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Tobacco Reporter for the International Tobacco Industry

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Length: 134 pages

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Named Organization
Acme
Agricultural Research Service
Agriculture Department (USDA)
Airco (claims patent infringement)
Filed suit with Philip Morris against Brown & Williamson claiming infringement of patents.
Allen Products (subsidiary of L&M; maker of Alpo)
Amatil Ltd. (Australia) (BAT subsidiary)
Subsidiary of BAT Industries, in Australia
American Tobacco Company
Arjay Equipment Corporation
B.A.T. Industries PLC (BAT)
British American Tobacco Industry, parent company of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. in the U.S.
Batig G.m.b.H. (Operates under BAT Ind. PLC London)
Operating group under BAT Industries PLC of London
BATUS Inc. (Parent of B&W)
BATUS Inc. is a subsidiary of B.A.T. Industries P.L.C. It is the parent corporation of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation in Louisville, KY.
Benson & Hedges Canada, Ltd.
Benson and Hedges (Benson & Hedges (elite cigarettes, 1948))
A small, elite cigarette company in NY, NY in 1948.
British-American Tobacco Co Ltd (British-American Tobacco Co. Ltd.)
British-American Tobacco Company Limited was a operating group under B.A.T. Industries P.L.C. in 1985.
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation (B&W)
Subsidiary of BAT U.S., located in Louisville, KY.
Burlington Industries (Textile Manufacturer)
Chamber of Commerce
Cigar Association of America
Civil Aeronautics Board (Ruled on smoking in U.S. airplanes)
Clemson University
CNA Insurance (unit of Loews Corp)
Commodity Credit Corporation (Lender to tobacco farmers, part of U.S. Dept. of Agriculture)
Lends money to tobacco farmers cooperatives, is part of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
Commonwealth Tobacco
Consolidated Cigar
Coresta (Industry-affiliated Int'l scientific/research group)
An international organization whose objective is "to improve cooperation in scientific research and tobacco." Consists of 186 member companies/institute from 54 countries, including tobacco, paper and filter companies, and universities engaged in tobacco research.
Council for Tobacco Research - USA (CTR) (Formerly Tobacco Industry Research Committee (TIRC))
Originally organized as the Tobacco Industry Research Committe(TIRC) in 1954, and renamed Council for Tobacco Research - USA, Inc. (CTR) in 1964.
Department of Justice (DOJ)
Diversified Products (health/fitness subsidiary of Liggett Group)
EEC (European Economic Community)
European Economic Community
European Community
Federal Maritime Commission
Filtrona (Manufacutre Reynold's Filters)
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Foreign Agricultural Service
Fortune
Franklin Life Insurance
Free Choice Inc.
Gallaher's (British tobacco company)
General Cigar & Tobacco Co. (Manufacturer of pipe tobacco.)
a manufacturer of pipe tobacco.
H.B. Fuller Co.
Hercules
Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union (HERE)
Imasco Ltd. (Canada) (Tobacco, fast-food retailing co. in Canada)
A tobacco, fast food and retailing company in Montreal, Canada. The leading Canadian tobaco company in 1994.
Imperial Group Limited (Has a 1982 patent on an alternative nicotine delivery system)
Has a 1982 patent on an alternative nicotine delivery system
Imperial Tobacco Co. (Determined optimum nicotine levels for cigarettes)
Did testing pre-1972? of U.K. smokers and concluded that the optimum nicotine delivery for the cigarette, and that stepwise reductions in delivery caused progressive rejection by consumers (see Project Wheat)
Imperial Tobacco Ltd. (Cigarette manufacturer in United Kingdom)
Cigarette manufacturer in United Kingdom
International Flavors & Fragrances Inc.
Japan Tobacco Inc. (Japanese gov't -owned tobacco company)
Japanese government -owned tobacco company, until 1994.
John Wiley & Sons (Publisher)
Kimberly-Clark Corp. (Specializes in the tobacco reconstitution process)
Specializes in the tobacco reconstitution process and in helping the tobacco companies control their nicotine
Liggett & Myers Inc. (Pioneer in the generic cigarette business)
Cigarette manufacturer; Pioneer in the generic cigarette business; L&M is the manufacturer of Chesterfield, Decade, Dorado, Duke of Durham in 1958, Eagle, Eve, L&M, Lark, Pyramid and Stride cigarettes
Liggett Group Inc. (American cigarette manufacturer)
American cigarette manufacturer, was the first to start selling discount brands (GPC)
LTR Industries (Makes reconstituted Tobacco sheet in France)
A subsidiary in France of Kimberly-Clark Corp., which makes reconstituted Tobacco sheet
Marsh & McLennan
Miller Brewing Co. (Subsidiary of Philip Morris Co.)
Subsidiary of Philip Morris Co.
Mission Viejo
North Carolina State University
Olin
Papeteries de Mauduit (supplier of tobacco papers)
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd. (Cigarette manufacturer, incorporated in U.S. in 1902)
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd.., was incorporated in New York in April of 1902; half the shares were held by the parent company in London, and the balance by its U.S. distributor and his American associate. Its overall sales in 1903, its first full year of U.S. operation, were a modest seven million cigarettes. Among the brand offered, besides Philip Morris, were Blues, Cambridge, Derby, and a ladies favorite name for the London street where the home companies factory was located - Marlborough.
Philip Morris Companies Inc. (Parent company of Philip Morris USA, Kraft, Miller)
America's seventh-largest industrial enterprise in 1993, owns Kraft, Miller Brewing, General Foods, and more.
Philip Morris Incorporated (Philip Morris U.S.A.) (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Philip Morris Co., Inc.)
A wholly-owned subsidiary of Philip Morris Co., Inc.
Philip Morris Industrial (div of PM manufactured gum, razors, etc)
Philip Morris International Inc. (A subsidiary of Philip Morris Cos (1994))
A wholly-owned subsidiary of Philip Morris Companies in 1994
Philip Morris U.S.A. (See Philip Morris Incorporated)
See Philip Morris Incorporated
PMI (See Philip Morris Inc.)
See Philip Morris Inc.
Proctor & Schwartz (Made Dryers for RL Process)
R.J. Reynolds Corporation (second tier subsidiary of RJR Industries)
R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc.
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. (Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral))
Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral)
Ralston Purina
RJR-MacDonald
Rohm and Haas Co.
Standard Commercial (Leaf buyer)
Tobacco Advisory Council (TAC) (International industry advisory council)
Tobacco Advisory Council
Ted Bates & Company (Advertising agency for BW)
Advertising agency for Brown & Williamson and other tobacco companies.
Tobacco Advisory Council (TAC) (Tobacco lobbying group in U.K.)
Association of UK cigarette manufacturers
Tobacco Associates Inc.
Tobacco Chemists Research Conference (Formerly known as the Tobacco Science Research Conference)
Tobacco Exporters
Tobacco Industry Research Committee (TIRC) (Renamed Council for Tobacco Research-USA (CTR))
Organized in 1954 as the Tobacco Industry Research Committee (TIRC), and renamed the Council for Tobacco Research-USA (CTR) in 1964.
Tobacco Institute (Industry Trade Association)
The purpose of the Institute was to defeat legislation unfavorable to the industry, put a positive spin on the tobacco industry, bolster the industry's credibility with legislators and the public, and help maintain the controversy over "the primary issue" (the health issue).
Tobacco International
Tobacco Stabilization Corporation
U.S. Department of Agriculture
University of Virginia
University of Wisconsin
Upjohn
Washington Legal Foundation (Supports industry causes)
Wayne State University
Named Person
Ainsworth, W. Eugene (RJR VP, Government Relations)
W. Eugene "Gene" Ainsworth Jr. served as the Vice President of Government Relations for R. J. Reynolds Tobacco USA in 1984 and 1987 and as Senior Vice President of Government Relations for RJR Tobacco USA in 1988 & 1989. (Source: R. J. Reynolds Summary - RJR Liability Notebook).
Akins, Gene
Allen, Joseph
Alston, Julian M.
American Brands, Inc.
Defense
Arthur, Hugh M.
Bachmann, Michael, Jr.
Bale, Parker
Bautista, Andres
Beam, James B.
Beck, Van
Beek, Van
Bell, Graham
Bennett, Robert M.
Berger, Rachel
Bergson, Paul C. (RJR Lobbyist, Public Affairs VP, TI Executive Committee)
Defense
Bickers, Chris
Blumberg, Joseph
Boden, Richard M.
Bohren, Richard
Bond, Fred
Bowman, Daryl
Box, Carlton
Brand, Peter
Bray, J. Robert
Brooks, Derrick W.
Brothers, Martin
Brown, Bob
Brown, James
Brown, Jim
Buie, Len
Cane, Ernesto
Clarke, Patrick
Corp, Del Monte
Cristina, Gabriele
Crump, Peter
Cutter, Parker Bale
Deal, Philip A.
Duffy, Mark
Edward, King
Edwards, Bill
Edwards, Thomas
Europe, Dexter
Felton, Eddie
Felts, David
Field, Marshall
Fils, L. Lacroix
Finch, Charlie
Fishburne, Frank
Fletcher, Robert (Regional Public Affairs Manager)
1989 Hong Kong
Folts, John
Ford, Gerald R.
Frear, Ronald H.
George, King
Goin, Bob
Goins, Bob
Gooch, Peggy
Gordon, Edward S.
Gordy, Berry
Gottlieb, Robert A.
Grau, J. Richard
Green, Charles Raymond, Ph.D. (RJR Chemical Div. 1969, Principal Scientist RJR 1989, Sr. Pr)
1993
Greenberg, Frank S.
Greenwood, Ken
Grossi, Carlo
Hammer, Cynthia H.
Harvey, Gordon
Haycock, Steve
Haywood, Keith
Head, Hilton
Henning, Peter
Hertz, Alfred N.
Hinchcliffe, Dennis
Hockett, Robert C.
Home, Barbara
Horn, Gordon
Hotchkiss, Charles
Hume, Robert M., III
Israel, J. Cart
Jacob, John
Jimenes, E. Leon
Jimenes, Leon
John, Trevor
Jones, Douglas
Jones, Wilson
Jordan, Vernon E., Jr.
Defense
Juenger, Rudy
Keller, Kenneth
Keough, Donald R.
Kiger, Hugh
King, Glenn P.
Kirkman, Doug
Knopf, Alfred A.
Kornegay, Horace R. (TI President and Exec. Director)
VP Leaf Ops (RJR), TI Chairman (1985)
Lawson, Nigel
Lawton, Frank
Leaf, Ken
Leaf, Winston
Lee, David L.
Leone, Sierra
Lester, Reginald
Lewis, Ted E.
Liedtke, Kurt
Logan, John
Matlick, Dayton
Mccullagh, Leo
Mclaughlin, Ed
Merlo, Ellen (PM Corp. Affairs VP)
Marketing Services prior to 1986. Understood use of nicotine addiction in selling PM products.
Meyer, Karl Heinz
Minn, Paul
Moelter, Karin
Monte, Del
Morris, Chris P.
Munday, Richard J.
Nixon, Richard M.
Owen, Roy
Pak, Parker
Paulus, Walter
Perkins, Steven
Plackett, Nigel
Platz, Charles
Player, John
Port, Virginia
Pullen, Lester W. (RJR Int'l President & CEO 1981-85)
Defense
Ray, Del
Read, Will
Reed, Samuel F.
Respicio, Santiago
Rogan, Mike
Rogers, David E.
Roper, Robert P, Jr. (PM Marketing VP 1993)
1993 Held this position from June 7, 1993 to October 31, 1993, when he resigned.
Rosen, Sue
Rosenblum, John W.
Sales, Morris
Sanford, David
Schonberger, Hans
Scott, Willard
Seed, King
Shore, Robert G.
Sills, Beverly
Snodgrass, Frank
Solomon, John
Steinberg, Ira
Stewart, Andrew Gordon
Stirlen, Richard L. (PM Brand Manager, Marlboro, Merit, VA Slims)
Defense
Stone, Mark
Sumner, Daniel
Tan, Lucio
Tilley, Jack
Townsend, David E.
Trenkle, Robert W.
Van, Jan
Voges, Ernest
Wahlen, Michael
Want, May
Ward, Ed
Ward, Elias
Weber, John D.
Weissman, George (PM Chairman & CEO '79-84)
Vice President of Philip Morris from 1954 to 1956. Vice President and Assistant to the President in 1957. Vice President of Marketing from 1958-59. Executive Vice President of Marketing in 1960. Exec. VP Overseas in 1961, Exec. VP PM International 1962-66. President from 1967 to 1972. President and Chief Operating Officer in 1973. Vice Chairman from 1974-78. Chair and CEO from '79-84 and on the Board of Directors from 1959-84.
Welch, Gerald A.
West, Peter Wood
Wilson, J. Tylee (RJR President 1979)
Served on Board of Directors 1977-83, President in 1983, Exec. VP of RJR Industries 1977-78; Chair of Board, CEO and President of RJR Tobacco International in 1976 and for RJR Foods, Inc. in 1974
Wilson, Robert
Wilson, Sir James (Chairman, Tobacco Advisory Council (UK) c. 1980)
Wines, Jordan Valley
Witt, Eli
Woessner, Rene
Wolff, Robin K.
Wonder, Golden
Yagi, Michiko
Date Loaded
16 Mar 2005
Box
0546

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Page 61: TI56305421
However you say "cigarette adhesives',' H. B. Fuller understands. In the world d cigarette pro- duction, we spe~k many languages. We have to, With plants and technical service centers located in 30 countries, H.B. Fuller must understand the needs of every cigarette pmducea: Our worldwide experience allows us to stay current on paper weights and types, filter components, high-speed packaging machinery and more. Every day H.B. Fuller tobacco specialists solve production problems around the globe,. And with a world hill of knowledge like that, you can bet we've already solved problems just like those you're facing. One of our technical service managers is ready to recommend the right adhesive for you, fight now. For more information, contact H.B. Fuller Company, Tobacco Strategic Business Unit, P.O. Box 8341, Louisville, KY, U.S.A., 40208-034L Telephone: (502) 637-9771 Telex: 20-4236. We work chemistry into al~wer~ o H.B. Fuller Company TI56305421
Page 62: TI56305422
price-oriented promot/on could serve to thrust cigarettes into the mass of non-durable consumer pro- ducts wtdch sell more by price than by brand image or quality, thus cut- ting into profitabil/ty. But such speculation seems to have eased now that the after-shocks of doubl- ed taxes can be examined and seen to be less drastic than first feared. Now the speculation leans more toward a resettling of the market, with the weight of opinion tending towards more segmentation, renewed or broader emphasis on • brand image, and a small niche reserved for the economy brand or non-brand cigarettes which have forged ahead so well during recent months. In a static sales environment, manufacturers must turn their em- phasis toward capturing what can be termed as 'loose' market shares. New brands, more line extensions, more packings, more specialty pro- ducts, more ways to make use of the excess capacity some U.S. manufacturers currently have--all efforts directed at gaining market share. W~dTHE GENI~RIC cigarettes the economy-25s brands continue to carve out significant Comparison of pipe tobacco and cigarette price levels in the EEC ~rda~ U~ market shares in the months to come? Most industry analysts think it depends on the economy. If the budding recovery proceeds to full bloom, if unemployment continues to decline and if the spectre of hard times fades--it is logical to assume that as the cigarette market returns to its former strong emphasis on brand image, the bargain brands will not find so quick an accep- tance among people who have jobs and money to spend. But strong fears remain that the recovery will not last. And if it does* not, the bargain cigarettes will con- tinue to fill a very important place in the market: they will keep in the market those people who might not be able to afford to smoke other- wise. Either way, there should con- Branching out for profitability DIVZRSlrlCATION seems to be the name of the game for the tobacco industry in the United Kingdom--both out of it and into it. The latest company coming in is Palmer & Harvey, wholesale tobacconists and confectioners, which has launched a new brand on the market, King George, at just under one pound for 20. P&H, also the new distributor for B.A.T cigarettes in the U.K., has sa/d little about its new cigarette, which is on sale only in London and surrounding areas, and of- fers "higher than normal returns and greater proF~ margins." In reverse, Gallaher's brand Silk Cut has introduced a r~nge of coordinated clothes {its sister brand Benson & Hedges tried this last year}, but the Silk Cut Leisure line is the first to be of- fered for sale through retailers. Clothing is not the first depar- ture for Gallaher, as it is already in the book business and in long- haul holidays. Industry observers tend to feel the long downturn in the British cigarette market is coming to an end. "Cigarette manufacturers felt the recession from 1980 to 1982--some time behind other manufacturers," observes Mark Duffy of stockbrokers W. Green- well in London. "But with the economy generally lifting, their problems should not be so per- sistent. The trends suggest the decline in sales is coming to a halt." Whether tobacco manufac- turers belii~ve this is hard to ascertain. While industry in- aiders say that cigarette sales declines have been halted, they are in no mind to stop diversi- Wing out of the tobacco in- dustry. "Our biggest problem," says one manufacturer, "is we never know what is going to happen to our market--not so much from our own deeds, but from outside influences. "There's the annual chance of the Budget: Will taxes go up or down? Will this stop smoking? Will the anti-smoking lobby beat us? Will people smoke more or less as the economy starts to go ss TR--Ap~, 19~
Page 63: TI56305423
Effect of tax increases on UK cigarette c~nsumption 80 -- 120 - ÷~p +3p + tinue to be a place for cheaper ciga- rettes in the marketplace. Whether as just one of many small segments or as the only affordable luxury of the unemployed depends on future gains in the economy. At best, 1984 will probably be a break-even year for U.S. cigarette manufacturers. And if taxes on the state level continue to soar at the rate of recent years, this could well be another declining year for sales. By segment, the market picture shows a decline in sales of ultra- low-tar brands, a slower growth in the low-tar segment, and continued gains in the popularity of 10Omm brands, particularly the 100ram in boxes. pERHAPS THE GLOOMIEST scene in the U.S. cigarette industry can on the upward trend? These questions are virtually unan- swerable," he continues. "After all, B.A.T spent many millions of pounds to get into the insurance market and soon after announc- ed they were going to stop sell- ing cigarettes in the U.K. market." It is these imponderables that worry the tobacco industry in the U.K. more than the p .rqsent decline in smoking. Too many people still go.into shops ~ ~ for "twenty Of the cheapest,"" sIthongh many do trade up on weekends and holidays. : I~VOaTZD CZC, Z~T~e are also g~ ining a small share of the British market and generic brands are ~ present, and all this is eating away at the tradi- tional tobacco manufacturers' sales and profits, as can be evidenced by B.A.T's recent de- cision to pull out of the market. So the battle for B.A.T's four- to-five-percent share is now on among Imperial with about 45 percent of the market, Gallaher with 32.5 percent, and Carreras Rothmans with about 14 per- cent. In "an early strategy move, far example, Imperial is offering a ~-2-cants reduction on the mar- ket price for the next pack customers buy of its King Size Ibctra Mild, and a 74-cents-off coupon is being offered in press advertisements. Usually, where one leads, others fol|ow. The future can only get more excitin~ --M~ be found in the export picture. The very high level of the dollar against major European currencies--com- bined with the relatively stagnant cigarette market in Europe--has cut severely into overseas sales of American cigarettes during the past year. As a natural result, manufacturers are turning their ef- forts more and more to building markets in developing countries and to negotiating with nations which have traditionally restricted imports. In what it describes as one df the most extensive consumer sampling and promotion programs for a foreign tobacco product entering the Japanese market, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco International has launch- ed its Camel brand in Tokyo. The introduction makes Camel Filters and Camel Milds the first Ameri- can cigarettes to be marketed in Japan since the relaxation of re- strictions on imported cigarettes by the Japanese government last year. Reynolds notes that the introduc- tion is a major test of the Japanese demand for American cigarettes. B UT ZT WORKS BOTH WAYS: Im- ported cigarettes are making notable inroads into the American market. Cigarettes from approximately 40 countries registered U.S. sales of close to 600 million units in 1982, reflecting a continued market growth rate of more than 10 per- cent a year. Nearly half of these sales are English cigarettes; ano- ther 40 percent or so are Canadian. But holding about 10 percent of the market are Indonesian brands, which began building a market on the west coast and are now begin- ning to expand eastward. The ap- peal seems to lie in their exotic nature: Kreteks, like bidis and other unusual styles or shapes or lengths which have also gained some following in the western U.S., are totally different from any Ameri- can-made smoking products. And therein lies the much of the future for world cigarette sales: Find a market away from home, where your product has the appeal of the new, the different, the exotic. TI56305423
Page 64: TI56305424
Previews The Tech.n,o, logy o,n d,sp:i ay In just a few days, the doors will open on the 4th World Tobacco Exhibition and Symposium in The Hague. On the pages that follow, TOBACCO REPORTER continues its preview of displays .featuring the latest technology for the tobacco industry. Among the wide range of new equipment and supplies be- ing exhibited are microprocessor monitor- ing and control systems; new styles of papers, filters, plugwrap, and packaging materials; equipment for leaf processing, for cigarette making and packing, and for cartoning, and shipping. Cardwell Machine Company P.O. Box 34588 Richmond, Virginia, U.S.A. Cardwell Machine Company (UK) Ltd. Invincible Road, Farnbomugh Hampshire, England Cardwell Stand G-11 Cardwell will have on display a rotadrum feeder and tobacco dischargers used in the feeding of cut rag tobaccos to cigarette making machines. Together with the Cardwell microprocessor control system, this unit results in a simple, cost efficient method of servicing high speed cigarette machines. The exhibit will also feature photographic displays of equipment and systems designed and manufactured for the tobacco industry. Representing Cardwelh Charles Hotchkiss, President J. Derek Darkins, Managing director, Cardwell (UK) Colin Lungley, Sales director, Cardwell (UK) Roy Owen, Technical director, Cardweli (UK) Doug Kirkman, Chief engineer, Cardwell (UK) Len Buie, Contract engineer, C, ardwell (UK) Ed Ward, International sales manager 58 TR--April. 1984 AMF Legg Newbury Road, Andover Hants SPI0 4DW, England Stands N-25 and N-26 AMF I_egg's exhibit will feature a pictorial display of new developments in process technology encompassing jet conditioning of tobacco; automatic drying systems, electronic process; control from rod weight control; microprocessor controlled weighing conveyors, up to total turnkey information retrieval and. control systems for primary making and packing departments--together with recent developments in tobacco cutting and auto weighing and packing of fine cut tobaccos. Representing AMF Legg: G.B. Edwards, Managing director & Chief executive Dr. M.D. Sanderson, Director of engineering A.E. Clarke, Director of sales R.E.G. Neville, Research & Development manager A. Aldridge, Deputy director of sales C.R. Mabey, Marketing executive P.F. North, Sales executive--Europe C.H. Dexter Europe S.A. Avenue de Tervuren 269 1150 Brussels, Belgium Associated with: C.H. Dexter Division One Elm Street Windsor Locks, Connecticut, U.S.A. Stand N-18 The C.H. Dexter stand features the company's high performance porous plugwrap developed especially for diluted cigarettes. These plugwraps are designed in a range of porosities to provide cigarette manufacturers an economical and consistent means for achieving desired dilution levels. In addition to its manufacturing facilities in the United States, France and the United Kingdom, Dexter also has offices in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Japan and the U.S. Representing Dexter: R.B. Gettins, Managing director--European products D.G. Gordon, Marketing director--Europe C.S. Ross, Sales director--Europe =D 'ER TI56305424
Page 65: TI56305425
10 East Baltimore Street Baltimore, Maryland 21202 U.S.A. Stand C-5 The Craggs organization has served the international tobacco industry for over fifty years in the sale of both new and good surplus equipment and has acted as consultants and appraisers to both large and small tobacco manufacturers. It also represents several tobacco machinery manufacturers such as Schmer- round, Marden Edwards, Tingey and Quester--all of whom will have their own stands at the exhibition. Representing Craggs: Ted E. Lewis, Vice president Rachel Berger Finifter National Tobacco Board of Gre~ece 36, Kapodlstriou Street Athens 102, Greece Stand C-39 NTB will exhibit a comprehensive range of odental and burley leaf tobaccos. There will also be a display of Greek cigarette brands and gratis distribution of many of the brands to visitors. Board President Alexis Baltas will head the NTB delegation. Robert Fletcher & Son Ltd. PO Box 10 Kearsley Paper Works Stoneclough, Radcliffe Manchester M26 9EH, England Branch works: Greenfield Paper Mill Greenfield, Oldham OL3 7NG, England Fletcher will exhibit its range of cigarette papers, available commercially in permeabilities up to Coresta 200, and plugwraps, available in a range of types and grammages. Research and development in the company has resulted in the commercial development of high in- herent porosity cigarette papers, the ability to control the variability of such papers within fine limits, and the emergence of cigarette paper with the capability to restrict carbon monoxide deliveries. Also on the stand will be the subsidiary co~tlpany, Proofed Packings Ltd.(Newbury, Berkshire, England), which manufacturers all types of cigarette tipping, in- cluding overprints and perforated, tear tape, cigarette G.D SpA V'~ Pomponia, 10 40133 Bologna, Italy Stand C-13 Featured will be a complete range of films illustrating the full G.D production line, including high-speed soft packers and hinge-lid packers; high-speed integrated cellophanerlparcaller and cellophaner/parcetlerlover- wrapper groups for cigarette packets; maker/packer direct rink-up system with buffer reservoir; faulty packet detecting/rejecting systems; and units for application of stamps and/or banderoles. In addition, there will be information about various installations of G.D machinery at leading cigarette factories all over the world. Among G.D's representatives: Giorgio Seragnoli, Vice president Dr. Gianoarlo de Martis, Joint managing director Romano Chiesi, Sales director Giancarlo Fusari, Tobacco division manager Carlo Grossi, Area manager Stefano Cavallad, Area manager ...and other agents from G.D's foreign offices: G.D Package Machinery Inc. (U.S.A.) G.D do Brasil/Maquinas de Embalar Ltda. (Brazil) G.D Machinery Ltd. (England) G.D Enveloppeuses Automatiques S.A. (France) G,D Automatische Verpackungsmaschinen GmbH (West Germany) bundle wrap and many types of flexible packaging in- cluding waxed, printed and laminated. Representing Fletcher: Gordon Horn, Managing director Richard Bohren, Marketing director Nigel Plackett, Production director Eddie Felton, Director of research & development Andrew Gordon-Stewart, Sales manager Frank Lawton, Technical sales manager Representing Proofed Packings: Gordon Harvey, Sales director Ken Greenwood, Sales dkector designate T~, ~984 59 Ti56305425
Page 66: TI56305426
The ue Focke & Co. Verpacku,n,gsmaschine,n Siemensstr. 10 Verden/Alter, West Germany Associated companies: FOPAC Maschinenbau GmbH & Co. KG H.-H. Focke GmbH & Co. KG Focke & Co. Inc. (U.S.A.) FOPAC Enterprises Ltd. (Canada) _---- FOCKE & CO ----__ Stand C-45 Focke will show for the first time its high speed hinge lid packer (Model 350 HS), which has a capacity of more than 350 packs per minute. The company will also display the latest version of its case packer, the Model 465. Thede two pieces of equipment will be shown link- ed to a fully automatic tray unloader (model 317), which feeds cigarettes automatically to the packer. Personnel will be available to discuss this new equip- ment as well as any other in Focke's complete range of machinery--complete hinge lid and shell and slide complexes, including film wrappers, boxers, parcellers, combined wrepperlparcellers and combined wrap- pedboxedoverwrappers, autoweighers for tobacco, pouch packers and parcellers for tobacco pouches, and different case packers for the cigarette and tobacco industry. Representing Focke: Heinz Focke, President Jurgen Focke, Personal assistant to the president Hans Schonberger, Vice president Manfred Moormann, Sales manager Peter Henning, Technical sales manager Hermann Roesink, Representative in the Netherlands Dieter Neuber, Representative in the United States Fishburne International P.O. Box 706 Arden, North Carolina 28704 U.S.A. Stand N-43 Fishburne invites visitors to share the latest advances in tobacco press design and the technology of com- puter aided design and drafting. David Felts will in- troduce you to computer drafting and offer a personaliz- ed memento of your visit. Representing Fishburne: Frank Fishburne, President David Sanford, Executive vice president David Felts, Computer draftsman ,~.~~ FISHB URNE ',, ,,, , ~>\,k.\.ti/ Japan Tobacco & Salt Public Corporation 2-1, Toranomon 2-Chome Minato-Ku, Tokyo 105, Japan Tobacco Industry Engineering Servic 5th Floor, 13 Mori Building 3-13 Toranomon 2-Chome CIE) Minato.Ku, Tokyo 105, Japan Stand C-21 On display will be the JTS bottom fold packer, shell and slide packer, and direct linkage device. Personnel will be available to give information about consulting engineering services, cigarette exporting, and other JTS and TIES businesses. In attendance: Kiyoshi Kawabata, JTS Kazuo Sekiguchi, TIES Mobil Plastics Europe 6761 Virton-Latour, Belgium Mobil will display its Bicor R OPP films for the inter- national tobacco industry. Among the products featured will be MB621, a 21-micron acrylic coated pack and car- ton overwrap film sold throughout Europe for cigarette and individual cigar packaging. Of particular interest will be the innovative differentially coated MB777 for a high flavor and odor barrier tobacco packaging ap- plications and the unique differentially coated white opaque film "Oppalyte." M bil Plastics Europe
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IN ITS PROPER PLACE ? ;e Introduced just 10 years ago, the Kaymich Gravity Fed Nozzle Applicator System has already sent countless starch wheels to the scrap heap. And now accounts for sealing some 50% of all cigarettes manufactured worldwide. Easy to install, simple to maintain, the Kaymich System cuts out cams and gears, tricky preparation of adhesives, and wheels that need to be re-ground. The Kaymich System is at home with all kinds of ready-made adhesives - sealing often at ,See you on Stand N17 at t~e 4th SYMPOSIUM WORLD TOBA - The Haaue ~,~ ...... CCO EXHIla/T~u .~. ........ =-nnos. April 15-18 1984 ....... Time-worn starch wheel system first introduced in the late 19th century temperatures of under 100°C, and a huge range of cigarette papers and plug wraps. In fact, its simpler design - with just one moving part - and greater versatility mean that in most instances it's substantially increased overall efficiency. Small wonder that so many manufacturers are switching to Kaymich- and that the prospects for the starch wheel are going up in smoke. If you're not already using it, find out more about the Kaymich Nozzle Applicator System. C.B. Kaymich & Co. Limited, Leigh Street, Sheffield S9 2PR, U.K. Telex 54171 Telephone Shf~field (0742) 44607 I Kaymich Inc., 420 Southlake Boulevard, Richmond, VA 23236. U.S.A. Telex 828312 Telephone Richmond (804) 7941648/9 TI56305427
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Previews The Gandy Betting Ltd. Corporation Road, Birkenhead Merseyside L41 8JX, United Kingdom Sland N-40 In addition to its collection of cotton and synthetic fabric based PVC tobacco conveyor belts, Gandy Belting will introduce a further addition to its range. This new belt, developed in close liaison with tobacco processors and equipment manufacturers, utilizes the latest in non- toxic polymers and is designed to meet the demand for a conveyor belt for use in possibly combustible ap- plications. Like all other Gandy tobacco conveyor belts, its ingredients are totatly non-toxic and comply with all recognized international food quality standards, in- cluding tile U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Technical staff from Gandy Belting will be on hand throughout the exhibition to discuss new developments with original equipment manufacturers. Export sales and marketing personnel will also be in attendance to give details of the many locations through the world where their products are being used successfully to convey tobacco. MOLINS Hambro Machinery Ltd. Chandos Street, Netherfield Nottingham NG4 2PF, England Machinery Limited Stand G-7 The stand will feature photographs and descriptive literature covering the Hambro range of tobacco primary process plants. Video films will be shown of the new fluidized bed dryer and the high .capacity cigarette ripping and tobacco reclaim plant. Also to be featured are Hambro's new high efficiency separator, the Elutriator, and a new microprocessor-controlled band weighing system which permits "bolt-on" conver- sion of existing conveyors. Representing Hambro: Derrick W. Brooks, Managing director Chris P. Morris, Sales and engineering director Peter Crump, Sales engineer Molins Tobacco Machinery Ltd. Evelyn Street London SE8 5DH, England In the forefront of its information facilities on The Hague stand, Molins will have on hand a products video library and a selection of sales literature embracing the com- pany's comprehensive range of cigarette making, plug manufacturing, inspection, mass-flow, trayfilling and packing/wrapping equipment. With these aids, Molins aims to provide the widest possible advice to match customers' needs throughout the secondary machinery field, recognizing the diversity of requirements in speed, efficiency, reliability and flexibility. In the week preceding and during the exhibition, Molins will be showing at their Saunderton premises a full range of hardware and services. The Molins team will be headed by the product plan- ning and marketing managers and supported by technical and sales staff from the U.K. Moisture Systems Corp. 117 South Street Hopkinton, Massachusetts 01748 U.S.A. On display will be a working demonstration of the com- pany's new microprocessor-based moisture analyzer, the Micro-Quad 8000, which measures moisture, nicotine and reducing sugars. Ti56305428
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Not Marlboro! Not Winston! Not Salem nor Kool! It's Newport! The fastest growing brand of all[ In fact, total Newport packings are up over 10% for 1983! That's the llth year in a row that Newport has shown a sales increase. We couldn't have done it without you. Keep backing a winner. Newport. The only business we do is the business you do. We never forget that.
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Maschinenfabrik Fr. Niepmann GmbH & Co. Postfach 1820 B~strasse 21 5820 Gevelsberg/Westfalen West Germany On display will be Niepmann's newly designed, fully automatic shipping case cartoner with integrated palletizer type ROBOT 633, which can open, fill and close shipping case cartons with contents from 5,000 to 12,000 cigarettes and then palletize them. Representing Niepmann: Dr. Brinker, Commercial managing director Mr. Stewart, Technical managing director Mr. Krefter, Sales manager Mr. Sokoli, Sales manager Philip Morris International 120 Park Avenue New York, New York 10017 U.S.A. Stand C-47 PHILIP MORRIS INTERNATIONAL The Philip Morris display has been designed to func- tion as a hospitality area where people can meet and talk and be served refreshments. There will be a short video shown about a new ex- panded tobacco process developed by Philip Morris in conjunction with the Airco Industrial Gases Division. Attending will be: Cynthia H. HammeR, Director of communications, PM International Patrick Clarke, Director of operations services, Tobacco Techology Group, Philip Morris Inc. Rudy Juenger, Assistant director of international services, PM International D.S. Devitre, President, Philip Morris Asia R.H. Bockman, Director of corporate affairs, PM Asia Leo McCullagh, Area director, PM Asia C.E. Smith, Director of operations services, PM Asia Ira Steinberg, Manager of engineering programs, Airco H~roid Hersch, Program manager for tobacco ex- pans.ion, Airco Rentsch AG 4632 Trimbach-Olten Switzerland Associated with: Rentsch International SA (France) Rentsch GmbH (West Germany) Prestige Packaging Ltd, (England) Rentsch Services Ltd. (Switzerland) Stand C-31 With its facilities in Switzerland, France, England and Germany, Rentsch produces and prints more than 25,000 tons of paper and cartons each year, making the company a leading supplier of specialized cigarette packets in Europe. At the Exhibition, the company's trade experts will be on hand to greet old friends in the industry, establish new ones, and hold discussions on the newest ideas in how to improve production methods and how to meet the strictest requirements for the smooth flow of modern cigarette making machines. Representing Rentsch: Rudolf Rentsch, President Peter Brotzer, Sales director Rene Woessner, Tobacco sales manager Ked Hiestand, Sales representative Alain Gassner, Sales representative 64 TR--April, 1984

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