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tobacco and candy journal

Date: 09 Feb 1984
Length: 103 pages
TI56324204-TI56324306
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nysa_ti_s1 TI56324204-TI56324306

Abstract

States converge in Anaheim February 15 for the opening of the 25th national winter convention and exposition of the National Candy Wholesalers Association.

Fields

Box
0548
Type
Newsletter
Named Person
Allen, Marvin
Allen, Murray
Anderson, Robert E. (RJR Marketing Exec. VP, on Board of Directors)
Defense
Andreu, Gerardo
Andrews, Helen
Ansel, Ed
Arthur, Thomas D.
Ball, Don
Barrie, Steven
Barry, Timothy Patrick, Jr.
Baskin, Melvin
Beecher, Katherine
Beitel, Herb
Bellanca, Nick
Bennett, Michael
Best, Easter
Blachly, Terry D.
Blackburn, Fred
Blanchard, Kenneth
Boll, Lincoln
Bork, David
Born, Richard L.
Borne, Maureen
Bornstein, Sol
Brainard, Alex
Brick, Harry
Briggs, Marilyn
Brosch, Thomas R.
Brothers, Joyce
Buccellato, Vincent J. (PM Marketing &Sales, Sr. VP)
Senior Vice President of sales for Philip Morris U.S.A. from October 29, 1990 to April 25, 1991.
Bun, Wayne
Burgh, David W. (TI Board of Directors, Gen. Cigar Co. President)
Chapin, Jim
Clark, Bob (ABC News Chief Correspondent, "Issues & Answers")
Clark, John
Clark, Roy
Clarke, Kelley
Cohan, Walter
Cohen, Ben
Colletti, Ross
Connolly, Paul
Corbett, Dan
Corral, James J.
Corral, Manuel
Crawford, Henry
Crisp, Ruth
Cross, Ron
Curd, Howard
Dane, Doyle
Dangerfield, Rodney
Dean, Roger
Deeter, William
Diamond, Matthew
Doran, Patrick
Dunn, John N.
Edward, King
Eisman, Stan
Feldman, Marvin J.
Ferrero, John C.
Fisher, Al
Fitzgerald, Walter
Foley, Ray
Foley, Raymond J.
Ford, Gerald Rudolph (US President, 1974-77)
Ford, Richard L.
Ford, Yancey W., Jr. (RJR Field Sales Sr. VP, 1988, Sales Exec. VP 1989+)
Yancey W. Ford, Jr. was Senior Vice President of Field Sales for RJR Sales Co. in 1988, was a Director for RJR Tobacco Co., Executive Vice President of Sales, and Executive Vice President & General Manager for RJR Sales Co. in 1989, and in 1990, 1992, and 1994 was Executive Vice President of Sales. (Source: R. J. Reynolds Summary - RJR Liability Notebook). Yancey W. Ford, Jr. worked for RJR Tobacco Co. as a Sales Rep. in 1962; Assistant Director of Sales Manager 1965; Administrative Assistant to Manager of Sales, Training & Development 1967; Director of Sales Manager 1968; Assistant Regulator of Sales Manager 1970; National Vending Manager 1972; Assistant Zone Sales Manager 1974; Zone Sales Manager 1974; Director of Sales Planning 1978; Director of S. Atlantic Sales Area 1979; Group Director of Sales Operations 1982; Vice President of Sales Operations 1983. (Source: RJR Who's Who NMLRP)
Fox, Jim
Frigon, Henry E.
Fuente, Arthur
Fuente, Carlos
Gaige, Richard M.
Gant, Harry
Garber, Paul
Gary, Jim
Gerber, Suzanne
Gillespie, David
Goldbach, Peggy
Goldenberg, Edgar R.
Goldfarb, David
Goldstein, Joanne
Grandjean, Ann
Greenman, Paul
Grossman, Stuart
Grosso, Del
Grout, Donald W. (RJR Asst. National Sales Manager (1967-71))
Defense
Gummer, Rick
Halpert, Hedy
Hamel, Fran
Handel, Peter Van
Hards, Arnold
Hards, Arnold M.
Hardy, Bruce
Harken, Paul
Harmsen, Bob
Harrington, Eileen
Heide, Henry
Hennessy, John P.
Hill, Whitney
Holler, Don
Hollie, Jerry W.
Hord, Chuck
Horrigan, Edward A., Jr. (Several RJR, Liggett and CTR Top Positions)
Director for RJR Tobacco Co. 1980-1989, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer 1979-1983, President 1979-1980, and Chairman & Chief Executive Officer 1987-1989.
Houten, Van
Humphries, William L.
Jim, Clark
Johnson, Howard
Johnson, Willis
Johnston, James Wesley (CEO of RJR c. 1989-95)
CEO of RJR domestic, c. 1989
Johnston, Jim
Johnston, Ward
Jones, Rickey
Jordan, John R., Jr.
Judge, Curtis H. (RJR Bd of Direct. '67-69, VP Mrkting '68; CEO of Lorillard)
Curtis H. Judge served on the RJR Board of Directors from 1967-1969, Vice President of Marketing in 1968, and on the Advertising Committee. (Source: RJR Who's Who NMLRP)Also, CTR director, President of Lorrillard during 1970s-1980s.
Kahn, George N.
Kaplan, Sanford
Kartman, Robert
Kelley, Harry L.
Kelly, Frank
Killeen, John J.
Kleiner, Edmund C.
Kleiner, Edmund M.
Kolodny, Joseph
Defense
Kowalsky, Michael J.
Kruger, Charles
Landry, John T. (VP of PM 1970-76. Sr. VP '77-83, Dir. of Marketing '84)
Vice President for Philip Morris, Inc. from 1970-76. Became a Senior Vice President in 1977 and held that position until 1983. Was named Senior Vice President and Director of Marketing in 1984 and served on PM's Board of Directors from 1973-84. Served as memer of the Social Acceptability Working Party of ICOSI, c. 1978
Leaf, Beatrice
Lerner, H. Jerome
Lesser, Donald
Lewis, Lincoln R., Jr. (BW Brand Manager)
Defense
Llaneza, Frank
Llaneza, Jose, Jr.
Loe, Charles W., Jr.
Long, Bill
Long, Gerald H. (RJR Director, 1979-88; President '82-86)
Chief Operating Officer of RJ Reynolds, 1982-83, CEO of RJR 1984-86, served on Tobacco Institute Executive Committee, 1984-87. Replaced Ed Horrigan as president of RJR's domestic tobacco business.
Mac, Richard
Maddock, Herbert
Madsen, John K.
Maestas, Geri
Maner, Walter
Mann, Timothy
March, Dallas
Marie, Jean
Marvin, Bill
Maxwell, Hamish (PM President c.1984)
Took over at time of Cippolone. Cleaned house. Carried company into a strong defensive position.
Maxwell, Mitchell
May, Sophie
Mccormack, Bob
Mccorvey, Bill
McCoy, William D. (PM R&D)
Defense
Mcenroe, John
Melle, Van
Mellman, Andrew J. (BW Consumer Research Dir., Mktng Res. Dept. '85)
Andrew Mellman worked for B&W in the MR Department as Director of Consumer Research in 1985. He was Director of Marketing Research from 1984-85 and M.R.D. Director in 1984. He was also employed in the M Department as Group Product Director of New Products in 1983.
Middleton, Herbert H.
Miller, Kevin
Millhiser, Ross R (TI Executive Committee, PM Pres, 1968)
Ross Millhiser was Vice President of Philip Morris in 1952, VP and Director of Marketing at PM 1961-62, President of PM USA in 1970-72, President of PM Inc. in 1977, Chair of the Tobacco Institute Executive Committee and Vice Chairman of PM Inc. in 1979, Chairman of the Board of PM in 1980. The above information is gleaned from correspondence found within the Philip Morris collection of documents. The assumption is made that Millhiser worked at Philip Morris the entire time between 1952-1994, based on his correspondence during those dates, however nothing has been found in the documents verifying his positions at PM during the gaps in time noted above. President of Philip Morris in 1968 Millheiser was with Philip Morris in 1983 in New York. Knew that profitability of PM derived from addictive nature of nicotine. Why risk multi-billion dollar business for your rats, Victor.
Morgan, W. Tommy
Morra, Steve
Morris, A. Philip
Morrow, William
Moss, Philip L.
Neary, Walter, Sr.
Newman, Millard W.
Newman, Stanford J.
Orcutt, Richard H. (Sr. VP of Sales at Lorillard 1989-1995)
Ordway, Mary
Osmon, Herbert E. (RJR, TI Communications)
Director for RJR Tobacco Co. in 1987, Staff Vice President of External Affairs for RJR Tobacco Development Co. 1988-1989, and Staff Vice President of Public Policy in 1994.
Ostrander, Ray
Owen, Mickey
Paine, Jacquie
Palmer, Jim
Paul, Louis
Paulsen, Pat
Pealer, Mary Jo
Perfetti, Mike
Ports, Bradford L.
Prescott, Gerald J.
Prescott, Lorna
Prost, Andre
Puhl, Jackie
Rabin, Edward
Racey, Les
Ratcliff, Joe
Remington, James A. (PM Vice President)
Specialty is biology
Riedel, Duane
Riffle, Edward J.
Riggio, Frank
Riggio, Vincent (Vice Pres. for Sales and later CEO of American Tobacco Co.)
Roberts, Lynn
Roberts, Page
Robertson, Mac
Rolls, Candy Money
Rosenfield, Dan
Ross, Ralph
Rossi, Ralph L. (UST, TI Executive Committee)
TI Executive Committee
Russell, Dorothea
Ryder, Thomas G.
Sales, Ross
Sanders, W. Lee
Schmitz, Ellen
Scudder, Laura
Seidman, Louis E.
Shaw, Ronald G.
Sherman, Bill
Shipley, Russ
Shipley, Russell
Shipley, Russell L., Jr.
Shockley, Jack
Smith, Grady
Smith, Helen (Aunt to Mary Farnan)
Smith, Jane
Stowell, Gary
Sullivan, Gerard E.
Sullivan, Joseph M.
Tai, Hal
Tobin, William J.
Valente, Sergio
Viscome, Frank
Vogel, Laura
Wacker, Dr.
Wayne, C. N., Jr. (TI Employee)
Defense
Weissman, George (PM Chairman & CEO '79-84)
Vice President of Philip Morris from 1954 to 1956. Vice President and Assistant to the President in 1957. Vice President of Marketing from 1958-59. Executive Vice President of Marketing in 1960. Exec. VP Overseas in 1961, Exec. VP PM International 1962-66. President from 1967 to 1972. President and Chief Operating Officer in 1973. Vice Chairman from 1974-78. Chair and CEO from '79-84 and on the Board of Directors from 1959-84.
White, Frank
White, Sam
Wilson, J. Tylee (RJR President 1979)
Served on Board of Directors 1977-83, President in 1983, Exec. VP of RJR Industries 1977-78; Chair of Board, CEO and President of RJR Tobacco International in 1976 and for RJR Foods, Inc. in 1974
Witt, Eli
Wood, Jim
York, Michael
Young, Harold W.
Young, Jerry
Zuckerman, Wendy
Named Organization
Acme
Advanced Tobacco Products
Agriculture Department (USDA)
American Brands
American Cigar Company (ATC subsidiary)
A wholly owned subsidiary of the American Tobacco Company
American Farm Bureau
American Tobacco Company
ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms)
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
B.A.T. Industries PLC (BAT)
British American Tobacco Industry, parent company of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. in the U.S.
Barnes Hospital
BATUS Inc. (Parent of B&W)
BATUS Inc. is a subsidiary of B.A.T. Industries P.L.C. It is the parent corporation of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation in Louisville, KY.
Benson & Hedges Canada, Ltd.
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation (B&W)
Subsidiary of BAT U.S., located in Louisville, KY.
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
Census Bureau
Cigar Association of America
Civil Aeronautics Board (Ruled on smoking in U.S. airplanes)
Coca-Cola Company
Consolidated Cigar
Cosmopolitan (Woman's Magazine)
Department of Commerce (DOC)
Diamond (Leaf buyer)
Disneyland
Eastman Kodak Co. (Kodak) (Cigarette filter mfg from 1950s to 1994.)
Manufacturers of quality control equipment for cigarette packaging
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
General Cigar & Tobacco Co. (Manufacturer of pipe tobacco.)
a manufacturer of pipe tobacco.
General Foods
General Mills
General Mills Inc.
Gillette Co.
Grand Metropolitan PLC (Parent company of the Liggett Group 1980-86)
Parent of The Liggett Group and Liggett & Myers Inc. from 1980 to 1986
Helme Tobacco (Marketed moist snuff under "Best Choice" label)
In July 1992, Peer Marketing Associates Inc. agreed with Helme Tobacco to market private label moist snuff products under the "Best Choice" label (USDJ 7/15/92).
Hershey
Hershey Foods Corp.
Hyatt Regency
John Middleton, Inc. (Cigar Manufacturer)
*Kentucky Tobacco Research Board (Tobacco and Health Research Institute)
Liggett & Myers Inc. (Pioneer in the generic cigarette business)
Cigarette manufacturer; Pioneer in the generic cigarette business; L&M is the manufacturer of Chesterfield, Decade, Dorado, Duke of Durham in 1958, Eagle, Eve, L&M, Lark, Pyramid and Stride cigarettes
McLane
Mint (Treasury Department)
Nabisco Brands (Subsidiary of RJR for a time, then Philip Morris)
Snack and cookie-manufacturing company, often held by a tobacco company. See RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp.
National Candy Wholesalers Association
National Tobacco Council
Newsweek (Weekly News Magazine (U.S.A.))
Philadelphia Chewing Gum Corp. (Makers of candy cigarettes)
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd. (Cigarette manufacturer, incorporated in U.S. in 1902)
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd.., was incorporated in New York in April of 1902; half the shares were held by the parent company in London, and the balance by its U.S. distributor and his American associate. Its overall sales in 1903, its first full year of U.S. operation, were a modest seven million cigarettes. Among the brand offered, besides Philip Morris, were Blues, Cambridge, Derby, and a ladies favorite name for the London street where the home companies factory was located - Marlborough.
Philip Morris Companies Inc. (Parent company of Philip Morris USA, Kraft, Miller)
America's seventh-largest industrial enterprise in 1993, owns Kraft, Miller Brewing, General Foods, and more.
Philip Morris International Inc. (A subsidiary of Philip Morris Cos (1994))
A wholly-owned subsidiary of Philip Morris Companies in 1994
Philip Morris U.S.A. (See Philip Morris Incorporated)
See Philip Morris Incorporated
Pinkerton Tobacco Co. (Leading producer of chewing tobacco in 1987)
the leading producer of chewing tobacco in 1987
Playboy
Point of Purchase Advertising Institute (Trade institute)
Public Health Council
R.J. Reynolds Corporation (second tier subsidiary of RJR Industries)
R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc.
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. (Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral))
Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral)
Reader's Digest
RJR-MacDonald
Road and Track (Car Magazine)
Rothmans International
Senate
Simmons Market Research Bureau (Advertising auditing company)
Small Business Administration (SBA)
Swedish Tobacco
Switzer (developed process for reconstituting tobacco)
TAN (Tobacco Action Network)
Organization created by the tobacco industry to galvanize "grass roots" political action from among those who work in some capacity for the tobacco industry: growers, manufacturers, retailers of cigarettes, etc.
Time Magazine
Tobacco Action Network
Purpose was to encourage people in the tobacco industry, as well as any others who were concerned about what was happening to the tobacco industry regarding the misinformation that was being put out by government and by the private health organizations, to write and try to correct the incorrect information that was disseminated by HEW and others in the government, as well as the Cancer Society and Lung Association.
Tobacco Institute (Industry Trade Association)
The purpose of the Institute was to defeat legislation unfavorable to the industry, put a positive spin on the tobacco industry, bolster the industry's credibility with legislators and the public, and help maintain the controversy over "the primary issue" (the health issue).
Tobacco International
Tobacco Tax Council
United Jewish Appeal
United States Tobacco Company (Producers of Copenhagen/Skoal chewing tobacco)
Producers of chewing tobacco
University of Kentucky
University of North Carolina
Walt Disney Corporation
Warner Lambert
Washington University in St. Louis
Wilkinson Sword (Maker of WS14, a menthol compound)
Thesaurus Term
Trade Association
Tobacco Industry
Publications
Confectionery Industry

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Page 1: TI56324204
REC'D ~-r.d ~.L ~84 -- tobacco and candy vol. 212-no. 2 february 9 - feb. 29,1984 NCWA winter show to draw large turnout NEW YORK: Candy and tobacco wholesalers from all parts of the United States converge in Anaheim February 15 for the opening of the 25th national winter convention and exposition of the National Candy Wholesalers Associa- tion. The "Tomorrow Is Now!" con- vention and trade show are scheduled for February 15-19 at the Disneyland Hotel and Convention Center. Accord- ing to NCWA executive vice president Russ Shipiey, every important con- fectionery supplier to the wholesale trade will be exhibiting his lines at the show. Exhibits will be open on Friday and Saturday afternoon, February 17 and 18, and on Sunday morning. "'Buyers Only" hours are 12:30 to 3:30 on Friday and Saturday and 10:00 to 12:00 Sun- day. The exhibits dose at 5 p.m. the first two days and at noon Sunday. Business program Among the highlights of the business will be Thursday's audience- ~articipation session on management style and philosophies, entitled MNO ISSN0741-2258 Gerald Prescott NCWA president and a talk by Dr. Marvin Cetron on "Encounters with the Future." Cetron, founder and president of Forecasting In- ternational, will present the insights of an international group of experts in (Continued on page 6) Number of wholesalers down 25% in decade, but sales have doubled WASHINGTON, DC: The number of tobacco wholesalers in the United States declined 25% between the 1972 and 1982 Department of Commerce's censuses, but the tmde's sales over the same time virtually doubled..(See chart on page 6.) In 1982, the nation's 1,829 whole- salers had sales of $15.5 billion, com- pared with 1972"s 2,432 wholesalers who did $7.74" billion. In 1977. there were 2,180 whole- salers and they had annual sales of $11.3 billion. Index to Ar, ticles As a service to its readers, U.S. T~- bacco & Candy Journal publishes on pages 86 to 106 of this issue an index of the articles and ,news stories that appeared in this publication dudng 1983. According to the Census Bureau, the number of paid employees in the whole.- sale tobacco trade dropped from 37,592 in 1972 to 34,177 in 1982. At the same time, the wholesalers' payroll rose from $287.9 million to $536.t million, or 82.6%. In the five-year period since the last census of the wholesale tobacco trade, cigarettes and cigars dropped from a 77.5 % share of the distributors," volume to 74.2% ... other tobaceo products's share alrhost doubled, going from 3.8% to 7.2% ... and confectionery rose from 9.6% of their sales to 10.4%. In doliar terms, wholesalers did $11.5 billion in cigarettes and cigars in 1982. as compared with $8.76 billion in 1977. In other tobacco products, they did $1.12 billion against $429 million. In confectionery, they did $1.61 billion in 1982 versus $1.08 billion in 1977. (See chart on page 6) Leaf, Inc. explains acquisitions We're speaking with Erkki Ratio, president and chief executive officer of Leaf, hw.. and with Raimo Hertto. e.recutive vice president and chief operating officer. Leaf. hw.. t~s formed in November1983 ~, the Huhtaraaki Goup of H elsinki, and consolidates the confections unit of Beatrice Foods. Leaf Confectioner.~; Inc., and the Donruss division of General Mills, Inc. USTCJ: Why was your company in- terested in Beatrice's confectionery units when Beatrice was no longer interested in the confectionei'y busi- ness? Ratio: It ~as a coincidence that at the same time we were looking to acquire confectionery businesses in the U.S.. Beatrice was planning lo sell some 50- odd companies, including its eon- iectiot~, ~t. k ju~t h~ope~ t~ Hertto: We have been in the candy and chocolate business in Finland for more than 70 years; we have two-thirds of the gum market there and a 30% share of the candy bar market. We feel we know hew to manage this kind of business. would rather concentrate our effort in confectionery than diversify further into other businesses. USTCJ: Isn't the company in dy ~y and over the years acquired additkntal cat~y comp~aies, bat rite (Conti~ed t~ pag~ 84l TI56324204
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February 9, 1984 ~ntl~l~ ~~dc~d~jo~n~i 3 NCWA winter convention exhibitors i Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim, Ca., Feb. 17-19 Companies Booths Adams & Brooks, Inc ............. 221 ~d-Comm Advertising ............ 616 R.L. Albert & Son, Inc ............ 410 The American Candy Mfg. Co ..... 225 American Chicle Div ............. 205 American Licorice Co ............ 536 Amurol Products Co .............. 703 ~,ndes Candies, Inc .............. 227 Andre Prost, Inc ................. 503 Annabelle Candy Co., Inc ......... 301 Atalanta Corp ................... 232 Atlas Biscuit Co ................. 525 Atkinson Candy Co .............. 701 Sloven Barrio & Co ............... 211 Bee International ................ 318 Paul R Belch Co ................. 507 Beltran Corp. ................... 632 Bezzerides Co ................... 103 Bobs Candies, Inc ............... 606 Borden Confectionery Prods ...... 801 Boyer Bros ..................... 431 E.J. Brach & Sons ............... 334 Brock Candy Co ................. 209 Brown & Haley .................. 320 C V Sales ...................... 622 Californin Candy Co ............. 526 California Peanut Co ............. 420 Callard & Bowser ............... 322 Carousel Industries, Inc ........... 516 Carver Bauer Foods ............. 601 Ce De Candy Co ................ 309 Cella's Confections .............. 325 Charms Co ..................... 303 Chiodo Candy Co ................ 806 Chipurnoi, Inc ................... 534 Chocolate House, Inc ............ 807 CoIombina Candy Co ............ 702 The Confections Group .......... 414 Confex, Inc ..................... 809 Continental Vitamin Co ............ 111 Cornnuts, Inc ................... 537 Dalt Div. ........................ 705 Dandy Confectionery, Inc ......... 808 David & Sons ................... 501 DeMet's Inc ..................... 204 Distributor Concepts, [nc ......... 602 The Donruss Co ................. 539 Dynamic Displays, Inc ............ 425 The Estee Corp .................. 416 F & F Laboratories .............. 529 :azer Chocolates, Inc ............ 623 Ferrara Pan Candy Co ........... 408 Ferrero, USA ................... 609 Fisher Nut Co ................... 304 Fleer Corp. ..................... 328 The Foreign Candy Co ........... 604 General Mills, Inc ................ 508 Ghiradelli Chocolate Co .......... 104 Giant Snacks, Inc ................ 409 Go-Lightly Candy Co ............. 220 Goodmark Foods, Inc ............ 222 Haribo of America ............... 611 L.S. Heath & Sons .............. 224 Henry Heide, Inc ................. 541 Hershey Choco}ate Co ........... 326 Hickory Kist Meat Snacks ........ 630 Hoffman Candy Co .............. 535 Hollywood Brands ............... 538 International Nut Corp. ........... 517 Intersweet, Inc ................... 621 The Jel Sort Co .................. 811 Jolly Rancher/Asher ............. 437 Judson-Atkinson Candies ........ 336 Just Born, Inc ................... 223 Keebler Co ..................... 523 King B Jerky .................... 419 LJ K, Ltd ....................... 418 Leaf Confectionery, Inc ........... 337 Leader Candies, Inc .............. 631 Lehman Dietetic Confections ..... 626 Libin & Associates ............... 614 Liberty Orchards Co .............. 321 Life Savers, Inc .................. 433 Lil' Drug Store Products .......... 323 James P. Liffette, Inc ............. 603 Lowrey's Meat Snacks ........... 306 Luden's Inc ..................... 429 Lusk/Fresh Pak Candy Co ........ 432 M&M/Mars, Inc .................. 101 Mars Broker Div. ................ 607 Maxfield Candy Co .............. 706 Melster Candies, lnc ............. 235 ~'he Mexican Candy Co ........... 237 Mr. Candy, Inc ................... 624 Murray-Allen International ......... 311 Ben Myerson Candy Co .......... 108 Nabisco Confections. Inc ......... 406 National Candy Co ............... 519 National Chicle Products Co ....... 212 Nellson Candies, Inc ............. 530 The Nestle Co., Inc .............. 504 New England Confectionery Co .... 411 Nussbaum Novelty Co ............ 615 Old Trapper Smoked Prods ........ 518 Palmer Candy Co ................ 707 Peter Paul Cadbury .............. 330 Pez-Haas, Inc ................... 514 Philadelphia Chewing Gum ....... 427 Polley's Sales, [nc ................ 112 Processing Innovators .......... 626A Pronto Distributors .............. 620 Quaker Oats Co ................. 236 Quality Packaging, Inc ............ 213 RTC Industries, Inc ............... 512 Reed Candy Co ................. 412 Republic Tobacco ............... 315 Sathera, lnc ..................... 113 Schrafft Candy Co ............... 216 Sherwood Foods, [nc ............. 613 Slush Puppie Corp ............... 422 Smoke-Craft Div. ................ 106 Smokie Products ................ 317 Sophie May Candies ............ 324 Sorbee International ............. 617 Spangler Candy Co .............. 214 Squareshooter Candy Co ......... 522 Howard B. Stark Co .............. 230 Stagi & Scrivan Farms ............ 114 Storek USA ..................... 528 Stuckey's, Inc ................... 203 Sun Diamond Growers ........... 219 Sunline Brands .................. 312 Swizzels, Inc .................... 208 Timberline Industries, lnc ......... 805 Tootsie Roll Industries, Inc ........ 510 Topps Chewing Gum ............ 506 J.G. Van Holten & Son ........... 217 van Melle, Inc ................... 627 Verboot Sausage, Inc ............. 218 Vernell's Fine Candies ........... 629 Wildberry Confections ............ ~16 Wilkinson-Spitz, Ltd .............. 308 C. & J. Willenborg, Inc ............ 520 Willy Wonka Brands ............. 332 Wm. Wrigley Jr. CO .............. 532 Long elected ceo of R.J. Reynolds WINSTON-SALEM. NC: Gerald H. lamg, president and chief operating of- ficer of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.. has been elected president and chief execu- tive of liter. He succeeds Edward A. Hor- rigan. Jr., who continues as Long chairman of R.J. Reynold~ and as ex- ecutive vice president of R.J. Reynolds Industries. Inc. Horrigan has respon- sibilib, for the oper~tions of R~'nolds's U.S. and overseas tobacco units, Heublein. Inc.. R.J. R~'nolds De~lop- mere Corp. and coqx~'ate research ~ d~elot~nent. lamg joir~ed Reynokl_s i~ 1969 ~s a brand director Ibr R JR Foods. Inc. He became vice president of marketing for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco International in 1976 and was later named senior vice president oflhat unit. He moved to R.J. Reynolds Tobacco in October 1979 as execufive vice president and became president and chief operating officer in October 1981. Johnston resigns from R.J. Reynolds Tobacco WINSTON-SALEM. NC: James W. Johnston. executive vice president of marketing for the R.J. Reynolds To- bacco Co. since October 1981, has re- signed to pursue other interests. Prior to becoming executive vice president of the cornt~ny, he was presi- dent and chief executive officer of R.J. l~aeynolds Tobacco Intematioaal's Arian Eveready consumers can help Olympians DANBURY, CT: Beginning in April, buyers of Eveready super heavy duty hatteries, will be nffered a $2 refund with proof of purchase, which they can either redeem or donate in whole or part to the U.S. Volleyball Association. The ~.~sociation is responsible for sending the American men's and women's teams to the sunamer Olympics. In addition, a 25¢ store coupon, good to~"ards the purchase of Eveready super hea~y duty D or C batteries in 2- pack or 4-pack: 4-pack AA batteries or 2-pack 9-voh batteries, will he offered to consumers .',s pan of the same pro- modtm. Help yourself and your business. Read every issue of The UNITED STATES TOBACCO AND CANDY JOURNAL. Management may buy Liggett & Myers LONDON: Grand Metropolitan PLC is considering selling the Lig- gett & Myers Tobacco Co. to the cigarette company's management and outside investors for more than the $570 million it paid for the com- pany in 1980. GM suggested the buyout because it wants to reinvest its money "'for long-term strategic reasons." and not because the unit's growth might not continue. L&M president and chief execu- tive officer K. v. Dey said manage- ment is pleased with the opportunity to discuss buying the company. The possible management buyout w~midn't include Pinkerton Tobacco Coml~.,,'s chewing tobacco busi- TI56324206
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4 attired ~tatet Iotm== twtd mackj jo~aei February 9, 1984 Reg. Is U.S. Pateat Office IRWIN BREITMAN publisher HEDY HALPERT associate publisher GERARD E SULLIVAN editor associate publisher PATRICK DORAN managing editor PEGGY GOLDBACH national accounts manager PATRIEIA PAHLMAN midwest manager JACK HOEHLEIN STEVE MORRA advertising sales EILEEN HARRINGTON sales coordinator SUE MARRITT western states represenlative t213) 783-5888 DAN PETROCELLI circulation director JOANNE GOLDSTEIN director of marketing services WENDY ZUCKERMAN production manager Good showing for tobacco wholesalers The U.S. Department of Commeree's just-re- leased 1982 Census of the Wholesale Tohacro Trade confirms what the industry has long recog- nized: There has been a continuing decline in the number of tobacco wholesalers in this country and a continuing growth in the trade's annual dollar volume. As reported in this issue, the Census counted 1,829 wholesalers in 1982 and they enjoyed an annual volume of $15.5 billion. This compared with the 2,180 wholesalers in 1977 who did $11.3 billion and the 2,432 wholesalers in 1972 who did $7.74 billion. What these figures say is that (1) there were 25% fewer wholesalers in 1982 than in 1972, but the survivors did 50% more business as a group, and 12) the 1.6% fewer wholesalers in 1982 than in 1977 did 37% more annual sales volume. Inflation and price increases over the periods notwithstanding, these are not unimpressive fig- HI'US. Interestingly, ten states had a greater number of tobacco wholesalers in 1982 than in 1977 -- Alas- ka, Arizona, Arkansas, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nevada, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont and Wash- ington. The District of Columbia and five states-- Connecticut, Hawaii, Montana, New Mexico and West Virginia -- had the same number of whole- salers in 1982 as they did five years earlier. The greatest decline in numbers of distributing companies ~ but not necessarily in their percen- tage of wholesale tobacco houses -- over the past five years occurred in the states of New York (48), Illinois (32), New Jersey (24), Pennsylvania (22). Texas and Alabama (17), North Carolina (16). Georgia (15), Missouri and Virginia (14), Califor- nia. Massachusetts and Ohio (13) and Michigan ~12). Of the states which had the largest numerical losses of tobacco wholesalers since the 1977 Cen- sus, five ranked among the trade's 1982 leaders in terms of dollar sales. New York led all states with 1982 sales of $2,670 million, followed by Califor- nia with $1,121 million, Illinois with S1,025 mil- lion, Michigan with $753 million and Ohio with $608 million. Together, these five states ac- counted for 39.6% of the nation's total tobacco wholesaler sales. Nationally, tobacco wholesalers employed only 8% fewer full-time and part-time people in 1982 than they did in 1977. Over the same period, the trade's payroll went up 34c,~, or from $400 million to $536 million a year. The states which had the largest percentage gains in tobacco wholesaler sales over the 1977-82 period were Connecticut (238.6%), Arizona (205. 1%), Nevada (142.5 %), Oklahoma (91.0%), Utah (88.0%) and Washington (82.3ck), While there has been much discussion and con- siderable concern expressed about the health of the wholesale tobacco business in recent years, the latest Census figures would seem to indicate that the trade's condition is far stronger than even the wholesalers themselves had assumed. IRV BABSON executive vice president The index of USTCJ's 1983 articles There appears toward the rear of this issue a cross-index of the articles and news announce- ments which appeared during 1983 in the U.S. Tobacco & Candy Journal. The index was initiated solely to make it easier and taster lbr readers, researchers, librarians and our own editorial staff members to locate stories and historical information of particular impor- tance to them. While leafing through this listing, we came to realize that people who produce a new publication every few weeks really lose sight of just how much information they pass along to their readers over the course of a )ear. It's a matter of not being able to see the forest for the trees. And, frankly, we feel pretty good -- now that we've viewed the index-- about the job USTCJ did in 1983. TI56324207
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LIGHT UP YOUR SALES WITH THE PEOPLE GENERATION The People generation is huge and growing in influence. After just ten years, People not only attracts the third largest audience among all magazines, it reaches more adults under 50 and more under 35 than any newsweekly or women's service magazine. And People reaches them most efficiently, of course. If you want your brand to be their brand, talk to them in their magazine...People. TI56324208
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6 ~~ ~(~hmmt~ j(m~a(al February 9, 1984 tContinued frora page Tobacco wholesaler statistics for states:1982 and1977 ~£sc~[cc o~ Colu:~bla ........~ 3 81 998 (D~ 2 225 (O) 2~ 332 562 NCWA winter show to draw larc (Cominued from page 1) management techniques, strategic planning, resource allocation, econom- ics and marketing. ']'he feature of Saturday morning'.,; business session is a talk on "'Making Money in the "80s" by author and en- trepreneur Paul Harken. Hawkea is the foamer of Erewhon Trading Co., the ~o~s compass ~ ~e coamry. Folk~ing his address s,'ill be Amer- e turnout ican Chicle's presentation of the latest installment of its "Partners in Progress'" series. Roundtables The traditional NCWA roundtable discussions are scheduled for Friday morning and will focus on 17 different subjects ~ including servicing super- tions; health care and insurance; telemarketing; what you should know about banking; business computers and data processing; creative financial man- agement; manufacturer-wholesaler communication; wholesaler-broker co- operation; salesmen's compensation and motivation: warehousing; govern- meat relations; merchandise and inter- nal security, and wholesaler bagging and packaging. Help yourself and your business. Read every issue or The UNITED STATES TOBACCO AND CANDY ~OL~qAL. King division appoints Stowell sales manager FLINT. MI: Gary Stowell has been named sales manager at King/Michigan Sundries. a divi- sion of The King Group. Inc. Stow- ell had been a salesman since December. 1973. In his new assign- meat he will be responsible for actb, ities in the ,,outhea..q Michigan TI56324209
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The back of the Zeus container lists hundreds of lighters-each one of them color coded for the precise adapter it needs. (See the story on adapters below) Adapters are easily removed and/or changed. And the color-coding system is copyright protected. Zeus contains 139 grams (4.9 oz.) of lighter fuel. The secret of Zeus is in its transparent head which contains 8 patented, differently colored nozzle adapters. All a person need do is select the appropriate adapter to fit their lighter. Lane Limited Blenders o~ lu~ary tobacr~ for aver thr~ ~cn~atians TI56324210
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February 9. t984 NATD convention to hear Pres. Ford, Pat Paulsen NEW YORK: The 1984 convention of the National Association of Tobacco Distributors, which will be held at Locws Anatole Hotel in Dallas, March 21 -25. will have President Gerald Ford as the principal speaker at the annual meeting's opening ceremonies. He will speak Thursday morning, March 22, and give the convention a political overview tbr 1984. The NATD membership will also hear from a defeated candidate for high national office when entertainer and satirist Pat Paulsen gives his perspec- tives of the upcoming national elec- tions. He'll address the March 23 luncheon of the association's young ex- ecutives division. A third speaker of note at the dis- tributors" convention will be Dr. Ken- neth Blanchard, co-author of the best- selling One Minute Mat,ager. The Amherst professor of leadership and or- ganizational behavior will address the . way Original Whenever the music is hot, the taste is KOOL At any 'tar' level, there's only one sensation this refreshing. Our business is helping yours. Brown & W'dliamson Tobacco Corporation membership luncheon Saturday. March 24, on "Putting the One Minute Man- ager to Work." McMannis is honored The Spangler Candy Co. West Central Broker of the Year Award is presented to McMannis & Associates at the recenl National Candy Wholesalers Associa- tion convention in Boston. Jack Shockley (I.), Spangler west central re- gional manager, makesthe presentation to Rhoda Korstjens and Frank Kelly of McMahnis. Scripto's re-designed, 98¢ push point pencil is available for the 1983-84 sec- ond semester season. The 0.7 mm lead clutch-action mechanical pencil has a sleek shape, textured non-slip grip and a metal pocket clip. Barrel colors are red, black, blue and yellow. B=c Corp. is introducing Brite Liner in fluorescent yellow, ~ green and I~Je. Suggested mta=l is 69¢. Comes ka single mencing March I. Tracle and ~ pmrnz~s acc~r~pany ~tmductk~. TI56324211
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STARBURST® Fruit Chews • #1 selling fruit chew [] Ranks in top 20 singles for all candy bar items (SAMI & Nielsen) • Leading advertiser in the category • Now: two new packs. All Strawberry pack. And Sunshine pack... grape, red raspberry, pineapple and wild cherry. SKITTLES® Bite Size Candies BFastestgrowing bite size candy BII Growth rate more than 7 times confection category growth rate • A favorite of kids and teens MUNCH® Peanut Bar IB New and improved taste • Now bigger for better value B Improved packaging for extra protection MARS BROKER DIVISION A winning combination of strong national consumer marketing and local broker expertise. TI56324212
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12 mtilcd st~ct ~ mid ~ ~ Feb~aary 9, I984 Candy brokers unsure of the impact consolidations will have on them At the December meeting of the Na- buquerque: Hertford Wirth of Wirth ! USTCJ: What are your feelings tional Can~' Brokers Association, we Daniels Corp.. Rosemont, ll., and Tom! about the recent acquisitions and spoke u'ith NCBA president Charles Munson. president of Maraton Market- consolidations which have taken Kruger of the Charles Kruger Co., AI- ing. Bellwood. I/. place in the confectionery manufae- SLUSH PUPPIE° on national TV'. Let Slush Puppie's national TV advertising lead you to a pot of gold. While your customers plunge over and over again into Slush Pupple's rainbow of fruit flavors, you'll ride the rainbow to some of the easiest, highest profits avail- able. Let us show you how the Slush Puppie program can lead you to a pot of gold. Your customers know Slush Puppie from national network TV. They want Slush Puppie. It's the county's fw~orite slush drink. Because Slush Puppie is the only slush program backed by national advertising support. Toll Free: 800-543-0860, Ext.lL In Ohio call: 513-244-2400 Slush Puppie Corporation Box 11, 1950 I~uidiffDrive Ct~Annatt, Ohio 45204 turing industry and in the wholesale candy and tobacco business? Kruger: It's kind of frightening all of a sudden to have eight manufacturing companies controlled by one, but it could work out quite well if things are put together properly. If the shipments and billings come through promptly and there's good advertising, it could be good tbr everybody -- especially for the brokers who represent them. It also remains to be seen what the impact of the consolidations in the wholesaling business will be. If the ac- quiring companies pump more money into the businesses they've bought and become more aggressive sellers, then, the sales people who sell to them will benefit. If, on the other hand, the buyers try to drain the companies they've bought, it could be devastasting for ev- eryune. Wirth: In my mind, the recent moves we've seen are all positive. Major man- ufacturing corpnrations are involved and this should lead tu more efficient, more service-minded operations. Also, they are now in a position to advertise heavily and to compete with the two leaders in the industry. This should be good for all facets of the business, in- eluding the brokers. These companies will need better brokers. They will make better brokers of the ordinary ones, and the marginal ones will suffer-- but they would have suffered anyway: As the manufacturers become more sophisticated, the brokers will become more sophisticated, and the customers will become more sophisticated. The needs of the market will be fulfilled much better now, and every aspect will be more professional- planning, ship- ments, billing and advertising. The distributor merger situation is different. The impact on the broker will be tremendous. There will be a greater demand for service from him. Retail work will become more important; work will have to be preplanned; pre- sentations and promotions will have to be on time. Less business will be done on a friendship basis and more will be done on a professional basis. This is a positive angle. Munson: I belicvc there is going to be a continuing me~er situation because of the trend to direct-selling organizations like Keeb~er Biscuit and the Nabisont Standard Brand~/Life Saver combiaa- ~Co~inued ot¢ page 14) T156324215
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Announcing fhe Fun & exciting for kids.., Fun & profitable for you! * Faster retail tumovefi • NATIONAL ADVERTISING • Extra Profits! FULL COLOR SUNDAY • Volume Sales! COMICS AD REACHES 63 MILLION CONSUMERS • FREE FUN CLUB KiT OFFER • IMPACTFUL RO.S, ON ALL 300 WILLY WONKA MATERIALS CANDIES [Excluding Nerds] • EXCITING RETAILER'S INCENTIVE STOCK UP NOW FOR VOLUME SALES, PRORTS & FUN/ See or Call Your Willy Wonka Sales RepresehtativeToda~ TI56324216
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14 unil~ lo~m~m ~ aa~itj ]o~n~i February 9, 1984 (Continued from page 12) tion. I believe there are going to be excellent opportunities for small man- ufaeturers, but more giants are going to be emerging to compete with the M&M/Mars and Hersheys of the world. The general feeling among brokers seems to be that we need to diversify into related product areas to protect our businesses. One area that is growing very rapidly is natural products; another is specialty foods, and a number of bro- kers have gone into non-foods which relate to candy and tobacco distribution channels. The wholesaling side of the consol- idation picture is a very big conee.rn to the brokers because we are uncertain where these mergers might lead. Buy- ing decisions in one location could eliminate brokers in areas where the), presently have wholesaler customers. I think this is going to happen; that buy- ing will become centralized. We find this in the natural products area now. USTCJ: Some bargoods manufac- turers are increasing their prices; others are not. What do you think of this situation? Kruger: One of the two realIy big man- ufacturers is going up and others are joining in, while the other big one is holding the line. It is going to be inter- esting to see if the dual-pricing situa- tion that h~-s occurred will continue. It would seem that Mars, being the leader in the field, holds the advantage all the way. Wirth: I think the Mars move was most interesting. The two giants are taking whacks at each other and are apparently indulging in a vendetta. A lot of people can get caught up in this. Most other manufacturers are raising their prices from 30¢ to 35¢ because of increased costs and, to some extent, to support Hershey. Hershey has been good to this industry. As a con- sequence, I see pricing going to the 35¢ and 40¢ levels across the board -- with or without Mat's permission. Munsan: It's a continuing battle of the giants in their marketing strategies. Eventually, I feel, Mars will end up raising their prices as well. In lhe mean- time, they are getting good press. USTCJ: What are your feelings about the viability of dual-pricing? Kruger: I think t~m-tier pricing is the only way to go. even though it will mean some problems along the way. I think it would be in the best interests of the smaller manufacturers if they held the line where at all possible and give this two-tier pricing a chance to take hold. Wirth: I don't see two-tier pricing as a reality. If you look al the people who run the stores, be it the convenienc~ store or the tobacco store, they want single pricing. The 17-year-old at the cash register is not going to be con- ceroed about which product is 35¢ and which is 40¢. You can't expect him, or even the consumer, to know the dif- ference. It's not realistic. The price will seek the highest point. You may have two-tier pricing in the more sophisticated supermarket chains whose scanners can handle this situa- tion easily. Where the human element is involved, I think you will find single pricing. Munson: I don't see two-tier pricing. I think the retailer will raise to the price of Hershey; it's too much trouble for him to control two-tier pricing. USTCJ: There'~ a trend towards bro. kers employing service merchan- disers, retail merchandisers. Would you like to comment on this? Kruger: We have a couple of retail people who are partially supporled by one of our principals. This is probably the greatest thing that has ever hap- pened to us. Our market is widespread, sparsely populated, and provides lim- ited sales opportunity, so it would be virtually impossible for us to employ these types of retail assistants without the financial help of our principals. If smaller manufacturers would build this service into their price, it would benefit everyone -- them, the broker, the wholesaler and the retailer. The whole industry would be healthier. Wirth: We are motivated to implement service merchandising by the realiza- tion that we cannot expect the trade to do our job. The wholesaler has thou- sands of products and can only be so concerned about the ones we sell him. So, if we want our products on major display at retail, we have to get it. USTCJ: Thank you, gentlemen. The Perpetual Motion Money Machine Constant movement is what you can expect from King Edward Imperials. Imperials consistently turn from two to five times faster than any other cigar brand. They make more money per front display inch than many other products occupying display space in your store. You can prove it--check your figures. They will show you how profitable Imperials really are. You may then want to add additional perpetual motion money machines to your cigar rack. Ask your King Edward man about our other remarkable "Money Machines." KING EDWARD LARGEST SELLING CIGAR BRAND IN THE WORLD. A product of Jno. H. Swisher & Son, Inc. Quality Cigars Sin~ 1~61 T!56324217
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Introducing the Candy Lover's Can . The Elegant Candy Lover The Card Playing Candy Lover The Accident Prone Candy Lo~r The I-Itking Candy Lover The Growing Candy Lover' The Man's Man Candy Lover The Nature Loving The "You Wouldn't Believe The The "Sweet as They Candy Lover One That Got Away" Candy Lover Make Them" Candy Lover Popular with candy lovers o[alI variety of packages and cello bags. ages, Goetze's comes in five de- Contact your local candy distrib- licious flavors: Ca .mmel Creams, utor or phone Goetze's toll-[tee Chocolate Caramel Creams, Licorice Caramel Creams, Peanut Butter Creams, Strawberry Caramel Creams. Available in a directly for informa- tion: (800) 638-1456. Goetze's: a very tasty way to sweeten profits. TI56324218
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Smokeless cigarette to be marketed SAN ANTONIO, TX: Favor, a ciga- rette which is not be smoked, will be marketed hem and abroad later this year by Advanced Tobacco Products. The product is said to have the look, weight and feel of a cigarette and to produce a similar sensation for the user. but it is never lighted. The user report- edly get~ satisfaction by inhaling nic- otine vapor. Favor is to be positioned as a pleasur- able product and not as one intended to discourage or reduce smoking or to have therapeutic benefits. A six-unit pack vail retail at a price competitive with a 20-pack of regular cigarettes. Among the officers of Advanced To- bacco Products is Edmund G. Vimond. its vice chairman, marketing chief and a director. He's a former president of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco International. USTCJ: The source for candy and tobacco news. Orcutt-Neary dinner a return engagement for Brooklyn clerics NEW YORK: Bishop Joseph M. Sul- livan and Rev. Joseph Funam of the Catholic Charities office for the Di- ocese of Brooklyn will speak and en- tertain at the March 20th testi- monial dinner honoring Richard H. Orcutt, senior Bishop Sullivan vice president of sales for Lorillard, and Waiter Neary, president of Neary Distributing Co., Lawrenceburg, In. The dinner will be held on the eve of the 1984 convention of the National As- sociation of Tobacco Distributors at Loews Anatole Hotel in Dallas. The appearance in Dallas will be a return engagement for Bishop Sullivan and Father Funaro. They performed at last year's National Council of Catholic Charities fund-raiser in Chicago, which honored U.S. Tobacco Co. executive vice president Ralph Rossi, and Fon- tana Bros. vice president Joe Miazgowicz. Joanne Goldstein, director of mar- keting services at U.S. Tobacco & Can- dy Journal, is chairperson of the Orcutt-Neary dinner. Tickets for the af- fair -- at $200 per person and $50 per accompanying spouse -- are available from her at U.S. Tobacco & Candy Journal, 254 West 31st Street, New York, NY 10001. Buccellato sales v,p. for Philip Morris USA NEW YORK: Vincent J. Buccellato has been named vice president of sales USA to succeed Robert H. Cremin. who has beconre vice pres- ident and director of special pro- grams tbr Philip Morris Inc. Buccellato Buccellato has been group director of brand manage- ment and served as vice president of marketing tbr Benson & Hedges (Cana- da) LM.. a Philip Morris affiliate, from 1981 to 1983. A Vietnam veterart, he was appointed assistant to the director of distribotioa and customer service in 1972, assistant to the vice president of finance in 1975, ae~ imxtt~ts txtad manager in 1975= Merit braml manager in 1976 aml Marl- boro I~aad nmaager ia 1977. TI56324219
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18 February 9, 1984 Suzy Fucini's Speaking of wholesaling... Spangler enjoys unique perspective of candy industry Like the hem of the old Judy Collins song "Both Sides Now," Roger Dean has seen the candy industry from two different perspectives. In his position as president of Span- gler Candy and Tobacco Ind.,Dean has the vantage point of a wholesaler. He is in charge of running two furl-line can- dy/tobacco distributorships, located in Toledo and Bryan, Oh. As its name suggests, Spangler Can- dy and Tobacco is a wholly-owned sub- sidiary of Spangler Candy Co. (makers of the Dum Dora lollipop and other popular confections), and it is because of this connection that Dean enjoys a second industry perspective -- one to which few wholesalers are privy. He setwes as an advisor on the candy man- ufactnrer's marketing committee, where he is given the opportunity to air his views on new confectionery prod- ucts, pricing, policies etc. before they are put into effect. "'l really get a chance to have a close- up look at two viewpoints-- that of the wholesaler and that of the manufac- turer,'" says Dean, who has been with Spongier for more than 20 years. "Spang[er Candy & Tobacco is run as a completely separate entity from Span- gler Candy Co,, but the connection be- tween the two has given me a unique induslry perspective. "In my role on the marketing com- mittee, my function is to represent the viewpoint of the 'typical' candy whole- saler," he details. "When Spangler Candy is about to come out with a new product, for instance, I am asked for my opinion on its price structure and other features, insofar as what the pros and cons will be for the wholesaler. Other individuals on the committee represent different viewpoints -- such as that of the mass merchandiser. All of this feed- back is then taken into account by Span- glcr in finalizing their marketing plans." Presidency provides insight Having such an inside track, says Dean. has greatly aided him in his role as pcesident of Spa~gler Candy and To- bacco, a positior~ I~ has keld since 1975. For o~e tldr¢, heqng closely ~ with a major candy compmy kas concerns of confectionery manufac- turers in general, and this has helped him develop better relations with all his suppliers. Another big benefit is that Dean is kept well informed of new can- dy market trends. "'Being in constant contact with Spangler Candy's marketing people keeps us abreast of confectionery trends," he notes. "This puts us in a better position to advise and service our retail accounts. Many of our accounts have come to regard us as 'candy ex- pert:s,'" he adds. Between its two locations which are 65 miles apart, Spangler Candy and Tobacco services some 1600 accounts in a territory which covers northwestern Ohio and parts of northeastern Indiana and southern Michigan. Twelve sales- men work out of the two houses, and the company has nine deliver), trucks on the road. Despite its affiliation with Spangler Candy Co., the distributor- ship carries products from "all major confectionery manufacturers," as well as a large selection of tobacco goods and sundries. "Just because we're a subsidiary of Spangler Candy doesn't mean that we limit the lines of candy that we carry. On the contrary, we probably stock a larger confectionery selection than average," says Dean. Business is booming "'The candy business is really boom- ing in our market these days. as it is most places," he adds. "One of the reasons for this is that both the NCWA and the manufacturers have done such a marvelous job promoting confectionery products," I Based on his "'dual-edged perspee- I tire." what types of trends does Dean i see developing m the candy market'?. i One phenomenon which the veteran wholesale÷ feels is bound to occur is that the 50¢ candy bar will completely replace the 35¢ size in the near future. "'Soon, you'll see nothL'ag but 50¢ bars on the counter," he forecasts. "The larger size has been extremely well ac- cepted at evc~" level. Consumers come to regard the big bars as a bargain, a~l of course ~etailers w~ald much ratfter sell them ~ tim A second cindy tt~d ia~licted by Roger Dean Dean is that the 10¢ category will make a "comeback." At the same time that the candy bar market shifts to the 50¢ size, he says. manufacturers will be in- troducing new, smaller ilems to meet the demand for inexpensive con- fections. "'Spangler Candy has just come out with a new 10¢ Dum Dum Drum Roll, and we have very high hopes for this product," Dean dis- closes. "The 10¢ price point in general is enjoying an upsurge in popularity. We believe that there are lots of oppor- tunities within this categovy in the im- mediate future." Another area which Dean believes is rife with "'opportunities" for both wholesalers and manufacturers is the fund-raising candy category. The Ohio distributor notes that Spangler Candy and Tobacco currently sells a large vol- ume of fund-raising confectionery products to schools and other civic and charitable institutions. "This is an area of our business which is growing each year." he reports. "'As schools experience cutbacks in their budgets, more and more booster clubs are springing up to raise money for sports and other extra-curricular ac- tivities, This presents wholesalers with an excellent opportunity to sell fund- rais~g candy," he points out. One deft- ni~ tre~l noticed by Deem is that day's fur~-rtisimg groups a~e ~ying pint. "Tiffs is a f-mtctio~ofd¢ affecting how much the public is will- ing to spend on a 'charitable cause,'" he asserts. "'Schools are encountering the best success with candy that retails for 50¢ whereas not too long ago most of the fund-raising business was done in the $1.00-1.25 range." Future looks bright In addition to fund-raising candy, Dean anticipates good future prospects tbr wholesalers in another institutional category -- the industrial market. "'There's a lot of potential to sell boxed candy to corporations and other com- mercial accounts, particularly during the holidays," he says. "These com- panies then give out the candy as gifts to their customers and employees. We do some of this type of business now, but not nearly as much as we'd like to in the furore." According to Dean. the backbone of Spangler Candy and Tobacco's busi- ness continues to be the small morn n pop grocery." Although convenience store chains have made their impact felt in the Toledo market, as they have most places, the Spanglcr executive believes that the independent will remain a via- Me force in retailing for years to come. "'! simply don't see the morn "u pop slom vani~ing," he comends.':'In fact, based on economics, I ~ee it gaining in stt~mgth in the futu~. A retail L'~tablish- rnem wkich is operated by ICo~lin-,ed on page 231 TI56324221
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Number one in a sedes. : Up front with you WRIGLEY TI56324222
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Up frontwith you Front end merchandising can make the difference. Carefully thought out front end merchandising programs can make a big difference in your vitally important checkout profit centers. Wrigley can bring years of experience and unique expertise in this area to you and your operation. Shoppers spend 20% ot their shopping tlm~ at checkout. Knowing the territory a~l your customers must visit and know- ing the facts about every front end calegory is critical. Over the years we've studied front end merchandising in depth. Expenence like this can help you get a bigger share of the $2.9 billion in check-out sales in all major checkout categories. Maximize profits on your cheoko-t inventory investment. Front end items have high margins-- but that's only pad of the story. With years of researching ways to manage this high profit potential, we'll help you maximize your checkout inven- tory investment and increase your R.O.LI. Planning ahead can solve two big checkout problems. Merchandise clutter at the front end can actually reduce your customers' impulse purchases. Providing you with more long-range studies, analyzing your front end, and with realis- lic stockng, plus proper rack management, checkout pro- fitability can be increased dramat ca ly. A complete picture Improves front end profitability. You need to see the who~e picture when looking at the front end. Our investment in checkout merchandising research can give you a clearer, more complete over view of your front end profit potential and show you how stocking consistency can pay off. Plan by the number~. A solid data base is the key to proper front end merchandis- ing. We can provide you with a profit picture based on actual supermarket numbers. (Analysis has shown that improper front end merchandising can result in a 3g% loss.) An "Up Front With You" hctllne: 312-WRIGLEY collect, The information you need to help you plan a more profitable checkout profit center is yours for the asking. Now you can call 312-WRIGLEY collect and talk with a front end merchan- dising expert. The bottom line, Front end merchandising is vitally important to all of us in the marketplace. And as always, Wrigley wants to be up front with you. WRIGLEY
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WRIGLEY Up front with you. ~ Co~y~g~ 1984 Wm W~*g~y J~ Comp~t TI56324224
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February 9, I984 The Spangler cigarette stamping operation (Conthmed from page 18) can be successful in many situations where a convenience store--which has to pay out a salary to a manager- would fail to turn a profit. I think that in the years ahead the "chain trend' will reverse itself and we'll see a lot of con- venience stores replaced by morn 'n pop operations." In light of th!s, says Dean, a major goal of Spangler Candy and Tobacco is tn become "more responsive than ever to the needs of the independent." One way the company has met this objec- live, he elaborates, is by offering re- tailers a conveniently large selection of merchandise. "The owner of a mom 'n pop store works hard and doesn't have time to shop around from wholesaler to wholesaler. In the future, the distributor who gets these retailers' business will be the one who is able to service the greatest percentage of their needs. Diversified line "'We feel that one of our strengths as a wholesaler is our broad selection of products," continues Dean, holing that Spangler Candy and Tobacco stocks more than 4000 different items in its warehouse. "Although our name is most closely associated with candy, we also can)' a very large selection of prod- ucts in the tobacco category -- more exlensive, we believe, than the average wholesaler.'" As an example, Dean points to the $40,000 cigar inventory which is housed in a walk-in humidor on the second floor of Spangler's 36,000 sq. It. Toledo warehouse. Represented is "virtually every major manufacturer" --and furthermore, the wholesaler notes, the majority or" cigar lines ar~ stocked in depth. "Most jobbers will ~ only the top sellers of each line -- I~t ~v¢ try to be ~s comple~ as possi- Ne." he says. "Cigars do very well i~ our market, and one reason is because Toledo has a large Lebanese communi- ty as well as other ethnic groups." Unlike some strong cigar markets in which virtually all the business is done in high-grades, Dean reports that "less expensive cigars" also sell well in Toledo. "'Of course, we do an excellent business with premium labels like Mac- anudo, La Corona and Don Diego. But what surprises some people is that we move a large volume of King Edward and R.G. Dun too, Cigars of all types are popular here N and we carry what we believe to be the largest selection in the area." In keeping with its objective of being a "'complete supplier" to its retail ac- counts, Spangter Candy and Tobacco is taking a long, hard look at the grocery category, Dean discloses. Currently, the firm has a working agreement with a local grocery, wholesaler, under which the tobacco/candy distributor is unable to supply its accounts with food prod- ucts. "We take orders for groceries from our accounts, and then the grocery wholesaler fills them," Dean explains. "However, we're seriously considering going a step further and becoming a full-fledged grocery jobber. Right now, we're researching this area, and we should start drawing up some definite plans within six months to a year. "As I mentioned earlier," continues Dean, "'we believe that it's only going to become more and more important for a tobacco/candy wholesaler to be able to service the t6al needs of the morn 'n pop store. This is why we're looking at groceries -- we want to offer our ac- counts the convenience of one-stop shopping.'" Emphasis on service Another important dimension in meeting be needs of the independent , reviler is !acovidiag good customer ser- vice. Deal believes that his role as a Making up sample trays for Spangler salesmen wholesaler is evolving to the point where ""service" will mean helping our customers become better businesspeo- pie.'" "It's up to us as wholesalers to help the independent retailer become more sophisticated in managing his busi- ness," he says. "One way we do this at Spangler is by providing our accounts with information from our computer on product movement. We will also track anything they buy. Our salesmen en- courage customers to take advantage of this service, and they show them how to interpret the data." Prompt, reliable deliveries are an- other part of the service package offered by Spangler Candy and Tobacco. About two years ago, the 33-employee wholesaling firm began the practice of filling orders at night. As a result, says Dean, the company is not only able to schedule its routes so that the delivery truck always arrives at a given account the exact same time of day. "Here again, this is of particular ben- efit to the independent retailer, whose time is very valuable. He can plan his work schedule more efficiently if he knows exactly what time the delivery truck will pull up at his door," the wholesaler observes. "Our customers really appreciate this regularity. It's one of the services we offer that sets us apart from the competition." With its top-notch customer service and extensive product selection, Span- gler Candy and Tobacco has shown it- self to be much more than a "spinoff business" ventured into by a candy manufacturer. The full-line Ohio dis- tributorship is a dynamic, vital entity in its own right. As Roger Dean sums up, "We're a unique wholesaling operation in that we're owned by a candy manufacturer. Of course, this has given us strength and expertise in the confectionery field. But we've gone well beyond that. Fur- thermore, we're still growing and evolv- ing to meet the needs of today's retail marketplace." Zellers retires from Consolidated TI56324225
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r 24 February 9, 1984 Art Deco Society cites R.J. Reynolds building NEW YORK: R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. h~s won the first Art Deco Society of New York Award for best restoration of an An Deco office building. The award for the interpretive restoration of the lobby and exterior of the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem was pre- sented .lanuary I1. The building, completed in 1929 and renovated in 1982, was the prototype of the Empire State Building in New York. Help yourself and your business. Read every issue of The UNITED STATES TOBACCO AND CANDY JOURNAL. Illinois distributors to meet in Chicago SPRINGFIELD. IL: The 1984 con- vention of the Illinois Association of Tobacco & Candy Distributors will be held March 9-11 at the Downtown Chi- cago Marriott Hotel. Among the features of the "'Striving are here again ... NCWA Convention Anaheim, California February 15-19,1984 S8,00O IN GOLD COINS eight sponsors.., eight Sl,000 prizes Drowings (=re held ot each sponsor's booth=. l~You must be at the booth to win.~.~ ~1 Only wholesalers and direct-buying retailers are eligible to win! Each wholesaler and direct.buying retailer receives ~wo OOLD RUSH DAYS Cerfificates in the registration packet. Additional certificates are available only FROM THE SPONSORS at their booths! Limit: One prize per person. spor~_so, rs and schedule of drawings Friday, Fel~.za~y 17,1984 $1000 ~ c,~, 1:30 PM I~ #206 $1000,~-~'~'~"='-~ Saturd=~ Febru~y 18,1984 1:30 Pt~ ~ ~2Z $1000 ~==""°" $1000 ~'~ 3:30 PM I~olh #523 $1000 4:~e PM for Excellence" comention will be a Saturday morning sales .symposium featuring American Chicle's Ross Col- letti and M&M/Mars's Phll Garfinkel and Richard M. Gaige. Romanell made Bic national sales mgr. MILFORD, CT: Joe Romanell has been promoted to national field.sales manager for Bic Corp. and has been succeeded as Mid-Atlantic sales manager by Jim Palmer, for- mer Bic chain ac- connt manager. Romanell, who Romanell joined Bic as an assistant zone manager in 1975, has been Mid-Atlantic sales manager since 1981. He will be responsible tbr the sale and distribution of all Bic products and for personnel development in the tleld. He will make his office at the compa- ny's Milford headquarters, Palmer. a ten-year veteran with Bic, had been assigned to the Dallas market the last three years. He will make hisI offices at the Mechanicsburg. Pa., divi- sion headquarters. Kowalsky General's marketing vice pres. NEW YORK: Michael J. Kowalsky has been promoted to vice president of marketing for the General Cigar Co. He joined the company in 1981 as marketing manager for pre- mium cigars and, with the forma- Kowalsky tion of General Cigar as a company of Culbro Corp. in September 1983, he was appointed mar- keting manager for all cigar products. Prior to joining General, Kowalsky was president of the Cigar Association of America. He joined that o~aniza- tion as a junior economist in 1971, was elected vice president and treasurer in 1977 and president in 1978. Candy brokers meet day prior to NCWA WASHINGTON. DC: The members of the National Candy Brokers Associa- tion will meet Febroary 15 at the Dis- neyland Hotel in Anaheim, the day prior to tt~ official opening of the win- ~ co~ventitm of the ~ Candy TI56324226
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Service Stations and Counter Top Merchandising... A Profitable Combination! Kevin Zalak Owner Joe's Mobil Station Centereach, New York "l started selling candy with the counter top merchandiser. My sales have expanded so much that I now have a complete candy section as well as the counter top display. Impulse sales and profits are still growing and l'm very pleased with the results." Lew Helfstein President Golden Tobacco, Inc. Hauppauge, New York "The counter top merchandiser is a way I can increase my candy sales and help retailers do the same. I am convinced it is mutually beneficial to all concerned and I support the concept 100%. My sales force will continue to provide the counter top merchandiser as a service to all my customers." mail this to M&M/MARS0 Sales ~ _ High Street, Hackettstown, NJ 07840 ElPlease have an M&M]MARS ass°ciate contact me as soon as possible Name Title Company No. o~ Locations. C~ __ State Z~p __ a ~ d M~lrS. Inax-por~l P~r.C~"TTSTO@,;~I. NL~ JEI~:~KY 07840 TI5632422_7
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26 ~ld~l¢~ I~m~m ~l m~l~ ]~i February 9, t984 BIG BO is bigger than ever with a new flavor American Candy now has BIG BO in an exciting rainbow color with cherry flavor. Contact your American Candy representative. ~ Or see us at NCWA Booth #225-6. American Candy Manufacturing Co. ® B°x 879; Selma, ~2L035~702"0879 875-1450 Here to your health! Ansel details survival needs of small candy manufacturer CHICAGO: A few giant corporations may dominate 60% or more of the U.S. confectionery market, but the small manufacturer--and his candy bro- kers--can still survive and be profita- ble. according to Ed Ansel, chairman and chief executive officer of Cella's Confections, Inc. Speaking before the recent western meeting of the National Candy Brokers Association in Chicago. Ansel enumer- ated what the small manufacturer must do to compete successfully for market share. "The challenge for the small con- fectioner," he suggested. "is to offer the consumer the same thing the multi- million dollar company offers--a quality product. The consumer doesn't really know or care who makes the can- dy. She is interested in the quality and the price-value relationship." Ansel also emphasized the impor- tance of the relationship between the manufacturer's chief executive officer and the customer. • "The coo should get out and work the trade. It is itnportant for the customer to know someone from the home office other than the regional manager; some- one who cares enough about the cus- tomer's business to visit him and thank him: someone who will listen to the customer's problems." he said. Because small manufacturers don't have the large producers" strong brands and volume to compensale for mis- takes. Cella's president maintained. "When a small company comes out with a new product, or line extension. or deal. or point-of-sale material for the year, it has to know that it's right. And it has to be ready to move on it imme- diately.'" Basic principles Ansel also mentioned to the candy brokers the basic principles which will dictate which companies will sur- vive-honesty, professionalism, quality, service and self-esteem. "'Over the long term." he said, "'a manufacturer has to be honest so his brokers can feel good about the compa- ny they represent and their customer,. can feel good about the company from which they are buying. If honesty isn't there, the rest of the mix doesn't matter, "It's impoaaut also,'" he said. "that the company has professionalism. We've seen the day of writing orders on the backs of envelopes, of not ha'~ing, cle~'iy defi~,xl goals. That day is turin. Companies that don't change and adapL that &m't ~ clearly de~d goals, are not going to survive. "'Customers w'ant professional sales presentations, regardless of the size of the supplier. They vamt factual informa- tion and they want to be asked tbr the order. So, the small cont'ectioner has to hire good people, manage those people and know what they're doing in the field." he said. Concerning the need of the small manufacturer to oft~r products of value. Ansel emphasized that companies which combine quality and price in their products have improved their rela- tionship with the trade "'Service is auother important ele- ment and it starts well before the sales presentation." he claims. "'When the managers sit down aod plan their mar- keting and their presentations for the year or the season, that's when they should be thinking of service. If it's a new pack. how will it work? Can it be worked easily? Can it be worked at the retail level? "'A service department should be in place so problems can be anticipated before they arise," he said. Ansel's final ingredient for survival, self-esteem. "'means a confidence and a satisfaction in onesself and in one's company." He told the brokers: "Think of the companies you have represented over the years, of the ones which projected an image of con- fidence, of the ones which could stand up and be proud of the products and presentations they gave you. They backed their products; they backed their policies. They are the ones who are surviving today. '" Ansel concluded his remarks by presenting a list outlining traits needed to be a successful manager: • Insist on quality: • Tightly control costs. • Aggressively market your brands. a Be a leader; set an example: use common sense: work hard. • Have courage, imagination, com- munications and intelligence. • Make things happen. RJR appoints directors WINSTON-SALEM, NC: RJR- Macdonald, Inc., the Canadian sub- sidiary of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Inter- national. Inc.. has named Anne Grasset director of marketing for Vantage. Mac- donald Select. U.S. cigarette brands, smoking tob~cos and cigars. Jeremy Harris has been promoted to dffector of marketing on new products. Gordon Tompkms has been appointed dit'ectoc of br~d la'omocio~ ~ad spoasorships. TI56324228
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:brand:to:shoW:-a sales increase! In fact, all :NewtS_. rt:packings are up almost 10% for the llthyear in a mw that Newport has shown an increase! We couldn't have done it without you. Keep backing a winner. Newport. *M;.xwel Report--October. 1983. The only business we do is the business you do. We never forget that. TI56324229
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28 February 9, 1994 USDA estimates '83 cigarette production declined about 5% WASHINGTON, DC: Falling sales likely caused U.S. cigarette production in 1983 to decline 5% from the 1982 level, according to USDA's Tobacco Outlook. U.S. consumption totaled 455 billion cigarettes during January-Sep- tember 1983, 5% or 25 billion units below the year earlier. State cigarette tax receipts, however, indicated that unit sales for the first nine months declined 6.6%. The discrepan- cy. USDA says. came about because retailers sharply increased inventories at the end of 1982 as wholesalers pulled down holdings to avoid January 1, 1983 floor stocks tax. Then, it says, retailers worked off inventories the first part of the year and taxpaid removals fell pro- portionately more than the drop in con- sumption. According to the Department, ciga- rette consumption may increase a little during the next 12 months with a slow- down in price hikes and with the im- proved economy. Retail cigarette prices in October 1983 were 17% higher than a year ear- lier, or six times that of all consumer prices during the period. Twelve states raised cigarette excise taxes in 1983. compared with nine in 1982. One state added a 1¢ surcharge per pack and five states removed sunset provisions which would have ended previous excise in- creases. By September. the weighted-average state tax was 15.1¢ a pack, or 0.9¢ above the year earlier. Other products Consumption of large cigars totaled 2.7 billion during July-September, or 3% less than a )ear earlier. The total for the year was probably down by a similar percentage. With rising prices, sales of lower- priced cigars have Pallen, and a larger proportion of total sales volume has be- come concentrated in the higher price categories. The pattern is expected to continue in 1984. Both production and sales of chew- ing tobacco declined in the third quar- ter. Total production for the year was expected to drop from 1982's 90 million pounds. Snuff production for the first nine months was about 5% above the same period of 1982. Third-quarter domestic use of smok- ing tobacco~including imports--was down from the year earlier. For all of 1983. smoking tobacco consumption may have dropped 2% from the prior year. Storck promotes Vick to sales vp CHICAGO: Donald W. Vick, who joined Storck USA in 1980 as senior product manager and who was pro- moted to national sales manager the following year, has been appointed the company's vice president of sales. Prior to joining Storck. Vick was vice president of sales for Woodficld Farms in Boston. Previous to that, he was na- tional sales manager for Flavor Tree Foods in Chicago. Help yourself and your business. Read every issue of The UNITED STATES TOBACCO AND CANDY JOURNAL. UJA dinner honors Gillespie, Long NEW YORK: David GilMspi¢, chair- man and chief executive officer of Core-Mark International, and Gerald H. Long. president of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., will be guests of honor at the 1984 fund-raising dinner of the to- bacco and allied trades division of the United Jewish Appeal-Federaiion of Gillespie Long Jewish Philanthmples. The dinner will be held May 1 at the New York Hilton Hotel. Malcolm L. Fleischer, managing di- rector of the Retail Tobacco Dealers of America, is chairman of the divison I and Joseph Kolodny, tbrrner managing director of the National Association of Tubacco Distributors. is chairman emeritus. in English (~lta) TI56324230
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February is ~~~~@ Month in the Life Savers. Inc. $2.000.000 PLUS Deal New Prizes and New Profits with ~~~. the leading sugarless gum. See your Life Savers, Inc. Representative for details. ^~ Life Savers. Inc.--profitability today and tomorrow. TI56324231
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30 tmil~latx~am~,~lmn~amml Februaryg, 1984 POPAI honors merchandising awards winners FORT LEE, NJ: The Point-of-Pur- chase Advertising Institute has an- nounced the winners of the 24th annual merchandising awards contest. Each entrant was judged from an ac- tual display with a case history provided, explaining merchandising objectives, available field results, mate- rials, etc. The judges consisted of na- tional and regional advertising profes- sionals with each evaluating displays outside is own industry. The Bronz Outstanding Merchandis- ing Achievemant was awarded to adver- tisers whose materials were considered outstanding within their category. The Silver OMA gas presented to winners who received an exceptionally high point total for the type of display (best of class) and not the category. Gold "OMAs were awarded to the few chosen Big Jaw family expands Leaf Confectionery's family of Big Jaw Jawbreakers has added the Hot Ice, Top Secret and Super Sour members. The Top Secret Jawbreak- er is available in fruit, anise, orange, peppermint and grape flavors sur- rounding a bubble gum center. The Hot Ice Jawbreaker (10¢) has a hot cinnamon outside followed by a cool peppermint ring that leads to a hot bubble gum center. Top Secret and Hot Ice are sold in 24/26 count case ~acks. The Super Sour Jawbreaker consists of three mouth-filling gum balls in four flavors with a sour fruit bubble gum center. From: Leaf Con- fectionery, Chicago. No tax parity for 25 packs DOVER. DE (M): The House of R~presentatives defeated a bill which wo~Id have made it economically feasi- ble to market 25-cigarette packs in Deb ~a~e. H.B. 391 ~ hav~ permitted the state to tax cigarettes iadividuall~ rather tha~a in gmu~i of ten. R 1. l~aolds T 'ohacco Co. warned best of marketplace for outstanding ac-~ will be finalists in the Display-of-the- complishments in the advertising, mer- ] Year contest in February. chandising and incentive programs andI All entries were evaluated on the promotions divisions, These winners I basis ot': effectiveness (carries 40% of the scoring); originality of concept; ex- cellence of design and engineering; and quality of reproduction and/or manufac- turing. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. won with a Camel overhead display designed for performance, commanding attention while not taking up counter space, and featuring the brand and price, es- pecially significant at convenience stores. Reynolds took other awards in- cluding: wall display clock and pricer sign; Vantage golf promotion; 30-pack flexible tray; Camel outdoor metal signs; vending machine header, digital clock; and Vantage lane closed sign. Liggett & Myers received awards for their superior gravity pack dispenser and their Red Man floorstand. Philip Morris was chosen for their overhead pack merchandiser. Nabisco fetes its top salespeople At its recent annual sales meeting, Nabisco Confections, Inc. presented a number of multi-million sales dollar plaques. Pictured (I to r) in the top row are: Tony Cognetti, D.C. Sales Co.; Fred Pachasa and Joe Kondas, Kondas & Wood, Inc.; Fran Hamel, Bruce Hardy, direct salesmen; Pete Shinnamon, EA. Shinnamon & Assoc.; Ed Riffle, Edward J. Riffle Co.; Jenny Berg, R.H. Walllsh & Assoc.; Bill Marvin, LBM Sales and AI Mate, direct salesman. Front row; Jim Wood, Kondas & Wc~gJ, Sob Wallish, Ed Bieslnger, Mike Perfetti, R.H. Wallish & Assoc.; Nick Bellanca, Paul Connolly and Bill Long, LBM Sales. Also receiving a plaque but not pictured was Maureen Borne o! Bromar Southern California. the tax "law modified so it could market Century 25s here. The state levies a seven-cent tax on 10 cigarettes or poaion thereof, so that a traditional 20-cigarette pack carries a 14-cent levy. A l~,.ck of 25 would car~ 21-.cent tsx under current tales. If the just-defeated H.B. 391 had passed and been sig~ed by the Go~er- ne¢, a pack of 25 cig-a~-nes w~aid have heea taxed 17.5 I"Eveready,"Disney promo "Eveready" has joined Walt Disney Pro- duct/ons in a promotion to be tied in with a movie called Mickey's Christmas Carol. "Eveready" is offering a $1.50 maiFin cash refund or a free tote bag with three purchases of specially- marked packages of its super heavy duty battet~"s. The peornotion will be 10 "acnolesalecs 0¢ retailers will wet an TI56324232
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THE BEST TASTING CHOCOLATE CHERRY YOU CAN BUY! • Rich chocolate shell • Luscious, real fruit cherry • Exclusive, 100% liquid center 22 Cherrie~ -- 11 oz. Ca~e peck -- 24 boxes Cm weiJht-- 22 Ibs. WHITE PANE~L F14-M ~140-D O Item #lSJd - ~I~D MILK CI4OCOCATE Cme ~ - 24 be~e~ CELLA'S CONFECTIONS, INC. 327 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10013 TI56324233
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February 9, 1984 ~k~.t ~ ~¢am~ ~maai 33 Industry is well-positioned to meet legislative challenge ORLANDO. FL: The tobacco indus- try is better positioned to meet legisla- tive challenges in 1984 than it has been at any time in the past. according to Tobacco Institute chairman Horace R. Komegay. He told the American Farm Bureau Federation's peanut and tobacco con- ference here that Congressional passage of price support legislation at the end of last year resulted in greater unity among industry supporters. Among other developments in 1983 which led to Komegay's upbeat assess- ment. he said, were the reorganization and strengthening of the lnstitute's gov- ernment relations program; the estab- lishment of industry coalitions with non-tobacco groups, and the creation of the National Tobacco Council, an in- dustry-wide advisory group. Kornegay said there are signs that many Americans are beginning to reject government controls on smoking be- havior. He noted that in a two-week period, over 180,000 people signed pe- titions to the Civil Aeronautics Board opposing further restrictions on smok- ing aboard commercial aircraft. "This industry does not back away from challenge and it will continue to vigorously defend its customers" free- dom of choice," he said. "We will meet and contest in every legislative arena those who would usher in an era of tobacco prohibition." "The reports of the death of the to- bacco industry are greatly exagger- ated," Komegay told the conference. "I can assure you I am fully confidenl that tobacco's future will be as long and as golden as its great historic past.'" Mike Spaniolo retires; with MTCDVA 31 years LANSING, MI: Mike Spaniolo, general and legislative counsel as well as past executive secretary of the Michigan To- bacco & Candy Distributors and Vendors Associa- tion, has retired effective January 1. He will con- Spaniolo tinue as lobbyist in the state for q'he Tobbaco Institute as well as represent several small associa- tions. Spaniolo, who joined the association 31 years ago, arranged Ibr vending ma- chine operators and amusement ma- chine operators to join the distributors organization and built the association into one of the strongest state groups in the nation. In announcing Mike's retirement, MTCDVA executive secretary Walter Maner said. "Few associations in Lans- ing, Washington or anywhere else have been blessed with the dedicated and loyal leadership that Mike Spaniolo brought to our industry." Duffy treasurer of U.S. Tobacco GREENWICH. CT: Eugene Dully ~ been promoted from ~ssistant trea- ~rer of the U.S. Tobacco Co. to trea- surer ard u officer of the corporatiort. He joined tim company m t96~ =s a ~¢-r..iO¢ ttX =ceooma~t. Report tells when to seek a buyer AKRON, OH: A report which pin- points 22 situations which occur or de- velop in a business and which indicate that an owner should plan on finding a buyer are listed in a tree. four-page re- port from Independent Business In- stitute, P.O. Box 159, Akron. Oh. 44309. (Send a self-addressed envelope with 37¢ postage.) The report, in addition to showing how to identify a potential seller, also points out negative situations which spell frustration and disappointment for the business owner. Among the situations cited in the re- port are obvious ones--the owner with- out succession, partner/co-owners con- templating estate planning, a business overburdened with nonproductive debt (as for new housing). Bul some more subtle ones are also explained--a busi- ness purchased by the owner within the past three years, one which has been moved, and any whose owner does not have a marketing background. Sanders to direct B & W distribution LOUISVILLE: W. Lee Sanders, who had been Winston-Salem branch man- ager for the Brown & Williamson To- bacco Corp., has been named director of distrilx~tion here to succeed John IC Madsen. Madsen retired.hauary I after 20 years with the corapaay. Sanders k,xs betnt with B&W t~" 24 Stan Newman again president of TCMA TAMPA: Stanford J. Newman, presi- dent of Standard Cigar Co. has been re- elected president of the Tampa Cigar Manufac- turers Association for 1984. Elected vice president was Car- los Fuente, Fuente Cigar Factory; Newman secretary, Manuel Corral, Corral-Wodiska y Ca.: and trea- surer, Jose Llaneza. Jr., Villazon & Co. Charles W. Loe, Jr., will serve as ex- ecutive director and Mary Ordway as executive secretary. Elected directors tbr 1984 were Stan- ford J. Newman and Millard W. New- man, Standard Cigar Co; Thomas D. Arthur and W. Tommy Morgan, 1II, Havatampa, Inc; James J. Corral and Manuel Corral, Corral-Wodiska y Ca.; Jose Llaneza, Jr. and Frank Llaneza, Villazon & Co.; and Carlos Fuente and Arthur Fuente, Fuente Cigar Factory. Taglienti sales manager for Haribo of America BALTIMORE; Frank J. Taglienti has been named national sales manager of Haribo of Amer- ica and will be re- sponsible for over- seeing all U.S. brokerage opera- tions. Taglienti, who has over 25 years in the confection- Taglientl cry business, has been affiliated with Nestle. with Ward- Johnston as sales vice president and, most recently with the Pezrow Co., Hadbo's metro New York broker. He will report to Jacquie Paine, presi- dent of Haribo's U.S. company. New from Ferrara Johnny Apple Treats, a new 10¢ item from Ferrara Pan Candy Co., is a bright grsoa candy with a tart, fresh a~t~ie taste, It's packed 16 24-¢o~1 display b~xes per case and has a NCA to meet in Palm Beach, FI. May 23-27 MCLEAN. VA: The Breakers in Palm Beach. FI. will be the site for the annual convention of the National Con- fectioners Association. May 23 - 27. For further information contact Richard O'Connell, NCA. 7900 Westpark Dr.. #514, McLean. Va. 22102, (703) 790-5750. Linderman heads Luden's western sales region READING, PA: William P. (Lindy) Linderman has joined Luden's, Inc.. as western regional sales manager. He all Luden's cus- tomer contacts. broker representa- tive contacts and sales in the 13 western states. Linderman Prior to joining Luden's. Linderman served as western regional sales manager for Phila- delphia, Gum, national sales manager of Beatrice Foods' Switzer Candy Divi- sion, and with Warner-Lambert as key account manager in Los Angeles. dis- trict manager in New Orleans and divi- sional manager in St. Louis. Tropical C wafers Each Tropical C wafer contains as much vitamin C as one whole orange while containing only six calories. Tropical C's are available in six fla- vors: Island Punch, Mandarini Orange, Mandarin Lime, Pina Col- aria, Passion Fruit and Pineapple/ Coconut. A 32-wafer mui~pack with a suggested retail pdce of 99¢ and an 8-wafe¢, single serve pack with a sug- gested retail price of 39¢ are bein offered. From: Hall Labo~atode., TI56324234
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34 February 9, 1984 By George N. Kahn. Marketing Consultant ~ George N. Kahn Facing buying committees making headway. Lawyers use this device quite often in addressing juries. They will single out one juror and play to him. The idea is that he might swing the others to the attorney's side. Now carry this theory over m the buying committee. Suppose you make one friend on that committee. He may go to bat for you when it meets to make its tinal decision, Some committee members may try to get you offbalance with rapid-fire ques- tions. There's no mason you have to adopt their pace. Take your time. Think The traditional person-to-person selling is giving way in many instances tu a person-to-people relationship. Instead of a single buyer a salesman often finds himself confronted by a buy- ing committee which at first glance is a rather awesome group. Salesmen meeting this committee fbr the first time have been known to quail. Some become so flustered that their normally smooth presentation falls to If you've been through this ordeal you know it's a little like being on trial and having a jury hear your story. You might convince three of the jurors but what about the other nine? It has been done in court and you can do it with the buying committee. When we cut this bunch down to size you'll find they are not so rormidable. Why a buying committee? First. let's lind out about the reason for the buying committee. The commit- tee is a logical step I'or industry. Orders involving hundreds of thousands of dol- lars are becoming routine. Many com- panies have decided that they don't want to place the responsibility for these big orders on one man. There's too much at stake. So these firms have delegated a group of individuals to make the'buying deci- sions. The committee is usually made up of experts in finance, production, marketing, advertising, etc. Individu- ally they can really put a salesman through his paces: collectively they are even tougher. When you engage a buying commit- tee you don't have to drastically alter you just have to be better prepared. You must develop answers and arguments to an array of questions in different areas, This means you must work a litde harder, learn a little more and be a bit more versatile. Win over one m~ ~ psyel~iogical f=etor of the buy- mg committee is a barrier to sonte They "re afraid to face what seems to them a hostile ring of faces. This stage fright is normal. There is usually some fear of the unknown. But it should not inhibit you to the point of freezing before the group. One way of getting over the hurdle is to mentally pick out one member of the committee and concentrate on him, Pre- tend there is nobody else in the room but you and this man. You will find yourself ,a~ming up to your IX, esenta- tion. If you reach this m=ta you'll usu- ally get to the rest of the committee. If ~ v.atch ,vo~" chosen m~ ~ will spo( a reaction soo~er o¢ l~ter. Hemay over each question and answer clearly and to the point. Don't waste time in long embellish- meats after you've answered the ques- tion. These are busy men who are interested only in pertinent facts. If matters reach a stand still you might invite questions from the com- mittee. This will show your confidence in your product and compan}: Motivation is the same Purchases are not made ou the "basis of sentiment, personality or whim. Committoe members ~re prim~ily ia- ~ in whelher yo~" peoduct fills • particular need in their organization. Next, your price has to be right and your company able to supply the product when it is needed, "'Well,'" you say. "This is nothing new. Every buyer l've ever dealt with has thought along the same lines.'" Exactly! Only now you have six or seven minds running in the same direc- tion instead of one. Therefore your sales talk must be that much more effective. When talking to a committee your proposition must be angled to the buyer's point of view more so than when you are selling to a single purchaser. You must understand the needs and wants ufthe prospect firm and convince the committee that your product will satisfy its needs. Stress the buyer's point of view throughout your presenta- tion. Think big If you appear before a buying com- mittee the chances are that you're deal- ing for big stakes. In a large order committee members are mainly con- cerned about the essential qualities of your product, not the trivial details. They want to know its performance. durability and maintenance needs. Don't dwell on secondary issues that will only take up time without shedding much light, You might also keep in mind that the committee appearance does not permit much of the eas],; informal give and take that you experience with one buyer. Jokes, anecdotes and small talk should be kept to a minimum. Get on the track and stay there. Your appearance before a buying committee may be a great success ccpt lbr one thing: you did not get as order. This can and does happen. When it does be sure that you get a rain check.! Conduct yourself in such a manner that,.. you'll be invited back. Are you effective before a buying committee? Hold up the mirror to your- self and see. If you can answer "yes" to! at least seven of the following questiom~ you are probably at home before the committee. 1. Are you seriously intent on under- standing the buying committee instead of rebelling against it'?. Yes [] No [] 2. Do you stick to the main facts when appearing befure a commit- tee? Yes [] No [] 3, Do you try and catch the attention of one committee member and corwinee him? Yes [] No ~ 4. Do you think over carefully each question tkat is put to yo~? 5. Do you adopt the committee's TI56324235
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February 9, 1984 ~nil~l~ I~:m~d~ Jm~l 35 6. Do you understand the needs and ",,.'ants of the committees firm? YesFl Nor-I 7. Do you leave a good impression with the committee, order or no order? Yes 1~] No [] 8. Doyou keep jokes and small talk to a minimum? Yes .-1 No [] 9. Are you training yourself in knowledge about various Pacers of business, e.g. finance, pro- duction? Yes [] No [] 10. Are you able to talk intelligently about them before a committee? Yes E-I No [] REPRINTS FOR YOUR SALESMAN ... this is a condensed version. Each lesson is avail- able in an expanded form, in a 4-page bro- chure, size 8½ × 11. printed in 2 colors on white glossy paper and is 3-hole punched to fit any slandard 3-dng binder. Each subject in Ihis expanded version is fully and completely developed in comprehensive delail and in- cludes a self-examination quiz for salesmen, Prices are as follows: 1 to 9 copies .................. 80 ¢, ca. 10 to 49 copies ................. 70 ¢, ca. 50 to 99 copies ................ 60 ¢, ca. 100 or more copies .............. 50 ¢, ca. The entire series may be pro-ordered or indi- vidual lessons may be ordered by number ... address orders to the George N. Kahn Co. of Conn. Inc. Marketing Consultants, Sales Training Division, Depadmenl TP, 38 Echo Lake Road, Watertown, Conn. 06795 (203) 274-8400. Lesson Titles am: 1. The Salesman is a V.LP. 2. Are You A Salesman? 3, Get Acquainted With Your Company 4. You're On Stage 5. You Can't Fire Without Ammunition 6. You Are A Goodwill Salesman. Too 7. Closing The Sale 8. How To Set Up An Interview 9. Resting Between Rounds tO. The Competition 11. Taking A Risk 12. Playing The Short Game 13. Selling An Idea 14. Buying Committees Am Hem To Stay 15. The Automated Salesman 16. Samples Can't Talk 17. The Unexpected Letter 18. Prospect or Perish t9. How To Dislodge A Prospect From An Existing Supptler 20. Making Salesmen of Customers 21. Repeat Orders Are Not Accidental 22. Room At The Top 23. You Must Give More To Get More 24. Running Into The Rude Buyer Buffalo Table elects F BUFFALO. NY: John Clark, western New York sales representative for F& R Confectioners, has been elected presi- dent of the Buffalo Tobacco & Candy Skoal Bandits in France GREENWICIt, CT: Societe Nation- ale d'Exploitation Industrielle des Tab- ace et Allumettes has been given exclusive rights to promote and sell Skoal Bandits in France. Negexiatkm,, Ibr Fa'er, ch ma~eting lke new poakm pack ,,er~ion of U.S. Tob~¢o\ Skt~al moist smokelens to- bacco were completed December 13. RJR's Sticht retires; remains board chairman WINSTON SALEM. NC: J. Paul Sticht retired as a full-time employee of R..I. Reynold~ Industries. Inc. Decem- ber 31, but remains as chairman of the board and chairman of the executive committee of the board. Stlcht had been chairman and chief executive officer of Reynolds Industries since April 1979. In October 1983 he v, as succeeded as ceo by J. Tylee Wil- son. the company's president. Sticht ",also continues as chairman of the Reynolds Industries International advise .ry board and has been retained as consultant, representing the company with a broad range of business and gov- ernment organizations and advising management on internal matters. & R rep John Clark Table. He succeeds Russell Bauda, di- vision manager for the General Cigar Co. Clark. who was also Table president in 1975. will have as fellow officers vice president Len Heining. of Blackman & Esbary; second vice president Milt Surre of Luden's. and secretary-trea- surer AI Conroy of Philip Morris. Ex-president Bauda is chairman of the arrangements committee for the March 31 spring dinner. At that affair. the officers will be installed at~d indus- try representatives will be hor, ored for outsta~tding promotions of candy. cigars ~ toba¢o:~ prodt~. Council tables smoking SPRINGFIELD, MA (AMW): A proposed ordinance mandating non- smoking areas in restaurants was unan- imously tabled by the Springfield City Council Committee on Health and Pub- lic Safety. The Public Health Council, a com- murdty-based group, wrote proposals calling for a minimum 20% non-smok- ing section in restaurants containing 80 of more ~eats. Springfield Health Commissioner Job.n C. Ayes said that ~ Cotmcil questioned the PHC's l~Ve for ~ each ~-tio=. Coencilor Mary H~rley, poiotiag oat Hollis, Potts appointed mgrs. at No Nonsense GREENSBORO, NC: Jerry W. Hol- lie. formerly division manager with General Foods Corp., has been named national sales manager. West, Ibr No Nonsense Fashions, Inc. He will be re- sponsible lbr all sales activity in the western U.S.. and will operate out of the California office. Bradford L. Ports has been appointed national account manager at No Non- sense. He will handle sales to national drug. mass merchandiser and discount chains. His prior experience includes eight years with Brown & Williamson "Ibbacco Co. Potts will be based in Greensboro, NC. Paul Greenman was promoted from Tampa zone manager to national ac- counts representative and will have re- sponsibility for several national chains. He will wnrk in the Greensboro office. Sanford Traberman was moved up from Tampa zone supervisor to Tampa zone manager. Pfeister, Clark Food merge brokerage firms GRAND RAPIDS. MI: The Pfeister Co. and Clark Food Brokers have merged. The western Michigan branch will be known as The Pfeister Clark Co. and Robea G. Clark, former owner of Clark Food, will serve as senior vice president and branch manager. The branch will havea staff of 42 and will offer departmentalizarion in the areas of dr}, grocery, perishable, health and beauty aids and general merchan- dise, and food service. The Pfeister Co. was a 65-year-old lbnd brokerage firm which, in recent years, had expanded its operation to include all of Michigan, Toledo, Oh., and Ft. Wayne, In. Clark Food Brokers was organized in 1932. serving the western Michigan marketing area as a full-service broker. control that the PHC had no authority, per se, said it is important to protect the consti- tutional rights of commercial activity, and expressed concern that councilors -- as individuals -- might be held per- sonally liable for seeking to regulate commerce. New distribution center LOS ANGELES: Nellson Candies, Inc.. has acquired a distribution center in Chicago to better serve its mid- western customers. TI~ Astro Pop uf~-ttarer also has di~uibutioa ¢er~ers N¢~- Ytx'k and Birmingham, as well i~ Lo~ TI56324236
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36 ~ll~ ~~l~~ February 9, 1984 S.L. Kaye Presents From England ~zgs4 S.L. KAYE COMPANY INC. DISTRIBUTOR 230 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10001; (212) 683-5600 Cigarette price increases Once again, the cigarette companies, hereinafter referred to as the "prof- iteers", have seen fit to raise cigarette prices over 8.36% in a year's time, without regard to prevailing economic conditions. With our sales less than last year's, due to higher taxes, we would expect the companies to hold th~ line. There is no way that the "'profiteers" should make the money they do. This increase was preceded by rumors of an increase, with the result that stockpiling occurred in the distribution channels. This caused a drain on local warehouses thus creating an intolerable situation. The rumor was thlse and not denied by the cigarette companies. When the increase finally came, everyone was caught off guard. Orders, taken before any increase was announced, were not honored as taken. The subsequent mailgram made in-house orders subject to the in- creased prices. Shipments were delayed without notification due to the depleted warehouse stock levels. We are now in a new business, or so it would seem. Just as the commodity business changes its prices daily, so the cigarette business has become. There is very positive price protection in the commodity business as stipulated by the Commodity Exchange. but the cigarette business does not maintain such a price protection, I am sure that if the cigarette companies are truly interested in the welfare and the sound economic state of the cigarette business, the increases will subside. When an increase should become necessary, it will be previously announced and handled in a more efficient manner. Standing orders, plus in house orders, will be honored and the shipping requirements fulfilled. However, if the "profiteers" and figurers have their way. we are in for a rough road ahead. Answers to our pertinent questions such as: "We did not start this increase, or we did not increase the price till the first of the year while maintaining allocations" will not work. The cigarette business is truly in the hands of the cigarette companies. It would seem to me that when one realizes the degree of sophistication which prevails today in the business word there is a singular archaic mode of operation for the cigarette companies. "I'hey are oblivious to the needs of the distributor and his problems. The distributor, being in a highly competitive industry, has extraordinary needs. Edmund M. Kleiner, President Edmund C. Kleiner, Inc. Hoboken, NJ 07030 Cigars imported in November Yearto date COUNTRY OF ORIGIN No~ No~ 1983 1982 1983 1982 11 mos. 11 mos. Austria -- -- 4,000 4,080 Belgium 59,000 70,000 Brazil 298,1~'~ 122,6~'~ 2,665,100 2,689,558 Burma ~ -- -- 21,000 Canada -- -- -- 26,000 Canary Islands, Spain 41,000 89,400 147,000 964,950 Costa Rica 114.050 474,275 1,346,515 1.805,666 Denmark8,600 545,400 120,770 Dominican Republic 3,517,130 4,888,2~ 36,582.671 33.479.763 Honduras 1,515,999 2,072.191 25.264.885 22,918,537 Indonesia 3,750 -- 68.750 ~ Italy -- -- 1,800 -- Jamaica1,060.170 1,247,798 14,045,366 15,610,075 Mexico 1.282,285 1,401,492 12,266,319 11,847,165 Netherlands 820,765 360,850 5.021.785 5.507.447 Nicaragua 276,175 806.740 6,538.350 7,270.680 Panama -- -- 8,734 -- Peru -- -- 1,250 -- Philippine Republic 118,000 60.000 596.450 671.335 Switzerland 91.000 44,200 462.5~5 446,400 United Kingdom -- 60,500 136,784 100,500 West Getmar~y 177~50 331,275 2,007.265 1,791,675 TolalAIICoonbios 9,~.4,274 11,959,577 107,770,019 105.345,521 TI56324237
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NEXT JANUARY YOUR NEW AM-FM CLOCK RADIO COULD WAKE YOU IN MAUl. INTRODUCING REPUBLIC TOBACCOIS EXPANDED 1984- BONUS AWARD PROGRAM... "PICK YOUR SPOT." Hundreds o~ our distributors received awards worth hundreds of thousands of dollars in the 1983 program. And " this year's bonus award program is bigger and better than ever--more prizes, from clock radios to TV3 to computers to Hawaiian holidays; and more time (8 months) to earn them. The Hawaiian holidays include airfore, deluxe occommodolions at the S-star Kapalua Bay Hotel in Maul, elegant dining, entertainment plus o full array of other exciting activities. And best of all, it's up to you --you can "pick your spot:" HOW TO REGISTER. You're qualified to "pick your spot" just by selling JOB Cigarette Paper. To register conrad Mr. Phil Mittlemon at Repub|ic Tobacco, 5100 N. Ravens- wood, Chicago 60640; 800-621-8279 or 312-728-1500. And be sure to look for JOB's expanded consumer advertising program on radio and magazines including Cosmopolitan, Penthouse, Cycle World and Road and Track. TI56324238
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38 February 9, I984 November candy shipments rose 23.3% from year ago McLEAN. VA: Factot~ shipments of shipments, according to a survey spon- confectionery products in November sored by the National Confectioners were 23.3% higher in poundage and Association and the Chocolate Man- 17.3ck in value than November 1982's ufacturcrs Association of the U.S. Confectioner)' shipments totaled ~5,077,000 pounds in Nm'ember, for an increase of 48.158.000 pounds over November 1981. Their value was $391,192,000. or 17.3~ more than in November I982. Chocolate and chocolate-type con- fections accounted for 171.339,000 pounds of November 1983"s candy ship- ;ILove is sweeping country. Americans are discovering what's good for them. All natural snacks with no artifi- cial flavor and no artificial coloring. And, they're getting to know that the freshest and most deliciously satisfying of those snacks are Love Snacks. There are reasons. Love Snacks unique nitro-flush process keeps them fresher, extending" shelf life 3 months longer. And all of the nuts and fruits that make up the 39 appealing combinations are carefully selected for taste and quality by our own staff. ments, and they were valued at $294.386.000. The year before, they accounted for 139,897,000 pounds worth $249.651.000, Thus. these types of confections showed an increase of 31.442,000 pounds or a gain of 22.5% over November 1982, and a value in- crease of $44.735,000 or 17.9%. November 1983 shipments of non- chocolate confections totaled 83,738.000 pounds, which was 16,716,000 pounds or 24.9% more Ihan the same month of the year prior. This past November's shipments of non- chocolate confections were valued at $96,806,000, which wa~ 513,080,000 or 15.6c~ more than the prior Novem- ber's shipments, The statistics are based on a survey of manufacturer-wholesalers who sell pri- marily to wholesalers and retailers. chocolate manufacturers, and manufac- turer-retailers who sell primarily through their own retail stores. Roll-Your-Own champs Mitchell Maxwell and Jana Tvedt, win- ners of the recent Boston edition of E-Z Wider's "Great American Roli-Your- Own-A-Thon," celebrate their victory. An estimated 1400 people attended the contest at Boston,; Metro. Chanting for dollars Our consumer advertising helps, too. It's a highly visible and very effective cam- paign that has customers, coast to coast, sweeping Love Snacks off the racks and out of the buckets as fast as merchants can stock them. Love Snacks. The way they're sweepin~ the country guarantees that you'll dean up. Wodd Tobacco Auctioneering Cham- pion Page Roberts of Clarksville, Va., (r) and country music superstar Roy Clark get their heads together in a musical rendition of the tobacco auctioneerL~ chant. Rot~'ts, a guest entertainer at the annual Roy Clark Celebrity Golf C~assic, ~ o~I a 9old-plated I:~- Idedical C,~¢ller in Tul~a. Nearly 100 o~ T!56324239
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Earn double prize points with ROLL CAN DY Life Savers, Inc. $2,000,000 PLUS Deal New Prizes and New Profits with tl||.~A~l~ the leading roll candy. Wholesalers .earn 2 prize points for every box you sell during February-June 1984 over the same period in 1983. See your Life Savers, Inc. Representative for details. ^~ Life Savers. Inc.--profitab,lity today and tomorrow. TI56~24240
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40 u~¢l~ ~ ¢~¢1¢~ jou~¢~l February 9. 1984 Committee coordinates plans for NCA convention The convention cnordinating group for the National Confectioners Association meet to initiate plans for lhe 101st annual meeting scheduled at The Breakers, Palm Beach, FI., May 23-26, 1984. (L to r.) Henry J. Bomhofft, Jr., Nabisco Confections, Inc., NCA chairman; Bob McCormack, Bobs Candies, Inc., program chairman; Lee L. Gmse, Tom's Foods, Ltd., entertainment chairman; John P. Hennessy, Fine Products Co., Inc., convention chairman; Richard T. O'Connell, NCA president; Themi Vasils, NCA managing director; Richard Gibian, American Candy Manufac- turing Co., honorary chairman; and James W. Spredley, Sr, Standard Candy Co., Inc., recreation chairman. Alabama distributors elect Crawford pres. BIRMINGHAM, AL: At its recent annual convention, the Alabama To- bacco & Candy Distributors Associa- tion elected Henry Crawford, Crawford Wholesale, Montrose, as president. Other officers include Kevin Miller, Miller. Stabler & Miller, here, vice president; and secretary/treasurer Richard Bumett III, Bumett Cigar Co., here. New area directors are Grady Smith. TVC Wholesale, Florence; Frank D' Amico, Birmingham Tobacco Co., here; and Rickey Jones. The Andalusia Distributing Co., Andalusia. Lang-Senders gets award tang-Senders & Co. ~ the Span- g~- Candy CO, Western B,',oket ~ Ihe Year .~ard at a sates meeting at the mee~t National Ca~dy Wholesalers New Andes Product A fifth style of Andes chocolate con- fections- peanut butter between layers of milk chocolate -- is being test-mar- keted in Boston, New York and Phila- delphia in a 5 oz. box with a suggested $1.29 retail. It joins creme de menthe, parfait, petite and tingaling. It is de- signed for the older consumer who pre- fers a subtle peanut butter taste. From Andes Candies, Inc., Delavan, WI. NCMI seeks broader use of dollar coins FT LAUDERDALE, FL: Pointing out that continuing escalation of operat- ing, product and labor costs for the in- dustry will add even more sales volume at the $1 or more level, the National Coin Machine Institute has requested that the Bureau of the Mint develop programs for widespread distribution and usage of $1 coins. Coin operated machines were re- sponsible for over $20 billion in retail sales of products and sen'ices in 1982, with a sul~stantial portion of these sales totalling SI or more. according to the NCMI. "The sudden collapse of the dollar coin program was a severe Mow to the vending industry and many others.'" said NCMI managing director Herb Beitel. -It is oer hope that an early meeting with the Treast~y can develop coin ba~ to life.'" he added. Swisher promotes three executives JACKSONVILLE. FL: Jno. H. [ 1980 he wa.~ named vice president for Swisher & Son has promoted Nicholas I marketing. L Cevcra to senior vice president for operations; Timo- thy Mann to se- nior vice presi- dent for market- ing and sales; and Paul M. Arvia to vice president, sales. "Cevera joined Swisher in 1980. Prior to that, he was production manager fnr Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. Mann came to Swisher in 1978 as directur of business development. In Cevera Mann Arvia Arvia joined Swisher in 1966 as a sales representative and in 1977 became midwest regional sales manager. In 1978 he was promoted to national ac- counts sales manager and later to na- tional sales manager in 1982. Candy convention's tennis champions Finalists in the 17th American Chicle/NCWA doubles tennis tournament are, from left to right: runnerup Don Ball, L.B. Ball Co., Long Beach, Ca; winners Stan Eisman, Eisman Johnson Co., Narbeth, Pa., and Jerry Prescott, The King Group, Ann Arbor, Mi.; chairman Ross Colletti of Amedcan Chicle; winners Mickey Owen, Chambers & Owen, Janesville, Wi., and Lorna Prescott, The King Group, and runnersup Lois Weir, Cornnuts, and Cyrilla Pearson, Donruss. Bali's partner, Mike Brown of Buehler Brown & Crane, Los Angeles, missed the photo. L&M introduces two new brands DURHAM, NC: "A Taste Worth Sharing" is the theme of L&M Lights and L&M Lights 100's - recently intro- duced in the Green Bay and Milwaukee. USTCJ names Pahlman Midwest sales manager NEW YORK: Patricia Pahlman h~ been appointed midwest sales manager tbr U.S. Tobacco and Cmtdy Jour- nal. She was pre- viously a midwest sales representa- tive for USTCJ and sister publica- tion Convenience Store News. Pahlman Prior to joining USTCJ's parent company, BMT Pub- fications in 1981, Pahlman ~ts employ- ed by Gordon Publications ~ di~Iriet sales manager. Before that, she was Wi. and Columbus, Oh. areas. L&M is emphasizing the "smooth, mild flavor" of the brands. "Our research shows that people who smoke light cigarettes today are more interested in flavor than ever be- fore." says John Franklin, manager of marketing programs for L&IVi. "The complaint we beard most often from smokers of light cigarettes was that their cigarettes weren't as flavorful as other cigarettes." Packaging for the brands has been redesigned in white with blue and gold graphics. Slightly relined packaging for L&M Filter Kings is also being intro- duced. The ad campaign will include a "buy one, get one free" promotion for con- I sumers and related point-of-sale dis- plays for retailerL Help yourself and your business. Read every issue of The UNITED STATES TOBACCO AND CANDY TI5o"324241
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Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18016 ~ (215) 867-7568 T!56324242
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February 9. 1984 m~l~l~l~ ~ m~l ~am~j ]actual 43 Gerber heads western sales for Cornnuts OAKLAND. CA: Suzanne Gerber. former regional sales manager for Beat- rice Foods. has been named west- em regional sales manager for Cornnuts, Inc. She will be re- sponsible for sales through the com- pany's brokers in the 12 western Gerber states. Gerber, who had been with Beatrice nine years, will make her office in Los Angeles. Lorillard appoints regional managers NEW YORK: Lorillard has pro- moted three division managers to re- gional sales man- ager. Robert P. Bonomo, who was divison man- ager in Buffalo, NY, is now re- gional sales man- ager in San Fran- cisco. William R. Bonomo Baldwin, who was division manager in Minneapolis, is now regional sales DECATUR, GA: The annual con- vention of the Southern Tobacco & Candy Association will take place June 15-17 at the Opryland Hotel in Nashville. Tn. For farther information co~tact Jane Smith. S.T.C.A.. 3009 Rainbow Dr., Suite 143, Decatur, Ga. .~,OOM, {404) 243-3974. • Taste th~ difference. A~Ci~ S~ill made with the natttra~ leaf~wapper. Baldwin Blachly manager for Minneapolis, and Terry D. Blachly, who was division manager in Glendale, Ca.. is now regional sales manager for Portland, Or. S.T.C.A. sets June date for annual convention New York/Paris prize trip marks record Tic Tac year Fermm~ golden broker circle celebrates, at the Eiffel to~er, Tac's third year as the growth leader in the mint category. Brokers were nominated based upon their outstanding level of sales which have made "fic Tac the number five brand in the country. Several leading accounts were included on the trip. WV bill would restrict smoking CHARLESTON, WV: Bills to re- strict smoking in passenger elevators, libraries, buildings where health ser- vices are rendered, vehicles accessible to the public and public meetings have been introduced in the West Virginia House (H.B. 1259) and Senate (S.B. 170). "'Public meeting" includes any pre- sided-0ver gathering of three or more individuals, to which aathering mem- bers of the general public have either been invited or are legally entitled to attend. The identical bills provide for a fine of not more than $100. Handbook from Digital helps computer buyers MAYNARD, MA: The Look Over the Rahtbow Handbook from Digital Equipment Corp. is a guide to buying a personal computer for business or pro- fessional use. The 275-page book includes a guide to computer hardware and its options, a listing of over 700 software programs and information on how to get as- sistance. The handbook is free from: Digital Equipment Corp., 200 Baker Ave., CF01-1/M94, West Concord, Ma. 01742. I-Ielp yourseff and your bt~in~m. Read every ism~e of The UNITED STATRS TOgACCO AND CAICDY Natural leaf wrapper American Cigar launches a campaign ~ Antonio & Cleopatra cigars with a four-oo~, two-third page ad in national magazines. The ad, which focuses on the brand,s natu- ral leaf wrapper, will appear throughout the year. Nebraska distributors set for May convention AURORA. CO: The Nebraska Asso- ciation of Tobacco & C',mdy Distribu- tors will hold their annual coa~entioa at the Old Mill Holiday Inn, Omaha, Ne,, May 4 - 6. For further informiaioa con- tact Mary, O'DelI. 2848 S. Kemon Ct., Aurora. Co. 80014, (303) 755-.1049 Lights lO0's in flip top Philip Morris USA has introduced Marl- boro Lights 100's in the flip-top box. The new entry enables Marlboro to take ad- vantage of the throe fastest-growing cat- egodes of the cigarette market--low-tar' 100's and box packings. Media support m magazines, newspapers and outdoor, as well as strong merchandising at point- of-sale is planned. Proper celebration Whe~ Havatampa, irm. president Tom Arth~ (I) was el~:l ~o suoceed Culbro ~sident ol the Ck3ar Assoc/ation of TI56324243
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44 ~i~:ltl¢~ l~a ~U:l ¢a~hJ i~m~l F~bruary 9, 1984 Philip Morris awards scholarships in jobs program Philip Morris, inc., last year~ lead corporation in a private-sector summer youth employment program in New York, awarded $1,000 scholarships to the youth co- chairs, Gilbert Maldonado and EnJse Simmons. (L to r.) Marvin J. Feldman, president of Fashion Institute of Technology accepts check on behalf of Maldonado, who will be attending FIT in the faLl; George Weissman, chief executive officer of Philip Mords, inc. and chairman of Summer Jobs '83, makes the presentation to S|mmons and Maldonado. NJ tobacco distributors GREAT GORGE, N J: Rt~bert Nun- nink, ]ohn Bricks, Inc.. Paterson, was elected president of the New Jersey As- sociation of Tobacco Distributors at its annual convention. Michael Maltzman, Jersey Coast To- bacco & Candy Co., South Belmar, was installed as first vice president. Al Fish- er. Metropolitan Distributing Services, inc.. will serve as second vice presi- dent. Voted in as secretary was Donald Lesser. Pine Lesser & Sons, Inc., Clifton. Treasurer is Matthew Dia- mond. H.L Bailey Co.. Red Bank. William Fodi. Hardy Tobacco Co., New Brunswick, is chairman of the board. David Goldfarb will serve as ex- ecutive director. The directors are: Melvin Baskin, Ir- vington Tobacco Co.. Jersey City; Richard Herbeck, Irwin Tobacco Co.. Trenton: Sanford Kaplan. Belco Sales Co.. Jersey City; Sander Katz. Mid- dlesex Tobacco & Confectionery. Inc., elect Nunnink president Perth Amboy; Edmund M. Kleiner, Ed- mund C. Kleiner, Inc.. Hoboken; Ed- ward Rabin, Thomson-Okun Co., Inc., Orange; and Robert Stoll, Metropolitan Dist. Kelley-Clarke reps candy from Australia BEVERLY HILLS: Mac Robertson Proprietory Limited, a major con- I~ctienery manufacturer in Australia, launched two candy products at a ban- quet here and selected the Kelley-Clar- ke Co. as broker representatives for Califbmia and Nevada. The new products are: Cherry Ripe. a blend of cherries with creamy coconut covered with chocolate and Aussie Bear. a milk chocolate in the shape of a koala bear with a creamy caramel con- let. Murray-Allen honors outstanding sales achievement TI56324244
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HoPe_ to see ~ at our Booth 429-30 - LUDEI~I'S ZlSI37629g! TI,56324245
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46 usdl~l tlai¢~ ~ ~ ¢m~kj jcmm~ February 9, 1984 Sales boosting tips used by led salesmakers By William J. Tobin "'A man who does not apply the [earning in his head is no better than a donkey bearing books on its back." The Coca-Cola Co. is famous for an always-timely advertising slogan, "The Pause That Refreshes.'" This has a spe- cial meaning tbr salesmakers just about any time of the year. That's because selling is a busy, action-packed, profes- sion. There's always something more to do. There's always a new customer/eli- entlbuyer to see and sell. And there's precious little time to pause and to re- fleet, to stop and to think about the job of selling. Why stop at all? Top sales producers reason: Because thinking begets ideas. Because reflection begets inspiration. Because stopping occasionally re puzzle over the right-things-to-do in selling can be a most rewarding experi- ence. Can give you the extra up-and-go. Can truly refi'esh you for the tougher selling that lies ahead. So. let's take a moment to pause, to reflect and consider the tried-and- of a group of vet- eran salesmakers this columnist inter- viewed recently. You'll be the richer for the experience: Each of these better- ways-to-sell recomnrendation.~ comes with a how-to-use-it idea[ • Be equipped to sell agaim't price resistance. Think hard on this: Price is the #1 sales obstacle these days. A memorable five-point procedure for handling price objections is this bright sales tactic: (ll Prepare to meet the price objec- tion head-on. Know what form it is most likely to take for your product or service. (2) Relate the price to customer ben- efits -- first, last and always! (3) Illustrate why the price is right -- hearing's not good enough, "seein's believin!" (4) Control your reactions, watch your reflexes. However right your price. it won't seem right if your voice, facial expressions, gestures signal your lis- tener that answering is bothersome or difficult. (5) Erpecnoclose, tosecureafavor- able buying decision, make a sale ~ no matter how the customer;buyer/client poses the price objection. Your attitude counts for everything here: It must be bright, confident, reassuring. It will be all these things if you P - Prepare, R - Pclate, 1 - Illustrate, C - Coat..,ol, E - Expect ~o close! #l xales --Sheikh Sayid How else might you do it in your sales field? • Obligate yourself to sell more t~mes h~ more places. A simple, but surprisingly effective door-opening tac- they. can't see me." • Sell more selectively. You sell more selectively whenever you pick and choose the best places in which to do your selling. You well more se}ectively when you go where the money is more plentiful. You sell more selecrively whenever you use your imagination to sell the logical customer, the qualified prospect, the most Iikel): biggest, pur- chaser of your goods and services. Sell If you're hooked on profits, wdve got you pegged! tic, used by a top seller of industrial products, involves the use of a short note: "Dear Mr. Jones: I am going to be in your city the early part of next week. I hope it will be convenient for you to see me when ! visit you at 10:30 a. m. on Tuesday." The note, used with some frequency on a variety of accounts. means he is committed ~ to see and .sell morn than one key sales contact! "'1 don't always get my appoimment,'" he explains, "but it is surprising ~ many important co~tacts find it conve- nient to make a note o~t their appoint- merit pad to s¢¢ me, tlsas it is to take the trouid¢ to call or wnle me a lener sa~i~g selectively and you sell with all the odds favoring your continuing success: You join an elite group of salesmakers who continually seek out. search for. that rewarding 20% of oustomers/pms- peers who account for 80% of sales -- and 80% of repeat sales. You look for business where you have every reason- able expectation of finding it[ • Sympathize and sell. A three- point procedure, we see practiced by the mo~e expert salesmaker these days, pcevents many a sales tall faocn being a complete waste of time. It calls for you to: ~ 11 Agree -- aCt~e ~ ~uty poL-~tial customer's refusal to listen is a perfectly natural feeling for him/her to have these days. a feeling you understand com- pletely. (2) Explain -- explain that because you understand this feeling you know he/she will be interested. ~3) Bridge ~ bridge back int~ your sales story with a "'let me show you why...'" reason or colorful illustra- tion. la.rpirational note: In its broadest sense, sympathizing and caring, can be the source of a mountain of new sales results. U.S. News and World Report cites the startling statistic that "80% of lost sales, lost business, is due to an attitude of indifference (not caring) on the part of some employee." In small and big ways it pays to care, to sym- pathize and sell. • Creole a better organized sales talk. A mature salesmaker, turned sa/es training executive, enthusiastically rec- ommends this organized way of putting together this better-than-average sales talk, sales presentation: (I) A theme ~ "'Every truly worth- while sales talk contains a clear and memorable statement of the selling proposition: "This is what's in it for yon, Mr. Rightman!'" (2l A promise of gain ~ "Every I good sales talk includes an equally, clear and speeilic statement of how the ~ listener, or viewer, stands to profit- from some new action he or she is asked to undertake with respect to your sug- gestions or offerings." (3) A problem -- "Every on-target sales talk addresses itself to a customer : problem. Its accurate identification is of paramount importance to the success of the entire talk." 14) A solution ~ "'Every u,inning sales talk contains a highly believable problem-solving solution that guaran- tees the fulfillment of the promise of' gain made earlier in the talk." ~5) Proof~ "Every good sales pre- sentation uses facts, case histories, suc- cess stories to document the desirability and certain success of the recom- mended solution. (6) Action -- "Every productive sales presentation contains a motivator. This, finally, is the central objective of every sales talk', The customer must he motivated, he must react, he must agree to move in some positive manner or direction. Only then does he (she!) put his name on the order form or approve your suggestion with a ~lcome 'Ship~ it just ~ soon as }~tt ca~! .... • Sell be.r~md the paint orioles re. ~i~ce. The hm~ons stoct o~ ~ of- (Continued o~ page 481 TI56324246
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Independent research shows that front end selling space should yield up to 1V2% of your store's profits. That's 3 to 4 times the average for space occupied you get from the rest of the store. Now that extra profit can be yours with a total program from American Chicle, including valuable research studies, free for your use, to help generate better selling upfront. Get it all from American Chicle: products, merchandising, research and an experienced sales force to help you put it together for more profit. The challenge: find out how you can make more upfront when you see the experts at American Chicle. We'll help you u _l~front... where the profits are. AmericanChicle Your partner in progress Division of Warner Lambert, 201 Tabor Road, Morris P|ains, N.J. 07950, Te}ephone: (201) 540-4269 TI56324247
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48 February 9, 1984 Sales boosting tips used by veteran salesmakers (Conthmed from page 46) rice equipment salesmaker makes this 9oint rather dramatically: He sold top- of-the-line products for the Mosler Safe Co. of New York. It took him some time to discover why he was so consistently thwarted in his attempts to sell a large office sate to a newly qualified pros- peer. The potential customer kept put- ting him offwith a variety of objections: "No budget" -- "We just can't afford it" -- "The pace is much, much too high!" Always a different reason-- al- ways no sale. His persistency, however. had a handsome payoff. He finally un- covered the real reason he couldn't sell the safe. The prospect's partner was deathly afraid of being robbed and, being a very short man, he was sure his small stature would be an invitation to burglars to lock him in the safe! The salesmaker suggested a small safe, one that guaranteed the person',d safety of the partner, and the sale was made then and there. Play it safe, win that next tough sale, sell beyond the point of sales resistance. • Mechanize your salesmanship. A paper products salesmaker has a wing- dinger of a sales builder idea (that also sells a lot of his product): "What mort simple way can you duplicate your sell- ing messages and see to their immedi- ate distribution to tens, hundreds, thousands of prospects and customers i -- than by employing your company's office duplicating machines and the U.S. Post Office to do your selling? Dozens of our customers use sales let- ters, single-leafed and double-leafed ~ostcards, to generate sales leads, se- cure new and reorder business." Many another salesmaker circularizes all the newer entries in the latest telephone or business directory. Others multiply the usefulness of their sales messages via telegrams and cablegrams. And selling becomes a more repetitively rewarding business. • Sell more to regular customers. It is good business, in any line of busi- ness, to sell more than one item IO any good customer. Listen to your local re- tail salesmaker: The druggist promptly inquires: "Anything else today -- toothpaste, shaving cream, razor bladesS" -- whenever he sells a tooth- brush to a customer. The haberdasher asks: "'How about some socks to match the new tie you just bought?" "l'he alert gas station operaUn-asks: "'May I check your oil. sir'?" And e~ry sa~esmaker works harder selling more of the com- pany's goods awl services. Tic reg, slar, stetd% cu.,aomer is the sottree of gO~ of company sales, of company repeat sales, of more sales. • Work SMARTER-SMARTER. Chemical products salesmakers, so notes a recent study made by a top- management marketing friend, earned "above average" ratings as sales pro- ducers because they: Make double the calls on very large customers that aver- age salesmakers make -- call regularly on all desirable accounts -- talk busi- ness and orders almost exclusively- visit the customer:s plant, office: meet and talk to his people -- take personal responsibility for every aspect of cus- tomer service -- set personal sales goals, objectives -- work closely with associates, friends, to maximize their sales contacts, sales results. They work smart, smart, smart -- and harder. • Go where the bush~ess is! Another salesmaker friend, sales marlager of a ' USA-wide insurance firm, writes in a ~ recent trade magazine article: "More' than 20% of U.S. citizens-- one out of every five businessmen, doctors, law- yers, merchants, shoppers, .sales con- tacts -- change their place of residence every year. The sales targets are con- stantly shifting. That means you have to constandy re-evaluate where it is you must look for your new selling oppor- tunities. No more than 3% of Amer- icans spend their whole life in one dwelling. Not more than 15% always live in the same county! These changes involve every salesmaker -- and just about every customer he or she calls on. It makes sense to look for the new busi- ! ness opportunities where your study of these changes tell you that's where it pays to sell and sell and sell.'" Selling's great, when as here. you pause to medilale. Where's the application of all this to your selling? Stop. Think on it -- now? Pink Lemonade gum Bubble Yum Pink Lemonade from Life Savers is said to taste Dike a sum- inert[me party year'round. It is avag- able in 24 count boxes and wil( be advertised on radio and rich,york tale- vision. From: Liie Savers Inc.. Ne~ Yock, NY. TI56324248
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THEY BRING THE FRESHNESS BACK! SAILA MINTS, with the soft chewy center, are different from all other breath mints on the market. SAILA MINTS are made from best quality, all natural ingredients, with just 4 calories in every mint. SAILA MINTS' unique, eyecatch- ing display ensures point-of-sale positioning, and therefore fast turnover. SAILA MINTS are the #1 selling breath mint in Italy. Introductory promotion available in your market. Display at point of sale. 12" high. Requires just over 1/4 sq. ft. of counter space. Pack: 12/60-count displays to the case. Each display boxed individually. Imported and distributed by: AD-COMM 1410 Higgins, Park Ridge, IL 60068 (312) 823-3510 TI56324249
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50 uaiicd~lc4mc~cmcl~lmmmi February9, 1984 l Mars" seminar outlines repositioning of candy COLORADO SPRINGS, CO: At a recent seminar for editors of con- fectionery publications, M&M/Mars detailed its efforts to reposition candy as a snack food and explained its in- volvement as a corporate sponsor for the 1984 Winter and Summer Olympic Games (the company's M&M's choco- late candies and Snickers bar have been designated as "the official snack food" of the games). The three-day seminar, entitled "From Indulgent to Permissible: Team- work Can Make the Difference," took place at the United States Olympic Training Complex and the Bmadmoor Hotel, here. The program, hosted by Greg Pflug. Mars' Olympic sales coor- dinator, and Burson-Marstellar, the public relations firm for M&M/Mars, featured a combination of speakers manufacturer and peo- connected with the Olympics in various capacities. Whitney Hill, soutbem region sales director for M&M/Mars, said that while members of the confectionery in- dustry and nutritionalists realize that candy is a permissible snack food, con- sumers regard candy as an indulgent treat. "'Most of the consumers" miscon- ceptions about nutrition are a direct re- suit of information from well-inten- tioned yet misinformed government agencies and other groups that reinforce candy myths in their materials," Hill explained. Fighting misconception The way to combat these misconcep- tions, Hill believes, is to place candy in the much larger category of snack foods which he defined as any food ready for immediate consumption. Hill pointed out that snack foods represent a nearly $23 billion industry in retail sales and that candy accounts for $7.6 billion of that figure. "'Sales of snack foods have nearly tripled over the past decade and snacks have grown 10% faster than all other food categories," stated Hill. Hill said that consumers break snacks down into three categodc.~r-in- dulgent (candy and snack cakes), per- missible (chips, crackers) and "'good for you" (apples, yogurt, nuts). "'Can- dy's label is restricting sales,'" Hill be- lieves, "'but if we can move consumers' perception of candy from the indulgent to the permissive a~n~--the way the fast food industW has--we can signifi- candy broaden the sales horizon for our category.'" John Feuling, national accounts why his company cho~ to associa¢ itself with the Olympics and reviewed some of the promotions Mars is con- ducting for M&M's chocolate candies and Snickers bars. "'What better association could can- dy have than with the OIympics--a highly visible and credible vchi- cle-~the eptiomc of fitness, health and nutrition," Feuling asked. He added :hat Mars' title as "official snack food of the 1984 Olympic games" drives home the industry repositioning and marketing strategy for candy. Educate the consumer "'The repositioning strategy," Fuel- ing concluded, "will help to create a more open-minded and educated con- A consumer who will finally realize that candy is okay to eat. This should be the goal of our industry." Pointing out that the Olympics are the world's most prestigious sports event, commanding 300 hours of televi- ston coverage, Feuling stated his belief that the games will provide the perfect forum for Mars to convey its reposition- mg message to the American consumer. "The Olympics are an incomparable media spectacle and an outstanding op- portunity for our industry," opined Feuling. "This is the first thne a con- fectionery company has been involved in the Olympics on this scale. Our cus- tomers should be the first to know of the implications of a candy company being an official sponsor.'" In discussing his company's advertis- ing and promotion activity for the Olympics, Feuling said Mars is featur- ing vignettes of Olympic athletes who include candy as part of their diet-fit- ness programs. Other advertising focuses on spectators enjoying Olympic related events and eating candy. M&M/Mars is also sponsoring The Road to L.A.. a television seres docu- menting U.S. Olympic hopefuls, and a series of nationally syndicated shorts The Olympic Winning Moments which highlight past Olympic games. On the public relations front, the can- dy manufacturer will continue to reach consumers through media speakers like AI Oerter, who in "84 will be trying to win an unprecedented fifth gold medal in the discus event. The company is also putting together an educational pro- gram for schools which will attempt to change some of the myths surrounding candy at the youngest level mad build a broader comsumer base for future years. Mars will shortly be laxtaching its "Help America Win" program, a month wrapper return program signed to suppo~ the U.S. Olympic team. Mike Eruzione. captain of the 1980 gold medal winning U.S. Olym- pic hockey team, will be the company spokesman for the program which will include television and print advertising. For every I0 M&M's chocolate can- dies or Snickers bar wrappers col- lected. $1 will be donated by the brands to the U.S. Olympic team. Consumers returning 10 wrappers will receive a free "I Helped America Win" patch. Most American athletes are misin- formed about nutrition and many be- lieve myths that can be detrimental to their performance, according to Ann Grandjean, nutrition consultant to the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) Sports Medicine Division. "The sports world is full of misinfor- mation about the relationship between nutrition and athletic pertbrmance," Grandjean said. "A lot of well-known, accomplished athletes hold some rather bizarre ideas about nutrition. An athlete who excels and practices a nutritional quirk is emulated by younger athletes. But the fact is that these athletes excel in spite of their eccentricities, not because of them." Grandjean cited a survey involving 171 college athletes and 14 experts in sports nutrition which produced some startling results. "It was incredible to see how ill- intbrmed the athletes were about basic nutrition practices. In several instances --taking salt tablets and refraining from drinking water, for example--the ath- letes were following practices that had the exact opposite effect of what was intended," Grandjean remarked. ]n her ongoin.g campaign to eradicate the traditional myths and misconcep- tions surrounding sports diets, Grand- jean believes the role of nutritionalists is to educate and get accurate informa- tion out to the athletes, coaches and other support staff. In recent years, the American con- sumer has been bombarded with mes- sages that snacking results in nutri- tionally unsound diets and that candy rots teeth, leads to obesity and causes none. Dr. Dan Rosenfield, scientific affairs director for M&M/Mars, said there are scientific facts that allow consumers to refute such myths surrounding health, confectionery, and snacking. "If con- sumers took the time to read the labels on the foods they eat, they would begin to realize that all foods cause problem.~," Roseafield explained. "In a rmdonwide food consumption survey, conducted in 197g. the United States Depm'tmeat of Agriculture found that snack foods provided 20~: of sumed at least one snack per day.'; Rosenfield said. Addressing the dental health issue, Rosenfield pointed out that the cavity causing potential of foods cannot be correlated with sugar content. Diet is only one factor in the development of cavities, and excess emphasis on diet has been counterproductive, Rosenfield believes. M&M/Mars' scientific affairs direc- tor also said that confectionery products provide nutrients other than carbohy- drates. "Many consumers believe that candy is 100% carbohydrate and that carbohydrate is a negative thing," he revealed. "In actuality, the primary role of carbohydrates is to provide energy. Energy is obtained from the chewing and digestion of carbohydrates whic.h are then absorbed and transported as blood sugar (glucose) to cells of the body where physical activity and nor- mal life processes take place. Without energy, life is impossible." Rosenfield concluded by saying that a diet consisting of a variety of food- s--including confectionery--eaten in moderation, leads to good nutrition and a healthy lifestyle. Other speakers on the agenda in- eluded former Olympic gold medalist Wendy Boglioli of the M&M/Mars Olympic Speakers' Bureau; Casey Clarke. director of the USOC Sports Medicine Division; Geri Maestas, as- sistant to the director of corporate par- ticipation for the USOC; Peter Van Handel, physiologist for the USOC Sports Medicine Division, and Jackie Puhl, physiologist for the USOC Sports Medicine Division. Also included on the program was a tour of the U.S. Olympic Training Complex. where seminar participants were able to experience fit:st hand the sacrifice and training athletes go through in preparation for their chance at Olympic glory. Refillable pipe lighter TI56324250
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S/COAL TAKE A POUCH INSTEAD OF A • A great new alternative for more than 25 million men who smoke. • A massive $35 million budget to help you build this new business. From U.S. Tobacco, who pioneered smokeless tobacco and built the market, another great first! Skoll Bandits are Individual, pre-moistened pouches of wintergreen flavored tobacco. Nillt tO use, easy to handle-- pop one between your cheek and gum, and get everything you wlnt Prom great tobacco without lighting up. Revolutionary? YeS .o. Because Skoal Bandits is a new category to. ADD tO your tobacco busun~ • Offers smokers who wantto cut down a legitimate alternative. • Will add to your tobacco sales by bringing in new customers. AND... Add tO your profits • Skoal Bandits has highest gross margin of any tobacco category. • Higherturnover per square inch of counter space. • 100% guaranteed sales policy--you Incur no Iossl • Generous promotional allowances atall trade levels.
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WHAT CUSTOMERSARE SAYING ABOUT SKOAL BANDITS ]Jl~ I I III I Since we launched Skoal Bandits last year, we've been swamped with letters. Here are some excerpts from them: ................. you can't burn yourself. ................ Chicago, IL Take a pouch instead of a puff. A pouch Is no mess, It's clean, it's refreshing. I get a lot of enjoyment without having to light up. New York, N,Y. On the job it is an easier choice for the satisfaction of:tobacco. Have been purchasing Skoal Bandits since sample won me over. cleveland, off MY wife appreciates my using Skoal Bandits because there is no smoke in the house. New Yo~, First of all, let us say how much we enjoy your Skoal tobacco product. Many of us work in office areas where smoking is not permitted, Skoal Bandits fill the need when you just can't light up. Bluefleld, W. Instead of havlng the bad taste of cigarettes in ~ ~ my mouth, I enjoy the wintergreen flavor. NewYork. N.Y, I highlyrecommend yourProductand in view of the fact that l own an etiquette school, I feel that Iris as appropriate for women as for men. San Francisco, CA I have tried many products but always go back to smoking. This time I have found the answer. Quincy, Messacllusett~ It'S very clean -- no mess--just drop It In there and it's tobacco, It's the real thing. New Yor~, I have also introduced itto my friends, who ln turn thought itwas terrific. Thank you for such a refreshing alternative. Detroit, As a smoker you're treated as a second class citizen. With Skoal Bandits you're back to first class again. New York, N.Y.
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On TV, Skoal Bandits"~consumers will endorse how satisfying, neat and easy a pouch of Skoal Bandits can be. Massive print campaign backs uP TV commercials with Skoal Bandits sampling. "I'm ~od example that Skoal Bandits" II . a pouch ,nstead of a puff.
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OF SPONSORSHIPSSPECIAL EVENTS During 1984 Skoal Bandits will be tying-in with some of America's leading events -- building awareness and extending mass sampling opportunities. Grand National stock car ~.~nts with winning NAS- drivers Harry Gant and Phil Parsons. CART Indy RacingSeries -- featuring Forsythe Racing's Teo Fabi, four time winner and .1983 Indianapolis 500 ROOKie ofthe Year! Dirt track sprint cars and midget racers. Major tie-ins to agricultural snows, county fairs, auto shows, and special mall .prom.otions throughout America. Skiing .-- maj.or sponsorsh!p of amateur aownhill events, PLUS... On-campus.events and programs aE more than 400 colleges and universities.
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SELL SKOAL They are big mass market items! They are impulse items! That means mass merchandising throughout the store! • Display bins --for high traffic in-store display. • Counter rnerchandisers and • Checkout counter units -- give higher per ticket sales, maximize impulse purchases and dollars per square Inch of counter space. GENEROUS PROMOTIONAL ALLOWANCES AT ALL TRADE LEVELS The better you do with Skoal Bandits, the better we do. That's why we have set aside really generous case allowances for customized trade promotion at all levels of Skoal Bandits business. Promotional packages can va~/widely from major chain merchandising events to SkOal Bandits auto racing sponsorship (like the highly successful programs we do with Kmart, 7-Eleven, Fast Fair and circle K), to Individual store display events and local media tle.lns.
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MORE D DOWNRIGHT SlNESS.I • Skoal Bandits sales will boostyour tobacco business and help make up for expected cigarette revenue downturn. • Skoal Bandits high margins will boost your total tobacco business gross profits. • Skoal Bandits undated packaging and 6 month shelf life makes stock planning easier. • Skoal Bandits 100% guaranteed sales policy means you'll incur no losses. • Skoa, I Bandits impulse purcnase means higher per ticket sales. • Display Skoal Bandits at the check out for high dollars per square inch counter space. SKOAL BANDITST'"" $35 MILLION BUDGET AND MASSIVE CONSUMER SAMPLING PROGRAM ASSURES YOU HIGH CONSUMER TRAFFIC AND PULL THROUGH.
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• BANDtTS Take a pouch instead of a puff."u
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U- S.TOBACCO Tele. (203) 661-1100 100 West Putnam Avenue, Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 Telex~ 9~66~4 • .. • =~-~.L~o.-:... .....
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~ Februar.¢ 9, 1984 69 Can you afford to miss discounts? By .loseph Arkin, CPA High interest rates discourage many business man- agers from bank borrowing. "Ihe cost of the borrowed funds exceeds the apparent benefits. Yet many of the same business managers un- knowingly pay exorbitant interest rates for the privilege of delaying payments to suppliers for only a few days. That occurs when they forego significant cash dis- counts that suppliers often allow in exchange for early For example, assume you purchase $1,000 in goods from a supplier who extends 2% 10, Net 30 Day credit terms. If you pay for the purchase within ten days. the supplier allows a 2% -- or $20 discount -- off the invoice amount due. However, if you forego the dis- count the supplier then expects the full $1,000 payment in thirty days. From one perspective, the failure to take the discount i.e. paying the full $1,000 invoice amount due in thirty days -- isn't a major financial event. Standing alone, the loss of a potential $20 discount isn't signifi- cant. However, that discount acquires more significance when you recognize it as an interest charge, rather than as part of your total purchase cost. The same dollar cost that appears nominal becomes a startling annual inter- Component parts To demonstrate that thee. let's break down the above and payment transaction into two component One part represents the $980 net purchase cost he merchandise. That represents your cost t'br the merchandise so long as you pay for the purchase within ten days. Since the supplier does allow that grace period, you can view that initial credit period as a ten day interest from the supplier. Instead of requiring cash time of the purchase, he extends credit 'or ten days without expecting any compensation in excess of the original purchase price. In fact. since it represents free financing, there is no reason to pay the supplier before the tenth day. even though you may have the necessary cash on hand. However, should you t~il to pay the supplier by the tenth day the terms of the original credit consideration change. Indeed, the supplier will charge you $20 for the privilege of using that $980 in credit for an addi- tional 20 days. Again, that charge may appear nomi- nal. But when we view it as an annual interest charge, it i becomes more substantial. The following model clar- i ifies the view of a missed discount as a loan from a supplier. I0 Days 20 Day Loan Period Free Credit Now, let's calculate the effective annual interest charge that arises from the $20 charge for using the in credit consideration for twenty days. The first step in the calculation process relates the : to the net amount of he purchase pdce: Continuing the above example, the calculation be- purehase. comes: The cost of missing that particular discount remains at two percent. But the term of the loan now is sixty Interest charge for = $ 20 = 2.04% days. the difference between the final payment date and missing a discount $980 the di.,,coum date. The annualized cost from missing the discount now is calculated as: Thus, a business pays a 2.04% charge for foregoing a two percent discount in ten days, and then paying for 36.__9.0 × 2.04% = 12.24% the purchase in thirty days as required by the credit terms. Not insignificant At first glance, that cost still may appear insignifi- cant. However, the business pays that charge for unly twenty days. To make the charge comparable to other interest rates we must "annualize" it. That is, we must determine what the interest charge represents on the presumption that the business pays the equivalent amount to use the funds for a full year, rather than just twenty days. The conversion process proceeds in a straightfor- ward manner. First, divide 360 (for calculating con- venience, the number of days in a business year) by the term of the supplicr's "loan" -- i.e.. the time between the discount date and the final due date for payment. Then..multiply that number by the percentage charge paid to use the supplier's funds found in the previous calculation. Thus, continuing the example we find: .- 360 - × percenlage rate = Annual Ten'n of the "loan" paid for one term interest Rate - 360 - x2.04 = 36.72% 20 The 2.04% charge tbr delaying payment tbr twenty days represents a 36.72% effective annual interest rate. tActually, it's a bit higher, since we know the year actually has 365 days.) The lower charge that appears nominal translates into an exorbitant annual interest rate. Indeed. a business often can increase its profits by borrowing the funds necessary to take the discounts. Of course, that benefit develops only when the cost of borrowing falls below the annualized cost it incurs from missing the discount. As a representative guide, the table that follows includes the annualizcd charge a business incurs from missing the discounts indicated: Annualized Credit Cost Credit Terms If Discount Not Taken 1/10. Net 20 37% II10, Net 30 18 ~10, Net 20 73 3/15, Net 45 37 Of course, the perceptive business manager will qu.ick.ly note the potential for reducing the cost of messing a discount without resorting to borrowed funds. Indeed. merely delaying payment for a purchase beyond the due date can reduce the cost of missing a discount to a tolerable level. For example, assume the abo~ business misses the two percent discount allowed tbr payment in ten days, b~a~ then delays fitml payment until tim invoice is forty days past dae ~ i.e. :/~y days afar 1he da~ of 60 Wrong conclusion By delaying payment the firm reduced the an- nualized cost from missing the discount from 37% to 12.24%. Thus it becomes obvious that the solution to the high cost of missing discounts is found in deferring payments to suppliers until the effective cost drops to something reasonable. Obviously not! The business that habitually fails to pay within sup- plier credit terms soon collects blemishes on the pri- mary criterion used to evaluate its credit worthiness. Indeed, the business that repeatedly fails to honor a supplier's credit terms risks losing that supplier's credit consideration altogether. Missing a discoXmt allowed tbr early payment is expensive. But repeatedly failing to pay by the final due date can lead to financial failure. Thus, you should use the following management guidelines. First, if you have the cash, take all significant dis- counts allowed for early payment for a purchase. A discount becomes significant when it exceeds your normal cost of borrowing from your bank. Second, if you lack the cash necessary to take sig- nificant discounts, try to borrow the necessary funds. Naturally, the cost of direct borrowing should be less than the cost of missing the discount. In that event, it becomes profitable to borrow to take the discount. Finally. don't abuse any supplier's credit considera- tion. If you can't pay by the end of the discount period, exert a conscientious effort to pay by the final due date. Hunoring a supplier's credit terms remains an essential element necessat)' for the success of every business enterprise. Three from S.L. Kaye S.L. Kaye Co. announces O'Kaye Fizz Bars, Sooper Sipper and Butter Toffee. The Fizz Bars come in grape, apple, cherry, strawberry and water- melon flavors and sell for 5¢. Sooper Sipper, in grape, cherry and can be sipped like a drink or eaten like catm~/. The Butter Toffee chang,e- TI56324263
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70 ~llmdtl¢~ Iobo~ ~ m~kjjom~d February 9. 1984 Econom=es of scale enhance Brach We're speaking with Robert D. Hecklau. senior vice president tf marketing atut sales for E.J. Brach & Sons, about his company's marketing perspectives. USTCJ: Bob, how would you de- scribe the Braeh business today? Hecklau: Brach is a large, general-line candy manufacturer with 120 different formulas and 1,200 different packings. We have a great variety, of staples and a great variety of seasonal items. We make, for example, between 50 and different candies for each of our four key seasons -- Christmas, Valentine's Da3: Easter and Halloween. When you consider the length and breadth of our line, the number of dif- ferent outlets we sell to, plus the great number of promotions we run a year, you can see why our sales force is very busy. We have over 300 salespeople covering the U.S. USTCJ: You have rather recently added a broker network to sell Brach items. Why did you elect to add bro- kers rather than expand your direct sales force? Hecklau: Very simply, we can get bet- ter coverage for some of our items with a broker network than .we can with our own salespeople. It wouldn't be eco- nomically feasible, for example, to staff up a very large sales organization to market the Gumdinger lollipop. Brach has traditionally been very strong in the food markets with family packs of pops, but this particular pop sells one at a time in a great number &retail outlets -- in far more outlets than our own sales people could possibly cover. It just made sense to appoint brokers and have their 25 or 50 people work with dis- tributors to get Gumdinger into a lot of smaller retail establishments. USTCJ: Is the distributor important to the Brach business? Hecklau: We've not only always en- joyed good business with distributors, we rely on them. The thrust of our busi- ness will come through the distributor network. We provide him with pro- grams to sell our best-selling candies. USTCJ: What are your feelings about the acquisitions and consolida- tions which have been taking place in the wholesale randy and tobacco business? Hecidau: At this poi~, roe have not seen any changes in the basiness stem- miag from these coasolidmioas. The~ probably are certain advantages in forming larger groups. Certainly the drug industry is an example of how re- tailing can be made more efficient with multiple stores operating off one ware- xouse's centralized computer. Fifty years ago, the drug industry was pri- marily independent; today two-thirds of the business is done by chain nrer- chants. If history is any barometer, greater efficiency and lower operating costs come with size. The mergers may force certain smaller jobbers to develop a unique service to compete with a net- work. if not, they may not survive. USTCJ: What is your opinion of the i price increases recently effected in the candy market? Hecklau: There is an inexorable in- crease in the salaries paid to the people who make candy in the factories. Also there have been increases in the costs of basic ingredients-- cocoa beans, sugar and corn syrup -- and these costs can't continually be absorbed. Mars's reac- tion to the price increases of other man- ufacturers is, in my opinion, more cosmetic than an impoaant step in any ~articular direction. USTCJ': Bob, how does a large con- fectionery manufacturer continue to prosper in this market? Hecklau: Your question is timely be- cause of the recent sales of a number of candy manufacturers. One might won- der if everybody today is for sale. Well, Brach is not; it is surviving, thriving and growing. Our sales were at a record high in 1983. We can shape our growth. We have good quality and, when we bring out a new product, people expect it to be good. We don't have to launch every new product from ground zero, because it shares in the reputation of Brach quality. We have an excellent distribution system their enables us to bring candy to every state in the U.S. -- relatively quickly and at relatively low freight costs. Smaller companies have consid- erable difficulty with freight rates which are increasingly higher, I'm sure they find it difficult to provide o~eat qualky product, on-time deliveries with "l'lm~gh o~r si~e. o~r adl~e~ce m Robert D. Hecklau quality and our freight efficiencies, we can survive. And, by adding quite a few million dollars in national advettising, we reinforce our image with the Amer- ican public and expand our sales. A further element which helps us prosper in challenging times is our at- tention to customer needs. We respond to problems with reasonable decisions. When looking over the sale of certain companies late in 1983, it was obvious that many were having difficulty turn- ing in a quality performance -- growth and a satisfactory return to stockholders while providing candy at a reasonable stability price. In that kind of situation, the choices become providing less for stockholders or providing less for re- tailers and distributors. USTCJ: From a manufacturer's standpoint, how would you sum up the candy situation? Hecklau: 1 think the confectionery in- dustry is fundamentally healthy. Per capita consumption has started to come back; the economy is strong; retail is strong. The pressures on candy from con- sumer groups has abated somewhat. The whole myth about ache has been put to bed and the dental earle situation. has quieted. Candy is a better value now than many other consumer items. The con- fectionery industry has held costs down while developing more efficient man- ufacturing and distribution methods. In 1983, we took a 3% price increase, which was our first price increase in two years. Other industries have seen a lot faster escalation in retail pricing than that. All in all, I'm upbeat on the candy industry's future. USTCJ: Thank you~ Bob. Food & Drug okays sale of nicotine gum WASHINGTON, DC: The Food & Drug Administration has approved the sale by prescription of Nicorette, a chewing gum containing nicotine. Each square of the gum, which is made by Men-ell Dow Pharmaceuticals of Cin- cinnati, will contain two milligrams of nicotine of the same type found in ciga- rettes. According to a company spokesman, the target audience for the product is the cigarette smoker who has tried at one time or another to quit smoking. It is expected to be available for sale in mid- March. It is estimated that a box of 96 pieces of Nicoretre will retail around $20. That's seen as a ten-day to two-week supply. According to the manufacturer, the gum is intended to help people who give up cigarettes as part of an organized smoking cessation program. though it will not replace the desire for ¢ig~xettcs. FDA ~'-ommends that ncithcr l~eg- Mars holds prices, aids retailers with multi-tier pricing HACKETTSTOWN, N J: In addition to assisting retailers with multi-tier pri- cing, M&M/Mars will continue to maintain the same list price on their candies and bars in the forsceable fu- ture, despite other industry price in- creases. To supplement its media campaign, Mars has developed a number of tools and point-of-purchase materials to aid in implementing the independent pric- ing decision in retail stores. Back in November. Mars added the message, "'Still same price" to their television commercials. The company has already presented their customers with aggressive promotion plans lbr the first quarter of 1984. To assist retailers who have decided to use multi.tier pricing, Mars has de- veloped a number of point-of-imrchase i~'n~ and shelf talkc~ to ~infoccc the possibk, all single bar wrap~s md boxes ~ill ~d. -Still same lXiCc." TI56324264
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February 9, 1984 72 One minute technique boosts profits NEW YORK: Dr. Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson are co-authors of The One Minute Manager. a number-one best seller which they. and their readers, claim, "'Increases productivity, profits and your own prosperity." The tech- nique can be put to use in just 60 sec- onds. In less than two years, over one and a half million copies have been sold. A permanent fixture on the 1983 best-sell- er lists across the country, TI, e One Min- ute Manager is available in 16 languages. Just one month after its re- lease in paperback, it climbed to num- ber one on the national charts. The 106-page book provides readers with three exceedingly practical secrets that can be applied daily at home and on the job. The book sells for $15 with a money- back guarantee. Blanchard, an interna- tionally known management consul- tant. and Dr. Robert Lorber, an expert on productivity, are preparing a new book called Putting The One Minute Manager To Work. Available in Febru- ary 1984, this book will provide sug- gested applications for using the secrets of The One Minute Manager. Both books are published by William Morrow and Co.. Inc. Bicycle celebrates birthday with Olympics license R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY NOTICE TO THE TRADE TO THE RETAIL TRADE: R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company wishes to remind you of its display programs for all retailers selling cigarettes "over-the-counter." R. J. Reynolds offers merchandising perfor- mance allowances to all competing retailers who sell our products. All such offers require display of cigarette brands designated by R. J. Reynolds and are categorized as follows: • Carton and Package Merchandising programs. • Permanent Counter and Floor Display programs for packages and cartons. • Temporary Package and Carton display programs. From time to time we also make available point-of-sale display materials and promotional offers for in-store use. Payment is made on a monthly, t~i-monthly, or quarterly basis, as designated in each program. If you would like to receive further information on our programs, contact your R. J. Reynolds Representative, or send your name, address and telephone number to: R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Sales Department 401 N. Main Street Winston-Salem, NC 27102 R. J. REYIIOLDS TOBACCO COM~Z~iY Ray Ostrander. executive vice president for U.S. Playing Card Co., cuts the cake to celebrate the 99th blrthday of the company's Bicycle brand playing cards, with Bill McCorvey, vice president of sales; while company leaders Howard Curd (I.), chair- man of the board, and Les Racey. president, toast the announcement that the firm has been chosen as the official playing card licensee for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. Sam Awand NEW YORK: Sam Awand, 59, re- tired vice president of Garcia y Vega cigars and more recently New York branch manager for Jno. H. Swisher & Son Co., died May 14 after a short ill- ness. Awand, who spent more than a quar- ter of a century in the cigar industry, had previously been affiliated with E. Re- gensburg & Sons and Bayuk Cigars, Inc. A former member of the Merchants & Salesmen's Club of Greater New York and the New York Tobacco Table, he is survived by his wife, two sons and a daughter. Louis Paul CAMDEN. NJ (MO): Louis Paul, 76, retired owner of the former Camden Wholesale Confectionery & Tobacco Co., died December 20 at his home in Merchantville. He v, as a l~St president and director of the Beth J~ob-Beth Is- rael Coagregatiom past president of Brkh Sholom Lodge 20. a~l see,~-tary of the Uni~=d Synagogue ~ America. Frank Riggio, 78 BAY .SHORE, NY: Frank Riggio. 78, one-time president of the Riggio Tobacco Co., maker of Regent ciga- rettes, and more recently a U.S. repre- senlative for Rothmans, died Janua~ 2t. Riggio, son of the late Vincent Rig- gio. former president of the American Tobacco Co., is survived by his widow, Margaret; two daughters and a son, and nine grandchildren. Philip L. Moss ST LOUIS (JB): Philip L. Moss, 83, former president of the Moss & Lowenhaupt Cigar Co.. was killed De- cember 24 in an automobile accident. The body was donated to the local Washington University Medical School. Contributions may be made to Barnes Hospital in St. Louis. Moss. a pioneer in the cigar industry. .sold his company to Universal Cigar in 1965. Servivors include his wife, Rodyn Coke. Moss. a datt~hcr, two bmtkers TI56324266
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No doubt • J about it When ~ ' you put Bayer'121s ~ beside your registers, where fo ks can see them, they sell fast! Especially now that Bayer is improved! Bayer has a micro-thin coating that makes if easy-to-swallow, easy to take. So your customers will be faking Bayer'12's more than ever. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT BAYER® 12's DISPLAYS AND DEALS FOR NEW IMPROVED BAYER,e CONTACT YOUR LOCAL GLENBROOK REPRESENTATIVE. OR WRITE TO GLENBROOK LABORATORIES, 90 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10016 TI56324267
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February 9, 1984 PM International names marketing services head NEW YORK: Elizabeth Margatitis Butson has been appointed director of marketing services at Philip Morris In- ternational and will be responsible for international advertising and market- ing. and sales analysis. She'tl also: provide regional affiliams with market- ing support, including advertising, point-of-sale materials, promotional ac- tivities, graphic package design and a range of consumer marketing research. Mrs. Bulson was previously director of promotions and advertising services in the Latin Ameriea/lberia region. Vogel senior analyst NEW YORK: Laura Vogel,' who joined Lofillard in 1982 as a project analyst in marketing research, has been promoted to senior project analyst. She is responsible for conducting consumer research on Satin cigarettes and other corporate projects. YOU TWO can Mn a Irlp I0 Be 1994 Olympic Games! *Win 4 days and 3 nights for TWO at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, Calilomia rtus ground and air transportation PLUS =, m.,s PLUS tickets for each day's 1984 Summer Olympic Games II'S easy 10 enter and easy !o *win Ihe US Tobacco and Candy Journal conlosl. ~'~t' ', " ~ " ~ " .... ~'~ ..... " ...... ~'~- ;'~'] : Your essay automaHcally quaKes you for Ihe drawing. , Cross merchandising techniques that increase confectionery safes. , impact of multiple placements orl confectionery sales, 3= Promotional techniques that we have used to increase sales. ~/ '-.~~ Clip your essay to the coupon below and send it to: Irwin Breitmart, Publisher US Tobacco and Candy Journal 254 West 31st Street New York, NY 10001 All of the essays qualify their writers for the drawing.., the best of them will be used editorially in US Tobacco and Candy Journal. The drawing will take place at the NCWA winter meeting in Anaheim. You need not he present to *win! *Only Distflbutom are Eligible to WIN. Mail before February 3,1984 to: Irwin Breitman 254 West 31st Street New York, NY 10001 Dear Irwin, Attached is my essay that automatically qualifies me for the random drawing for the trip to the 1984 Olympic Games in L.A. Name Address. C, it~ State, Zip Sanders to direct B & W distribution LOUISVILLE: W. Lee Sanders. who had been Winston-Salem branch man- ager for the Brown & Williamson To- bacco Corp., has been named director of distribution here to succeed John K. Madsen. Madsen retired January 1 after 20 years with the company. Sanders has been with B&V¢ for 24 years. RJR declares WINSTON-SALEM:NC The board of R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc., has declared a regular quarterly dividend of 80¢ per common share, payable March 5 to stockholders of record February 10. Carton sizer Shipping cartons are tailored to de- sired sizes with the carton sizer from Service Products Co., 3869 West 95th Street, Overland Park, Ks 66206. A serrated wheel on the 10 in. steel cutter perforates the interior walls of corrugated cartons, so they can be folded down to the correct size after the corners are slit. Scripto rolls out 69¢ erasable ballpoint pen NEW YORK: Scripto, Inc. recently unveiled a second-ganeration, 69¢ dis- posable erasable ballpoint pen expected to provide the company with a product capable of penetrating the inexpensive disposable stick pen and woodcase pencil markets. The pen is also available in a twin- pack for $1.19 and will be offered for the back-to-school selling season. A major seven-figure national advertising/ promotional program will support the launch beginning later this year. Available initially in medium point blue ink, the pen will be marketed in individual and twin blister cards, open stock, one-dozen bulk boxes and through counter and floor in-store mercba~lis- The compan2¢ expects to have tbe TI56324268
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After more than 25 suc- cessful years in Europe, Stimorol is now changing the way Amer- ica chews gum, and for good reasons. Stimorol is the unique taste experience. The flavor lasts far longer than any ordinary gum. Stimorol offers the first new fla- vors in adult chewing gums in decades, real alternatives to the space-consuming duplicatiqns of peppermint, spearmint and cinnamon. And no gum has a more effective breath freshener. That's why Stimorol is the only chewing gum that consumers often buy by the carton instead of the pack. Stimorol comes in three very special flavors: Original, Minted Fruit, and Sugarless. And they're all packed in high impulse, bright foil packaging that catches the eye and stands out on the shelf. Packaging that tells consumers that Stimorol is different than all those ordinary gums. Because Stimorol is im- ported, it has a small premium price. But it delivers premium profits. Stimorol gives the best margins in the industry so a box of Stimorol yields more profit. And that really makes all three Stimorol Danish Chewing Gums a very attractive alternative to ordinary gums. For more information, con- tact Dan Corbett, Vice-President Sales, Dandy Confectionery, Inc., 701 Westchester Avenue, White Plains, New York 10604. Or call (914) 683-0051 for the name of the sales broker in your area. Stimorol Danish Chewing Gums: A Uniquely Enriching Experience. TI56324269
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76 Pilot Pen reports dramatic growth TRUMBULL. CT: Sales of Pilot Pen Corp. of America climbed to $38 mil- lion in 1983, a 23% increase over 1982, according to executive vice president Ronald G. Shaw. "Our sales are on a sharp upward trend compared with the total writing instruments industry," he says. "'We have grown dramatically from 52 mil- lion in sales in 1975 and are now taking orders well in excess of a $40 million annual rate. Moreover, Pilot sales io- creases represents true growth, since we have not raised prices since 1980." USTCJ: The source for candy and tobacco news. Tampa to host food distributors meeting CHICAGO: The National Food Dis- tributors Association will holds its an- nual winter convention at the Hyatt Regency in Tampa, FI., from March 2-4. For further information contact Marilyn Briggs, NFDA, 111 E. Wacker Dr., Chicago 60601, (312) 644-6610, Market guides ready WESTON, MS: Metro Market Stud- ies, here, has published 1984 Distn'bu- tion Analysis & Guides covering grocery, drug and discount stem outlets irt top metro areas. The individual guides examine national, regional and Ioea! chains and detail their respective market shares. Diversified line The European Chocolate Shop, a dM- sion of Allied International of Min- neapolis, Mn. and Lugano, Switzerland represents over 16 major chocolate and confection companies and has ~ com- plete line of over 300 products. Their fall catalog features about 10% of the most popular items and is available to inter- ested retailers. Value brand for U.K. R,J, Reynolds Tobacco International is introducing Dorchester filter cigarettes for value-conscious Britons. Since 1982, specifically positioned value brands have captured more than 14% of the U.K.'s retail cigarette market, principally due to tax hikes. Taxes represent about 75% of the retail price el cigarettes in the De.al w_.,ith the ?.e.vils To premo(e HMoweem in the New York- New Jersey Metropol~tan erea. Ce De Ca~dy made a de~l with the Devils, TI56324270
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Sun.Maid Seedless Raisins: Natural Sun-Dried Raisins - No Artificial Preservatives or Flavors • It's the Raisin • It's Sun.Maid Packaging Information: Product Case Case Cases Per Code Packed Wt. Dimensions Cube Pallet 5833 4/36--1 oz, 11.6 tbs. 13~1~" x 8~ls" x B~/e" .$27 96 Bag Raisins (16 x 6) Sun.Maid Carob Crunch: A Delightful Blend of Carob Chips, Peanuts, Raisins, Sunflower Seeds, Dates and Almonds Packaging Information: Produc~ Ca~e Case Cases Per Code Packed Wt. Dimensions Cube Pallet 7327 4/36--I oz. 12.5 Ibs. 133/8" x 83/1~" x 81/8" .527 96 Bag Carob Cr. ( 16 x 6) Sun.Maid Raisin Crunch: A Delicious Mixture of Raisins, Toffee Peanut~, Almonds, H~elnuts and Walnuts Packaging Information: Product. Case Case Cases Per Code Packed Wt. Dimensions Cube Pallet 7317 4/36--1 oz. 12.5 Ibs. 133/8" x 83/8" x 8%" .527 96 Raisin Cr, (16 x 6) Sun.Maid Fruit Bits: A U.~que Blend of Dried Apricots, Apples, California Seedless and Golden Raisins Packaging Information: Product Case Ca~ Ca~s Per Code P~ck~d Wt. Dlmen~lons Cube Pallet 7027 4/36~]/4,oz, " 9] Ibs. 13~/8" x 831," x 8"/J" .527 96 Fruit Bits (16 x 6) T!56324272
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February 9, 1984 tmll~l,d=¢~¢~ Iobe¢= ¢~d ¢~¢1~ Jcmn~l 79 NATD opposes SBA standards WASHINGTON, DC{HVS): Pro- posed small business size standards are unfair te tobacco wholesaler-distribu- tors. the National Association of To- bacco Distributors has told a House Small Business Subcommittee. Steve Blnom. Chicago wholesale- distributor and chairman of the N,~I'D Legislative and Taxation Committee, called for the Small Business Admin- istration to change the standards to bet- ter recognize the true requirements of the industry. SBA's proposed small business size standards would raise the standard for businesses in the wholesale trade cate- gory of tobacco and tobacco products (SIC 5194) from $14.5 million in gross revenue to $25 million. The proposed increase "is still too low to be useful to the majority of tobacco distributors which arc small businesses," Bloom testified. Tobacco wholesalers are in a difficult situation in that their products are sub- ject to federal, state, and local excise taxes. In some jurisdictions these ex- cise taxes inflate the wholesalers gross revenues for each product by as much as 100%, Bloom explained. "It is unfair." he stressed. "to disqualify tobacco wholesalers from SBA Section 7(a} Bank Guarantees. Direct Economic Opportunity Loans. and Local De- velopment Loans, merely because such exci~e taxes inflated their gross reve- nnes so that they exceed the SBA size standard.'" "'It is especially unfair to tobacco wholesalers because by law they are obligated to act as tax collectors for government excise taxes, because they have no control as to the level of excise taxes, and because the level of excise taxes vary substantially between juris- dictions. For example, the price for a pack of cigarettes in Chicago includes 16¢ federal tax, 12¢ state tax, 10¢ city tax and 5¢ county tax, for a total of 43¢ in excise taxes." Bloom testified. Two alternative solutions were sug- gested by Blomn: • The pruposed size standard could be raised to $50 million. • The proposed $25 million could be based on "'adjusted gross revenue" which would exclude federal, state, and local taxes. NATD, he said, does not object to an SBA employee size standard of 1(30 - 150. Fleer appoints broker advisory board Reer Corp.b eastern broker advisory board includes (standing I to r): Ralph Ross, Ross Empire State Brokers, Inc.;Arnold M. Hards, Fleer Corp.; Thomas G. Ryder, Reer Corp.; Jerry Young, Harold W. Young, Inc.; Gentry Ledbetter, Confection Marketing Co.; and Manny Martins, Golick-Martins, Inc. Seated (I to r) are: Richard Mac Fadand. Del Grosso-Mordson, Inc.; John J. Killeen, Fleer Corp.; Frank Viscome, V'mcome Brokerage Co., Inc.; Irv Katovsky, Kaye & Silver Bro- kerage Co.; and Ruth Crisp, Richard L Born Co. The purpose of the board, according to Fleers Arnold Hards, "is to allow key brokers the opportunity to communicate, interact and plan together along with Reef sales and marketing managemenL in order to determine long term sales goals and discuss new product Ilelp yoarseff aml y~r b,~si,te~. Itesd every ~ ,d" The UNITED SLATES TOIIACCO AND CAN~)Y .IOIJ~dNAL. Hughes received '83 Human Relations Award Or. I.W. Hughes (I.), chairman and chief executive officer of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., receives the 1983 Hum an Relations Award of the Tobacco and Allied Industries Division of the Amedcan Jewish Committee, from event chairman, Louis E. Seidman of Glaser Bros. Mrs. Durkin's Lickers ready to go national MINNEAPOLIS, MN: Mrs. Dur- kin's Lickers lollipops, introduced in January of 1983 by the Licker Co. and initially marketed in Minnesota and Wisconsin, will be marketed nationally this year. The expansion is due to the con- tinued success the 50¢ lollipop tsaid to last over half an hour) experienced in a variety of retail outlets in its first year of existence, according to Walter Cohan, vice president of sales and marketing. The product is manufactured at the Winsted Baker's Products facility, here, and production capabilities are being increased to supplement the marketing !expansion, Features of Mrs. Durkin's Lickers in- elude: • High quality ingredients including expensive, full strength flavorings. • Old fashioned "barely cooked" pro- cess for full flavor development. • Over 50 flavors, a variety to please every, palate, • Product is handmade and hand- wrapped. • Double tape package seal for "flavor lock" protection. • Eye appealing display with "genuine v~oden'" base. • No salt added. • Appm~ safety stick According to Cohx_a, loe'~tioa is the ke~ to hunkering t~ ~dli~o~. The/ section for children. Cohan says that sales of the lollipops during the first few weeks will be 50% to 100% greater because of uniqueness and impulse. After that, sales will maintain a healthy rate. Mrs. Durkin's Lickers will yield a gross profit of $85.71 per square foot of display space for high traffic stores and $28.57 for stores with average traffic, Over 50 Flavors Cohort reports. To gain acceptance and cooperation in selling the product, The Licker Co. is. offering wholesalers early buying al- lowances for early orders and introduc- tory allo,*,am-es covering the first 45 d~s shitx~ents (1 free witk IO for ptod-- ~.-t s,hil~ by April 30. $2.27 ~ box; Mare:k 30, $3.12 per box), TI56324273
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80 ~nilad~ai~t Iol:m~m m~Ham~j jo~ami February 9, I984 FEBRUARY 1984 15 National Candy Brokers Association. annual convention, Disneyland, Ana- heim, Ca. Contact: Jerry Pauaro, NCBA, 1747 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.. Washington, DC 20006, (202) 785-9500. 15-19 National Candy Wholesalers Associa- tion annual winter convention and ex- position, Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim, Ca. Contact: Audrey Payne, NCWA, 1430 K St., N.W.. Washington. DC 20005, (202) 393-6733. 21-24 Western Candy Conference, Red Lions La Posada Resort Hotel, Seottsdale, Az. Contact: Heal D. Maxfield, P.O. Box 554, Salt Lake City, Ut. 84101, (801) 355-5321. 23-26 North Carolina Wholesalers Associa- tion, annual conference, Hyatt Winston-Salem. Winston-Salem, NC. Contact: John R. Jordan, Jr., NCWA, P.O. Box 709, Raleigh, NC 27602. 26-28 National Association for the Specialty Food Trade, winter fancy food and con- fection show, Moseone Center, San Francisco. Contact: Jean Frame, NASFT, 1270 Ave. of the Americas. New York, NY 10020, (212} 586-7313. MARCH 2-4 National Food Distributors Associa- tion, annual winter convention, Hyatt Regency, Tampa, FI. Contact Madlyn Briggs, NFDA, Ill E. Wacker Dr., Chi- cago 60601, (312) 644-6610. 4-11 National Close-Out Show Merchandise Exhibit, Continental Hall. Chicago. Contact: R.C. Wolff, N.C.O.S., 900 Bay Drive, Miami Beach, FI. 33141, (305) 865-7189. 26-28 Georgia Wholesale Grocers' Associa- tion, annual convention, Holiday Inn, MAY (eondnuedl 11-12 Arkansas Wholesale Grocers & To- bacco Distributors Association, annual convention, Little Reek Excelsior Hotel, Little Rock. At. Contact: William L. Humphries, AWGTD, 300 Spring Blvd., Ste. 804, Little Rock, Ar. 72201. DOUBLE LOLLIES FAMOUS ENGLISH LONGER LASTING TART FRUITY FLAVORS Available wrapped -- 120 count unwrapped -- 200 count "~"~ Distributed by SWIZZELS, INC. 710 Clinton St • Hoboken, NJ 07030 Tel: (201) 798-4494 or (212] 943-4723 SEE US AT NCWA BOOTH #208 9-11 Illinois Association of Tobacco & Can- dy Distributors, annual convention, Downtown Chicago Marriott Hotel, Chicago, I1. Contact: Harry L. Kelley, IATCD, 828 South Second St., Suite 430, Springfield, 11. 62704, (217) 544-7161. 22-26 National Association of Tobacco Dis- t~ihutors, annual convention and ex- positkm, Loews A~iole Hot, el, D~llas. Contact: Ten)" Burns. NATD, 630 "(bird Ave., Ne~ Yock, NY 10017, (212) 599-3344. Jekyll Island. Ga. Contact: Baron Thor- pc, GWGA, 2966 Riverside Dr., Suite 1115, .P.O. Box 7776. Macon, Ga. 31209, (912) 474-1096. MAY 4-6 Nebraska Association of Tobacco & Ca~tdy Distributors. annual con- ventioa, O!d Mill Holiday Inn, Omaha, Ne. Contact: Mary O'DelI, 2848 S. Keitoa CL. Atn~¢l, Co. ~O14, (303) 1755-4049. 17-19 Oklahoma Association of Tobacco Dis- tributors, annual convention, Foun- tainhead Lodge, Cheeotah, OK. Contact: Ron Cross. OATD, P.O. Box 70, Durant, OK. 74702. 18-20 South Dakota Association of Tobacco & Candy Distributors, annual con- ventioa, Howard Johnson Motel, Rapid City, SD. Contact: Duane Riedel, SE~TCD, 11 Ist Ave., N.W.. Box 150. Aherd~m, SD 57401, (605t 225-7445. MAY 23 -27 National Confectioners Association, annual convention, The Breakers, Palm Beach, FI. Contact: Richard O'Con- nell, NCA, 7900 Westpark Dr., #514, McLean, Va. 22102, (703) 790-5750. JUNE 8-I0 Florida Tobacco & Candy Association annual convention, Marriott Hotel Marco Island, FI. Contact: Wilson W. Wright, FTCA, 217 South Adams St., Re. Box 1386. Tallahassee, H. 32302 (904) 224-5169. 8-10 Minnesota Candy & Tobacco Distribu- tors Association, annual convention, Madden's Resort, Brainerd, Mn. Con- tact: Audrey Nessheim, MCTDA, 1123 Plymouth Blvd., Minneapolis, Mn. 55402, (612) 339-8121. 8-10 Kansas Tobacco-Candy Distributors & Vendors Association. annual con- vention, East Hilton Hotel, Wichita, Ks. Contact: Harry O'Riley, KTCDV, P.O. Box 4352, Topeka, Ks. 66604- 0352, (913) 234-9316. 14-16 Indiana Tobacco-Candy Distributors & Vendors, annual convention, Radisson Plaza Indianapolis, Indianapolis, In. Contact: Richard L. Ford, ITCDV, 6101 North College Ave.. Indianapolis, In. 46220, (317) 251-9556. 15-17 Southern Tobacco & Candy Associa- tion, annual convention, Opryland Hotel. Nashville, Tn. Contact: Jane Smith, S.T.C.A., 3009 Rainbow Dr., Suite 143, Decatur, Ga. 30034. (404) 243-3974. : 21-24 Virginia Wholesalers & Distributors Association, annual convention. Win- tergreen, Wintergreen. Va. Contact: Gaut G. DeBrohl, VWDA, Suite 201, Heritage Bldg., 10th & Main Sts., P.O. Box 2129, Richmond, Vh. 23216, (804) 643-4715. 22-23 Washington State Association of To- bacco & Candy Distributors, annual convention, Thunderbird Motor Kelso, Wa. Contact: Chuck Hord, WSATCD, P.O. Box 25711, Seattle. Wa. 9g125. (206) 36.%5032. TI56324274
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82 February 9, 1984 Front Range Imports, P.O. Box 410, Colorado Springs, CO 80901, is market- ing Imco~ refillable Hit lighter from Aus- tria. Comes in metallic or assorted colors of red, yellow, green, black and white. It's lightweight; with rounded cor- ners to prevent pocket wear and see- thru base to check gas level, and gives slanted flame. Packed ten in foam dis- play tray. $4.95 suggested retail. BIc lighters are being offered for a lim- ited 1line in a promotional four-pack, which is expected to retail between $1.59 and $1.79. Blister-packaged pack is available in counter and floor displays. Shipments run from April 2 to June 1. New 5th Avenue Twin Pack from Luden~ contains two fi.~l-size 1.75 oz. R.M. Paimer Co. features Gold Medal Gus, 3V2 oz. of hollow chocolate, foil wrapped displaying medal for athletic achievement. Packed 24 per case. Timex present.~ ~portsquartz, with stainless steel case and hand, water re- sistant, /uminescent hands and mark- ers, sweep second hand and date window, at $79.95. Wetther~ offers Original Butter Can- dies pac~ llka the butt~" boxes in a A ladies' analog quartz model, with sweep second hand and calendar from the Lorus collection at $39.95. Gold tone case, matching adjustable brace- let, water resistant and two-year battery life. Assorted treats offered by Spangler Candy Co. as Easter Baeket fillers, featuring 40 per see-through bag which includes Dum Dum tollipops, Sat-T-Pops and Smiles Candy Roils in a variety of tlavors. Packed 24 bags per carton. Scripto invites dealers~o rese~v~ the Ul- tra Lite Limited Edition disposable lighter, gold or silver-mirrored finish, available only through March 1984. Four six and 12-dozen open stock shipments. Special four-dozen unit counter and 12- dozen piece floor displays offered. Mechanical Pilot Pen Corp. of America offers Pen. oilier, a mechanical extra-fine lead pen- cil at $1.69. Display holds dozen black and blue Pencillers, taking up 9½ inches. Stands on sales counter or hangs on peg board with total retail value of $40.56. Fleer Corp. has released 39¢ Crazy 13/ Dinner candy. Open the lid and each cordainer has three sections filled wi~ assorted candies, 12 flavors in all. TI56324276
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The Servic, Only ICC FASTRACKS can provide weekly, monthly and quarterly sales tracking reports w consistently. Only ICC FASTRACKS can classify distributor sales by class of trade -- accurately. uct Tracking Market. Only ICC FASTRACKS can pinpoint distributor sales by region, area or zip code --effectively. Only the ICC DATA- BANK can access the sales from over 123 Candy and Tobacco Distributors to their retail accounts -- instantaneously. [] yes, I'm interested in me more information [] Please have a salesperson call on me. ICC FASTRACKS, please send Name: (Please pdnt clearly) Telepl~one: Send to: Mr. Robert Kartman, President, Intercontinental Consultants Corpora- tion. 600 Reisterstown Road, Suite 600A, Baltimore. MD 21208 or Telephone: (301) 484-8355 The Only Tracking Service of its Kind. T!56324277
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Leaf, Inc. explains acquisitions (Continued frora page 1) founder also started some food com- panies and pharmaceutical companies. In Finland, the company grew horizon- tally as a conglomerate. The world is getting so small now that to position in a small marketplace is not ennugh. We havc to establish manufacturing facilities in the market- e we want to operate. This is why wc have gone from the broad base which Mr. Huhtamaki originally built in Finland and have taken a next-gener- ation step by jumping into one business in several countries. This is a major change in our corporate strategy. USTCJ: Are you planning acquisi- tions in other countries besides the U.S.? Railo: When we acquired Leaf Con- fectionery, we acquired two plants in Canada and two in Ireland as well as Erkki Railo their production facilities in the U.S. We have acquired enough companies now in the U.S. to be among the ten leaders in the industry. This is a good starting point. USTCJ: A number of key marketing executives left the Beatrice candy unit before you acquired it. Does this create a management void for you? Railo: It's not a problem. In addition to retaining executive manpower from Beatrice. we are filling other positions from our own organization. We have divided the Beatrice unit into two divi- sions -- Jolly Rancher and Switzer- Clark. Bob Harmsen, who headed Jolly Rancher for Beatrice, beads this divi- sion for us, and Kennetb Wasenius, who used to head our Finnfoods Inc. operation in New Jersey. is managing the Swirl-Clark division. members of our board of directors have had experience as general manager of nut Hellas confectionery unit. Their 9_5 years of experience in our Finnish can- dy and chocolate business is a great asset. Bob Harmsen is well known in the candy business in the states. Kenneth Wasenius has been in international can- dy business for five years, including tffo and a half years in the U.S. We are really in a very happy situa- tion, because we have the ability to put our own people into the breaches. USTCJ: What will be the structure of the Leaf Confectionery and Donruss divisions? Rai[o: More or less as they have been. Leaf Confectionery conlinues to oper- ate as an independent division and the same goes for Donruss. Instead of Leaf Confectionery being an independent company, it is an independent division of Leaf, Inc.; Donruss, instead of being a division of General Mills, is a divi- sion of Leaf, Inc. So, there is no real change. USTCJ: Some of your divisions bare the same brokers; some have dif- ;erent brokers. What impact will your acquisitions have on the bro- kerage companies which represent the different divisions? Railo: This has to be studied. We are quite happy with the broker organiza- tions that have been working tbr each of the companies. Hertto: Brokers are very important to us and 1 really hope this new situation will encourage them to give greater effort to our products. USTCJ: Do you plan to consolidate your lines in brokerages now repre- senting your various divisions? Hertto: No. It is up to each division to arrange its own representation. Railo: The products are different and fit into different niches. Many of these products need special attention from the brokers, so 1 don't think there will be many changes. Hertto: There is something to be gained from having our brokers com- peting with each other. Raiio: Of cou~. k is quite clear they have to ~ ~heir capabilities, We ex- pect Ihem to play aa active ~e ia lhe coming months. USTCJ: With the present size of the company and its numerous lines, are you entertaining, perhaps, the pos- sibility of a direct sales force at some point? Railo: No, we haven't considered any- thing like that. The broker, as an inde- pendent entrepreneur, has the strength to generate good sales for us. And, as I said, the line is diversified into so many products and product segments that we want to operate the way the broker net- works are operating now. Hertto: We are in a positiofi where, in most cases, we are the number one prin- cipal to the broker. We hope this keeps him happy and that he keeps us happy. USTCJ: Why the decision to adopt the corporate name of Leaf, Inc., rather than retain the Finnfoods name under which you had been op- erating in this country? Ratio: We put all the possible names on the table and we thought about them. Leaf was a good name which could be used on an international basis, not only in the United States. As far,as Finnfonds are concerned, we didn't see this name as having any special sales value to ei- ther the trade or the consumer. Further- more. we are selling candy, not foods. so the name tended to be misleading. We felt Leaf was the superior name. USTCJ: Some of the major bar man- ufacturers have increased the prices of their products, while others have not. What are your plans? Railo: The prices of raw materials are going up and the industry must consider higher prices. We will follow the indus- try example. USTCJ: It is obvious from the size of your recent acquisitions that you have a strong belief in the potential of the U.S. confectionery market. What is the basis for this feeling? Railo: This is a great industry and the U.S. is the biggest single marketplace for confectionery. We have been playing a very small role in this market tbr some time and we wanted to expand that role. Previously, we had studied several Eu- ropean markets, but we found all tytms of limitations in those ctm~tries. They offered more roles ~ limitatioas than Ol~Orttmities, bat tho U~. is a good market ecoaomy and that's why we Raimo Hertto elected to expand here. Hertto: We did different kinds of re- search through two different research institutes for three years, so we really have a very good background of this market. We have a lot of things we can do here. We have good ideas and we are investigating opportunities through our research and development department. Additionally. we feel our management style fits very well in this business. USTCJ: In what ways do the U.S. and European markets differ? Railo: If you take the business as such, it is pretty much the same all over. The differences are actually in details. The tastes are different, so the lbrmulas must be different. And then there are some diffrrences in the methods of sell- ing. Hertto: There are really two dif- ferences. Language is one. In Europe, there am ten or twelve different lan- guages and ten or twelve different tastes. Then the different cultural back- grounds make it more complicated to market in Europe. In the States. you can sell a single item across the nation. USTCJ: Do you think the U,S, can learn anything from Europe in terms of merchandising confections? Railo: Oh, yes. First, there are more outlets selling confectionery in Euro- pean countries than in this country. Sec- ond, in some European countries, candy is more heavily advertised than it is in the U.S. USTCJ: Will Leaf, Inc., be advertis. ing? Hertto: Absolutely. We will be using the media to make our brand names more important than they have been. This year's media advettisin~ will he from five to 10 times bigger than it was in the past. We're working 24 hours a day o~n tmr advertising programming. USTCJ:'I~k y~u, gc~emcn. TI56324278
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Wayne Bun Bars with the NEW FIN SEAL to protect the real milk chocolate, with peanuts over a creamy center. Available in Vanilla, Maple and Caramel. Toffifay, a hazelnut surrounded by a caramel cup, creamy nougat, topped with chocolate. Werther's Original Butter Candies made with real butter and fresh cream. Contact your Storck representative for details. Stofck USA, LP., 500 N. M~chig~n Ave., Ch~,ago, IL lY0611, 1-800-K21-7772 TI56324279
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U.S. Tobacco and Candy Journal Editorial Index --- 1983 A A.A.V, Companies Selling five wholesale subsidiaries. Jan 22, l Abdnor, Senator James Interview on future tobacco IcgJslation Apr 9,22, 54 Abrams, Dick (Royal Whalesale Cigar Co.) Sales managers' tips on salesmanship, Jan 8, 12 Ace Tobacco Co. Feature on purchasing agent Mary Jo Pealer. Mar 8o 62 Acme Packaging Snack food sales increase by 37%, Jul 22, 20 Advertising Order banning cigarette ads on buses rescinded, Jan 22, 6 Outdoor advertising buyer's guide offered, Oct 8, 36 Alper, Sheila Named marketing manager for Mutual Merchandising, Feb 8, 69 Amatucci, Dolores Named NATD convention and sales director, Aug 8/22, 6 American Brands, Inc. Acquires Pinkerton's security organiza- tion, Jan 8, 30 Buys three tobacco farms in Connecticut, Oct 8.43 Increased dividend announced, Aug 8/22.6 Record income reported in Ist half, Aug 8/22.3 Record sales continue, Nov 22, 3 Record sales in first quarter. May 22. 6 Set to acquire Southland I.ife. Dee 8, 32 Tobacco division reports record profits, Mar g. 60 American Candy Back-to-school/Halloween plans, May 8.8 Ground broken for expansion site in Selma. A1. Jul 22.23 American Chicle Price raised to 30 cents for Dentyne and Chiclets, Mar 8. 1 Retailer survey findings presented to NCWA meeting, Apr 22. 26 American Cigar Top executive appointments headed by Fclipe Silva, May 22, 6 American Tobacco Co. Lucky Strike Lights unveiled Amurol Products Co. Feature interview with A.G. Atwater and E. Burns, Dec 8, I Honors Arlington Park Police Depart- ment, Aug 8/22, 11 Anderson, Robert W. Named vp marketing Ior Leaf Confec- tionery. May 8. 3 A~des Camlies Inlerview with pre~e~ John Oct g. 1 Andlinger & Co. Purchases specialties business from Saxon Ind., Jun 8, 16 Andrea, Gerardo Named president of McCarty-Hull Inc., Sep 8. 8 Angiuoli, Ralph Promoted to vp field sales for R.J. Reynolds, Jan 22, 14 Ansel, Edward G. Named president of Lehigh's Cella's Confections, Nov 8, 16 Artier Bros. Co. Feature on Cleveland wholesaler, Jul 22, 48 A-1 International Foods Buys Servette Distributors from Norm Licbman, Jan 8. 12 Arisen international Named U.S. agent for Van Houten of Europe, Jul 8, 14 Arnold, Claire (Newton Tobacco) Wins Swisher Woman of the Year Award Apr 22. 8 Arnns Co., The Samuel Expands warehouse capacity in King. ston, Apt 22, 20 Associated Tobacco Manufacturers, Inc. Herbert H. Middleton re-elected presi- dent. Apr 8, 15 Aikinson Associates Purchases Judson Candy Co., Aug ~22, II Atwater, A.G., Jr. Feature interview with president of Amurol. Dec 8. 1 Automatic Service Co. Burglars take $3,000 stock of cigarettes, Mar 8. 38 B Baelgalupo, James E. Named national sales manager for Hoyle Products, Jan 22. 13 Promoted to vp sales for Huyle Products, Jul 22, 32 Ball. Hal lL.B. Ball Co.) Wholesaler's views on coding candy inventory. Mar 8. 25 L.B. Ball Co. Michael Bennett elected president. Oct 8,6 Sold to Trade Development Corp., Apt 8,1 Banking Coping with changing banking relation- ships, Jan 8. 23 Bantle, Louis F. (U.S. Tobacco Co.) Honored by California distributors group, net 8. 6 Made honorary citizen of Fort Worth, Jun 8, 3 Bantle Memorial Im'titnte qbbacco industry seminars scheduled for April. Mar 8, 3 Bartons Candy Corp. Relocating from Brooklyn to Boston, Oct 8.24 B.A.T. Industries Execs say increased cigarettes hurt business. Mar 8. 89 BATF, see Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms BATUS, Inc. Henry E Frigon appointed president, Sep 22, 18 Bauda, Russell (General Cigar) Installed as president of Buffalo Tobacco Table, May 8, 14 Beatrice F~ds Combining market functions of its candy companies, Mar 8, 3 Confectionery operation purchased by Huhtamaki, Dec 22, 1 Divesting itself of candy units, Sep 22, 13 Beaver Products Golick-Martins, Inc. appointed fond broker, Jul 8, 14 Bencher Co. Affiliates with Schwartz-Hagerty Sales Co.. Sep 8, 39 Bell, Austin (Willis Johnson Co.) Interview on confectionery sales team. Jul S, 18 Bennett-Lewallen Co. Expands wholesale tobacco operations. Mar 8, 92 Bennett, Michael Elected president L.B. Ball Co., Oct 8, Wins ~'bung Executive Achievement Award, Apt 22, 11 George Bensen & Son Will market luxury cigar brand Zino Mouton-Cadet, Nov 22, 6 Berger, Allen (Nestle Company) Interview: Dual pricing would protect candy trade, Sep 8, 1 Berger, Carl (National Cigar) Predictsflatcigarsalesin 1983,Jan22 1 Berman, Stanley (Pearl's Candy) Candy wholesalers views on cigarette tax increase. Mar 8.26 Elected chairman nf NCWA0 Sep 8o 3 Bernstein. Alvin (Eli Witt Co.) Expects company to show slight increase in 1983, Jan 22. 1 Berry.Pendarvis Co. Feature on candy/tobacco wholesaler, Feb 8, 44 Bershof, Maudce and David (Mid-Conli- nent) Honored by ADL of B'Nai B'Rith, Sop 22, 3 BIC Corp. Erasable pen featured in commercial, Oct 8, 24 Interview with Ken Ellis on disposables, Jol 22. ~0 John McEnroe featured in new televi- sion commercial. Dec g, 8 Oddo and Sherman promoted. Oct 8, 55 l~_tcha~ car rack b~ia¢s5 of Piaso Spot~ Ltee.. Jan 8. 6 Winter and Ellis named to top sales jobs. Jul 8, 14 ;ieh. Bruno Named c.e.o, for BIC Corp., Ju122, 52 Blackburn, Fred & Sons Company acquired by Neary Co.. Sep 8,43 Bleiherg, Robert M. (Barron's Magazine) Featured speaker at NATDIEMD meet- ing, Sep 8, 36 Blue Grass Cigar Co. Feature on Kentucky wholesale, r, Jun 8, 31 Blumenthal, Dan (Danby-Palielo) Predicts higher cigar sales for mall smokeshops, Jan 22, 10 Bonesho, Thomas J. : Promoted to exec vp of Wisconsin Phar/ macal. Mar 8.8 Bootlegging Feature: Cigarette bootlegging incentive continues, Oct 8, 50 Borkin, Jod (Wis. Assn. Tobacco Distr) Testifies against smoking restrictions. Apt 22. 54 Bornhofft, Hank (Nabisco) Panel interview on candy industry and Halloween, Apt 8, 1 Reelected chairman of National Cun- fectioners Assn., Jul 22, 20 Borshay, Mike Joins Tinder Box International as sales manager. Sep 8, 40 Bourbonnais, Martin G. Named vp at RJR-Macdonald Inc.. 22, 36 E.J. Braeh & Sens Back-to-school/Halloween plans, May 8,8 Bralnard, Alex Interview with Consolidated Cigar ex ecutive group. May 22, 1 Television appearance on future of c industry, Sep 22, 1 Brian-Thomas Candy & Tobacco Co. Acquires new building in West Hartford Oct 8.42 • Brick, Harry (Brick-Hanauer) Cigar sales in smokcshops may year, Jan 22. 10 Brock Candy Co. David E. Brock named sales manager. Nov 8.3 Inc.. May 22. 36 Brodsky, Victor (J.J. Brodsky & Sons) Candy wholesalers views on c~ increase. Mar 8, 26 Wins AJC Human Relations 8,8 Brasch, Thomas R. Interview on Slush Puppie Corp. phi-[ lo~ophy, Dec 22, 39 [ Named president and c.e.o, of Sl~d=I Puppi¢. Jnl g. 14 [ Bruthers, Dr. Jeyee l tpedT / anao4.taccmeat cff HalltTt, ee~ [ ~afety til~ Sep 22, 3 | I T!56324280
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• Sales are up 480% 480 80 81 82 83 • Golden Almond® is consistently among the fastest selling items in the Large/Giant bar category. RANK SAM152 weeks ending 10/t 4 / 83 ~ SAMI t2 weeks ending10/14/83 SAMI 4 weeks ending 10/t4 / 83 • Accelerated sales growth in all classes of trade reflect the widespread consumer acceptance and appeal of Golden Almond®. Class of Trade % Of Sales Chain Grocer 23.7% Wholesale Grocer 20.9% Candy/Tobacco Distributor 23.0% Drug Store 15.6% Convenience Store 7.3% Other 9.5% The classic success of Golden Almond® is supported with on-going national advertising which has generated well over 1.25 billion impressions. And there's more. t3 solid weeks of awareness build- ing national consumer advertising coming this spring. 250 million more golden impressions on consumers. Reader's Digest People -- Full page, full color ads appearing in ten (1 O)leading national consumer magazines. -- Reaching over 60% of adult con- sumers a minimum of 2 times during the campaign. National Magazines Better Homes & Gardens Life Newsweek Bon App~tit Ebony National Geographic Time Chocolatler Hershey Chocolate Company TI56324282
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February 9, 1984 89 Interview with Consolidated Cigar ecutive group. May 22, I Brawn & Williamson Tobacco Corp. Introduces Richland 25-cigarette pack, Sep 8, 24 Brawn & Williamson Tobacco Corp. 1982 sales rise 7.7% to $2.l billion, Jun g, 27 Lincoln Lewis. Jr. and Andrew Mellman promoted, Jun 22.3 Brownell, Robert F. r Promoted to director marketing fo Laura Scudder's, Dec 22, 6 Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms Feature: Cigarette bootlegging incentive continues. Oct 8, 50 House Committee restores $4.2 million budget, Jul 22. 3 Senate Committee restores funds, Sep 8.36 .Burgh, David W. Interview: How Culbro intends to di- vidc & cooquer, Sop 22, 8 Named president of General Cigar, Oct 8.6 President and ceo of General Cigar Co., Aug 8/22. 1 Burns, Edward Feature interview with Amurol vp sales, Dec 8, 1 Burns, Terry J. NATD executive director opposes CAB proposals, Nov 8, 23 C CAA, see Cigar Association of America Collard & Bowser New series of TV commercials, Apr 22, 12 Camel Ski Adventure Promotional program will visit 28 ski resorts, Jan 22, 6 Campbell Sales Co. Husband, wife team form New Mexico brokerage, Apt 8. 3 Campbell, William I. Elected vice president Philip Morris Inc.. Sep 22, 22 Feature interview on industry issues, Nov 22. 1 Named exec v.p. marketing for Philip Morris, Jul 22, 3 Named executive vp Philip Morris USA. Nov 22, 12 Curtains, George C. (Canalos, Inc.) Honored by hospital for voluntary serv- ice, Jan 22, 13 Candy Andes is targeting on discerning con- sumer, Oct 8, 1 Associations invitcd to support Hallow- cen campaign. Apt 22.40 August confectioncry shipments up, Nov 8,3 Bill Sherman of Excel discusses broker- age business, Feb 8.25 Broker's views of convenience store market, Feb 8, 28 Brokers" views of the industry's 1983 outlook, Feb 8, 16 Confectionery Report: A look ahead into 1983, Feb 8, 54 Confectionery Report: NCWA show a sunny one, Apr 8, *,25 Confectionery report: Drugstores are big business, May 22, 16 Consumer survey sees upbeat Hallow- een in'g3, Apt 22, 16 Directory of confectionery iadustry puMidmd. ~ g, 5q Eleven nominated for candy hall of faale. Apt 22.. 23 Feature: A case for cand); naturally. May 8. 10 Governor Brown proclaims Candy Month in Kentucky, Mar 8, 32 Interview with Harry Oulundsen. Cad- bury's, Aug 8,r22. 1 Interview: How Ferrara grows as fam- ily business, Sep 22. 12 M&M/Mars aims to upgrade consumer candy perception, Sep 8, 43 Manufacturers sales up 5.5% for 1 months, Mar 8, 122 NCA program to restore Halloween tradition, Mar 8, 1 Nutritionalist says candy helps athletes perform, Mar 8, 98 October named candy month by New York governor, Oct 8, 24 Opportunities to build candy sales vol- ume, Mar 8, 37 PeterPaul Cadbury's retail distribution. Feb 8, 51 Product shipments for October decline by 6.28%, Jan 22, 13 Roundtable discussion of tobacco/candy business, Jan 22, 3 Roundtable on retailing continued.~eb 8,3 Sales rebound in 1983 Halloween season, Dec 8, 1 Survey says NATD members expect higher candy sales, May 22, 1 Wholesalers discuss manufacturer's sales support. Mar 8, 72 Wholesalers group discuss importance of variety, Mar 8, 78 Wholesalers plan to use confectionery poster, May 22, 6 Wholesalers put racks in unfamiliar outlets, Mar 8, 48 Wholesalers say inventory coding is necessary, Mar 8, 25 Wholesalers sce increased sales in 1983, Jan 8, 1 i Wholesalers see little prospect of two-,I tier prices, Dee 22, 3 Wholesalers tell how to attract new customers, Mar 8. 119 Captain Black Photo of commercial crew, May 8, 3 Carew, Greg (Capltai-Myers-Cox Co.) Wholesaler's views on coding candy inventory, Mar 8, 25 Cart, Sheldon G. (CFG Sales) Brokers discuss the state of the candy industry, Feb 8. 16 Carroll, John C. Named president of American Chicle Ju] 8. 14 Carsten, James N. (Akron General Tobac. co Co.) Feature interview with distributor, Mar 8. 100 CeDe Candy/Inc. New shipping cartons, Dee 8, 32 Warehouse addition completed. Oct 8. 54 Chopin. Jim (Core-Mark Interaatianl, Inc.) . Interview on taking the company pubhc, Jun 8, 1 Chilcote, Sam "D. (The Tobacco Institute) Calls for unified action at NATD meet- ing, May 8, 1 Chocolate House Back-to-school/Halloween plans. MayI 8,8 I Ciguentes, Ramoa (General C~ar & T~- I trace* Co. Panel interview on premium cigars. Jan | C~ sales parallel stock amrket ia- crea~e~. M~ 8, qg Nominations for Cigar Distributor of the Year, Jan 22, 14 Officers and direetom elected, Jan 22, 8 Cigarettes 12-packs fail vending machine market test. Nov 8. 12 Arrest made for selling untaxed ciga- rettes, Sep 8, 43 Candy wholesalers say cigarette tax won't hurt. Mar 8.26 Coin machine group fights to repeal excise boost. Mar 8, 52 Discrepancy found in teen smoking data, Sep 22, 3 Feature interview with Jim Johnston, R.J. Reynolds, Jan 22, 1 Feature: Cigarette bootlegging incentive continues, Oct 8.50 Feature: L&M finds niche with generic cigarettes, Dec 22, 36 Four smoking clinics closed in St. Louis, Oct 8, 36 Generics make headway in St. Louis market, Jan 8. 3 Higher prices increasing theft in Atlanta, Apt 22, 39 Interview discussion of Lucky Strike comeback. Mar 8, 16 Interview with L&M execs on generics. Feb 8, I Japan approves tariff reduction on U.S. cigarettes. Jun 22, 12 Law banning street samples may be unconstitutional. Jan 8, 12 Legislation would require self-extin- guishing. Mar 8, 21 March 1983 state cigarette lax report, Jun 8, 16 Market for exotic cigarettes is growing, Dec 22, 38 NATD briefing on excise tax increases. Jan 22, 14 Nebraska bill makes tax increase per- manent, Mar 8, 82 Nebraska proposes 7-cent tax increase. Mar 8, 3 Nebraska wholesalers fight taxation with fire. Dec 8.24 New Jersey tax increase funds cancer research. Mar 8, 85 Pennsylvania nabs smuggler with 162 cartons. Oct 8, 55 Pennsylvania revenue secretary leery of smuggling. Jun 22.26 Pennsylvania tax hike has little impact on sales, Oct 8, 54 Players moves into national distribution, May 8. 14 RJ R introduces Century in 25-cigarette pack, Jun 8, 3 Reynolds tests 12-pack in vending ma- chines. Feb 8, 48 Sales decline 10.33% in Wisconsin, Feb 8.26 Sales hurt in 1983 by taxes and health concerns, Dec 22, 1 Self-extinguishing proposal rejected in Conn.. May 22.20 Stronger warning on packages endorsed by Senate, Jul 22, 52 Tables of sales and market share by manufacturer, Dec 22. 12 "lhr and nicotine levels down from 1981, May8, 1 The distributor's role with imported cigarettes, Dec 22.38 Vending machine sales down in 1982, Oct 8 26 Virginia reta lets say tax hike hurts business, Mar 8. 92 Wall St.analysts impressed by stability of sates. No~ g. 1 Wholesalers expect slight drop in con- sump6o~. Jan 8. 1 Whole~le~ say ~ slatting to revive, Cigars Consolidated's Brainard discusses in- dustry on TV. Sep 22. 1 General Cigar optimistic about premium market. Jan 22, I Importers divided on 1983 sales outlook. Jan 22. 10 Industry execs predict level market in 1983, Jan 22, 1 On verge of a major comeback, Nov 22, 34 Party for bus, taxi, limo drivers at Super Bowl, Jan 22, 13 Report on sales in 1982, Jun 22. 12 Wholesalers expect continued decline in sales, Jan 8, 1 Will we let the cigar market pass us by?, Dec 8, 3 Clampitt, John M. Appointed vp sales Melster Candies. Inc., Jan 22, 13 Elected president of Melster Candies. Inc., Jun 22. 24 Clark, Jim (Truck.stops of America) Roundtable discussion of tobacco/candy business, Jan 22, 3 Roundtable on retailing continued, Feb 8, 3 D.L. Clark Co. Anti-litter campaign launched in Pitts- burgh. Apt 8, 11 CMA, see Chm:olate Manuracturers Asso- ciation Cohen, Herbert L. (Universal Cigar Corp.) Honored at retirement party. Ju122, 46 Collbri division Park Lane Associates Appointed to represent Dunhilllighters in U.S., Jun 8, 1 Colorado Association Tobacco & Candy Distributors Photo collection from annual conven- tion. Dec 8, 8 Cone, Howard Elected president of Tobacco Merchants Association, Jul 22, 78 Confectionery Report "First timers" shine at NCWA. Sep 8, 10 Boxed chocolates shine at NCWA, Nov 8, 21 I,C.C, data shed new light on cough drops, Oct 8, 28 NCWA show--everybody's a star. Sep 22, 14 Conroy, Robert S. (Lamb:Weston) Named to NFBA advisory group, Apr 8.15 Consolidated Cigar Co. Five senior execs buy cmnpany from Gulf+ Western, Mar 8, 68 Interview with executives who bought the company, May 22, 1 New advertising for Backwoods brand Dec 22, 22 Continental Holding Corp. Executive appointments announced, Ju: 22, 78 Convenience Store News Reprints of convenience store study made available, Sep 8, 43 Convenience stores Candy broker discusses marketing needs, Feb 8, 28 Opportunities for confectioner~ dis- cussed at NCWA, Sep 8. 13 Convenient Industries of America Inc. Ad specialists work with suppliers, Jan 8, 16 Conwood Corp. Board votes to raise cash dividend. Jan 8. 14 Declares two-for-one stock split. Jun 22.3 Kodiak Rodeo sponsorship, Apt 22.45 Quarterly dividend increased, Oct 8.59 T!56324283
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90 February 9, 1984 Record earnings and revenues for 1982, Apt 8. 3 Record earnings for first half. Aug 8! 22.3 Sales and earnings set record in first quarter, May 22. 3 Shareholders approve increase in com- mon shares, .fun 22. 2l Corbett, Daniel J. Named vp sales for Dandy Confection- ery. Dec 8. 7 Core-Mark Acquires Young-Warren Food Broker- age, Ltd., Oct 8, 26 Agreement to purchase S. Bloom & Co., Dec 22, 1 GIaser Bros. acquires Straus-Keilson. Aug 8/22, 1 Glaser Bros. parent company goes pub- lie. May 22. 1 Interview with David Gillespie and Jim Chapin, Jun 8. I Interview: Execs explain game plan, Oct 8. 16 Cornell, Timothy M. Named vp manufacturing for U.S. To- bacco, Sep 8, 43 Cornnuts, Inc. Pare Leonard named customer service representative. Jan 8, 20 Corporate strategies Strategies that assure the sale or company, Oct 8, 38 Costello. Edward, Jr. (Costello Bros.) Fears new state and federal cigarett taxes, Jan 8. 1 Cough drops I.C.C. data shed new light on cough drops, Oct 8, 28 Cox, Ronald O. (Wrigley) Discusses wholesalers problems with gum makers, Apt 22, 28 Culbro Corp. Board approves option to buy Eli Witt Co., Jul 22, 3 Interview: How Culbro intends to divide & conquer, Sep 22, 8 Reports higher sales and earnings. Nov 22.34 The Seneco Co. formed to manage distributing units, Sep 8, 24 Cullman, Edgar M., Jr. Interview: How Culbro intends to divide & conquer, Sep 22, 8 Named exec vp Culbro Corp.. Aug 8/ 22, I Culver, Jim (Fox Industries) Elected president of West Virginia Wholesalers. Mar 8, 46 Cummings, .Joe (Fargo Moorhead} Candy wholesalers views on cigarette tax increase. Mar 8. 26 Curtiss Candy Co. Baby Ruth and other brands reassigned by Nabisco, Mar 8, 6 D Dallolio, Lewis (Sweetheart Candy Co.) Elected vice president of NCWA. Sep 8.3 Daugherty-Davis No-frills operation succeeds in Youngs- town. Oct 8. 57 Dauksavage, Arnold (Eby.Brown Co.} Sales managers" ti~,,s on salesmanship. Jun 8, 12 Davis, Bob No-frills oper'atkm succeeds in Youngs- to~'a, Oct g. 57 Ek~cted chairman o~ Hershey Foods. DeeR. 7 Declslon-making Failure to make decisions puls business in a rut. Sep 8.46 Deeter, William R. (M&M/Mars) Interview on company's support of Olympic Games, May 22. Ill W.A. DeHart Inc. Loan approved for expansion project. Jun 8, 27 DeLapp, Joe (Lurch's, Inc.) Interview about larger, thicker 5th Ave- nue bar, Jul 22, I Distributors. manufacturers must be partners. Dec 8, 15 Feature on Spaulding's Inc.. Aug 8,' '~'~ 19 Feature: Wholesaling in the techne, cracy of 1983. Mar 8.30 How Michigan distributor mnti','ates sales force. Dec 8. I 1 Interview with president of M. Paolella & Sons. Mar 8. I No-frills operation succeeds in Youngs- town. Oct 8, 57 Demoeratlc National Committee Eslablishes council to help small busi- nesses, Sep 22, 13 De,v, K.V. (Liggett & Myers) Panel interview on generic cigarettes. Feb8, 1 Dilettuso. Jerome T. Named president o~ Martin Bros.. Dec ~.31 Dispa~able shaverS 20% growth in sales reported. Mar g. 116 Cigarette sales starting to re~ive. Apt Suppliers see plusses in "national" distri- bution. Sep 22, 1 The distributor's role with imported cigarettes. Dec 22.38 USTCJ interview with Paul Garber. Garber Bros., Oct 8. 1 USTCJ study gives distributors bench- mark figures, Nov 22, 1 USTJ forum delines wholesaling "Win- nets". Jan 8. 3 Wholesaler Les George discusses com- p~ater .',y~,lem, Mar 8, Special ~crio~ o[ USTJ. Jun 8. 11 Dolgln Tobacco & Candy Co. Feature on St. Louis wholesaler. Jan 8.11 Domantay, Norlito Named vp-brand management at Brown & Williamson. Mar 8. C~l Donati, Alfred, Jr. New York tax director returns to private industry. Mar 8. 10 Donruss Co. Back-to-school/Halloween plans. May 8.8 Purchased by Huhtamaki Group. Dec 22. 1 Doran, Pat Named managing editor of U.S. Tobacco Journal, May 8.3 Dowd, Jim (Gary Tobacco Co.) Panel interview on generic cigarettes. Feb 8, I Doyle Dane Bernbach Ad agency gets Parliament account, Jan 22. 13 Drugstores Confectionery report: Drugstores are big business, May 22, 16 Duffek, Thomas M. Named sales manager for York, Apr 22, 42 Dunhill of London, Alfred Appoints Lane and Colibri to sell prod- ucts in U.S., Jun 8, 1 Sale of celebrity doodles supports play- wrights, Jan 8. 16 E Eastman Kodak Co. Disc film cnntributes to record sales Mar 8, 19 Echeandia, James F. (American Consultl~ goundtable discnssion of tobacco/cand~ business. Jan 22. 3 Rnundtable on retailing continued, Fel~ 8.3 Editorials A cogent reminder, Jul 22.4 A good "Day in Washington'. Nov 8.5 A surprising revelation, May 8.5 Acquisition: The talk of the NCWA, Sc 8,5 Because the industry deserves the besl Mar 8.4 CAPITALISTS get on editnr's lnwe~ case. Mar 8. 4 Cigar men never give up. Jan 22.5 Contrary views are welcome. Nov 2.,. Current CAB rules are sufficient. Nm 22, 5 EMD needs a mission, Oct 8, 5 Everybody's an editor, Jan 8, 5 Excises: Marketers" fear. Jan 22.3 Fighter for his industry (H. Jerome Lerner). Jul 8, 5 Free goods a questionable strateg): Oct 8.5 Hats off to the confectionery industry. Dec 8.5 National Confectiuners Assuciation. Jun g. 5 No heart for San Francisco. Aug 8/2_. 5 Nnw is the time for all tobacco men .... Dec 22.5 Penalize frivolous petitioners, Sep 22.5 People enjoy cigarettes. Jun 22, 5 Ray Foley: A tough act to follow. Feb 8.4 Retain ~ndy's p.r. force. Ju122, 4 Strike for tobacco. Jul 8. 5 The giants are coming!. Jun ~ 5 The new NATD convention. Apt ~ 5 The new. challenging year. Jan 8, 5 t C.'¢~in,~ed o,'¢ l~ ~¢¢ 921 TI56324284
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They're getting to thi~ guy. Dec 8.5 To increase cigar sales. Aug &r22. 5 Unitc, candy people! Unite!. Apr 8, 5 What's going on in the states?. Sop 22. 5 Where are the other 65%. May 22. 5 Whcro there's smoke. Dec 8. 5 Who's got the match?. Sop 22.5 Editorials, Guest Cigarette Marketing Report, Mimi Cochran, Dec 9_2, 5 Fleischer: Don't shirk your responsibil- ity, May 8, 5 Elam, Christopher R. Named asst brand manager for Lorillard. Oct 8, 55 Elfenbein, Bill (United Distribution Co.) Wholesaler's views on coding candy inventory, Mar 8. 25 Elicofon, George Winner of J. Ernest O'Brien Memorial Award. Apr 22, 6 Ellis, Ken IBIC Corp.) Interview discussion of disposable prod- ucts, Jul 22.40 Named national sales manager for Corp., Jul 8, 14 English, Earl (Confection Marketing) Brokers discuss the state of the candy industry, Feb 8, 16 EIs. Gusset S.A. Majority interest acquired by Reynolds Tobacco. Jan 8. 6 Evered, Jim (HRD Servlcos) Speaker at STCA stresses goal setting. Jul 22, 68 Excel Marketing Inc. Feature on candy brokerage business. Feb 8, 25 Executive Forum Leaders discuss state of the industry, Dec 22, 33 F Faber, Cue & Gregg, Inc. Appointed sole U.S. importer for Mac Barons brand. Jan 22, 28 Folk, Douglas L Joins B&W as group product director, Jun 22. 6 Family business How to show your son the excitement of business. Jan g, 19 Faraday, Walter Named director sales for R JR-Macdon- aid. May 22. 22 Farn, Jack Interview with Consolidated Cigar ex- ecutive group. May 22, [ Farrell. Rick Named president of Hoyle Products, Inc., Jul 8. 14 Ferrara Pan Candy Co. Interview: How Ferrara grows as family business. Sop 22, 12 Ferrero U.S.A. Feature interview with Ezio Rozzi, Dec 22, 26 ~ickers. Edward B. Named sales vp at Queen Anne Candy Co., Oct 8, 36 ~'inanslal reporls American Brands has record earnings in 2nd quarter. Aug 8/22, 3 American Brands--first quarter, May 22.6 American Tobacco sets record profits, Mar g, 60 Broad gains continue at American Brands, Nov 22. 3 Co@~¢l Corp. votes inerea.~d cash dividend, Jan 8, 14 ~ Corp,--¢~ quintet, Idaff 22, 3 Culbro reports higher sales and earnings, ! Nov 22. 34 Gillette earnings on slightly lower sales, Nov 22, 3 Giilette's sales down but profit up for 3 quarters. Jan 8, 20 Hershey Foods Corp.--first quarter. May 22, 3 Hershey Foods reports record 2nd quar- ter sales. Aug 8/22, 3 Hershey posts record third quarter earnings, Nov 22, 3 PM has record 3rd quarter and nine- month earnings, Nov 22, 3 Philip Morris Inc.--first quarter, May 22,3 Philip Morris has increased earnings in 1st half. Aug &r22, 3 R.J. Reynolds Industries--first quarter, May 22` 3 RJR sales, earnings up in 1983 third quarter, Nov 22, 3 Reynolds reports record sales for 2rid quarler, Aug 8/22, 3 U.S. Tobacco Co.--first quarter, May 22` 3 U.S. Tobacco reports 3rd Q and nine- monlh gains, Nov 22. 34 U.S. Tobacco reports higher sales and earnings. Mar 8. 85 Finkle, Leon (Finkle Distributors) USTJ poll of wholesalers on cigarette sales, Apt 8, 1 Fisher Nut Co. Regional Brokers of the Year an- nounced, Mar 8, 60 Fitzgerald, Walter Joins John Middleton, Inc. as vp mar- keting, Jan 8, 6 Fleer Corp. Interview with top execs on changin~ marketplace, Apt 8, 8 John J. Killeen named director of sales. Oct 8, 6 Fieischer, Malcolm L. (RTDA) Guest editorial: Don't shirk your re. sponsibility, May 8, 5 Flurida Tobacco & Candy Association Convention told to fight anti-smokin proposals, Jul 8, 3 Photos of annual convention, Jul 8, Foley. Raymond J. Editorial on passing of NCWA managing director, Feb 8, 4 NCWA executive dies of heart attack Feb8, 1 Fontana Bros. Inc. Purchased Michigan Cigar Co., Nov 8, 2 Fontana, Sal (Fumas Tobacco Corp.) Blames recession for decline in premium cigars, Jan 22, 10 Ford, Yancey W. Promoted to vp sales operations at R.J. Reynolds. Jan 22. 14 Forstmann Little & Co. Acqt, ires Topps Chewing Gum, Dec 22, 26 Fort Howard Paper Co. Acquires Maryland Cup Corp.. Oct 8.43 Fox, Duane Named senior vp manufacturing for Spangler Candy, Aug 8/22, 8 Frandrlao Sam House of Rizla regional manager of the year. Aug 8/22, 49 Frankel, Nell .loins BMT Publications sales organize. tion, Oct 8, 6 Frle~ads of the Cigar Joe Torte sigued for cigar promotio~ tacw, Jan 22, 8 Appointed president o~ I[kA.TUS. la~., s~22` is Fryer. Stephen J. [Tulsa Tobacco) Wins Kaufraan Memorial Award. Apr 22.8 G Garber, Paul (Garber Bros.) Interview: Distributor more than a supplier. Oct 8. l Gardner, Run Named mgr sales development for R JR- Macdonald. May 22, 22 Gary Tobacco Co. Feature: L&M finds niche with generic cigarettes. Dec 22, 36 GASP, Group Against Smoking Pollution Charges Massachusetts tax hike is insuf- ficient, Aug 8/22, 14 Gauvain, Richard R. Named exec assistant to president of U.S. Tobacco, Nov 22, 26 General Cigar Co. David Burgh named president, Oct 8, 6 Executives optimistic about premium cigar market, Jan 22. 1 Launches majur tv ad campaign, Nov 22, 8 Macanudo and Remy Martin sponsor joint promotion, May 8.3 Macanudo cigars get boost in movie. "The Verdict". Jan 22, 13 Split into General Cigar and Helme Tobacco Cos., Aug 8/22, 1 General Cigar Co. New division formed from split of GC&T Co., Aug 8122. 1 Generics Feature: L&M finds niche with generic cigarettes, Dec 22, 36 Generic cigarettes make headway in St. Louis, Jan 8, 3 Interview with L&M executives, Feb 8,1 General Mills. Inc. Trade offer on Nature Valley granola bars, Jun 8, 3 George. Los (The King Group, Inc.) Wholesaling expertise made computer viable, Mar 8, 80 Gershel, George Interview with Consolidated Cigar ex- ecutive group, May 22. 1 Ghiloni, Peter Interview on growth of smokeless prod- ucts, May 8, 1 Wins Young Executive Achievement Award, Apr 22, 11 Gill~pie, David (Core-Mark lnteruation- • ,d, Inc.) Interview on taking the company public, Jun 8, 1 Gillette Co. Earnings rise on slightly lower sales. Nuv 22, 3 First quarter sales.profits decline, Aug 8/22, 46 , Sales down slightly, profits up for three quarters, Jan 8, 20 Gilworth, Steve Named national sales manager for Ha- waiian Host, Apt 22.45 Glaser Bros. Discussion of parent Core-Mark going public. Jun 8, 1 Parent Core-Mark acquires Straus- Keilson, Aug 8/22. 1 Parent company Core-Mark goes public. May 22. 1 Goetz.e, Spaulding (Goetze's Candy Co., Inc.) Head~ NCA trade rehtions group. Nov 22`8 Ge/*d, Lemard Named director sales Faber, Cue & Gregg. A~ ~22. 6 Goldberg, George USTCJ interview: How Te-Amo catev~ to retailers. Sep 22, 1 Goldenberg Candy Co. Back-to-school/Halloween plans. May Feature interview with Edgar R. Gol- denberg, Nov 8, 1 Pre-I lalloween ad campaign for peanut chews, Jul 8. 12 Goldstein, Jeanne (BMT Publications) NATD Harden E. Goldstein Award winner, Apr 22, 6 Gollek-Martins, Inc. Named food broker for Beaver Products, Jul 8. 14 Gordon, Arnold Chairman of National Assn. Tobacco Distributors. Apt 22. 1 Explains NATD convention registration fee policy, Jan 8, 1 Honored by UJA/Federation, Jun 22.3 Inducted into Tobacco Industry Hall of Fame, Apt 22, 3 USTJ poll of wholesalers on cigarette sales, Apt 8, I Gordon, Ivan (Park Jensen Co.) Interview about new entry in wholesdling business, Ju122, I Grant, Hal (Liggett & Myers) Panel interview on generic cigarettes, Feb 8.1 Grossman, Stuart M. Wins Sol Bornstein Memorial Award, Apr 22, 8 Grout, Donald (Reynolds) Inducted into Tobacco Industry Hall ot Fame, Apt 22, 3 Guarnlerl, Albert Reelected president of Ohio Distributor~ group, Nov 8, 12 Guibord, Jean-Marie Named RJR-Macdonald director sales, Feb 8, 58 Gum Wrigley exec discusses wholesalers prob- lems. Apr 22, 28 Gummer Wholesale, Inc. Feature interview with president Rick Gummer, Dec 8, 1 Guthrie, Helen Andrews The role of carbohydrate in a balanced diet, Jul 22, 74 Guttlerez, Jose USTCJ interview: How To-Ainu caters to retailers, Sop 22, 1 Gwynne, Jay M. Named president of Warner-Lambert health division, Jul 8.14 H Hagman, Bill. Jr. Distributors" views of n 8,6 Halloween 1982 overview and NCWA, Jul 22. 12 Associations invited to support confec- tioners. Apr 22, 40 Candy industry panel on new efforts to preserve, Apt 8, 1 Candy sales rebound in 1983 season. Dee 8. 1 Consumer survey sees upbeat Hallo~ een in'83. Apt 22~ 16 Dr. Joyce Brothers discusses psycholog.- teal aspects, Jul 22.9 Editori',d: Unite, candy people[ Unite!, Apt 8.5 Information program proves hi .,mece~sful, Dec 27_ 6 NCA pcogi-am to restore co~fftdeaee j ~ady treats, Jan 8. 1 TI56324286
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Walter Neary, Sr. President Neary Distributing Co. Second Annual Dinner National Conference of Catholic Charities tobaccolconfee~ionery division honoring Richard Orcutt Sr. Vice President, Sales Lorillard March 20, 1984 Loews Anatole Hotel Dallas, Texas 6:30 PM Cocktails 7:30 PM Dinner $200 per person... $50 accompanying spouse It's a great party! It's an industry reunion! It's a most worthy cause! Make your reservations now; you'll have one less item to worry about before the NATD Dallas Convention PLEASE RESERVE MAIL TICKETS TO: NAME .SEATS FORTHE NCCC, MARCH 20th DINNER IN DALLAS. COMPANY PHONE NO,~ ADDRESS CIT~, STATE, ZIP Check enclosed in the amount of $ [] @ $200 ($200 per person; $50 accompanying spouse) Please make check payable to CATHOLIC CHARITIES. MAIL TO: Joanne Goldstein, Chairperson U.S. Tobacco & Candy Journal 254 West 31st Street New York, New York 10001 @$50 TI56324287
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February 9, 1984 NCA launches public relatiorts program. I Survey anticipates ups~ving in candy giving. Jul 22. 23 Tootsie Roll's Gordon di~usses safety measures, Mar S. 50 Halpert, Hedy (U.S. Tobacco Journal} Guest speaker at NCBA conference, Jul 8.3 Speaks on c-store opportunities for confectioners. Sop 8. 13 Hamilton Harris & Co. Feature on cendy/tobacco company. Feb 8.38 Hanson, David {Hanson Candy Distribut- ing Cu.I Wholesaler's views on coding candy inventory, Mar 8.25 HarKs, Arnold IFleer Corp,} Feature interview on Fleer and the changing market, Apr 8, 8 Haltorl Manufacturing Group of Japan Lotus watches seeking niche in U.S. market. Ape 8, 6 tawaiian Host Candies qames Maxim Io market macadamian nut line in U.S., Aug 8/22, 11 Hays, Thomas C. (American Tobacco Co. Interview features resurgence of Lucky Strikes, Mar 8, t6 Head, John (Head Tobacco Co.) Candy wholesalers views on cigarette tax increase, Mar 8, 26 Heller, Don (Trade Development Corp.) Expanding wholesale tobacco and candy business, Jun 22, 1 Helme Tobacco Co. Co., Aug 8;22, I Henning, Tom ICash-Wa Distributing Co.) Elected president of Nebraska Assn Tobacco Distrs.. Mar 8.3 Elected president of Nebraska distribu- tors group, Nov 9_2, 22 Herkimcr Wholesale Co., Inc. Acquires Perretta Candy Co., Oct 8, 49 Hershey Chocolate Co. Business planning for candy & tobacco distributors, Apr 8, 1 Factory prices on bar goods increased. Nov 22. I Fiuancial pcrfurmancc business planning model. May 22, t4 Germann and Thomas named brands group managers, Jul 22, 20 John N. Dunn named brand manager. Sop 8, 4fi Management assistance programs for wholesalers, Sop 8, 38 Feature: Cigarette bootlegging incentive Jarrett, E. David continues, Oct 8. 50 Appointed sales manager of Hershey Hilgartner, Charles R. Chocolate Co., Aug 80_2. 6 Joins Intercontinental Consultants as Jenkins. Doug (Kwik-Way) exec vp, Nov 8. 12 Roundtable discussion of tobacc~eandy Hinkle Enterprises, Inc. Egg coloring maker celebrates ~tth year Mar 8, 80 Hodges, Basil Elected president of Candy group, Jul 22.38 Hoffman, Jeffrey M. Named general manager of Manufacturing Co. Mar 8. 107 Hollco Rohr Appointed to import CCC premium cigars, Sop 22. 1 HouR, Peter J. Named vp marketing R.J. Reynolds "lbbacco, May 22, 19 business. Jan 22. 3 Roundtable on retailing continued. Feb 8.3 Johns, Larry (Hershey) Business planning for candy & tobacco distributors. Ape 8, l Johnson, John (Synergistic Management) Business planning for candy & tobacco distributors, Ape 8, l Johnston, Jim Feature interview with R.J. Reynolds exec vp, Jan 22. 1 Interview on introduction of Century cigarettes, Jul 8. 1 Jones, Alun G. House of Rizla Named president of M&M/Mars, Mar 8.6 Luxury cruises for winning salesmen,: Joyce, Phil Juo 22, 6 Perkins anti Ross named to sales tions. Apr 8.6 Hoyle Products James E. Bacigalupo named national sales manager, Jan 22. 13 U.S. Playing Card Co. makes offer tc buy. Mar 8, 38 ' Huhtamaki Group Finnish company purchases Beatrice Leaf, Donruss, Dec 22. 1 Humes, Timothy B. Promoted to division man~ Candy. Mar 8, 107 IATCD Photos of 32nd annual convention, Jun 8,8 Independent Business Institute New report tells when to sell a business. Dec 8, 12 Mars executive discusses price reduc- tion, Dec 22, 1 Judge, Curtis H. (Lorillard) Calls Waxman bill a step toward prohi- bition, Apr 22, I Excerpt of testimony on Waxman bill, Apr 22, 57 K Kaler, Dale and Bill Feature on Hamilton Harris & Co., Feb 8, 38 Karats, Frederick W. Named sales vp for Aristocrat Leather. Mar 8, 128 Karakas, Nick (Marcus Distributors) I.JSTJ poll of wholesalers on cigarette sales, Ape 8, 22 Karakas, Tony (Marcus Distributors) Urges Missouri group to be legislatively involved. Jul 22, 24 Indiana Tobacco.Candy Distributors Kartman, Bob (Intercontinental Consul- Officers elected at annual conventinn rants Corp.) Aug 8/22. 14 Distdbutors'viewsofmerger trend.Sop Photo collection of annual meeting, 22.20 Inside Business, Cable Network News Viewers hear Alex Brainard on ci industry. Sop 22, 1 lnteral Commodities Ltd. lbbler Nussini Austrian candy introduced, Aug 8122, 40 International Consultants Corp. Fastracks to monitor tobacco, cand 8,6 Keeney, Douglas Named brand manager at Brown & Williamson, Jan 22, 14 Keilson-Dayton Co. Feature: Young Ohio executives meet challenges. Ape 22, 35 Kelley, William H. (Goelltz Confectionery) Appointed chairmun of NCA informa- tion committee. Dec 22, 6 Record %rnings announced for 1982, I business. Oct 8, 15 Kelly, Tom (Faber Coe & Gregg} Apr 8,. [ Simplified data reporting RTDA Industry Recognition Awurd,Jul Track and lield event for youths moved I turers, Apr 8. 11 22, 78 to Hershey, Mar 8.92 [ International Fancy Food & Confection Kemler, Zane (McDonald Candy Co.) Hershey Foods Corp. I Show Wholesaler's views on coding candy Company votes stock split and raises| High attendance expected at San Fran- inventory, Mar 8, 25 dividend. Sop 22.22 [ cisco show. Sop 22, 6 Kentucky Tobacco and Candy Association Ouarlerly dividend announced. Dec International Nut Corp. Conventioneers optimistic on tobacco 8. 32 New warehouse completed in Lowell. prospects, Jul 22. 30 Record consulidated sales in first quar- ter. May 22. 3 Record third quarter earnings reported, Nov 22.3 Richard A. Zimmerman named presi- dent and ceo, Dee 8.7 Sale and leaseback transaction finalized. Dec 22, 31 Shareholders vote increase in number of shares. May 22, 2{I Strong sales reported for 2rid quarter. Aag g/"~. 3 Wil"tiam E.C. Dearden elected chok- ing. Dec g, 7 Aplx~i~-d dircc~¢ oi B~r,rau of Aico- kol. Jol 22.. 71 Ma.. Jan 8.24 Kentucky Tobacco Research Board Second phase of expansion program $1 million budget to hire new research- begun, Jul 22, ~ ors. Jul g. 12 Keyneo Elliot J. Named manager market development for Nestle. May 22. 42 J Kirkpatrick, Dick (Luden's, Inc.) Interview about larger, thicker 5th Ave- Jackson. David R, hue bar, Jul 22, I Named dire'tot national sales for Liggett Klein, Jay & Myers. Dec 8. 12 Wins Phoenix Candy salcsmanshi Jaeksom Reggie award, Jan 8, 6 Featured in Topps television commer- Kostrnnek, Bernie ciah. Jun 722. 21 Named regional ~ managcr for Fisher ~ae*l~, M_itck (l~a American C~gar Co.} Nut. J~l 22, 58 Interviewonont~ookio~cigarbe~iae~s. Kewai~y, Mid~d tGeaernl Cil~W & Te- May. ~ 26 Panel interview on premium cigars. Jan 22. 26 Krasny, Edward P. tDistributor Concepts) Elected president of Young F_xecutives Group. NCWA, Sop 8.3 D. Kurman Co. Western theme for annual trade sho'~ Sop 8, 36 L i Lagana, John, Jr. Elected president of New York distrib utors group, Nov 22, 6 Landry. John T. (Philip Morris) Elected to New York racing board. Jun 22, 26 Lane Ltd. Appointed to represent DuohiII products in U,S., Jun 8, 1 Lcnny Raskind appointed director of sales, Mar 8, 28 Ted Skhwer named distributor specialist, Mar 8, 28 Leaf Confectionery Back-to-school/Halloween plans, Mny 8,8 Host for 100 Special Olympians at socce~ game, Jan 8, 21 Purchased by Huhtamaki Group, Dec Z2,1 Sponsors broadcasts of Phillies and Royals. Jul 8, 6 Trophy presented to Frank White ot K.C. Royals. Dec 22, 44 Leed, Theodore W. Named educational advisor to NATD Oct 8, 6 Lees, Harold J. Appointed vp specialty products fo R.IR, Jun 22, 24 l,egLslation Anti-smoking bill fails in Delaware, Jul 22.20 Battle looms over self-extinguishing cigarettes, Mar 8, 21 CT law requires smoke-free work areas, .lul 22.32 California committee passes cigarette tax increase, Jul 22, 26 California gets tax increase proposal, May 22, 20 Cigarette tax bill in Iowa delayed, Jul Cigarette tax up 5 cents, Jul 22. 58 Connecticut markup law in jeopardy. Apr 22.51 Connecticut seeks new tax increase, May 22. 40 Connecticut state senator opposes ban on cigs. May 8, 17 Delaware governor votes tax bill, Oct 8.44 Delaware modifies cigarette tax regula- tion, Jul 22, 46 Iowa seeks permanent tax collection law May 22.22 Kansas proposes 8-cent per pack in crease. May 22, 42 Maine Senate reject~ no-smoking pro- posal, Jul 22, 77 Maine bill would repeal cigarette tax exemption. Aug 8/22, 8 Maryland tax bill dies, May 8. 17 Massachusetts debates tax proposal revenues, May 8~ 17 Massuehusetts ruling allows worker to SUe, Jul 8, 17 Massachusetts seeks to ~ sales tax to cigarettes, May 22, 42 Mkane~ota tax in~t'e~.e bill oo hold. M~y ICe, tied o~ .l~ge T!56324288
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THEY POUND THE PAVEMEHT FOR YOU. WE FOOT THE BILL. Meet the Peter Paul Caclbu~" team that works ~r.vou. The Peter Paul ~ Confecxione~t" point-of-purchase materials and promotions to bring cor~surners in and keep them coming back Tl~."~e ~rking f~ ~u --keeping up ~;pecialists T~.~un. We pay them. but work for you. And these da.~ who can turn down a helping hand? TI56324289
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96 February 9, 1984 Montana kills bill upping vendor's fee. Jul 22. 60 Montana tax bill goes to governor for signature. May 22. 3 NAMA opposes bill requiring rotating labels. May 22.30 ~ebraska bill makes 18-cent tax per- manent. Jul 22, 64 Oregon temporary tax ruled unconsti- tutional. Aug 8/22.22 Penalty raised in CT for smoking viola- tions, Jul 22, 28 Pennsylvania asks increase on cigarette, candy tax, Jul 22, 64 Pennsylvania consumer groups new tax proposal, May 22, 30 Pennsylvania seeks half-cent tax increase Jul 22.60 SF smoking ordinance hits stiff opposi- tion, Oct 8, 28 Segregation of smokers fails in Montana, Jul 22, 71 Senate committee restores funds for BATF, Sop 8, 36 Smoking restrictions established in Ore- gnu, Jul 22, 58 Two anti-smoking laws set in Connec- ticut. Dec 8, 18 Vermont eyes tax increase for candy, Dec 22, 31 Vermont governor asks 5-cent cigarette tax hike, Aug 8/22, 6 Vermont ups cigarette tax by 5 cents per pack, Oct 8, 46 West Virginia to introduce new tax bill, May 8, 17 Wisconsin governor approves Indian cigarette tax, Aug 8/22, 14 Wisconsin passes anti-smoking bill, Dec 22.22 Lehman, J.J. (Com~lidated Wholesale Co.) Wholesaler's views on coding candy inventory. Mar 8.25 Leilao, Manuel Elected to U.S. Tobacco board of direc- tors. Apt 22, 42 Lemus, Gerald (Independent Wholesale) USTJ poll of wholesalers on cigarette sales. Apt 8.22 • Lerner, H. Jerome (Straus-Keilson Co.) Editorial: Fighter for his industry, Jul 8.5 Interview: Core-Mark execs explain game plan, Oct 8, 16 Named distinguished activist by TAN, Jun 22, 22 Tobacco Action Network 'activist of the year', Jul 8, Wins Timothy Patrick Barry Jr. Award, Apr 22, 12 Lessin, Robert (L&M Distributors) Sales managers' tips on salesmanship, Jun 8, 12 Letters to U.S. Tobacco Journal Bennett, Michael: Hails Hershey busi- ness system, Apt 22, 45 Bemstcin, Alvin-- The Eli Witt Co.. Mar 8, 32 Brenner, Bernard S.--Professional post- er, Nov 8, 15 Conti. Jim-- Zenith Vending Corp.. Mar 8, 119 Edlen, Bruce--Wholesaler applauds L&M, Nov 8, 14 Grossman, Larry B., Warehouse poster, Oct 8, 59 Grossman. Stuart M.-- Spot Distribut- ing C~.. Mar 8, 82 Gro~smaa. Smart M., A cocmmm-Acation gap. Oct 8, 58 Grc~sman. Sta~rt M.: Better communi- ~ Jo~ F. Jt.-~ IGIF ~ooed. Nocg. 14 Hickey. William L--More posters please, Nov 8. 15 Kern. Jacob, Jr.: Robbing Peter to pay Paul?. Jun 22. 6 McKay. Winston L.-- The Grocer's Wholesale, Inc., Mar 8, 32 Perlin. Marvin B.--Excelient concept. Nov 8. 15 Shipley. Russ--Name change lauded, Nov 8, 15 USTCJ's new look, Oct 8.59 Leven, Norm Elected president of Michigan distribu- tors group, Nov 22.8 Lewis, Lincoln R., Jr. (Brown & Wil- liam~n) Promoted to group product director, Jun 22,3 Life Savers, Inc. Million Dollar Deal nffers allowance to dealers, Feb 8. 26 Will market Baby Ruth and olhers in Nabisco move. Mar 8.6 Liggett & Myers Feature: L&M finds niche with generic cigarettes. Dec 22, 36 Promotions and appoint.recurs an- nounced, Aug 8/22, 35 Q uality seal for generic brands, Nov 22, 22 Superior and Dorado cigarette brands introduced. Jul 22, 3 To discontinue seven cigarette brands, Oct 8.42 Lilienfield, Bob (General Cigar & Tobac- co Co.) Panel interview on premium cigars. Jan 22, I Lincoln Boll & Associates, Inc. New distribution consultant firm estab- lished, Aug 8/22.6 Litel, Robert (Arons & Sons) Heads Executive Management Division of NATD, Apr 22. 16 Littleton, Thomas Appointed exec vp of Metropolitan Distrib. Sees., Mar 8, 26 Locke, Craig Named western sales manager of Callard & Bowser, Jan 22, 14 Long, Bill (LBM Sales) Brokers discuss the state of the candy industry. Feb 8, 16 Lorillard Brand management promotions an- nounced. Dec 22, 3 Coupon redemption offer to continue, Jan 22, 13 Ellen Schmitz named brand manager for Newport, Apr 22, 42 Promotions and appointments an- nounced, Aug 8/22, 35 Satin brand cigarettes go national, Feb 8, 58 Silver rings to top N.~/pD salespeople, Apt 22, 26 Lorus, Inc. Expanded television ad campaign, Nov 22. 26 Seeking niche in U.S. watch market. Apt 8,6 Losey, Cliff (Michigan Cigar Co.) Candy wholesalers views on cigarette tax increase, Mar 8, 26 Lucky Strike cigarette~ Feature intep,'iew with execs of Ameri- can Tobacco. Mar 8. 16 Sponsors Pen~ouse ski tournament. Mar 8, 68 L~den's Inc. F'mtini. wins company's Distinguished Sales AwartL Apt 22. 45 lmte~view with ~ execs about 5th Avemte bat-, J~ 22. 1 Sponsors mad race ha New York City. Oct 8.6 Lyfle, Rick (Leaf Confeclioners, Inc.) Candy brokerage and the convenience store market. Feb 8. 28 Named senior vice president, Leaf Con- fectionery, Dec 22. 6 M M&M/Mars, Inc. 1983 winner of Isidore F. Kartmar Award, Apr 22, 12 Aims to upgrade consumer perception of candy. Sop 8.43 Alun G. Jones named president. Mar 8.6 Ceremony kicks off 1984 Olympic Sweepstakes. Aug 8/22, 8 Feature interview with J. Stalenhof and P. Joyce. Dee 22. l Final plans for new building completed, May 22, 20 Interview with Jos Stalenhoef and Wil- liam Deeter, May 22, 10 Lowers factory prices on bar goods, Nov 22, 1 Olympians complete protnotion tour Apt 22. 42 Special promotion for Olympic jars o: M&M's, Jul 22. 52 Thank you letters to customers who pay nn time, Mar 8, 34 To sponsor 1984 Olympic teams, Feb 8, 46 Macanudo cigars Brand gets boost in movie "The Verdict" Jan 22, 13 MaeKinnon, Sally A. Named marketing director of Bright fo Reynolds, May 22, 50 Maichle, William H. Wins Public Service Award ofNCA, Jul 22.3 Makowski, Leo (Capitol Candy Co.) Sales managers" tips on salesmanship, Jun 8, 12 Management Feature on effective financial manage- ment. Mar 8. 124 Feature on word processing, Mar 8, 110 Rating your company's customer serv- ice, Mar 8, 95 Manhold, Bud Interview on new ownership of Reed Candy, Jul 22, 34 Marcus Distributors Expansion will double headquarters warehouse space, Jun 22, 6 Karakas says cigarette sales are re- bounding. Jun 22, 22 Lauded for scholarship program, Oct 8.36 Marks, Richard A. (Life Save~, Inc.) Wins top NCWA honor at summer con- vcntion. Sop 8, 3 Marlboro Country Music tour kicks off in No- vember, Aug 8/22, 13 Mareusls, Christ OSTJ salute. Apr 8, 3 Martin, Bill (Draper Tobacconist) Calls on retailers to speak out for in- dustry. Oct 8, 15 Martin, Jay (Capital Cigar& Tobacco Co.) Distributors" views of merger tread. Sep 8.1 ~assachnsetts Leg/siature sidelines prth-msed cigarette sales tax~ Jan 8~ 3 dattheiss, Walter A. Nadcmai sak:$ director ~or I nteral Com- modities. Feb 8. 60 Mattimore, Gex~rd P. Named vp marketing for GIenbrook Laboratories. Jun 22.24 Matthews, Milton (HorSey) Business planning for candy & tobacco distributors, Apr 8, 1 Maus, Arthur B. Appointed exec vp for Straus-Keilson Co., Nov 8, 3 Monte, Bill (W.F. Monroe Cigar Co.) Roundtable discussion of tobacco/cand~ business, Jan 22, 3 Roundtable on retailing continued, 8.3 Maxfield Candy Co. Chocolate manufacturer celebrates 35t[ year, Feb 8, 32 Maxim Marketing Corp. Will market Hawaiian Host macadamian nuts in U.S., Aug 8/22. I 1 Maxwell, Hamish Named president of Philip Morris, Inc., Dec 22, 3 Maxwdl, John C., Jr. Release tobacco fact book, Jul 8.6 Mayer, Minus Named vice president, Culbro Corp., Dec 22, 6 McCarty, Nell (McLane Co., Inc.) Tells brokers how to increase c-store candy sales, May 22, 19 McCarty-Hull Inc. Gerardo Andreu named president, Sop 8,8 McCormick, Jack (Jna. H. Swisher & Sot Cigar consumption decline continue~ Jan 22. 1 McCoy, William Named director product developmea' for Hoyle, Jul 22, 32 McDonald, Walter L., llI Heads L&M brand development, Aug 8/22, 3 McGuinness, M.J. Appointed sales and marketing manag- er, F&F Labs., Mar 8, 128 McMannis Associates Research survey of NATD membership, May 22.8 McWhinnie, Scott Named president of Pez-Haas, Inc., Sop 22, 13 Mehas, Charles J. Appointed vice chairman for American Brands, Nov 8, 12 Melinsky, Roland J. (penca Wholesale) Elected president Natl Assn Tobacco Distributors, Apr 22, 1 Expects continued decline in cigar mar- ket, Jan 22, 1 Mellman, Andrew J. Named group product director Bravo & Wiiliamson, Jun 22, 3 Melton, William H. Appointed vp marketing for Pinkert0t lbbaeco Co., May 22, Mergers and Acquisilions A-I International buys Servette Distrib utors. Jan 8, 12 American Brands acquires Pinkertan's Jan 8. 30 BIC buys car rack portion of Pins~ Sports. Ltee.. Jan 8, 6 Editorial: Acquisition--The talk of th4 NCWA, Sep .8, 5 Neary Co. aeqmres Fred Blackburn Sons, Sep 8, 43 Pennsylvania Dutch buys Metster Csa- dies. Jan 8. 6 Reynolds Tobacco acquires Ets. Gasser S.A.. Jan 8. 6 Te-Amo Geryl buys Fireside Industries, Jtm 8, 3 Trade Development Corp. buys LB. Bali Co., Ape 8, 1 TI56324290
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AMERICA'S GROWTH LEADER! 1983 MINT SALES vs. YEAR-AGO MAKE SURE YOU'RE TAKING FULL ADVANTAGE OF TIC TAC's: • PROVEN CONSUMER APPEAL • YEAR-ROUND NETWORK TV/ PLUS EXTRA SPOT TV • FULL MERCHANDISING/ PROMOTIONAL SUPPORT
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February 9. 1984 Metropolitan Distributors Material handling contract to Unex Conveying. Apt 8.3 Miazgowiez, Joe if'ontario Bros.) Feature USTJ interviev*; Feb 8. 1 To be honored at fund raising dinner. Feb 8, 10 Wins Cigar Distributor of Year Award Apr ~. 20 Michigan Tobacco & Candy Dist. & Ven- dors Assn. Norm Leven elected president. Nov 22.8 Middleton, John, Inc. Walter Fitzgerald appointed vp market- ing, Jan 8. 6 Miller & l-lartman, Inc. Food wholesaler holds first trade show Jun 22, 3 Millhiser, Ross R. (Philip Morris) Honored for helping speech handi- capped. Jun 22. 11 Miller, John (Pine State Tobacco & Can- dy Co.) Sales managers' tips on salesmanship, Jun 8. 12 Mohler, Harold S. Hershey chairman elected to board of Ashland Oil. Jan 8, 20 Money Magazine Musical revue to celebrate 10th anni- versary, Jan 8.26 Montana Assn Tobacco and Candy Dis- tributors Record crowd at 13th annual convention Jan 8.26 Will fight legislation adverse to industry, Mar 8.98 Morris, Tim (Southland Corp.) Discussion of company's product man- agement, Feb 8, 21 Morris Import U.S.A., Inc. Allen Schnapp named exec vice presi- dent. Apt 22.42 ~lorrls National Feature: making waves in candy market, Jul 22, 83 Vlote, Phil (Keilson-Dayton| Feature: Young Ohio executives meet challenges, Apt 22, 35 VIS! Data Corp New systems for rout.e accounting, Dee 8, 18 Vluilen, Charles H. (American Tobacco Co.) Interview features resurgence of Lucky Strikes. Mar 8.16 N Nabisco Brands USA Curtlss Candy brands assigned to line divisions. Mar 8.6 Salon award to Shinnamon & Assoc. Oct 8.6 NAMA, see National Automatic Merchan. dising Assn National Asseeiafion of Tobacco Distributors Awards to be presented at March con- vention, Mar 8, 28 Big turnout expoctcd for Chicago con- vention, Mar 8, 1 Convention registratinn fees explained. Jan 8, I Day in Washington scheduled Septem- ber 29° Sop 22. 18 Dolores Amatucci named conve~tion director. Aug 8/22, 6 EMD meeting to offer varied program, Oct&! EMD meeting to probe political scene. Aug 8/22. 8 EdRocial: The ~ew NATD convention. Jean-Paul Deslieres elected president. Jan 8. 21 Legislative briefing on excise tax in- creases. Jan 22, 14 Management group planning session. Mar 8. 28 NATD executive director opposes CA B proposals. Nov g. 23 Opposes uniform cigarette tax cuncept, Aug 8/'22.8 Photos from Chicago convention. Apt 22. 14 Photos of "Day in Washington'. Nov 8. 6 Photos of Exec Management Division meeting. Nov 22. 16 Photos at strategic planning sessions. 2un 22.3 Photos of Young Executives meeting in Colorado, Nov 22. Z5 Registration fee for Chicago convention explained. Mar 8.59 Speakers and entertainers at convention announced. Feb 8, 48 Survey of members by McMannis As- sociates, May 22, 8 Survey says most members prefer annual trade show, Jun 22. 16 Ten College-Aid grant winners chosen, May 22". 6 Theodore Lced named educational ad- visor. Oct 8, 6 Tobacco Institute's Chilcote ,asks unified action. May 8, 1 Wholesalers give NATD convention high marks, Apr 22, 1 Wholesalers meet politicians at Day in Washington, Nov 8, 1 Workshop seminars planned for Chicago COnvention speaker to discuss executive stress. Jul 8. I0 Dorothea Russell named director mem- bership sots., May 8, 3 Feature interview with Russ Shipley on programs. Dec 22. 8 Foley youth foundation announced. Oct 8. 49 Gerald J. Prescott elected president for 1983-84. Sop 8.3 l.arge turnout expected at winter con- vention, Feb 8. 1 Manufacturersgraded on business prac- tices. Nov 8, 3 National Candy Month draws record participation, Apr 8. 16 Photo coverage of winter convention in San Diego, Apr 8, 11 Raymond J. Foley dies of heart attack, FobS. 1 Record sponsorship for 1984 Candy Month. Nov 22. 1 Report on summer convention in Bos- ton, Sop 8, 1 Russell L. Shipley, Jr. named interim exec vp. Feb 8. 1 Russell Shipley elected to fill out exec vp term. Mar 8.22 Speakers announced for summer con- vention, Jul 8. I Winter convention set for Feb 16 in San Diego, Jan 8, 1 National Coin Machine Institute Midwestern regional council formed Mar 8, 128 "l~x laws and regulations discussed at meeting, May 8, 3 Will fight to repeal the federal excise convention. Mar 8, 34 increase, Mar 8. 52 y ......... National Confectioners Association /::.1.~ tO tOOK at rmure OlrCCtlOns, ~ug I ..... 8/22. l I ] Atdspassage otantt-tampermgbtlLs.Jun Young Execut ves D vis on e oct officers I 22, 3 A,.rn 22.20 ' I Backs.nutrition. labeling and open dating Young execs hold strategic planningl . poh, cte.s,,Aug 8122:13 . . exercise Jul ")2 64 [ t~oaru o[ oirectors etecteo. May 8, 17 Convemlon will teatare confectioner', National As~ociat~,~ of Wholesaler-Dis. | " " "' " .' tributors museum, May 8.3 Chairman stresses strategic planning at convention. Mar 8.20 Opposes tax hikes to cut federal deficit, Aug 8/22.52 Seeks corporate contributions, Aug 81 22, 14 Trends in Wholesale Distribution report published, Aug 8/22, 40 National Automatic Merchandising Asso. clarion Booklet lists certified vending machines, Aug 8/22, 14 Cigarette vending sales down in 1982 Oct 8, 26 Directory of vending companies, Aul 8/22, 35 New officers elected for 1984. Dec 22 31 Survey shows mo~t vending companie did well in 81. Jan 8, 14 Trade exhibition and convemiou set fnr Chicago. Sep 8.36 Vending machine production down, Oct 8.60 National Candy Brokers Association Conference focuses on convenience store industry, Jul 8, 3 Photos of meeting in Boston. Sop 22. 11 National Candy Wholesalers Association 'Concepts for tomorrow" convention theme, Jul 22. 1 32 members honored for service to i,,dusay, sop 8. 3~ Ca~,~, makers SpOrL~W poster on fresh ~_aady, Apt 22. 1 Concepts for Tomorr~ is theme for ctmventkm. Jam 22. 1 Editorial salutes I00th anniversary. Jun 8.5 Future conventions in Chicago recom- mended, Dec 8. 32 Manufacturers graded on business prac- tices, Nov 8, 3 Planning underway for 100th anniversary convention, Apt 22, 26 Program to restore confidence in Hal- loween candy, Jan 8, 1 Program to restore the Halloween tra- dition, Mar 8, 1 Senator Percy to speak at June couven- tion. Mar 8.34 Speakers scheduled for June centennial convention. Jan 22, 14 National Food Brokers Association Conroy and Rich named to advisory group, Apt 8. 15 National Retail Merchants Association Sales promotion handbook published, Oct 8. 49 National Tobacco Council New council formed to monitor tobacco legislation, Jan 8, 8 NAg; see National Assn. of Wholesaler- Distributors NCA, see National Confectioners Associ- i alion : NCWA, see National Candy Wholesalers Association Neary Co. Acquires Fred Blackburn & Sons..Sop 8, 43 Nc~xy, Walter, Jr, Sales mam~ers" ti~ o~ salesm,~ddp, Jun 8, 12 Neary, Walter, St. To be honored at Catholic Charities dinner. Dec 8. 3 Nebraska Association of Tobacco Distrib- utors Report on mid-year meeting, Aug 81 22, 14 Tom Hcnning of Cash-Wa elected presi- dent, Mar 8, 3 Nehman, Joe Feature on Dolgin Tobacco & Cand, Co., Jan 8. 11 Nellson Candies, Inc. New warehouse opened in Birmingharr Jul 22, 68 "rote bags offered to retailers. Dee 22.44 Nelson, Jonathon P. Named secretary of U.S. Tobacco, Jul 22.52 Nestle Co. Back-to-school/Halloween plans, May 8.8 Bringing old chocolate formula back. Jul 22.32 Nevsimal, Charles J., Jr. Promoted to vp of Wisconsin Pharmacal Mar 8.8 Newman, Stanford J. iStaudard Cigar Co, Reelected president of Tampa Cigar Association, Mar 8, !19 New VU-Lighter Buys assets of VU-Lighter. Inc., Mar 8, 59 New York State Assn. Tobacco & Candy Distributors John Lagoon. Jr. elected president, Nov 22, 6 Officers pleased with'83 legislative rec- ord, Aug 8/22, 40 Photo collection of meeting at Kutsher's, Dec 22, 43 Nowak, Kennelh J. (Variety Vendors) Elected chairman of NAMA for 1984. Dec 22. 31 NTC, see National Tobacco Council Nu Service Tobacco Co. Retirement parly for Rose Gold, Jul 22, 46 0 Obituary Albert. Sidney J., Apr 22, 49 Coclin, Ari D., Coclin Tobacc6 Corp.. Oct 8.52 Cohen. Ben (Cohen Candy Co.), Apr 22, 49 Davis. [..W. II, Old Dominion Tobacct Co.. Jan 8.6 Finn. Edward L.. Jr.. E&J Distributon Inc.. May 22, 22 Foley. Raymond J.. National Cand Wholesalers Assn. Feb 8, 1 Fried. S. Sidney, Consolidated Cig~ Co., May 8. 14 Garfinkle. Henry. Ancorp National Services, Mar 8. 85 Hansbury, Thomas A. (Waitt & Bond). Jun 22. 24 Herbert Maddock (Tobacco Tax Council of Virginia). Jun 8.38 Litchfield. John C.. Ferrero, USA. Jan 8.6 Lunardini. l-a)uis E.. El Producto Cigar Co.. Apr 8, 3 Mattern. Ernest E.. New En~and Cigar & Tobacco Co. May 22.50 McGraw. Michael J.. Apt 22.49 Oriel. ltyman. A. Oriel Co.. Aug 8/ Pftmcler. Elbert F. (Clark Bros.. Inc.). sept. 17 Rhekastrora. Herbert. Sc (K. Srrav.s & Co.). Dec8. 32 TI56324294
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100 Risman. Louis,L, H.C. Brown. Inc., Jul 8. 17 Robbins, Rufus, Robbins, Inc.. Oct 8.43 Sheinkopf. Frimi. Feb 8. lIl Silverman. Isadore J., Schrafft Candy Co., Jul 22. ~ Sosniek. Marvin Allen, Apt 22. 49 Todd. Kenneth R., Jan. H. Svdsher & Son, Inc., Mar 8, 6 Tupper. Frank L.. Universal Match Co., Oct 8, 52 Warren, W. Arthur, Mar 8, 122 Yolen, Burtnn, Modern Tobacco Co., Apr 8. 3 O'Coundl, Richard T. Elected president of National Confec- tioners Assn.. Jul 22. 20 Ohio A~odatlon of Tobacco and Candy Distributors Convention photos Nov 8.22 Oliver, James (P.H.S. Tobacco Co.) Sales managers" tips on salesmanship. Jun 8, 12 Orcutt, Richard (Lorillardl To be honored a; Catholic Charities dinner, Dec 8, 3 Osmon, Herbert E. Named director social responsibility for R JR, Jun 22, 6 Oulundsea, Harry [Peter Paul Catlbury) Interview with national merchandising manager, Aug 8/22. I Pagano, Lou and Tom Interview: How Ferrara grows as famil business, Sop 22, 12 Pan American Cigar Co. Interview with Mirth Jacobs on cigar business, May 22, 26 Pantusn, Peter J. Named manager of legislative affairs for NCA, Mar 8, 119 M. Paoldla & Sons Feature interview with Michael Paolella, Mar 8. 1 Pared Foods. Inc. New name fi)r former Party Foods. Inc., Dee 8. 32 Parker, B.C. Named vp sales fur Conwood Corp.. Jul 22, 30 Parliament cigarettes Doyle Dane Bernbach named advertis- ing agency. Jan 22, 13 Portia, Everett W. Assistant treasurer for American Brands, Inc., Jan 22, 21 Elected vp of NY credit association. Jun 8, 27 Passanesi, Dick (To-Area) Blames prices and economy for flat cigar market. Jan 22. 10 Named vp marketing and sales for Te- Amo Geryl, Jul 22, 32 USTCJ interview: How To-Area caters to retailers. Sop 22, I Paysaver Catalog/Showrooms, inc. Acquires assets of Value Mart. Dec 8, 32 James A. Polep elected to board. Oct 8,6 Pealer, Mary Jo (Ace Tobacco Co.) Feature on purchasing agent for whole- saler. Mar 8, 62 Peck, Donald, (Fleer Corp.) Fealure interview on Fleer and the changing market. Apt 8, g Pennsylvania A.~a. T~,baeeo & Candy Anmtal coave~tioa to be held Scpte--. bet 22, Aug 8/22. 13 Pennsylvania Dutch Co., Inc. Purchase,, a.~ets of Melster Candies. Jan Pentel of America, Ltd. Official licensed Olya'npic pen and pencil. Sop 8.50 Perkins, Keith Named national sales manager for House of Rizla. Apt 8, Peter Paul Cadhury Back-to-school!Halloween plans, May 8.8 Finkle Distributors and TBI Corp. win awards. Apr 22. 6 Interview with Chuck Trado on retail distribution, Feb 8, 51 Treasure Island Game will be launched in September, Jul g. 3 Petersen's lad. New offices and warehouse in Little Ferry. N J, Nov 22. 22 Pez Candy Names Buford Claxton Broker-of-the- Year, Jan 8, 8 Philadelphia Chewing Gum Co. Back-to-school/Halloween plans. May 8.8 Philip Morris Inc. 1;1 million gift to Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jan 8.26 $3 million grant h~r Vatican Art Exhibi- tion, Mar 8, 59 Accounts receivable presentation at NATD meeting, Mar 8. 8 Campbell and Remington elected vice presidents, Sop 22, 22 Carl P. Johnsnn appointed government relations mgr. Oct 8, 6 Doyle Dane Bernbach named agency for Parliaments, Jan 22, 13 bunds police training bunk, Oct 8.44 Grant to college /or police training programs, Jan 22, 14 Increased sales and earnings in 2rid quarter. Aug 8/22, 3 NATD presentation on managing ac- counts receivable, Apr 22, 18 New field assignments announced, Jun 22.24 Organizes and funds agricultural con- ference, Jul 22, 46 Promotions and appointments an- nounced, Aug 8/22.35 Quarterly dividend increased 20%, Apr 8,11 Raffles menthol brand introduced. Mar 8. 26 Record 3rd Q and nine-month earnings, Nov 22.3 Reports record earnings in lirst quarter, May 22, 3 Time capsule placed in new headquar- ters building. Jan 22, 8 Winners of marketing competition an- nounced, Jul 22. 34 Wins Architectural League award, Jul 8.~4 Wins New York Fire Prevention award. Jan 8.8 Philip Morris USA Feature interview: Pollack and Camp- bell,-Nov 22, 1 Pilot Pen Corp. of America Groundbreaking ceremony for new headquarters, Jan 22. I4 Pitt, David Named director sales for Melster Can- dies, N~' 8.3 Phyer~ C~u'ette brand goes into natkmal disui- betiort. May 8. 14 ~ Lm"ry P. (Va~ Maile, Ine.l l~ed NCWA 19~'~ Co~-ctkmeff Dip. k.~t. N.~ ---~. 14 Point-of-Purchase Adverffsing Headquarters moved to Fort Lee. NJ. Jul 8. 6 Study proves motion display~ sell more' batlerie~,. Apt 22. Polep Candy & Tobacco Co. Acquired by White-Holler investment group, Oct 8, l Pollack, Shcpard P. {Philip Morris USA) Feature interview on industry issues, Nov 22, I USTCJ intervieW with I)hilip Morris executive, Dec 22, 33 Ponca Wholesale Mereantile Co. Acquired by Sam White and Don Holler. Nov 8. i Prescott, Gerald J. Elected president of NCWA lbr 1983-84, Sop 8, 3 Price Waterhou~e Offers microcomputer gukle, May 22, 40 Profit Makers Promotion circulars raise sale~ for whole- salers. Jul 22, 7(I Proulx, Norman R. Appointed senior vp Scripto. Inc.. Jal~ 8,8 Q Quail, William R. Named vp mfg. services for U.S. Tobac- co, Sop 8, 43 R Raccagnoo Jay (Heart of America Tobacco & Candy) Predicts larger market fi)r cigarette-type cigars, Jan 22. 1 Radeliff, Will Interview on Slush Puppie Corp. philos- ophy, Dec 22, 39 Ramos, Milton Named manager sales administration for Fez Candy, Dec 8, 7 Rateliff, Joe Interview with president ufTexas distrib. group. Nov 22.32 Reagan, President Ronald Fihned address to NCA centennial con- vention, Jul 22, 6 Reed Candy Co. Interview with Bud Manhnld on new ownership, Jul 22.34 Regensburg, Anthony S. Interview: Core-Mark execs explain game phm. Oct 8, 16 USTJ poll of wholesalers on cigarette sales, Apr 8. Wins Gunst Executive Management Award, Apt 22, 8 Reid, Frank (S.Bloom, Inc.) Sales managers" tips on salesmanship, Jun 8, 12 Reilly, Luke {Fleer CnrpO Award of Merit presented at retirement dinner. May 22, 36 Remington, James A. Elected vice president Philip Morris Inc.. Sop 22.22 Named exee vp Philip Morris USA. Aug &22.6 Remy Marlin Joint promotion with Mac~nudo cigars. May 8. 3 Research POPAltDuPont expands drug store study base, Oct 8. 43 US'I CJ study gives distributors bench- mark ~gure~. Retail Telmeee Dealers Seminars scheduled at August ctmvcn- lion, Jul ~ 64 R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc. $750.1R30 gift to University of North Carolina. Jun 22. 1~ 19% gain in first quarter ~les. May ~ 3 Changes in reporting alignment. No~ 22. 26 Declares quarterl.v dMdcnds. Aug 8,22. Files new stock issue with SEC. Scp 8.43 J. Tylee Wilson named chief executive officer. Oct 8, 46 Quarterly cash dividend increased, Dec 8.8 Record sales and earnings reported for 1982, Mar 8.77 Record sales reported in 2rid quarter. Aug 8/22, 3 Sales and earnings up in 1983 third quarter. Nov 22, 3 Set to acquire Bear Creek Corporation, Dec 8. 32 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. "Pride in "lobacco" caravan. Aug ~22, 22 Acqnires majority interest in Ets, Gossel S.A., Jan 8. 6 Camel filters launched in Puerto Ricu. May 22, 44 Century brand to debut in Illinois. Sop 22, 14 . Feature interview with exec vp Jim Johnston, Jan 22. 1 Inflatable 30-foot cigarette pack. at antn races, Jan 8, 16 Interview with James W. Johnston about Century, Jul 8. I McCann-Eriekson appointed ad agency for Camels, Jun 8.6 New field assignments announced. Jun 22, 24 Overseas promotions announced, Oct 8,6 Pride in Tobacco program unites indus- try. Dec 22, 33 Promotions and appointments an- nounced. Aug 8f22, 35 ' Ouarterly dividend declared, Jun 22, 21 Raises price of cigarettes by $1,50 per 1.000. Jul 22, 3 Reports sales gains in overseas markets May 22.42 Seminars held for minority buMne~es Jan 8. 30 Spnnsors Team Anterica soccer matches. Jul 22, 26 Sponsors World Tobacco Auctioncerine Championship. Jul 22, 46 Sponsors auctioneering championship. Oct 8, 24 "l~sting 12-packs in cigarette vending machines. Feb 8, 48 WEll produce two brands in Yu~oslavia,[ Jul 8, 22 Rhoades, Charles T. Sales MaunDer uf the Year Award. Apr] "~2 19 Rich~ ~o~-ert E., Jr. (Rich Products) Named to NFBA advisory group. Apt 8, 15 R JR Gallery Exhibit of photos from Time Magazine. Mar 8, 22 Rockovitz, Bob Appointed Slush Puppie regional man. ager, Jan 8, 6 Rodda Candy Co. Back-to-school/Halloween plans, May 8,8 Ross, John Named new products manager for House of Rizla. Apt 8, 6 Ross, Leonard {Ross Sales Co.) Brokers diso.~,,s the state of the candy industry. Feb 8. 16 Reed, Ralp~ (U,S. Tobacc~ Co.I To be honored at fund raising dinner, Feb b. 1o ~Co~uin~.rd ~m page 102t TI56324295
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9ovid Fortney Fort's Cand/es I-/o//and, Michigan "We were really impressed with the simplicity of start-up and operation of the DEBS System; set up was no problem. The reliability of the DEBS System has been fantastic. In well over two years of operation we have yet to place a problem service call .... By using the Statement and Age Analysis programs and the quick availability of information, we have reduced our A/R days from 20 to 16. Order filling time was reduced by at least 20°,4, but more importantly, errors were drastically reduced. Our salesmen and the office staff save an hour a day because of the billing procedures alone. With the DEBS System we can get better penetration (greater sales) in each account because of availability of product information .... As a result, Fart's Candies' profits have increased tremendously, because the salesman pushes service, product freshness and availability, instead of price." SYSTEM5 featuring: Distributor Concepts 2460 S. Industrial Highway P.O. Box 1508. Ann Arbor, MI 48106 Telephone (313)663-4135 TI56324296
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102 February 9. 1984 Roth, Michael Named marketing coordinator for Swed- ish Tobacco, Dec 22.6 Rothmans International Acquires 20% ownership in Cartier, Apt 22.1 Rothstein, Sidney IPhillies Cigarsl Elected president of Philadelphia cigar group, Jan 22, Ill Row/and, Don C. Named vp sales for Spangler Candy Co., Aug 80_2, 6 Roybal, Rep. Edward R. USTCJ interview on future of ATF Bureau, Sop 8, 29 Rozzi, Ezio Interview with exec vp of Ferrero USA. Dec 22, 26 Rubin. Jack Joins USTCJ as associate editor, Dec 22.3 Ruick, Kenneth L. (Frankel & Co.I Honored as Young Executive o[ the Year. Sop 8.34 Russell, Dorothea L. Named director of membership sevdces for NCWA, May 8, 3 Ruzansky, Marvin (Capitol Candy) USTJ poll of wholesalers on cigarette sales, Apt 8, 22 s Salem cigarettes Expands sponsorship of summer con- certs, Jul 22, 34 New packaging introduced, Dec 8, 22 Salesmanship Feature: Sel{ing is complex. Dec 8. 14 Honor roll of 1982 $2 million sales- people. Jun 8, 18 How Michigan distributor motivates sales force. Dec 8. 11 In selling, time well used is time well spent. Dec 8. 18 Proper sales training a must for whole- salers, Dec 8.2(I Sales managers offer tips on salesman- ship. Jun 8. 12 Selling most of the people most of the time, Jun 8. 14 Smooth Selling: Developing a sales idea, Sop 8, 48 Smooth Selling: "Puking a risk, Jun 8.28 Smnoth Selling: The automated sales- man, Dee 8, 22 Smooth selling: Playing the short game, Jul 22, 26 Special USTJ section: Distributor Sales Force, Jan 8, I I Successful salespeople don't play it by ear. Dec 8. 16 Samtn~erna A , Indonesian clove cigarettes distributed in D.S., Apt 22, 49 Saxon Industries, Inc. Sellingspecialties business to Andlinger & Co., Jun 8, 16 Scandia Packaging Machinery Co. Brochure published on packaging capa- bililies, Mav 22, 3 Schmit~, Ellen " Named Lorillard's brand manager for Newport. Apr 2r2, 42 Schuapp, Allen Named executive vice president Morris Imports USA, Apt 22.42 Seripto Cuts price on Mighty Match disposable lighter. Mar 8.82 Disposables do,ante erasable ballfx~nt market. Jan 8.29 F_a-asab~ ~k refdl is W~,ra~ed. Oct g. 43 rams. J~ g. g Yellow pencil is leaving its mark. Oct 8.54 Security syslems ADT Focus 6 system with false-alarm deterrents, Jun 8. 3 Seeman, Dr. Jeft~'ey I. Wins Philip Morris tobacco science award. Dec 8.8 Seneca Co. Manhattan headquarters established. Nov 9_2. 8 Servette Distributors Company sold to A-I International Funds. Jan 8, 12 Shankman, Lea (Leaf Confectionery) Panel interview on candy industry and Halloween. Apt Sharp, Norman Re-elected president of CAA, Jan 22, 8 Sheen. Dr. Shuh Ji (University of Kentucky) Plant pathologist produces protein from tobacco, Aug 8/22. 14 Shehorn. Bobby J. National sales manager for David & Sons. Feb 8, 69 Sherwood Gruup Marketing Israeli-made Nandy confec- tionery line, Feb 8. 42 Sherman, Bill (Excel Marketing lnc.I Feature on candy brokerage business. Feb 8, 25 Sherman, Milton M., Ltd. Ascot and Tall Ships brands introduced, Oct 8. 15 Nat Sherman Tobacconist Twn new cigarette brands introduced.~ Oct 8, 49 ' Wins Clio award for packaging design.I Oct 8, 43 Shinnamon & Assoc. Sales award from Nabisco Confections. Oct 8, 6 Shipley, Russell L., Jr. Elected to fill term as NCWA exec vp, Mar 8, 22 Feature interview on NCWA progrants, Dec 22, 8 Fills unexpired term as NCWA man- aging director, Feb 8, 4 Silva, l?elipe Named chairman, coo. American Cigar, May 22, & Skoal Bandits Pioneer Days Rodeo in California, Nov 8.24 Skoal smokeless tobacco Presents Charlie Daniels Band concerts. Aug 8/22, 8 Set to sponsor All-America auto learn Dec 22, 16 Slush Puppie Corp. Interview with top company executives, Dec 22.39 Names Craig Whirr vp and Bob Rocko- vitz regl mgr. Jan 8. 6 Thomas R. Brosch named president and c.¢.o.. Jul 8. 14 Smith, Helen LaPat (NCA) Panel interview on candy indast~ and Halloween, Apt 8, 1 Smith, .Marcia Named midwest sales rcp for U.S. To- bacco Journal. Feb 8, 52 Smokeless tobacco products Relx~rt on sales in 1982, Jun 22. 12 Wholesalers predict rise in sales in 1983, Jan 8. 1 Smoking limitations Airline smoking rules restored by. court, M~rS, 22 Appeals court reject~ m~okc-frcc work C.A.B. seeks smoki,,,g ~ ott sltort ~i~ts. Otx 8. 26 Connecticut committee approves Work area bill. Jun 8.26 Connecticut high school bans chew/r, tobacco, Apr 9-2. 26 Connecticut law would extend Clean Indoor Act. Feb 8. 69 Connecticut legislature considers work- place ban. Mar 8, 46 Connecticut restrictions draw industry protests. Apr 22. 39 Feature: The threat in Washington is real. Dee Z2.35 Missouri court rules non-smoking em- ployee can sue, Mar 8. 60 NATD executive director opposes CAB proposals, Nuv 8. ~ New Hampshire Senate bans smoking at its meetings. Mar 8, 46 New Hampshire rejects restaurant re- strictions, Apt 22.8 New Jersey rejects smoking restricting bill. Jun 8, 38 Non-smoking measure sought in Con- nectieut, Jun 22, 12 Two anti-smoking laws set in Connect- icut, Dec 8, 18 UN ponders smoking ban at its meet- ings. Nov 8.24 Wisconsin town bans smoking in schools, Feb 8, 69 Smoking research Council notes increased interest among scientists, Sop 8, 40 Melvin Sosniek Co. Christmas in August promotion, Nov 8, 24 Southern Tobacco & Candy Association Awards contribute to lively meeting, Jul 22. 28 June convention offers something for everyone, May 22, I List of 1983 STCA exhibitors. May 22, 48 Officers and directors elected at con- vention, Jul 22, 23 Photos from annual convention. Jul 8, 20 Young Leaders Division holds meeting. Mar 8, 92 Young Leaders Division plans January meeting, Oct 8, 15 Young Leaders active at annual conven- tion. Jul 8, 12 Southland Corp. Product distribution and organization, Feb 8.21 South Windsor Tobacco & Candy Co. New firm opens in Connecticut. Oct 8, 36 8pangler Candy Co. Advcrtlsing award to Kaye & Silver Brokerage Co., Dee 8, 3 Spangler, Ted Honored at NCWA show on upcoming retirement. Nov 8, 3 Spauldlng's Inc. Feature on Pennsylvania wholesaler, Aug 8/22, 19 Stalenhoef, Jos (M&M/Mars) Interview on company's support of Olympic Games, May 22, 10 Mars executive discusses price reduc- tion, Dec 22. 1 Standard Candy Co. product broker assignments announced. Dec 22, 22 Straus-KeiBon Acquired by Cure-Mark International. Aug 8/22, 1 Strauss, Peter (Metropolitan Distribution Honored by American Jewish Commit- tee, Jan 8.6 Winner of Homer C.A. Po~ell Award, Apt 22, 12 l:X, st rib~ors" views ~ merger trend. Sep 8.6 Heads new company overseeing Culbro Corp.. Sop 8. 24 Strob, George B. Appointed vp finance Scripto. Inc.. Jan 8.8 Sullivan, Gerard P. Named associate publisher of USTCJ. Dec 22, 3 Super Rite Foods Stock offering filed with S,E.C.. Dec 22, 6 Symcox, James C. Named vp sales for Quality Packaging, Inc.. Feb 8.69 T Tables and charts April 1983 State Cigarette Tax Report, Jul 8, 12 Cigar market shares, Jun 22, 12 Cigarelte brand sales and market shares, Dec 22. 12 July cigar imports rose 33.5%. Sop 22. 17 March 1983 state cigarette tax re.port, Jan 8, 16 Non-medicated cough drop sales, Oct 8, 28 Smokeless tobacco market, Jun 22. t2 Teen smoking--what's the story?, Sop 22,3 USTCJ's tobacco/confectionery distrib- utor survey, Nov 22. Taxes Cigarette tax boost unlikely in Connect- icut, Jan 8, 30 March 1983 state cigarette tax report. Jun 8, 16 Massachusetts sidelines proposed ciga- rette tax. Jan 8, 3 Montana proposes 3-ct:nt hike in ciga- rette tax, Mar 8, 46 NATD briefing nn cigarette excise creases, Jan 22. 14 Nebraska proposes 7-cent cigarette tax increase. Mar 8.3 New report tells how to eliminate es- tate taxes, Apt 8. 26 PennsyLvania bill to increase cigarette tax. Apt 22, 39 Pennsylvania wants to remove cigarette exemption. Apr 8, 22 Transfer of business can be done tax- free. Mar 8.59 Virginia seeks local cigarette tax, Mar 8, 56 Te-Amo Geryl, Inc. Acquires Whiz blfg. Co. and Sterlin Candy Co., Nov 22, 22 Purchases Fireside Industries. Inc., 8,3 USTCJ interview: How To-Area caters to retailers. Sop 22. 1 Teneja, Prom Named director of market for R JR- Macdonald. Feb 8, 58 Texas Assn. of Tobacco & Candy Distrib- utors Interview with excc vp Joe Ratcliff, Nov 22, 32 Thompson, ,]on Sales Manager of the Year Award, A 22.12 "l~me Magazine Photograph exhibition at ILIR GalleD: Mar 8, ~ Timson, John Interview with president of Andes Can- dies. Oct g. ! "l-mkd, Gary E. Named vpm~ufacturing for Spangler Candy, Ma, r 8. TI56324297
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STAYING TOP It's never easy. And in today's chalfenging business climate, it's getting tougher every day. You need a lot more than instinct and good business sense to make a go of it. You need skills, and ir~ormadon. You need open lines of communication with your peers and experts in your industry. You need to know how government regulations will ~fect your com- pany, and where the market trends will be taking you a ~ew years down the road. To stay on top, you have to be on top o~ the changes in your industry. How do you get there? The Young Executives Group o~ the National Candy Wholesalers Association can help. We head the largest exclusive network o~ industry leaders and problem solvers in the country--including experts |tom manufacturing, wholesaling, brokerage and even the grocery ~rade. We can plug you into the right advice'at the right time--any time you need it. We'll help you stay on top of: • Industry Trends--through reg- ular reports on wholesaling and market activities around the nation; • Warehousing and Sales Manage- ment Techniques--through special YEt workshops designed to help mid-level managers refine their skills; • Creative Marketing Methods-- through a continuous flow of imsh ideas designed to help you maxi- mize sales and profits; • Goverament Regulations-- through constant coverage by our legislative counsel; and • Conventions and Seminars-- through advance notices of all the best extra-learning opportunities available across the country. NCWA's Young Executives Group offers you the information you need today to keep you on top tomorrow. That's why it's the fastest-growing organization o~ its kind in the indust~. Become a par~ of it now. Just $20.00 a year will bring you all YEG member services and allow you to partici- pate in YEG informational and social activities. It'll also make it possible for you to become in- volved in the YEG decision-making process through members-only voting privileges, committees and surveys. Every day you wait is a day you're missing out. For yourself, for your business, for your future ..... send in your application today. < STAY ON TOP Join the Young Executives Group Today! APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP [] Yes, I want to join the Group and stay on top. Name Company [] Send me__ additional application forms. I know other people who want to stay on top. Title Company address City State Zip Code State Work phone ( ) City Nature of business Home address Zip Code. Send mml to [] home [] business Committee(s) I'd like to serve on (circle): Winter convention plann/ng; Summer convention plann/mg; MemSersh/p; Public relations; Legislative. Requ/rements for membership: Applicants must be involved with the candy, tobacco or allied indusfries (or have family member in one of those indush'ies); be under 40 years o~ age; and pay $20 annual due~ (checks payable to NCWA Youn~ Exec~/ves Group). Ret~ra Thi~ Form To: Natiemal ~ Wk~emaY~-z ~ [] che~ em~kmed. 1120 Vermont Ave. NW, Suite 1120, W~shington, DC 20005 [3 ,end invo~oe. TI56324301
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104 Februmy 9, 1984 Tobacco Researcher products plant protein from leaves, Aug 8/22, 14 mndtable discussion of tobacco/candy business. Jan 22. 3 Round{able on retailing continued. Feb 8.3 Tobacco Action Network H. Jerome Lerner named "activist of the year', Jul 8. 1 Tobacco industry Feature: A responsible tobacco indus- try prevails, Jun 22, 11 Maxwell releases new tobacco fact book, Jul 8. 6 USDA report says cigarette consump- tion down 3%, Jul 8.22 Tobacco Institute Americans paid $6.8 billion tobacco taxes in 1982, Mar 8, 92 Asks Congress continue funding fire re- port system, Jun 22, 18 Chilcot¢ cites need for unified action May8, 1 Opposes self-extinguishing cigarette bills. Mar 8, 21 Report shows cigarette tar and nicotine level down. May 8, 1 derchants Association Cullman of Philip Morris will be speaker. Apr 8, 15 Too{sic Roll Industries Back-to-school/Halloween plans, May 8,8 Topps Chewing Gum, Inc. Acquired by Furs{mann Little & Co., Dec 22, 26 Announces free calculator promotion. Aug 8/22, 40 Back-to-school offer [or retailers, Sup 22,6 Top Stone Cigar Co. Free cigars passed out at jai alai event, Mar 8, 68 Torre, Joe Braves' manager to do Friends of the Cigar tour, Jan 22, 8 Trade Development Corp. Planning national presence in wholesal- ing business, Jun 22. i Trado, Chuck (Peter Paul Cadbury) Interview on retail distribution, Feb 8, 51 Trainor, John Honors and gifts on 251h year with DeMets, Jan 8, 8 Trebor Confections, U.S.A. New sales appointments announced, Dee 22, 31 Tucker, Bud (Springer Burklund) Candy wholesalers views on cigarette tax increase, Mar 8, 26 u Uniform Product Code Council Will merge master file with Distribution Codes. Jul 8. 17 U.S. Playing Card Co. Offer made to Saxon to acquire Hoyle Products. Mar 8, 38 United States Tobacco Co. $2 million campaign for Skoal in paper pouch. Aug 8/22. 1 Declares quarterly dividend, Dec 8.8 High sales and earnings in first quarter, May 22, 3 Higher sales and earnings reportod for 1982, Mar g, 85 Increased earnings for 3rd O and nine months. Nov 22, 34 Iaeaeased earnings in 2rid quarter, Aug Interview with Peter Ghfloni on smoke- less products, May 8. 1 Safe driving film praised by USDOT. Oct 8, 59 Winners at NCWA Gold Rush Days. Sep 8.44 Wins advertising award for Copenhagen and Skoal. Jul 22, 23 U.S. Tobacco and Candy Journal Announcement of new name for maga- zine, Jul 22, 1 Journal celebrates its new title at NCWA, Sup 8, 3 Tobacco/confectionery distributor sur- vey. Nov 22, 1 Trip to Olympics offered in essay con- test. Nov 8.3 U.S. Tobacco Journal Confectionery poster will be supplied to the trade, May 22, 6 Gold Rush Winners photo album, Apr 22, 24 Winners at USTJ Gold Rush Days at NCWA, Apr 8, t4 v Van Houten of Europe - Aristo International named U.S. agent, Jul 8, 14 Vann, Mike Named vp sales for Brock Candy Co., Sup 22, 13 VCT Corp. New computer takes orders by phone, May 22, 25 Vending companies NAMA survey shows most had higher sales in 1981, Jan 8, 14 NAMA survey shows revenue off but outlook bright, Jun 8, 27 Vending machine production down, Oct 8.60 w Wall Street Analysts impressed by stability of ciga- rettes, Nov 8, 1 Walsh, Joseph J. Named national sales manager for S.L. Kaye Co., Feb 8, 69 Ward-Johnston Back-to-school/Halloween plans, May 8,8 New broker contract goes into effect Jun 8, 12 Waxman bill Industry leaders see it as step towar, prohibition, Apr 22, 1 Wayne, C.N. Acting chairman of new National To- bacco Council, Jan 8, 8 Weissman, George (Philip Morris Inc.) Chairs NYC Partnership Summer Jobs program, Nov 8.24 Sees industry growing despite taxes and laws. Jun 8, 3 Wdlinghoff, Gregg T. (Keilson-Dayton) Feature: Young Ohio executives meet challenges, Apt 22, 35 West, Frank D, Retires as U.S. Tobacco executive. Aug 8/22, 6 W~stern Penn~. Ivania Tobacco Table Boat ride and awards night. Dec 8, 32 Whltt, Graig Appointed vp by Slush Puppie Corp., Jan g. 6 Brtnch opens ia Philip Morris buildi~ in Hew York. Apt 8, 3 White, Sam {Trade Development ~orp.) Expanding wholesale tobacco and candy business. Jun ~7., 1 White-Huller Acquires Polep Candy & Tobacco Co.. Oct8. I New acquisitions include Ponca Whole- sale, Nov 8. 1 Whitwell, Joseph E. (Cuibro Corp.) Honored by UJA/Fedcration, Jun 22, 3 Interview: How Culbro intends to di- vide & conquer. Sup 22, 8 Re-elected chairman of CAA, Jan 22, 8 Tells NATD convention about cigar pro- motion effort. Apt 22, 3 Wholesalers, see Distributors Wick, H. Gene Named vp operations, Reynolds Inter- national, Oct 8, 6 C&J Willenborg, Inc. Expansion plans announced. Oct 8, 26 Williams, L.E. Named southern regional manager for Amurol, May 22. 36 Willy Wonka Back-to-school/Halloween plans, May 8,8 Wilson, J. Tylee Named ceo Ryenolds Industries. Oct 8,46 Winehrenner, John T. Named group marketing director RJR, Jun 22, 24 Winston cigarettes To sponsor pro basketball MVP award program, Jan 22, 10 Winter, Ray Promoted by Bic to director of sales and marketing, Jul 8, 14 Wisconsin Association Tobacco & Candy Distributors Dorothea Russell to address annual convention, Aug 8/22, 14 Wisconsin Pharmacal Thnmas Bonesho and Charles Nevsimal named vp's, Mar 8, 8 Witcher, Harvey Joins McNally & Associates to develop snack items. Jan 22, 13 Wrigley, Wm., Jr. Co. Repurchases shares from American Home Products, Aug 8/22, 11 Ronald Cox discusses wholesalers prob- lems, Apt 22, 28 Writing instruments Erasables--a revolution in the making, Jul 22. 64 Industry group sees growth in 1980s Mar 8, 90 Sales drop in 1982, Jul 22, 23 Y Yahn & McDonnell Discussion of takeover by M. Paolcll; & Sons, Mar 8, 1 Yeager, Glen Joins Fisher Nut Co. as western regional manager, Jul 22, 20 Yergens, Virginia (Huser-Paul Co.) Candy wholesalers views on cigarette tax increase, Mar 8, 26 York Candies, Inc. Duffek named national sales and mar- keting manager. Apt 22, 42 Sponsors riverbnat float in Macy's pa- rade, Jan g, 12 Young Executives Group (NCWA) David Bork to speak at special business session, Jul 8, 8 Edward P. Kxasay elected pcesident fo~ 1~, Sup 8, 3 Frankel's Kenneth Ruick named Young Exec of Year, Sup 8, 34 z Zimmerman, Richard A. Elected president of Hershey Foods Dec 8. 7 ZIotoff, Leonard (Palisade Wholesale) Elected president of California distrib- utors group, Mar 8, 77 Product and Promotional Program Announcements A Accorn Enterprises New medicine cards, Jun 22, 21 ~d-Comm Saila Mints, Nov 22, 20 American Candy Big Bo peppermint stick, Sup 8, 54 American Cigar Corona Whiffs canisters, Jun 8, 27 Amergon, Inc. Hay-A-Joe chewing tobacco. Ju122, 61 Amity Leather Producls Co. Calculator and credit card cases, Jul 22, 67 Key holder. May 22.36 Tri-fold billfold, Aug 8/22, 49 Western style billfolds. Jan 8.21 Amurol Products Awesome Apple Bubble Gum, Apt 8, 15 Big League Plug bar, Nov 22, 20 Dungeons & Dragons Fantasy Candy Figures. Dec 8, 28 Tubble Gum, Nov 8, 18 Wacky Wash powder candy, Aug 8/22, Andre Pros{, Inc. Zotz string candy, Jul 22, 67 Areal Chemicals, Inc. Kitchen equipment metal cleaners, Jar 8,6 B W. E. Basset{ Co. Trim family manicure kit, Aug 8/22. ~4 Belch, Paul F., Co. Fruit-flavored caramels in plastic display jars, Jan 8, 20 Bic Carp. Back-to-school items, Jun 22, 22 Erasable ink pen, Apt 8, 15 Erasable pen, May 22. 40 Multi-packs, May 22, 42 New lighter and shaver promotion. Jul 22. 67 Shaver packs promotion. Dec 8.28 Ultra fine marker, Jun 8, 26 Ultra fine marker, Aug 8/22.49 Blue Diamond Smokehouse nuts, Dee 8.28 E.J, Brach & Sons Mellocreme candy line. May 8, 8 Brock Candy Co. Gooney Bears candy, Dec 8, 28 Brown & Williamson Kool Super Nights concerts, Mfiy 22, 42 Byfidd Snuff Co. Handmade Red Top snuff, Ju122, 80 C Caterpillar Lift truck, Dec 22.44 Ce De Candy, Inc. Ce De Candy Money Rolls, Jut 22, 45 Chocolate Smartias Pops, Aug 8/22., 49 New chocolate Smarfies, Mar 8, 56 Chocolate House, Ine. Chocolate Whip bar, Sep 22. 18 D.L. Clark Co. Hew chocolate bars. Mar 8, 116 Crowd Caps Inc. Skoal Bandit cotton cap~. Nov 22. 20 D 13~ady Ceafectionery, Stimorol D~-,d~h chewiag gums, Dec T!56324302
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FOCUS ON the FUTURE The 1984 NATD Convention and Exposition March 21-25 Loews Anatole Hotel & Market Hall Dallas, Texas JOIN US. Contact: National Association of Tobacco Distributors 630 Third Avenue New York, NY 10017 (212) 599-3344 TI56324303
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106 Donrus~ Co. Color Bubbles gum balls. Oct 8.44 Dr. Grabow Corn cob pipes. Mar 8.8 E European Chocolate Shop Sweet Show Swiss Chocolate. Nov 22.20 Sweet Show Swiss chocolate. Sep ~. 18 Eveready 'Cash for Life" game. Jul 8. 12 Battery experiment book. May 22.40 Bowling promotion. Jun 8. 16 Fall Harvest promotion. Jun 8. 12 Rebate on rechargeable batteries. Jan 8.24 Spooky Sleeve flashlight. Jun 8.27 Expressive Products Co. Fun Write roller pens. Apr 22. 52 F Featherweight Corn chips and cheese snacks. Ju122.67 : Candies Licorice by the Yard. Mar 8. 128 Design lighter. Mar 8. 128 Chocolate Nuggets. Feb 8. 58 coffee candy. May 22. 42 Keppol's Fiddle Sticks. Feb 8.58 L Chocolat, Ltd. Chateau Suisse chocolate. Feb 8.45 .cat" Confeclionery 28 bubble gum and candy products. May 8.8 Big Wheel Sweepstakes. Apr 8.3 Cola Bubble Gum. Jun 22.22 French Fry Bubble Gum. Jul 22.45 Jelly Bean gum. Jul 22. 80 Laser Disc Bubble Gum. Nov 8. 18 New bubble gum jar. Jun 22.21 New seal of assurance. Jul 22. 72 New value Rain-bin. Jul 22.26 Sno Balls and Holly Berries. Oct 8.44 Super Jawful. Jan 8.26 Whoppers promotion. May 22.36 Winnin' Ugly Bubble Gum. Nov 8. 18 Life Savers Sugarless Grape Bubble Yam. Jan 8.16 Lorus, Inc. 5th Avenue Digital watch radio. Nov 8. 18 New package for t.-andy bar. Aug 8/22.49 Love Snacks TV & radio advertising campaign. Jan Sesame honey bar. Jan 8.24 8. 12 Fisher Nut Co. Expanded low-salt line. Mar 8. 128 Fleer Corp. Baseball cards. Dec 22.28 Crazy Can Candy. Dec 8.28 Dubble Bubble gum. Aug 8/22.49 Mad stickers and albums. Dec 22.28 Lnden's, Inc. 5th Avenue candy bar six-pack. Feb 8.46 Casmtova novelties. Mar 8. 68 Jelly Buttons candy. Mar 8.37 Mellomint chocolate mints. Mar 8.77 New cough drop displays. Jul 22.58 Norllghts icily candy. Mar 8. 26 Thicker than ever 5th Avenue. Jul 8. 17 Guicksand powdered bubble gum. Nov Lynn Roberts International 22, 20 G Gillette Co. All-Star baseball promotion, Jun 8, 28 Cricket lighter refunds promotion. Nov 22.20 Daisy disposable shaver for women. Oct 8.44 Revolving disposable sunglass rack. Jul 22. 67 M Inc. Quartzmatic lighter. Nov 22.20 British Sterling air fresheners. Nov 22. 20 Playboy air fresheners. Nov 8. 18 Paper Mate gift sets. Sep 22. 18 Sergio Valente air fresheners. Dec 8.28 Travel kit promotion supports blade Mars sales. Jan 8.23 Olympic promotion. Dec 22.22 Widget scraper and cutter. Jan 8. 16 Starburst fruit chews. Sep 8. 54 World Series Bonanza promotion. Jul Maseeo 22, 67 Gummy Bear Co. Black Forest llne. Sep 8.54 H Hal Tai International. Inc. Bear in the Box, Jul 22.67 ribo of America Gold Bears gummy candy, Dec 8.28 Gummi-Bears package display. Dec 8.28 Packaged candy line, May 22.40 Hershey Chocolate Co. Skor candy bar, Sep 8, 54 Hershey Import Co, Cookies from l lulland, May 22.42 Hinkle Enterprises. Inc. Egg decorating kit, Jan 8.24 House of Rizla E-z wider cigarette rolling kit. Sep 8.54 Hoyle Products Free puzzle display. Jul 22, 60 Jigsaw puzzles, Mar 8.46 1 Intercontinental Cigars Diablo handmade cigars. Jul 8, I0 J Jet Spray Corp. Beverage dispensers. Jun 22.22 Disposable toothbrush, May 22. 40 Maxfield Candy Co. Chocolate eggs. Oct 8.44 Happy Easter eggs. Sep 22. 18 Car air fresheners. Feb 8. 22 Manufacturing Co. Afishionado jewelry. Mar 8. 107 Cigar lover's guide to New York restau. rants. Feb 8, 45 MSI Data Corp. Bar code scanner for data entry, Jan 8.30 Bar code scanning system, Jun 22, 22 Data collection terminal. Jun 22.21 Ben Myerson Candy Co. Christopher's Chocolate/Almond bar. Jan 8. 12 Counter baskets for Sunkist Fruit Gems. Jan 8. 12 Irish cream mints. May 22.42 N Nabisco Confections Back-to:school items, Jun 22, 21 Charleston Chews. Jan 8.30 Christmas Chuckles, Jul 22, 72 Chuckles in countertop tubs, Mar 8. 52 Nellaon C~ndies Fruit & Nut Easter eggs. Jan 8. 24 Nellie Bars counter display. Apt 22.20 New space-saver box. May 22.40 Norelco Air cleaner. Mar 8. 107 O Oak Rubber Co. Balloon merchandiser. Sep 22. 18 Old Dominion Peanut Corp. Bushels of chocolate, Jun 22. 24 P R.M. Palmer Co. Bootin" Bunny. Dec 22, 28 Bugs Bunny Superstar chocolate rabbit. Sep 8.54 Christmas season novelties. Jun 8.16 Double Crisp Foto Hearts. Dec 8.28 O'Palmer Shamrocks. Dec 22. 28 Peanut Buddy candy bar. Dec 8. 28 Paper Mate Christmas merchandiser. Mar 8, 108 Peter Paul Cadbury Mounds and Almond Joy promotion. Mar 8. 122 Multi-packs of Mounds. Almond Joy and York. May 8. 8 New Cadbury Thick bars. May 22.40 Pez Candy Napoli peanut butter wafers. Dec 8, 28 Philadelphia Chewing Gum Chewola Bubble Gum, Dec 22, 28 Pilot Pen Ad featuring Rodney Dangerfield gets respect. Jan 8, 2[ ?rice Waterhouse Microcomputer guide, May 22.40 Puff International Industries, Inc. Sportpuffs pipes, Jan 8, 24 Q Queen Anne Candy Co. Easter Best candy package. Dec 8, 28 R R.J. Reynolds Camel filters now in hard pack. Jan 8, 30 Century 100s cigarette brand. Dec 22, 22 Rodda Candy Co. Giant Bonny, Oct 8, 44 Russell, James B., Inc. Raja and Pompa Mas clove cigarettes. Jan 8, 24 S Schick Disposable razors. Feb 8, 58 Scripto Disposable butane lighters. Nov 22.20 Erasable Twin Pack. Jul 22.77 Erasable pen & pencil set. Jan 8. 16 Erasable pens. Nov 22.20 Ultra thin Yellow Pencil. Mar 8.64 Ultra thin yellow pencil. Jan 8.26 Milton M. Sherman Ltd. Tall Ship packaged tobaccos. Nov 8. 18 Smokie Products Co. Fat Freddie beef sticks. Aug 8/22.49 Fat Freddy beef stick. Jan 8.24 Spangler Candy Co. Christmas candy canes. Oct 8.44 Saf-T-Pops in premium pack tub. Jan 8.30 Smiles candy rolls. Jul 22.67 Stanback Co., Ltd. New lip conditioner, Jan 8. 30 Steven Barrie & Co. Real wood rose products. Jan 8, 30 Storck USA Products Halloween.~back-to-school items. May Wayne Bun Bar. Jun 22. 21 Cranberry apple drink. Apt 8.22 22.40 Wayne Bun Bar multi-pack. Sep 22. 18 Born Something Special Junior Mints, Oct 8, i Wayne Bun Bars, Nov 8, 18 Hot Tamales tender jellies. Sep 8. 54 44 [ Werther'sOriginalButterCandies.Nov K Sugar Daddy milk caramel pops. Jan I 8. 18 Katherine Beecher Candies 8, 24 | Werther's Original Butter Candies, Sep ~ lg Charlic the Candyman candies and N~i~l C~y Ca. [ - ~lgl~. Jul 22. 67 ~-A-Pop lollipop. Sep 9_2. 18 I S~ehe~'s • 7 S.L. KI~teCa. Wkal:-A-Popstlekerx, Ntwg. lg i "2X4"ca~ybarmtrodu~d,Jul8.1 SunFme Brands Halloween candy items, May 22, 42 Jno. H. Swisher & Son, Inc. Cigarillo and Perfecto Valentine packs, Jan 8, 24 Double bonus Labor Day Special. Aug 8/22, 49 Special wrappings for Father's Day, May 22, 40 ;witzer Co. Rothschilds candy counter display box, Jan 8. 12 I'e-Amo Geryl, Inc. Henri Wintermans cigars. Mar 8. 108 Timberline Industries 1I, Inc. Trolli Gummi-Squiggles. Dee 22.28 Topps Chewing Gum, Inc. 1983 line of baseball bubble gum cards, May 22, 25 A-Team cards, Nov 8.18 Bazooka Bubble Gum. Dec 22, 28 Football stickers and albums, Dec 22.28 Grape Juice Bubble Gum, Jun 8, 27 NFL Fuolball Bubble Gum cards, 8/22, 49 Return of the Jedi candy containers, Se 22. 18 Santa's Bag. Nov 8. 18 Smurf stickers and albums. Dee 22. 28 Soft Bazooka bubble gum. Nov 22. 20 Sundae Cone Candy. Mar 8. 108 Superman III movie photo cards. Nov 8. 18 Tropical Punch bubble gum. Oct 8.44 Trebor USA International Selection candies. Jun 8, 32 Pillow bag candies, May 22, 40 Railway Stick licorice, Jul 22, 67 Twookies Crunchy Crisp candy bar, Jun 8, 28 U Universal Cigar Corp. Optimo brand in three sizes. Mar 8, 22 Usher Candy Co. New packaging for mint and fruit rolls Mar 8.68 U.S. Tobacco Co. Campus Duds novelty clothes. Jan 8. Cigars for new grandfathers. Ju122.57 Skoal smokeless tobacco. Feb 8. 48 V Van Melle Assorted fruit chews. Sep 8, 54 Villco Imports. Inc. Shone Mexican charutes, Jan 8. 16 W Well Products Push-button combination padlock, 22.67 Whitehall Products Co. Refillable pipe lighter, Dec 22, 44 Universal lighter fuel, Dee 22. 44 Wilkinson Sword New floor merchandiser, Jul 22. 80 Rise shaving cream promotion, Jul 8, 14 Self-sharpening knives, Jul 22. 67 Twin-blade dispusable razor, Mar 8,122 Willy Wonka Nerds crunchy candy. May 22.42 Pre-pack display. Jul 22, 77 Winthrop Products Soapure cleanser for delicate skin. 22,67 Y York Candies, Inc. Caramel Rolls for Caramel Apples. Jtm 8,27 Happy Taffy. Jul 22, 67 Z Zimex Corp. Swi~ M~sli r~d¢ b~r, Dec ~. 28 TI56324304
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BUILDING ON THE SUCCESS OF CENTURY 85's l J. R OLI)S INTRODUCES Cen~ is not currer~y =vail~d~e in the followlng ~'eas due to tax rate¢ AL, AZ, ~ O~ IO, K~ ~, M~ ~ NE, N& NR N% ~ OH, ~. SD.V& CentuPj 100's no~ ¢U=Ten~y availeb~ in Flodda. R.J. Reynolds. Dedicated to leadership through innovation. TI56324306

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