle Souser 1,3,6,7B MINNESOTA MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL A and I of Minnesota 1248 Eden Prairie Center Eden Praide, MN 55344 Ph. 612-941-0825 1,3,4,6,7A Colle and McVoy Research 7900 International Dr., #700 Bloomington, MN 55425 Ph. 612-851-2566 Fax 612-854-8639 Contact: Steve Akerson 1,3,6.7B CIMR,Concepts In Marketing Research 400 N. Robed St. St. Paul, MN 55101-2098 Ph. 612-228-5667 Fax 612-223-4488 Contact: Kelly Quehl 1,3,6.7B Cook Research & Consulting, Inc. 6600 France Ave. So., Ste. 214 Minneapolis, MN 55435 Pho 612-920-6251 Fax 612-920-1230 Contact.Harold Cook 1,3,4,5,6.7B Be~ ~ Research, 3900 36th Ave. No. Minneapol'rs, MN 55422 Ph. 612-521-7635 1,3,4,6,7C Dynamic Observations 2900 Rice Street, Ste. 290 St. Paul, MN 55113 Ph. 612-481-6937 Fax 612-481-0200 Contact:Carrie Cardinal-Bale 1,2,3,4-,5,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 85) codes: Location: '1. Conference Style Room 7A ShoDp~ng Mall 2. Living Room Style 7B Office Building 3. Observation Roem 7C Free Standing 4. Test Kitchen 7D Other 5:Test Kitchen wl Obs. Room 6. V=deo Equ=pment Available 85 T108571126
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Focus Market Research, tnc, 801 W. 106th SL, Ste. 201 Bloomington, MN 55420 Pho 612-881-3635 Fa~ 6~2-861-t880 Contact: Judy Opstad 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 86) Focus Market Research, Inc. 4956 Lincoln Drive Edina, MN 55436 Ph. 612-933-0449 Contact: Judy Opstad 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 86) N.K. Friedrichs & Assoc. 2500 Centre "Village 431 So. 7th Street Minneapolis, MN 55415 Ph. 612-303-5400 Fax 612-344-1408 Contact: Norma Fdeddchs 1,3,4,6.7B Heakin Research, Inc. Knoilwood Mall, 8332 Hwy. 7 St. Louis Park, MN 55426 Ph. 612-936-0940 Contact: Elena Johnson 1,3,4,6,7A FOCUS in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Market When ~]our projects include the Minneapolis/St. Paul market, turn to FOCUS. We will provide you and your client with respondents screened in strict accordance to your specifications, within your deaclline. Established in 1972, FOCUS is an experienced field service agency with reliable and conscientious staff. Our clients are our best source of new business.., so please feel free to ask us for references. • Focus Group Facilities • Mall Intercept ,, Recruilment • Executive & medical • Test Kitchens wilh one • All phases of consumer way mirrors interviewing • Central Phone -- WATS • Vehicle Clinics For Your Special Qualitative Needs Two Locations Each location has two focus rooms and a test kitchen. The four large and accommodating conference rooms have ample space for display and demon- stration. The client viewing rooms are spacious and seat 12 in comfort. Test kitchens are fully equipped and provide excellent viewing. All rooms offer: • Large 5 x 10 double parted one way mirrors • Prolessionally installed sound systems • Client guest offices with privale phones • Separate entrances for clients • Video jacks with taping available • Security lock up in all areas • Appetizing meals and snacks • Minutes from the airped and better hotels Our goal is to make you and your clients comfortable at our facility. We believe that a combination of quality control standards, spacious working conditions and a friendly, hospitable staff will provide you with the working atmosphere you deserve. Contact Judy Opstad at FOCUS 801 West 106th Street Bloomington, MN 55420 612/881-3635 Market Research, Inc. 4956 Lincoln Drive Edina, MN 55436 86 CJn:Je No. 87a ¢~r t P,~ade¢ Card Ideas "re One M~n at Riverptace, #504 Minneapolis, MN 55414 Ph. 612-331-1570 Contact: Fred S. Meyer (See advertisement on p. 87) Lakewood Research 50 South 9th Street Minneapolis, MN 55402 Ph. 612-333-0471 Fax 612-333-0471 Ext. 398 1,3,6,7B Minnesota Opinion Research 7901 Xerxes Avenue So., Ste. 300 Bloomington, MN 55431 Ph. 612-881-2380 Fax 612-831-3452 1,3,6,7B Molgren Research Associates 10910 Wayzata Blvd. -Minneapolis, MN 55343 Ph. 612-544-8497 Contact: Douglas Dickerson 1,4,6,7B MRC, Inc. 5820 74th Ave. No., Ste. 105 Brooklyn Park, MN 55443 Ph. 612-561-4467 1,3,4,6,7B C.J. Olson Market Research, Inc. 708 So. 3rd St., Ste. 105 East Minneapolis, MN 55415 Ph. 612-339-0085 Fax 612-334-3169 1,3,6,7B Orman Guidance Research, Inc. 715 Southgate Office Plaza 5001 W. 80th St. Minneapolis, MN 55437 Ph. 612-831-4911 Fax 612-831-4913 Contact: Allan Orman : 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B Project Research, Inc. University Technology Center 1313 Fifth St. SE Minneapolis, MN 55414 Ph. 612-331-9222 Fax 612-331 -I 726 Contact: Lynn M. Nadeau 1.3.6,7B Quality Controlled Services 2622 W. Lake St.. Ste. 150 Minneapolis, MN 55416 Ph. 612-926-2646 Fax 612-926-6281 Contact: Kathryn Riemer 1,3,6.7B (See advertisement on p. 59) Research Systems 1809 S. Plymouth Rd.. Ste. 325 Minnetonka, MN 55343 Ph. 612-544-6334 Fax 612-544-6764 Contact:Bill Whitney 1.2,3,4,5.6,7B Location: 1. Conference S.'y~e Ro~m 7A Sho~op*ng Mall 2. Living Room SD/ie 7B Otlice Budding 4. Test K~tchen t 7D Other S- Test K~chen w~ Obs Room' 6. V~deo Equipmen~ Acaital;le i Ouirk's Marketing ResearchRaview T108571127
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Roc~wood Research 1751 W. County Road B St. Paul, MN 55113 Ph. 6t2-631-1977 F~x 6-~2-63t-8198 Contact: Lisa Schwartz 1.3,5,7B (See advertisement on Twin City Interviewing Service, Inc. 3225 Hennepln Ave. So. Minneapolis, MN 55408 Ph. 612-823-6214 Fax 612-823-6215 Contact: Beth Fischer 1,2,3,4,6,7C Winona MRB, Inc. 8200 Humboldt Ave. So. Minneapolis, MN 55431 Ph. 612-881-5400 Fax 612-881-0763 Contact: Marcia Janzen 1,3,6,7B WILLMAR Olsen Marketing, Inc. 310 So. First St. Willmar, MN 56201 Ph. 612-231-19"70 Contact: Chds Olsen 1,6,7B For Groups in Minneapolis TFI~ ~FO~CU~S' ~ROUP FACILITY CLIENTS AND =RESPONDENTS LOVE TO VISIT • Attractive, Convenient Riverplace Location is a big plus for recruiting and for client down time. • Big, Rexible Rooms can be set living- room or conference style, or for kids on the carpeting. • Designed-for-Clients Observation Rooms-Two tiers. 15' mirrors. Private phone areas. • Professionalism and ~LC-a corn mit- ment to providing a comfortable and problem-f.ree project to rneetf your needs. Call Wrg[nia Morse to00 One Main at R[verplace, Suite 504 • Minneapolis, MN 55414 Circle No. 880 on ReaderCard THE ROCKWOOD Your room with a view DIFFERENCE Where you conduct your focus group interviews does make a difference. At Rockwood Research the difference is: • Thousands of fresh respondents within a few miles of our offices. • An ideal Twin Cities location. • An experienced professional staff. • Modern, state-of-the-art facilities. Our completely remodeled moderating area includes a large focus group room, a spacious observation room, private client offices and high-quality recording equipment. Ceiling-mounted microphones are connected to large speakers so you never miss a word from the respondents. Call us when you need focus group interviewing in the Twin Cities. Rockwood Research 1751 West County Road B • SL Paul, MN 55113 • 612-631-1977 C3J~de No. 879 orl Reade~,C~rd December. 1990 87 T108571128
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MISSISSIPPI JACKSON Friedman Marketing/Jackson 1275 Metro Center Mall Jackson, MS 39209 Ph. 601-352-9340 or 313-569-0444 Fax 601-355-3530 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Message Factm~ Inc. 715 S. Pear Orchard Rd., Suite 307 Ridgeland, MS 39157 Ph. 601-977-1100 Fax 601-977-110o Contact: Schuyler "Skye" Jones 1,3,6,7B MISSOURI JEFFERSON CITY Klein Market Test, Inc. 226 East Dunkl[n Jefferson City, MO 65101 Ph. 314-635-9600 Contact: Ann Klein 1,3,6,7B REDUCE THE RISK In Selecting Your St. Louis Focus Group Service New Facilities Designed By Professional Moderators With The Cllent In Mind Exceeding Client Expectations Is Our Service Commitment Call About Free Introductory Videb Taping Marketing Horizons, Inc. St. Louis, Missouri 605 Old Ballas Road, Ste. 101, 63141 (314) 432-1957 Convenient To Airport, Hotels, And Restaurants Circle No. 881 on ReaderCard RESEARCH SOLUTIONS Ch~omalloy Plaza Suite 1750 120 8outh Central S1. Loul=, Ml~ud ~310S Conta= V.LSa~la or FREE Videotaping Guaranteed R~:mltment Moderators 8S KANSAS CITY" The Field House, Inc. 7220 W. 98th Terrace Ow#a~ P-a~ KS 6~212 Ph. 913-341-4245 Contact:. "l'ina Benz 1,2,3,4,5,6,7C The Field House, Inc, Oak Park Mall 11319 W. 95th St. Overland Park, KS 66214 Ph. 913-341-4245 Contact: Tina Benz 1,3,4,6,7A Flaspohler-Rose Market Research, Inc. 4330 Shawnee Mission Pkwy., #222 Shawnee Mission, KS 66205 Ph. 913-384-1337 Contact: Jill Rogers 1,2,3,4,6,7B Heakin Research, Inc. Indian Spdngs Mall 4601 State Ave. Kansas City, KS 66102 Ph. 913-596-2244 Contach Debb|e Culver 1,3,4,6,7A Heakin Research, Inc. Blue Ridge Mall 4200 Blue Ridge Blvd. Kansas City. MO 64133 Ph. 816-737-1130 Contact: Pat Stockman 1,3,4,6,7A Heakin Research, Inc. 116 Independence Center Independence, MO 64057 Ph. 816-795-0706 Contact: Eloise Mills 1,3,4,5,7A Interro Research Inc. 4050 Pennsylvania Manor Sq., Ste. 215 Kansas City, MO 64111 Ph. 816-931-8770 1,3.6,7B Market Research Institute, Inc. 7315 Frontage Rd., Ste. 200 Merriam, KS 66204 Ph. 913-236-6060 Fax 913-236-6094 Contact: Donald Weston 1,2,3.4.6,7B Quality Controlled Services Corporate Woods Office Park 10875 Grandview St., Ste. 2230 Overland Park, KS 66210 Ph. 913-345-2200 Fax 913-345-2070 Contact: Shirley Musgrave 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 59) Quality Controlled Services 8600 Ward Parkway Kansas City, MO 64114 Ph. 816-361-0345 Contact:. Ira Schlatter 1,3,4.6,7A (See advertisement on p. 59) Ou~rk's Market~.g ResearchReview T108571129
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~ty-On-Time Interviewing Consumer Opinion Search Marketeam Associates 8889 Bourgade Ave. 1279 Mid Rivers..Mall 1807 Park 270 Dr., Suite 300 St. Louis, MO 63376 Lenexa, KS 66219 Ph. 314-926-0247 SL Louis, MO 63146 Ph. 913-894-9012 Fax 314-965-8042 Ph. 314-878-7667 Contact: William Foley 1,3,4,6,7A Contact: Denise Titus 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 49 ) 1,3,4,6,7B Consumer Opinion Council Research Ctr. (See advertisement on p. 89) Valentine Radford 222 So. Meramec Ave., #301-02 911 Main St. St. Louis, MO 63105 Marketeam Associates Kansas City, MO 64105 Ph. 314-863-3780 515 No. Sixth St., #374 Ph. 816-842-5021 Fax 314-863-2880 St. Louis, MO 63101 Contact: Genny Schumacher Fax 816-¢72-5177 1,2,3,4,6,7B Ph. 314-569-1324 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 89) Fax 314-241-6429 Contact: Joyce Klosterrnann S'['. LOUIS Equifax/Quick Test Op|nlon Ctrs. 1,3,6,7A 505 Northwest Plaza St. Ann, MO 63074 (See advertisement on p. 89) ACG Research Solutions Ph. 314-291-8888 120 South Central, Suite 1750 Fax 314-291-8581 Marketing Horizons, Inc. St. Louis, MO 63105 Contact:Fletcher Peacock 605 Old Ballas Rd., Ste. 101 Ph. 314-726-3403 1,3,4,6,7A St. Louis, MO 63141 Fax 314-726-2503 (See advertisement on p. 3) Ph. 314-432,1957 Contact: Vicki Savala - 1,3,6,7B Fact Finders Fax 314-432-7014 (See advertisement on p. 88) 11960 Westline Industrial Dr., Ste. 105 Contact: Renee Fredman St. Louis, MO 63146 1,3,4,6,7B Bryan Research Ph. 314-469-7373 (See advertisement on p. 88) 820 S. Main Street Fax 314-469.0758 St. Charles, MO 63301 Contact: Sandra Chdstie Ph. 314-946-8007 1,3,6,7B Fax 314-946-8168 Contact: Susan Bryan Lucas Market Research 1,3,4,6,7B 13250 New Halls Ferry Rd. co~es: Location: 1. Conference Style Room ' 7A Shopping Mall Consumer Opinion Search FIorissant, MO 63033 2. Living Room Style ~ 7B Office Building 10795 Watson Rd. Ph. 314-838-0696 3, Observation Room 7C Fre~ Standing St. Louis, MO 63127 Fax 314-838-1996 " 4 Test Kilchen I 7D Other 5. Test Kitchen wl Obs. Room Ph. 314-965-0053 Contact: Mary Lucas s. Video Equipment Avs, lable Fax 314-965-8042 1,3,4,5,6,7C Contact: Carol McGill 1,3,4,6,7B "See advertisement on p. 49) $'1'. We put quality in qualitative resoxrch. To read Middle America, come to St. Louis Centre. , State-of-the-art focus group facilities downtown in St. Louis Centre & in trend-setting West County , Conference room equipped with • Fully-equipped kitchen • New 20-station CRT-assisted phone center in a state-of-the-a,..t video and • Experienced recruiters, North County, plus 60 WATS telephones audio system inlerViewers and moderators • Complete mail survey capabilities - Large two-tiered viewing room • Centrally-located in Clayton, the with 13" x 4' one-way mirror hea~1 of St. Louis. For more information or a specific proposal, call Vicki Thies or Dave Tugend at (314) 878-7667, • Comfortable ctient lounge with O~ly 15 minutes from bo~h me Marketeam ooo,o, ASSOCiates " " "'" ' " OPINION COUNCIL RESEARCH CENTER 1807 Park 270 Drive, Suite 300, St. Louis, MO 63146 222 s. Meramec ~30~-02 " Sl. Louis. MO 63105 (314) 863-3780 ,~ecl~lTlt:~f. t ~90 CJtc~ No.884 onReaderCa~cl Chcle No.883 or) ReaderCa=rd ~9 T108571130
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Peters Marketing Research, Inc. 12400 Olive Blvd., Suite 225 St. Louis, MO 63141 Ph. 3t4-469-9022 Fax 314-469-7436 Contact: "l'i.na Peters-Price 1,3,6,7B Pragmatic Research, Inc. 222 So. Meramec Ave., #301 St. Louis, MO 63105 Ph. 314-863-2800 Contact: Swaran L. Saxena, Pres. 1,3,4,6,7B Quality Controlled Services 1655 Des Peres St. Louis, MO 63131 Ph. 3t4-966-6595 Fax 31'4-822~;29~4 Contact: Yvonne F~lla 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p~ 59) Superior Surveys of St. Louis 10795 Watson Rd. St. Louis, MO 63127 Ph. 800-325-4982 Fax 314-965-8042 Contact: Trish Dunn 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 90 ) Superior Surveys of St. Louis 10795 Watson Road 1279 Mid Rivers Mall St. Louis, Missouri 63127 St. Peters, MO 63376 PERMANENT REGIONAL MALL FACILITIES • High Traffic • Up-Scale Demographics • Video and Portfolio • Modern Group Facilities • Placements • Concept Testing PLUS.. • 12 Central Telephones With Monitors • Full Time Data Collectors With On Site Supervision • Access To Strip Centers, Grocery Stores and Various Plazas • Participating Organizations and Name Banks Available From Pre-School to Senior Citizens • Executive Studies • Audits • Computer Interviewing "WE MAKE SUPERIOR SURVEYS OUR BUSINESS" 9O Trish Dunn (314) 965-0023 CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-325-4982 Circle No. 885 on Re=~d~r Card Carol McGill Superior Surveys of St, Louis 1279 Mid River's Mail St. Louis, MO 63376 Ph. 3t4-278-8463 Fax 3~14-965-8~4"2 Contact: Trish Dunn 1,3,~.,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 90 ) U. S. Research Corp. 338 Jamestown Mall Florissant, MO 63034 Ph. 314-741-0284 Contact: Jackle Weise 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisernent on p. 91 ) Westgate Research, Inc. 650 Office Parkway Creve Coeur, MO 63141 Ph. 314-567-3333 1,3,6,7B SPRINGFIELD Bryles Survey Service 227 Battlefield Mall Springfield, MO 65804 Ph. 708-532-6800 Fax 708-532-1880 Contact: Bob Bryles 1-,3,4,6,7A Martell Research 3 Corporate Center, Ste. 3-300 Springfield, MO 65804 Ph. 417-882-5999 1,3,4,6,7B Opinion Center 227 Battlefield Mall Springfield, MO 65804 Ph. 417-887-1035 1,3,4,6,7A MONTANA GREAT FALLS Intermountain SIR 902 3rd Avenue So. Great Falls, MT 59405 Ph. 406-727-7050 Fax 406-727-7847 Contact: Jan Reagor 1,3.6,7B NEBRASKA LINCOLN Coy/Pedco 380 Bruce Dr. Lincoln, NE 68510 Ph. 402-488-3753 1,3,6,7A Codes: Location: 1. Conference Sly~e Room7A Shopping 2. ~g R~m S~e 7B ~ice 3. ~S~a~ R~m 7C Fr~ St~ 4. T~ ~t~n , 7D O~ Ou~rk's E -'t,~ket~ng ResearchRev~ew Ti08571131
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Service Is Our Business I'm Dennis Hill, President of U.S. Research Company (formerly U.S. Testing). As a newly independent company, we can offer you the flexible service you need. Here are 7 good reasons to call on us for your next research project. 1. Project Cost and Timing quotations within an hour. 2. All aspects of your research are handled internally -- no subcontracting needed. 3. Data collection locations in high traffic malls including our newest facility in Independence Mall, Boston. CRT interview- ing available in all mails. 4.100 V~ats lines. 5.8 Focus Group locations with state-of-the-art equipment. 6. Coding and processing handled in house. 7. Full written reports. |in," n ijj . ,m.l 1.~" g_lll Contact either one of our client service offices CHICAGO NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY 300 Marquardt _D_ri~qe 1099 Wall Street kvndhutst. NJ 0707L Wheeling, IL 6tXYgi. ~,~.~6 ~,,~,a~e~,~ . 17081 520-3600 (2011 507-9600 T108571132
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OMAHA Midwest Survey, Inc. 8~22 Curaing Omaha. NE 68114 Ph. 4O2-392-O755 Fax 402-392-1068 Contact: Jim Krieger 1,3,4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 92 ) Wiese Reseamh Associates 10707 Pacific St., Suite 202 Omaha, NE 68114 Ph. 402-391-7734 Fax 402-391-0331 Contact: Cathy Morrissey 1,3,6,7B - OMAHA. Your Only Source CORPORATE OFFICES 8922 Cuming St., Omaha, NE 68114 ~ Midwest Survey Cenlral ~ CROSSROADS MALL Omaha, NE 68114 SOUTHROADS MALL Bellevue, NE 68005 As we near 40 years STILL the only Full Field Service with three Omaha Focus Group Locations MIDWEST SURVEY, Inc. 402-392-0755 92 Ck~e No. 8~7 onR~ade¢ Card NEVADA LAS VEGAS Las Vegas Surveys 900 E. Karen Dr., Ste.B212 Las Vegas, NV 89109 Ph. 702-796-6451 1,3,4,6,7C RENO Sierra Market Research 63 Keystone Ave., #302 Reno, NV 89503 Ph. 702-786-6556 Fax 702-786-3279 Contact: Carl Bergemann 1,3,6,7B NEW HAMPSHIRE MANCHESTER American Research Group, Inc. 814 Elm Street Manchester, NH 03101 Ph. 603-624-4081 Fax 603-627-1746 Contact: Robin L[ndtey 1,3,6,7B Granite State Mktg. Rch., Inc. 1 North main Derry, NH 03038 Ph. 603-434-9141 Fax 603-434-4176 Contact: Dorothy Bacon 1,4,6,7B New England Interviewing, Inc. 5 Coliseum Ave. Nashua, NH 03063 Ph. 603-889-8222 Fax 603-883-1119 Contact: Joan Greene 1,3,4,6,7B New England Interviewing, Inc. 650 Elm Street Manchester, NH 03101 Ph. 603-641-1222 Fax 603-883-1119 Contact: Stella McDaniel 1,3,4,6,7B NEW JERSEY (Also See New York City and Philadelphia) ATLANTIC CITY Survey Central, Inc. 1270 W. Washington Ave., #310 Cardiff, NJ 08232 Ph. 609-383-1700 Fax 609-383-1783 Contact: Jody Scharf 1,3.6,7B PRINCETON Research 100 29 Emrnons Drive Princeton, NJ 08540 Ph. 609-924-6100 Fax 609-452-0138 Contact: Michael Sandier 1,3,4,6,7B Response Analysis 377 Wall Street Princeton, NJ 08540 Ph. 609-921-3333 Fax 609-921-2611 Contact: James Fouss 1,3,6,7B J. Ross Associates, Inc. Princeton Windsor Office Pk. Pdnceton-Hightstown Rd. Cranburyl NJ 08512 Ph. 609-443-3434 Contact: Leslie Ross 1,3,4,5,6,7B Total Research Corporation Princeton Corporate Center 5 Independence Way CN6305 Princeton, NJ 08543 Ph. 609-921-8100 Fax 609-987-8839 Contact: James Alleborn 1,3,4,6,7B NEW MEXICO ALBUQUERQUE Business Information Group 7800 Marble N.E., Suite 6 Albuquerque, NM 87110 Ph. 505-265-4760 Fax 505-265-5062 Contact: Carol Jacobus 1,3,6,7B Sandla Marketing Services Coronado Mall 923 Coronado Center Albuquerque, NM 87110 Ph. 505-883-5512 Fax 505-883-4776 Contact: Lana Scutt 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 95) Sandia Marketing Services 2201 San Pedro NE. Bldg. 1, #230 Albuquerque, NM 87110 Ph. 505-883-5512 Fax 505-883-4776 Contact: Lana Scutt 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 95 ) Ouirk's k~ket~ng ResearchRev~,ew T108571133
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SUBSCRIBE TO, DAY!'"' Pl~eese enter my' subscrip~cx~ for o~e year (10 issues), of Qu/nVs Marketing Reseamh Re~'~ew. I| net satisfied after my ~¢s:t ~s~ue t may ~f and be 11~fun~e entire atn~altt,ef,~y ~Ut~cn~l~n. Alt~rwards, t may cancel'at any t~me and be immeciateiy refunded my money for ~il issues not received. [] Payment of $40 endosed Charge Credt Card [] Mast~rCard [] Visa CHARC-~ ACCOUNT NUMBER Name Company, SIGNATURE ( REQUIRED FOR ALL CREDIT CARD ORDERS) .Title Address City State Zip Are you a Purchaser of Marketing Research Products~ervices? [] Yes Areas of Research Interest (Check All That Apply) [] Consumer Non-DuraJ~le [] Service (Banks. Ins., Etc.) [] Health Care [] Consumer Durable [] Business-To-Business I--]Ot~er (Specify) [] No T108571134
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PLACE STAMP HERE ~G RESEARCH Rev/ew P.O. Box 23536 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55423 T108571135
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SANTA FE Equlfax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 1124 V~lla Unda Mall Santa Fe, NM 87505 Fax 505-471-4336 Contact: Coral Bradley 1,3.4,6.7A (See advertisement on p. 3) NEW YORK ALBANY Equifax/Ouick Test Opinion Ctrs. 428 Mohawk Mall Schenectady, NY 12304 Ph. 518-370-5077 Fax 518-370-5054 Contact: Scott Burgess 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) J,L.Whalen Markette Research 521 Dwaaskill Pk. Prof. Bldg, Clifton Park, NY 12065 Ph. 518-383-1661 1,3,6,7B BUFFALO Buffalo Survey & Research, Inc. 1249 Eggert Rd. Buffalo, NY 14226 Pho 71 6-833-6639 Fax 716-834-0396 1,3,4,6,7C Ruth Diamond Market Research 770 Alberta Dr. Buffalo, NY 14226 Ph. 716-836-1110 Fax 716-836-1114 Contact: Harvey Podolsky 1,3,4,6,7A Goldhaber Research Associates One NFA Park Amherst, NY 14228 Ph. 716-689-3311 Fax 716-669-3342 1,6,7B Marketing Decision Group, Inc. 9141 Main Street Buffalo, NY 14031 Ph. 716-634-2045 1,3,4,6.7C Marion Simon Research Services C103 Walden Galleria Cheektowaga, NY 14225 Ph. 71 6-684-8025 Fax 716-684-3009 Contact: Marion Simon 1.3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 99 ) Survey Svce. of Western New York 1911 Sheridan Drive Buffalo, NY 14223 Ph. 716-876-6450 Fax 716-876-0430 Contact: Susan Adelman 1,2.3.4.6,7C December, 1990 Suc~m] Svce. o~ W~e,...~m New York 4545 Tram~t Road ~liamsville, NY 14221 Ph. 716-876-6450 Fax 716-876-0430 Contact: Susan Adelman 1,3,4,6,7A Survey Svce. of Western New York 3701 W. McKinley Parkway Btasdell, NY 14219 Ph. 716-876-6450 Fax 716-876-0430 Contact: Susan Adelman 1,3,4,6,7A NEW YORK CITY Accu-Trend Inc. 1045 Route 109 Lindenhurst, NY 11757 Ph. 516-957-8811 Fax 516-957;8938 1,3.6,7C ' A La Carte Research 6800 Jericho Tpke, Suite 114W Syoeset, NY 11791 Ph. 516-364-4004 Fax 516-364-4683 Contact: Phyllis Gorin 1,3,6,7B Alenik-Rudman Research 151-t7 82 Street Howard Beach, NY 11414 Ph. 718-835-3100 Fax 718-641-6310 Contact: Roberta Rudman 1,3,6,7D A-One Research 2800 Coyle Street Brooklyn, NY 11235 Ph. 718-646-1721 1,3,6,7B Assistance In Marketing,'NY Galleria Mall, 100 Main St. White Plains, NY 10601. P~ 201-569-19,~9 Fax 201 Contact: Wayne Odle 1,3,4,6,7A Beta Research Corp. 64~ d~h~ T~jmpike Syossel. NY 11791 Ph. 516-935-3800 Fax 516-935-4092 t ,3.6.7B The Conference Center of New Rochelle 3 Cottage Place New Rochelle, NY 10801 Ph. 914-576-3800 Contact: Annette Walker 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 96 CSI Q~Jalitative Research Ctr. Wayne Towne Center Intersections of Rts. 23,46 & 80 Wayne, NJ 0?470 Ph. 800-227-0666 Fax 203-748-1735 Contact'. Karen Forcade 1,2,3,4,5,6,7A Tom Dale Market Research 160 East 48th Street New York, NY 10017 Ph. 212-758-9777 1,3.4,5,6,7B DTW Marketing Research Group 227 Route 206 Flanders, NJ 07836 Ph. 201-584-2500 Fax 201-584-2400 1,6,7B I Codes: Location: • t. Conterence Style Room [ 7A Shopping Mall 2. Uvtng Room S[yla I 7B O~=ce Building 3. Observallon Room 7C Free Standing 4. Teat Kitchen I 7D Other 5. Test K tchen wl Obs- Room' , 6. Video Equipment Avadable =1 ".',., .SANDIA MARKETING SERVICES COMPLETE Ch, PABILITIES! • Permanent ma# facility. .t 6-lin~ monitored phone bank. • 15 IBM/CI2 Interview stations. • Bilingual flexibility. ,Executive interviewing. .Door-to-door. C|rcteNo. 889 on Re&tier Card 95 T!08571136
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El~my Marke~ag, Researci~ 2100 Bruckner Blvd. Bronx. NY 10473 Ph. 718-217-0842 Contact: Bruce Kirldand 1'.3.4,6,7B (See advetlisement on p. 7) E~o~y Mmk~ttng Research, 2100 Bartow Ave, Baychester Bronx NewYork, NY 10473 Ph. 718-526-0432 Fax Contact:. Bruce KJrkland 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 7) The Best In Quality And Service FIELDWORK, INC. Large one-way m. irrored conference rooms Fully equipped test kitchens Separate client entrance One-on-One interview rooms Ample parking Convenient to all major hotels and airports ~11 in-house recruiting For All Your Focus Group Needs Boston (617) 899-3660 East (Fort Lee) (201) 585-8200 East (Westchester) (914)347-2]45 Chicago (312) 282-291t Chicago at O'Hare (312) 714-8700 Denver (303) 825-7788 Phoenix (602) 438-2800 WE TAKE RESPONSIBILITY SERIOUSLY Circle No. 890 on Reader Card GET OUT OF TOWN!!!!!!! ...just out of town 30 minutes from Manhattan The ideal-cross section of suburbia Let Us Cater to You! We offer a moclern and spacious facility (just 2 blocks flom Metro North Station, righ~ off 1-95), excellent recruiting staff, and the utmost in hospitality. Get the right people at the right place for the right price! Call Annette Walker. The Conference Center of New Rochelle 3 Cottage Place New Rochelle, N.Y. 10801 (914) 576-3800 96 Equ[fa~Quic~ Test Ol~nion Ctrs. Rye Brook. NY 10573 Ph. 914-937-0220 Fax 914-937-O561 Ga~l~_.-" Ru~ Suhf 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 3) Equlfax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. #370 Sunrise Mall Massapequa, NY 11758 Ph. 516-541-5100 Fax 516-541-1099 Contact: Sina EhrenFreund 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Fieldwork East, Inc. Two Executive Dr. Fort Lee, NJ 07024 Ph. 201-585-8200 Contact: Carol Tauben 1,2,3.4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 96 ) Fieldwork East at Westchester, Inc. 555 Taxter Road EImsford, NY 10523 Ph. 914-347-2145 Contact: Carol Tauben 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B 'See advertisement on p. 96) George Fine Research 220 No. Central Park Ave. Hartsdale, NY 10530 Ph. 914-328-0200 1,3,6,7B Focus America 1140 Sixth Ave., 9th Floor New York, NY 10036 Ph, 212-302-1808 Contact: David Schreier 1,3,4,6,7B Focus Plus Div. of ASI Market Research, Inc. 79 Fifth Avenue New York. NY 10003 Ph. 212-807-9393 Fax 212-645-3171 Contact: Liz Lobrano 1,3,4,6,7B See advertisement on p. 97) Focus Plus Div. of ASI Market Research, Inc. 141 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10010 Ph. 212-807-9393 Fax 212-645-3171 Contact: Liz Lobrano 1,3,4.6,7B (See advertisement on p. 97) The Focus Room & Field Service. NY 231 Central Ave. White Plains, NY 10606 Ph. 914-682-8404 Fax 914-428-3925 1,2,3,4.6,7B Quack's Marketing ResearchRe~ew T108571137
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Focus Room o~ New Jersey 285 Grand Avenue 5 Patriot Center Englewood, NJ 07631 Ph. 201-569-1919 Ce~tact: £)o~ Weinberg 1,3,4,6,7B Friedman Marketing/New York Jefferson Vall-ey Mall 650 Lee Blvd., E-1 Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 Ph. 914-962-9400 or 313-569-0444 Fax 914-962-1067 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73) Glickman Research Associates 354 Old Hook Road, #204 Westwood, NJ 07675 Ph. 201-664-6688 Fax 201-664-0590 1,3,6,7B Ideal Field Services, Inc. 1242 Green Acres Mall Valley Stream, NY 11581 Ph. 516-561-1723 1,3,4,6,7A Interviewers For Research/Suburban Associ- ates 517 Route 1 S~uth Iselin, NJ 08830 Pho 201-855-8900 Fax 201-855-9291 1 ,.2,3,4,6,7B J & R North Harrison Street New Rochelle, NY 10801 Ph. 914-235-8335 1,3,4,6,7A Long Island Groups In Focus LTD 1185 Northern Blvd. Manhasset, NY 11030 Ph. 516-365-8630 Fax 516-365-4913 Contact: Annetle Heller 1,2,3,4,5,6.7C Manhattan Opinion Center 369 Lexington Ave. New York, NY 10017 Ph. 212-972-5553 Fax 212-557-3085 Contact: Jana Warren 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 98 ) Meadowlands Consumer Center The Plaza at the Meadows 700 Plaza Drive, 2nd Fir. Secaucus, NJ 07094 Ph. 201-865-4900 Fax 201-865-0408 Contact: Janis Wagman 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 55 ) Codes: I. Con'eience S~le Room 2 Lr~=~g Rocm Sidle 3, (~ose~vat¢on Room 4, Tesl I~tm~en 5. Tesl K~lche~ w: C~s. Roor~ 6 V~deo Eq~pmenrAva~;~t~le Location: 7A St~3pp~j 75 Office Building 7C Free ~ng 7D Other December. 1~0 CUS Plus. Qualitative Research with all the pluses: Our Location Focus Plus is centrally located between Manhattan's two most important business districts--the area between midtown and Wall Street, now fashionably known as the "SOFI" district or South of the Flatiron building. Focus Plus (212) 807-9393 79 FIFTH AVENUE FIFTH FLOOR NEW YORK, N.Y. 10003 (BETWEEN 15th & 16th) Focus North 141 FIFTH AVENUE FIFTH FLOOR NEW YORK, N.Y. 10010 (BETWEEN 20th & 21st) Circle No,8~2 on Reader C~:I 97 T108571138
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"l~el'eMa~e~ ~ Cen~r 855 Valley Road Clifton, NJ 07013 Ph. 201-470-0044 Fax 201-470-0397 1,3,4,5,6,78 T. A. Miller Company. Inc. 1060 Clifton Ave. Clifton, N3 07015 Ph. 2(] 1-778-6011 Contact: Thomas Miller 1,3,4,6,7B Murray Hill Center 205 Lexington Avenue New York, NY 10016 Ph. 212-889-4777 Fax 212-683-2282 Contact: Sue Winer 1,3,4,6,7B New York Conference center, Inc~ 240 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10016 Ph. 212-682-0220 Fax 212-682-0214 1,3,6,7B I, tew' Ye~k ~ 12 East 41st St. New York, NY 10017 Ph. 212-481-3780 Fax 212-779-8623 Cont~C,t: Nancy Opoczynski 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 120) Peters Marketing Research 615 W. Mt. Pleasant Ave. Livingston, NJ 07039 Ph. 201-535-6488 Fax 201-535-9887 1,3,6,7B Plaza Research 120 Rte. 17 North Paramus, NJ 07652 Ph. 201-265-7500 Fax 201-265-7269 Contact: Jeffrey Robbins 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 98) Circle No. 893 on Reader Card State of the Art Focus Group Facilities New York Los Angeles Chicago Dallas Denver Atlanta Philadelphia NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS: 120 Route 17 North. Paramus, NJ 07652 (201) 265-7500 Pamela Rakow, Executive Director 195 Cotumb{a Turnp~'ke Florham Park, NJ 07932 Ph. 201-765-0077 Contact: Donna Weinberg 1,3,4-,5,6,7B Q and A Research, Inc. 1701 Sunrise Hwy. Bay Shore, NY 11706 Ph. 516-968-6868 1,3,4,6,7A Rich Interviewing, Inc. 261 t Pettit Ave. Bellmore, NY 11710 Pho 516-826-8822 1,3,4,6,7B St. George Research 1025 W. St. George Avenue L_inden, NJ 07036 Ph. 201-486-5700 Fax 201-486-5643 Contact: Barbara Studney 1,3,6,7B Schlesinger Associates, Inc. Levinsan Plaza, Ste. 302 2 Lincoln Highway Edison, NJ 08820 Ph. 201-906-1122 Fax 201-906-8792 Contact: Steven Schlesinger 1,2,3,4,6,7B Audrey Schiller Market Research 3601 Hempstead Turnpike Levittown, NY 11756 Ph. 516-731-1500 Contact: Audrey Schiller 1,3,4,6,7B Smith Davis Communication Rsch. Rt 299 Time Square Bldg.,#203 Highland, NY 12528 Ph. 914-883-7241 Fax 914-883-7673 Contact: Martha Levin 1,3,6,7B Suburban Associates 579 Franklin Turnpike Ridgewood, NJ 07450 Ph. 201-447-5100 Fax 201-447-9536 1,2,3,4,6,7C Technical Analysis 20 E. Oakdene Ave. Teaneck, NJ 07666 Ph. 201-836-1500 Fax 201-836-1959 Contact: Pat Herman 1,2,3,4,6,7B Wolf/Altschul/Callahan, Inc. 171 Madison Avenue, #1100 New York, NY 10016 Ph. 212-725-8840 1,3,4,6,7B Qu~rk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571139
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ROCHESTER Gordon S. Black Corp. 1661 Pennfieid Rd. Ph. 716-248-2805 or 800-866-7655 1,3,6,7B BRX/GlobaI, Inc. 169 Rue De Ville Rochester, NY 14618 Ph. 716-442-0590 Fax 716-442-0840 Contact: Joel Axelrod 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 99) Car-lone Research, Inc. Marketplace Mall 3400 W. Henrietta Rd. Rochester, NY 14623 Ph, 716-424-3203 Fax 716-292-0523 1,3,4,5,6,7A Marion Simon Research Services 49 Wildbriar Rd. Rochester, NY 14623 Ph. 716-359-1510 Fax 716-334o9423 Contact: Marion Simon 1,3,4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 99) SMG Research 260 East Avenue Rochester, NY 14604 Ph. 716-263-2614 Fax 716-271-6250 1,3,6,7B The Sutherland Group, Ltd. 1160-B Pittsford-Victor Rd. Pittsford, NY 14534 Ph. 716-586-5757 1,3,6,7B SUFFOLK COUNTY d & R Mall Research 800 Montauk Hwy. Shirley, NY 11967 Ph. 516-399-0200 1,3,4,6,7A SYRACUSE KS&R Consumer Testing Center Shoppingtown Mall Syracuse, NY 13214 Ph. 800-289-8028 Fax 315-471-0115 1,2,3,4,6,7A McCarthy Associates Penn Cam Mall 5775 South Bay Road Syracuse, NY 13041 Ph. 315-458-9320 1,2,3,4,6,7A I Confelence $~le Room 2 IJwng Room Style 3. Observation Room 4. Test Kilchen 5. Test K~J'mn wl O~s. 1:~3(~' 6. V'~eo Equ,pmen! AvailebM [ December. 1990 M=tioa Simon Flesecu,e,h Northern Lights Mall Syracuse, NY 13212 Ph. 315-455-5952 Fax 315-455-1826 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertfsement on p. 99) NORTH CAROLINA ASHEVILLE Ame~ica~ S~es & Mar4~ting 216 Vance Street Hendersonvtlle, NC 28739 Ph. 704-693-1971 Contact: Dorothy" Rogat 1,6,7B BRX/GL@BAL,,.c. We Focus on your. Interests IN UPSTATE NEWYORK • 8 minutes from airport and center of city • Ample, free parking adjacent tobuilding • 13' x 20' conference room • Bl-level viewlng room, comfortably seats 15 • Uniquely styled V-shaped table • Separate moderator's station • State-of-the-art audiovisual equipment • Compact, lully equipped test kitchen 169 Rue de ~ille • Rochester', New York 14618 Telephone: (716) 442-0590 FAX: (716) 442-0840 Clinic No. 896 onReeder Card Providing . Reliable, Cost-Effective, Data Collection for three key New York markets Syracuse • Rochester • Buffalo is what we do best! For more information on our organization, and how we can best serve yours through focus groups, mall intercepts, central telephones, audits, and our other services, please call. Marion Simon Research Service, Inc. SyracuseRochesterBuffalo (716) 359-t5 0 Circle No.895 on ReJider Carol 99 T108571140
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CHARLOTTE Catherine Bryant & Assoc. 353 Jonestown Rd., Suile 124 V~nsto~Sate~, NC 27104 Ph. 919-766-8966 Contact: Cathy Bryant 1,3,6,7A Charlotte Research Services 301 E. Kingston Avenue Charlotte, NC 28203 Ph. 704-333-5028 Contact: Elizabeth Peeler 1,3,6,7B Consumer Pulse of Charlotte Eastland Mall 5625 Central Avenue Charlotte. NC 28212 Ph. 704-536-6067 Contact: Betly Collins 1,3,4,5,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 84) Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. 2300 W. Meadowview Rd., #203 Greensboro, NC 27407 Ph. 919-854-3333 Contact: Dan Glackin 1,3,4,6.7B (See advertisement on p. 3) FacFind. Inc. 2101 E. Rexford Rd., Suite 123 Charlotte. NC 28211 Ph. 704-365-8474 Fax 704-365-8741 Contact: Martha Harbison 1,3,4,6,7B HomedLeibowitz Market Research 333 Four Seasons Town Centre Greensboro, NC 27407 Ph. 919-294-9415 Fax 919-294-6116 Contact: Leonard Homer 1,3,4,6,7A KPC Reseamh 908 S. Tryon Street Charlotte, NC 282O2 Ph. 704-358-5754 or 342-1626 Fax 704-342-1600 Contact: Und~ Daw[ey 1,3,6,7B Le~owitz Market Research Assoc. One Parkway Plaza, Ste. 110 Charlotte, NC 28217 Ph. 704-357-1961 Fax 704-357-1965 Contact: Teri Leibowitz 1,3,4,6,7B W.H. Long Marketing, Inc. Golden Gate Shopping Cenler 2240 Golden Gate Dr. Greensboro, NC 27408 Ph. 919-292-4146 Contact: W. H. Long 1 ~2,3,4,6,7A MarketWise, Inc. 1332 15. Morehead St., #100 Charlotte, NC 28204 Ph. 704-332-8433 Fax 704-332-0499 Contact: Beverly Kothe 1,3,4,6,7B Video Testing Service(VTS) 301 So. Green St., Ste. 16 Greensboro, NC 27401 Ph. 919-275-9990 1.3,6,7B RALEIGH Diener & Associates 200 Park Bldg.. Ste. 111 Rsch. Tri. Pk., NC 27709 P'h. 919-549-8945 1,3.6,7B Cincinnati's Premiere Focus Group Facilities THE ANSWER GROUP Two outstanding focus group facilities, our Downtown facility and our Blue Ash facility on Cincinnati's northeast side. Large focus group interview rooms with contemporary styling for relaxed conversation. Spacious viewing rooms which seat 12 comfortably. Recruitment of qualified consumers and professionals according to exact specifications. Emphasis on client service and prompt, expert attention to your market research needs. Call Lynn Grome at (513) 247-2200 THE ANSWER GROUP 4665 Cornell Road, Suite 150 Cincinnati, OH 45241 lO0 CircJe Noo 897 o~ ReaderCard Equ.~x/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. South Square 4001 Chapel Hill Blvd. Durham, NC 27707 Ph. 919-489-3104 Fax eJ~'9~4'8~8316 Contact: Beth Simons 1,3,4,6.7A (See advertisement on p. 3) FGI, Inc. 700 Eastowne Dr. Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Ph. 919-493-1670 Fax 919-490-8829 Contact:Jim Protzman 1,3,4,6,7B Johnston, Zabor & Assoc. 2222 Chapel Hill/Nelson Hwy. Headquarters Park, #300 Durham, NC 27713 Ph. 919-544-5448 1,3,4,6,7B L and E Research 4009 Barrett Dr., Ste. 101 Raleigh, NC 27609 Ph. 919-782-3860 Fax 919-787-3428 1,3,4,6,7B Management Rsch. & Ping. Corp. 303 Blake St., #200 Raleigh, NC 27601 Ph. 919-856-1144 Fax 919-856-0020 1,3.6,7B A North Carolina State Interviewing Service 4208 Six Forks Rd. Bldg. 2, Ste. 333 Raleigh. NC 27609 Ph. 919-781-0555 or 781-7810 1,3.6,7B WINSTON-SALEM Bellomy Research, Inc. 108 Cambridge Plaza Dr. Winston-Salem, NC 27104 Ph. 919-765-7676 or 800-443-7344 Fax 919-765-8084 Contact: Lora Sessions 1,3,4,5,6.7C The Customer Center. Inc. 3528 Vest Mill Rd Winston-Salem. NC 27103 Ph. 919-768-7368 Contact: Tara Olson 1,3,6o7C OHIO AKRON Opinion Centers Akron 2872 West Market Street Akron, OH 44313 Ph. 216-867-0885 Contact: Betty Schwarcz 1.3,4.6.7B Quir,~'s Marketing ResearchReview T!08571141
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CINCINNATI ADI Research, Inc. (See Matrixx Marketing) AdV~anced~ R~s,e~mb In M~'keling 10133 Springfield Pike Cincinnati. OH 45215 Ph. 513-772-2929 Fax 513-772-0731 Contact: Judy Christman 1,3,4,6,7C Alliance Research, Inc. 538 Centre View Blvd. Crestview Hills, KY 41017 Ph, 606-344-0077 Fax 606-344-0078 Contact: Molly Moreland 1,3,6,7B 3"he Answer Group 4665 Cornell Rd., Ste. 150 Cincinnati, OH 45241 Ph. 513-247-2200 Fax 51 3-489-9130 Contact: Lynn Gmme 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 100) The Answer Group Downtown Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH.45242 Ph. 513-247-2200 Fax 513-489-9130 Contact: Lynn Gmme 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 100 ) Cincinnati, OH 45249 Ph. 513-683-6600 Fax 513-683-9177 Contact: Irwin Weinberg 1,3,4,5;6,7C Assistance In Marketing 9523 Colerain Avenue Cincinnai, OH 45251 Ph. 513-385-8228 Fax 513-683-9177 Contact: Irwin Weinberg 1,3,6,7A Assistance In Marketing, Inc. Florence Mall Florence, KY 41042 Ph. 606-283-1232 Fax 513-683-9177 Contact: Irwin Weinberg 1,3,4,6,7A B & B Research Services, Inc. 8005 Plainfield Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45236 Ph. 513-793-4223 Fax 513-793-9117 Contact: James Moler 1,3,4,6,7B Burke Marketing Research Gwynne Bldg., 6th & Main Sis. Cincinnati, OH 45202 Ph. 513-852-8676 Fax 513-852-3013 Contact: Rod Cober 1,3,6,7B Cot~mmer .Pulse of Cinclm~ati 514 Forest Fail I~'~e Cincinnati, OH 45240 Ph. 513-671-1211 Contact: Susan Lake 1,3,4,5,6,7A (5"ee ad~rtisement on p. 84) Consumer Testing Services of Greater Cincinnati 311 Philadelphia St. Covington, KY 41011 Ph. 606-431-7700 1,3,6,7B Elrick & Lavidge, Inc. 11 Tdangle Park Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45246 Ph. 513-772-1990 . Fax 513-772-2093 Contact: James Palmer 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 101 ) Fields Marketing Research, Inc. 7979 Reading Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45237 Ph. 513-821-6268 " Fax 513-821-0210 Contact: Ken A. Fields 1,2,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 104 ) Codes: L-cation: t. Conlerence Style Room7A Shopping Mall 2. Living Room Style 7B Office Building 3. Observalton Room 7C Free Standing 4. Test Kitchen 7D Other 5. Test Kitc.'~en wl Obs. Room: 6. Video Equipment Availaole : At Ekick & Lavidge. we value the kind of people who value challenge. Without them, our nationwide dam collection and pro~essing ~aci]Jdes would be useless. That's one reo~n we attracx the calib~ of people we do- ene~gefic plan~ers, thinkers and g~ounds ]i~ computer sdence. ecooomics, rnad~ng and psychology. These am people who come to you already up m speed on ]com" issues and speaking your larguag~-like hataie 13uder. at letL Vice President and an expca't at in-d6pth moderating and E & L people li~ laurie Buder offer powerfuhhlnking you can profit from.when you have marketing a~search needs, aren't they the kirul ofpeopte you want on your side? December:. 1990 C~rc~eNo.SgS on Reader Card 101 T108571142
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Mad~tWs~on Research+ Inc. 4500 Coope~ Rd. Cincinnati. OH 45242 Ph. 513-791-3100 Fax 513-791-3103 Co.tact: ~11'~ Berne# 1.3.4.5,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 103) :Matrixx 8044 Mordgome~ Rd., Ste. Cincinnati, Oh 45236 Ph. 513-984-2470 Fax 513-984-3422 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 102 ) MATRIXX MARKETING RESEARCH HASTHE MOST MODERN AND CONVENIENT I:OCUS GROUP FACILITIES IN CINCINNATI. OUTSTANDING ~:ACiLITIES • Two completely equipped focus group/cllent viewing rooms with audio/video recording. • Recruiting and focus group sessions conducted seven days/week. • On-hne, computerized respondent database. • Complete k~tchenlfood service. • Experienced managers and supervisors: trained personnel. CONVENIENT LOCATION • Next to Kenwood Towers Centre, the most prestigious regional mall in Cincinnati. • In the suburbs, yet less than 15 minutes from downtown Cincinnati. MODERN BUILDING • 24 hour on site security. • Kenwood Towers. a landmark office-complex development. DIVERSE AREA COM~)SITION Demographics - 73,000 households within five mile radius of the Towers. - Median education - 13 years, - Median household income - $30,000 (30% over $40,000). - Home values - 15% above national average. • Available on request Detailed demographics and 40-Cluster PRIZM Lifestyle profile data for 1, 3. & 5 mile areas. For on-the-spot bidding and availablity information, please call: IIII II III IIIIII Circle NO. 899 on Reader Card ~.,+ ~ .. . :~..~':'.~Th~~''..~.-~..~i. ~ ~; ' " ~This demoofophicolly desiroble oreo hos o new od consumer research focili~ designed to sewe today's m~[keling needs. ~er 2.000 sq. ~. of comfod and technology in which to conduct f~us groups, one.n-one inte~iews ~nd ongoing bus]ne~ in o private office environment. Only minutes from Cleveland Hopkins ~rpod. with excellent hotels, d~ning and olher omenities right ne~ dooL We invite you to coll... FOCUS GROUPS OF CLEVE~ND 2 Summit Pork Drive -- Suite 225 • (2~6} 642-8883 at the R~kside R~d exit of t-77 • C~velond. Ohio 44~3~ 10"~ Cir~Je K,o. ~00 on Reader Cacti (~Fact Marketing Flesea~ch, inc. 9~08 Cawer ltd. Cincinnati. OH 45242 Ph. 513-891-2271 Fax 513-791-7356 1,3,4,5,6,7B (See adve~isement on p. 105) Research and Results, Inc. 4941 Paddock Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45237 Ph. 513-242-6700 Contact: Barbara Newman 1,3,6,7B jSpar/Burgoyne 705 Central Ave., Ste. 500 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Ph. 513-621-7000 1,3,4,6,7B I CLEVELAND Business Research Servi.c_es. 23825 Commerce Park . Cleveland, OH 44122 Ph. 216-831-5200 Contact: Tony Ramacciatti 1,3,4,6,7B Cleveland Survey Center 691 Richmond Mall Cleveland, OH 44143 Ph. 216-321-0006 Fax 216-461-9525 1,3,4,6,7A Consumer Pulse of Cleveland 4301 Ridge Road Cleveland, .OH 44144 Ph. 216-351-4644 Fax 216-351-7876 Contact: Veronica Hoffman McCready 1,3,4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 84) Focus Groups of Cleveland 2 Summit Park Dr.. Ste. 225 Cleveland, OH 4413t Ph. 216-642-8883 Fax 216-461-9525 Contact: Betty Perry t,3,4,6,TB (See advertisement on p. 102) Heakin Research, Inc. Severance Center 3542 Mayfield Road Cleveland Heights, OH 44118 Ph. 216-381-6115 Contact: Laurel Taichnar 1,3,4,6,7A The Maffett Research Group 25111 Country Club Blvd., Ste. 290 No. Olmsted, OH 44070 Ph. 216-779-1303 Fax 216-779-2718 Contact: Tiina Pampa 1,3,4,6,7B Code=: Location: 1. Confarerc.e St-/le Room 7A Shopping Mail 2. Living Room S~te I 7B Otfa:e B~lding 3. Ob~en~ation Room ~ 7C Roe Slanding 4. Test K}~:tten t 7D O~er 5. Test Kitchen w/Obs. Room 6. Video Equ'~anl Available Ouirk's Marke~'zg ResearchRev[ew T!08571143
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Ma d~.e~ea~'~ Associates 3645 Ware~ Cerea~ Rd. Stroker He~hts, OH 441 ~ Ph. 216-491-~15 Fax 216-491-8552 O~t~t: ~k~ KIo~ds 1,3,6,~B (See a~is~e~ on p. 89) National Market Measures, Inc. 781 Beta Archade Mayfield Village, OH 44143 Ph, 216-473-7766 Fax 216-473-0428 1,2,3,6,7B National Market Measures, Inc. 28901 Clemehs Road Westlake, OH ~134 Ph. 216-473-7766 Fax 216-892-0002 1,2,3,6,7B Opinion Centers Amedca, Inc. 22021 Brookpark Rd. Cleveland, OH 44~ 26 Ph. 216-779-3000 Contact: Be~ Schwarcz 1,3,4,5.6,7C Rosen Research 25906 Eme~ Road Cleveland, OH 44128 Ph. 216-464-5240 F~ 216-464-7864 Contact: Eric Silver 1,2,3,4,5,6,7C Strategic Consumer Research, Inc. 26250 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44132 Ph. 216-261-0308 1,3,6,7B COLUMBUS B & B Research Service, Inc. 1365 Grandview Avenue Columbus, OH 43212 Ph. 614-486-6746 Fax 614-486-9958 Contact: James Moler 1,3,6,7B Clark Jones Inc. 1029 Dublin Road Columbus, OH 43215 Ph. 614-488-2466 Fax 614-488-2964 Contact: Hilary Wallach 1,3,6,7C Focus and Phones. Inc. 2655 Oakstone Dr. Columbus, OH 43231 Ph. 614-895-5800 Fax 614-895-5840 Contact: Anita Ingalls 1,3,4,6,7B Focus Plus At Shelly Berman Communicators 707 Park Meadow Rd. Westervilie, OH 43081 December, 1990 ~ ~ W~:~s~n 1,3,4,6,7C Quality Controlled Services Crossma-ds Center 7~34 Crossroads Dr. Columbus, OH 43219 Ph. 614-436-2025 Fax 614-436-7040 Contact: Judy Golas 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 59) Dv~g~t ~ & Assoc~-s 1290 ~ Avenue Coturnbus, OH 43212 Ph. 614-488-3123 Contact: Betty Spencer 1,3,4,5,6,7C ToI.M.E. Market Research 4265 Westtand Mall Columbus, OH 43228 Ph. 614-276-6336 Fax 614-276-3303 Contact: Anita Ingal]s 1,3.4,6,7A OMMITMENT . +° QUALITY ...THE STANDARD OF MorkctVision: FOCUS GROUPS 2 fully-equipped suites with luxury tiered seating remote controlled video CONSUMER CENTER • high tech test kitchen • ~o viewing rooms newest and finest facility in ~/ Cincinnati MorkctVision Rcs¢orch The MarketVision Building 4500 Cooper Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 ~_~ I I I ~ I I I® (513) 791-3100 An Inc 500" Company C~rcle No. 90! on Reader Card 103 T108571144
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Fields Marketing Research, Inc. 7979 READING ROAD • CINCINNATI, OHIO 45237 CINCINNATI's ........ Most spacious and advanced focus group facility. FOCUS ROOM (19' x 24'), Members o/... A.M.A. • National. • Cincinnati Ch~ter. M.R.A. • National. • Gre~t Lakes Clmptor. ~ or writ~ for our brochure. F~n • quick bid in Cia~innatl, F~x us specs ~m yo~r next study. D~aa~ I. Fields, ~sidcnt Km A. Fields, Vice Presider~ OBSERVATION ROOM (ROOM 14' x 26' / MIRROR 8' x 12') * Now available CRT interviewihg and tabulation Call (513) 821-6266 • FAX (513) 679-5300 C#cle No.902 on Re~deeC~rd DAYTO,N Ruth Eltiott Research Services 3077 Kettedng Blvd., Ste. 300 D,ayt~n, OH 45439 Ph. 5t3-294-5"9Fg Fax 513-2_.94-8518 Contact: Dianne Howell 1,3,4,5,6,7B The Opinion Center Upper Valley Mall-Upper Valley Pike Springfield, OH 45504 Ph. 513-579-1555 Fax 513-562-8819 Contact: Ruth Hull 1,3,4,5,6,7A QFact Marketing Research, Inc. 8163 Old Yankee St. Dayton, OH 45459 Ph. 513-891-2271 Fax 513-435-3457 Contact: Beverly Shores 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on ~105) Shiloh Research Associates, Inc. 16 West Wenger Rd., Ste. B Englewood, OH 45322 Ph. 513-836-9485 Fax 513-836-9497 Contact: Laura Martin 1,3,4,5,6,7B T.I.M.E. Market Research 560 Dayton Mall Dayton, OH 45459 Ph. 513-433-6296 Fax 513-433-5954 Contact: Anita Ingalls 1.3,4,6,7A TOLEDO Barbour Research, Inc. 5241 Southwyck Blvd., Ste. 201 Toledo, OH 43614 Ph. 419-866-3475 Fax 419-866-3478 1,3,6,7B Market Research of Toledo 3103 Executive Pkwy., Sic. 106 Toledo, OH 43606 Ph. 419-534-4705 Fax 419-531-8950 Contact: Sharon Schweickert 1,3,6,7B Package Factors, Inc. 3736 Sylvan Wood Dr. Sylvania, OH 43560 Ph. 419-841-9224 1,3,6,7B Codes: 1. Conference Style Room 2 L~vmg Ro~m St'j~e 3. Observa~on Room 4. "Test I'Qlc:hen 5. lest K~tchen w/C~s. Room 6 V=deo EqLupmen! Avadable Location: J 7A Shopp=rtg Mall J 7B OlfiC~ BuilOing J 7C Free Standing 7D O~er t~,~irk's Marketing ResearchReview T108571145
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U N I Q U E L Y R I G H T Quafitative & Quantitative Research That's Right For You QFACT Marketing Research, Inc. 9908 Canter Road C~ncinnati, Ohio 45242 (513) 891-2271 FAX (513) 791-7356 QFACTtDayton • OFACT/Eastcjate Mall December. 1990 c~tcle No. 903 on Reader Card 105 T!08571146
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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA CITY 15qaffa~#Qui-Sk Test.Ol~Mion Ctrs. 1153 Crossroads Mall Oklahoma City. OK 73149 Ph. 405-631-9738 Fax 405-632-0750 Contact: Map/Rose 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Johnson Marketing Research 2915 Classen Blvd., Ste. 350 Oklahoma City, OK 73106 Ph. 405-528-2700 1,3,4,6,7B Oklahoma City Research Ruth Nelson Research Services 2501 W. Memorial Dr. Oklahoma City, OK 73134 Ph. 303-758-6424 o r 405-752-47 Fax 405-751-1743 Contact: Ruth Nelson 1,3,4,6,7A Oklahoma Market Research/Data Net, Inc. 3909 Classen Blvd., Ste. 200 Oklahoma City, OK 73118 Ph, 405-525-3412 Fax 405-525-3419 1,3,4,6,7B TULSA Cunningham Market Research 4107 So. Yale, #LA 107 Tulsa, OK 74135 Ph. 918-664-7485 1,3,4,5,6,7A Friedman Marketing/Tulsa Eastland Mall 14002 E. 21st, St., #144 Tulsa, OK 74108 Ph. 918-234-3337 or 313-569-0444 Fax 918-234-3793 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73) Tulsa Surveys 4530 So. Sheridan #101 Tulsa, OK 74135 Ph. 918-836-6614 Fax 918-838-2439 1,3,6,7B T~lsa Surveys Woodland Hills Mall 7021 So. Memorial Drive Tulsa, OK 74133 Ph. 918-836-4512 Fax 918-838-2439 1,3,6,7A Codas: , LocatJon: I. Conte,ence Style Room [ 7A Shopping U~ll 2. Uvir~J Room S~le [ 7~ Office Building 30bservaLon Room [ 7C Free 5tarclz"<j 4. Tesl K~t~..~en [ 70 CXher 5. Test K=tchen w/O~s. ~i 106 OREGON EUGENE Ma~Sta~ Madder Research 71 E. 28 Avenue Eugene, OR 97405 Ph. 503-484-6176 Contact: LaDeane Pryor 1,3,4,6,7B PORTLAND Columbia Information Systems 333 SW. 5th Avenue, #200 Portland, OR 97204 Ph. 503-225-0112 1,3,6,7B Data Unlimited, Inc. 9900A SE. Washington, Mall 205 Portland, OR 97216 Ph. 503-256-0987 1,3,4,6,7A Gargan & Associates, Inc. 2705 E. Burnside, Ste. 200 Portland, OR 97214 Ph. 503-234-7111 Fax 503-233-3865 Contact: Ginger Shank 1.3,4,6,7B Gilmore/Northwest Surveys 5322 NE Irving Portland, OR 97213 Ph. 503-245-4014 Fax 503-280-1130 Contact: Yvonne Eby 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 116) Griggs-Anderson Field Research 110 SW. Yamhill Portland, OR 97204 Ph. 503-241-8700 Fax 503-241-8716 1,3,4,6,7A Image Analysis Market Research 4386 SW. Macadam, #301 Portland, OR 97201 Ph. 503-227-5763 Fax 503-274-2303 1,6,7B ManagemenUMarketing Associates Bank of California Tower 707 SW. Washington St.,Ste. 1460 Portland, OR 97205 Ph. 503-228-9327 Fax 503 248-1952 Contact: Donald Jacobson 1,2,6.7B Market Decisions Corporation 8959 SW. Barbur Blvd.. Ste. 204 Portland, OR 97219 Ph. 503-245-4479 Fax 503-245-9677 Contact: Philip Cartwright 1,3,6,7B Mark~ Trends, tnc. 2130 SW. Jefferson. Ste. 200 Portland, OR 97201 Ph. 503-224-4900 Fax 503-224-0633 1,3,4,6,7B Omni Research 9414 SW. Barbur Blvd., Ste. A Portland, OR 97219 Ph. 503-245-4014 Fax 503-245-9065 Contact: Chris Robinson 1,3,6,7B PENNSYLVANIA ALLENTOWN Parkwood Research Associate 4635 Crackersport Rd. Allentown, PA 18104 Ph. 215-481-0102 Fax 215-395-8027 Contact: Kathleen Follw6rler 1,3,4,6,7B ERIE Heintz Research 709 Park Avenue South Erie, PA 16502-1238 Ph, 814-452-6474 1,3,4,6,7D T.I.M.E. North 3854 Walker Blvd. Erie, PA 16509 Ph. 814-868-0873 1,3,6,7B HARRISBURG The Bartlett Group 3690 Vartan Way Harrisburg, PA 17110 Ph. 717-540-9900 Fax 717-540-9338 Contact: Jeff Bartlett 1,3,6,7C PHILADELPHIA All-Ways Advertising Co. Smylie Times Bldg., Ste. 100 8001 Roosevelt Blvd. Philadelphia, PA 19152 Ph. 215-332-9000 Fax 215-331-8031 Contact: Robert Lieberman 1,3,4,6,7B Consumer Pulse of Philadelphia Plymouth Meeting Mall #2203 Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462 Ph. 215-825-6636 Contact: Linda Crowder 1,3,4,5.6,7A (See advertisement on p. 84) Qu~k's Market'ng Resea~chReview T108571147
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The Oa~ G~up 2260 Elutter P1~e, Ste. 150 Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462 Ph. 215-834-2080 Fax 215-834-3035 Cer~t.aIt: IK~hy Leister 1.3,6,7B Davis and Company 3901 Market Street, Ste. 12 Philadelphia, PA 19104 Ph. 215-222-3000 1,3,6,7B Equifax/Qulck Test Opinion Ctrs. Moorestown Mall Moorestown, NJ 08057 Ph. 609-234-5440 Fax 609-235-2691 Contact: Dot Muir 1,3.4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Equlfax/Quick :lest Opinion ctrs. Neshaminy Mall #109 Bensalem, PA 19020 Ph. 215-322-0400 Fax 215-322-5412 Contact: Alice Osborne 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Focus Suites of Philadelphia One Bala Plaza, Ste. 622 Bala Cynwyd, PA. 19004 Ph. 215-667-1110 Fax 215-667-4858 Contact: Kathy Jonik 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. f 19) Group Dynamics In Focus, Inc. 555 City Line Ave., Ste. 580 Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 Ph. 215-668-8535 Fax 215-668-2072 Contact: Merle Holman 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 108 ) JRP Marketing Research Service 100 Granite Drive,Terrace Level Media, PA 19063 Ph. 215-565-8840 Fax 215-565-8670 Contact: Paul Frattaroli 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 107) JRP Marketing Research Services, Inc. 108 Oxford Valley Mall Langhorne, PA 19047 Ph. 215-565-8840 Fax 215-565-8870 Contact: Paul Frattaroli 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 107) Mar's Surveys, Inc. Cinnaminson Mall, Rte. 130 Cinnaminson. NJ 08054 Ph. 609-786-8514 Fax 609-786-0480 Contact: Judy Abrams 1,3.6.7B December. 1990 ClrcleNo.904 on Re~derCard 107 T108571148
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Boez Aie~ & ~, inc. 1700 Market Street, #1700 Philadelphia, PA 19103 Ph. 215-496-6800 1.3,6,7B Philadelphia Focus, Inc. 100 No. 17th St. Philadelphia, PA 19103 Ph. 215-561-5500 Fax 215-561-6525 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. I09) Plaza Research Two Greentree Centre Marlton, NJ 08053 Ph. 609-596-7777 Fax 609-596-3011 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B Contact: Annette Guss (See advertisement on p. 98) Quality Controlled Servlces A2577 Interplex Drive Trevose, PA 19047 Ph. 215-639-8035 Fax 215-639-8224 Contact: Mitzi Keller 1,3.4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 59) Quality In Field 308 Lakeside Ddve Southampton, PA 18066 Ph. 215-698-0606 1,3.4,6,7B Plymou~ Meeting, PA 19462 Ph. 215-941-2700 or 800-828-3228 Fax 215-941-2711 Contact: Rosemarie Huber 1 Research Options 521 Plymouth Rd., Suite 107 Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462 Ph. 215-828-2390 Contact: Jack McAleer 1,3,4,6,7B Savitz Research Center, Inc. Valley Forge Plaza 1150 First Ave., Ste. 750 King of Prussia, PA 19406 . Ph. 215-962-0609 Fax 215-962-0613 Contact: Harriet Silverman 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 113) Savitz Research Center, Inc. 3007 Willow Grove Park Mall 2500 Moreland Road Willow Grove, PA 19090 Ph. 215-657-6660 Fax 215-657-1915 Contact: Harriet Silverman 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 113 ) Strategic Marketing Corp. GSB Bldg., Ste. 802 City Line & Belmont Aves. Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 Ph. 215-667-1649 Fax 215-667-0628 1,3,6,7B Subu#o~m Asso~ates 587 ~ P~e, Sle. 800 Montgomeryv~le, PA 18936 Ph. 215-822-6220 Fax 215-822-2238 1,3.4,6.7B U.S. Research Corp. 224 Echelon Mall Voorhees. NJ 08043 Ph. 609-772-2220 Contact: Jackie Weise 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 91 ) The Vanderveer Group 555 Virginia Drive Fort Washington, PA 19034 Ph. 215-646-7200 1,3,4,5,6,7B PITTSBURGH AIlegl~eny Marketing Group Osborne Plaza 1106 Ohio River Blvd. Sewickley, PA 15143 -- Ph. 412-741-2410 1,3,4,6,7B Code=: Location: 1. Conlerence Style Room 7A Shopp,ng Mall 2. Living Room Style 7B Office Building 3. Observation Room I 7C Free $1anding 4. Test Kitchen I 7D Other 5. Teat Kitchen w/Obs. Ro~m 6. V dee Equ pment Ava lab e Philadelphia's Ultimate Location For Focus Groups! Easy ways to get here... by plane, train and carlll Comfortable client lounges with private telephones and televisions. Fully-equippedtest kitchen. BLAST OFF your next project with Group Dynamics! graphic specifications. • Easy access from: --Philadelphia Int'l. Airport (30 rain.) --Amtrak's 30th Street Station (8 rain.) --Pennsylvania Ibrnpike (20 rain.) • Lodging, dining and entertainment within walking distance. GROUP DYNAMICS IN FOCUS Call Group Dynamics at 215/668-8535 for a free brochure. 5.55 City Avenue. Suite 580 • Bala Cynwyd. PA 19004 108 Circle No. 906 on Reader Card (X:irk's Market~ng ResearchReview T108571149
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'P_ N J OY OVE R OF philadelphia is the nation's fifth largest market, with 5,890,600 residents. But it's often over- looked as a focus group location, and that's unfortunate. After all, those overlooked respondents are ready to give a new point of view to your products and ser~4ces. At Philadelphia Focus, we specialize in recruiting new respondents, and bringing you unsurpassed service in our centxally- located facilities. Our Center City IocallOll Is easily accessed transportation. So we draw from a wider range of respondents not just those in our "neighborhood." Dozens of major medical cenlers and hundreds of corporate head~aflers make us perfect for business-to-business and health care focus groups. SUbU~an ~d CitY respondents ibm our Iocallon, becau~ it's so central. We can recruit the quality mass- market respondents you need -- easy and quickly, from a]l over the Philadelphia area. We even offer them free parking, right next door! Our professional a~de Is one ~ull like, too, Circle No. 907 on Reader Card You'll never hear us complain or make excuses -- no matter how demanding your requirements. Clients say our facllllles are the floesl Ihey'~ seen. They've been designed for optimal privacy and comfort, with the latest audio- visual equipment and spacious viewing rooms. Give us a call today. And discover over five million reasons why we should be your next focus Thomas A. Bershad group choice. President Philadelphia Focus I N C. 100 N. 17th ,ga'cct Philadelphia. P,L 19103 (215) 561-5500 T!08571150
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P~d~bmgb~ PA 15222 Ph. 412-471-8484 Fax 412-471-8497 Contact: Yvonne Campos 1,3,4,6,7B Dat~ tnFo rm~t~on Century II! Mall, Room 934 3075 Ctairton Rd, W. Mifflin, PA 15123 Ph. 412-655-8690 Contact: Nancy Palyo 1,3,4,6.7A Greater Pittsburgh Research Service 5950 Steubenville Pike Pittsburgh, PA 15136 Ph. 412-788-4570 Fax 412-788-4582 Contact: Ann Urban 1,3,6,7B Heakin Research, Inc. 1000 Ross Park Mall Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15237 Ph. 412-369-4545 Contact: Leslie Pape 1,3,4,6,7A Noble Interviewing 1610 Potomac Pittsburgh, PA 15216 • Ph. 412-343-6455 1,2,3,6,7B Noble Inte'r~iewing North Hill Village Mall McKnight Road Pittsburgh, PA 15237 Ph. 412-343-6455 1,3,4,6,7C Santell Market Research 300 Mt. Lebanon Blvd., Ste. 2204 Pittsburgh, PA 15234 Ph. 412-341-8770 Fax 412-341-8770 1,3,6,7B T.I.M.E. East Market Research 280 Ohio Valley Mall St. Clairsville, OH 43950 Ph. 614-695-6288 Fax 614-695-5163 Contact: Anita Ingalls 1,3,4,6,7A Truxell Interviewing Services Monroeville Mall. Rm. 256 Monroevil[e, PA 15146 Ph. 412-373-3670 Fax 412-373-5076 Contact: Helen Truxell 1,3,4,5,6,7A SCRANTON/WILKES BARRE Pennsylvania Research Institute 118 Woodside Drive Clarks Summit, PA 18411 Ph. 717-587-2633 Contact: Stanley Lefkowitz 1,3.7B Codes: Location: 1. Confue~'~e Style RoomI 7A Shopping Mall z Living Room SPjle 7B Office I~jilding 3. Obse~ R~m 7C F~ St~ 4. ~est K,tchen [ 7D ~er 5. T~t K~tchen w; ~s Room] [10 YORK Polk-Lepson Research Group 108 Pauline Drive York, PA 17402 Ph. 717-741o2879 Contact: David Polk 1,3,'6,7 B RHODE ISLAND PROVIDENCE Alpha Research Associates, Inc. 395 Smith Street Providence, R102908 Ph. 401-861-3400 Contact: Cathy Camille 1,3,6,7C Rhode Island Survey & Research 690 Warren Ave. E. Providence, RI 02914 Ph. 401-438-4120 Fax 401-438-3617 Contact: Martha Baker 1,2,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 31) SOUTH CAROLINA CHARLESTON Bernett Research, Inc. 62 Northwoods Mall 2150 Northwoods Blvd. N. Charleston, SC 29418 Ph. 803-553-0030 Fax 803-553-0526 Contact: Judy Glass 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 83) COLUMBIA Marketsearch Corporation 272t Devine St. Columbia, SC 29205 Ph. 803-254-6958 Fax 803-799-9180 1,3,4,6,7C Metromark Market Research, Inc. 3030 Devine St. Columbia, SC 29205 Ph. 803-256-8694 Fax 803-254-3798 Contact: Emerson Smith 1,3,6,7C GREENVILLE Carolina Market Research 88 Villa Road Greenville, SC 29615 Ph. 803-233-5775 Contact: Elizabeth Buchanan 1,3,4,6,7C Market Insight 530 Howell Rd. #205 Greenville, SC 29615 Ph. 803-292-5187 1,3.4.5.6.7B ProGen Research 712 No. Main St. Greenville, SC 29609 Ph. 803-271-0643 1.3.6.7C SOUTH DAKOTA SIOUX FALLS American Public Opinion Survey and Manet Research 1320 So. Minnesota Ave. Sioux Falls, SD 57105 Ph. 605-338-3918 Fax 605-334-7473 1,2,3,4,5,6,7C Phoenix Systems, Inc. 525 W. 2_.2rid Sioux Falls, SD 57105 Ph. 605-339-3221 Fax 605-339-0408 Contact: Sharon Hunt 1,3,6,7B TENNESSEE CHATTANOOGA Wilkins Research Services 1921 Morris Hill Road Chattanooga, TN 3742:1 Ph. 615-894-9478 Fax 615-894-9478 1,3,4,5,(~,7C KNOXVILLE H M R Associates 1423 Coker Ave. Knoxville, TN 37917 Ph. 615-522-4532 1,3,4,5,6,7C T.I.M.E. South East Towne Mall 3029 Mall Rd. Knoxville, TN 37924 Ph. 615-544-1885 Fax 615-544-1802 Contact: Anita Ingalls 1,3,4,6,7A MEMPHIS Chamberlain Market Research 1036 Oakhaven Rd Memphis, TN 38119 Ph. 901-763-0405 Fax 901-763-0660 1,2,3,4,5,6,7B Friedman Marketing/Memphis Century Plaza Bldg.. Ste. 1 & 2 5830 Mr. Modah Memphis, TN 38115 Ph. 901-795-0073 or 313-569-0444 Fax 901-360-1268 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1.3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 73) Heak~n Research, Inc. 5501 Winchester, Suite 6 Memphis, TN 38115 Ph. 7901-795-8180 Contact: Betty Huber 1,3.4,6.7B Market Development Associates 5050 Poplar. Ste. 821 Memphis. TN 38157 Ph. 901-682-1011 Fax 901-682-1627 Contact: James Mecredy 1,3,6,7~ QLdrk's Marketing Resea~chReview T108571151
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Memphis, "IN 38119 Ph. 901-682-2444 Fax 901-682-2471 Contact: Karen Redo'in Venture Marketing Associates, Inc. 3845 Viscount, Suite 3&4 MempNs, TN 38118 Pt~ 901-795-6720 Fax 901-795-6763 Contact: Larry Berry 1,2,3,6,7B NASHVILLE Equifex/Ouick Teat Opinion Ctrs, Hickory Hollow Mall #1123 Nashville, TN 37013 Ph. 615-731-0900 Fax 615-731-2022 Contact: Tom Frydrych 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) NCG Reseamh 2100 West End Avenue, Ste. 800 Nashville, TN 37203 Ph. 615-327-3373 1,3.6 Quality Controlled Services Faidawns Bldg, 5203 Maryland Way Nashville, TN37027 Ph. 615-383-5312 Fax 615-292-44t 6 Contact: Nancy Proctor 1,3o4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 59) 20/20 Research 2303 21st Ave. ,~. 2n~l Fir. Nashville, TN 37212 Ph. 615-885-2020 Fax 615-385-0925 Contact: Grog Fuson 1,2,3,6,7B TEXAS AMARILLO Opinions Unlimited, Inc. 8201 SW 34th. Amarillo, TX 79121 Ph. 806-353-4444 Fax 806-353-4718 Contact: Anndel Hodges 1,3,4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 111 ) AUSTIN Equifax/Ouick Test Opinion Ctrs. Barton Creek Square 2901 Capitol Texas Hwy. Austin, TX 78746 Ph. 512-327-8787 Fax 512-327-7460 Contact: Patty Franchina 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) NuStats, Inc. 816 Congress Ave., Ste. 300 Austin, TX 78701 Ph. 512-469-6400 Fax 512-469-6408 Contact: Carlos Arce 1.3,6,7B December. 1990 RPC Manet ~ex~s Field Svcs. 3200 Red Rb~, S~. 302 Austin, TX 78705 Ph. 512.459-3139 Fax 512-472-2232 Contact: Ester Smith 1,3,4,6,7B RPC Market Research/Texas Field Svcs. 1200 Highland Mail Austin, TX 78752 Ph. 512-472-7765 Fax 512-472-2232 Contact: Ester Smith 1,3,6,7A Tammadge Market Research 1616 B Rio Grande Austin, TX 78701 Ph. 512-474-1005 Fax 512-370-0339 Contact: Melissa Pepper 1,3,6,7C CORPUS CHRISTI Equlfax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Sunrise Mall 5858 S. Padre Island Dr., #38 Corpus Christi, TX 78412 Ph. 512-993-6200 Fax 512-991-6029 Conlact: Lorna Miller 1,3,4,5,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) DALLAS/FT. WORTH Accurate Research, Inc. 2214 Paddock Way Dr. #100 Grand Prairie. "I'X 75050 Ph. 214-647-4277 Fax 214-641-1549 Contact: Jeff Harwell 1,3,4,6,7C Brisendine and Associates, Inc. 9619 Wendell Rd. Dallas, TX 75243 Ph. 817-292-8073 Contact: Betty Munger 1,3,4,6,7B B~e,-~me and Assocm~ms, Inc. 4800 So. Hulem SL Ste. 1248 Ft. Worth, -IX 76132 Ph. 817-292-8073 Contact: Betty Munger 1,3,4,6,7A Databank Marketing Reseamh Rt. t, 109F Hwy. 718 Rhome, "IX 76078 Ph. 817-489-2300 1,2,3.4,5,6,7C Dallas Focus 511 E. John W. Carpenter Frwy., #100 Irving, TX 75062 Ph. 214-869-2366 Fax 214-869-9174 Contacl: Robin McClure t ,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 120) Fenlon Swanger Consumer Research 14800 Quorum Dr., Ste. 250 Dallas, TX 75240 Ph. 214-934-0707 1,3,4,6,7B Fenton Swanger Consumer.Research Town East Mall Mesquite, TX 75150 Ph. 214-934-0707 1,3,4,6,7A Fenton Swanger Consumer Research Galleria Mall Dallas, TX 75240 Ph. 214-934-0707 1,3,4,6,7A Focus On Dallas 12240 Inwood Rd., #400 Dallas, TX 75244 Ph. 214-960-5850 1,3,4,6,7B Heakin Research, Inc. Fort Worth Town Center 4200 So. Freeway, Ste. B-31 Ft. Worth, TX 76115 Ph. 817-926-7995 Contact: Vivian Taylor 1,3,4,6,7A ,,..~, UNLIMITEr'! s~ucz 1.9 - ...where the accent is on QUALITATIVE[ Spacious, new facilities Moderator-designed Fresh respondents True southwestern representation Tough recruits our specialty For a bid within 2 hours or more information, contact: Anndel Hodges or Neil Norwood in Amarillo, Texas Circle HO.90~ on Reader Card III T108571152
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1534O Da~a~ i~a~w~f, Sure 274O Ph. 708-501-3200 Cor~act: Vat Maxwelt 1,3,4,6,78 14160 Datias Parkway Dallas, TX 75240 Ph. 214-392-0100 Fax 214-386-6008 Contact: Susan Trace 1,2,3,4,5,6,78 (See advertisement on p. 98) Probe Research 2723 Valley View Lane Dallas, TX 75234 Ph. 214-241-6696 Fax 214-241-8513 Conlact: Richard Hards 1,3,4,6,7C Quality Controlled Services 14683 Midway Rd., Ste. 100 Dallas, TX 75244 Ph. 214-456-1502 Fax 214-490-3065 Contact: Joyce Clifton 1,3,4,6,78 (See advertisement on p. 59) RPC Market Research/Texas Field Svcs. 7557 Rambler Rd., Suite 706 Dallas, TX 75231 Ph. 800-288-9287 Fax 512-472-2232 Contact: Ester Smith 1,3,6,78 Savltz Research Center, Inc. 13747 Monffort, Ste. 11 Dallas, TX 75240 Ph. 214-386-4050 Fax 214-661-3198 Contact: Harriet Silverman 1,3.4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 113) Savitz Research Center, Inc. 2053 The Parks at Arlington Mall 3811 So. Cooper Arlington, TX 76015 Ph. 817-467-6437 Fax 817-467-6552 Contact: Harriet Silverman 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. ~ 13) Texas Audits & Surveys Rt. 1, 7 Green Oaks Rhome, TX 76078 Ph. 817-489-2016 1,3.4,5,6,78 Tops In Research, Inc. 2925 LBJ Freeway, Ste. 121 Dallas. TX 75234 Ph. 214-484-9901 Fax 214-484-4090 Contact: Elayne Fairchild 1,2,3.6.78 Tops In Research, Inc. Beltline Rd. & Hwy. 183 Irving, TX 75062 Ph. 214-484-9901 Fax 214-484-4090 Contact: Elayne Fairchild 1,2.3,4,5.6,7A Codes: Location: 1. Conference Style Room7A Stooping Mall ~ 2 I.~ng Room Style 7B O~ce ~ 30"osertat~on Room 7C Free St..nO,rig ~ 4. Test K~t~en 70 O~er [ 5. Te~ ~Olc~en w/~s. Roor~ ~ 6 V~eo Equipment Av~fable 112 PASO, Aim Reseamh 10456 Brian Mooney El Paso, "IX 79935 Ph. 915-591-4777 Fa~ 915-585~6305 Contact:Bob Adams 1,3,4,6,7C HOUSTON CQS 1726 Augusta, Ste. 150 Houston, TX 77057 Ph. 713-783-9111 1,3,4,5,6,78 Creative Consumer Research 4133 Bluebonnet Stafford, TX 77477 Ph. 713-240-9646 Fax 713-240-3497 1,3,4,6,78 Equifax/Qulck Test opinion Ctrs. Sharpstown Center 7500 Bellaire Blvd., Ste. 762 Houston, TX 77036 Ph. 713-988-8988 Fax 713-988-1781 Contact: Portia Cotton 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Field Services of Houston 10001 Westheimer, #1240 Houston, TX 77042 Ph. 713-785-1927 1,3,4,6,7A Heakin Research, Inc. 5085 Westheimer, Ste. 3897 Houston, TX 77056 Ph. 713-871-8542 Contact: Maggie Franek 1,3,4,6,7A Heakin Research San Jacinto Mall #1670 Baytown, TX 77521 Ph. 713-421-2584 Contact: Valede Owens 1,3.4,6,7A Houston Consumer Research 730 Almeda Mall Houston, TX 77075 Ph. 713-944-1431 Fax 713-944-3527 1.3.4.6,7A International Forum Corporation 11111 Richmond, Ste. 111 Houston, TX 77082 Ph. 713-784-2222 1,3,6,7B In-Touch Research, Inc. 1710 Highway 6 South, Ste. D Houston, TX 77077 Ph. 713-497-2828 Fax 713-497-4059 Contact:. Debbie Thigpen 1,3,4,6.78 In-Touch Research, Inc. 307 Northwest Mall Houston, TX 77092 Ph. 713-682-1682 Fax 713-682-1686 Contact: Debbie Thigpen 1,3,4,5,6,7A Key Rese~ch. tnc 3115 W. Loop So, ~n, "iX 77027 Ph. 713-840-7711 Contact: Jean Stanley 1,3,6,78 MVA Research 1726 Augusta. #100 Houston, "iX 77057 Ph. 713-783-9109 Fax 713-783-4238 Contact: Michael Pope 1,2,3,4,5,6,78 Quality Controlled Services 1560 W. Bay Area Blvd., Ste. 130 Fdendswood, TX 77546 Ph. 713-488-8247 Fax 713-486-3831 Contact: Adelaide Ferguson 1,3,4,6,78 (See advertisement on p. 59) RPC Market Research/Texas Field Svcs. 6750 West Loop South, Suite 680 Bellaire,. TX 77401 Ph. 800-288-9287 Fax 512-472-2232 Contact: Ester Smith 1,3,6,7B Savitz Research Center, Inc. 1122 Deerbrook Mall 20131 Highway 59 Humble, TX 77338 Ph. 713-540-2020 Fax 713-540-2026 Contact: Harriet Silverman 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 113 ) LUBBOCK UMS Research Group 1516 53rd Street Lubbock, TX 79412 Ph. 800-858-4567 1,3,4,6,7C SAN ANTONIO Creative Consumer Research 5411 Bandera Rd., Ste. 307 San Antonio, TX 78238 Ph. 512-520-7025 Fax 512-680-9906 1,3.6,78 Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Windsor Park Mall, Ste. 148 San Antonio, TX 78218 Ph. 512-657-9424 Fax 512-657-9432 Contact: Emestene Suhler 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) Galloway Research Service 4346 NW Loop 410 San Antonio, TX 78229 Ph. 512-734-4346 Fax 512-732-4500 Contact: Patrick Galloway 1,2,3,4,6,7C L. Tucker Gibson and Associates 1046 Grand Central Pkwy. So. San Antonio, TX 78232 Ph. 512-496-1166 1,3,6,78 Ouirk's Marketing Resea~chReview 3-108571153
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N~ionai Data Na~ork 4~,03 Pad~ate St. San Antonio, TX 78229 PPL 512-699-9781 Fax 512-699-0605 1,3,6,7B Pmmatk, Professional Marketing Svcs. 1777 NoEo Loop 410, Ste. 801 San Antonio, TX 78217 Ph. 512-822-1200 Contact: Deborah Prost 1,3,4,6,7B UTAH SALT LAKE CITY Friedman Marketing/Salt Lake City 2051 Layton Hills Mall Layton, UT 84041 Ph. 801-544-8688 or 313-569-0444 Fax 801-546-6075 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A - (See advertisement on p. 73 ) Utah Market Research Ruth Nelson Research Services 50 So. Main Street Salt Lake City, UT 84144 Ph. 303-758-6424 or 801-363-8726 Fax 801-321-4904 Contact: Ruth .Nelson 1,3,4,6,7A Valley Research & Survey 1104 East Ashton Ave. #106 Salt Lake City, UT 84106 Ph. 801-467-4476 Fax 801-487-3531 Contact: Sally Christi~nsen 1,3,4,6,7B Your Opinion Counts Gay Hill Field Service 4835 Highland Drive Salt Lake City. UT 84117 Ph, 801-261-4117 Fax 801-268-0247 Contact: Gay Hill 1,3,6,7A VIRGINIA NORFOLK/VIRGINIA BCH Continental Research 4500 Colley Ave. Norfolk. VA 23508 Ph. 804-489-4887 Contact: Nanci Glassman 1,3,6,7B EqulfaxlQuick Test Opinion Ctrs. 816 Greenbrier Cir., Suile 208 Chesapeake, VA 23320 Ph. 804-523-2505 Fax 804-523-0463 Contact: Gerri Kennedy 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 3) Norfolk Focus Group Centre Div. of Martin Research, Inc. #5 Koger Executive Ctr. #110 Norfolk, VA 23502 Ph. 804-455-8463 Fax 804-499-8445 Contact: Suzanne Deibler 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 115) December. 1990 Dallas Houston Philadelphia Focus Group Suites * At last, somebody's built a focus group_room that lets clients see and hear what they're paying for in comfort and style. Our viewing room features seating for up to twenty people on two levels. A lighted writing table helps make for easier note-taking. Adjoining the viewing room is an ante- room designed specifically for private meetings with the moderator. • The spacious focus group room features a sound-proof full wall mirror. Inside, microphones and camera are hidden .from view and are part of the state-of-the-art audio and video systems. • First-class facilities for first-class results. That's the Savitz difference', along with trained recruiters who consistently get the people you specify. All of this, plus the most convenient locations in Dallas, Houston and Philadelphia. Call for your next focus group study. You'll get a whole new look at effective focus group research. (214) 386-4050 Dallas • Houston • Philadelphia Circle No. 909 on Reader Card 113 T108571154
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RICHMOND Basso Survey Services, Ltd. The Shops At Willow Lawn 616 No. Office Tower Richmond, VA 23230 1,3,6,7A Capital Focus Group Centre Div. of Martin Research Inc. 8100 Three Chopt Rd., #203 Richmond, VA 23229 Ph. 804-285-3165 Contact: Kathryn McGuire 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 115) Pappas Research 7437B MidlotNan Tnpke Richmond. VA 23225 Ph. 804-276-8537 Contact: Katherine Pappas 1,3,4,6,7A Richmond Focus Group Ctr. 6802 Paragon Place, Suite 210 Richmond, VA 23230 Ph. 804-288-0590 Fax 804-288-3234 Contact; Terry Brisbane 1,3,6,7B Southeastern Institute of Research 2325 W. Broad St. Richmond, VA 23220 Ph. 804-358"-8981 Fax 804-358-9761 Contact: Burnette Wilks? 1,3,6,7B • (See advertisement on p. 114) ROANOKE Roanoke Focus Group Centre Div. of Marlin Research, Inc. 2122 Carolina Ave. SW Roanoke, ~/A 24014 Ph. 703-342-5"364 Fax 703-982-8101 Contact: Margorie Jeskey 1,3,4,6.7C (See advertisement an p. 115) WASHINGTON SEATTLE/TACOMA Consumer Opinion Services, 12825 1st Ave. So. Seattle, WA 98168 Ph. 206-241-6050 Fax 206-241-5213 Contact: Jerry Carter 1,3,4,6,7C (See advertisement on p. 115) Consumer Opinion Serv.ices 10829 NE 68th St., Bldg. B Kirkland, WA 98033 Ph. 206-241-6050 Fax 206-241-5216 Contact: Jerry Carter 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 115) Equifax/Quick Test Opinion Ctrs. Tacoma Mall Shopping Canter, #699 /acoma, WA 98409 Ph. 206-474-9980 Fax 206-473-1931 Contact: Debbie Champagne 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 3) _F_quifax/Qutr¢. k Test Opinion Ctr~./Seattle Cmssroads ~ 15600 North East 8th, Ste. F13 Bellevue, WA 98008 Ph. 206-641-1188 Contact: Debbie Champagne (See advertisement on p. Friedman Marketing/Seattle South Hill Mall 3500 Meridian South Puyallup, WA 98371 Ph. 206-840-0112 or 313-569-0444 Fax 206-840-0517 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A "(See advertisement on p. 73) Gilmore/Northwest Surveys 2324 Eastlake Ave. E., Ste. 300 Seattle, WA 98102 Ph. 206-726-5555 Fax 206-726-5620 Contact: Vikki Murphy 1,3,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 116) GMA Research~Corp. 11808 Northup way Bellevue, WA 98005 Ph. 206-827-1251 Fax 206-828-6778 Contact: Donald Morgan 1,3,4,6,7B Hebert Research, Inc. 13705 BeI-Red Road Bellevue, WA 98005 Ph. 206-643-1337 1,3,6,7B MACS 4500 9th Avenue N.E., Suite 316 Seattle, WA 98105 Ph. 206-545-8144 Contact: Leslie Lytle Relax Virginia's Largest Full Service Research Erm Provides Everything. Whether you require a complete, full service research study that includes design, data collection analysis and recommendations, or just the individual components, Southeast- em Institute of Research can provide it all. We will satisfy all your marketing research needs using monitored phone banks, one-on-one in-d.epth interviews, monthly omnibus polls, con. sumer intercepts or total focus group capabilities for whatever level of service youreqmre. SIR, a full service custom marketing research company, has been serving national and regional consumer and business-to-business clients since 1964. For more information about our services and I~ Southeastern facilities, contact Robert M. Miller, President, or Richard G. Steele, Executive Vice President ~ Institute of at 2325 West Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23220 Research,Inc. or phone (804) 358-8981. Custom Marketing Research 114 Circle No.910 on Reade~C=rd Ou.~k's I'.~ket ng Re~earchReview Ti08571155
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Madder Dma. =C_,~,~pa~_ 1111 Fawcett Avenue, ,Steo 105 Tacoma, WA 98402 Ph. 206-383-1100 or 800-735-702I Contact: Gene Start 1,3.6,7B Market Trends, tnc. 3E33 136th Place SE, Ste. 110 Bellevue, WA 98006 Ph. 206-562-4900 F~:~( 206-562-4843 1,2,3,4,6,7B SPOKANE Consumer Opinion Services, Inc. 315 Northtown Mall Spokane, WA 99207 Ph. 206-241-6050 Contact: Jerry Carter 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 115) Inland Market Research Center 1715 "B" N Atlantic Spokane, WA 99205 Ph. 509-326-8040 1,3,6,7B Market Trends Research, Inc. East 130 Indiana, #B Spokane, WA 99207 Ph. 509-325-8080 Fax 509-325-8068 1,3,4,6,7C YAKIMA Garclan & Associates. Inc, 32 Galleria Yakima Mall Yakima. WA 98901 Ph: 509-453-7974 Contact: Ginger Shank 1,3,6,7A WEST VIRGINIA CHARLESTON McMillion Research 119 Eastwood Acres Nitro, WV 25143 Ph. 304-755-5889 Fax 304-342-1941 Contact: Sandy McMillion 1,3,4,6.7B Ryan/Samples Research, Inc. 1012 Kanawha Blvd. Charleston, WV 25301 Ph. 304-343-7655 Fax 304- 342-1941 Contact: Sandy McMillion 1,3,4.6.7B WISCONSIN APPLETON Friedman Marketing/Green Bay/Appleton Fox River Mall, #712 4301 W. Wisconsin Ave. Appteton, WI 54913 Ph. 414-730-2240 or 313-569-0444 Fax 414-730-2247 Contact: Paula Crimmins 1,3,4,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 73 ) GREEN BAY Wisconsin Research, Inc. 1270 Main Street Green Bay, WI 54302 Ph. 414-436-4646 Fax 414-436-4651 Contact: Barbara Smits 1,3.4.6,7B December, 1990 MADISON Madison Interviewing Service, Inc. 1955 W. Broadway.Ste. 105 Madison, W! 53713 Ph. 608-222-6758 Fax 698-~-6761 Contact: Trudy Young 1,3,4,6,7C Wisconsin Research 122 East Olin Madison, Wl 53713 Ph. 6O8-258-3660 Fax 606-258-3687 Contact:. Maxine Trakel 1,3,4,6,7B 1. Conlerence Style. Room 2. Li~ng Room SUe " 3. Obse~,'ation Room 4. Test K~tchen 5. Test Kitchen w! Obs. Room 6. Vi~eo Equipment Available Loc=tlon: 7A St~p~ng Ma~l 7B Off'me Budding 7C Free Stancllng 7D Oth~ FOCUS GROUPS IN VIRGINIA? NORFOLK ROANOKE CAPITOL FOCUS GROUP CENYRE FOCUS GROUP CENTRE FOCUS GROUP CENTRE Norfolk, VA Roanoke. VA Richmond, VA (Suzanne Deibler} (Marjorie Jeskey| (Kathryn McGuitel (803) 455-8463 (7031342-5354 (8041285-3165 Each Facility Provides: • large conference room • full audio/video capabi~ties • large one-way mirror • quality recruiting • large client viewing room • dedicated staff I ~~ Martin Research, Inc. 2122 Carolin~ Ave. $.W.P.O. Box 8595 Roanoke. VA 24014 (7031 M2-1970 FAX (703) 982-~101 Circle No. 912 on Reader Card We Cover The Northwest We've been collecting data and keeping clien[s happy in the Norlhwest for over 30 years. Call us. Consumer Opinion Services We answer to you 12825 1st Ave. South - Seattle. WA 98168 206/241-6050 a~k for Jerry.. Doroth.v or Greg Carter ~tcle No.911 on Reade..r Cacd T10857"1156
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MILWAUKEE Consumer Pulse of Mffwaukee The Grand Ave. Mail, #2028 275 West Wisconsin Avenue Milwaukee. W153203 Ph. 414-274-6060 Contact: t~a~hy Jers~h 1,3,4,5,6,7A (See advertisement on p. 84 ) Dieringer Research Associates 3064 Ro. 78th Street Milwaukee, W153222 Ph. 414-445-1717 Fax 414-445-4275 Contact: Robert Dieringer 1,3,6,7B Focus and Facts Millie Sevedge & Associates 6001 W. Center St. Milwaukee, W153210 Ph. 414-453~6086 Fax 414-453-6087 1,3,4,6,7B Lein/Spiegelhoff 235 No. Executive Dr.. Ste. 300 Brookfield, Wl 53005 Ph~ 414-797-4,37-.0 Fax 414-797-4325 Contact: Arlene Spiegelhoff 1,3,4,6,7B M~r/Z.~chow, Inc. 4319 No. 76th Street Milwaukee, W153222 Ph. 414-438-0805 Fax 414-438-0355 Contact:.Diane Zachow 1,3,4o6,7B Milwaukee Market Research, Inc. 2835 No. Mayfair Road Milwaukee, WI 53222 Ph. 414-475-t~R56 Male, 25-40 Enjoys omdoom Sodal dub member Frequent traveler Believes clothes make the man NO SURPRIS There's a good reason why modera- t.ors ~ho conduct ftxu.s gloups at Gilmore l~eseard~ virtually always come back: no surprises. Our ~gt~" trained and experienced recruiting team delivers exacdy the people you're after.., t~e after time. We're f,~uaous for it. In fact, if the exact kind of people you need aren't to be found in our market, we'll tell you. l.*p front. Due to extra di~genco, our respond- ent show rates are extremely high. And our sophistkated database aumrna~m~y screens out "professional" respondents. ~en you wa~ into our ol~ces ~or the first time, be prepared ~or one of ~he most modem, e~ent and comfort- able focus group ~a:ilitJes in the nadon. (We wouldfft want it to be a surprise.) Call us at (206) 726-5555 and we'll bring you up to speed on our complete focus group services. G ORE RES CH G,cRg Seatde, Washington Portland, Oml~On 116 Circle No. 913 on Reader Card Fax 414 -475-0842 Contact: Susan Lehmaz~ 1,2,3,4,6,7B Zigman o Joseph • Stephenson 100 East Wisconsin Ave., #1000 Milwaukee, WI 53202 Ph. 4t4-273-~680 Fax 414-273-3158 Contact: George Shiras 1,3,6,7B CANADA ALBERTA Heffring Research Group 630, 999-8 Street SW Calgary, AB T2R 1J5 Ph. 403-228-9100 1,3,6,7B Criterion Research Corp. 10155-114 Street, Ste. 101 Edmonton, AB TSK 1 R8 Ph. 403-423-0708 1,3,6,7B BRITISH COLUMBIA Research House, Inc..- Metmtown Centre, 468-4800 Kingsway Burnaby BC V5H 4J2 Ph. 604-~33-2696 Fax 604-433-1640 Contact: Marlene Harm 1,2,3,4,6,7A MANITOBA Ooinion Place 66K-1485 Portage Avenue Polo Park Shopping Centre Winnipeg, MB R3GOW4 Ph. 204-783-5160 Fax 204-'783-9748 Contact: Kathy Herrernan 1,3,6,7A ONTARIO ABM Research Lid. t 7 Madison Avenue Toronto, ON M5R 2S2 Ph. 416-961-5511 Fax 416-961-5341 Contact: Judi Rosen 1,2,3,4,6,7C Canada Market Research Ltd. 1235 Bay Street. #300 Toronto, ON MSR 3K4 Ph, 416-964-9222 1 2,6, 7B Contemporary Research Centre Ltd. 2221 Younge St., Ste. 503 Toronto, O~q M4S 2B4 Ph. 416-486-2043 Fax 416-486-6190 1,3,6,7A Decision MarketingResearch Ltd. 661 Queen StreetEast Toronto, ON M4M 1G4 Ph. 416-469-5282 1,2,3,4,6,7C Focus Canada 55 St. Clair Ave. W., Ste. 127 Toronto, ON M4V 2Y7 Ph. 416-922-0338 Fax 416-922-0379 1,2.3,6,7B Codes: . Location: 1. Conference S~e Room . 7A Shopp=ng Mall 2. Lrv~g Room Style ; 7B Off~:e Buil~in9 3. ~at~n ~m ] 7C Ft~ 4. Test ~l~en [ 70 01h~ 5. Test ~en ~I ~S. Rcom 6. V~ Equ@m~t Ava, l~e ; continued on next page Quirk's k"e~keting ResearchReview T108571157
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Trad~e Taltk continued from p. 118 insurance industry. "When people go through an experience like that there's a feeling of a lack of stability, of being unsettled, and what that means is that if you can show some way that your product or service can give people a greater feeling of stability or security, you're tapping into a kind of unspoken concern. This finding applies to many industries, but I came across it in an article on group life insurance." While Sharp is often asked to gather numbers--what she calls "hard" informationmit is in the more nebulous world of opinions and commentary--or "soft" information--that she makes some of her most useful finds. "People like facts and statistics, because they're tangible and verifiable. But I think the soft information is also valuable, even though it's more readily dismissed, because that's where the clues_are, the insights, and perspectives.". It is also important, she says, to be open to information that challenges your opinions or beliefs, about your market, or even the world around you, because this can often be the source of new insights. "Most of us, when we find information that's different or unusual, we tend to dismiss it. The more diverse and open- Infocus 920 Yonga St., Ste. 720 Toronto, ON M4W 3C7 Ph. 416-926-1562 1,2,3,4,6,7B Research House, Inc. Warden Woods Mall, 725 Warden Scarborough ON M1L 4R7 Ph. 416-488-2328 Fax 416-488-2368 Contact: Dawn Smith 1,3,4,6,7A Research House, Inc. 273 Eglinton Ave. E. Toronto, ON M4P 1L3 Ph. 416-488-2328 Fax 416-488-2368 Contact: Dawn Smith 1,2,3.6.7C Research House, Inc. 500 Rexdale Blvd., Suite CIA Rexdale, ON Mgw 6K5 Ph. 416-488-2328 Fax 416-488-2368 Contact: Dawn Smith 1,3,4,6,7A Toronto Focus 4950 Yonge Street, Ste. 1700 Toronto, ON M2N 6K1 Ph. 416-250-3611 Fax 416-221-2214 Contact: Pennia Glancy 1,3,4,6,7B (See advertisement on p. 120) QUEBEC Centre De Recherche Contemporaines Ltee 2155 Guy St., Ste. 1080 Montreal, QU H3H 2R9 Ph. 514-932-7511 Fax 514-932-3830 1,3.6.7B minded you can be. the better. "For example, a few years ago, I read an article on how single people spend their money. It said that single women over 55 spend more money than single men over 55 on cars, and conversely, that men of that age spend more on apparel. That's the opposite of everything we believe, and even if you're not marketing cars or apparel, it's telling you that something is going on with that age group. And maybe it's something you hadn't considered before and which could be an opportunity. "You have to wonder, how did a competitor come out with something that never even occurred to you? It could be an ad campaign, or the way they position their product, or the features they're touting. What was it that they knew that you didfi't know?" Sharp says she is surprised that so little "future researching" is done prior to primary research. "It seems to me that your primary research is most valuable when you have some clues to what might be happening in the near future. If you can incor- porate that information into yourprimaryresearch, you have the opportunity to check it out perhaps six months to a year before those changes become larger trends or movements." Survey Monitor continued from 23 December. 1990 painted the inside or outside of their homes. The Survey of American Con- sumers by Mediamark Research Inc. identifies who buys all lhe paint: --Men and women are about equal in being purchasers of house paint (33.4% and 3I. 1%, respectively). --Married consumers are more prone to buy paint (37.6%) than singles (24.5%). --People ages 35 to 54 represent about two out of five buyers (38.4). Younger adults ages 18 to 24 and those 65 years of age and older are less inclined 1o paint their homes. --People living in cities are as likely to buy paint as those living in the suburbs. --While Americans throughout the country take paint brush or roller firmly in hand, more of those living in the North East and North Central regions do this than those living in the West. The most popular retail outlets for buy- ing paint are: paint store, hardware store, department store. Premixed paints and custom color paints are equally popular. The survey also reports on the most popu- lar brands that Americans prefer, includ- ing Sears, Sherwin Williams, Glidden, and Benjamin Moore. Most Americans are pleased with telephone service According to a receni national survey, the majority of Americans are pleased with the quality of service they receive from telephone companies. Six of ten people (60%) are satisfied, and 31% are very satisfied. Only 7% are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. The study was con- ducted by Maritz Marketing Research Inc. The survey shows women are some- what happier than men with the service they receive. Women outnumber men in the very satisfied category by eight per- centage points. Billing that's easier to understand tops the list of improvements Americans would make at the phone company. Almost one of five people (19%) say billing is a problem. Second on the list of improve- ments is better sound quality, chosen by 14% of respondents. Then comes faster handling of problems (13%) and knowl- edgeable employees (12%). Closing out the top five is greater dependability, cited by 6% of respondents. Discounted long distance plans are highly touted by all carriers. But, accord- ing to the poll, many people remain unconvinced of their worth. About one- quarter (26%) think they are of little value, while 32% rate them an average value. Only 34% of people say the plans are a good value. Men are more critical of the plans, giving them lower marks than women. 117 T108571158
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Researching the future M'uch of the information gathering done prior to a research project aims to collect facts and figures .about the past and present state of the market for a particular.product or service. What have the trends been? Who uses the product? Who doesn't and why? But what about the future? Seena Sharp, owner of Hermosa Beach, California-based Sharp Information Research prefers to look ahead---one, two, three, years ahead, if possi.ble. She locates business and marketing information for clients in a wide range of industries and applications. To find her information, Sharp spends much of her time in libraries, poring over publication indexes and association di- rectories, accessing on-line databases, and on the phone, talking to trade journal editors, association heads, government experts. "There are people who have been investigating things that influence your industry or your product directly or indirectly. There are clues all the time out there and it's the savvy marketer who will pick up on those clues and try to make them work for them." One of the main ideas Sharp stresses to her clients is the importance of staying informed about future trends. "The focus of our work is to look for information that will by Joseph Rydholm managing editor give ourclients a competitive edge in the future. We don't really spend a lot of time looking at what has happened up until today. We look for information that will point out opportunities or warn clients of potential problems or threats. "There are so many changes that are occurring in our world today, you cannot do business just by knowing what's going on in your industry. You really have to be aware not only of what's going on in industries that are directly and indirectly related to yours, you have have to be aware of changes in the economy, attitudes, behaviors, lifestyles and how they will affect your product in the future." Sharp For example, she says, while doing research on group life insurance many years back, she came across information on the effect that "transitioning"---changing jobs. going through a divorce, caring for parents who become ill--might have on the continued on p. 117 At N~maeLab, were made product and company nameslike Acura~ AutoZone, Compaq, Cyvolor, Geo, Inzmina, Sequa and Zapma//by constructional linguistics. The result of a NameLab project is a report presenting and analyzing registrable names expressing your marketing ideas. We quote costs accurately in advance and complete most projects within four weeks. For information, contact NameLab Inc., 711 Marina Blvd., San Francisco, CA 94123. Voice415-563-1639 NAMELAB Fax415-563-9176 !18 Circle No. 914 on Reader Card ~rk's Marketing ReseamhReview T108571159
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Find out what hundreds of researchers already know... Focus Suites is like no other facility you've ever tried. ~ The expertise of our professional recruiters is unsurpassed in this industry. • We have three separate, totally private 3-room suites. " These extraordinary suites are available for the same cost or less than that of an ordinary facility. Call todav for a competitive bid on your next qualitative research project. Once you've tried us, you'll never be satisfied with an ordinary fadlitv again. The Right People... The Right Price... The Right Place One Bala Plaza, Suite 622, 231 St. Asaphs Road. Bala Cvn~.~'d, E4. 19004 (215) 667-1110 CitcleNo. 016 on Reader CaK~ T10857I 160
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CHICAGO FOCUS :\~ SAN JOSE FOCUS L.A. FOCUS DALLAS FOCUS NEW YORK FOCUS Networking To Meet Your Needs For National Market Research The Focus Network is a coast-to-coast organization of focus group facilities offering highly reliable recruiting and client support services at competitive prices, if )'our proiect demands the participation of several Network facilities, our directors will work together to ensure you of success in ever)' market. Thoroughness. Cost effectiveness. Responsiveness. National scope. All good reasons to do business with the members of The Focus Network. CHICAGO FO(;US 7 East Huron Street Chicago, IL 60611 Contact Lynn Rissman 312/951-1616 • Fax 3121951-5099 FOCUS 17337 Ventura Blvd., Suite 301 Encino. Galilornia 91316 Contact,J, ay Crossan 816;501-4794 Fax 81B/907-8242 DALLAS FOCUS 511 E. John Carpenter F~wy., Suite 100 Irving, Texas 75062 Contact Robin McClure 2141869-2366 • Fax 214/869-9174 NEWYORK FOCUS 12 East 41st Street New York, New York 10017 Contact Na.ncy Opoczynski 212/481-3780 Fax 21Z,'/79-8623 SAN JOSE FOCUS TORONTO FOCUS 3032 Bunker Hill Lane, Suite 105 Santa Clara. California 95054 Contact Colleen Flores 408/988-4800 • Fax 406/988-4866 4950 Yonge Street. Suite 1700 North York. Ontario M2N 6K1 Contact Pennie Glancy 416/250-3611 • Fax 416/221-2214 ¢ C0pyngh11990. The Focus Net~work clr ¢Je No.917on Reader Ca~l T108571161

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