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The Fifth Annual Discoverers Awards - 1-)91 We honor these exceptional scien_sts whose significant

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Length: 50 pages

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Abstract

We honor these exceptional scien~sts whose significant pharmaceutical discoveries have greatly benefited our quali~, of life.

Fields

Named Organization
Agriculture Department (USDA)
Allstate Insurance Company
American Bar Association
American Civil Liberties Union
Appropriations Committee
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System)
Census Bureau
Central State University
Chrysler Corporation
Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)
CPC International
Dana Corp.
Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
Dow Jones
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
DuPont
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
Federal Trade Commission (Enforcement agency for laws against deceptive advertising)
Enforces laws against false and deceptive advertising, including ads for tobacco products. Ensures proper display of health warnings in ads and on tobacco products;collects and reports to Congress information concerning cigarette and smokeless tobacco advertising, sales expenditures, and the tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide content of cigarettes.
Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Ford Motor Company
General Motors Corporation
*Health and Human Services (HHS) (use United States Department of Health and Hum (US)
Heritage Foundation
Highway Users Federation
Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
ITC (India Tobacco Company)
India Tobacco Company
League of Women Voters
Manhattan Institute (Judicial studies think tank; RJR is corp. sponsor)
1990 RJR was corporate sponsor in 1990. Judicial studies think tank
Merrill Lynch
Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc.
Mobil Oil
National Academy of Sciences
National Food Processors Association
Nike
Office of Management and Budget (OMB)
Olin
Phillips Petroleum
Red Cross
Republican Party
Senate
Texaco
University of Georgia
University of South Carolina
University of Tennessee
University of Wyoming
Washington Legal Foundation (Supports industry causes)
Washington Post (Newspaper)
White House
World Health Organization (Concerned with global public health)
International organization concered with public health worldwide
Named Person
All, Fritz
Allan, George
Allen, George V. (TI President & Exec. Director 1961-66)
President and Executive Director for the Tobacco Institute, Inc. from 1961 through 1966.
Arnott, Bob
Arnsberger, Sharon
Ashman, Richard T.
Bateman, Herb
Beaulieu, Charles
Bentley, Helen
Boltz, Ronald R.
Boron, David
Boxer, Barbara (Senator (D-California) Environment & Public Works Comm.)
Breaux, John
Brooks, Jack
Bryan, Jan
Burger, Timothy J.
Burton, Phil
Bush, Walker
Cady, John R.
Campbell, Tom
Carey, Helen
Carnes, Nathan B.
Carroll, David
Chandler, Sharon
Cheney, Dick
Cleghorn, Stephen
Clinton, Bill
Coats, Dan
Cole, Thomas E.
Cook, Charles
Cranston, Alan
Curran, Tim
Danforth, John
Darden, Buddy
David, Georgia
Day, May
Dixon, Mason
Dixon, Sharon Pratt
Don, Virginia
Dowden, Albert R.
Doyle, Michael C.
Duncan, John
Durbin, Richard J. (U.S. Representative in 1994, anti-tobacco voice)
Richard J. Durbin was a United States Representative in 1994 (D-IL). He was a leading anti-tobacco voice and a leading antismoking advocate in Congress (LAT 7/18/94; U.S. News 4/18/94). Durbin is concerned about reducing the number of young smokers (U.S. News 4/18/94). He proposed an amendment, with Reps. Synar and Wyden, which would give FDA authority to regulate the manufacture, sale, labeling, advertising, and content of tobacco products, circa 6/94 (AP 6/13/94). Durbin appeared for the 3/25/94 Waxman subcommittee hearing and stated that "Tobacco companies are our nation's number one drug pushers." In May 1994, U.S. representative Martin Meehan wrote a letter to U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno signed by six other congress members (Hansen, Stark, Viscols, Durbin, Synar, Foglietta, and Meehan signed). The letter suggested DOJ investigate whether the tobacco Executive violated RICO laws or committed perjury before the Waxman subcommittee (1994) (BN TLR 6/29/94; DJ 5/27/94). The contact in 1994 was Melissa Narins at (202) 225-5271.
Edenfield, B. Avant
Edwards, Jim
Everett, Chad
Fazio, Dee
Foley, Tom J. N., Esq. (BAT Sydney)
Fox, Andy
Gephardt, Richard
Defense
Gingrich, Will
Gleason, John P.
Glickman, Dan
Glosser, Susan B.
Gordon, Barton
Gray, Bill
Haldane, Bernard
Hall, Elliott S.
Harm, May
Hartwig, Marvin D.
Herbert, George
Hess, Hans Jurgen
Holderman, James
Jeffs, Thomas H., II
Johnston, Bennett
Kann, Curtis Von
Keep, C. Everett
Kennedy, Edward
Kennedy, John Fitzgerald (U. S. President, 1961-1963)
Kennedy, Ted
Kess, David
Kessler, David A., M.D., J.D. (Former FDA Commissioner)
appointed FDA Commissioner by President George Bush in December 1990.
Keyes, Alan
Knotts, Gary
Kung, Patrick
Kunsman, Dan
Lamm, Lester P.
Leahy, Patrick
Lewis, Carl
Lewis, Tom
Lugar, Richard
Lugar, Sam Richard
Madigan, Edward
Market, Sunday
Martin, Lynn (Secretary of Labor)
Mccain, John
Mccurdy, Dave
Mcgee, Gale
Mikulski, Barbara
Mitchell, Barton S.
Morella, Connie
Murphy, Tom
Murray, Jeff
Nader, Ralph (Consumer Activist)
Consumer activist long renowned for a career of exposing corporate deception and wrongdoing that result in human harm.
Nan, Dan
Neat, Richard
Newman, Carson
Nolan, Tom
North, Oliver
Obey, Dave
Olin, Jim
Osmon, Donn R.
Park, Lincoln
Perin, Reuben L., Jr.
Porter, Donna
Quackenbush, Chuck
Rail, Tom
Reagan, Ronald
Reed, T. Dean
Reilly, John E.
Rice, Denis
Richman, Phyllis
Ristow, Stephen
River, Chester
Rockefeller, Jay
Ronan, Arthur P.
Rose, Charlie (U.S. Rep. (D-NC) 1986-1994)
Tobacco grower political ally.
Ross, Steve
Rowland, Roy
Rush, Charlie
Ruth, William
Samet, Jonathan
Schaefer, Dan
Schreyer, William A.
Scott, Willard
Shoemaker, Bill
Simon, Paul
Simpson, Glenn R.
Slaughter, Kay
Smith, F. Alan
Smith, Mike
Spencer, Duncan
Spratt, John
Stark, Pete
Steiger, Janet
Stokes, Louis
Stone, Doug
Strand, David
Sullivan, Louis, M.D. (Secretary, U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services)
Sullivan, Mike
Teitelbaum, Leonard
Tell, William K., Jr.
Temple, Paul
Terrell, Ross C.
Thomas, Clarence
Thomas, Craig
Thompson, Jerome
Thurmond, James Strom (U.S. Senator from South Carolina, Dixiecrat candidate for pr)
Upton, Fred
Wallop, Malcolm (Retired senator from Wyoming)
Formed conservative think tank, Frontiers of Freedom
Waxman, Henry A. (U.S. Representative)
(D-CA) Was chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Health and the Environment in 1994.
Wein, Allan M.
Weiss, Ted
Whitman, Karen
Wilder, Douglas
Wins, Kay Slaughter
Date Loaded
16 Mar 2005
Box
8236

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Page 1: TI53151427
The Fifth Annual Discoverers Awards - 1-)91 We honor these exceptional scien~sts whose significant pharmaceutical discoveries have greatly benefited our quali~, of life. Ros~ C.Ten-el/, Ph.D. Gideon Gol~tein, M.D., Ph.D. (IRI) Hans-Jurgen Hess (Pfizer) (Amquest) & Patrick K~ng, Ph.D. (T Cell Sciences) Pmzosin (Minipre~) Er/x~e & For, me-An e..cJ~e//cS Orthoclone OKT3 Mooo~lonM aatibody Hig~ bloodprexmm control" Four W ac, t lave Touched Tl e Lives Of Millioas The world's most ~idely used anesthetics. An anybody used in ~0% o[ ladne~ Wansplant rejec~'ons. The first ~delj, used drug t~at reduced blood pressure by a n~ mechanism -- selective alpha-blockMe. These knpor- rant medical discoveries share one aspect.., develop- ment by ~'s ye'~.'~ award ~nning scientists in Ame~ca's pharmamutical research company laboratories. In 1961, Dr. Ross C. Terrell took up a formidable chal- lenge.., create an anesthetic, without early itthalatioll agents' disadvantages. An organic chemist in what is now the Anaquest division of BOC Health Care Inc., Or. Ten'ell determined that only a fluorinated ether would have the volalfle, nonflammable properties he desired without pro- , ducing cardiac arrhythmias. He and his st~ff prepared hundreds of compounds before synthesizing Ethrane. Subsequent efforts brought the discovery of Forane. To date, Ethrane and Forane have been used in several hundred million surgeries. In the late 1970s about half of all kidney transplants failed.., even with immunosuppressive therapy. Dr. Gideon Goldstein and Dr. Patrick Kung of Johnson & Johnson's 0~o Pharmaceutical Corporation created a series of "monoclonal" antibody to determine whether therapy actually reached white blood cells that attacked donated kidneys. They found that one antibody, OKT3, cleared white blood cells from the bloodstream and re- versed rejection. OKT3 is now used in almost 60% of kid- ney transplant rejections. In 1963, when Or. Hans-Jurgen Hess of Pfizer Central Re- search began work on antihypertonsive agents, the exist- ing drags for lowering blood pressure frequently displayed unwanted side effects, or stopped wonking as ga~ents devel- opal tolerance. Seeking an alternative therapy, Dr. fless developed pmzosin, the ~hst of a n~ class of antihypeaew sire agents, which lowers blood pressure by selectively blocking re~tors on smooth muscle ceils of blood vessels. Since Dr. ttess's discovery, prazosin (tV, Anipress) became a leading agent for tr~tment of high blood pressure. These'outstanding contributions underscore the impor- tant discoveries made by sci.entis~s in pharmaeeutical re- search company laboratories across America. Indeed, in 1991, America's pharmaceutical manufacturers will spend over $9 billion on new drug research ~d develop- ment in their commitment to a better quality of life. Pharmaceutical AsMan. u.f.acturers SOclation 1100 Fifteenth Street, KW., Washington, D.C. 20005. TI53151427
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I [~ ~,~ Work on the Hill I ~ And Live inthe Trees For as little, as $26 per day! For over four decades we have been offering all the convenience and comfor~ of home. Take advantage of our Intern Special featuring: ~ Fully Furnished Studios* ~ Free Metro Shuttle ~ Fitness C~nter ~ Unfurnished units from $399 (minimum 9-month lease) THE OODNER Apartments on the Park 3636 16th Street, N.W Washington, D.C. 20010 (800) 325-0448 (202) 328-2822 *minimum 30:day rental EHO Put a little romance in your weelmights. Nothing is more mmantlc than Evening Symphony every Monday at 7pro, on WGMS 1035 FM. For the maste~' of Mo;,:am The brilliance ofBeedaoven.The magnitlcence of M'ahle~ Listen. You'll love k. WGMS Evening S~..mpl-~tm~/ cantuman°rdinar"cvenJng V~ 103.5 FM I_isten. You'll love L Money Chase-Is On For House Hopefuls draising competition ~ even before they know theboundafies ofthedis~icts, which wltl likely be aitared signitkantty for 1992. Federal Elecdon (X~mmlssion r~ords for the first half of 1991 show that six Democratic candidates for Rap. Barbara Boxer's (D) seat raised a rural of 6"27~ in the first half of the :year. Boxer is giving up the Bay Area seat in an attempt to succeed retiring Sea. Alan Cranston (D), Among the coutendem in the 12th dis- ~et, San Francisco CAty Attorney Louisa Ranno raised. $71,909; Bennett Johnston III, son of theLouisiana Senator, brought in $52,000; Dick Spotswoed raised just under $50,000; Denis Rice garnered $51,834; while David Strand and/oesph Nation each raised just under $25,000. Meanwhile, four candidates for the open 6Lh disMct scat in nearby Silicon Valley raised almost $135,000 in the first half. GOP Rep. Tom Campbell, who currently representS the district, is also vying to place Cranston, Democratic San Marco County Supervi- sor Tom Nolan led the pack for the Campbell seat, according to FEC reports, raising more than $53,(~0. Among the three GaP candidates who filed FEC re- ports, Assemblyman Chuck Quackenbush raised $43,575, former Assamblyman and H/ll aide Dixon Amett brought in about $20,000, and San Morea Supervisor Tom Huenlng collected just over $13,000. era| candidates am. expected in'Sis race from both sides of the aisle. On the ~ther end of the slate, Assembly- man Butt Margolin, a former 9ida to Rap. Henry Waxman (D),raised over $80,0(~ in his bid to replace Rap. Mel Levlne (D), who's aisonmning for Cranst~'s seat. House FEC reports revealed 6ther inter- esting information. In Virginia's 1st dis- uict, whem Rap, Herb Bateman (g) nearly lestia 199016 unheralded former televialon newsman Andy Fox (D), Jr'appears the incumbent will have another tough fight. In the first half of 1991, Fox, who raised jaat over $90,000 for his 1990 bid, has Some of the incumbents who cranked up their ~undraising in fhe first half of ~he year: Reps. Young, Vander Jagt, Studds, Roth, Swift, Snow~. akeady banked $86,000, while Batsman" e~Ie~the cyclewldi Mssthan$4,0~in his war ~ast aher paying off a $~35,000 debL Two Members who ere almost sum to f,~e off next year when lvlgntana loses a Ho~ ~ ~ reappoainnmant, Raps. Pat Willies (D) mad Ran Mar/anon (R) ~ currently on n fakly oven financial footing, although the Republ~ean was much more antlve. Marlenez raised $168,000 and ended the period with a war chest of $164,000. whiln Williams raised $22,000 ~J~.kRos~ wi.lh.hl~t 56 ~ o[ t~ ~dct's l~e~e ~ber f~a 1~5~ m Photo by Ywn~e Hawren California GOP Assemblyman Chuck Quackenbush (above) has raised over $43,000 for his bid to fill the seat being vacated by GaP Rap. Tom Campbell, who is. running for Senate, leageand raised$57,000 daring the first six months of the year toward the effort. S~nar responded by raising $258,000, giving him a war chest of S200,000. South Carolina Democratic Raps.Robin Tallon and John Spratt may go head-to- head next fall, and Talton, who willproba- bly bemaning in more unfamiliar territory, starts with the financial edge. He boasted more than ~390,000 on "lung 30, while Sprett had $180,000 (but h~'s got a $64,0~0 dcb0, Both ran uhopl~osed in 1990. IncumbentS in 1990 saw ti~h" winning percentages shrink across the board, often against undeffandedand unheralded candi- dam. A number of incumbentS.who web re.election by narrow margins cranked up their fuudraisingin the f'trst half o f the ye~, hoping t6 avoid, farther nailb]~ers. Rap. D~ Y6ung (R-~), a winner with 52 percant desplte outspendifig his op- ponent by more than three-m~one, raised and spent roughly $134,000 during thef"~rst half. The Natio~alRepublican Congressional Committee chairman, Rap. Guy Vander 1agt (/vl~ch), whose challenger last year spent $17,0~0 and recelved 45 percent of the vote, rai~ed $101,000 in the first half. MassachusetrsRep. Gerry Studds raised $119,000 in anticipation of a rematch with Republican Jan Bryan, who held the in- cumbent to 53 percent last year. Bryan raised $23,000 but is still saddled with a $I 18,0~0 debt-- ta himsel f. Likewise,Rep.TobyRoth (R-Wis)o held to 54 percent in 1990. raised $170,000,and Rep.AI Swift (D-Wash), whoreeelvedjust 51 percent in a tlaev-way race, collected $175,000. Rap. Olympia Snowe Maine), who nearly 1eat Io stair Rap. John MeGowan ha a shocker, raised Among the mum inMguing c'ampaigu costS incu~ed ha I.be first haffnf 1991, the ~c.ords show, we~,'~the$1,075A4 thatRcp, Sonny Montgom.e~ (D-Miss) spent on pointing and distributing cookbooks in 1an~.ry and t/~ $~72 ~at Rcp, T-.rank Hot- tea ~-1~ spent on mapk~ syrup, Perhaps the saddest eam~ in the FEC files cornea ftora Rep. Harold Vnlkmer (D4vlo). Ia addition to th¢$154.75 stoat oa "Too~c lodged over $486 on"t.logs for fuedreiserY But app~,eatiyo the pigs weren't for a pet- aug ~. A in/In.w-up ~a'y shows a $555 dis~¢~t to Woods Smvt~d Me~,
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America ,Needs a Good Highway- Transit-Safety Bill This Year On September 30, federal funding to the states for hlghways, safety, and tra nslt will stop unless Congress passes a surface transportation bill and the President signs It into taw, ShUffi1~vgdew~-ff~ e h~ghway'progr a m ah~h1's,c fl flcal juncture InAmeflea's eoonomlc recovery is'a bad'rdea. Transportation accounts for 18 to 30 percent of the final cost of most goods and products. Business executives know that efficiency gains In transpoffation have an immediate bottom-line impact on America's economic performance. A previous generation of government ond buslness leaders foresaw the economic benefits of the Interstate Highway Syst&n and made it a reality. But we cannot dependon the foreslght of previous generations to carry our economy Into a more competitive future. It Is time to create a new national highway program to serve a more dynamic America. What Happens If There's No Highway Bill? Except for a small amount of unobllgated fed eral funds from previous years, the states will run out of federal highway do}lars on September 30. Road and bridge Improvements will be put on hold. Highway safety programs 'will be slashed. Unemployment, especially In the construction industry, will continue to rise. Planning and research will be Interrupted as the states face uncertainty in highway funding. The already substantial backlog, of needed~ roa@ and bridge work will grow. The cost of doing business will rise. No one will benefit. Worsening travel condifionswill result In delays for commuters, business travelers, and truckers who carry the goods and services modern commerce depends upon. Improved economlc performance will require improved transportation. A Highway Bill is Essential to Economic Recovery " Good highways are critical links for business and Industry. If the AmeTican economy is to grow, we must have a national highway system able to serve our industrial capacity. Without a modern, expanding, hlghway system, American business will be unable to compete In the world economy. We, the Executive Committee of the Highway Users Federation, urge Congress to give America an adequately funded highway program at the earliest possible date. Our industries need it. The nation needs it, Richard T. Ashman Michael C. Doyle Senior Vice President Representative Holiday Inn.Worldwide National Electrical Manufacturers Assoc. Ronald R. Boltz Vice Presid~'nt John P. Gleason Product Strategy President & Regulatory Affairs Portland Cement Chrysler Corp. Association Charles L. Bowexman Q.P. Graves Senior Vice President Vice President Petroleum Products Shell Refining Phillips Petroleum Co. & Marketing Co. Thomas E. Cole Elliott S. Hall President Vice President Rubber Manufacturers Washington Affairs Associatioh Ford Motor Co. J.L. Cooper Marvin D. Hartwig Vice President Chairman U.S. Marketing Dealers Safety & Refining Div. & Mobility Council Mobil Oil Corp. Thomas H. Jeffs II John E. Doddridge Vice Chairman President NBD Bank, Inc. North American Operations James W, Jensen Dana Corp. Director Albert R. Dowden Construction Industry President & CEO Manufacturers Assoc. Volvo North America Corp. Raymond I-L Kiefer President Allstate Insurance Co. Theodore Knappen Arthur P. Ronan Senior Vice President President Greyhound Lines, Inc. Automotive Operations Leon J. ICxain Rockwell' International Corp. Vice President F. Alan Smith & Group Executive Executive Vice President Finance Group General Motors Corp. General Motors Corp. Chester Stranczek Lester P. Lamm Chairman President American Trucking Highway Users Federation Associations, Inc. Robert A. Lulz Yutaka Suzuki President Vice President Chrysler Corp. External Relations - Nissan Barton S. Mitchell Motor Corp in U.S.A. Director David A. Taxf National Asphalt Representative Pavement Assodation National Private Truck Council Donn R. Osmon Group Vice President William K. Tell, Jr. Traffic & PersonaISafety Senior Vice President Products Texaco Inc. 3M Co. Norbert. T. Tiemann Reuben L. Perin, Jr. Transporation Programs Executive Vice President Manager Commercial Sheet & Tin Donohue & Associates, Inc. USS - A Div. of USX John E. Reilly American [suzu Motors, Inc. ~FOR .~ff~=-r~ AND MOBILITY 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, .I~LW. Washington, D.C. 20036 Ti53151429
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OF SWITZERLAN D "Swiss hit! The .menu is evenly divided into Switzerland's three faces-French, German, Italian...best fondue Washington has seen in decades." -- Phyllis Richman The Washington Posf 4:00-7:00pro complimentary Swiss hats d "oeuvres 1990 M Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 293-1990 If You're Looking ForA Serious Ste , Unly 2% of the beef sold in the United States is good enough for Ruth's Chris Steak House. That's because we know that serious steak sta~Ls with serious beef. Magnificent corn-fed U.S. Prime, custom-aged and cut by hand. It's the kind of beef you can't get at your corner grocery, or even in most fancy restaurants. Come taste a serious steak. And come hungry. Home of Serious Steaks 1801 Connecticut Avenue, NW (Comer of ".~" Street}. 202/797-0033 Monday-Saturday 5:00-11:00PM Sunday 5:00-10:OOPM Complfmez~tary V~let Paddr~ After 5;30PM Hatfield Is Sub,j,e,ct Of New Revel,ations Senator's Son Among Children of Public Figures Who Received USC Scholarships By Glenn R. Simpson Sen. Mark Hatlield (R-Ore) condanod to be dogged over the recess by con~ovarsy. In the latest development, recess leased last wcck rcvcalM that theson o f d~e Senator was onc~f'amlm~r o fchiIdrco ot prominent fixates who, were awarded scholarships by the former president Univcrsky of South Carolina, The p;cSidant, James Hol derraan, whose tics to Hatfield ~¢ the subject of an FBI probe, gave scholarships to the son of a fom~cr lamalcan primo minister, the soo ot Dcpaty Secretary o f Stat¢ LawrcnccEagle- burger, and the danghU~rs o[ the South Carolina state treasorcr, as wcli as to Hafflcld's son Charles. The scholarship that the younger Hat- field reaolved has been thesobjecto[prcvi- oas reports in the press, but the records released by USC were the first indicadon that Holdorman b~.stowcd awards on the chJlchcn of governmont leaders in a pos- siblo pattern. The ranking Republican on the Appro- priations Committee and its former chalr- man,Hatfieki received some$9,000in gifts and travel from Ho[dcrman, who has plesded no conCst to state income tax evasion charges and is said to be cooperat- ing with authorities in ongoing investiga- tions. University of South Carolina. assistance to Charles Hatfidd ~.otaled $11,~50 over live yeats. The Senate Ethics Committe~ has also begun gathering information on Hatficld's des to Holderman, who has claimed that H.affield assisted him in win- ning a $16 million federal consh'uction grant for USC. HaLqold has declined to commont pub. licly on his ties to Holdcrman and othei mattevJ siuc¢ April, dLccdng inquiries to his Washington afiorney John Hialds, who was out of town this week and unavailable for comment. Moanwhi]¢, new revclatlons abotlt Hatfidd's rcai eatat~ dealings in the early and mid-1980s were published in tho Aug. 25 issue of tho Orcgonian. The Portland newspaper reported that Hadicld and his wife Antoinetto made as much as $250,000 in 1981 as a z~sult ef three zealcatate deals thoy entarcd into with a pair of wealthy businessmen. In 1981, tho paper reported, C. Horman Winningatad of Bcavezlon, Or, .e., a friend of" I-IaLqcld's and a contributor tO his cam- paiga, bought a house owpcd by d¢ Sana- tot in Newport Beach, Calif., for $1 above the asset, sod Also in th~ year, oiiman Paul Temple bought an Accokcck0 Md., house for $250,000 that Aatoinctto ttaffield had pur- chascdless ~ayeorandahal£1xcvioualy for $160,0~0. Foor years inter, Temple los~ $90,000 when he ~old the property. Around the same time. Temple sold the Ha~qclds a Washington, DC, which they resuld shelly afterward at a $100.0~0 ]xofiL The Orcgoulan noted that Temple told Cong~Jsiooul Qanxtcriy earliex this year he had sold tbo Washington apmlment to form~ Rcp. CI~ Booth Lace who has slJ~¢ died, bat the newspaper said tic $¢natods 1981 financial disclosore i~s indiontc the odgimd sole wa~ to the Haffie, lds, wh~ then sold k to Lace. ~ 1~$1 ~ ~ t~ov~d Ihat the Sen. Mark Halfield (above) has de- clined to comment both on his ti~s in former University of South Carolina presldent James Holderman and on revelations published last month of unusual real estate dealings. $300,000 in credk from Temple at bcinw market intcrast ~tes. The Orcgonian ulso rcponed dcalinga bctwecn the Pmffields and thub" friands rega~dlng a Portland, Ore., contiominium boughtin 1980 for$391,Td8 andsoldby the I-~u'ields at a $35,000 loss in 1985 to a newly organized Omgou company, BRI~ Parmccs. The parmc~shlp resold the condo five weeks later for $12,(~0 less than it paid, then dissolved itself. Two of the BRM pannc~s wore Pea of Portland commis- sioners involved in the maritime indus~y, which is dopemdcnt oa govommant subsi- dies. Two of the th~cc commissionczs clined to cooperate with Oregonian rcporl- ors looking into the deal, while the third granted a brief inu:rview. The Orcgonian,which defended Haft'told last year in its editorial pages against sag- gcstioas ofimptopdctylodged by hls opp0- ncot ~ Lonsdale (D), also pablishcd a separam, lengthy front-page stray Ang. 25 delving into the Sanatads financial prob- terns, which the papex said "cast a dank cloud over an otherwise exemplaxy career," The Hatfields wcm both mlscd in blue- collar families, the newspaper noted, but wci'c surrounded by the wealthy after Hat- field, who served as governo¢ o fO~cgon for ncaxly adecad~, came to theSeaatoin 1966. A month bofote Hatfield was cleated to Cong~sa, Foliticaliy coaneatod California induatdalist Charles Cook and his wife Dorothy bought him and his wife an $80,(X}0 house in Bethcsda, Md. Cook, pa~ of the "kitchen cabinet" of former Callfomia Guy. and later P~esidont Ronald Reagan, was among several major lend~s to Hatfield who fotg~v¢ debts owed by the Scnalor in the 1980~. Another, as Roll Call ~cpotted May 9, was college asso- ciation executive and former Rep. Dcllcubanko who forgave som~ $75,000 in debts and Aflcr their recdIX of tbe boosc from Cook in 1966, "The HaLticlds' acccl~ncc of fl~'*clal favors would increase, not deca~=~, as dm~ went en." the Or~gonian T153151430
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THE REAL ISSUE Judge Clarence Thomas' Record on the Right to Privacy: The Spin vs. The Facts The Spin: The White llouse wants us to believe Judge Thomas has not made up iris mind about the constitutional right to privacy and abortion. The Facts: U1~fol~nately, the facts contradict the spin. Judge Thomas endorsed'a view of ~natural law" that would o'vecrule Roe v. Wade and would outlaw abortion nation~4de. . Speech to the ltedtage Foundation (1987) Judge Thomas criticized constitutional protection for the right to privacy in Griswold v. Connecticut, calling it an "invention." "-Assessing the Reagan Years (1988) Judge Thomas served on a White House task force that called for the oven'uh% of Roe ,: Wade, and the.decision that protects the fight of an unmarried individual to use contracepfi-~-~n. . Report of the White House Working Group on theFam@ (1986) The Republican Party Platform calls for appointing only those judges who pass an anti-choice litmus test. The Thomas nomination is another step in a decade-).ong effort to overrule Roe v____,. Wade through the judicial appointment process. .. Republican Party Platforms of 1980,1984, I988 What do you believe? The spin or the facts? The Conclusion: The facts speak for themselves. The record shows that Judge Thomas has made up his mind..-He opposes the fundamental right to priva~: He would overrule Roe v. Wade and the two decades of case law that protect our right to choose. That's why the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL) urges the Senate to htlfilllts respansibilit3'" to protec~ the rights Americans value and refuse to ~odirm Judge Thomas. T153151431
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p.a~e ~. ROI.~ CALL "l~y, September 12,1991 Rose Again Accepts Donations From Vendors of Hill Software By Timothy J. Burger Fivomonths a.qerRetx Charlie Rush NC) said he would "in all ~kel~ood" stop accepting contributions from software vendors who do business with the House, the chairman of the House Adminiswadon Committ~tookir~$5,'~00 from officers o four ~n~ll>orgal~atittns., ~edersl El~etloo C~mmlsSion re~ds ~h o~. Over the 1988 and 1990 electi~m cycles, Rose accepted $10,500 in contributions from persons with a direct interest in the work of the panel. Some of these same persons also Cohabited in the Fu'st l~If of this year (Roll Call, Jan. 10). Until January, Rose chaired the House Administration subcommittee on commu- nleations, computers, and office systems, which in large part coo~'ols the process by which outside vendors gain approval to offer theh" wares to.House offices. Rose took over as head of the full com- mi ttee thia Congrcss, aftec w~ing the ~nst in u Dec.5.1990,Democratic Caucus elec- tion. He handed over cha~-manship of his old subcommittee to Rep: Sam Gejdeason (D-Corm), but changed the panel's name back to its old tltle,"stlbcommlttee on of- fice syslems," and brought up to the full committee level resl~insibility for House Information Systems, which oversees some a@enm of the House's business with A~er a Roll .Call story in Janua~j, Rose said that "in all likelihood" he would not take such funds again. But he has. In a Jan. 9 inteawiew about the earlier centn'bnfion~. Rose told Roll Call that, committee chairman, ho would"go out of ray way to have a fundraising system that doesn't sh~ any discredit on the Hous~ AdmlnlstratiunCommlttee,In all likelihood. I'll not reee'tve any more contributions from the vendors that dear with the House Administration Committee, slt~ply canseldrm' t want there tobeany q~ueStirm? The six vendors who gave to the Rose ecmpaigu fund fiye months later are: • Charles Beaulieu,owner o f Benchmark Systems Ine.,$1,000 for theprlmary ($500 on May 17 and $500 on May 23); • I>aleBrunner, president of Benchmark, $i,0~3 for the prima~j; • C.W. Gilluly, president of Micro Re,- the computer and soR'~are servlec venders saureh Industfins, $2,000, half for the pri- that contributed to Rose .... mary and half for the general election; Rose said, however, amt most decisiour • Gary Knotts. vice president_fur federal affectlnglhevendors~emadeby the office ~les at Brmehrsark, S500 for the primury; systems panel. • Stephen Ristow, I~'esldentofIotolligent According to mid-year FEC data, Sohitions,$1,O00forthetnimary; Gejdeason has received no conlrlbufions • Leonard Teitelbaum, president of the from vendors doing business with the TerminatDatacarp.,$200forthepfimmT, House. Searches of FEC records this week Keel Moe Dee Fazio & 2 Slow. Crew Among Teams in Today's Nike Race Weird Names Abound as 34 House Members, 11 Senators Compete Six-timeNike Capital Challenge winner Scott Celley isn't cotmting on te~ng race again this morning. "I'm not getting any younger." said Colley,.31. press secretary to Sen. John McCain (R-Arlz). "I'm older than Carl Lewis." • Also older than Carl Lewis arelnst year's top-finishing Senator, Max Baueus (D- Moot) and House Member, Barton Gordon (D-Term). Both are expected to run in today's contest. Proceeds from thorace, now in its llth year, go to the DC Special Olympics. The money comes from each t~am's $25 entry fee and n S2,500 contribution givrm by Niko on behalf of the men's winners. Held at East Potomac park, the .five- kilometer (about 3.1-mile) race had 600 participants last year, but 750 are tuday,includingM HcoseMemhersand i Senators, each leading a five-person team, The smiting gun goes off at 8 z.m., with refreshments and the awards ceremony slated for 8:55. "Runners will finish the race to the strains of music from the US AnnyBand. be fed by RidgewolPs, and have their thirst quenched by Perfie~." a~co~ding to race director Jeff Dannan. Even more exciting, the Today Show's Willard Scott will hold court at the Challenge. Awards willbegiven for winnem in eneh branch of guves~ment ~induding"sepa- rate but equal Hoosoand Senate aw~dF-- ~nd for the fot~th estate. Whether o~ not Scott Celloy repea~ as victor, t~ay's m~stimpcslam race is wldn Ol~n: W~eh teams will be rec~gn~d for having the best and wo~t names? Among the H~'s top ¢~nl~k~rs: Rep. Martin L~neasl~r's (D-NC) "Capitol C~nn) "Shay's Lonng~" P~p. David Pdea's ~ ~Ru~away Ptlc~," Sea. Last year's top.finishing Senator was Max Baueus flight), who ran ~e 5K East Potomac course in 20:40, Next to him is spe~tacolarly fit S~n. Richard Lngur, 59~ who also ran impres~vely• Both are scheduled to he in the field today as well. "Writ Rurmer~" teams, led byDC Superior fearless selections fur N'd~e Challenge stl- CouR Judges Curtis Von Kann, Rufus King, and Richard Levle. And, lest we forget, media mavens Far- ficipatlng are A~'s Larry I~ lead- ing ~Wired;"Natloanl Gengraphlc'sRoger Hirsehland, heading up "National Geo- era feet;~ and U.SMnws & World Report's Stereo Findlay, heading up the "U.S. Meaawhile~ 1990 champ Cdl~/is won- dozing how long his record for tbe race ~ 14".06 -- which be set live years ago, v~ql sumd ti~ ~st of time~ (which 1~ said was won by anotherM,Khin perlatives: • Fastest female Senator:. Nancy K~sse- bantu (R-Kan). • Mastl~opular temn name: Ba~ Gordon, • 'Air Gordon"; Rope Tom Lewis (R-FIn), "Air Lewis"; rind Rep. Lindsay ~ (D-Oa), "Ak Thomus." • Most original names: Rep. Law/La- Rocco (D-ldsho), 'q-..a Rocco;" Rep. Bob Livingston (R-La), "Livingston;" Sea. BOb Kemey (D~Neb), "Kerrey" (ean't a posdble p~drmtlalc~tend=dobett~); and Sen. • Stmng~t names: Rep. Peter DeFaxlo ~Osek =i~l Moo Dee Fazio &2 Slow "St~o's Siomo's;" (a tie ~ the ~ The campaign of Rep. Charlie Rose, chairman of the House Administration Comruittee, t~k another $5,700 from the vendors during the first half of 1991. sho wad that none of these pcopl e han givon to any other candidates in this aiecdon cycle. In theprevious two cycles,Rosereceived $2,500 from Brunneg $3,000 from Gilhily and his wife, Marny, a former Rose staffer; $4,000 from Ristow and his wife, Linda; and $250 from Teilelbaum. In thatpedod,Ristow alsogave$1,000 to the camFaign of Rep. Frank Armunzio (D- Ill), the former House Admlnisuatinn chairman,and $500 to Rep.Dave Obey (D- Wis).who used to sit on the Appropriations legislative branch subcommittee. In an inten, lew with Roll Call yesterday', ROSe said. "I have, ul~n reflection, decided that there's nothing improger with political contributions when all the facts are on the ruble:' The chairman said that. "Numberone, all my con~ibudous are public. Number two, all decisions of this committee are pubfie. Number thse~, only a small minority of the people we deal with in this commiUee have ever given me a contribution .... "1 don't think I'm doing anything that gives the ~ppearanea of iml~'opriety." Most of Rose's vendor onntributions came at a May 17 fondralser at his home. "We got invited so we sent the check," Giiluly of Micro Research said, He said he couldn't recall whether he or his wife went to the event, but said they had mailed the contribution. Hh firm is approved to sell conrespon- dance management system (CMS) equip- ment and software. Asked why he made tbe donations, Gil- laly refen'ed Roll Call to remanks he made in alanua~yinte~inw on the same topic: "It doesn't ~J:e a rocket scien~t to figure out that if he's the chair that's who tl~ veffdo~ are going to want Io conlrihat~ to." Added Gilluly this week: "It'll probably h~ppen ~gain ~xt year and the year afar that." Gillaly .said he lind not been asked by Rose at any time between Janus,/and the fandraiser to stop making conU'ibutioas to hi~ campaigu. He noted thnt be wrmld cense do~ating if Rose made ~uch a request: 'Tin not uying to give the guy any trouble." Teitelbanm said he is a longtime friend of Ro,~ and gives because "he does a good job. and 1 believe in good government." Tdtelbanm said bereceived an invitatlo~ to Ro~e's May fundraiser but simply mailed hi~ cheek, alone a ~heduling con- llkt ta'evented him from attending. Temd~l Datais~ to sell computer equipment a~d fmnlmre. Ndther Banehma~k's Beauli6Uo Bren- ner, and Kn~, nor lmelligeat Solutions' B eaelxand: and l~dllg~t $oludon~ ~r~ T!53151432
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s~,um, uoo
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America's Most Trusted Profession Asks You to Support Indepmadent retail pl~armacists-- health ca, re professionals and small business entrepreneurs---are Amerb- ca's most accessible health care resources. Repeatedly in recent Gatlup Polls the public has iudged druggists/retail phar- macists to be the nation's most trusted professionals. forces for the price-fixing, tying, monopoliza- tion and market allocation. Small business strongly supports H.R. 9, including the Small Busi- ness Legislative Council (SBLC), the independent, permanent coalition of more than 100 trade and professional associations representing the interests of Retail Druggists (NARD) is businesses in manufacturing, the association representing retailing, distribution, profes- the professional and propri- sional and technical services, etary interests of the'nation's ~ , construction, transportation independent retail pharma- " \ / and agriculture. The insuranc_._~e cists. Consumers obtain 70 per- \ / Tndust .ry stands virtually alone cent of'the nation's retail pre- \ / for prlc.e fixing and against scription drugs and related phar- ~ A ~'~ ~ I~ ~ / increased competition. . macy services'from independent \ • ~ ~ ~ I~, ~,,~ ~,~ / retail pharmacists. The 40,000 inde- ~ . / Although the record fully, supports pendent retail pharmacies NARD repre- ~ . . J., ~re, p~eal: H.E 9 ,s not an .o..utn.ght repe.a) of sents, where over 75,000 pharmacist~ practice, 'the McC'arran-rerguson antttrust exe ,mptren. are concerned about a wide variety of health and It is a compromise. It.specifically immuniz.es from business issues. The insurance industry's price-fixing, its access to unfairly priced drugs, and the consequential denial of consumer equal access to participate in insured prescription drug programs overshadow all other con- ceres. H.R. 9 will reestablish for these programs the hallmarks of our private prescription drug marketplace: consumer choice and fair competition. The Insurance Competitive P~ricing Act, introduced by Chairman Jack Brooks (D-Tx) and Senator Howard Metzenbaum (D-Oh), as H.R. 9 and S. 430, enjoys the support of a wide array of consumer, labor, business and law enforcement groups. H.R. 9 is the product of a long-term, thoughtful, steady, patient effort to substitute pro-consumer and pro-competitive market any antitrust challenge activities that fire unique and essential to the insurance industry. The state regulation 6f insurance provisions of the Act remain intact. Industry is attempting to miscast H.R. 9 as partisan. It is not--unless supporting small business and consumer interests in preventing price-fixing and other anti-com- petitive insurance activity is the exclusive domain of Democrats. Industry opponents will ask you to defend insurance price-fixing and their coercive, anti-competitive practices that deny your constituents equal access to small busi- nesses, including pharmacies. The answer is simple: these practices are indefensible. Stop Price Fixing by the Insurance Cartel Support "The Insurance Competitive Pricing Act" Department of Government Affairs * Legislative Defense Fund Nadonal AssodationofRetall Druggists * 205 DaingedlddRoad * Alexandria, Virginia 22314 T153151434
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Give th,e FDA Expa,nded Powers Currently, the Agency Has No Authority to !Embargo 'U nsafe Food, Drugs, And.Cosmetics; No Authority to Inspect Records of =Food .Facilities; .No Authority to Assess Civil 'Penalties. By Rep, Heary Wax'man Imagino tho following ~:enez An official from the Food and Drug Administration is inspect- ing a food processing plant. Ho f'mda a batch of canned mash- rooms that looks ~icious; heis coneeme& ~out po~iblc o0~- taminaffon with bdtulism, deadly .poison. He ~vinws his options. If this were a heart valve or othex medi- cal devlce facitity, hecould ordar the suspect product embargoed for 20 days. enough time to quest a court order so that the product could be des~oyed or made safe. in the case of food produc~s. there is no embargo authority. [nstcad, if the food processor doesn't cooperate -- and they don't always cooperate -- the lasFcctor's only option is to oh- lain assistance from the state. Although it is odd f~r the fed- eml official to have to rely on state authorities to enforce the Federal Food. "Drug and Cosmetic Act, help from state officials is es~ea- tial to solving the immediate problem ofthecansin theplant(as it wotfld be in a drug or cosmetic facility). But where did those mush- rooms come from? To find out, the inspector has to took at ship- plug records, This wotfld be no proble~ i[,th~ c~lpHt ~vem a p~- scripfion drug. Again, the FDA has no authority to inspect the records of food facilities (or fa- cili fies where cosmodcs and mest medicai devices are produced). What about the mushrooms that have alxcady been dJs~bu~d? In How did we get to this sorry state of affairs? The answer lies in the age of the FDA's current law, enacted more than 50 years ago. the case of a medical device, the agency could rely on its reeall authority. Again, no such luck for foods (or for drugs and cosmet- iesL What about the investigation that follows, to determine whether topunish the r~ponalbl~ A subpoena for relevant docu- menu could be is sued if the inve~- tig~tim were being conducted by almost any otitet agency, inclod- ing the Department of Agricut- tore, EPA. Frc, CPSC, HI:ITSA. O~H_A, or IRS. Again th~ FDA has no subpoenaauthority (exempt in limked ca~es for medical de- On~ the inv~agon pl~to, the FDA mast decide akics ~u~ a~ways aa optk~ bur they are not always What about civil ponaltins? Again,adminis~dve civil penal- ties would bean optlonifthls were a violation of the medical d~vico law, but not for other products regulated by the agency. How did we get to this sorry s~t¢ of affair~?' I~ ¢~d~ .~g, agency that r~g~fa~ p~dUo~ thata~un~ for2$ e~n~ g['ev~ doll~spentin this ~ountr~cm~ up with such weak and t'ncon~istent enforcement authorities? The answer lies in the age of the IDA's current law, which was The agency does not have authorities that would routinely be given to a regulatory agency today. enacted more than 50 years ago. As a result, the agency does not have authorities that would rou- tinely be given to a regulatory agency today. Whom slx:cific is- sues have b~n addressed (such as in the case of.the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 and 1991), the agency's anthorities have beap .updated, ~bt]t unfonunatcly- odly In a pie~et~t~d fashinh. To modernize the FDA's en- forccmeat authorities, Rcp. John Dingall (D-Mich) and I have in- traduced the Food, Drug, Cos- medc, and Device Enforcement Amendments of 1991. The key provisions of those amendments would give theiDA the following authorities: • Embargo of products where theinspector has mason to believe that the pr~uct violal~ the Act, un&r the same circamstances as are now applicable to medical -devices; • Record inspection authority for.food and cosmetics, under the applinab]e to drugs and medical devices; • Recall of products that vioLate the Act where the dofcct prc~ants a significant risk to public hca]th; • Subpoeaa anth~xity compa- ruble to the authority given to other administrative ag~cies; • Authority to anscss ciyil pen- alties for violations of th¢ Act; • Authority to destroy import~ products that ti~eaten the public health; and • Aothority to cony f~eatms when inv~dgating sodoas crimi- nal activity, such a~ dive.ion of ste.roid drug~. ~ Ombiil follows tborccommen; dadons of various commissions that have ~ocendy reviewed the IDA's opcratioos and anthoritics. Iris ¢lo~ly ~ored to a bill that va~ ~ by the FDA and ap- proved by Health and Human S.c.~es Seem~ry Lo~is Sulli- ha~ not yet s'abmitt~d legis- lation or t~em a ~ m iL Pl~o couete.~ Food and Dr~$ Adm&b~raaon An FDA inspector on the job at an ice cream plant. If the inspector Finds a possibly contaminated batch at the plant, the FDA itself Lacks the power to embargo the food. 'q'he inspector's only option," writes Rep. Henry Waxman, "is to obtaht assistance from the state." For many yca~ the Food and Drug Administration has been a wnak agency that has de#lined to enforce the law or toissue regula. tions in a timely manner. Itmade litde sens~ to ta]kabout additional enforcement tools, wl~en the Agency expressed so little inter- ¢st in enforcing d~e basic Laws on Today the FDA has a new Cmnmissionex, Dr.David Kessler, who .~ c~miuod to s~mp~ hw aedbfingingenforcemcntactions easy. And the lack of recaU au- incouttwl~ncomlmnieszefus~to thority and tho authority to tic- comply. But Dr. Kessler is ham- su'oy dangerous, imported prod- pored by cturent law. ucts threatens the public health. The lack of subpoena, em- The, time has come to bdng thc barge, and inspection authorities Food and Drug Administration ~utts in inefficiencies, into the 1990s. The Food, Theageneycantakethaacdon Cosmetic, and D~vkm Eafore~- needed to protect the public memActof1991wooldgoalong health, but only in a round-about way toward achieving that goal way. The |aek of civil penalties Rep. Hemy Wa~man (O-~lif) is means that the agg~x:yis fol~td to ehaim~a of th= health ~r~d t~e en- choo~ between criminal ~ ~'imtwae~t subcommittee of the wh~h ha~ ~urle~ctie~ ev~ ~he T153151435
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The Eating Right Pyramid A Guide to Daily Food Choices and Cheese Vegetable Group " Fats~ OBs, and Sweets Meal, Poultry, Fish Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts Group Fruit Group Bread, Cereal, The Cont'roversy Over the 'Eating Right Pyramid' It May Reflect USDA's Dual Missions: To Back Food Producers And to Promote Public Health Which red,vat agency sho~ b~ ~ponsiblc for cdu~fi~g Amcd~s a~ut ~¢mlc of~et~ h~ of ~¢ on~oin~ co~Uove~y ~lici~d by A~c~c Edw~ M~dig~'s sudden ~- ~I OE ~c'~a~g Right mid," thg d~p~menCs new graphic pf~cnm~on o~ long- s~ding advi~ to help ~c poblic p~an he~y ~cm (~ ~cIc by Se~c~ ~i~ on ~iS subjet a~s ~¢ ~mld all.lays br=ds ~d c~s at i~ ~dc tables and fmi~ in the b~d the n~ow upper ~nd, and fa~ and swc¢~ Jn ~c sm~l b~d wid~ ~pr~en~ numbe~ of MadoB Nestle is professor a~d chair of the Depa~ment ~o~ at New York Unlve~[~, and was managing editor of th~ 1988 "5urg~ General's Repo~ on Nu- triton a~d Health,q a ¢ompreh~n- slve reviaw of resea¢ch [[n~ng diet to ohroql¢ disease da~l~rlX~n~stbr ead~So~xl,group x'~ommendtd by ~S~A since 19~ But un~ c~licr ffaphi~, ~ ~id m~ it c~ ~t ~ di~shouldinclu~ morn ~ings of ~ns, ~i~, ~d ~ ofm~,~p~uc~, fa~, Sho~y ~r c¢~n m~t ~o- ducc~ complained about ~id's a~ea~ ofm~t~d~ f~,Sccm~ Margin pos~o~M publication, sm~g ~at ~ d~i~ w~ un~r ~vicw ~d ncMcd f~cr ~g on e~I&en md l~ w~lf cducm~ ~eso r~ons su~sM ex- pe~ aw~* ofUSDA's ¢xmmlve r~h inv~t in ~ ~m- mid, md fu~ clemn~ for publi- teflon. ~is incident is ~ most r~¢nt in a long histow of conflict be- twin USDA's d~[ missions suppo~ fo~ producem and mote the health of thcpublic.Th~ Continued on'page Why Was Debut of Pyramid Put Off?. Agriculture Secretary Says It Wasn't Thoroughly Tested By Edward Madigan • When the government fails to do iL~ bomcwork, it's time for more learning. When the Agriculture D~patt- meat's proposed "Eating Right Pyramid" is not thoroughly tested for clarity and comprehension among those who would benefit the most -- children and low- income groups ~it's lime In p~l back and rethink. 'D~e development of the Eating Right Pyramid,. the proposed Madigan's question: Will the symbol be understood by • children and low- income groups? iii symbol to represent the now die- tary guidelines, foil short on these counts, and thal?s ~vhy I delayed its publication. The pyramid, as well as other nutritional symbols, is now being retested by a social marketing research C~m ~n Mas- sac~qu~t~. I hope to have results and reeemsaendatioas this winte¢. l.a~t April's po*tpooemont of a revival uutr~onal symhal, r~- placing the popular "fo~l wheel" that has graced the classrooms of America since the 19508, pro- duced art avalanche of news sto- ries that said the Agriculture Dcparm~ent had caved in to oppo- sition from the meat and dai~y industries. • That's simply not tree. My cancer6 is that the government's symbol of good nutrition must be broadly and ~8ily understood. The depart- ment is sFending about $30 bil- lion this year on food programs designed to help people receive the nulrili0n they need. Yet some of the beneficiaries of these pro- grams are u~ng this govemmsnt assistance to buymeals consisting of eopsakes, soda pop, and other snack foods. Why are we not trying to r~ach them'?. Tha Eadng R~ght P~'amid was developed ax the symbol of the government's revised dietary guidelines. The design is not a "new" or "unique" coacopt, ns someeowsaccounts repotted, and in fact slmilntsymboJs have been a~l in thi~ coontty as wall as in Denmark. Sweden, Norway, and Aestralla. 'Tee IYSDA pyre'hid w~ ~ T!53151436
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avoiding excess 2. staying within bounds 4. keeping Your cool 3. taking it easy 5. • • . . rnamtammg control 6. doing the right thing KNOW THE MEANING OF THE WORD. A message from the Disliked Spirits Coun "- cu of the U~ted States Alcohol abuse and underage drinking are problems in America--no one denies that. Everyone wants to see them eliminated. The controversy erupts when we begin to discuss how. Some say the way to fight alcohol abuse• is to ban advertising. Eliminate ads, they reason, and we'll cut consumption. Cut consumption, they say, and we'll curb abuse. Yet, banning advertising as a means of fighting alcohol abuse is misguided policy. First, advertising does not cause one to consume,let alone abuse,alcohol beverages. Second, restrictive measures can actuallybe counterproductive. They divert attention and resources from programs that work. What's more, the alcohol beverage indust~ i~ not the advertising monolith that some would have us believe. Of the $40 billion spent on advertising for all products in 1989, less than 3% was spent on alcohol (far less than what was spent on automobiles, or toiletries, or half a dozen other products). And less than 2/3 of one percent was spent on distilled spirits. At the Distilled Spirits Council, we have a 40-yearhistoty of fighting alcohol abuse. Experience tells us that repressive measures are not an effective means of addressing this problem. One thing that does work in fighting alcohol abuse is education. Tell kids that consumption of alcohol by those under 21 is illegal. Period. Tell adults that if they choose to drink, they must know that alcohol is to be consumed responsibly, in moderation. Tell them that alcohol, like many other products, can be abused. And ['or some people, should never.be consumed. Recent government statistics demonstrate progress in reducing alcohol abuse. But more needs to be done. The answer is not advertising bans. It's education. T153151437
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P~ge~ ROLLC~.t. Food a...~dDm~Ycllc~rgrleFmg "~u~day, September12,,l!~9I ..... " ~ , Nestle: At the Heart ofthe Debate, Should USDA Be Responsible for Educating Americans About the Role of Diet in Health? Continued flmm page 16 COnflict has grown more |ntanse as dict-rehted health problems haye~ifted from those eattsed by nutrient defisienaios m those sugared, wit~ dlet~ and ~ gnvernmer~t poUztcs ~have had ~ f~nd m ~s shi~ Until ~o late 1970s, ~SDA f~ gdid~ oncon~g~ consum- c~ ~ ~t a ~r v~ty of f~ f~m ~ons ~ups ~ avoid an- ~eat de,dean/as. In ~e 1950s, for ex~plc, f~ into s~oys iMi~d ~ar many ~edc~s consum~ die~ ~atwere t~ low in ~ ce~in vi~mius ~ m~er- fls, In r~n~, ~ USDA o~ ~g"B~ic 4," which fi~ ~o m~imum humor and s~¢ of~ly s~gs wi~ uf fo~ f~ ~is guido remfined in uffant until ~ticy~ers r~hz¢d undemu~fion w~ no longer pr~glpal dig~ problem in received poorly by commedlty groups. •Tho USDAiHEW 19g0"Die- tory Guidelines" gently advised Americans to "avold too mneh.fat, aCkl U~,DA's stuff 'thought such starcmenrs urdikeiy to offend a~- deullural producers. Tboy wer~ wrong. Under pressure from the food industry, Congress de- manded revision. Nevertheless, the Guidelines have survived with few changes through the 1985 and 1990 editions, largaly heeaoso their sei- ant/fie basis remains unchal- lenged. • When the National Academy of Sciences released its 1982 re- pen on Diet and Cancer, f~ producers and the USDA oh- jeered to the report's research rOYJeW and recommendadous to reduce fat to 30pc/cent of calories and to decrease consumption of high-fat meats. These controversies prompted USDA's staff to devalop a new food guidance system based on [he Dietary GuidHines that would spselfy serving s~izea for each Protests by meat and egg producers led McGovern's committee in the mid-'70s to reword its warnings. food group. In I984, the Agricul- ture Depar~mant presented this system in a wheel format for use by the Red Cross. Banause thewhe~lproved d/f/i- cult fqr consumers to uuderslmld, thn USDA initiated a three-year research effort to identify a better format, and used the text alone in a 1988publication and in the 1990 Dietary Guidelines. The research ferred the Pyramid over many other designs. The Pyramid graphic and its supp~m~a~ brochtw~ were reviewed, cleared, and finally sent to the I:nlnter in Pcbramy 1991, but withdrawn in April. At last report, the department has issued a new and far more expensive e~ntmet to re-test altar- native designs on children and low-income adults. Whether this research will support the Pyramid, or result in a design morn aneeptahle to meat producers remains to be Since 1862, theUSDA's prlncl- pal mandate Ms been to ensure a sufficient and reliable food sup- ply. The 1977 Farm Bill desig- noted it the lead federal agency for a wldo nmge of food-related ac- tivities. Language in n 1988 House'Approprladens Commit- tee r~pcrt added d/elm7 guidance to USDA's lead agency responsi- bilities. It is time to re-evaluate this language aa well as USDA's con- fllstlng mandates. The House, G'oveamment Operations ~x~om- mittee on human resources and intergavernmenral relations, ckalred by Rap. Ted Weiss NY), is investigating allegations that commodity groups pressured USDA to kill the Pyramid. This investigation deserves support. It provides an opportunity to consider as well whather con fliers of interest impair USDA's ability to regnlata meat and poultry lahel- ipg and inspections, and whether the department's nutrition func, lions should be transferred to a morn indoFendant agency such as HHS. At stske here is thehealth of the American public, a matter of no litdeimportance during this arra of rising health care cosl& US. Instead, conditions rolateA to h o n don--suches°oro dis s ne eaoce ,dia- Madigan: Beneficiaries of Food Assistance betas, and other chronic diseases -- were now leading causes of death and disability. In the mid-1970s, a Senate committee chaired by George MeGovsm (D-SD) noted links between such diseases and diets high in fat, saturated fat, choles- terol, salt, mad sugar, but low in fiber. Cholesterol is found only in m~al and daky foods, which are sources of most saturated fat. Therefore, in tiroposing Dicliny Goals for disease prevention, McGovem's committee recom- mended that Amerieaos reduce fat to 3O pemeut orless of caiodes by esdng more fruits, vegetables, and grains, but less meat, eggs, and other foods high in fat and cholesterol. Prbtests by meat and egg ducers led the commltt~ to place the recommendation, "re- dune consumption of meat," with this euphemism: "choose meats, poaiwy, and fish which will re- dace satttrated fat in~.ke." Because the Dietary Goals were based on substantial search evidence, they were not easily dismissed, and indeed, they remain consistent with current di¢lary advice, Political pressures, however, con~ued: • In 1980, in response Io com- plain~ from tl~ meal. dab-y, and eggindeslries,USDA sul~essed "Food" in its rtrst publi~ti~ to address diet and chronic disease It ended plans to print "Food lI,"a guide to reducing dletary fat. audit ~lld not mpdnt an anr.ompa- nylng consumer leafleL These publications displayed the froit, veg~able, and ear,rat, groups above d~ meat. dairy groups and format, and the guide •s advice to "~ur d~wn oa fatty ,~eat~" were Weren't Even Asked What They Thought Of the Proposed New USDA Dietary Symbol Continued from page 16 mended in its "Daily Food Guide." The guidelines were is- sued last November hy the De- parrmants of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. These are the key guidelines: Eat a variety of foods; use sugars only in moderation; and choose a diet low in fat, satoraLed fat, and cholesterol. Written by nutri- tional specialists using the latest seianee, the dietary guidelines offer excellent nntrifional advice. When I was sworn into office as the nation's 24th Secretary of Agdcdiluro in Ma~ch, the prepa- rations for the"EatingRight Pyra;- mid" were w~ll under way. When I baname aware of the pyramld in mid-April, I investigated and found that the testing prneess was flawed. I then-said, "Hold it." Unlike p~ople in Ethiopia or Bangladesh, citizens of the United States do not suffer clini- ca/malnutrition or hanger, how- ever, becausz some Americans do not practice good dletaff habits, their health suffers. Studies tell us that the beneficiaries of our fed- eml food a~ismace programs are among ~e p~pls whose health is most at risk as a result of poor dietary habits. Despite this fact, beneficiaries of food aesistenee pxBgrams w~e not included in the original test groups that evaluated thepyramid symbol That aleno is a gtxxl jus- tification for eeading the food pyramid symbol bank for more testng and review. We must be nertaia oar message is ~eachiag the men, women, and childeen most in t~..~d ~f this ia~Chom And f~r tl~ fwst fia~ revis~1 tests will include sessions with children and iow-incom e adults in various geographic regions. Whatever symbol is rocom~ mended by these tests, I want to ensure that it is understood by those most atfisk, andthatit halps them ta make more informed die- tacy chtieas. Good nutrition can make a dif- ference in a youngster's class- room poffnrmanea -- the diffor- encobetweea passing and failing, For 18 years, i served on the House, Energy and Commerce Committee, ten of them as the ranking Republican on that .panel's health and the environ- meat subcommittee.During those yearsI spent many houtslistening and questioning nutrition experts, teachers, and employment eenn- selors. My £armer colleagues and I developed some excellent legis- lation on this issue, and, in font. last yearl co-sponsored, with the panel's chairman, Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Call0, the Nutrition Labeling Act p a s,',',',',',',',',~ d by Congress and signed by President Bush. My experience with rmtrition issues tells me that a symbol for gtaxlnnMtion that is broadly and easily understood can have a powerful effect on the lives of consnmers. It is cerlainly crucial to the Agricaitur~ Dcpanmeat because our food aasismace programs, withafisea11991 budget of nearly $'29..5 billion, toneh the lives of ov~ 55 million Amoriean~ of all Good di~L,y t~bita also can belp bold down tlm emt of other aml Medicaid. far extol. Imv¢ been a focus o fRep. Waxman and myself. With these programs now costing $114 billion and $51 bil- lion, respectively, we need to consider any ranter -- such as using an understandable food symbol -- that can contribute to wellness and reduce the need for federal spending. These kinds of budget impacts underscore the need to make. cer- tain our dietary information is easily understood and captures 'When I became aware of the pyramid in" mid-April, I investigated and found that the testing process was flawed. I then said, "Hold it." attention. Clearly, a new nutri- tional symbol that helps the die- tar/ guidelines to enter public awareness is important for long- term public health poBcy. The fitestorm OVer the Eating Right Pyramld brought on a great deal o f ~ficism. F~Jr enough. But let's cleat up one poine The current nutrition dobatois not about the dietery guidelines. They are ootat issue. Nobody is urging that they be changed, not cv~n the dairy or meat iadoswy. The new ~idallnes agreed m last year by HH$ andI.~DA have my full anpport. S~cr~u'y of H~kh ~ H~man Sea'vlces Louis Sullivan and I have con- ferred many times about nutrition questions. Is it worth our time to make sure thatthe new symbolis wall-tested and effect/re with a very broad range of Americans, not just the wol~ educated? You bet it is. Once a sew symbol is selected, whether it is the pyramid or some other illus~xation, it will remain in the public eye for years. A recent poll disclosed how much work we have to do. The Gallop organization,in a nutrition poll ordered, by the Wheat Foods Council, found that about half of those questioned did not consider white bread a wheat produsL It is. About the same number of people surveyed thought oatmeal was a wheat product. It isn't. There was another interesting finding: Respondents who tended most closely to follow the 1956 dietary guidelines also tended to have the highest awareness of the new 1990 guidelines. Those ra- spondents ianin~ed: femaies, re- spondants living in the North Central region of the United States and college graduates. Put anothar way, that means we are missing huge segments of tl~ US population. Clearly, we must do better. Selection of a symbol torel~r~- sent the new dietary guidelines is critical to efforts to promote good nutrition. It represents a key e~ meat in my plans to do what I can as Secretary of Agriculture to en- courage good nutrition hy bet.ping An',Cricans make bettor choices •bout t.hei~ dices. Bat if that symbol ian't broadly by all, d~ca it missea the mask. TI53151438
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s.~oo3 "H Jalad-- ":I~)H]~t,II6 V ~liVIAI og lilt II:IH I:igOL
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Page20 ROLLCALL F~eclandl3x-ugPolicy BHeFmg "l~hur-~day, Seplembe~22,1991 it's Time to Rewrite t,he Laws That Regulate Pesticides in Our Food, Says Sen. Kennedy New Standards Should Apply to Pesticides Already in Use; Estimates Are That 90% Of Dietary Cancer Risk Comes From Pesticides With 'Residue Limits Set Decades Ago By Sen, Edward Kennedy • '~ ~! :'~'."~ "~'Y For many years, the federal governmant ,'" h~s notbeen adequately meeting itsmspon- sibility to prevent harmful levels o£ pcsti- l~i~on allowable concen~fio~ of~- cid~ in f~. But EPA h~ o~n f~I~ ~ in scltlng ~limi~. Routine monit~ng mctho~ cannot detect many residu~ which may pos~ h~l~ fi~; ~ a ~sulL c~tic~ regulato~ d~isions a~oftcn made on ~c b~is of inad~qua~ info~afion. ~e Iong-s~din~ "zer~6sk" s~d~d o[ Se D~l~cy claus~ h~ prov~ unwork- able under sophis6~t~ scien6fic niques capable o[ me~ng im~nit~im~ ~idou levels. The ~o~ ~gimc is a~ plagued by I~pholas ~at ~it ~a- g¢~ous chemi~ls ~ mmaln on ~c m~kct b~anse ofva~cost-~ncfit a~ys~ that unde~ut lh¢ goal nf prot~ting public h~l~. In addition, pr~ for d~gcmus p~6cid~ ~m t~ m~ket be- cause of h~lth fis~ ~cunwieldy ~d Wpi- c~ly involv~ y~s of bureaucra~c delay. As long ago as 1976,thcScna~Judici~y subcommitt~ on a~fiuis~ve pmcti~e and pr~¢du~ is~ a re~ de~ling inad~ua~ h~Ith ~d s~c~ ~ba~ for pes~cid~s. ~i[t~n y~s later, serious doub~ confin~ ~ ~ which ~s6cid~ ~e and which ~ noL T~ li~le info~a6on is av~lablc on hun~c~ of ~ficid~ r~idu~ found in f~ ~at may ~ ~iangans or toxins. F~lli~ dc~ ~ know ~at ~e on their ~b~ i~ ~e.~e public h~ a fight m say ~ cbemic~ maoufact~¢ts, ~e f~ indus.,and ~cgovcmmcnL "If you don't ~ow what ~e ~ ofa ~6~id~ ~. find ~u~.if ~ 6~ ~c unac~p~bl~, p~uct off $~ ~nd~$cc~t ~stem, ~is s~ple~d ~nsible pr~u~on ls not ~ing ~co I~g~ n~ ~id~. ~vc ~ lcg~la~oa, ~c S~ety of Pes6¢id~ ~ F~ Act of 19~1" (S. H~. ~42), ~o m~ long eye.an fo~s ~ fcd~ ~gu~fiom Und~ $~ bi~, ~idu~ ~ ~w or ~ f~ ~n~ ~ l~v~ ~t con- ~n mo~ ~ a "~g~g~I~ ~ of ad- v~ h~ ¢ff~. ~1 ~ides wit ~ ~ apply ~ ~s~d~ ~dy in c~ ~k ~m~ f~m ~c~ ~ out- ~ ~id~ limi~ set d~d~ ~o. y~, ~ ~ ~o~ ~lays ~nt sys~mis~tit ~idee for e~p~o~w~y~ ~ ~v~'s~m~ plwto by US Depor~en~ of AsricMlur¢ A crop dusting plane sprays insecticide over a field nf peas in the Skagit Valley of Washington. Sen. Edward Kennedy is among the-many Members who want regulations on the use of chemicals on food updated. 1973anggestedthatthlsposticideposeda Ifth¢IxOposedrefosmsh.adbeeninplaccin long.runint~restsoffann~rs, thefoodin- cancer risk, but nosing was d~me. The the 1950s, they would have requited a dus~'y, and chemical mannfacto~rs. Con- issue festered for years, and exploded in 1989, when the Natm'al Resoum~ Defense Councllpubllshed data revealingEPA esti- mates that Alar residue levels in apple products on the market posed cancer risks 45 times g~e~tei .t~an safe levels; d~ risk was highest for ch~ld~n, whom average The regulatory regime is plagued by Ioophol .es that permit dangerous chemicals to remain on the market because of vague cost- benefit analyses. apple consumption was ten times higher than a4~t co~mmpdon. EPA said that k would take years m tma the l~sticide, bat co~smnex ptes:mres fo~d manff~-mr=~ ~ withdraw ~ fe~=l v, ac~log was sk~ng m tbejob. much moreinfosmed and timely gviev~ of .Mar ri~ and the sub~ancc could have been quicldy tskea off the marke~. Another pcovision of the bill establishes a "child~n's slandard" to ensure infants and child~n up to tbe age of five are not expo~:l to more than a negligible risk fi'om pe.sdcide~, Because of thd~r metabolism, patterns of food consumption, low bodyweight, and scnsitivetissae and o~gan development children can rccdve a d~pro- ponionam sha~re el cancer risks from I~Sd- cides. The bill will prevent this f~oht-e.nd l~ading in ~h¢ early childhood ye~s. According to the American Academy of Pedls~fics, mo~t carcinogens have la~mcy pcfied~ of up m20 ycarsbefoeethe ons=of dlseas~. A child with a tile expectancy ~?0 ),~ has many more years of risk from la~¢nt h~.~u'ds than an o,duR, and m~'~ risk factors am added each year. s~ndard" ia ordcx to p~veat exposing in- fan~s and ~ to wh~ k c~lls poc~n6al "dine bombs" ht the food ~p~y. Food is ant Italy mfe ualees it is safe for cl~kkut sumers no longer accept assorances of "lrust us" from indusWl or govemmanL Widespread skepticism about food safety will continue to increase, untilrcal- istic and enforceable procedures arc est~b- fish¢~ to dctesmine thatpesticldcs are sate, or that they should be eemovod ~om tho One provision of the bill. establishes a 'children's standard," to ensure that infants are not exposed to more than a negligible risk. marke~ ffthey po~ morn than a negligible rlsk to heakb.. Determinations of ri~ mint be based upon s~und ~cience, no~ anecdote or cmo-. tioo. 3~e need for reform is obvk~ and is many years ovex~e. Sen. Ted Kennedy (O-Ma.~ k cha&'maa of T!53151440
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12 10 8 6 4 U.S. tte~l~ Care gxpendituws As A Percent of GNP 0 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 "If every element of the health care system were as constant a percentage of GNP aspbarmaceuticals, the health care share • Would not be ramping up." Gerald J. Mossinghoff " President's Report ~o the AnnualMeeting Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association April 199.1 Pharmaceutical ksianufacturers sociation 1100 Fifteenth Street, N.W., V,~shington, D.C. 20005 RX /DRUGS T15315144-1
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Page22 ROLL CALL Fnedan~DrugPaltcyBrleilng Thur~day~$*:ptembet L2,2991 Away With Deceitful Food Labels ATough .New Nutrition Labeling and Education Act Was Finally Passed Last Year. But it Will Be 1993 Before the FDA Can Radically Change What Consumers Read On Supermarket Shelves. Until. Then, Be Wary of 'Lean, Light, Less, and Lower.' By Sen. Howard Metzenbanm If you've spent any time push- ing a supermarket shopping cart rein tly, yea'robe.an sul:~ted t o sbolv~ in cv~ ~d¢ Ha mclinw m~mg~ hare j~t d~i~l up~ d~i~l of ceil Light! ~l ~gherl Fresher! F*wer[ Ha Cho~terol[ High Fiber[ Low CM! ~ 1980s wim~ss~d an in- cr~ing int*r~st ia hml~ ~d nuuition issues on ~ pm of wi~ an iR~asibin ~d cvcr- es~la~ng m~kc~ng s~tegy an • ~ pm of th~ f~d indns~ app~ to ~os~ As a msul~ we got only p~ of thc story. Food manufacturers told us what ~cy wanted as know, not what w~ n¢eded to Aided and abetmd ~y ~ g~- tor-busin~s, good-for-yoo phi- insop~y of t~c R~g~-Bush • c food Inbcl ~cam¢ sion of a food company's adver- tislng c~pM~ -- a m~kcdng t~l. ~¢ F~ ~d ~g A~ini- s~atioa ~ ch~ged wi~ pro~b ing ~c public h~ ~ cns~ng co.mac ~unmbRity -- w~t weak-kneed und¢r a political l~dc~hip wi~ fi~le v~inn even l~s vigoL ~*n ~* ~and-sa~rs decid~ t~t nuMfico s¢lls,~disoa Av f~ was t~ fat, no snack too ~lty, no ca~o t~ ~ws ~latlng f~d m~kev log w*~ pash~ to ~ l~it ~d ated unfettered by consuain~ sach~ f¢deml regulation, or ~van ~¢ ~$, for ~at matter, T~ing ~ sell a high-fat ing oil~ No p~blem. Slap a "No Cholesmrol" laM1 ~ it. N*ver mind ~O fact ~t it'S l~dM with ~e~-cloggMg ~tm~d fat. Look~g for ~ edge in snack f~ b~ess? Sprite a litde oat b~ in~ yo~ mix ~d you've gor a p~uct ~t preven~ ~ wh~c you ~y a ~r ~d a If ~s love ~g~ b~t ¢~. but it ~ p~n~, jmt a~ a ~p of a~l~ j~ ~ it's "Natty Sw~- S~y mup? R~ve a p~, ~y ~? Sli~ ~ ~r~d ~o~"~t ~"~c During the 1980s, Sen. Metzanbaum writes, "the food label became an ~xtensinn of a fund company's advertising anmpaignY Madison Avenue simply responded to "the trendsetters [who] decided that nutrition sells." Above, a grocery store display of a good-for-you cereal. is just one of the many gamts played by food companies in der to pre.s~nt their products as "NC" -- NuMtiooally CormcL For example., a package of hot dogs might proudly Ix~ast the sin- gun "90 Pedant Fa, t Free" by The next leap will be to extend these same regulations to meat and poultry products, regulated by the Department of Agriculture. II w~ighL That claim i~ at once fac- tually ace~Jate and ~3amefully R doe~t't ~ ~, imwever, ties you me eating come directly from fat. Without a calculator, you can blow your diet for the entire week before, hmchtime on Tuc,.~day. Another urea contlibuting to all this confusion is your food's ".~.rving size:' Today, each.com- pany decides for itself the appro- priat~ portion of their product that you should eaL Invariably, that amount will Ix~ nowh~,c near the amount you ~r~ hoogt~ for, nor even close to the po~on you will For instance, how about that froz¢n ~ pie that is paclmgod with a full color photo of a huge, mooth-walerlng slice of a la mode? "Ihe box claims "only 21 calo- rics per serving." U~forttmately. Calorie." R~ad the fine print on the buck of the can, however, a~d you'll find that every soda'i~ meant to be shared--a ~inglo can equals ~wo settings. Following this logic, a food manufacturer can transform stan- dard dessert cheesecake into a "lit#' che~ccake simply by rc- duclng the size of the sliver they "suggest" you be s¢rved, Strang~ things have bapl~ned -- one name bland company of- feted a "light" che~s~cak~ thut was higher in fat than its regular cheesecake. Tbo company fended its chim by pointing out that tl~ "light" ch~secake was ligbt¢r, ludted--ligh~r~ oo]or. Is it realistic to bdtievo that any of this will fandam~tully chafe anytime soon'?. The answer, t~an~uILv, is yes, Today. with a t~g~ ~w l~w timt t~uds to anfor¢~. The Nutrition Labeling and Educadrm Act (NLEA), passed after mor~ than a de~adc of attempts, will insd- tateswe*plng changes in the con- tent: m~l, format of today's fo~d label When thn lastr~guhfionimpla,- mcntingNLEAis wriUanin 1993. consumers will wimess the trans- formation of the food label from a hylxd-up handbilltoa useful text- book on nutrition. HLEA will provide an ~a'ts wef to consumers' most basin questions: "What are we getting? How many calories? How much fat? What kind of fat'? How much salt.'? And sugar? How much chol~mmI? What kind of vitamins, and promin, and fibe~" Thes~ ~e falr questions that desexve straightforward answ~s, and this now law will provide them. Moreover, FDA will soon bo dovoinping def'mitioas for the meaningless terms and #mmiuky slogans so popular with food markcturs today. We'll know what "lean" really me~s. We'll shed some light on "lira,." Whan a product is pitched as "high fiber," it must m~t a stsn- dard set by t heFDA. "No Choles- terol" claims will bo banned for fcgxts high in saturated faL Some order will bo re.storM m the gro- cery shelve. With cardiovascular disease and cancer our nado~'s two top l~fllers, thisright-to-know lcglsla- lion will help save thousands of lives, and save hilHonsin health- care costs. There will b~ no fund- ing required by the federal gov- ornmant, and the cost to consum- ers is estimated at only about a dime for every $100 worth of grocafiea. Sound too good tol~ true'?. It is, The job is far from finished. The Nutrition Labaling and Edecat/on Act is only a good first step. Its ~gularioas will apply • only to paokagudo processed foods under the jurisdiction of FDA. The next leap will bo to extend thcsa same principl~ to m~t and poultry ixoducts, r~gu- Trying to sell a high-fat cooking oil? Slap a '.No Cholesterol' label on it. Salty soup? Remove a pinch, and now it's 'Reduced Sodium.' Fatty fries? Slice them thinner and label them 'Lean." luted by ti~ Eh~mmeat ~£Agd- fat ia the ~et of flte~ av~m,ge Ti53151442
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WHAT'S WRONG WITH PLACING A WARNING MESSAGE AT THE END OF EVERY BEER AD ON TV, RADIO AND IN PRINT? Everything--if you really care about stoppin alcehel abuse. proposals to require warning messages in all types of beer, wine and liquor advertising would not only fail to meet their sponsors' stated objectives, they would also cause harm in a variety of ways. Here's why: The warnings under consideration provide no new information. Telling people that d~ey • shouldn't drink and operate machinery, or that they shouldn't drilak when pregnant hardly breaks new ground. The warnings simply repeat common knowledge. Mandated warnings would likely prove to be unconstitutional since they" provide no • public benefit. Repeating well-known warnings will not curb alcohol abuse -- the stated goal of the legislation. Forcing advertisers to change their ads would devalue the ad---and provide a disincentive • to advertise at all. Who'll pay for that? The millions of people who enjoy watching spdrts and other program~ supported by our ad dollars. Brand advertising is the wrong vehicle to attach such wernings, since advertising doesn't ,~ affect abuse in th~ first place. The Department of Health ;rod Human Services, the Federal Trade Commission, and independent researchers have concluded that alcohol advertising affects brand preference, not consumption or abuse. The public believes there are other, more effective ways to curb abuse. A June 1990 ~ nationwide Roper poll found that the public thinks ad warnings would be the least effective of several ways to fight alcohol abuse. At the top of the list were education through schools and ~mily, and law enforcement. Our years of experience tell us that education is the most effective way to prevent abuse, and that's where we've focused our resources. Our educational programs, in conjunction with others managed by government and private organizations, are having a dramatic and positive impact. The improvement regarding drunk driving, for example, is eye-opening. In the 1980s the number of drunk drivers involved in fatal accidents decreased by 13 percent; of all fatal crashes during that time, the proportion of those involving drunk drivers decreased by 20 percenr~ These are red, tangible results. America's brewers will continue to support programs that produce results. Indeed, no other industry does as much to prevent the abuse of its products than ours. We urge Congress to take a long, close look at ~e likdy results of mandating warning messages in ads, ~s proposed by S. 664 and H.R. 1443, before moving further on bills that do not address real solutions. BEER INSTITUTE T!53151443
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Metzenbaum :P,redic ts Problems Wi,th ,Getting the Ag Department To Adopt Similar Food Labeling Conthued hum ptge 22 ing in continuing ctmfesionin the $ageofthcNntrithmLabelingand W~fleexwndMg the provisions of NLEA to the meat and poultry industriea is absolutely c~sen tint, it is by no means a fail aucompli. Theconflietsaxe readily appaxent. The D~pax~ment of Agriculture i~ nn~ a public hea[fl~ ~gtn~y, it is an egency non,cruet -~ith the he.adS and the well being nf th, American agTioultme indus- The agriculture community has long re.lied on the department to protect its long-term economic interests -- ,'rod much o[" the in- dustry views mandatory nutrition labeling as running counter m thos~ interests. The Department of Agriculture recently published some pro- posed regulations for meat and poultry labeling that were roandly criticized by conanmer and health organizations. In a number of crucial axons, these proposed rules t'Ml far short of the standards set up under thn NLEA. Under USDA's plan, serving sizes would end up in portions smaller than those commonly consumed,and would makeoom- parisuns of meat and non-meat products imimssible, In addition, many nutrition claims would re- ceive definitions different than those developed by FDA, result- markntphce.. Two aeparate sets of rules which apply to the same basic circumstances will he of little or no use to consumers. Any systole that wilt make some sense out of the~ha~ o[th~ .~tu~q~u0mu~t be a on?form ~yalem. Tha'~ should Unaer U$O~A~s plan, serving sizes would end up in portions smaller than those commonly consumed and would make comparisons of meat and non-meat products impossible. be unc set of rules,and evcrybedy playing by them. It looks like a tough road to g~t there, but I'm optimistic. Ournew Agriculture Secretary, Ed Madi- dan, has a long history o£ ]eader- shiponhealthiasues.ln[act,then. Rep. Madlgan (R-fil) teamed up last year with my co-author, Rep. Henry Woxman (D-CaliD, and clesred the way for House pas- Education Act. r m hopeful that meat andpoul- try prnduncrs will come around to the view that was eventually adopted by the processed food industry during consideration of NLEA -- that a no-nonsense, meaningful.food hbel with the kind ol~nformation that ann~mn* ers ax~ demanding is go~I for busla~ss. I am under no illusions:. tion labeling reform could not have been poasihlo without the cooperation and eventual support of the fo~xt industry. In the end, grocery mannfaaturers came the conclusion that things had gotten a little out o[" hand and helped us draw up the boundaries within which they must now comp~te. If legislation is necessary to extend NLEA to meat products, and ! am convinced it will be, would welcome the participation of the meat and p~ultry producers in that process. Livestock producers should know that nutrition labeling won't drive them out of buslaess, or turn the majority of Americam to to(u. We unders~aod that no foodis a perfect food -=- but we need more information then we're getting Abuve~ rows of breakfast cereals packaged to tempt children ~ and adults. Sen. Metzenbaum notes that current regulations allow food companies to add just a drop of apple juice to a sugary cereal, and label it "Naturally Sweetened:' now if we want to know when to with all the information available enjoy a thick stea~:, and when to to help us prevent preventable balance out our meals with lower disease, and tomakous a healthier fat alternatives, nation. How, in good conscience, It Is time that we ann ourselves can wc do anything less? Motorized Scooters Electric Breast & Wheelchairs Pumps & Patient Walkers - crutches Lifts Hospital Beds Ostomy & Commodes Incontinent Needs - Traction & Supplies Equipment Diabetic Glucose Orthopedic Fittings Monitoring & Appliances Equipment FAX 202/543-6276 326 East Capitol St., Washington, DC TI53151444
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We're : ncerned about the abuse, of our products. w.e do g. s'omething about Know When To Say When__ i,_. BACCHUS ~ . . [e~, ,~t Anheuser-Buschwe, like any This nationwide consun~er educatioo and !,~i' BACCHUS i~ the kind ofgrass roots program [~ /~ responsible manufacturer, are awareness campaign began ir~ 1983 and is !~ we support to encottrag¢ responsible drink- [~ ~ concerned by the abuse of de~igned to encourage responsible ¢on- I!;~ ingoncollegecampuses.lnthemomthan I~, -£- ~. our products. . sumption of beer. A seres ofprime time t~ 500 BACCHUS chapters nationwide therds [~~': The wast majority of the 80 rail- television commercials and other promo- ~';? plain talk between students of legal age tional materials reminds consumers not to ~',~ who choose to drink Their goal is to de- |~ lion Americans who enjoy beer do overindulge, and provides suggestnms ~ ~ velop responsible drinking habits, as well ~i~2 SO responsibly. But those few who to bartenders and hosts on responsible se~- ~-'~ as respect for state laws and campus poli- ~ing."KnowWhenToSayWhen" {,~ ~.¢, cies. BACCHUS is proving that ~ abuse it can have an impact far ~1 ~'~, ha~ allowed us to apply our ~,; /~'X when it comes to responsible I~ beyond their numbers. An irfipact ~+'~,t~+'~'~'~.marRetingexpertiseand !~/~lr/'~r,.'~"~', d,imng, studenucanm+me }~ that reflects on us as a company, orl ~8~.c'~'~l~]ff" re~ponsibiltytoabroarl ~.~.~(.[7~q~']~fi' marion w,~te~,~CCnUS 1~4~ our products and employees, and ,~,la'/~:' crnss section of the american ~\~..'%.~/1~3" oftheU.'S.,lnc. P.O.Box ~..~ on the much larger populadon of ,_-,__..~_=, ~ ....... ~ responsible beer drinkers. ...................................................................... ~~'+' ' grams we've created, or help spon- 'Family Talk About Drinkir~g_ .~. Alert Ca~ ~ so~; to lessen that impact. Thlsprogramfeaturesaseriesofirdorma. [~ This program offers a freo or mduced-priced y~ The absolute s01ution to the tiveguidesWritteninconjunctionwith ~ taxi~dehomet~qustomersintavemsorms- ~ abuse ofalcohol isr~t on this page. prominent authorities on children, family [,.~ taurants who have chosen not to drive after ~.~ That's a challenge our~society as a counseling, and alcohol research. ]~ drinking. Alert Cab is no substitute for safe tt ' e vervt i tz ~ and responsible drinking but it can add a k~ whole has before it. We must all The~utdescov re _. hn=fromthe , . , ' effectsofpeerpressureandrecognlzing ~ gt'eaterm~atgmofsafetyforthesecustome~ I~ continue to take the problem seri- and othe~ m the teenagedrinkingproblemstodrinkingand [~. ~,_~ ." [~ ously, asparent.s, hosts, friendsand drivingandthecommunityresources ~ /~ _,~ ~commumty. available to you and your kids. For copies, ~t~ . a'~ -~.~*,,~ ~ CitiZ~DS. ~!~~~~ respotlsibflRy. The arlclent craft we practice is designed to produce a beverage of friendship, refreshment and moderation. We brew beer to be enioyed responsibly.. If you have comments or sug- ~ . gestions, please let us hear from you. And please rake a few moments to ~ This program is designed to educate coi~- see ffyou can play a role in any of through sponsorship of the q'm Driving" ~ sumers about alcohol me in an easy-to- program~ing"is promoted with ~{ understand, entertaining format. A virtu ~ the programs mentioned here We~d counter cards, tabletents, buttonsand other .:- starring "LA Law's~ MichaelTucker and Jill g~ welcome your helg educational materials. This program is not a ~. Eikenberry takes the viewer through the offers a sensible opt'ran in pote~atial dnmk ~g Ataheuser-Bnsch h.~ developed this pto- .~l:ff,~,. driving s i tuat ions. ~- gram m the belief that educatton t~ the best .,~ ~ tool available to encourage responsible con- ~-,~a~g~6,~, -:-:-' sumptionandreduceabuse'YourAIcohol I~?,' spons--'-"lOly i ~ :, lne. ~¢r~ware.m~ and Education, One Ti53151445
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Agriculture Chairman de ]a Gnrza writes that fish and seafood, "ironically, the source of most food.borne disease outbreaks in the UMled States," are not anhject to mandalory inspecllon. The current USDA practh:e o£ inspecting meat and poultry "by sight and ~nell" misses such contamlnants as salmonega. Pesticides May Harm Food Supply, But Real ,Problem Is Meat, Fish, and Poultry Inspection By Rep.Kika de la Garza AgancyhasproposeduSlnganeg- feature that'aired, based on /z Our nadon's pesticide regula- velztion are foouscd on critical Hurdlyamonthgoesbywithout ligib]¢ risksmndardio de.term/u- wlde]y publ[clzed report on taryprogramsneedtobecontinw points in Eood processing wher~ a major slot7 appearing in the print or electxonin news media questioning the safety of ~ome aspect of our food supply. It's ironic that while much of the rest of the world fimply wants to put anoogh food on the table, Americans w0rt7 that the foods they enjoy may b~ ha~-daas their health. Most knowledgeable experts tell us that the US food supply is among the safest is the world. But the public, r~acdng to the razh of recant food r~ety "scares," is skepdcal of ~s a.~.~tio~ Is oar food supply gan~'al]y safe? l..¢~k at all the dam and rescue, oh, and the answer is Do federal programs to assure food safety n~.d improvement? 0 f course. TI~ uoublo is that our priorities sometimes get mis- placed as we attempt zo do so. Public perception of food safety problemsJs a driving in much of the earre~t toed safety d~bate. Instead of ~dng a scie~- dt'w-~ly ~oood aI~ to proving food ~ffcty, government spon~ most of its time reacting to the "scorn~ of the men.at. This f~l[ Congress is set to refom~ M~¢~ of tho de~ will ~ely c~tor on.the ing if a IX~sdclde is"safe" in food us~. If the :risk of an individual contracting cancex from a pesti- cide is greater than one in a mil- lion, the agnncy would question th~ pcstlclda's safety. It'simportant to r~membcr that this kind of risk assessmem sumes regular consumption of the product over a lifetime (for chronic effect*) and that thoI~sti- cide is use~ at the maximum lowable rate on the product. Some pesticides can cause can- cot. That is not a debatable point, What is debatableishow great are the risks of caac¢r or other health problems from pcsdcid~ rcsldu~s and how that risk compares with other food safety pz~blems. In recent testimony befora tlm health and th~ environment sub- committcc of the Energy ,and Commerce Coromitt~o former US Surgeon Genesal C. Everett Keep stated that ~while people die from bacteria.caused food poisoning each yeax, therois ~o scientific cvidcooe showing that tcfido~s £rom tl~ lawful plicafion of pesticidcs to food havoevarcausedillness Ye~ despit~ ~e clearly high= risk ~o poblic health from bacterla Reme~Ix~ tic l~bIic h~ in I~ owrAlar, ~cbe.~eal th~ Alar'scanccr-causlngdsk to chil- dren, created a panic among par- ents and school dish'icts around the countzy. Many consumers stopped buying apple products. Alar's health risk was the sub- j¢ct of confidnrable debate within the scientific community. The chnmical was eventually pulled offthe market, but not because of Despite the clearly higher risk to public health from bacteria on foods, the public believes that pesticides are a bigger problem. ii a govorameot d¢cisi~ l~sed on the most up-lo-datc scientific data available~ The withdrawaI cameb¢cau~ a well funded, coordinm~d media blit~ fan~d pu~o hy~m~a Ixought ahalt to tl~ ~lc ofappl¢~ and apple p~xiucts. It's not die wi~h'awal oE Alar from the marl~t that both~ roe. Wh~t is ol'eoncetn. ~hough, is thc the ct~tthility of "An~r~ ally monitored. Changes and improvement* should I~ made to re~ect our ~r~t level of scien- tific ~owl~g~ But let's not mis~¢ p~fici~ rcg~to~ refo~ ~ ~e soludon to ~c ~ f~ ~f*ty problems we face.That's proci~ly what Dr. K~p is ~g a~uL ~blic ~rcep~on alan ~vos ~o~cr fo~ ~cty issuo o~cn in ~e news ~ m~t ~d panl~ im~don. C~endy, US ~t 0f Agriculture ~SDA) m~t ~d hmvfly on in~don ~y fight ~d smell) of mcff~fl ~s at ~g pl~ for whol~ F~d ~fety ~pem, howmer, qum* for ~g m~iolo#. ~ view ~ su~ ~ ~o s~ by ~ Nafi~fl A~y of Sci~ ~AS). ~h~ N~ smdi~s ~cind~ ~m a ~1 ~int ~C~) m~ ~ ~ ~fing ~ contamination is likely to occur. USDA's Food Safn~ and specdan Service (FSIS) is cvflu. afing ~ kind ofpro~ for u~ at m~t ~d ~ul~ pt~esfing pl~. Cl~ly, impmvemcn~ of th~ natron can and should ~ made in ~ in~ecdon pro- Finflly, and most ironic~ly, th~ semen of most f~-~me e~c outbra~s in the United Smt~ -- ~ -- is not even sub~ct to m~tow im~cti~. Ac~rding to ~c ~n~ for ~nsib]* fox 18 outb~ of f~-~m* ~s¢~ for ~v~ b~- lion pounds consumed. This c~p~ wi~ 1.1 ou~r~ ~r billion poun~ consumed for ~ ~d 0.7 o~th~s ~r bil- l~n ~an~ for Mef ~ on ~m for 1982 ~ 1987). A~cordMg to ~ Fo~ ~d Drag Admin~doa, n~rly ~ of sh*~sh. us ~t a ~t~ ~ ~- ~~~lmly~ T153151446
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Let's Act to Bolster ,FDA's Authority to Speed Approval of Life-Saving I)rugs, Writes Hatch By S~m Orrl~ llaleh When people = sick, they want trmt- mellL When discoveries ~ rnadc to t~eat ~ncss, penplo want those discoveries to move ~ the Iahomto~y m the market- place in the fasles~ f~hlon -- as long tbe~, are ~t~ end ~rh¢ ros~areh~, .~VdRpmenk proval of new dro~m~ American f~alth,¢are, erie that aft=to all of us. During thepast tea 7e~rs~I have partici- pant in ~¢ enactment of important con- sumer legislation m get new dr~gs mar- keted quickly and safely. One such law is the Orphan Dmg.Azt of 1983, which provides incentives for development of drags to ~eat rare,but oftcn devastating, diseases. FDA's Orphan Drugs Development Program, which was created by this legislation, l~s, m d~t~, awm-dedorphan drug 55 of which have received final FDA mar- SimiLarly, in O~tober 1988, the agency NewFDAC~mmlsSionerDavidKesslcr lifetimes to test efficacy of ccrmin thorn- adopted a new reguint$on (commonly m- h~recenflystreamlinedreviews ofcc~n pies. And, finally, there should be fcrredmasthe"Bushlnitiative;fortho cancerdmgsbyan~ngthmughsumeofthe hancedlab~lingrcquircvaenlssothateon- pivotalrointhen Vice President Bush played in its devclopmeaO designed to speed thn clinical testing ofpromlsing drags for serf ous or IL~threatanlag ind~ati~us. ~o ~rogmn allows ~ apomoes m re, celv~ intons;.v¢ FDA e~nstti~.~.on -- beginning at: the pre-dintcal Stage and throughout the re.st o[ the drug develop- ment process -- on how critical data needed for theapprOval o f their drugs could be gathered in the shortest lime. Since its inception, mum than lP drugs have been earmarked to benefit from this program. bureancrefic review.But morccan be done. While I am not yet ready to abandon the standard of safety a~l efficacy ixlor to marketing pharmaneotieal produced, we can Set somt, parametists ~d a]Ibv¢ ocr~n etltic~lty ill patient~ to get drugs quicker, FDA should Closely monitor drags ap pruved OXl~litiously end withdraw Ifiem if quastio~ of safety arise, Many can't walt ten ye~¢s for new therapios.No other coun- uy has a proeeas that takes this long. In addition. FDA must set surrogate endpolnts so that we do not have m walt sumers~cognize they am taking drugs that are approved expeditloesly and, will ~..qui~ grcata¢ lx~stmarkedng surveil- lance. Such use~re~orliag wilt aliowI~A to monitor potelto~al pr~ms. Those ~forms, done e~ther legislatively or administ~tively, m~t go froward. must, for cxmnple, dmng¢ the reviowlxoc- ess so that it is more compatible with emerging scientific developments, s~ch as biotcchnology, and utilize new clinicaland laboratory methed~ to assess drugs' ca~y more qvSckly. ketlng approvaL In 1984,anotherpiccc oflcgislatJonI co- For the g.rowth of your business, the authored, the Drag Irdce Competition and prosperity of you r bosiness, there Patent Term Restoration Act~ was sig~ext into law. Th~ law established a new way is on more powerfid tool than the forapprovlngeost-compctltivev~sionsof telecommunications network. standard therapies. Both of the afommcn- tionedlawsa~wcllusothermcasureshave And at G'I'E. Ihcre isnothing vague helped to foster advances in medical set- about tim pnwcrwe put into your hands eace and We broadened access to a wide array of new treatments for thcmostscrlous ~ when we design that network for you. For uric of the nation's leading retailers, we are now implementing one of the largest satellite-based private dala and video networks in the worid. A network like no other because it was creatcd to power the success strategies o fthat company alone. The power era personalized tele- commnnications network. We've given it to others. We can give it it) you. Becaus~ at GTE, the power is on. We can set some new parameters and allow certain ¢rftically ill- patients to get drugs more quickly .... Many can't wait ten years for new therapies. I II I I health risks affecting our nation. Thekeyston¢ to the govemment'spmin the drug d~logment, however, is FDA's mlo in the approval process. The agency's role is m deac.tmlne when there is ad~tuate e~ddenee that a drag is safe and and at that point approve it Many belie'~e our emzent system is too slow in reviewing eSl:~eially drugs for llfe-thrcat~alag dis- cas~s, and some of ~e tests required too long and &lay completion of the clini- cal trials. Howcver, PDA~ under.ken beldini~ tiativas to spe~d the letting, review, and availability ofpmmlsingtrcalmants.Many belicvethatFDA has sufficient anthority to czpedito approval; however, I am ready and willing to amftleglslation to guarantee tl~ anthodty. Them forms al FDA are focused on dmg~ •fora wido array olserioes andlife-thrcaten. • lag illnesses such as cancer, AIDS, and heart Ctsesse. And they have aL,~ly pro- dated ~ome da~nalic For example, in 1987,FDA instituted the IND Irealment lm~am, wldeh allows lxe- drags. Shoe then. FDA In~ granted 20 tr~tment ]NDs that have ailowed tens of thousmds of ~inm (sm'f=ing from di~ eus~ ~ach as cancel, A/DS, Paddnsoa's T!53151447
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Sdect From Our Lunch Monday-Frida~ 11:30-2:30 Dinner Private Available Patent Protectio, n OurVigomus Pharmaceuticals Industry Is a Big -With ,Foreign Count¢ies Stealing Their Inventions, US Companies Need Help. By Sen. Dennis DeConcini Over the last few years, we have heard time and again how one Amcriesnindast~ after another has mllnquishod its global lead to a t'omign competitor. But .d~,sphc th~ ~al~sandimmease costs ot'reseamhanddevelupmant pr~ct, the r~sea~h~based pharmaesuti~ col indusRy in the United Staw.s remains a competitive fo~ in the world market. It leads tho world in pharmaceutical sales and maintains a positive balance of wade. In fact, approximately43.8 p~mcntofthe phaxmaceu~/cal indusffy's total sales axe abroad, and the D~anment of Commerce estimates that the indashS, will enjoy a trade su~ins in 1991 of $1.23 billion. The costs that a drug company incurs in "bringing a single drug from a labomteq, iast tub6 t~ Food and Drag Adminiswation approval are staggcrlng, Phazma.canfical companies spend a higher pemantag¢ of sales oarese,'~ch and development than any • other high-technology indosl~,. A re~nt study.conducted through Tufts Un~vemity estimated that the.avcr~gn cost ofa ne~ drug is npproximate.ly $231 mil~ion.. It c6mmonly t~es ten to 12 years to rasea~h, tsst,~and d~i'alop'aphax/nacau- d.cal product before it lands on th~ drag- store shelves. Such an investment requires some assur- indus,, piracy, especially Asia. "." , I~: ,cl~d, ~ number of couna%shi those reg!ons have laws and policiesthat actually ea~dufa, ge thn Copying of p~an~acantical tnyeh~oos ~thout comp~nsatln~ the in- ventor. Pfiz~ hc., a US pharmaceutical firm, became a victim in Argentina. Before Pfi~:er ever received the Argentine government's authority to seltF¢ldeoe, its iimovadve and-axthrids drug, an Argentin- A 1988 ITC report estimate¢~ that ten US pharmaceuffc. ~l companies h~ lost nearly $2 billio~ to" trademark piracy. inn ~ompeiltor h~1 ill~gally cupi~ the prOducL Within a year, 14 A~gential~', l~ate copius co~tmlled two-thi~ ofthemarket for the anti-atthrltls drag. Pa~fof w/despecadiatmational]~racy of US pha~maceulicais ,was offered in a 1988 report by the [ntcmatioan[ Trade Commission, which estlmged that the tea surveyed US plu~a~ceudcal compalcs had lost nearly $'2 billion to patent and Toe Uoitod Stmes is a ~iganto=7 of inter- national treaties protecting intdlectutt ~ such ~ pharnmcan6cal peten~ fot'ccabk: mlaimem stantia~ B~eg~ t upon in~ tmaperty pro- tetgim, heg~a to view GATr, th~ weald- wide Genera! Agreement on TIh-iffs and Trade, as a renan for obtaining interna- tional intellectual Inopcrly proration. On their own and throogh their allies in Congress, the pharmaceutical companies b~gn~ to, ~/#: the US government ~ a~- ' tempt to~h~I~d~int~ffectt~.prolgr[y~n~ e Un~uay RonnflrO f OA~£T negoffatloas~ By Septemly.r 1986 their persisten¢~pald divl- dends, andintellectaalpmpeay was plac~ on the Ureguay agenda undsr the tide of Trade Related intellectual Property nego- tiations Although Coug~ss re, cendy granted the AdminisWatioa two moroyeaxs toncgotlate an agreement in the Uruguay Round, the talks have l~en stalled since last Decem- ber. The cur~nt discussion draft contains sevaxal provisions inimical to the interests ofhhe US phannacentlca/indosuy, and the International treaties lack enforceable standards to guard drug patent prevailing sentiment among Americ~qns to whom the intellectual property issue is important, is that no TRIPs agreement is preferable to a TRI~s agreement that pro- vides ~,eak protection. Pessimism over TPdPs is growing. Be- fore the A~g~ff~ecasst O~a[~: Mos~ing- hell, pr~ident of the Phurmacantical Manufantaxe~s Association, testified be- fore Congress that his group did not aTgIPs agrcementh~cansesom¢ countries such as lndia and Brazil axo ex~ente.d in bc intransigent on any agn~mant'that would set a high level of Rr. otectiono With such bI~k prospects, tha phatma- cectical indash'y will need to raly on bilat- eral and nnilateml messums tu combat pi- racy. Certain provisions in our trade laws authorize US measures to eliminate unfair foreign h'ado pracilees that impede corn- morea here. Most notable is Section 301 of the 1974 Trade Act, as amended by th~ 1988 Omni- bus Trade Act, which reqo/r~s ~he Uni¢cd States Trade Representative (USTR) to identify counuies that do nut ad~qualely protect US intellectual lxoperty rights and ialdate investigations of thes= coan~es for possible retallato~ measures. Recently, the Pharmaceutical Manufac- turers Assoc/adan petitioned Ihe USTR undsr Section 301 to initiat~ aa investiga- tion of the government of Thaibnd's fall- urn tu provide effective patent prutectinn. Section 301, in fact, may prow to 1~ the only effective alternative [or the United States to combat pharmaceutical patent ph'acy ahrosd. Thephaxmacantical induswis on¢ofthe few in theUS to ~njoy a wade su.,~l us ov~ the last few years, l=Iowever, becaus~ the enormous research and development costs for creating a n~w drag stand in stark con- 1:ast to therdadvely low ~ ofdevduping duplicate chugs, this indasay has proven to Ix: highly suscep6bl¢ to piracy -- a piracy cocotraged by many foreign govemmems. To prutect cer aa~onsl economic in~'- ests, the UaitedS~ates most mkethe lesdin of the pate~t~, eep,~ht~ ~nd ~ ef the ~udi~ Cemmlttee. TI53151448
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Restricting Tobacco Advertising ,and Promotion Would Cut US Health Care Costs, Says Synar TI53151449
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l~e3a ROLLCALL Feed~ndDru~P~lic't'Brlefing Thursday, Septemb~X2,1~t The FDA Cracks, ,Down ,on Misleading Food= Labels: What Do "Fresh,' 'Fat-Free' Mean? By David Kess]er Hate's how one cartoonist views suparmarkct shelves: Standing in front of vacant shalves, the grocery clark ob- serves, "We decided to ramona only tho~ p~du~ts with mlslead- in anothaz caxlom~ by Gary Larsco, an abviously IZuicky ant- eater asks the waitress, "Are the Dr. Davld Kessler is ¢ommls- red unts fresh off the hill?" ~ intogrity o[ tha food label r~sts on one fundam ea~l concept: that theinformarion it provid~ be ~uthfuLlfconsumcrsarenot to be misled, food labels mu~ provide correct information, That is a basleprcmi~of~d~F~od, Drug anti C~netic Ant. Naturally, the food indastry wants toeapRalizaon thogrowing r~ognition that tha food people eat avary ~lay can hays n real between diatand health,ns longns they do m pm~dy. ~¢ ~sul~ of a R~r poll, ~blish~ in Jam 1989, show~ ~t 52 ~t o[ con~m¢~ ~x- ~h¢ ~ f~d la~l for inlets- do.about an~fion ~ marc ~ Yet ~e f~ l~bel has ~n ssi~ u~n by soma ~ ~ ve~cla for expre~ing ~ff~y -- and [ don't m~ ~sfic~fivity--at C~oico" orange juice, snd other products, including Ragu's "Fr~h Ilallan" pusm anuca) raised the broader question about whethcr tha words on tha food la~l have any meaning. It be- came _a ]/~nus test of FDA's re- solve where f~ ]~ab~Is are con- in tha CtTrusHtl[ casa, theFood and Drug Administration re- ceived a court injunction to sciza tha juice product in tha ware- dons, P~ctor & Gamble, which manufactures Cin't~ Hill prod- ucts, is allowed to use up its ~ist- ing supply of labals b¢fore print- ing haw ones. Thus, for another month or so, consumers will still se~ tha "Fresh Choice" labels in Some h~v¢ dmllengad thean andons on thebns~ thzt no oneis harmed by being fooled into thinking that omnga juice from canceat~te is fresh julca. I dis- sloner of the Fond and Drag Ad- impact on their long.term well- The false use of the word honse~ before it was shipped to agree fundamentally with those m|nlstmt~on. This arttde Is adapted from a speech to the Center for being. And food manufacturers "fresh" (in the well-publicized grncery store shelves, who take thatposidon. Science ln the Public lnteresL shouldbeabletodrawonthalink case of Citrus Hill's "Fresh (Notethat underFDAr~gula- Continuedonpage32 More Health Warnings for Alcoholic Beverages Thurmond Wants Advertisingto Carry Admbnitions Similar to Those on Bottles and Cans By Sen. Strom Thurmond The recent evants that left for- mcr jockey Bill Shoemaker para- lyzed and put bns~bsil slat Lcnny Dykstm in the hospital have once again focused tha nation's atten- tion on our number-one drug problem -- alcohol abuse. Alcohalis themost widely use~ and abused drug in this country today -- especially among young people, even though it is illegal for youths under the age of 21 to purchase alcoholic beverages in all 50 stales and the Distrlct of Co- lumbia. All too often, alcohol is an unmentioned factor in tha equa- tion ofdmg abu~in Amarlca.Yet tha facts dcmoustrnto that alcohol and its attandant problems ara a major concern for us all. Each year, more than I00,000 Americans did from preventabin, alcohol.related nansen. Aim ost 50 percent of all automobile crashes in this country involve alcohol, and alcohol-related family prob- lems strike ona of avery four American homes. Even mere dishcarteaing, ap proximately 40,000 babies are bern each year suffering from alcohol-misted health problems, including Fetal Alcohol Syn- drama, arFAS. FAS is ooa of tha top three known cause~ of bkth defects with accompanying man- tal retardation, and it is the only ona of the thxen which is cndrely preventsbla. Alcohol use among minors is also a significant problem. Stud- ins show that the use of alcohol be£m¢ tha age of 15 i.s one of tha predictors of later heavy alcohol and drag use, and that the average • age at which Amaricuns now take thclr first alcohollc drink is 13o By the llme high school stu- percent of them hays used alcohol at least cacao and 71 percunt repa,a. having lxw.,n intoxleated. Tha Ixoblem do~ not diminish atth¢ anlloge level, lqearly a half- million collage studants drink" Set). SU'om Thurm~,'~d (R-SC] is a m~L~bet' ef ~ L~>~r ahd Htmmn Photo courte~ Bureau ~f Alcohol, Tobacco, and F~,~orrm An agent of the US Treasury's Bureau of Alcohol, Tebacco, and Firearms inspects a liquor store. Sen. Strata Thurmn~d is calllng for more government action to ameliorate "ou~ number-one drug problem -- alcohol abuse," which he says claims 100,000 lives a year. avary day, and collega studants sl~nd about $4,2 billion dollars yearly for alcoholic bevcragas. Litde wonder that alcohol con- sumption is one of the leading canses of death among young adults. CouplM with .the truly aston- ishing prevalence of alcohui usa and abusa by both adults and minors is an appalling lack of knowledge about the effects of alcohol. Many Amarieans lank even a basic knowkdgc of the possible health and safety conse- quancea of drinking. Thc~ ~ma Ameaieans, how- near,are wellawar~ of the numea'- ous alcoholic b~v~,ag~s availabla at tha comer llqa~r store. Lik~ the ~t of u~, they are enustamly bombarded with advertisements tenting tha virm~ ofvarions alan- helle baverages and strongly imply~g that to Imv¢ fun. yon have to drinl~ Alcohol advertising remah~ most Americans have access.The alcoholic beverage industry spends over $2~illian a year en- couraging A,mcrlean consumars to purchas~ their produats, with many of the ads @e~ifically mr- gating young Amaricans. Alcohol ads paint a glsmorous and seduetlva picture of drinking, Ads link alcohol with 'happiness, success, sexual prowess, athletic ability' in an attempt to appear to young Americans. linking it with im~clsely those at- m'lmms.--~ success, sex- ual pruwcsa, stld~ic abitity -- that yoang ad~l~ fired de~rab~- It is ccru6~y ironic il~ ti~se ar~ holabusaean dlminish or destroy. National health policy laode*s have long been calling for roans- urea to balance the one-sided pic- tare presented by alcohol advar- tieing. Tha National Commissiun on Drug-Frea Schools' final ~ port, published in 1990, tannin- mended that Congress require addidansi health and safety mes- sages on alcoholpreduets and ad- -vcrtisemar.ts. '1~ 1988 Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving recommended the inclusion of hmlth yearning messagas in all alcohol advertising, and former • Surgean General. C. Evar~tt Keep suggested that alcohol ads ba matched with an equal number of health and safety messages. Surgeon General Dr. Antonia Handle has ma~ the prevention of aleobol abuse oo~ o~ the key- stones in her camp~gn for Imbli¢ On March 14, 1991, I intro- duced legislation (S. 664) that would requ'tre alcohalle beverage advartisemeats to carry health warning messages. The bill pro- vides for five romtlng health messages, which would be in- chided in all alcoholic beverage advertisements and i~romodonal dispinys in both print and broad- cast h~edin. The measure also provides for the establishment of toll-free tele- phone numbers which would pro- vide information on drinking-re- lated problems. The Aleoholin Baver~gc Ad- vatlising Actor 1991 buildson the foundation of the alcohol warning label legislation 1 authored in 1988. That bill, now a law, re- quires that all alcohalin bevaraga containers can3, health warning labels. Tha health messages required by the advcrtlslng legislation are very similax to those appearing on the beverage containers. Thay provide information on tha pos- sible consequences of drinking during pregnancy; impaired abil- ity to dries or oparate machinery under theinfloenca ofaleohui; tha .possibility of interactions with othar drags; the possibility of becoming addicted to alcohol; and a reminder to consumers that it is illagal for persons who are under 21 t~ purchase alcoholic beverages. This measure is both necessary and long overdue, and public opinion supports this conclusion. In survey aftar sur~ey -- some sponsored by alcohol industry and advarlising publications -- tbe majority of Americans polled farmed health m~angea in alan- hal advertising. The pablie de- saP~es the facts, and thay are not being provided by the alcohol in- destry. The ad~artlsing warnings do not crest~ any legal res~cti~m or peaalty to a~x~ who do oat bead tbem. They metrJy caution con- sumers that use of the product may eatsJ.l se~ic~J~ cons~u~cea Th~ l~',~slatioa i~ aimed at mati~t to ti~ lmbli¢, not at ~ni- TI,53151450
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I AMERI CAN WORKE R A Roll Call Policy Briefing on Key Issues Involving Labor, Benefits, and the Workplace to be Published Monday, Oct. 14 Advertising reservation deadline is Tuesday, Oct. 8. Please call Karen Whitman, ad director, for information, at 202/289-4900. T!53151451
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Pa~e32 ROI$.. CALL ~-oed and Dr~gPo~dcyBriefi~g Thm~day, September~.,19~l ,Kessler Wants the FDA to Pro,mote the Use Of,Food Labels to ,Improve Nation's Health Continued from page30 Thet;DA m estbe c~edlbie in all its areas of respons~ility and expertise. If the public suspects that the FDA is not enfbrcing the laws governing the food label, why should the publiu f¢¢1 maS~ sur~ w~ea~ t~a~ s~n~ ~ ~ no ris~ Perhaps the most importsnt reason for acting .against "flesh and "no cholest~rnl" claims in- volves a longer-range goal; IDA intends to foster the availability of nseful information about the products we regulate. But unless and until we can sb Junco the curt'cat din of mixed messages in the. supermarket, there is little hope of turning things around. We are making progress. FDA has informed many firms of its concern about "fresh" claims ua the.h" prncessed food labels. To dale, every company receiving FDAletters on the use of the word "fresh" has agreed to conect its food labels. In response to our concern about misleading claims of "no cholesterol" on their food label, all the companies that have re- ceived a rcgulatm7 totter have agraed to fix the problem. The FDA has sb.rlous ~escrva- tioasahoutan increasingly preva- lent form of food labeling: the dezlaration that a product is peseent fat-free." " We fecl that this kind of label- ing can be misleading, in much the same way Ihat "no choles- tctoV' is misleading. A high number-- 90. 93, or even 97 pement -- linked with a desirable characteristic such as "t~at fr~" ~ leads people to coa- cl~da that the.fooditselfVcomotes good I~alth and that they can eat as much of it as they want. The nation's supermarkats contain many foods rcprescn=d as, say, 93 percent fat free-- when the,~ f~ods are, in fact, not low-fat products. We believe that this kind of assertion confusus and misleads consumer. Foods that &five a high pe.rceatage of their calories .from fat should not be making low-fat claims. The food industry should face the fact that most "pe.rcant fat fro*" claims, as they arccm'mntiy lh-~ented,am oothing mare than a marketing gimmick. Krah-Ganernl Foods ily apln~o~'hod the FDA to ex- lXess its opl~sitin~ to '~¢rcant fat free" labeling claims. The lX~y has informed as chat it will discontinue this type of claim on itsKraftline of food ptodnc~. It is importa~ that the rest Of D2~ food indaam/also dsop ~ chims fi'om the labet. Of cooke, labeling is only a n~.,,ceti~g. A~I wh~lc the ~gul~ ~ ~be~g. ~eod ad- v~ ~a~es ~ ~ j~'~- In tim Citrus Hill case, lhe ~A got a cau~ ~uncfion to ~ize ~ pr~iming ~r~ Choice' (above). Some have cha~enged ~e FDA's actions on the basis that uo one ~ h~m~ by being f~led into thinking that orange juice from ~neen~ate is Rmh or~ge juice. ~q d~ee f~- men~lly with thee ~ho ~ke that p~iflon," ~ites Commi~ioner K~sler. branch agency, theFMeral Trade Commission. FTC Chairman Janet St~iger and I sharu a commitment to pro- tent consumers from d~eption in both the advertising and Ia~llng of f~xl. Although thereare somediffer- encas l~tween advertising and qabeling, both agcucies intand to work cluscly to I~eVant dceepdon in food marketing. My sufff informs me that the FTC staff is akesdy invastigaling pe~centsge fat-fzee claims in ad- vmising, and that the FTCis also concerned about the prulifcmtion of unqualified pemeatsgo claims on high-fat foods. My vision for food ]ab~g in this count.,y extends we.ll beyond enforcement.. Wc have an enormous opportunity to affect the public health. Enforceangnt is merdy ti~ necessary first step. " If we are to make the food label truly nseful, we must rastom pub- the informatlon it contains. I know that many Am~ican ~- sum¢~ f~l thvy n~d to stay cnv la fact, I ~ Ix~a ~ai~d by I~vc bm~.M to ~ F~A tha food label. Consumers care • deeply about the food label, and they feel manipulated by recant label claims. The cause of better nuuidon in America will be se~od beat can keep four goals squarely ha- fureus. • First, the food label must be revise2. W'i'th charact~stic pub- lie health foresight, Secmta~, of Food descriptors such as 'light' require ¢le~rer deffnitior~s. Sometlraes, ~e worn merely describes the color of the product. Health and Haman Services Louis Sullivan two years ago asked the FDA to andc~ake a comprehensive ruview of the nation's f~xl ~ Dr. po:~m~l the resales of thls ]a~ view s]igl"~y mo~ ghana or maior lx, epo~ thaage:s in ~ FDA was well along with this task last fall when Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Edacatlon Act of 1990. Congress mandated a series of fairly "tlght" deadlines for implementing rega- latioas, andwearohard at work to meet them. • Secondly, the format nf the nutrition psual mnstborevamped. Out goal is to make the informa- tion on the label clear and usnfnl, so that the American consumer can make informed choices. For example, our own coesumer re- searuh shows that consumers want some kind of bemchmalk on the label to help them pat togethex • a healthful diet. Before I mlved at the I~DA, I u~l the nutrition panel only to track my intake of calories. I did oat-caw/aroondin my head the prescribed daily nllonation of such macro-nutrient~ as .fat, pro- lain, carhohydratus, and sodinm. I simply did not know tMt I should ctmsume no more than "/5 grams of fat -- or 2,400 milligrmas of sodium--daily. And I don't believe that the avexage American voasumer knows any met~ turn I dld about ~d ~e~po~:=t~ ia a heathy Unless cm.~rmera have a fixed refercacapoint, Iholinveit willbe impassible for them to decipher the information on the nutrldoo label Therefore, the revised food label should provide not only the amount pe~ serving of these moore-constituents, but also some benchmarks as well which should set a kind of target for the maxbnum amount of fat, sodium, saturated fat, and so on, that should be oonsumed daily. ~ Six food eampanies have al- ready valanteea'ed to help FDA improvetheuutrifionlabel format by agrcelng to pilot test various presentations on their labels. ThoSe pilot tests will measure what works in the only forum that matt*m -- the marketplace itself. • Our ~ goal: Food descrip- tors such as "light" require clearer definitions. Several common words are now being used in un- common ways to describe food products. The word "light" with its various spellings, also has been assigned a variety of meanings. $omedmas"light" denotes fewer calories; sometimes it refers to less fat; occasionally, it describes the color of a product. Precisely defining these key words represents a tough ehal- leege. The FDA's food labeling ialdadve will establish clear and usefdl definitions for food de- • Our foarth goal: the FDA should do everything within its power to promote u.~ of the food label to improve the collective diet--and wlthit thehealth --of the entire nation. IfI have emphasized the impor- tsnce of removing misleading information from the food label, do not conclude that I favor a blank label. If an eolighmned or ianovstlve food manufacturer develops a product that conmlns slgnifi- anntiy less fat, that mannfacm~r should be allowed to feature that information on the product's la- beL Thar~ must be an "incentive for indasuy to develop new food products. Iintend to support the avallabil- ity of valid label cla/ms for prmi- acts that are significantly im- provad -- just as I will upposu claims that ar~ little mor~ than marketing ploys. Likewise, "I would expe~t to support straight comparison claims for e.xis~g pro~c~. To earn ti~ support oflhe agency, such claims would have to be h'uthful- and they would have to t¢11 the whole sto~. Today, as the Science of antri- ~n cuatianes to map the Oomplex interac~ons b~tween diet and health, the food label that you see on the shelves of our nation's gores can~ a special responsi- hes~h of ~caus ~ great. "I'ac timt gm food lahal etmtdlmtos to a T!53151452
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,.Legislative action '~ hnperaflve for two reasons," says Sam Richard Lugar, the ranking member of the Agriculture Committee."First, Americans should never have Io~wonder about the safety of their I'ued, And second, Amer can farmera should never have to suffer random marketplace Io~ses due to consumer nncertalnty about the safety of the {ood they produce." In the photo above, herbicide is applied to cropland in Plymouth Count.y, Iowa. Take a Reasonable Approach Toward Changes In Food Safety Legisiation, Urges Sen. Lugar By Sen. Richard Lugar Fued safety has been a topic of debate fur ~msuy years. Although ~he driving forces • "scum to change from year to year, the fun-~ damentallc#sladveproblem_~vhich frame the discussions havS'~¢maiued consmat. Having pmticipated in the debut* since 1977, ! find it reasonable to conclude that most of the current concerns about safety stem from inadequa~iosin thotwo pdumry federal stam~ea on the subject-- die Fed- eml Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodcoti- cide Act (FIFRA) and the Federal Fucd, Drug, and Cosmetic Act CFFDCA). . The fundamental issues can be identified as l) replacement of the "zero risk" De- fancy claus~ of the FFDCA, 2) the role of rlsk/benefit balancing in determining safety,3) increasedanthorky for the federal government to remove unsafe products from tbe marke~luc¢, and 4) th~ impor- mace of nationally tmiform smada.,ds of While it is difficult to predict the out- corn e of the impending legislative magl e, lt is clear that the result must satisfy iacreas- ing consumer demand for assurances that th~ fond sopply is safe aeco~ding te modern sclentifio smadavds. Anyone who doubts the irnpo~lance of crafting lagislafivo solutions which quately address cor~umer concerns should recall the Aisr and Chilean grape episodes of~989. These two oventspoignandy illus- trate the frngil¢ antu~¢ of consumer canfi- deuce as well as the role of public pc~ep- lion. While the scientific validity of both of tbese episodes remains a matter of deb~ among scieea~s and a mat~ of opinion Sen. Nch~rd Lug~r (R,-~d) is member ,el ",Ae ~zj~::uiture. Nutd6e~ m,,d Feisty serried through constructive legislative changes. Ccng~should take apprnpdate and meoaur~ ac~iou soon. All technical couccms aside, action is imperative for two reasons: ~irst, Ameri- cans should neverhavc towonder about the safety of their food. Andsecoud,Ametican farmers should never have toanffcr random marketplacelosses due to consumer uncer- tainty about the safety of the food they produce. Significant progress was made toward a cafer food supply when Congress pusscd xeform~ to FIFRA in 1988. Most notabla was the requirement that some 600 ix~fi- clde active ingredients be rcevalanted for mfcly using modem scientLfic standards. Whit~ this measure was an important and nccessmy undctaaking, it ha~, iror~ically, created an even greater need to make fur- 'Pesticides are used because they provide the benefit of allowing other less desirable risks to be avoided,' such as food shortages and much higher prices. thor r~fom~s to food safety laws. Puem'bly the most serious problem involves th~ crea- tion of a uegligibla risk standard to replace tic antiquated, zero-xisk Dclaney clause. The Dclaney clause doea not permit the ¢s~b "h&hment o£ a resido¢ tolerance for pesticides used on ixocessed food if the pond& is l~owa to bo care~genie. The ~rict b~n ~ ~e~ of the level use ou mw agricultural products using a "reasonable risk" standard and an under- standing of the pesticides' economic bene- fits. The risk-only stundard of the Delaney cinuse is incousistcm with the risk/benefit ~mndard of FI'FRA, as well as othc.r FFDCA provisions. In addition, attompLs to reach soasibla decisions despite the strictaess of the clause, have led to various complicated exceptions to the prohibition. Thos~ cxcep- finns have probably contributed to some p~t decllaes in consumer confidcaeein the safety of the fond supply. TheNadoanl Academy of Scieaces con- eluded in 1987 that the inconsistent dards that the Dclaney clause has engen- dered may actually increase the net risk~to public health and racommende.d employ-. lag the asme risks~andard to bothproceased and mw foods. The Academy further racommended the establishment of that standard at a negllble I~vel such as one in a million. Suchracom- mondationa a~e sound and should be achievable, £stablishing a common negligible risk level will also help open tbe markelplacu to new pesticides which may be much safer than older peadoidcs bu~ which cannot approved andor the cun~at zero-rL.~k stun- dmd. Such a situation is made worse by the fact that ol&r pe~cid~ which were li- censed atadmewhen ~xicolnglcsi studies and risk assessment were less sophlsticated remain on the market today. Rc~gistration of the (~0 older peatlcldu active ingredients will mquirn increased and sts~tmlinedauthority toremov¢ un~.f¢ lXoducts from commode. As.acientffic L~rafiou program, it wRt be almost ingon the severity of the risk, suspension o f the regiswadou may be necessary. In either case, the authority to talc such acdons ai~e~r~ to be cumbcrsume and therefore of limited regulatory value.Failm'e to amend these authorities willlikcly mean faiIuro of the eatirc re-~egistmfion effort as resources will gradually shift from re-cvaluatlng to litigating. Pesticide cancellation suthor~ty should, at u minimum, ho s~eamlined by replacing the resource- and tlme-consuming hedging with a simple ruin-maklng process that peamlls ample opportunity for public com- ment and interaction. Quite poss~ly the must damaging reve- lation of the Alar episode was that even Quite possibly the most ~lamaging revelation of the Alar episode was that even when regulatory action is warranted, it may take up'to elght years to remov~ a dangerous pesticide. when rogulaloey action is warranted, it may tak~ up to clght yc.~s to r~movc a danger- oaspesdclde.Faiinrntoimprovcsuchiuef- fective authodty wlti. limber erode con- sumer con.qdencoin tlm govecnment's abLI- ity to ensar~ a safe food supply. $ospemion authority noxls to be im- proved as well A cas*inpointis that of div pesti¢id~ Ditms~ which w~ ~ duc to n Idghl~v~l of concert about serinus Ti53151453
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The :D eb=ate Over Passive Sine:king Although the Dangers Are Proven, the Tobacco Lobby Contin.ues to=Dispute The Evidence, Writes Rep..Durbin., Author of the Airline Smoking Ban By Rep. Richard Durbin In 1964 a landmark mpurt was poblished by then Surgeon Gen- erai LutherTc¢Wofficially recog- nizing that cigarette smoking causes cancer and other seHans diseases. Although this conclusion was in Washington ~ooffed. The dence was inad~uato~ they CUed. Today. :dtlmugh the evidence has continued to mco~[ and the anmb~" of tobacco-rciated deaths can now be quantified at more than 400,000 per year, tobacco's supponats continue m hide their heads in the sand and deny tobacco's culpability in tang can- ear and other deaths. With this histoq, in mind, it cornea as no surprise that the to~ bacon lndust~ also disputes the hazards of environmental tobacco smoke. Knowledge of secondhand smoke's dangers had been grow- ing for many yeats be[ere Sur- geon General C. Everett Keep issued his landmark report in 1986. It presented the compelling evldeoc~ based on 13 separate studies, ~at passive or invohin- ts~y smoking is a cause of cagccr and other diseases in nonsmokers. Although So Surgeon Geaeml oared that them was a minfive abundance of dam to back this conclusion, again the tobacco lobbyists scoffed, While the Sur- geon Geaaral'sjob is to try to limit ti~ damage to public health, thu tobacco lobby conducts damage control of another sort -- to try to protect the image of an indusli'7 whose product is now a recog- nized killer. The tobacco lndust~r's flu'st appmanh to damage contrnl is to downpiny the evidence. They point to their own carefully se- lected studi~ to "show" that is an ¢onclation between passive Data from "11 different studies concluded that passive smoking causes 53,000 deaths per year in the US. smoking and disease. But objec- tive scientists with no ax to grind have repeatedly rejected the indus~"s claims, and live morn years of evidence have only strengthened the eonclnsinn that passive smoking kills. Among those who have firmed the Surgeon General's findings are the National s~arch Coun£d and the Eaviron- i~ the evidence the te~ lobby is ~ anwllfia~ toanc~p~? Hercarc • Seine 3,700 aon~,sokhtg Plwto courte.~ Library of ~onsress The proverbial smoke-filled room, above, in a photo taken in the 1940s. If Rep, Dorbin has his way, it will be a thing of the past. While tlie ban on smoking on domestic airline flighLs is working well, he says, greater regulation is necessary to protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke in public spaces. Separation by "a mere three-feet aisle" is inadequate. Americans die of lung cancer evew year due m involuntary smoking. • Sccondlmnd smoke also con- tributes In deaths from other causes.The most recent and cem- prcheasive a~mpt to quantify the death tog, based on the data from il diffc~nt studies, concluded that passive smoking causes 53,000 deaths per year in the United Smt~s, including 37,0¢0 deaths due to heart disease. This meahs that breathing sec- ondhand smoke is the third lead- ing preveambln cause of death in the United $~ates today, bahlnd acllve smoking and alcohol • in addition to lung cancar and heart disease, pussies smoking is associated with an increased like- lihood of cervical and other can- cars, as welt as emphysema. It also cause.s ailments such as an- gina and chronic bronchitis. • Children of parents who smoke have an increased f~e- queacy of chronic car infections, asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and othar raspirato~ illnesses and infections. In addition to the short-term effects, these condi- tions can cau.~ long-term dam- age. As they g~w old,r, childran of smokers also demonstrate other s~gns of long-term harm such as lower mt~s of lnng lane- lion and cextala risk factors for heart disease. • At least 43 carcinogenic cbemicals are prasent in second- hand smoke. In fact, sscendband somke conlalns a hig~.~- quantity or ammco~ carben monoxide. nico~ne, l~nzcna, and several by th~ smoker. The tobacco indus~'y's second line of defense is to suggest that the risks of passive smoking, if any, arc small. But the seicntis~ respond that the risks far exceed thos~ of other haza~ls that have be~:n regniated far morn suicdy than tobacco. Any other product that kilis so many hystsnders wonl~[ be stricted. Any oth~r drng with such severe side effects would be banned or dis~bntod only with a pre~ription. Faced with these facts, the tobacco lobby is now engaged in a last dish effort to limit public smoking restricfians. ate new lactic is to t~ to divert the d~bat~ to the issue of"smokets' rights" -- to put a practiea that eodangcrsotherson apar with our nation's religious and racial rights. But thateis na"right"to smoke when the secondhand smoke and dangers others. The Sargeau General and oth- ers have found that the simple separation of smokers and non- smokers within the sumeakspaco cannot 13~xR¢ct noasmokers from exposure to environments1 to- bucco smoke. ~ocauso of the small s~ze of]:~uricles ofs~cond- band smoke, dight air currants qulcldy and eafilydistrlbumtho.~ perticl¢~ throughout the air in a Tharefore, nonsmokers can only be pro¢cted from involun- ~ ~ydc~y separated nad sepa- tardy vand~¢d. Wb.i~ the tob=cco lebby woeld li~c to wz=p iuelf in aaqu¢~tahty a health issue and its cffccts on others must be ad- This principle guidcd me and the othar members of the Con- gressioaal Task Force on To- bacco and Health when we worked to ban smoking on do- mestic alrlin¢ flighu. Since ade- quate separalion of smokers was not an option, the demands of public health dialated.a total ban. I am pleased to report that thg domestic airline smoking law is working very well. The ban should be extended to interna- tional flights t~'ough bilateral and multilateral agreements among nations. It should also aFply to other forms of Iransponation :hat The tobacco Iobby's trying to divert the debate to the issue of 'smokers' rights....' But there is no 'right' to smoke when it endangers others. pat smok=s and nonsmokers in close quarters. In othe~ public settings, new steps must be takea to protect nonsmokera from secondhand smoke. For example, while some of our nation's aisports have adopted admirable policies re- stricting smoking tolorations that noesmok~rs can avoid, othex air- ~ mnimaln what am cniled "sepexa¢ smoki~ ~d ne~raok- S~:ondl~ag ~o1~ doeaa't know any better than to drift across that aisle. Smoking ar~as should Lmly be separated from Ihc public spaces whcro nonsmokats are also pros- eat and should be separately van- tilated if possible to prevent the disparsion of tobacco smoke into the general air spane. To achieve this goal, greater ragulntian is neces.~a=y. Much o fit can be achieved at the local level But increased federal action is also necessary. The Occapatioanl Safety and Health AdmlnisU'ation has begun to coasider thgimplica- tions for the wurkplnco of the clear danger posed by seoond- hand smoke. Employars should c~porato and even lead the way to unsure that their nonsmokiag employees have a smoke-frc~ envimnmant. Finally, it is time to terminate tobacco's virtual exemption f~om federal regulation. The anthority of the Feed and Drug Administration to regulate tobacco is carrendy rastrictcd to eases in which tobacco compa- nion make health claims for their products. This policy was .~.rined in our nation's laws long before Surgeon Gan~ral Terw's report on tobacco, published 27 year~ ago. Other agencies are also i~ohibi~ed from exarci.~ng lntot'y authority over t~cco. The federal government's hand~-offpolicy toward tc~ac~o is an anacbxonism that must be een'eeted. C~asi&riag the dam- age caused bysmoking and invof n~o~ dea~nds no~ng la~ c~-c~L-m~a of the Task Ferce on T~:O at~d Heath. T153151454
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Th~day~Se!~t~mberl~.19~l I~OLLCALL Foo~anc[Eh~gP~l~cyBfieFung PageSS ~' Think We've Got Insp, ectilon: Problems? Dangers Of Wretched Soviet Meat Now,Coming to Light Infected ,Camels Breed Plague. Kazakh Cattle III= With T.B. Only 1% of Ukraine Farms 'Healthy.' By Gabrid Schoenfdd First the good news from the Soviet ropubllc of Kazakhstan. Mcdlca[ authorities in the city of Axalsk have liRed the quaran. Me they imposed ai~ an br¢~: Vf plague. anccessfully.tmc¢~ the dise~¢ infected cm'nel meat sold at th~ city's cenmal market. Now for the bad news from the rest of the USSR. In a country al- ready suffering from'dramatic food and medicine shortages, dis- eased livestock are causing a major agricultural and public health crisis• "We are dealing w.ith a pbe- nomenon which is assuming the ungovernable namm of a natural disaster," says Izvestia newspa- per economic affairs commenta- tor I. Abakumov. Heesdmates the cost to the economy from tious livestock disesses in the bil- lions of rubles. • In Aralsk, situated on the desic- cated Arul Sea, the authorities are continuing to .rake prophylactic measures. The local Anti-Plague Scie.nlific Research Institute is mo~oillzing to track down rodents. "Expeditionary parties of med- ics" ore spraying pestialdes into thebun'ows o fiargesand rats in an effort to destroy the fleas that c.~. p~gu~,. ,reporL.s. ~ the~, news agency Tass. Private hunting of foxes, zabbits, and rndants has With the Soviet economy gripped by searcity, .the pressure to bring bad produce to market is greater than ever. b~en banned. "Mass inocula- lions" of human Eaings ar~ also under way. Now even aunmputer has been eatisted to study the outbreak. But the successful earn- paign for high-quality enmcl steak is just one small advance in combating aproblcm now emerg- ing as a major concern. In the United States, ever since Upton SinclaJx Wide, The Jungle, the food-processlng industry has been carefully scrutinized by the preas. L~t year, articles in the Wall Street Join'aft and th~Aflan. tic Monthly focused on the health risks posed by defects in the US poul~Timpection system and the wide~rcad marketing ofdiseusc- tain~l chicken. Until very recently the Soviet press has been unvAlllng or able to wrir~ about the USSR's mooh'more *¢~,er¢ problems in this area. The information that the mc~ia lmve thus far provided maimsitd~ficalt toj~lgewhcther overall ~ d tbe Soviet oeneemy. Despite some complainls, the USDA inspection system is a marvel of efficiency and accuracy cnmpared with what goes on in the now-disintegratlng Soviet Union~ whose meat-packing ,[acilifies seem to be straight out of Upton Sinclai#s muckraking book "The JnngleY when it comes to the purity of the signed to protect the public from meat-operated inspection anon- food supply, "press censorship unhealthy produce. Centrally cieslnalladvancedcan/nricsaro hasalwayskeptsuchsccrclsfrom imposed agricultural regulations charged with regulating health thcpopulation,"Eveaifgiasnost dictate that milk from discasad ands~etysmndards. now reaches the, Soviet food- cows be specially pasteurized. Because market mechanisms processing industry, the sources Sic~a'nimalsinastbeslaughtered andincentiveaarenotinplaceand and scale of'its prohlems, mean • in a"sanitary'abbatoir.'"Jf~his is the central planning system they will not be uasy to addrass, not avaliablP., the animal~ must be run amok, the Sovlet Union today In Donetsk oblust in the placodonageneratconveyurafier enjoysneitherthedisciplianofthe Ukraine, for example, ~.he theslaughtarofheal[thyanima!sis masketnorthesafetymechanisms region's chief physician has completed, offered by government rennin- found that only fou~ out of 432 In practice, however, such don. The result of these trends froThS are considered "healthy." measures are roudanty ignored, about declining food safety, says He describes a "very alarming Izvesda has explained hnw the ]zvesda.lsthat"statecontrolhas coincidenua" of illness among slaughtethousesreallywurk:"Let beenpracticallylusLanythlngcan diseasedfasmanlmalsandhuman us not be n~ive. In reality, in our happenandboconeealed:Thereis beings. The physician is worried meat combines and dairies, live- no one tO sound the alarm." bystatisdus indicating thatpeople stock products evcrywhcrc move Even worse, the inadequacies ha'~c been afflicted with lymph in a single ~o~', and all these ~;e]l of Soviet statistical data ma~e it and blood disorders in virtually meaning instructions have no of- difficult to obtalq aviewofSoviet thesamelocaiitieswhere thereare fcct on this flow." How eau you problems that would allow corn- sick livestock• disuard all the substandard cur- padson with the experience of In these areas, be says, the casses/ooeloralofficlalwonders, other countries, But major deft- "lnvel of morbidity' is growing : ciencies in the structure of the menaclngly, escvideneadbysta- [zvestia describes Sovietinsp~ctionsystemvirtually tistics for 30 of the oblast's cities cnsuro that bad meat and milk arc add rayons over the past ten the Kazakh brought to musket and sold to' years.." Iivestoc~ crisis as unwitting consumers. Kazakhstan is the third lasgust Vctcdnasy inspecturs fall on- meat producer of the Soviet re- an ~.xtraordinary der the supervision of go~'e.m- publics and cmzendy 300,000 of situation~ that taunt-tun collective and state the Kaza~h uatfle herd ace re- should be regarded farms, entities that are under in- ported by Moscow telcvision to tease pre.~ure to fulfdl Iheit sales I~ ill-with toberenlusis, burcel- as an ~e¢ological quotas. The same arrangements in place in meat-procussing lusis, and other diseases that am catastrophe. ~ ~eanls and dairies where the vet- communicablc to human beings. As a result, the localmilk Js"dan- I efinars, inspectors axe"materially gerous topeople'shealth."ualda "and at the sam~ time fulfill or dependent on management." zecent broadcast, and the food even overfulfdl the stepped-up With the foxes inspecting the produced by daJz7 farms in sum-" plans and socialist pledges issued chicken coop, the Esults m'c loeadoes is also "unsafe." from above?" too predictable. Izvestlanow duscdbes thengri- But the aaswer is all too cleat. Arocent food-pnisoningcas¢in culmrec~sisdmthasar~enasan With the Soviet ecooomy now the central Asian republic ef "extraordinary situation" that gripped by scazcky and long Kkghlz.ia is typical. Thu veteri- should be regazded as an "eoo- queues, the presscm to bring bad nary sexvices there, Izvestla re- logi~l eatastroI.~he)" The illness produce to tam'keels greater than potted last year, are facing among fivestodz Js attributed to ever. cismfortha"umpteenthtime"for homing cattle in dilapidated Aldmugh the ,;z~.-'odantloo of their =ir~espouslb]c ~ttltud¢ to shedsth~tbavede~a~¢ra~ed~.rter ma.-~e~ meclum~ns into $ovicX. she, itoffi¢ialdaties.=TheJnspe¢- ye~s w~hout nmimeaance m,,d agricult,,Lm might improve the toes" ovcrs~ghtsledtoan eud~¢eak chron~ uud~f~alisg duo to query and mppSy nf me~t m~d of =exw.x~Ltype ~w~" ~er ~,~,-~es of fodtm d~y lxodac~o Western en~- intec~t m~.~ w~ sold m a sau- contain the disease. The authori- ties have announced .that the "sausage shop has been de- stroyed." Because all the trends in Soviet agriculture have bean unfavo~- ~]e for resolullom~f ibis ~u~bli¢ bealth problum, an~ will oontinuc to r~mr. B*fl~¢ the coup~ Ivfikhail Gorbachev had be*n vigorously pmerustinating with reform n f his country's failed farming and food sector;, the f'~st six years ofperestrnikahave only saccceded in adding six years to the hge nf theooantry'santiquated food-processing infrastrooture~ All of the changes Gurbacbev introduced had be2,n piecemeal. Some large farms had been par- tinily broken up into smaller ones. Whatever productivity henefits are derived from this, it made proper inspeodan of produce all the more difficult to ca~y out. If radical agricuhuml reform now goes furward and it leads to out- breaks of mass food poisoning and disess¢, the prospects for a sensible nveahaul of the USSR's agricultural sector will be blcakcr than before. Last November the US,E~part- meat of Commerce sent over a delegatino of government offi- cials and businussmen.to take a compicheusive look at Soviet food indus try facilities and nends; already an Alaska finn is engaged in one of the few profitable US- Soviet joint ventures.. Oimrating out of the far-eustem Magadan oblasl, the company is hclplng a collective farm upgrade Inspectors' oversights led to an outbreak of anthrax in Kir~hizia after Infected meat was sold to a sausage shop. Only when consumers fell ill were measures taken t6 control the disease. the p~ecessing of reindeer roeat, Hard cunency profits come f~om selllng pulverized anders to South Korea for use as an aphrodisiac, Given the scale of its problems, there axe undoubtedly other op* pormnifies almrt from antler aph- trxlisiscs fo~ Westom ¢omlmnies to make mtmey in the Sov'wt meat market. After its success with ~'md¢¢r, the Sov~tUnion w~Ibe looking for other Westtm Imn- n~rs. Perhaps McDeaalds will f'mditprofitable tobelp them fl~- tm out th~ humps in tbeir c~nel bor~ pmce~-i~. TI53151455
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PaSe3a ROLL C.ALL F~da~d, DrugPoI~eyB~e~ "~tunday, Se~;~.~l~1991 ................. Don"t Bla,me Al:cohol Abuse on Advertisi,n,g So Far, Research Has Not Conclusively Linked Consumption to Promotional Strategies B~' Rel~ Dan,Schaefer If all that was ruqnL, ed fo~ good ~b~c ~licy ~ ~en~s un a d~ ou~- c~c, ~ job would ~ un ~ on~ ~I of us. ~ Mcmb=s of Cun~, p~- end, and ~nsiblocifi~ns, s~d uni~d in our ~mmi~t ~ rid o~ ~ie~ of ~ ~g~s of ~cohol a~s¢, Unfonuna~ly, simp~ ~t~ go~ is not enoch, ~e ~e smt~i~t ~e S~bl~ A~Ver- a nobI¢ one, B~t ~ ending ~t on ~ ~ounds Mone. we mast ~ ~mM ir will deliver un i~ promises. Govemmeot w~ings on ~hol ~v~g, ~ ~ legi~ladon m~t~. ~mdtu~ a ~gn~- cant bnrd~n on t~ 6ghts of legitimate industri~ -- the alcohol bcverngc, broad- casting, and advertising industries -- and their consumers. Before such burdons are imposed, Con- gross should at least be able to demonstrate that they will be effective.. The SAFE Act falls this critical test. The answers to the problem of alcohol Zlm~ am neilker simply no~" str~ghtfor- ward., ~o~¢0 o nomic,lx~hol~glcal, cul- t uea];, ~Ind. eve.lt genetic l~tor* ~mbine to cause ~ ¢ompl~ behavio~l phenomv noIL The SAFE Act attunpts to draw a sim- plistic correlation which has never be.ea ¢liniM1y es=blJshed. Alcohol advertising has neve* been coadmivcty linIcd to alco- hol con~mptinn. AS ~fly ~ ~t y~, in im Sev~ Re~ t~ C~s, ~e US ~t of H~undHamanSe~ic~conduded~t "ms~ h~ yet to d~ent a s~ong rdatiunship ~tw~n ~cohol adve~slng and ~cobel eo~ump6on:' lm findings mamh ~at of m ~tensive 1985 ~ml Tode CommOtion smd~ whlehre~o.re~able~ts.on whidh m ~ndade~a~hol~dve~Mg signifi-" ~ay affee~ ~halab~" But~haps ~em~t ~Fmifive evidence com~ &am ~e num~ ~emselv=.Fmm 1975 m 1989, ~di~= on ~r adv=- ~ing~onein=~ed 87~nt- Over ~at U.S. Senate offices are switching to CQ's Washington Alert and DataTimes for three good reasons. We're BIGGER. We're BETIER. We're FASTER: N ow that DataTimes/Dow Jones News/ why people all ,over the Hill call us the Ultimate Retrieval Service has teamed up with us, Oniine Connection. CQ's.Washington Alert is bigger, better and faster. And if you think all this is great news.., there's BIGGER because we offer U.S. Senate offices more! Subscribe. to CQ's Washington Alert today and receive two superb services for one standard price ... and four extra copies of CQ~ Weekly Report plus one t:rtr'a copy of CQ:¢ Congressional Monitor. What more could a U.S. Senate office ask for? A demonstration or a free thai? We'll give you either. Just call and we'll ~ show you why Senate offices are switching to CQ's Washington Alert and DataTimes, the Ultimate Online Connection. Congressional Quarterlv's unrivaled coverage plus The Washington Post, The Wall Street Jottmal, USA TODAY and many more national, regional and state newspapers, financial and trade publications. Now you can get instant access to news from the home front, from around the globe or straight from the Hill. BEI'D~ because Washington Alert is the only online Congressional Tracking Ser- vice to offer full-text of these publications and four extra copies of CQ's Wee&Iv Report plus one extra copy 6~ CQ's Cong~ssional Monitor each it, eel. FASTER because one log on procedure provides instant access to both CQ's Wash- O. )N t ;RI-.'~.'~I( KX.M. ington Alert and DataTimes. That's Qu~rr~:m.v Washington Alert The Obvious Choice For a demonstration or free trial call Sharon Chandler at (202) 822-1458 DataT mes. Dow Jones News/Retrieval, same period, per capita consumption of beer byadulls ova21 actmlly dropped 0.6 pereenL Thus, if the intent of alcohol advertising is to entioc non-drinkers to drink, it has been a terrible failure. Rather, these and coundess otherstudiessuggest thatitsreul- life effect has been simply to enoourage consumers who already drink to select a pa~oular brand. .~1~ vast m ujority ot"tho~e who'ehoase to consume ~deehol do so re4peasibI},, "Tbey ond~rS_t~nEt~e risks of ¢xcesalwdrinking, as namerou~ polls polnt out.For theseindi- viduals, thepropascd warnings will be litde more than bsekground noise,, mutely peadng common knowledge. • While the me~ages themselves will inevitably be ignored, their east to the consumer can not. Each of us, regardless of whether we drink or not, stands to lose when commercial free speech is restricted. But beyond that, these additional burdens may force advenisea's to reconsider their promotional strategies, perhaps reducing their use of the uloetroalc media. Because adve~.ag is the sole source of revenue for the broadcast industry, fewer ad dollars would further hamper the abili- ties of local broadcasters to ser~e their communities. And let's not forget, the dampening effect of onerous government warnings isn't limited to promotional ads: They will discourage responsible drinking messages as wall. Where problems such as From 1975"to 1989, expenditures on beer advertising increased 87 percent. Over that same period, per capita consumption of beer by adults over 21 actually dropped 0.6 percent. I alcohol abuse and underage drinking do exist, education offers groat promis~. Butir mast be part of a comprehensive strategy aimed at changlng behavior, not just rnising In largo pan, such a broad-based cam- paign is aJrendy underway -- on a volun- tary I~sL~, America's brewers, broadcast- ers, and adveaisars have combined efforts with communities and local organizations in ~e hopes ofs~gnificandy reducing ulco- hol abuse. T he..~ lind other programs, such a~ those sponsored by government agen- cies and private entities, are m~dng sub- stantlul progress, Inthe 1980s,the number o f dmnkddvers involved in fatal seddenls decreased 12 p~cenu With respect to teenage dryers, the number of drunk drivers involved in fatal accidents was down 40 l~reent. Cle~ly we're raovlngin th~ight direction. We need to continue building on these successful efforts, recognizing what most Americans already know. A lone 1990 Roper poll found that the publle believes ad w~mfings would be the least effective of several ways to fight ulcohol abuse. Not stuprlsingly, the prdea~ed method was education ~throngh schools, famliiesoand law eafmeement. The ~,msevs of the SAFE Act shard be coaur~nded for contlnalng to hlghlight tl~ crltlcallmblic policy issue. But ~ted l¢~latie~, even whe~ inspired by the best T153151456
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While consumers can expect Io see imporlant changes in labeling by 1993, labels carrying nutrition information would be required on processed meat and poultry ~nly. The information would be optional for fresh poultry, 1 ke these Purdue chicken parts, Note the "All Natural" claim on lhe package. The Complicated, Time-Consuming Process Of FOod Labeling Reform: Where It Stands By Donna Porter Despi~ the plo~ora of reform acti~fky that has ~en placein ~cl~t s~veral ye~s, iLwill be some tlm¢ before new food labels • witib~ requited to appear in thegmcery and thus be useful to the average coaanmer. This titan lag is the resultofrequirements of the US mlemaking process, poliuy dif- fercocos in agencies, and the volume of work to be.completed in order for nutrition information to beprovided in conjunction with the sale of the majority of foods. Evolution of Reform In 1989, the US guvemment initiated an effort to reform fo~ labeling, with a par- titular emphasis on nuUltiun information. At that point, food labeling was based on a 50-year-old law and nutrition labeling regula~uns that were developed 15 earlier. In the meantime, the signi~icance of the r¢lationshlp between dietary intake and long-turn hudth had reached a critical point when the public health community came to a c.oosunsus on the need to provide consumers with mot~ information on the foods that they ahunld be eating to promote health and p~vent di~a~. The culminatiun of thla annsensas-build- lag resulted in the publication of two ]and- mark reports: the "Surgeon General's Report onNu~tion andHealth" (1988) und the National Research Cotmctl's ~po~ "Diet and I-]eslth: Implications for Redno- ]~trlyin Ibe 101stCongress, majorlegis- intion mfon~ing FDA's iced labeling au- thority was inlroduced. ~ House held bem'in~ in 1999, b~ se~m~ dchat~ on lhe [~n~ por~er ~s a spe~a~ in Life S~ences i~ ~he $~ce P~Rcy Res~:h Div~ ~ the C~g,'es~,,ml aesearchSer,,~e of the IJ'c~ary provisions of tho bill did not begin until 1990. The bill addressed foods covered by nu~tion labeling, components of nutrient information, consumer cdacation, health claims allowed, ingredient labeling, stan- dm-ds of identity, state enforcement, na- tionul uniformity, and effective dales. In August 1989, the Food and Drug Administration announced its plans for reform of anwltion labeling. The agency requested va'itten comments and held pub- lic hearings in four major clilas (Atlanta, Congress enacted the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 (NLEA) following considerable debate. Final regulations are to be completed by November 1992 and new packages on grocery shelves by May 1993. Chicago, San Antonio, and Seattle) on the issues that |t pinnned to Mdruss. In addi- tion, FDA, in conjun~un with the US Depa~nent of Agricultm'e, ¢ommlsdo~l thn Institut~ of M~icino (IOM) of th~ Natiomd ~y of Sclances to conducla stody addicting the nutrition components of foedlabeling. By July 19~0. FDA IXOposed new regu- labeling r~nu: nutrient con~nt, nulddon Isbeting ~o Recommended party Issues and Dircedogs for the 1990s" in September 1990. Th a report, based o n a revlow o fnutrition labeling issues by a group of experts, made recommendations on tho foods dmt should be cove~l by nutrition information, the nutrients that should appear on nu~tion labeling, the presentation of label informa- tion, and the legal authority under which such'labeling changes could be made. Congress enacted thoNutrition Labeling andEducatinnAct of 1990 (NLEA) folinw- ing consldemble debate and negotiation with consumer groups and the food indas- W. ~usident Bush signed the law (P.L. 101-535) un Nov. 8, 1990. Final regula- tions art: to be completed by l%vember 1992 and on grocery shelves by May 1993. Technical amendments to 'NLEA were canned in July 1991. ~ariy in }.9.91, USDA announced its plans to ~form nutrition labeling on meat and poultry predaom .In April 1991, the depamnent published un advanced noti~ of proposed ndemaking, requesting com- ments on nn~tion labeling related to fresh and proces.~l meat and Imultry products. The notice outlined the Agriculture Dcpa.,~ent's tentadvn position on several issues, based to i~ response to tl~ IOM study and the NLEA. The department stamlits des~ to work with I~DA to harmonlze buth its regulatory requlr~mants for nnl~ition labeling and to maintain a ~mil& sgbeduie for regulatory labels to appear on vitlmlly nit foods at approximatoly the same time. Differing Policies And Perspectives Contributing to the difl-agult ta~t: ~ re~- claims on food packages is the fact that thee different agencies with regulatory responsibility in this area have different laws, regulations, standards, and dafmi- finns-for regulating foods¢ Under ~¢ Federal Meat Inspuc~ion Act and the Poul~y Products Inspection Act, USDAregulates all meat, poait~y and other products that ¢onlain more than lwo pot- cent meat or puultry, All n~er foods fall under FDA's juris- diction, by authority of the Federal Food, Drug nnd Cnsmetin Act of 1938, ns In the last decade, the Office of Management and Budget has been a barrier to timely rulemaking, by.frequently returning proposed regulations for being politically unacceptable after languishing for weeks or months. I II amended. USDA reqnitea all lal~ls to he approved prio~ to the productb¢ing placed on ti~market. FDAdoesnot apprev~ labels prior to marketing, but ins~d monitors them on~ they imvn appea~:l in the maz- The Federal Trade Commission regu- intcs food advudsing, which also does not nx:c~ve any govct'nmeat~l review before it is preseated to ~k~umcrs. dovole~ag l~lations fee n~lal~y nu- tdtiea l~b¢:ling on r~t feeds under its T!53151457
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A Food and Drug Administration laboratory technician checks for pesticide residues. The Delaney clause in current legislation applies a "zero risk" standard for potential carcinogens that many in Congress believe is unworkable. Lugar: Let's Assess Benefits and Risks In Food Safety Rules Continued from page 33 anseb t0 the marketplace. Although Di- naseb was ultimately suspended, this ac- tion illustrated an inherent weaikness in the law. The weakness should be corrected by requirlngthateconomiebengfitsl~ec0n~- e~deommensuratewirh theneedtoprotect public health, Inherent in any discussion of fund safety legislation is the issue of economic benefitS and therein of risk/benefit balaocingin risk assessment decisions. Flea currently requires seqh balanc- ing. Some argue that the consideration of. economic benefits hasn.oplaeein dcclsions abontrisk.However, those who are knowl- edgesbla about the use of scientific studies in predicting risk realize that safety is a. relative term. There can never be assurance that a product or activity poses absolutely zero risk. Approving a product's entry into the marketplace requkes an understanding of potential population risks as well aspoten- tinl societal benefits. This is not to say all risk should be permitted; it simply recog- nizes that for many products there is alevel of risk that is acccptabie in light of the societal benefits that are likely to accrue. Balancing risks and benefits is a rondo- mental component of any dccisionmaking process. Decisions based solely on. a risk efiterinn will create a marketplace which may be void of truly beneficial products and fullofprodacts with estimated low risk but of small benefit. If the Delsuey alanse is ultimately re- New Food Labels Still 2 Years Away As Reform Process Slogs Forward CRS Expert Reports on Where It Stands With the Various Agencies Involved (FDA, USDA, FTC, etc.), and Why It Takes So Long Continued from page 37 anthority in accordance with N'LEA. Cur- rentiy, it is testing several different label formats to determine which conveys nulfi- tion information most effectively to con- lZDA plans to require the completa set of nutrient information on all foods required to bear nutrition labeling as set out in NLEA. FDA is eurrendy in the process o£ drafting a number oftegalatory documents on the various issues related to food label- ing reform, most of which are due to be published lhis fall. USDA is also drafting its proposed rao~t- lotions. The department plans to use the results from lZDA's format studies rather then eoednct its own; however, the USDA has suggested that complex carbohydrate and fiber information be omitted from la- bels on meat and poultry products. Nnttltinn Inhaling would be required on processed meat and poul~ products, bat it would be optional for fiv.sh meat and poul- tty products. Protracted debate over two yeats on theissns of sorting size finds P-'DA opting to base rmtritlonal valnes on the portions normally eaten by consumers, while USDA has suggested using a ston- de~d sctvlng siz~ (one otmce oc 100 groins) for all roosts and podlry. Meanwhile~ the FEC zegnlates food edverti~g, which in today's market fre,- qoc~dy carries either a health ox noeieat ~ claim in its message. In r~¢ last decade, the proliferation of health and nu- trient claims in beth advertising and label- ing was a result of the deragulatory envi- ronment in which the claims were heing made. When the Federal government failed regulate these claims, state regulators filled the void. In 1990 Congress began to ad- dress the problems by incindin~provisions on claims that were allowed and criteria for presenting them on food lahels in NLEA. However, Yrc operates under the provi- sions of the Federal Trade Commission Act, which requires a signifcantiy differ- ent degreeofsubstantlatlan from that oftbe other two food regulatoP/agenaies. As a result, the ciaims that can and will be made in advertising in the future can be very different than those allowed on labels. Due to the concern about this differance and the potential fur consumer confusion, the Nutrition Advertising Coordination Act of 1991 has been introduced in Con- grass to require FTC, in regulating advertising, to hold to the standards created undur NLEA for allowable health claims and nutrient content daiw~. Another cotupfieatlon in the im:w.ess of rdorming food labcis ~ advertlslng has been the xegulatory approval process through the Off'ace of Munagement and Budget (OMB), All Advanced Notions of Rcgulatkms Imbli~ed in the Federal Reg- agency and department engaged in role- making, but also by OMB. In the I~t decade, this arm of the execu- tive branch, more than any other, has been a barrier to fimdiy rainmaking, by fra- quently returning proposed regulations for being polltleaily unacceptable or by some obscure whim after Ihngulshing t'nr weeks or months withoat comment. Even as this article is written, proposal regulations that axe to be published on the mandated sahcduld outlined in NLEA arc being held up by OMB. If the normal rule- making process is not completed by the final effective dates required by NLEA, the law specifically states that prop~ed roles become the final rules. While this requirement will ensura that new regulations will go into effect accord- ing to the Congressional schedule, it may tesultin regulations that are not as good as might have occun'ed if f'mal rules had been completed by the deadline. Outlook TheMay 1993 deadline fur new lahels to apl~ar remains in place. What regulations will be complete and how tbe information wiil appe,,tr on that data remains to be seem Congress will, no doubt, continue to meal toe ilm lxogress and any further clumges n~ed in statutory authodty m x~,form fond Uail~d St~es. placed by a uniform negligible risk stun- dan:l, it should be done with the flexibility to consider benefits in establishing residue tolerances that may not precisely meet a one-ln-a-million risk standard. A risk of twain a mllli~ is not appreciably greater than~ne in a m~lion. In ~stabllsh~og peSti- eideresiduetolerarees, risks that ar~wlthln an ancnp.tabl¢ range should be considered for approval as long as tbere is an accept- able balance between risks and benefits. The Hudson Institute concludes that pesticides are an important agricultural tool because they help provide a low- cost, abundant supply of cancer-fighting fruits and vegetables and protect wildlife habftats by limiting the number of acres farmed. • The stark reality is that while pesticides sometimes pose risks, they ere used be- cause they provide the benefit of allowing other less desirable risks to be avoided. Food shortages, drastically higher fund prices, or an increased dependence on imported food caused by the unavailability of a critical pesticide should be considered risks that could dramatlely affect human health. In a recendy published report on global food issues, the Hudson Institute concludes that pesticidas are an importont agricultural tool becanse they help provide a low-coat, abundant supply of cancer-fighting fruits and vegetables and protect wildlifehabltats by limiting the number of acres farmed, Clearly, these kinds o f measurable bene- fits shunld be weighted against potential long-term cancer risks that are not greatly in excess of negligible. Assuming that someday all of these food Uniform safety standards for state and federal authorities will also be vital to our competitiveness in the international marketplace. safety issues will be laid to rest, there mains the looming qnestion of whether federal sumclards should be made uniform untionwidc, pra-empting stata authority to crea~ .~tr~e standards. The only certainty is that the topic of national unifct'mity will be heavily de- bated. Givcn that b'Ib'RA und b'FDCA food. surety amendmenls will likely strengthen .the statutes dramatically, it Ls worthwhile to consider including a oniformity clause. Indeed, with the passage of such amend- ments, safe food will mesh placing a con- siderably grester eml:~asls on protecting l~btio health. U~brm ~e~y smudges art oal~, imporumt to dome.stie Tboy win ~ be viral to nor competitive- T153151458
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Dou, bts About Curtailing Tobacco Ads Would Such= Legislation Restrict Free Speech? Would, It Actually ,Reduce Smoking Among Young People? The Canadian Example Provides Clues. By Rep. Alex MeMillan Over tho past flve years,.vasi- ous bills have been introduced to restrict the advertising of tobacco products. In 1986, Rep. Mike Synar (D- OHa)intredu eed~,bi] 1 thatwouM, baCelm~osed~ att~'Ootfig~h t ban, otr cen~y, P~eps. ~ and Hem-y Waxman (D-Calll) introO~eed legislation ia the 101st Congress to resClct atvertising, while Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass) intro- duced a similar bill this yeas. The various pieces of legisla- tion, while not purporting to ban such advevialng entirely, would impose resMctions and other bin'- dens that would have the effect of imposing a nationwide ban on most tobacco advertising. In conaldeting such legislation, it is iasl~mcdve to look at the axpe- riencu of Canada, which enacted the Tobecco Predncts Cantrol Act (TPCA) in 1988. This Act, which imposed a ban on tobacco adver- tising and promotion, was cently declasedinvalld by a Cana- dian com. Because tho arguments for and against advertising restrictions that were presented to tho Cana- dian Pasliament were vltlually identical to arguments made at Congressional hearings, tho Ca- nadian example tests the accuracy and viability of both sides of the asgumenL Amajarissuein this debate has been whether advasdsing bans and restrictions infringe free speech. Opponents of tobacco advertising restrictions havo ranged across the politicaI spec- trum, from tho consurvativc Washington Legal Foundation to the liberal American Civil Liber- ties Union. All have condemned advertising resections-a vinh- don of tho First Amendment. Proponents of tobacco adver- tising restrictions have restmnded by asguing justas vchemcnfly that such measures am co~sthuiloanl, and no court would ev~-strikc them down. The Qunbue Superior Court's decision squasely supports the arguments of ban opponents. First, the Court aff'uraed that the adver rising of tobacco products is protected expression, for the right encompasses "all content of pressiou irrespcctlvo of the mean- log or message sought to be con- veyed," and "no matte~ how uno pleasant or immoral some may consider it to bey Further, tho Court halt that tho TPCA's requLremant that an unat- tfhated"health message" be dis- played on each cigarette paekagu -- a message with which the manufaetorez does not agree -- also infringes f~eedom of Waxman's bill, I-LP,. 5041, would imp~e almilar requh'e-- rneut~ and lh~ world be ~ncon- slitudonal under theFirstAmend- Supreme Cot~ 1=¢ l~td that a speaker= cvou a corporate Marlboro Country: A cigarette billboard offlnterstate 85 near Durham, N.C. "Opponents of tobacco advertising restrictions have ranged across the political spectrum," writes Rep. Alex McMlllan of North Carolina, "from the conservative Washington Legal Foundation to the liberal Civil Liberties Union:' soeiato with speech with which [the spea~er] may disagree." In the RYR-MacDonald case, the Quebec Superior Coast flady rejected' the Canadian Attorney Genersl's assertion that freedom of expression did not cover the promodon ofapredact harmful to health. The salient issue, according to the Court, was not whether Them is no evidence that advertising as such entails a danger to public health, the Quebec Court ruled: 'As Aristotle said, the word "dog" never bit anyone.' " banco edvertising constitutes a form of cxpressi~. Nor ~'an it whether the perceived problem of tobacco use constituted asubstan- tial mad legitimate concern of the federal logislatar*. Rathor, the crucial issue, and ftual de feet, i~ the Canadian legis- lation was the lack of any re.on- able connection between the means ehese~ (advertising) aM the legi~tatkm'a objective {to re- d~ce tobacco elm.to.priori). ~rhe~ is no evidence float ad- .veedai~ a. s~h ~ a da~ger served. "As Aristotle said, the word 'dog' hayer bit anyone." Similasly, Congress, and then eventually a court addressing the eGnstitotianul issues, would have to determine whether tobacco advertising bans and restrictions actually achieve their stated ob- jective: to reduce smoking among young people. At a number of Congressinnul hearings, opponents of advertis- ing restrictions regularly cite data gathered by government bodies and other experts showing that advertising hak on effect on gregute cigarette eonsamptinn by either young peoplo or adults. A major nadunal survey by researchers for the World Health Organization (WHO) has found "no systematic differences" be- tween the smoking habits of young people in countries where tobacco advertising is banned and in anuntries where iris not. Rather, a young person's deci- sion about smoking, like other lifestylodueisions, ismost power- ful]y influenced by pa~ents peers, not by adve~sing= "When young people start smoking;' WHO repom, "the most impor- tant predictor is the smoking be- barter and smoking-related tiviiles of'significant others'." .l~ve~ form~ Surgeon Ganea'al C.Ev~ettK~opaekzowledgedin lois 1999 relx~t that "there is no scientifically rigorous study ava//able ~ the public timt ~ rising and promotion increase tho level of tobacco consump. ti0n." More recently, proponents of advertising bans have begun to rely heavily on the 1989 report of New Zealand's Toxic Substance Board (TSB), which coneludad .that tobacco consumption had declined more capidly in coun- tries with total bans on advertising than in non-ban countries. But the Canadian Court dis- missed this dueoment with the observation that "it contains seri- ous methodological e~ors and a lack of scientific rigor which ten- dass it for allintents and purposes devoid of any probative value." Like the Canadian Attorney General, anti-tobacco activlsts try to shrug off the anti-democratic and anti-free eapression aspects oftheirproposals by emphasizing the nobility and utilitarian value of their objectives. Note, however, the response of the Canadian Court: "although the Act as now drafted presents itself as essuntially beneficent, it in fact constitutes a form of cen- sorship and social engineering which is incompatible with the ve~ eSSence of a free and demo- cratic Therefore. it is not emmgh to asseff, as did the Canadian Attor- ney General and as do American and-tobacco activists, that "to- TI~ US Constitution, li~¢ Cmmdlan Charter, reap.ires far tify the suppression of speech, As Congress considers reslr/c- five legislation with respect to tobacco, we should boas in mind that if we are prepared to under- take prohibitive legislation on tobacco prodtlcts, then it will not be long before we undertake pro- hlbidve legislation on a long list of products and services that, when misused, posa a possible health hazard. This list could include fatty foods and l~tmleum-based prod- After a tobacco,ad ban~ can bans on ~ds for fatty foods or petroleum- based products be far behind? acts as obvious examples. Per- haps even products that have demonstrated "value" in the eyes of one ifiterest group or another would be restricted as well. It is proper for the business community to inform and. in fact, educate the consuming public based upon the freedom ofspeach and the frt~lom to listen. Con- ~ would do wellto ke~ thisin mind as we ¢onsidor tobacco advert~ing ~ m~mber of the health and the ~rw~onme~t subcommittee of t~ Enemy and Commute T!53151459
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Breaking the Circlie of Poison Dangerous Pesticides That We Ban .From Use in the US Can Make Their Way Back Through Foreign Food Imports. 'Consumers Should .Not Have to Choose Between Off-Season Cantaloupes and Cancer,' Writes the Senate Agriculture Chairman By Sen. Patrick Lanhy Every day, millions of Ameri- cans are exposed to needless risk. In neighborhood supermarkets, they unknowing.iy buy food grown o~¢rs~ ,that., hes been sprayed wilh p~ttd&s s~ dan- gurous, that the En,vh-ofimental Prot~otioo Agan~y refuses m let our farmers me them in this coun- try. Wome yet, anme of the-so p'-~,ti- cides are made, by companies right hem in the US solely for use overseas. Used on foreign-grown food that is shipped hem and scarcely inspected at the US bor- der, these pesticides often end up on America's dinner tables, com- pleting a cycle many call the "Circle of Poison." Last year, the Bash Adininistra- lion,using arguments supplied by the pesLicide industry,directed an extraordinary attack on legisla- tion to bw.ak the CiraleofPoison, playing the key role in killing it during the waning hours of the farm bill conference tenon!tree. But the legislation has been r~'m- troduced this year, and it has broad supper1. Some 25 Senators have no- sponsored S. 898, the "Circle of Poison Prevention Act." The Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Commitw~, which I chair, held hearings on the bill in .lone and has scheduled a second hearing for Sept. 20. .Identical Icgialation has bcea introduced in the Hansa (H.R. 2083) by Reps. Mike Synar (D- Ok]a), Isno Paneata (D-Call0, and Dan Glickman (D-Kan). At a dine when we are toughen- ing standards at homo, it makesoo sense to allow American compa- nies In as~ a loophole in current law to dump unsafe pesticidas abroad -- only to have these chemicals show up in imported foods inAmedca's supermarkets. Food and Drug Administration data shows thatimportedfood has substantially higher levels of contamination from illegal pesti- cides than domesdc food. For example, 8 percent of impormd pears havobeea found with illegal pesticide residues (from pesti- cldes that have no domestic toler- ance or which are illegal to use in thaOS), while no violations were found for domestlenlly grown For peas, I0 percent of those imported had illegal rcsiduns while no violations were found for those domestically grown. Overall, 5 pem..cnt of impott*d food sampled by FDA is found contaminated with illegal pesti- cides --twice the rste for dome*- tic f~xis. Although FDA is rc- sponttble for inspecting almost all imported food, it sample, only a minmcul¢ 1 to 2 percent ofth¢ zest is slmply wai,,~l thrnogh at la iha las~ two yea~s~ federsl In the past two years, federal inspectors have found US-banned pesticides in beef shipped to the US from Hondura.% pineapples from the Philippines, and beans and carrotS from Latin America. Other imported fruits and vegetables in which illegal pesticides have shown up: pears and peas. Chairman Leahy's bill addresses this phenomenon, called "The Circle of Polson:' pesticides in bccf frrsn Honduras, pineapples from the Philippines, and bones und earrots fi'om Latin America. Each year, Americans consume 134 billion pounds of fmim and vegnlable*,25 pement of whichla imposed.That eqeals 135poanda ofimportad £ndta and vegetables for every man, woman and child. During the wlnter mqat~= half q f what we noosume is imported. The Circle of Poison is aloe a prvblem for American farmers. It is not fair that forego competitors can use chemicals that our farm- er~ ~tunot. This legislation will =lvvel the playing tidal" for out a d~w~r to Amedzan workers Wvdd -,veOza~ who u~e theaL At th¢.Tu~ 5 ~dag d o~ nommit- The most grupkic ~xample is the pesticide DBCP. In 1958, separate studies by two US chcmlcal manufacturing giants showed that DBCP cause* steril- ity in laboratory animals. and later indusmJ studies were kept secret from domesdc chemi- cal company empinycos and from agricultural wo~ke~ using DBCP inthelield..~ " . <..*f .: Twenty yems later, the sterili- zatinn predicted by laboratory • tests became a reallty-- incrom- ing nand~rs of workers in the manufacturing plants and banana fi¢Ida found they could nex have When EPA ~nally bunn~d DBCP from nenrly =q domostic farm u~s, the chemical maaufac- stosks ov~seas wbo~ ll~ l~Sd- cid~ c~tiautd m t~ ns~l. A~ a Corn Rim wer~ The tale of DBCP is an appall. ing one. In the blind pursuit of corporate profits, US chemical companygiuntsignored theirown aclentista, kept studio* s6.n'¢t from their own eznployens, dumI~d their poisons oversess, and davas- ta~ed the lives of thoasanda of unsuspecting and innocent moral and ~pmhe~sible. We in tbo United Stales must make c~r- rain that it never happens again. Butit can hapl~n agaln.Today, US chemical companies still poR tons o[ pe.sticides that EPA b~xs from domestic farm nse~ And aft~ months of pmssaring, EPA still eannot ~ll us how many of those US-made pos6cidos are tickles ¢=ose long-m'm kcakh such as s~vere illness. So it may take 20 ye~ars b~for~ thea fflictlon, predicted by laboratory tests, shows up in human beings, If we are awe.re of the problem now, why are we treating the, Third World like an ol~n,~r dumping ground audits cifiz~osllkchuman guinea pigS'? Some argue that wc have no right to tell other nations what pesticide* they can use or how to us~ them. But the same urgnmeat was made when the Drug En- forcement Administration hlacked US companies from ex- porting chemlcais being diverted to process cocaine. The Admini- s~atlon argued that it was impor- tant for theOS to taken lendarship position to stop the spread of The US also took unilateral action against nxporta nscd to manufactu~ chemical weapons. In early Jno¢. The Washington Post reported that 19 nations havu followed our counW's lead. One House and Senate bills could close a loophole in current law that allows US firms to dump unsafe pesticides abroad. Administration official called it a "major breakthrough," saying that "to have taken this action so rapidly is quite an accomplish- menL" With both proposals, Admini- stration officials say it is impor- tant for theUS to take alendership role in restricting the export of certain chemicals. Why can't this Administmtion use its clout to stop the poisoning of workers, their families, and the environ- ment in the Third World? And why can'tthis Admlalstla- tian wurk with us to pass this bill, so that futuru DBCPs do not hap- pen? Last year's legislation was by an official from the Ecuadodan government who explained her difficuldy in monitoring and coo- trolling the use of pesticid~ en- tering her country fi~m abroad. This year's legislation has been endorsed by the Agficuhare D¢- pa~nent of the Philippines for many of the same veasnos. One thing should be clear. If EPA says that ape~tieldeis unsa£e to use on American~own food, then it is unsafe to use on foreign- gmwn food. Baying food should not be a guessing game. Consumers should not have to choose twe~n off-senson cantsloupes and eancet every thn¢ they buy ira- Sen. l~t6ck Leahy (D-Vt). r.hak- man of the Senate A~icultuxe.. NumMo~ and Fo,-est~ Cemmltte~ b the R~u)r of the "~trde of I'~ T!5315146O
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IRS: Agency,C ompletely Out of Control Senator David P~ryor and ~e Senate Finance Overslgh~ Subcommittee did a commendabl'e job in seeing through the passage of the 1988 Taxpayers' Bill of Rights. This was a bold and needed step in the direction of curtailing IRS abuses against taxpayers. Recent examples of continuing 1RS abuse have made it clear that even stronger measures are needed to protect taxpayers from a tax agency gone out of control. • In Texas, Sharon Arnsberger was dunned by the IRS for $119,765 in payroll taxes owed by a company she worked for as a bookkeeper. When she found out that the company was not paying this tax, Arnsberger did what any honest employee would do -- she reported the matter to the IRS. But when the company folded, the IRS came after her for the back taxes. Though she is appealing the matter, Ardsberger now faces having her and her husband's wages garnished to settle the debt. • David Carroll, an Arizona retailer of Western-style clothing, owed $20,601.86 in overdue self-employment taxes, interest and penalties. Instead of giving him the option of paying in installments, a revenue officer surprised him at his Phoenix home one July morning and demanded fult payment. Carroll refused, voices were raised and the agent left empty-handed. Carroll was later indicted for assaulting and threatening a federal officer and found himself facing up to 8 years in prison and a $100,000 fine• A federal judge, however, ruled that Carroll was innocent. • In Iowa, John and Susan Heiland were stalked by the IRS for three years. The tax agency was attempting to collect $400,000 in back taxes that were owed notby the He'flands, but by a trucking company John had worked for several years earlier. The IRS seized the Heilands' car, their bank account and also has taken a part of the couple's [The IRS' actions are] "a story of bureaucratic incompetence, aggra- vated by arrogance and hostility toward those the bureaucracy was intended to serve." m Judge B. Avant Edenfield, U.S. District Court paycheck for the last two years -- despite the Pact that John has an affidavit from the head of the company saying that he was not responsible for the company's payroll "taxes. What will it take to clamp down on taxpayer abuses? One action worthy of support is a bill introduced by Idaho's Senator S~:even D. Symms: the Fairplay for Taxpayers Act o11991. It is designed to put taxpayers on a more equitable footing through the following provisions: • It extends the general statutory attorney-client privilege to tax practitioners. • It equalizes the interest rate the IRS is obligated to pay the laxpayers with the interest rate charged by the IRS. • It requires the/RS Commissioner to submit detailed quarterly reports to the Treasury Inspector General on all cases of employee misconduct; and requires him to submit ammal summaries to Congress of the Commissioner's quarterly reports. • It requires the Commissi6ner to institute an ethics education and training program for employees. What other measures are needed? IRS abuses are being brought to the attention of the National Coalition of IRS Whistleblowers on a continuing basis. The following arc some of the most urgently needed reforms which we are • urging Congress to consider and include in planned legislation. • Broaden existing avenucs of appeal so taxpayers are not forced to pay disputed bills in advance; • Prevent the IRS from twisting the intent of section 6103 (confidentiality of personal taxpayer information) to ~hield employee misconduct from Congress. • Prohibit IRS employces from imposing licns and levies beforc personally talking to the t,axpayer and determining that no other recourse is possible; and • Give taxpayers the right to recover damages from the 1RS if an agent's negligent acts caused the taxpayer • financial harm. FREF2~M ~ulO~ii~, 1~ Made po~sib~ by a grant from ~ IntomaUonal Assoclatlo¢l of Sclentologlsts. TI53151461
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Secondha:nd S moke Is Not That Risky Although It, s 'Politically Correct' to. Be Down on Tobacco Products, the 'Science' Being Used to Unk Passive Smoke With Cancer Is Inconsistent, Says Rep. Bliley By Rep. Tom Bliley Tobacco is unpopular, and anyone who speaks out on behalf of the product or its usersis immediately "tarred and feathered" by legions of zealous tobaocc-eootrol ad- Nowhere is this moreevidant than in the ~lenee has p~v~n a heal~ risk 'to non,, smokers. An~smoking ad'~0cates would have you believe the scientific debate over the dangers of ETS was satded long ago. They attempt to move their social/political movement forward under the camouflage They almck as a tool of the tobaeao industry anyone who dares to disagree with their omniseiant view of what is good and appmprlato for America. When the weak- ness of their "salentifie arguments" are pointed out they revert to an appeal to emotion and with righteous indignation assert the correctness of their regulatory goals. "Tobacco is bad," they say. "so anything that makes it unpopular, unattractive, and [astricts peoples' ability to smoke is good Let me be speclfle. Look at the studies that have been used to weave the issue of "posslve smoking." A review of studies on. passive smoking was recently published in Consumers' Research. "Of the 30 studies,' six reported a statistically significant asso- ciation (between environmental tobacco smoke and lung cancer) ... and "24 of the studies reported no statistically significant Even attempts to enhance the slgnlfi- cause of the individual studies by pooling them for so-called "mnta-analysis" are not persuasive. These analyses show mlmive ris~, according m Consumers' Research, of 1.08, or 1.34, or 1A2. (Relative risk is expressed as a ratio; a risk ratio of 1.0 is, in real tea-ms, a risk of Some say even a risk ratio of 1.08 is me high to tolerate, raueh less a risk of 1,42. In If one uses studies only from the US to determine the risk of environmental tobacco smoke, you arrive at a statistically non-significant risk. that c~-~, we should all stop drialdng milk and impose mandatory exercise require- ments on the populace. O~e study showed the risk of lung cancer for those drinldng pasteurized mflk to be 2,1. A isek of phyalcal activity lX'nduced a risker L6. Them are significant difficulties with the "science" being used to make the case for "passive smoking." "Confounding variables" is a fanoy way of sayiag other factors may be at work in causing a di.~a..~. If confoundem are not properly controlled, the study loses folio, bility. The "passiv~ smoking" studies have a spotty ]~d, at beat, in mklnglnm aeae~nt Photo by Laura Pauerlon "The fundamental question ~s whether science has proven a health risk to nonsmokers;' wrttes Rep. Bhleyo Explaining that data from risk a&sessment studies can be manipulated, he argues, "The isaue is...a desire by anti-tobacco activists to elimi- nate tobacco from the landscape." Above, a tobacco field north of ReMsville, N.C. f'~res and cocking oil vapor seem to be highly significant. Recent work at EPA demonstrates how manipulation of data can give you different answers to the same question. The EPA's draft risk assessment on ETS and lung canear assigned a relative risk of roughly 1.3 to ETA What is behind that number'?. F'trst, if one uses studies only from the United States to datarmine the risk, you arrive at a slatisdeally non-significant risk. So studies from throughout tho world were used to bring the calculation up to 1.3. Included in the international studies was a study done by Japanese researcher Hirayama w.hich has been criticized for se- rious design flaws. Attempts to obtain the raw data from Hirayama for further analy- sis ate not possible. Why? Tho data of ~is rosearoh, pub- lished in 1981. have bced destroyed. Coin- cideneo orconvanicnce? You decide. If one removes Hirayama from the calculations, the resait is dramatically altered. EPA has Guidelines for Carcinogenic Risk Assessment. The~e are guidelines to be followed by the Agency in the conduct of risk assessments. Yet in the caseofETS, tho guidelines appear to have been applied inconsistendy and inoompletely. Forinstence;thvEPA Guidelinesrequim that a risk assessment inclod6 not only human eplderalologic'~I evidence (fancy terminology for statistical studies usually dezived from analyzingquv,~tiunnalrcs) but actnal animal exposure studies. Guess what? F:~A chose not toinelude the results from animal inhalation studies. Why? The animal data is negative. Bdom a cao~tl in~n is drawn from cpidemlol~ical data, it is ge~aily a ~lxi~p~ that fiskrati~ ratm cxee~l 2 or 3. Part eft ~¢ reason is fication. In such cases, it i'~'inappmp~i~t~ under EPA's Guidelines to make a causal interpretation. Misclassilication lathe term used to refer toindividuals who are smokers butsay they aren't. EPA's calculated riskis low enough that, uceording to some studies, it can be explained entirely on the basis of misclas- siflcation or the ocmmon lifastylo factors among spouses who live with smokers, suehas diet, exorcise, or alcohol consump- Lion. Some of the most illnstratlvo evidence of V&atisgoingonhetecomes from the words of individuals involved in the prnoesa at EPA chose not to include the results from animal inhalation studies in its risk assess.ment. Why?. The animal data is negative. EPA. When the EPA ~ciance Advisory Board [SAB] Execuq've Committe~ re- ported on its review of EPA's draft risk assessment it notnd that it had "difficuhy in applying the Guid¢lines ... as they am cur- rently formulated to this complex and vari- able mixture." The SAB report said ~if Galdelines for Caroinogesie Risk Ass*ssment can be used to cast doulx on a t'mding that the inhalation of tobacco smoke by humans causes an iucrcased risk of lung eaaner, the situation ~ggests a need to revise the Galdolims.~ This prompted otto member of the SAB Executive Coromitte¢ to note that it sounded alitdolikethey w¢~e caying"if tbe data do~n't llt tim gold*lines, the gnide- ]~ shodd be cha..~l." ~o~lo~ thnt moet~g ~'. ~rto~ Hein~icated that most pebple I~l"expos~.d themselves to greater risk driving across • town in Washington Waffle to EPA to at- tend the meeting. And the very next day when there was no press eovarago of the SAB Executive Committae meeting, Dr, Lippmann acknowledged that if the EPA guidelineswem applied as writlen, or in his words "rigidly," there was "no clear mechanistic basis for calling lETS] car- cinog~ie." Dr. Jonathan Samet, another member of the EPA review panel, published an article in theAug. 7,1991 lournal oftheAmerican Medical Association [JAMA]. While Dr. Samet believes ETS is a carcinogen, he finally recognizes the nuraerou~ problems and uncollainties with theETS epidemiol- ngical studies, Ironically, those criticisms would preclude a known human carcino- gen clasaifieadon for ETS under EPA's Guidelines, I-le states that "because of the methodol- ogin diffiealtles of assessing lifetime expo- sure to ETS and precisely describing risks that are not substantially elevated, the~e uncertainties in assessing the lung cancer risk of ETS may never be fully resolved though th~ remain a subject of research:" Despite Ihe equivocal nature of the sci- ence. Dr. Samet very clcarly artiediated the "politically correct seinnce" of ETS when he weat on to say, "in the ease of ETS it would be unfortunate if potentially ir- resolvableseiandflo unoextainties thwam, d euntrol.~ The ias tm is coned'el. It is a desire by anti- - tobacco activists to eliminatz tobacco from the landscape. Clearly, they have no inter- • st in allowing objextiv¢ seiendfie donee to get in th~ w=y of achieving that goal. To do so would be politically inoor- root. Re~. T~ ~,ley (II~V~) is r~nklng m~n~rily T!53151462
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"]~uxsday~ Sc"pt ~mber X2, L~91 ~OLL CALL Paod and Drug Polloj" Misleading Ads Can Have Negative Health Effects But the Potential Benefit of Advertising Is Enormous, Says the FTC Commissioner. By Janet Steiger Advertising is all around us. It informs us, entertains us. andsometimes offends us. Last yea& Al~ctiean. ~om~ _~.ie~ s3cnt roar ¢ th ~.~ q~IJ~on~to {adwerl~p.r ~ c ts to ¢onsume~rs. Adverffshg eanbe~a POwer~ ful eng,'no ~f eomp~dtiun~. ~u]~ t'l~'~five advettisj'rtg~Can a~iousl~y harnt censure era, "l~he Federal Tradn Co m misalon has b eea entx'ustadby Congress with broad rcaponsi- bility to en~uro that advertL~ is truth ful. The potentially negative health effects of misleading advertising or marketing of products such as alcohol, tobacco, and food ar~ a high priority for the commission. In one recent case, the commission charged that the marketing o f a potent for- tiffed-wine in a manner similar to low- alcohol wine coolers resulted in numerous cas~s of alcohol poisoning among young people. Similarly, the Surgeon General has called cigarette smoking the single most preventable cause of death in America. The commission issued an order agaMst Kraft barring misrepresentation of the amount of calcium and other nutrients in cheese. Cigarette advertising is now required by statute to carry health warnings that were originally required by F'I'C orders entered in the early 1970's. In 1986 the Surgeon General determined that smokeless tobacco can cause mouth cancer, tooth loss, and is addictive. Smokeless tobacco products and adver- rising also must curio, health warnings under a federal law administered and on- forced by the commission. As these cxamplas illustrate, the FTC'a role in this area is l~th to vigorously prose- cute cases of deceptive advertising and to administer and enforoo legislation eaacted by Congress. At the same time, the commission has long recognized that the potential in furma- tlvo benefit of truthful advertising can be significant. In the fond area, for cxampln, roedieal study after study has found important links betweea dice and a tedecfion in the risk of certain chronic illnesses, such as heart dis- ease and cancer. Food advertising has per. formed an important role in infomaing consumers of these fmdlngs. A study by thn FTC's Bureau of EOO- nomles demonstx'ates thcim~ of the educational role of advertising. The BE study discovered .th,3t the adver- tising and promotion of high-fiber cereals helped fnctm pobllc attention on the ointion betw~n ldgh.fiber ~ets and a dnced incidence of cancer. ~ lad to greater cunsumpdon of the fiber cereals and, in turn, encouraged manufaetorers to produce raur~ high-tiber Evea morn imlx~.ant, the study found that s~me of the increase* cau,~d by adwai.~g war~ roost signifi~at among t~ lea~t Mv~tag~l ~ontx of our This power of td.tmi~g to c~evcy verriaing is outh ful and not misleading. The FTC ha~pursued a number of cases recently concerning allegedly misleading health~reinted claims in fond and fond- suEplem~nt ad~e~rllsftlg~ l%r example,, 'fh~.~ommission k~'ued an order aga~mt Kr~, Inc.. prohibiting mis- repreaeatationr o[thoamoant ofanI~um or any other nutrients in cheese or closely related products. In anoth'esactinn, tbe commission setflad with CPC International in u case charging the company made deceptive claims that Nl"azola corn oil could help reduce serum cholesterol levels. Also, the Commlssion recently reachad a tentativesetflement in a case involving the Campbell Company's soup-advertise- meats. Thn FTC charges that the soups were promoted as low in fat and therefore heart-healthy without disclosing that the soups contalnad high inveis o f saIh which is associated with increased heart disown. In rognladng advertisin.g, thn FTC works closely with other federal agencies and the state attorneys geaeraL For health and nu- t.alden claims, the FTC has a longstanding relationship with the Fo~d and Drag Ad- ministration (FDA) through a liaison agreement that has been in effect for 20 years. Each agency's underlying statutory mandates are reflected in the liaison agree- meat. TheFTC's experds¢is in the area of consumer communication, marketing, and competition policy, while the FDA's strength lies in, among other things, its extensive scientific expartisu. Because of the complementary exper- else, there is generally close interaction between theFl'C andFDA at all levels, and case oiler case demonstrates that FDA conclusions regarding labeling claims carry great weight with the FI'C in doter- mlning the truth or falsity ofspec, ific claims in an advmlalng campaign. During the coming year, as the FDA works to implement the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 (NLEA), beth the FTC and the FDA will fac~ new chal- lenges in their liaison efforts to ensure a consistent federal policy with respect to food advertising and labeling. Food advertising is one of many areas in which the FTC shares juriadlcfion and closely coordinates with other federal agencies. For example, we shat~ jurisdiction with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Fire- arms (BATF) over alcohol advertising and roarketing. Despite these differences in statutory mandates, the two agencies havn been able to maintain complementary roles. "~his is best demortstrated by tbe Cisco fordfied- ~ case~ In this eas~, one ~ganey ad~ the product's ads and storepin~emcn~ and the other the sbe~ and color of the potcot wh~'a betde and its packaging and label- ing. Paaially us a ~sult of the succ~s of ~ eourdlnated notion, the Surgeon Gun- end has now assembled a federal task foax* composed of represantmlves titan a varify of ~¢ncle~ with sel:~-,"~z mand,"aes and distinnt expett~, including FTC. FDA, ~l BATF, to addrt~m i~n~es mi~l The Food lndustry's Voice in Washington THE NATIONAL FOOD PROCESSORS ASSOCIATION Supported by more than 500 food company members, large and small, manufacturing the majorily of the Nallon's packaged foods The Associalion that focuses only on the food Industn/issues, such as food safely, solid waste, and labeling • The only food association with laboralofies and more than 100 scientists on staff Call on NFPA's government affairs staff to learn the industry's posllions on the many food and con- sumer issues confronting your constituents. John R. Cady President John Agulrre Director, Federal Government Affairs Kalhleen S. Grant Environmental Issues Consultant Juanlla D. Duggan Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Melanie P. Oness Director, State Government. Affairs National Food Processors Association 1401 New York Avenue. N.W.. Wa_4ninglon. D.C. 20005 202/63%5900 T!53151463
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In fact, the tobacco indust~ has long taken positive children's playground. The dLstrihutio.~t of product samples steps supporting our commim~ent that young people and premiums also has beert sharply limited. shouldn't smoke. Working wRh over 100 retail cosponsors acm,,~s the I.ate last year, we announccd a scries of new initiatives count~, nearly 1 million individual pieces of aud dedicamd ourselves to an even more aggressive our "It's the Law" program have been distrib- program against youth smoking. Our efforts and achieve- uted free of charge to help retailers and their menus to date include: employees promote strict compliance with • Support for state la~s dD.t would prohibit the ,tale of . .~ate 'laws prohibiting the ~le of tobacco cigaretms to those under the age of 18. Thls year, tol~acen producta to those who are undersge. industry-suppomed Icy'relation to make 18 the minimum age for the purchase of cigarettes h~ pa.~ed in five states, bringing to 44 the mtmber of states with minimum-age laws of 18 or higher. - Support ofstatelegislation to require supe~i,~on of vending reachines in locations frequented by" minors. 8o far this year, sL* ~tates have p~ssed vending-resaxktion legislation of this kind with iadustq," suppom o Cigarette ads on billboarda now must be at least 500 feet from any elemental, junior or .senior high school or For families and adults who work with kids, we have made available a new booklet, "Tobacco: Helping Youth Say No," that is speciFteally aimed at helping parcnta help their children resist peer pressure to smoke. Over of these booklets have been distributed as a result of our national advertising and promotion. Tbe tobacco indu~ug is enmmitt exl to seeing that them actiorm and progr~n~ work. We all agree that smoking ,d~ould NOT be air, m. of growing up. TDBAC'c6 INS-~TUT T153151464
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Kay Slaughter Wins Demo Nod in Race For Cousin's Seat Charlottesville CityCouneilwoman Kay Slaughter, 51, breezed to victory over a Senate staffer Saturday to win the Demo- cratic nod to oppose Republican smta George Alien JnaNov. 5 special election to succeed ret~t~ng Rep. D. l~reneh Slaughter ROP~ Slaughter i~tirlng.dae to a s~des orminor stroke* whleh have impaired his: ability to speak. Kay Slaughter, a first cousin of the in- cumbent, won a first-ballot victory over Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Af- fa~ counsel Wilke Green and former Washington journalist T. Dean Reed. Her Der0ocrailc opponents had criti- cized her as a lil:eral who was out of step with the conservative~leaning district, and tho~: attacks quickly came back to haunt her as Alien announced the formation of "Democrats for George Allan," a commit- tee established for "all Democrats who are upset with the extremist I~crai agenda promoted by nadolml Democratic leaders and Kay Slaughter." Allen, 39, the son of former Redskins Attacks from her Democratic opponents that Slaughter is out of touch with the district have quickly come back to haunt her as Allen announced the formation of "Democrats for George Allen." ' coach George Allen, ~as unanimously nominated by Republicans in late August after his nearest competitor and the Congressman's son, attorney French • Slaughter 1H, dropped out of the race. At the samomeetlng,GOP delegates endorsed amcesur~ which would place 12-year term limits on Members of Congress. On Monday, in an atmnipt to keep his Dcmosmtla opponent further off-balance, AllcnchallengedSlaughtur to debate twlee, unce on eeouomin issues and once on for- elgn policy, early in the general eleeilon campaign. ".If you choo~ to declinu this invitation. please understand I will feel no obligation The Nov. 5 special to succeed Rep. French Slaughter will be a showdown between Democrat Kay Slaughter (above) and Republican George Allen. to accept an invitation from your campaign m the future, Allan wrote hi~'qppo. 0ant. "Debate schedules should not b~ d?.ter- mined by poll results." . Slaughter has not yet responded tO" the invitation. A first-term council member, Slaugl~ter has stressed her environmental credentials -- she is a lawyer with ihe Southern Engi- renmental Law Center--.and her suppq~ for alx~don rights. Alien has focused oh fighting against taxes and for a balanced budget. Slaughter faces ahV'.uphill task in the" sprawiing7th disMet,.which stretches fmin Virginia's nnrthernmoSt point south to the outskirts of Richmond. But D~roocrnts. dominate the off-year legislative eleetipm that will coincide with the special, and Republicans have suffered a series of set- backs in Congressional elections in the Old Dominion, losing a Senate seat and two Hons~ seats since 1986 in a dalogatlon they once dominated. The 7th is also likely to be a target of legislative temapplng when Virginia gains a seat through reapportionment and will probably have a very dh"feren t look for the 1992 elections. " -- Tim Curran Wallop.Moves Tawa.rd Bid for Governor in '94 Son. Malcolm Wallop (R) is feeding rumors that he may run for governor of Wyoming in 1994 "if everything looks good at the time." In 1988, Wallop barely won re-election to a third term, beating Demoerntle state Senator John Vinich by a scant 1,322 votes Asthma Research Study 3~.~ta # po~ aabna m,~ and $ ~,O00.O0 Michelle CoIwmhaver, RN, Clinical Study Coordinator of A~-~r &~ a-.~,~ or w~i~m ~t (2o2) Allan M. Wein~tein, M.D. Fre~t M. Atkim~, M.D. Howard Bolttnsky, M.D. Political Briefing despiteoum~mdingl'~f~byneadythr~e- ily beat all tbe t~hailengers whone narnet to-one. He cm'rently set~es as nmking member of the Energy and Natural R~ sources Committe~ W~op ran fvr governor in 1974 but failed to win the GOP nomination. Two years later, he was elected to the Senate over three-term Domocratle incumbent Gale McGee. While in Wyoming over rece~,Wallop, 58, told the Casper S tar-Tribune thatWnsh- ing~u had "aurt ofl~ft~hine~3' at~ that he was #vlng eouddern~oo to a 1994 .g~ bematorial hi& I~moernt Mike Sullivan won his and fanr-ycer term as govnmor with 65 percent of the vote last fall and has, quite naturally, not yet said whether he will seek a third term, although ther~ hasbcen specu- lation that bewouldrun forWallop's sestlf it became vacant, In that scenmlo, Wallop could f'md him- selfrannlng against Democratic Secretmy of State Kathy Karpan, ARepublleam has not served as governor of Wyoming since 19"/5.- .': ~ Mikulski,Beats Every Potential Ci~allenge~ In Independent PoD • A poll rele2~xl last Week shows Mary- land Democratic Seu..Barbara Mikulski in strong shat~e for re-eleclian next year, al~ough two GOPMembers, Rops.Helen Bentley and Connie Morella, could be in a posi.tion to challenge 'the Sanote's only Democratic woman." • Mikulski, known by 96 pereent of the vo~'s.in Mary:lan.~ ~J,aecordlng~ to the Ma- son:Dixon i~l|J ~@e,d a 52 l~cent favor- ablerafing fi'om he/'~nstiments Shehand- were ~ against hers with mum than 50 l~'eanL Bandey did the best of all those n~axL With a 38 percent favorable rating, the Baltimore Congresswoman was shown losing to Mikalski 51 percent to 33 p~reent, with 16 percent undecided. Morella polled similarly, losing by 54 to 27 percent, with 19 percent undecided. Alan Keyes, the black Republican who WaS Ih~ iOalng nominee against ~n. Paul S'arhan~ {D.~fflt) i'n I988, far,el worse. tVAkulSkt polled. 56 lxa'oant to K~yes's 24 l~aeant i~ the Lrlel matehup. Altholtgh Bandey is thought to be the most formidablu challenger Republicans could pat up against the popular Mikuiski, she has not yet announced her plans. A current battle shaping up over redis- Meting may determine the outcome: Bentlay's district is combined with that of fellow gopublicen Rep.Wayne Gilcheeat, she has indicated she will strongly consider the Senate race. Moralla, meanwhile, is seen as an likely nonreader to give up her safe House scat. One of the most liberal House'Repub- Iicans, Morella is extremely popular in her inside-tho-Beltway Montgomery County district. In fact, the Mnaon-Dixon poll found Morella actually beating Mikulskiin Montgomery County -- by 9 points. Still, the latest poll results seem to con- firm the conventional wisdom -- that the race is Mikulski's to lose. One Mason- Dixon pollster Compares the situation to that in Illinois last year, when then-Rep. Lynn Martin (R) mounted what hany thought could be a credible challenge against Sen. Paul Simon (D) only to be trounced at the polls. --Susan B. Glosser As se~n 9n CBS Morning News wilh Dr. Bob Arnott ~.tness Fleetls a complete mobi~ exerci.se, focilily sta,.ffed, with n certified illness instrudor that provMes per~o~otized fitoe*s insffuclion at ~ne Iocal~on of yoor choice. Fitness Fleet is Filness for Life 703~8-6632 161~ S~aac~ Av~,~ue T153151465
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Page 46 ~OLL CALL Thursday, ~tembe~1~3~1 Gorby Is Gaxbo In AFI's Timely Film 'Ninotchka' The premature vision of Mikhail Gurbachcvretoming t~ a Moscow transformed by its pcopl~ f~om huus~ m~t at his da~l%%~n~d~m~ thinl~m'0m~niar~ ly of tha~grcatemblemafic imag~ in l~ls6"nstoin's ][van The Ter- rlble', in self-imposed exile, called back by his peopin, the fur- hatted and bctde.-browed Ivan loomingin profiled clos~upwhile in the background, as far as Ihe bye carl see, a toduous procession made up ofbanner-can~ing Mus- covlt~s b~ceching the Tsar to return and rostorc..ordex. A]as,theevents ofthecoup,and Gorba~hev's behavior, turned out to have more resemblance to the intricate melodramatics of Mnssorgsky's opera Khovan- shchlne, with its doctrinal dis- pates, danuncindons, and immo- lations. Gorby isn't the heroic type. As a matter of fact, hCs more like Garbo in Ninotchka. In that 1939 comedy by Ernst Lubi~ch, which is playing Friday and Saturday at the American Film Institute at the Kennedy Cenfar, Garbo is a dour, aloof, ar- rogantly patronizing Bolshevik ,~nt to paris to investigate what has happened to threomcmbcrs of the Russian trade commission scot eur]iur to broker Ihe sale of the jewels of an erstwhile Grand Duchess. She discovers that the thre~ comr'Mes have already be~n cor- rupted by Gay Par¢~ (how you gonna k~cp "era down on the col- l~ctive farm, e~:.)0 and Ihanks to a The great actress plays a dour, • aloof, arrogantly patronizing Bolshevik whom Paris transforms. combination o fchampagne, dc~- dent Parisian millinery, and Mdvyn Douglas at his most ban: todng, she tee is coffupted. Sent back to Moscow with comrades in disgrace, she pines poignantly for the West-- sccncs of Go;be mashing in fie May Day ln~ed~, sadly singing "Ca, c'estParisr with the eomredesin a baron avmmenL All escape, but th~ ending is ¢quivocal,tosay th~ IcasL While Ninotchka might sim- ply be, as Gerald Weales says, a hit too categorically, about ~ s~xual awakening el d~ ca~ous malden~long a stspl¢ of Ix)polar drama," i~ is also about th~ indi- Yidua~ioa of th~ Russha !~mpM. In tha~ way, it's unruly the oppo- si~ of the ta'olc~ariaa pageants d the golden ~go of Russia film. O~e cinssics of Ei~aszein Advice and Dissent The Political Arts, byJon Newlin TI53151466
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THEY BROUGHT HOME MORE PANAM GOLD, SILVER ~ ~NZE THAN AN~'OD¥ HOW'S THAT FOt~ METTLE? in Havana. With support fromit~lntemational • Shooter Development Fund, theNRA trains the nation's best sho0ters at the At the 1991 PanAmerican Games in Cuba, the men and women of our U.S. Shooting Team: • won 24 goldmedals, more than any other U.S. team. • won54gold, silver andbmnze medals, more than any other U.S. team. • set 19 new Pan Am Games shooting records. • shattered three worm shooting records. U.S. OlympicTraining Center, sponsors As National Goveming Body for them in competitions worldwide and shooting sports in the USA, the helps our U.S. Shooting Team develop National RifleA~sociation of America the skills, pride .~ and th.e mettle -- to isproud.ofourU.S. Shooting Team ~ . go for thegold a~t'l~e OlympieGames. and theirunequalled performance ~' '" U.S. PAN AMERICAN SHOOTING TEAM GOLD MEDALISTS Fritz All,t. Vail. Colorado Bob ~xh. Cnlt~ado SFi,g~ Cd~t~o Susy Milk'r. Loxahatchee. Flc~dt Ddxa Sinclair. "I~ -~rd. O~gm .Mike Anti. Colembus, Georgia David Johnsolt. Hampt~.. Virginia Don Nygo~ La Cre~'cata, Callferaia Ed Sualr~ Celumb~. Geocgia TI53151467
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Ha kin S,et t,o Announce for White House Sunday; Kerrey Likely Next ~nfluued froflz p~ge I by lbe end of this montlx R is unlikely that any Members other than Harkin and Kerry will run in the primaries. Suns. AI Guru (D-Term) and Jay Rockefeller (D-WVa) have said that they will not bocandldat~, as has: ~ro u~o Majod ty ~atcr R~oh- /fo~ftffng ~be~0fC~ngress has been n pa~ty nomilxe~ for president since Son. George "If he beats me in Iowa, he beats me in Iowa/said Harkin of Kerrey. "I wouldn't put a lot of money on it." MuGovom (D-SD) in 1972. The last sitting Meanber cleeted to the Whim House was Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass), Guru and Gephardt wore among fear M~mbers who run for the Domocrafio nominatina in 1988. The others were Sons. Ion Biden (Del) and Paul $imun (Iil). The eventual nominee, Guy. Michael Dnkakis, sultcted Sen. Lloyd Bcntsen (Texas) as his running mate~ Beat.~n, 70, has said he has no pinna to ran, but some Democrats believe that ho is a potential nomine,c if no clear le,ader om~ges in tho primaries or if tho convanilon noxt summer in New York is deadlocked. Harkin, 51, provided a brief glimpse ofhlss~rat~gy earlier this w~l¢, spo~oring a Senage am~ndmen~ 'to .~h~ ,8,1 billion from th~ d~f~r~e, bodg~ ~ de- motic spundlng. His proposal was dofgated~ 69 to 2g. Kcrr~y, 48, said last week that he, e,xpccts to make, a docisiun r~garding his presidential plans by the end of this month. "My interest in running for president is b~ed upon the belief that the possibility eta better fu- ture 20 years from now will be determined by oar acdons today," Ke,rr~y said in a statement last week. The two Midwest liberals haw inherited the modiaspoflightaflor a summer of uncertainty about which Democrats would taku the presidantJul plunge. One by one., prominent ligures in the party announced they would not be running. So far, only thre~ Democrats hava officially announced pteai- dential campaigns: former Sen. Paul Tsongas (Mass), former Califomin Gov.IorryBrown,and former Irvina, Calif., Mayor Lar~ Agran. Virginia (3on. Douglas Wilder and Arkansas Go.,,. Bill Clinton New York Guy. Mafia Conmo's intentions am still a mystery, but huts n doubtful starter, aspccinily afl~rsaying ho wunld bo an onthu- siastio supptxter ofa Kvrroy can- dldacy. Other Members who ar~ e,van 1 r.,.m weil known than Harldn and K¢~ rtW have born :the, objects of p~ ~ulation in annnection with pnss~Io presidential cam- paigns. During the last few months,Reps.Stephcn Solam (D- NY) and Dave McCurdy (D- Okla) and Suns. David Boron (D- Okle) and Max Bauens (D-Mont) have all been mentioned in semi- $~rions articles in n~wsweckilvs as possible candidates. The latest of the bunch, Baucus, quickly squashed thorumor, Assuming they both run, Harkin and Kormy will b~ light- ing for the same constituency in early primary center. They are from neighboring farm states and arc making domestic issues such as health care, unemployment, and tax faknass partoftheirrheto- rio. Kerrey's candidaay could buck the conventional wisdom that Harkin will win his homo state's Febma~, 1992 caucuses. Kexroy, who served one term as govoruor of Nabraska, is popular in Iowa. Iowa political observers doubt Korrgy can beat Iowa's favorite son, but he could make, an impres- • iv~ showing. The anntcst tween elm two ca~didat~ timid actually make, the race more interesting (and me.re worthy of media coverage) than if Harkin wore simply to run away with Iowa. Asked if ho ware con~mod about Korrcy chnilanging him on his homo tuff, Harkln said last wcck,"Ifhe, b~ats m~in Iowa,be beats mc in Iowa. I wouldo'tput a lot of money on it." If the men lacks heavyweights, it appears that it won't be hurting for colorful characters.Harldn isa fiery speaker who doesn't shy away from pounding the popular presidanL whom ho calls in his spcoohns, "George Herbert Walker Bush." Harldn calls the vice preside,hi "J. Danforth Quayle." Korroy is a Congressional Modal of Honor winner who gained national attention as a dashing governor who dated trasa Dcbra Winger. Harkin and Kerrey, like all the other candidates running for the Domocrutio nomination, aru likely to pusition themselves as "outsider" candidates railing against entrenched Weshington • interests. Bcltway bashing is emerging as the main Ihomo of the campaign, with Brown and Tson- gas leading the charge. As Mombea's of Congress, it will bc difficult for Harkin and Kerroy to wear the outsider In the Wake of Georgia Redistricting, Will Gingrich Go for 'Safe' GOP Seat? that the new map could favor the Republicans. He thinks three or four districts could turn to the GOP. Continued h'om page I bo weighing the mce."Thcy'rc a Soviets, could take on Dome- different breed of Republican cradoRep.RichardRayintho3rd OVU there on the north side [of disaict, one that contains a go~l Atianta],° says the ptognesticat- 55 percent of the population in ingGongrcsaman, notingthosob- Gingrich's current district, the urbanites' generally 6th. consarvatism. "I think he will nm in the 3rd7 To the south of Atianta, where vantores one Congressman, do- Gingrich carrontiy holda court, cllningtobonsmedwiththepr~- "they're, concerned about home schooI~, abortion, waving the Lewis believes flag." But, Gingrich notes, already about 356th dlsuict rasldents bold a rally to ~rgo him to"como on up Been so, Gingrich'could sdll de*ide to run somewhere else for example, against Democratic Rop. B.uddy Dardon- But ho and other Republicans arc hopeful that a change of oeeeasoO', that the plan will out survive scrutiny by the, Bosh diction. Administration's Iustico But Gingrich could decide Io meatorthefederalcmzts. pick up and bsad to the nm+,hem For now, it's still chaos, a week Atlantasubarbs, thonow6thdls- after the Icgislatux~ passed itsplan trice, whereasolldiy Republican loteThars0aynightaflexweeksof seat has been created but where deliberations that climaxed in Gingrich is le~ well known and hentedconfereaeecommitteescs- would almost cetlaialy face stiff dons just befot~ and afterLabor Akeady, one GOP state xepru- Members and seatativc, Herman Chrk, ha~ the red~ pt'oees~ say that d~d f~ the new ~ and at s~v~-'al factor* prompted the, lcasttwostat~$enatoc~at*~dm murky outonmo, tbe being state House Speaker Tom Murphy's (D) deep-seated dislike of Gingrich. The uicky carto- graphic rusk of drawing a second majority black district in the state provided the second impcmtlve; the wishas of incumbent Mem- bers of Congress finished a poor third to thns~ dictums. Concede* Linda Megg*zs, staff dk¢ctor of the state Senate's re,- districting committee, "Thorn's probably not a Congressman who's entirely happy with the plan." Meggc~s, a vOeran of two previous rcdistricfings, also sc- knowledges that "there was less attention paid to incumbents than what we've, ~een in the pasL" Still, she, says Membcr~ had a Continued on page 49 The New Georgia Districts Sere ~b Ke~ at a Demo- era~ For the '9~s event in M~. He'll be ma~g ma~ more speech,. mantle. H~n, for in~c~ h~ b~n in W~hington for twod~d~.Hcw~ ~aidoto ~ House Sul~ct Committ~ on US involvcmant in Sun~t ~hin 1973 ~d 1974, ~n ~ fiv~ t~s in ~ House ~d w~ just ulcctMin 1~ to h~ second te~ in ~ Senate. H~n won with ~om ~ 54 to 46 p~n~ l~t ye~ in a Senate ~cc aghast GOP Rcp. Tom Ta~c ~t was sup~scd to be cxwcmely close. Kcncy h~ b ~n in Co n~ess for only ~r~ y~,~tar wiuni~ h~ s~t wi~ ~ ~pr~sivc 57 ~rucn t of ~e vote ~ 1988. BUt H~n ~d Kency may have ~t~ luck ~ o~ers have had in pain6ng ~emselves as "cu~ide~." 'We some cx~n~ ~ ~ ~d Ke~y fit ~at mold," G~rgc~ Univ~aity ~fes~r S~phen Wayne, anger of The Rood ~o the ~i~ Hc~e (St. ~a's ~s). r~egado for a w~e ~d ~ ~n an a ~eneg~c ~ a li~, ~w-fic ~m~L ~d in Ke~y's ~ing ~ much era new--or heis ~dwi~ ~ s~cex~6cane • c mold ~." Mem~rs who ~ for pr~ident f~e a aig~V~t h~c~ s~le. ~e ~t Mcm~r ~ ~ a pr~id~6~ n~inea from eiSer p~y, McGov~,lost 49 s~tes ~idoot Rich~ N~on (~ Mcm~r ~I~ 20 y~ ago. K~y ~d H~n c~ h~at ~eywon't~ob~e ~ o~Mcm~ whomn for p~id~t ~ 1988. O~oReps.J~ ~fic~t ~d Deug Applega~ ~ch ~ i~u~on~ c~gns ~d ~h plc~ up dolega~ ~ ~e ~m~6c fian~ Gonv~fion. int~ons, ~ ~ ~d Ker- ry ~ve ~ sch~ for next few w~. ~ ~e ex- ~s~~t~ S~y (w~ch ~ M ~n ~nd Mo~y h New ~ DC, W~oMay in T!53151468
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Supreme, Court Deals Blow to Calif. Request For New Census Data Continued from page 1 rcspons* and may end up having to issu~ a subl~ena to the Administration to the closely ke@t ~ofonr~alion. Sawyer can- ran& ,that ~_~ :~e~tal,v¢ bran~ ~gea~ cannot w[fl~hOld:~,l~ ~alualflelafOn~adon • fi'om Gongress. The Supreme COurt d~cision ~z a blow to slate legislatores hoping to as¢ enhanced popaiaOou counts tor~d/stficff0~ next year's*lectioas. With the decision, the Suprnma Court, 6 to 3, denied u lower court ruling that manded that the Ccesas ~axeau releas~ the dam to California's siam Assembly, which is in the midst of the tricky task of redraw- ing tha state's dis~ct boundaries. Reapportionment has" boostad California's total seats fi'om 47 to a record 52. Although theSup~eme Court did notmle this we~k on the merits of the legishmro's request for ~c ilumbers, u lower hearing on the matter is not likely until early now year -- fax too int~ to affect the 1992 elections. The decision pots a daml~r on the plans of dozans o~ state logislators who have demanded access to the datain the months since Secretary of Commerce Robert Mosbachcr declined te~cvlsothedeccnnlal anumcratian -- and the apportionment of House seats arnong the states. In statss mnglng from Ohio, where the state House Speaker Vcrn Riff¢ (D) has fil~ alWcedom of Information Act rnqutst asldng for themumbc~, to Texas, wher~ state Atmrnay Genctal~ Da~ M~las has thrca~nc~ to go to nou~.ovc~ ~t~¢~ issuc~ poEff¢/ans hav'ecag~:~ysought data, which corrects census figures for documented undezcounts o fsach groups as blacks and H~spanics. Th, Census Burcan has refused to grant any of the FOIA requests. Sawyet's was a formalzcquest fsom th* subcommittee, and according to Hous~ Counsel Steve Ross, thaCcnsusBamau will havotitdcjustifica- finn for continuing to withhold the num- bers. "It is dine to renew our erfo~," Sawyer said yestmhy. Ross added that it" a subpoena war~ sued-- a rare occurranc~-- the Adminb stration would almost ecaninly comply. And it's slill possible that ~e coveted 5gores will bo r~lcased through a pending case iiled by New York City and dozens of s~es and municipalities. That case, which has been reactivated since Mosbachcr's decision,is ~xpcctcd to come to trialin .early November, and some poliliciaus arc balding out the possibility that the Census Bureau may be forced to rniease the adjusted counts as part of prc.-trial discovcP/process. -Ge0rgiaRemapping Pays Little Heed to the.Desires Of Members Of Congress Co~tlnued fi'om page 48 gibus: "Iohfi I~wis probably'had as much compotcr dine as the canferc~s dM," says. Lewis, however, mninlalns that"I don't think they 'ware really concern~l about Members of Congressandaboutpmtcc~ng incumbents." The lack of rcsponslvanass, be says, cams from th~ Speaker, who, he says, was iesismnt that each of the Adanta- arcs D~mecrats absorb a certain amount of newRcpublicansin order to accomplish his dismantling of Gingdch's disPeL But that maneuver, say Lewis and a host of both Democrats and Republi6ans, could actan~y result in a n*t D*mouratic foss in tl~ Ganrgin Congressional delegation. "With Mr. Bush being a very popular lm~idcnt and a weakDarnoctatlc aominc~ [on the ballot next year], it's annc¢ivablo s~vcral Rcpublieans couldbo ea¢ctcd on hls coa~ls with this plan," says L~wis. The Congressman estimates that I~-. tween thrc~ and four districts could mm to th~ GOP. Ctm'~ntly, Gtx~ia is th, least Republican state in the $onth~ in toxins of Congrcssitmal reix~antmion. &vaslat~d by the r~istrictlng, ~ publicly that tim Dcmoerats may bare "shot ti~msdvea in the fo~L" In an intcaview, he pr~icts a n,t gain of two to roar COP Ncot~bele~. unc~tsinfies linger ~1~ tbo mw O~¢~cml l~m ~n Geor- gia is a been m Republicans. why m~ ~y Demec~ D~vid Wcdey. the 1990 fewer than 1,000 votes. Wodcy, who si~ys he wig run in the reconstituted 3rd disn'ict, says that the rein applng #an creates "a ba so of sight solid Domoeratlo scats while the gepublicaks have a base of one o~n safe seaL" Currnndy, Gingq'ch is t~ sole Rcpubli- can House Member from G~orgin, though Jones rcFgcsents an area that has tradition- ally ¢Iccfed Retmblieans, and many of the othor Democrats in the delegation are con- s~rvativcs who survivo despite disMcts that voto Repsblican at the prcsi&ntinl loveL And that is yet another of the imponder- ables.Othea's: whether J'asdc¢ will approve the Oeor#apkm, as required by the Voting Rights Act; wh¢therRay willmn in th~ 3rd district or in Rcp. Roy Rowland's (D) 8th district, whe.r~ his home has Ix~n placed; and how, at'ter months o~ discussion, it all came down to this? 3usdce Depamnant approvalis l~rhaps the blgg~t quasfion madz right now. B lack legislaters had wanmd to ~ a third majodty-blask seat in tbe slam- or, bar. ring that, a black "influenc*" district with bhcks coestltudng a':lcast45 tP-.soentofthe votc~s. fused, th~ Cong~slo~al plan rams ~¢ heavily agricultural s~cond district ~p~- sunni by Rep. C~ades I-hither (D) into a Tho lesdce I)opa~nem may say flint's dep~un~nt wonX No cn~ knows. ~I jest don't ~md why ~boy did wha~ tl~y d~d to hlm." sayaLvwls of Ray's pl~h~ inlmving hls Imme moved to tbo Sth Enter the Roll Call Gerrymander Contest Send Us the Weirdest-Shaped 1992 District You Can Find. Three Winners Each Get a World Atlas, Admirers and critics have called the weirdly shaped dis- ~Hcts that the late Pep. Phil Burton (D) drew in Ca~fernia ten years ago great works'of modern art. And some of the rem~ips this time around are rivaling such Burton master- pieces as Calif. 18 and Calif. 36. Roll Call wants to give full exposure to the works of art w~ought by the 1990 Census and its aftermath, and we're asking our readers to help: Please send us examples of wildly shaped proposed or actual 1992 House districts. By "proposed,~ we mean ad- • vancod as part ofabon~fide plauby alegislative committee, court, party, or legitimate interest group. Newspaper clip- pings are acceptable; we don't require primary sovxces. Roll Call will publish the Top Ten Gerrymandered Dis- tricts as our contribution to the ~promotion of modern art next month. The deadline for th~e~ntest~s Friday, Sept. 27, at 5 p.m.. The three winners " the ~olks who submit the best district maps, accor~ to our hlgh]y subjective aesthetic standards -- will each get a copy of the Rand McNally I1- lustrated World Atlas ($79.95 value). Mail entEes, along with your name, where you work (op- tional), address, and source of the map to: Roll Ca~l Gerry- rounder Contest, 900 2n~[ St., NE, Suite 107, Washington, D~ 20002. Or you can send the entry by fax to us at 202/289- 5337. Your own cvmments on what the district resembles, or other witticisms, are welcome and may affect the final judging. Please note on your barry if you want us to keep you anonymous; otherwise, entrants who submit Top Ten maps will be cited in Roll Call. Also, include your phone number so we can contact you if you're a winner. T153151469
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Continuing Mystery Of Cool 'Disco" Dan Disco Dan -- i.e., Cool "Dlsoo" Dan -- is not my fawdte graffiti artist. No, no, no. My fnvor~m is that hectic duo Robert and Claudia, "Party Animals In Love:' whose mcssug% complete with a voluptuous ham and swldent arrow, remains at 6th S~t and the ~uth~as__t~@+u~otwast ~e~w~,, Yet Cool "Dise~C~Dan is the s~ m~1. of thcmom~nt, wcll~nown to]ffill4welle;~ for his repetitive, yut tantalizing wofR,.the guy seized on by the~ew and ouwageoo~y funny andscumloglcai free puperCrackDC and by relatively gray, old hat, City Paper. "Cool" Disco Dan (I think the quotstlon m~xks arc l~tter placed m'ound the first word) has gone undonal, like a DC Ki boy. His mnssage has bccn spotted oo a water tank in Baker, La., yet no one hcr¢ seems to know his who or his why. Who is ~his disco man? And why disco, such a pass+ pursuit? A couple of pcople have met a young rrmn who claims the name. One is Cyn~a Connley, the nmnag~ of the popular night- spot, D.C. Space at 7th and E Streets, Another is SaraRndelet, assistant manager of 15 MJnotes, the dance club responsible for the publication of Crack DC. "Ho's a 20-year-old guy from Northeast or South- east. Maybe ha's lived in both p~ns of town, I'm not maliy sarc," says R~dciet, throwing very liRia light on the subjccL~ Dan, she told Roll Call, is a membm'of a loose organization of DC graffiti artists, MCA, or Murder C~piml A~ HIS friends am pmtc~dvc of him, slnce his orris illegal, not to mention intensely annoying m some propcW owners. Fewknow thu guy0r wtmt I~sm~s~gois. He never uses shading or oodandish stylis- tic letters; he never idonti~es his home block or gang. He'sjust Cool "Disco" Dan. Neither the Met~opolLmn Pelion nor the Capitol Police can remember pulling Dan in, though it's a misdemeanor called smJction of pmpoRy" to deface walls or fancns. Washington has a minor graffiti problem compared with, say, New York. I-~n'dly ever is them anything sprayed on the Me~o roll cars, for instsnoc, so there is no grafiui squad. Write on, Dan. Seventh Day Heaven: Eastern Market Opens Sm~day, Starting 9/22 Sunday, S~y. ~ways a Iitlle mixed in, A dine thing, I goess, a matter of finality, a miniature of the end of a Me, of a vacation, of a weskend. In the Neighbo,rhood A go~ example of the disco graffiti-man~s art, in a schoolyard on SOt Street, The serifs are particularly i~triguing. But what does "F,F.C." mean? changed. No more moping for Hillites here sin~ th6city in 1965 decided not tO locked into two jobs and family, and no tear the old place down for more pafldng. more motoring m gut m where tim acdon is -- Annapolis, Adams Morgan, malls, clubs.spons, wherovcr.Theacdoois going ~o t¢ here.thanks to aSunday thing that has saddcnly accelerated after crawling for years. Itwas crazy that the unc day when you had some time, ove~,thing was closed.For For years, 7th Stree# SE, was a graveyard on Sundays. Pennsylvania Avenue was blowing papers and dented aluminum cans. years thatwnsWashlngton. On theHill,7th Street, SE, was a graveyard. Pennsylvania Avenue was blowl/~g papers and dented aluminum cans. Gradually, the commercial area of the Bill Ix~J~an to rcviw, Sunday- wise. And from this month on,it's going to be a whole new bnilgamn. Sunday is going to be a stomping, chomping, jumping, walking, buying kind of day. Recent decisions and actions have canned a deluge of ncdvity in the central commercial area ~ to which, hurrah. Conrad to the change is the decision of the Eastern Market merohants to Lry Sunday hours starting Sept. 22. (New Eastern M~rket evening hours, until 7 p.m., start Sept. But Sunday is going to be forever This is thn bigg~t st~'~t-iavel change " OLUMBU Not only is the market cotFected to thaw peopln to shop, to have breakfast or lunch, but also it has virtually reined other m~r- chants I0 open up to take advantage ofth~ cxp~cled traffic. All of a sudden, Sundsy p~ople are to be faced with a feast of options: Just on 7th SweeL ~E, between North C~rolina Ave- nun and Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, the Sunday browser can chow down at Market Lunch, famous for the fish and craboake sun dwicbes; "Dmnicliff s Tavern, whichhas been catering to Sundays for years; Prcgo. the crusty sub and dell place; Che~e and Cheer, soon to be offering Russian cuisine frnmexpandedquarm,sscvcndaysaw~k; Provisions, with an upscaln soup and sand- wich menu; Roasters on the Hill for coffee, cakes and snacks; and Broad & Chucolato, offering sit- down m~is of varying sizes. A block or two away in the 600 block of Pan,sylvania Avanue, SE,brunch is the hot Sunday offering at suvcml pub~. Irunica~ly , thls vcrltable orgy cames with immediate conflict ~ between the market's merchants, mostly Maryland muu who flc~ thn Bill on weeknnds, and the market crowd, a raffish bunch of urbanites who are sure to squawk and squeal about the loss of their prc~cnt freedom to use all of the Farmer's Line (the space under llm old g, con tin rue0. Thamark~t memhante wony that theflna market absorbs all of thck parking (.meters don't rcqulm feeding on Sunday) and that thero will be Iess shopping as a rcsulL But th~ flea market has become so pop alas with ~endors tharimow spr~eds nlcararunndthe Eastern Marknt building, and th~ By Duncan Spencer Glangows, the most influential and numerous of the Eas~rm Market the city's Dqrdrtmant of Comumcr and Regulatory Affairs asking that thn flea marknt bc resented m the Market's Hall and Plaza. The city responded at the end of August by threntoning to alnsodown part of the market and restrfct it to the narth end of ~astm~ Market (Roll C211, Sept. Tom Rail, tbo e.xarb~an auatlone~- and farnltur, d~aler who %uns" th~ fie~market -- at Icnst as much as any such gaggle of idiosyncrats can b~ run ~ has agreed to m~ut with the GIasgows and DCRA with the aim of reaching a compmmiso which would nllow both activities, the Sunday Market and otc Flea Market, to coexist. "Wo will walk the exlra mile:" Rall told Roll Call. "Ourbooks are open to anyone at any dine, and everything has b~n ac- counted for.... We're going to takn care of cleanup." Rail suidhewasconfidnnt that anyinves- tlgatlun, such as that threntoned by DCRA officials, will exonerate his operation. Simply put, vendors rent spaces outside the market through Rail, who pays himself a portion as manag~ glvas a portion to Market Firs Gallery, the clty-spprov.ed les~e of thoNarth Hall; and nsas thornst for adverlising expenditures. Rail points out ha's doing a job the city should be doing butata fraction of the cost of a salaried bureaucrat who would doubt- less need a staffand a new car. An official of thoDCRA toldRo]I CMI the r e..al iensun none of the city r~gulatars was nvca aware of the expansion of the flea market (uvan though it's been them for II yours). "Nobody hera works weckonds," the official said. Colunmist's So~, Age 8, Is R~bbed A new nadir in crime hit my pint of the Hill a we~k ago when my eight-year-old was knocked on Ms ~car cud by two toughs and stripped of his roller blade.s. They laced 'era and ran off. The stru~t skates weren't evan his but were borrowed from a friend he was visit- ing. He walked homo in his Socks, a great dealsadderandwis~r only to thecxtentthat he now knows it's very difficult either to fight or flee on roller blades. But count on thenelghbors, who, when they h~ud of this pmaicular oulrage, said, "Well, if he was wearing roll tr blades, he was ~sking for it." The other c .o~ment: "At least he didn't try to r~isL" May the creeps who did this deed break ti~ir anldas on the nearest granite curb. T153151470
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Observer: Senators Should Question Thomas On Key Congressional Issue, Legislative Intent Can~aued from page 5 eX~utlve's int~pt~tmion i~ there ~c c~in in~g Con- ~ion~ in~nt ~ ~u~b~ aM d~blg ~gidity ~w~d Con- gressinn~ pr~ed~ and ~e some ~ ~p~i~ w~en it is aooompani¢~ by ilI-dlsg~ised hos~lity towed ~o ing[sia~v~ b~ch ~d i~ mm~zs. candid about the fact that ho doesn't und~stsnd or ~late to Coagrass. His ax~utiv~-~enter~d perspective oom~ ~m y~ of ~icc ~ ~c I~tlco D~nt. in~, only one ~fic¢ ~ ~c Co~,S~Day O'~nn~,h~ t~hR~of~o~haw ~nLg~of~c~ in ~ ~suo of lc~sla~ve inten[ h~ ~omo ~e~ngly impor- HOH: Scatalogical Reply From Stark To Nemesis North Continued from page 1 one evening befme the August recess, when he hoard strange hoiluring coming from a wain in the opposite direction. When the other train rounded the bend, freshman Sea. Paul Wetistene (D-Minn) was in the driver's seat, clearly enjoying himself anti whooping like a schoolboy. '/'ha Senate employee normally charged with pilodng the vehicle was relaxing in one of the passenger's seats. Explained Wellsmne's press seca'etary, Doug Stone. "He has a great reladonshlp with the sub- way &ivers:" Stone also said he was lr~tty sure there was a safety mechanism that wo~d have vented Wellstone from driving the car into a wall. Stark Language. HOH candy obtained an interesting exchange of loners between fraud Couwa ligure Oliver North and otttspoken Rap. Pete Stark Call0. North, who is now pro*ideal of an organization called the Free- dom Alliance, recently mass- mailed a four-page letter angrtly calling on Americans to petition House Speaker Tom Foley (D. Wash) to get him to remove gunco Committee. It's one of those fundralsing letters in which every other word is underlined and every s~ntence ends in thre~ exclamation points. Stark managed m get a copy of the fandraising missive and sent North a terscreply on Iuly 17: "I haveread yoarpathcticletter in which you refer to RSP. Ran Dellums as an 'incredible seetu-ity risk' and a 've~ dangerous ap- poimment' to the US HouSe leer Committee on Intell~geaea. "Frankly. Colonel, you arc full of shit. "I lind it incm0ihle that anyone wh? would conspire to s~il su. phisticatedweapon systems to the Ayatollah and the Iranian regime would oven consider making such chargea .... "For you to stoop to making such inflammatory, grouodluss attacks for the purposes of squeezing direct mail dollars from a vulnerahle mailing list is sick antipathetic. You ought to be ashamed." North replied in a Joly 31 letter to Stmk: "Thank yon for sharing with me your thoughts regarding Con- gressman Ron Dcilnms. While I am sum you use more sophisti- cated language when convtzsing with your constituents, you did taut as the Co~t has cha~ed its perepecfivc, and the polieymak- ing burden has gone more and more to Congruss and the ~ le#slaturas. The di~ction of the burden is appmlniate -- policy decisions belong in the leglslatums, not in become, tulbear, ahle~ and the Court's po~ioy role even morn ~tsidiously powerful, if Congress- can't writ* laws and outline intent with some leeway for its need and l~rog~Rives. One almmativc. anathema to the eonservativea who like the direction of this Court, will be far more detail written into law, and far more micro-management of the execu- tive. ClarenceTh0mas has served on ~ ~ongrcssinual,taft.evar~as~e has served in both the excout~ve and judicial branches. But over tha yeats, his w~Mngs have re- fleeted sharp animosity toward Conga'ass and toward Members themselves. How veal thi, ani- mosity play ootin his approach to the legislature on tlm Supreme Court. How much benefitof the doubt wilt be given the ]egislatur~ in signaling ils direction and intent in the lawmaking p~es~'i ~e-,~ ~ar¢, ~riflc~ guestions for S~nators toasq~.and~forThora as to answar. N~rman J. Omstelh Is a Resident Scholar at the Psnerlcan Enterprise Institute. Interrogating the Nominee P,'~o b~ Laura Paueraon Sen. Patrick Leahy directed sharp questions at Supreme Court nominee Ciarenea Thomas as hearings on the juOge's confirmation began this week in the Russell building. Sen. Howard Metzenhaum, another ,lu.dieinry Committee Democrat, looks on approvingly. league, Congressman Dellums." proud new parents of a baby bey. Travel Talk. 'Tis the season In a possible denouement, on StephenTaylorMcCarthyUp- for Congressinnal travel surveys. Sept. 5, Mednbevs of Congress ton was bern last Wednesday Yesterday, the Roll Cell Report reeeivedalettcrfromNmthagain night in SL Joseph, Mich., and Syndicat~ {:no relation to this complaining a bane Deilums. P-n- weighed in at six pounds, one newspaper) released its annual closed was the letter from Shark ounce. -. ~ . qtudy of taxpaysr.fonded Wavel and Noiah's reply. " TheCong~essmanwesonh, and. by House Mcmbers. for ~e birth of the" child, the The top travelers during 1989- From Stark to Stork. In hap- codple's second., .~ccording to 90, according to the report, ware: pier news. Rap.Fred Upton (R- R~.Opton's.Washington office, Raps. Mervyn Dymally (D- Mieh) and his wife, Amey. are the everyone is'dolfig fine. Call0. Stony Hoyer (D-M~. Bill liberal Rap. Ron Dellums (D- indem:l make clear your whole- Calit) from the House Intolli- hearted support for your col- P kw d O i d " il Riehardsun (D-NM)o and Stephen Salarz (D-NY), each ac on regon Res ence Is a Tra er with... Sol~z visited the most coun- Cenflnuedfrompagel Washin~totLNcexlleestosay, the Arlinle I that Members must, ftrstcleeted, while tha other was tries, however, stopping in 58 but fccmet O~vgonReps. Denny Senatordoesn'tspemialotoftlme "wbenalect~d, bean/nhabltantof turned down because he had a different poets of ca~l. Dymally Smith {R) and AI Ullman (D) at his Aloha abode-- though he that Stht~ for whleh he shall be business and residence in DC got 35 new stamps on his pass- might disagree. Smith defeated hopes to build a house thct~ one cbesen." bumot~inhishomestatoofVis- pore Ways and Means Committee day~ and oftea stays in hot*ls Abedyofprceedentshasd*vet- ginla. In total, the survey reports, ChalrmanUlln~nin 1980 inlarge when be retinas to Orngon.- o1~1 over tbeyears tm thesubjeet, ~ Seant~ has been more Ioni- House Members took morn than p~t by aeonalng him of having Moreover, Packwood's lilly and, in gencaal. Members don't ant. Ode Senator was s~ated de- 900 trips alxoad at taxpayer ex- "gvn~Washington,"vadha~ing opponent, Rep. l.~sAucoin(D), have to own lXOpea'ly in tha~r spi~ having lived in hls stste for pensudmlngtlm 101stcoogrcss, onthefaetthatUllman, likcPaek-- is a C~itol I'rafi vt~ran and no seam, but thay have to do things -lessthanayent, whilvanotherwas for a total of abont 6,300 days wood, owned no Oregon prop- "outsider."AuCoin"lmsanapart- that suggest citizenship, such as seated who had, whil~ serving ia away from Iha US. coy. ment, a stationary apartment,~ vote, obmln aetato driver's ll- thaArmy, dcelaredheiat~dedto Today, Publio Citizen, the There's a sig~fificant differ- that he rents in P~tland, said ecas*, or have a mailing addr*ss livelnthcstatoardthenranforthe Ralph Nader group, wtll~lense e,m.~howevar: Ulinzanowneda lXC~seeretar~B~Goklsmit2~ orapetrtmenc Senate. its bienn/al sm'v~y of Congx'~- Washington apartment and an Paf, kwood, litm ~tsmtless othex Two mm elected m the Honsu Aenordlng to Ssuat¢ Iri~torian s~Iml travel paid for by s'F~]aL me~mJ~softbeSemle.eveasn~ hishomcs~le(fivehm~tsawayby Oeev~esdise#slifiedbecausebc elecl~ anr, h,o~. whathc~ k's M~mbers of the Ho~se took T1,53151471
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Commi~ee Hearings and Mark-ups.LIVE over~e phone atyour desk or an~here. • Choose from a broad daily menu. • Pay on~ for wh~t you use. For information call: (202) 966-22~ Fax: (202) 966-1770 A se~ce o~ Natio~l Naff~w~st Ne~ozk, L.P. NON-CREDIT COURSES UNIVERSITY I ~J~ I SchoolforSummerand Cont.inMng Education CAI.I.: (ZOZ} 687. $94Z o¢ I:AX (zez) 687-,'054 for mote infomudo~. The Calendar Thursday, September 12 The llth Annual Nike Capitol Clml- leege thre~mil¢ foot race is ran by teams rqxes~nting all three bmncbes of the gov- ernment and the media. Teams will be formed flora such Hill offices as Sons. Richard Lugar (R-Ind), A! Gore Term), and Thud Corhron (R-Miss) and Reps. Buddy Darden (D-Cra), Richard Durhln (D-Ill). Richard Neat Chris Shays (P,-Conn), and Peter Pazio (D-Ore). 8 a,m. E~t Potomac Park. Call Jeff at 703/276~005'6~ The Congressional Black Caucus holds it~ 21st Annuat Leg~lative "Week- end featufingissn~ forums andworkShol~ on such topics ~s The Survival oftheBlaek Male, the Dilemma of Black Student Ath- l~es, and the Role of Single Black Women in Educating Their Children. Members of the Caucus and other black leaders will speak and lead dLseussions during the three-day event which slartod Sept. 11 end ends Sept. 14. The Washington Hiltun, 1919 Conneetlcut Ave., i',YCq. Call Jane at 202/675-6744, ext. 48. Friday, September 13 The Health Task Force of Women in Govarnm en t Relations sponsors Medleal" Profesalanal Liability: PaRing Reforms in Perspective featuring Walter Olsnn of the Manhattan Institute for Policy Re- search; James Rasenblum, chairman of the Medicine and Law Committee of the American Bar Association; PctarLiebald, LA to Sen. John Danforth (P,-Mo); and Michele Vnrnhagen of the Senate Lalx~r and Human Resources Committee, 8:15 to I0 a.m. 385 Russell. Call Mary at 202/245- 7388 or Robin at 202/337-2701, The Congressional Black Caucus Health Bralntrast hnl~ a panel discus- sion on Violence in the Mriean-Ameri- can Community. Rep. Louis Stokes (D- Ohio) will deliver the bpening remmks. 9 a.m. to noon. 345 Cannon. Call Leslie or Stephen Cleghorn, directnr of J~l~ for the Homeless, who wllI hold a discussion. 12:30 p~m. 2222 Raybum. Call Even at Capitol Hill Toa~tmast er~ hosts its nnal Humorou~ Spev'..h Contest. Guusts me welcome. 1'2:45 p.m. B318 Raybarn. Call Karen at 202/225-4021. Satttrday, September 14 1991 Have a Heart Chad Everett Ce- lebrity" Sporls Weekend goes throughout th~ we~g~t ho ~lEm,at ~ ose*,o~i~t ~,o rk- e~,pol~oeo~, antilxdlatrieiaas on. the froqt lines ~t'thv batdoagaiast child abase. Members Flaying in. th~ Tennis Tourna- ment include Sen. John Breaux (D-La) and former Sen. John Mel chef (D-Meno. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Omni Shoreham Hotel 2500 Calvert St., N'W. Call 202/862-3952. Sunday, September 15 The National Political Congress of Black Women holds it~ seventh annual brunch in honor of the Congressional Black Caucus Legislative Weekend. Guests include DC Mayor Sharon Pratt Dixon who willspeak on empowermentof women. 10:30 a.m. Washington Hilton, 1919 Connecticut Ave., NW. Call Barbara at 202/829-7957, Monday, September 16 The Heritage Foundation kicks off its first annual Hispanic Heritage Month with a lecture series to reflect the diversity of the Hispanic community and recognize Hispanic contributions to American soci- ety. Events continue through OeL 15. C',dl Troup Coronado at202/546-4400, ext. 360, Tuesday, September 17 The National Bureau of Asian and Soviet Research spearers a panel of ports chaired by Sen. William Ruth (17,- Del), who will speak on Soviet-Japanese Scotty at 202/225-7032. relations and changing the balance of Hill Staffers for the Hungry and power in East Asia. 8 a.m. 608 Dirksen. Homeless hosts a brown-bag lunch with Call Victoria at206/632-7370. Gulf War Contributes To Drivers' Overtime Continued from page 3 of 1991 should be considerably lower than in the first quarter, since the security pos- ture adopted during the Persian Gulf war has been relaxed, and also because be could reach his statutory mlary limit. SaJarlea for the rest of the CapitolPaliee fore6 should be lower during tho second qumer, l'qichol~ said. Records for the see- end quarter of t991 will not be available until Inlet this month, according to the f'me of the Clerk of the Hou,~. "Gingrich's workday often starts at 6 am. and goes past midnight," Elankiey time pay. His extra annual pay from the Whip's oHiee totals$5,333, and, unless it IS raised, his maximum pay for theyear would be $50,172. Dot. Edwin Panee works as a driver for House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt (D-Mo). He earned $16,676 in Capitol Police salmy and overtime during the First quarter of the year and collected another $1,500 from Gephardt's leadership offiea. Pence, who used to drive for formar Majority Whip Tony Coelhu (D-calif), eama a base salary of $37,093 and is eli- ~aid in explaining Awkv, ord's high tam of. gible to earn an additional $9.273 in over- pay. "George works venT, ve~/long days." Other Capitol Police off'r~rs working as drivers for House leadet~ earned similarly high paychecks during the first few man ofthcyear. Dee. Stereo Wel~ was a driver for House Majority Whip Bill Gray (D-Pa), who resigned f~m Congress yesterday. Well~ wilt continue working as a driver- bodyguard for ~e new Democratic whip, Rep.DavidBoninr(D-Mich).Wellsearaed $12,562in CapitolPoliee salary d~ring the tT~st quarter of 1991, He also $1,333 f~m the ofliea of the Majority time pny. His top ~ for 1991, again as- suming that his stipond from the Mojority I~adar's office stays the ~rae, would be $52,366. SgL Jvseph Powdl, who works as a driver for Hoas~ Slxaker Tom Foley (D- Wash), earned $17,288 during tbe first quaxtarof 1991.Powell earos a base salasy of $42,589 and is digible to earn an addi- tional $10,647 in overtlm¢, bat he does draw addi~nal pay from tbe Speaker's oltiee. Powell"s top pay for the year. then. Boos* bfinodty Lead~ braehel uses a fit'at qt~rlor, aa amml ram of $36.000. Ti53151472
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Rep. Thomas's New Hill Staffers Hail From Wyoming Bfing~g a ~ of borne to his DC office, Rep. Craig Thomas (R-Wyo) has hired a number of Wyoming natives to help out on the Hill. Kev~a Bol~nenblos[~ th~ aaniot ~A and jedin~tl, energy, anclpubl~1~d~ wifi. ovc~ Interior and Insular alTalm dul~es h~rn Dan Nan'. Nuatz has IeR the Hill to purane a master's inpublic administration from thnUnivcrslty o£Vi~glaia. In addition tolntc~orandlnsular affairs, Nastz handled forelgn affairs and defense issuea. A native of Wyoming, Bohnenblast, 31, has be~n with Thomas since 1989 when he mmcaboatd as political consathantand deputy can~palgn manager for the Congressman's 1989 special election to replace Defcuse $e.o'etary Dick Cheney (R-Wyo). B ohneahinst alsoworked forSen.Mzleclm Wallop (R-Wyo), both on his field staff and during the 1982 and 1988 campaigns. He earned his bachelor's in journalism in 1982 and his law degree in 1986, both from the University of Wyoming. Chris 8poonee, an LA since December, wBl keep his Ba~dng Committee duties wtt~le assuming budget and bp~inees issues as well. Spooner, 23, graduated in 1990 from the University of Wyoming with a degree in political science. Spouner also worked on Thomas's 1989 campaign doing advance work. "Lots and. I.OLS of yard signs;' he says. Coming aboardwith the legislative stalt'is Mike Smith, a new LA for defense, foreign Jim Edwards, Rep. John Duncan's press secretanj and LA, has takeh a post with the RNC as senior writer. II ~falrs, and EPA issues, who sta.-'led.in Au- gust. Smith, 23, is a 1991 graduate of the Uni- versity of Wyoming with a degree in see- ondary education. He is a native of Casl~r, Wyo. Smith interned with Thomas during the fall of 1990. " CatherlneKloe.kslemmoves up ffdm stuff ussistant to unmpmer uammuniea~ions dlrce- tor.Shahas been wlthThnmassineeIanua.ry. Photo by Chrb.~yers Th e Wyomingites on Rep. C~ig ~omm's s~aff (from le~): Mike Sml~, LA; Cathe~e Kl~lem, compu~r communications dlr~lor; Chr~ Sp~ner, LA; Kevln Bohnenblmt, se~or LA; and Dan Kunsman, s~ff ~nC ~, 23, ~ d~ dc~ in s~ ~s~t for a y~ wi$ Sen. S~m ~li~ ~i~ s~iolo~ ~m P~ps University, Andfinally, sommerintern Dan Kunsman was promoted to staff assistant. He gradu- atedfi'om Colorado $1ateUnivea'sltyin 199 .with a maj.or in political science and a minor Kunsman,22,is a native ofl.xaamle, Wyo. S OMETHINGVc'ILDER: Dinn Copelin has announced she is leaving the office of Rep. Jim Olin (D-Va) on Oct. 1 tobeeomethe director of the Vh'glnla Liaison Office in W~hington under Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder. The offian serves as the federal reta. tlons ann fo¢ the Commonwealth. Copelinisreplaeing Glenn Davldson,who was ~x:ccntly named director ofecmmuniea- lions for the Govesnor's Office. Copelin, 36, has been with Olin's office for more than three years. She starlcd out as an LA handling approprlalloas anti special projec~ For the I~St year, she has been Olin's LD,and since March,sha has been h.is slaffdlrectorfor the SmallBusiness subcom- mittee on environment and employment. She is a 1980 graduam of Oklahoma's Central State University wham she earned her degree in polltical science. PRESSING ON: Rep. John Duncan T~un) recently lost a staffer to ~e Repobli- can National Committee. Jim Edwards, Duncan's press secretary and LA for judiei~, health, Public Works, communications,~d Congresslonalreform, hasjoinedtheRNC as a senior writer.He had bcenwith Dunean's officeslnceAugust 1989. lldwants began his Hill czreerin 1981 as a Thnrmond ('R-SC). In 1982,heiatemed with thcn-Rep. Dan Coats 0t-Ind). He then left the Hill and worked in a variety of jobs in Georgia and Teanc~ee, including teaehlag at Carson-Newman Col- lege in leffnrson City, Tenn., and designing advartisem~nts in Atlanta. Fxlwards asmed hisbachalor'sandmastefs degrees from dm University of Georgia in 1980 and 1983 respectively, both in speech communication. In 1987, Edwards began work toward a doctorate in mass communi- cadun at University of Tennessee, which he is currently anmplating. Hill Climbers by Laura Pearlrnan COM P I.IT I~RS:_-~ H~wardWoll~ (D- Mich) ha~ hiredHoIIy Hines ~s hi~ new eye- who haswonaRota~y$chnlarship tostodyin Germsay. Hines, 27, comes from the o ft'~-'e of Rcp. Lmy Smith (D-Ha) wher~ she worked for morn than a yean as systems ~dministrator. Before that, she was a secretary ~ putez ope~mtor in the district nffiee of Rcp. Fff~'..s e.arn~I an ~o#ia~ de~t~ in ap- plied science from SIPak Teghniual College in Canton, Ohio, andis currently cnrol!ed in the Department of Ag~iettitum's graduate school where sl~ is studying computer sci- WRITE RIGHT: Bill Woodwell, a former aasislant pre~ secretary to the late Sen.Iohn Heinz (R-Pa), has smrt~ his own communications finn, William Wondwell Jr., whleh will focus on the development of written communiuatinus around a variety of pul~lic policy matteas. Woodweli, 28, worked for Heinz for two • yearsln 1985 and 1986,startlng out aspress aide and becoming assislant press secre.ta~. FoSowinghis temtrewlth Heinz~ Woodweli moved to the League of Women Voters where he was the national press secreany during the 1988 Presidential Debate Series, spcechwriter to LWV President Nancy Nanman, and associateeditor o ftheLeague's magazine, The National Voter. After leaving the League, Wcodweli I~- came an account supervisor at I-lager Sh Inc., the Washington pahlin relations fm'n. He handled a variety of cnviroamen~ and public policy aecunnls. Woodweligraduated from BrownUniver- sity in 1985 with a dcgrea in English, It's said that the mus'~ people like reveals a lot abou~ them. If so. you should find Guest Conductor on WGMS 103 5 FM~ cvcr.'Sunday at 5 pnk~an eye-openlng exlx:dencc. It~ the unique show where Representative~ and other Vvhshlngton El.P.s pick thcir classical favorites to share with you. Listen. You'll love it. Because 103.5 FM Gue~C~rnduerorisnothingl~, W/GMS d~an the taste of power. Listen.You'll love it. We down the house on Sundays;& T153151473
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R,O: L L CA COOPER-BAR'ROLL REALTY Chestertown~ Maryland 21620 DR UM FEINT. Superb87acm hunlng recent.2 pands, o~e mliesandy. erosion free Chast~River fionL new 4500 square loot coleelal home. $L875,000. CHESTERTOWN'S FAMED WATER STREET. Chroming V~tedan home, barn with workshop, off.street pe~ng, River view. 5 BR. 3 $275,000~ PHEASANTF1ELR. 500' deep Chester River freetage, large Estate tracts. 10minu.tas from Dhestertown, only21eft, pdcesstart at$109,000. 2~ ~om~ ~d'~12nfiles'~ Ch estettoW ~ groat eppottunfly for,[nvestoff CHES~B]~fE]~ p.dvata cove, Cape Cod, 2 PP. 4 BR, 2 and 1/2 scherzo pt~rd~ basement, 4. arms, MAGNIFICENT CHESTERTOWN WA'IERFRONT. V'¢rodan in pertect condign, dock. totalb~ restored, tram eedous views, 5 RFL 3 and 1/2 FP, ate.. $525~000. PLEASE CALL: 1-301/778-0330. PRIME PROPERTIES PERFECT LOCATIONS 918 North Carolina Avenue SE. 2 BR, one and 1/2 BA freshly painted "move-in" condition w~th one BR rental unit ($650 per month) $269,000. OR Grand unrestored 2400+ square fool Victorian with in-law suite complete wi~h kitchen and BA plus a 2 stor~ carriage house with automatic door. No better Iocallon on Cap;tel Hill. $339,000. #15 Seventh Street SE. Nathan B. Carnes ThePrudentlal (o) 202/'745-3500 (h) 202J383-7063 Preferred Properties Apartments & Houses on Capitol Hill, Come to... Commemla~ ol~ce space: Capitol Helen Carey Hill townhouse near Union ~ta- RealEstate lion. Prime condition, CAD, 711 E St., S.E.-- kitchen, lull BA, W/W, exposed 543-6162 b~ck, off street parking. 14(;O square feet. For informatioe c~li OLD TOWN 202/842-0219. Attention Hill Commuters sD~namlte 3 BR, 2 BA, with 3 out- e entrances. Groat far sharing with roommates. Whir Investment Potontlell ACRIENE 703/263-4524 PRUDENTIAL PREFERRED PROPERTIES ALEXANDRIA/OLD TOWN $214950 NEW OFFERING The best of O d Town at a mason- e~e price. Ait hflck lownhouse 3 finished levels, lots of quali~ and gergeaus deep garden. It's sper- kling~ Evenings. Waldi Cmwford 7O3/37O-35O3. MoENEARNEY ASSOCIATES CAPITOL HILL $157,000 Sunny 2 ER, 2 BA renovated condo in exclusive building over- Inoldng Lincoln p~k- Hardwood ffoors,~FP.*bowwindows*. Excel- lence. "The Faidax', 1200 East Capllol Street NE. Call Tom Marphy 301/946-6442 3011681- 5200. prudentis Pro sited Pmpo aries. GLOVER PARK $87,500 Large very sunny one BR comer a~ul~ent wlth beau~ful uee~ned views, harD.oDd fleers, gre~dos- el= and perking. Roof deck and axerclse room m beilding. Excek lent finishes. Superb cond~an. Cell 202/298.6898. 18 NORTH CAROUNA AVENUE SE Perfect coedRion, fine quall~. Ma~'o sea block Cap~ 3bkidm. 3 BR,2aed 1/2 BA,4woedbuming FFS. Save $25K: bey before $388K. OPEN SUNDAY 12-4. 202t364~228, . ARIJNGTON $108K OASIS FROM WORK dldng room. sup~ dean. st.av:ly ~ W,O. Matte. FHNVA. ewt-~r 70~P_76-1435. ~LVER SPRING SRORES. NORTH FLORIDA. Beautiful loC $~t~00. No t~eer~b~ e~r mkts~L adtar 6.'00 7~9~8-4745. SPECTACULAR TOWNHOUSE Cep~b~l Hill, 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA 3 blocks from Union Stailon, m~;~e floors, 18 foot ceilings, gourmet kitchen, jacozzi, library, alrium. FPs, patio. CAD, sea. syst. Patient ~ In r entertaining. 202/544-1338. = AvailabM after 9/15. Lovely one BR apartment with hardwood floors, FP, GAG, laundry room, bike teem, storage unli. 2 b~cks from Capftni South Maim..$825 per month. Indudec ut~ihes. Cats allowed. 202/547-1848. CAPITOL HILL Renovated 2 BR townhouse. Only3 blocks from Union Stafion. Availabkiimmediatdy. CAD eanmity system and FP. Evenings 202/364-1927 and days 202/789- 8888. $975 month. . CAPITOL HILL English ape~menb 4th and GSE. Walk to Metro. Renovated with new eve~.- thing. FP, W/D, AD. $590 whk~h includes heat #us electric. 202/544- 7582. CAPITOL HILL Exc~ont location. Sunny one BR. One block to Hart. CAD, laundy, carpeL private paflo. Convm~ent. 202t224.3477o 207J544. CAPITOL HILL 629 Cone~tutkm. Spacious 2 BR, one and 1/2 modern kitshen, AC, W/D, pado. $1300+. 20?./833-5500 extension 5333 weekdays. CAPITOL HILL Sho~ong tenn. loxa fan, shed rooms $4g0-~:~: ~. cien~s ~ one BR $1t70. One block Imm ~ma (:~o~ GAC, FP. CAPfTOL H~.L 215 9~ Sl~eet SF- Newly docoraled Dee BRI~ small qulet CAPITOL HILL One BR L C L A S S F 2 BFL 2 BA tovmhouse ~n Seath Fak- I ~. P~t. tennis, all ~nve~ ~ ~s. 15~nu~C~l~L No p~ ~O~ ~1~5~7~1 a~ ~ pro. NORTH GEORGETOWN/GLOVER P/~l~ Fbmished Er~lish basement effi¢iancy apartmenL Ava~ble now. Private ant~nce, $565. Mrs. ~/ack 20~/861-4085 or 202/244-870 f. ~ h~ma n:e~edi ~ 7 ~em~ ; `11/,~l~at~ Rant,$~50~ ~lRoman ALE30,NDRIA. Mae/ramaki to share spacious 3 BR 3 and 1/2 BA townhouse. Master BR su los with cathedral ceilings. FP WIDe AC. ten- nis c~rts, close to I,-3~..$475 in- dudes ulif~Jes. Mask {w) 202/224- 5721, (h) 703/354-9466. ONE BLOCK FROM CAPITOL Pm- kissional to sham executive 2-stoq/in presfigioud localiea, elegant appoint- masts an. d furnishings. 202/544.2696. GEORGETOWN. Female wanted to sham beautikil 2 BR aperlment. Hard- w~od floom easy parking W/D in bulling. $468+l/2utilities. 202/338- 8545, ADAMS MORGAN. M~ster BR in beaufikilrowhouce. Pdvate BA, huge do.sets, deck. Gmatlecafion. $520÷1/ ~. Joann 202/224-9704. 202/265- 1635. . LINCOLN PARK. Charming 2 hardwood fioom, skylight D~N, Female non-smokers only. $400 in- dudihg utlilfles. Available October 1 st. Andrea 202/544-3942. CAPITOL HILL. Male,'femde to sham 2 ErR apartment with Hill stellar. WID, FP..$450. October lsL Brian 202/ 225-6~21. CAPITOLHILL 2BR,townhou~.. W/ 0. D/W. CAD, pdvate pe~o, off s~et ~Id~..$895+ut~e~. 202/r~.~.~7166 ROSSLYN S'FJDIO. Metro only 2 bk~, walk to Georgetown, 10 ut~s la Hill. Free health ekib, pool Outstanding view; montxnanls tdi. 24~hour se~,'ily. $650month free ufi lies. Avallab e 9/15/91,703/243. 7674. CAPITOL HILl Two 2 BR spattmants in histetlo k:~mhouse~ EaRn kitchen. O_~ and 1/2 BA, ~qJ'a¢ious for e~ltertata[rtg. Step~ ¢~pttel, SO~, ~, ~d, Ro~se or- rices. Available Seplamher 1eL Ds~id 202/544~$20~ or 20PJ548-6162. DUPONT CIRCLE. Apartment ho~aL Fully fumlshed 2 RR, 2 BA, 2 TV, linens, dishes. $1500 month. 202/ 362-1816. CAPITOL HILL Sunny, spacious one BR. t2~andDNE. AC, newappik ances. $585. 202/546-5746. CAPITOL HILL/UNION STATION. Sunny one BR, one BA AC. FP, slate genre, polio, W/D, D7,~. $635. 202/ 54E-4291, 3011881-2490 extension 103. BR towshouse 2 and 1/2 BA carpet- ing W/D pool FP. Half bhT..k Metro. 15 minutes Capitol $1295+. 202/4E6- 0836, 207J547-4091. . 3 slo~J Capitol Rift tewnhouea with 3 BR, 2 and "1/2 EtA. riving room with FP~ dining room bitches and a light and airy lamily ream on the top floor. Smell hasementwith s onle stemge eapan~ty CAD electrlo heat WID and back ~/ard with storage shed. Availaide Ootober 1,1991. Formoreinformalion or showing, call Jerome Thompson (w) 7031045-9400, Janet "~hompson 703/506-18CO or at home after 7:00 ~m 202/543-1314. OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA. Charm- ~ng townhousa in brick-paved court- yaM. One block from river. Off-street p.ar~.ing. Secudtysystem. 2 BR, 2 BA. e'erfoctfocshazlng.W/D FP bdckwak ed parle. Ava abeCotoberlst. 703/ 528-0113. CAPITOLHILL Efl~ency. Fh'stand F, SE. Hardaood floors, ]~ge win- dows, bdck wall, AC, 2 blaaks Metro. ;550. "l~m 202/544-0906. ALEXANDRIMOLD TOWN. 2 BR 2 BA condom slum, Great v sw o fiver/ Capitol. $1250 indudlng perking, utili- ties. 703/548-6282. CAPfTOLHILL 2 ErR tewnheuse on Duddington Place SE. Stuck, 2 FPs, one fuil and 2 halt BAs large modem kitchen, wood floors, deck, WlD. CAD. $1300 month beglnnlng October lsL Call 202/543.6373 ~t 202/225-6161. One BR aperient on Capitol Hill. Near Metro. $550+ulililies. Call (w) 202r205.3117 or 202/543-5369. CAPITOL HILL Dramatic contempeo mty. 2 large ErR one and 1/2 BA, FP, CAC, security parking, patio. $1100+uliltlec. Ms. Rshor 203/544. 8762. Really Group. One BR..Secure mnevated bumming. One bkic~ Capffd South Metro.. CAD, laundry harciwood floors. $725 In- dudes uliilies. 70~o83-0938, 202/ 623-2333, Newly mneveted unlomishod Eng~sh basernent effi~enp/ apartmenL 6 blecks from Copi~. Male preferred. Wood homing FP. patio, u~lit[es dUded, 202/547-1~47. CAPITOL HILL Sueeyo~e EtRsparl- menL AC, W/D. 2 bloc~ to Metro. $630. 703/979-9887. CAPITOL HILL 15 Tlir~ SI~et'NF_ Eff, dancy. English basement, f~lly W. $700. ~ ~02/543-21¢3. CAPITCR.HILL 606C Street NE. C~e l~R, CAC, D/Wo hatdweed fl~rs. FP, FURNISHED AP,~TMENTS. ~ott ARLINGTON. Non-smoker. 2 BR, 2 DA apal'~ment. 2 and 1/2 b~ocks to Metro. W/D. D/W, CAD, pool..$450÷ 1/2. 703/527-7327. MOUNT VERNON. Room in pdvata house. $350permonth ineludingulili. ties. Smoking household & have eat). Ca 703/780-9248. ALEXANDRIA. Male to sham 2 BR condo. Available October lSL Near 395. Must Eke dogs. $277+utititlas. 7031379-9294. 2 BR house on Capito~ Hill. W/D, CAD, one and 1/2 BA, FP. Pdce negotiable. Call Michaela 202/224-4B79, 202/ 546.4066. SPRINGRELD. Pmfesdonal singte/ couple. Lower level of 3-level lownhouse. BR BA, LR, FP, lauedry. Share kitchen, $600 ndusive. nings 7081455-3425. CAPITOL HILL Non-smoking profes- sional to sham 3 BR, 2 and 1/2 BA townhouse with DOSOther. 3, blocks UaionStatlan. WlD off-s~'eetpar~kig, AC, FP. 202/544.7560 eave meg- NE. Female to share furnished townhouse. WK) D/W. FP, patio. $3~:k.1/Rut~es. ~u~n 202/224-5636, Julia 202/544-4063. ARUNGTON. Room in beautiful, large 2 BR condomloium. Parking. Me~o, flteeas cantor, eaea~, lounges. peer. =ananil/es. $420. Anne 4256, 709/243-1091. CAPITOLH|LL Ner~sm~king ferule. 2 BR, 2 BA rowbeuse. NANTUCKET FALL G~TAWAY. l game BR.ZBA. 7~'~4. E D S WATERFRONT VACATION PARADISE ST. MICHAELS, MD The speclac.lar v;owaof the b~ and the romanic sunsets rn~e ~ 9 ~cre estate unique! ~ea~q. 5shlng.. and swimming are right at y~r ~=~. ~a~ la our ~or ~a~l and ~ o~ by ~e wa~ of ~e ~d~d granite fireplug. There's over 5000 s~ f~t ~his ~mkey'pem- belted Rent ~ the week or MANHEIM MANOR 3EB & BREAKFAST INN Spend your weehend at M~nhaim Manor Bed & Breakfast Inn. 140 South Charlotte Street, Manhelm. Pennsylvania 17545. 7171664- 4168. Enjoy our bounlikil break- fast, AC morns with private BA and colerTVinamsteredhistoriohome (circa 1856). ~'Rnutes Irom Renais* sance Fair. Hayddelsleighride. Amlsh dinner offered. Enjoy our Victorian hospitality. One hour from DC. RADIO PRODUCER. Technical, on air, commerelal station experience Pciifieal experience a plus. $20 $25,000. Resumes only: 405 Her Suiting. Washington, DC 20510. COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR National covimnmental organizat~ol seeks expedenced media relation! person. Excellent writing, editing speaking sk~lis. 2+ years required Sale,'7 commensm'ale with experi ence plus benelits. Mail resume, dips tolerances to GECC~ 1717 Massachu salts Avenue NW. S~ite ~L2t 5, Wash ington, DC 20036. OFFICE MANAGER/A[JMINISTR/ TIVE ASS(STANT. Unique oppem nily for highly onmpotanL versatil person to work with weil-establishe downtown public affairs consultin firm. Must be abM to take inltiaflw possess excellent wd~ten and or= communications skills, and have gne M tarpemanal skills. Job dut~esinctud managing o ffice and personnel schot I ulec, answering phones, data ent~ maintainIng finandal records, costal with Congreaslanai staff and dlant! and pffmary aesls~nce with market,s ' andlobb~..ng strategies. Mustbape flc~ont in word Perfect, OuatVo/Lotu: and larelllar with the legislative Ixol ass. Salarj $29-$23K plus benefit: Send resume to Personnel Manage PO Etox 65942, Washington, D~ 20035-5942. INYERN. Consalvativa 0raesrool PAD loekin9 for student for paid n search postdon. Applicant ghoul have knowledge of Wordperinct an general offkieexpofianco. Interests applicants should send resume an reeearoh/writing sample to Stay Gmaninger 50! De#tel Court Ni #100, Wash ngton, DC 20002. BUSINESS RESEARCH. Wanle~ Grad students with mseamh and wff Mg expeffanne. PatS-fires. Hlilex .1~.~ encaa plus. Send resume andwn~ sample(e) to 120 E Street SE, Wad legion, DC 20003. COUNTERHELP NEEDED. LE Be CAFE. Freeeh c=fe and seeks ha~d~addag ~:i'.idua~ wi~ s ab~ t~ act sman4mt. time. T!53151474
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ROLL CAL J O ~ ExecutiveS & Professionals HUNTING O 1991 Bernard Hsldane Assoolste~s For over44yeers Bernard Haldane Associates h~ be~ ~e au~n~ ~ ~ fi~d el ~ HU~NG. ~mugh ~e d~rs of ~ ~an~n, ~r ~s~ a~ have ~t ~ over 4~.~0 ~ople nn~w~e w~ wee se~ng ~ffere~m~ terming ~ ~r ~e. If you ~ ~ I~ ~ bea~ W~SHIHGTON. DC " C~LL 70~5~ ~9122 FAX 703/51 ~228 A~ENTION: MR. STEPHEHS OFFICES IN MOST M~OR CITIES-US & CANADA A~. Ch~go. Cinclo~fi. C]av~and. Calma~ Spdngs. ~lombus. Gu~o. Dallas. Da~. Denver. Ds~i~ Ha~o~. Hous~n. ~s Png~ ~s. ~kee. ~rmapdiis. H~p~ ~anh O~a City. Phtiadal- phia. P~ix. Piffs~urgh. Poland. Salmon. ~lem. ~ Die~. San ~anis~. ~ Mat~. Sea,e. SL Lo~s Ta~ma. T~mge. Torero. Turn. Tu so. Wa nut Creek. W~h ngton. DC Ar~. ~rmipog ~O ~dS ~st' largest ~d~ m~edng sewloe. (Not ~ employm~t a~n~) rol]~D~ 1947 a s s o c i a t e s NOTICES NOTICE,~ MANAGER, CONSULTING SERVICES HEALTH CARE/GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Substantial Washingtonprofosslona] firm seeks dynamic ennler level eentive to head large H.G. pmctlee with focus on: PPOs/HMOs managed H.C. systems; mergerslacqs government relations (Hill and Federal agen- cies and robs. Ideal candidate possesses technical expertise in above areas, exgermnce in various Congressional health cam reform initiatives and pract~.al familiadt./with H.C.F.A. Advanceddagme(or J.D. ,aporlabl~ prac~ce synergeb'c w=th above and strong management skills. A~actlve compensation based on performonca mlriva ue of portables. FEE PAID. aubm t resumes to: THE SUMMIT GROUP INC. 1800 K Slreet NW, Suite 1122, WaShington, DO 20006 202/833-4800 or FAX 202/298-5580 PUBUCA'I"]ONS COORDINATOPJ OUTREACH SPECIALIST To workwlth Netkxlal Cloa~nghouse for Bi.Ungual Educatisn (NCBE} aJothl : project with the Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) and G.W.U. Incumbent will: 1. over~e prep~at~on el 6 publicatlo,'ls and 6 ssues of newsletter annoe)ly; and 2. disenminata information shout education of lan- guage mirmrit~es and NCBE. Must have M.A. In language misted field (Ph,D. desirable) exenlient vailing and editing skills: foml[isnty with language minority educational Issues Title V0 network Salad/: $32,000 to $42,000 per year. CAL is EEO and AA employer. For further informat~on, ¢ail: Ann W. Raybold Directorol Persorme at CAt., 202/429-9282. GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Nat~ocal trade asendation repro. sen~ng consumer-owned ele~.~ic utilizes eneks legislative.represen- tative. Position requires legisla- tive analysis lobbying, grassroots organ[zthg, and public speaking. Candidates must hove mloimum of 3 years proven legislative expe- fionoo and stm e~3 written and ver- balcommunications skills. Knowi- )dge ot electrio utility Induaffy )referred. Send salaP] require- merle, resume, add writing samples to Personnel Amerloa~ Pub~FowerAssodat~n 2301 M Street NW. Wash ngton, DO 20037. EOE. ASSOCIATION STAFF EXECffI1VES M~Jor Washington based n~- ~onal ~.de assodaflon has immedlatc ¢~anfogs lot ener- getic p~ect macagers ~o work rm fdddraJ/state legislative/ reguleto~ issues, technical co~es end ~ Indusb7 ISSUes. Legialalion/Regula- to~o Codes and Standards. an~/or A.~oc~fion expode~oe necesssy. Potished wdp~v' oral ¢~nmun'~s skils a mt~t. Stx:cassful canc~datos wilt ba self*st~s. Soma ~e Director, NEM, A, 2101 L DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Chicago based national asso- ciation seeks government af- fairs director with experience in health care issues. Position available December 1st. Downtown DCIocation; excel- lent benefits. Send cover let- ter end resume to: William SL John Dietary Managers Association 400 East Pgnd Street Lombard1 IL 60148 Trade asean{ation seeks govern- ment relations pm f~sslermJfor tax, budget, ennsumorissuos. Needs H~I experience top wfMg, lobby- ing skZis, Re,~me, sa~ histaff to 1901 Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Suite 1000. Attenrion: ~ Washington, DC 20O06. DIRECTOR OF LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS National noe-lXOilt ~m~ protoo- fol:~yir~g e~orts. M~st fi~'e ap ~in~~ ~I~P~x L CLASSIFIEDS: TIRED OF WORKING ON THE HILL? Join main a business appurtun~ that ~ change your life. 24 he,Jr recorded message 7081866- 6937. RECEPTIONIST Energy trade association seeks receptionist wlth -go~d,,pho'no sl~ill~ p!~asant zha~r~r, a~II~y to ha~dl~ d~e~e se¢r~da[ duffes, Weed; Perfect skills a~d kno~ge plus. Convenient down- town Ioc~fion close to Metro. S~a~ negoti~le, good ~nefits Cindy ~t 20~8~H722. SECRETARY/STAFF ASSISTANT science polley think-tank seeks respo~siblo individual for secre- todal/edminialrstJve duties. Excel. lent oommunlcatioo skills,ability tu handle mult~o]e projects simulta- neousl~, end woddng hrmwiedge of Wor~PorfectS.1 required. Out- standing benefit package. Near Dupont G~alo Me~o. Sala~ range $24K-$26K. Send resume to CCSTG, 1616 P Sveet NW. SuRe 400, Washington. DG 2003~ orlon to 202/332-2226, Cer~ied teacher seeks childsam as~ signments evenings, weekends and ovemights. Hascar. Goodrelorences and resume available. LoriAan 202/ L~ghtwe~ght portable Motorala cdlelar ahrme. Micro Tan. 18 monSs old. All aooessodes Included: 3 batteries;. short-tamdong-term charser; auto- mdalie adaptor. Fold-up phone ~ be carried ~ coat pockeL Original cost $~000, Selling prloe$.1400. 212/980- 2010. 1986 OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS CA- LAIS. Low miles, great gas miisage, new fires/Drakes, AC~AM/FM cae- set~e. MUST SELLI Kalth 202/667- 9259, 202/225-4731. SOFAEED FOR SALE. Grey and white, inner spring mattress. Paid $700 at Jennifer Convertible, asking $350. Ba,'bar~ 202/225-4731, 202/ 667-92B9. COFFEE and 2 END TABLES. Gold teal with mirror tops $150. Humpback love se8t $200. Call Grog 202/224- 4224. MERCURY SABLE 1967 with 61 miles (almost all highway). Very'reti- ahie, drives and looks great. B~ue book list ]s $6650, wll sell for $5800 firm. Contact Jeff Murray 202/225. 4565. WINDSURFER. O'l~ien Sensation with Nefi Pryde 5.4 and North 6.2 sails. Excalkmt beginner baaed. Go~d ~n- dillon. $40BOBO. Dan 202/364-8074 1986 GMC JIMMY. V-6 and loaded] RunUlooks Breatl 68K, $5995. Hate to but must selll Anne G. 202/225- 7054° 7O3/578-8808. 10~spend RALEIGH RAGING BIKE. SilvecJolue. great o:~c[~o¢1~ toe watod~ottle halder. Ma~e fc~ a ~ers~. $1~10BO. Misee202/224- 9774. GREAT DEALS on lik~ew squaze glen s?or~.~s oeffoe table ($60) and o~ end tables ($5O lot two). Dou9 ~02/ One grey s~fa $200, Dee pattern anfa.$140, 7O3/~'=-1732. hemu~ ove¢ t5 yest~ R~ ~Ot/ Y.B. IMPORT CAR REPAIR SERVICE Serving Capltol Hgl for 17 Years "We Fix It Right the First Time" Complete scr~ding of Foreign and Domestic Autos Same Day SaUce New Car Maintenance ComputerOIagess~o Ser~ca w/Cer~lied M~..hanics Senior Citizens Discoant 10% on all repairs O Towing Se~io~ Ave'ladle '~: 6tSfodapandenc~,.~/e~SE Mer~F.d~Ra~m,.6p.r~ .,-,,0 543-5166 vts~ Mo D~SCOVERV certificates, programs, plaoecards, epunso¢ boards. Call 703/243-6279 evenings or leave message. HANDYPERSONS AVA LABLE. General corpengy, [~a~nting and prep yardwork and clean.g. You p~ the rate. 202/338-8163. (703) 5Z7.290! WANTED: Drummer with own .e~. dip. meet, transportation, end salad t~me- keeping ability to jam with 3-pleoe rock %" roll guitar band in Hill basement Sunday nights. No pros. PCs or mousseheads. Wep~yDyisn D~ad, N. Young, Stones, other a~sortad nuggets. Only in it for the fun. plus maybe an open mike n~e gig or two. Smoker OK. Call Craig at 202/289- 49O0. Volunteer tutom and stall are needed at the Saturday Learning Exl~nslon Program to help DC elementary school students in reading and math from 10 are to noon eveP~ Saturday. Tralnln9 is pro~dsd. Call 207J724- 4400 fr6m 9~4 Monday.F~day for more information. Pro-choice Republicans interested in organizing for 1992 campaigns call COp mainstream at 202/546-8070. FREEI Adu}t cat to fl°°d h°me" Small, short-hair spayed with all shots, etches. Sarah 202/224.1142. ALEXANDRIA SINGERS 90-member mixed voice cho~Js singing Amedcan popular music OPEN AUDfflONS ALTOS" TENORS'BASSES Every Tuesday in September at 7:30 PM Morn Information: 703~350-8701 631 PenrmylvanLa Ave., 9E Washington, DC 20003 • 202~4&7~07 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED. Wenldyo, Ilke to help p~aple in crisis? Doyo, went to halp,orevent child abuse? the DO Holime needs your help. Th, Holiine is looking f~ volunteers t provide confidential crisis counsel[no and give lnlormatian and re fen-ale ov~ the phone. You'lileam how to knpmv your communication skills, and how t help people lind the resources to de= withthelr probhims. Ifyouwanttohelr call the DC Hotilee at 202/223-CALl The DO Hodinets a member o~ Unite, Black Fund. GIVE A PETA HOME. CALL ARK. Noah's Ark animal Se¢iety Inc is a nonprofit orga, rrizat[ca that vides adoption placement, spay//dt¢ programs, lost and found aerv~ce.~ and much much more, without d~ stroy~ng animals. Please call 301/65E 9043 today to provide a home for a p~ or give a contribuiloa to further th goals of the humane treatment el an mats. Send to Noah's Ark,4405 Eas~ West Highway, Bethesda, MD 2OBlZ The D.C. Rape Crisis Contorts offerin two rapu survivors support group starting in mld-Septembe¢. The gmu will provide a supportive almospber for survivors to sham wi~ others wh have similar experiences and to lear concrete wa~s to help hea~ ~om rap( us at 202/232-8709. YOU ARE NO ALONE. Unique Kids Clothing & Accessories On Capitol Hill Also featuring a great consignment dept. Located n~ar Eastem Market Metro. MenUon this ad and get 10% off. M-SaL 10-7pro Thurs. lO-Rpm Sun, 12-5pro FAX Your Classified Ad To Roll Call, It's Absurdly Simple. Here's the Procedure. 1. Write your ad out. 2. Put it in your FAX machine and d~lour num- bec 20Z,289-2205. 3. Within minutes we wgl call you bzu:k, ten you what the ad wiM cest. when Itw~ run, etc. 4. W'nile on the phone, glve us your Visa ~r Mas. ter~zd nu~b~ and cha~ge itto y~Jr accou~. (Or send us a check.) T!53151475
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"We should become missionaries f0r markets'.' - William A. Schreyer Chairman & CEO Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc.. The View Prom Merrill Lynch: Recently Dot~ Jonc.s, publisher of The "~all Street Journal, featured William A, Schreyer, Chairman and CEO of Merrill Lynch & Co., in one of a series of advertorials setting forth the views of America's h'nancJal leaders. This is an excerpt of his remarks. "Suddenly, the rush toward market econo- mies has become a worldwide starnpede. "In the US., we take markets so much for granted that we can forget how central they are to our prosperity. But as the recent events in the Soviet Union have so dramatically underscored, the tides of history are running incontrovertibly in favor of democrecy and capitalism~ We should look to the lessoos of victory and aim its uses. "The first lesson is the simplest. Market economies work, Command economies do not. For decades now, critScs have disparaged markets at~l lauded varions torms of central planning, economic control and political manipulation-forms epitomized by the structures now collapsing so ignominiously under the weight of their own failure. "Command economies are rigid. By contrast, each time the American economy goes through one of its cycles of recession and recovery it demonstrates once again the flexibility and resilience of the market system. "In recent years, many blows have hammered the capital markets: a punitive hike in capital gains taxes, the stripping away of such savings 'incentives as deductible IR/~, the savings and loan debacle, troubles in real estate and banking, the recession, the Gu.lf crisis, and yes, by the hang- over from the high-flying, high-lever'a~ing 1980s. "It would be a tragedy ol historic proportion if, just as the nations of what nsed to be the Soviet bloc arestrivingso desperately to become part of the global market system, we shrank from proclaiming and extending the vie- fory of capitalism. "We should all become missionaries for mar- kets: on the one hand, helping persuade those Met'till Lynclt ~oeemraent RelaEo~ OIK~ce, countries still clinging to command economies to make the leap to market systems: and, on the other, working vigorously to keep the world's markets both free and fair. "Here at home, this means regulating enough to make the markets work efficiently for all, but not choking them with arbitrary and expensive rules. Abroad, it means estab- lishing and enforcing equitable sets of rules for the global marketplace that will facilitate expanded trade in goods, services and capital. "It also means making full use o[ the oppor- tunities our free capital markets provid~ to save and invest so that, as individuals and as a nation, we can reap the rewards o[ that investment." Merrili Lynch A tradition of trust. T153151476

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