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Contents Arne Si'_elton

Date: Mar 1984
Length: 98 pages

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Abstract

Iran: Cigarettes in short supply .................. 20 Technology on display: TR previews The Hague .... 36 Symposium program ......................... 38 List of exhibitors ............................ 39 Descriptions of displays ...................... 44 Bulgaria sets sights on light leaf market .......... 64 U.S. flue-cured growers search for buyers .........

Fields

Box
0546
Named Person
Adams, Peter
Akins, Gene
Alegre, Manuel
Alston, Julian M.
Alverson, William
April, Sunday
Armstrong, John
Arthur, Thomas D.
Barker, Paul
Beek, Van
Beermann, Inge
Bell, C. Stanley
Bell, Graham
Bickers, Chris
Bignall, Fred
Boden, Richard M.
Braddock, Michael
Bray, J. Robert
Brodin, Hans
Bunting, Colin
Bunting, Richard
Burns, Terry
Butler, Adam
Campbell, William
Carrel, Manuel
Cesar, Julio
Chambers, George
Coins, Bob
Cole, John E.
Cremin, Robert H. (PM Sales & Marketing VP (1978-83))
R.H. Cremin was a Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Philip Morris, Inc. from 1978 to 1983. (Source: Philip Morris Summary - PMI Liability Notebook)
Dewitt, John
Dom, Peter
Domingo, Santo
Dwyer, R. William, Jr.
Edwards, Thomas
Evelyn, Aubrey
Finch, Charlie
Flavors, Bell
Fleckenstein, John
Fletcher, Robert (Regional Public Affairs Manager)
1989 Hong Kong
Freeman, John P. (Professor, Bus. & Legal Ethics, Univ. of SC Law School)
Member, Ohio and South Carolina Bars. Freeman specialized in teaching business courses and legal ethics. Taught legal ethics for 23 years at the University of South Carolina, has written and lectured extensively on the topics of legal ethics and Attorney-client privilege. Served as a member of the South Carolina Bar Ethic's Advisory Committee.
Frick, Walter
Fuente, Arthur
Fuente, Carlos
Giglio, Dara L.
Gilbert, Diane E.
Gooch, Peggy
Gordon, Lou
Greig, Colin C. (BAT R&D, Southampton, England (1974-1997))
Colin C. Grieg worked for British American Tobacco Company as a Group Leader in the Product Development Department, B.A.T. Group Research and Development Center in Southampton, England, circa 1979.
Hansen, Norman
Hart, Dwight
Head, Hilton
Heinz, Edward N.
Hertz, Alfred N.
Ho, Peter E.
Holland, Keith
Holloway, Peter
Hook, Richard G.
Israel, J. Cart
Johnston, James Wesley (CEO of RJR c. 1989-95)
CEO of RJR domestic, c. 1989
Keller, Kenneth
Kent, Kent
Kiger, Hugh
Kirby, Michael
Koehne, Walter
Kruger, Andre
Lanigan, Nick
Laurence, Michel
Layton, Max
Leaf, Ken
Lee, Charles W., Jr.
Lester, Reginald
Lights, Kent Golden
Lipton, Thomas I.
Llaneza, Frank
Lloyd, Nathaniel
Lobur, Joann
Logan, John
Madsen, John K.
Manzo, Mark
Marie, Jean
Mason, Paul
Mason, Ronald T.
Matlick, Dayton
Mazur, Gerald R.
Mcarthur, Colin S.
McArthur, Douglas (General; smoked corncob pipe and cigs)
McMurtrie, Andrew "Drew" (BW Supervisory Projects Manager)
Group Development
Meier, Manuel
Meixner, Ferdinand
Menendez, C. Moran
Miquel, Cristina
Model, David
Moran, Julio C.
Morgan, W. Tommy, III
Morse, Roy E., Ph.D. (RJR Director, 1981-1984)
Roy Morse is former research chief of R.J. Reynolds. He says that as soon as Edwin Jacob, who ran the CTR/Special Projects division, funded a scientific study, it was privileged and couldn't be used in court (WSJ 2/11/93). Roy E. Morse was a Director for RJR Tobacco Co. 1981-1984. (Source: R. J. Reynolds Summary - RJR Liability Notebook). He served as Vice President of Research and Development and on the Board of Directors in 1980, as Senior Vice President in 1982, Member of the Board of Directors of the CTR prior to 1984, and as Senior Scientific Advisor in 1985. He worked for RJR Tobacco as Vice President of Research & Development in 1980, served on the Board of Directors from 1980 to the present, and as Senior Vice President from 1982 to the present. (Source: RJR Who's Who NMLRP)
Nelson, William
Neuhauser, Kurt
Newman, Millard W.
Newman, Stanford I.
Nova, Barry J. (Sr. VP Marketing & Sales, U.S. Smokeless Tobacco c.1980)
Also served on Tobacco Insttite Executive Committee, Board of Directors and Communications Committee.
Ordway, Mary
Pare, Paul (Chairman and CEO of Imasco Ltd (Canada) c. 1978-85)
Paul Pare' was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Imasco Ltd. (Canada) in 1985. P. Pare (R.G. Baker LT 2/4/85 & chart BW#680582458).
Parks, Richard V.
Payne, John
Perez, Alfredo
Perez, Luis
Phillips, Rudy M.
Port, Virginia
Raven, Vivian F.
Ray, Philip
Rosen, Mike
Rosen, Sue
Ruiz, Armando G.
Sanders, W. Lee
Schwartz, James P.
Sharp, Norman
Shelton, Anne
Silberstein, Donald A.
Sineath, Jim
Smit, Bart
Snodgrass, Frank
Snodgrass, Frank B.
Southern, Colin
Southgate, Martin
Steinbrecher, Donald H.
Stone, Mark
Story, Edwin
Strange, William J.
Summers, Frank B., Jr.
Sumner, Daniel A.
Swindell, Jim
Terrace, Chase
Thompson, Chris
Thompson, John R.
Torok, Eva
Townsend, Christoper
Trenkle, Robert W.
Tribble, Gregory D.
Trull, Olin C.
Unger, Jan A.
Van, Jan
Ward, Elise
Wayne, Kirk
Weissman, George (PM Chairman & CEO '79-84)
Vice President of Philip Morris from 1954 to 1956. Vice President and Assistant to the President in 1957. Vice President of Marketing from 1958-59. Executive Vice President of Marketing in 1960. Exec. VP Overseas in 1961, Exec. VP PM International 1962-66. President from 1967 to 1972. President and Chief Operating Officer in 1973. Vice Chairman from 1974-78. Chair and CEO from '79-84 and on the Board of Directors from 1959-84.
West, Peter Wood
Whitehead, Ronald L.
Wilson, Robert W.
Witt, Eli
Wolf, Dale E.
Wolf, Dr. ---
Defense
Wolff, Robin K.
Woodall, Joan
Young, Norman
Zanini, Giuseppe
Named Organization
Advertising Age (periodical)
Agriculture Department (USDA)
Arjay Equipment Corporation
B.A.T. Industries PLC (BAT)
British American Tobacco Industry, parent company of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. in the U.S.
Benson & Hedges Canada, Ltd.
British-American Tobacco Co Ltd (British-American Tobacco Co. Ltd.)
British-American Tobacco Company Limited was a operating group under B.A.T. Industries P.L.C. in 1985.
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation (B&W)
Subsidiary of BAT U.S., located in Louisville, KY.
Coresta (Industry-affiliated Int'l scientific/research group)
An international organization whose objective is "to improve cooperation in scientific research and tobacco." Consists of 186 member companies/institute from 54 countries, including tobacco, paper and filter companies, and universities engaged in tobacco research.
Crompton & Knowles (Adds tobacco extract to cigarettes)
Crompton & Knowles adds tobacco extract to cigarettes, per ABC's Day One program.
DuPont
Ecusta (major cigarette paper supplier)
EEC (European Economic Community)
European Economic Community
European Community
Export Leaf Tobacco Co. (Purchases, processes and stores U.S. tobaccos.)
Purchases, processes and stores U.S. tobaccos.
Filtrona (Manufacutre Reynold's Filters)
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Foreign Agricultural Service
Free Choice Inc.
General Foods
Haarmann & Reimer Corp. (Supplier of tobacco extracts in 1993)
supplier of tobacco extracts in 1993
Hercules
Imasco Ltd. (Canada) (Tobacco, fast-food retailing co. in Canada)
A tobacco, fast food and retailing company in Montreal, Canada. The leading Canadian tobaco company in 1994.
Imperial Tobacco Co. (Determined optimum nicotine levels for cigarettes)
Did testing pre-1972? of U.K. smokers and concluded that the optimum nicotine delivery for the cigarette, and that stepwise reductions in delivery caused progressive rejection by consumers (see Project Wheat)
International Flavors & Fragrances Inc.
ITC (India Tobacco Company)
India Tobacco Company
Japan Tobacco Inc. (Japanese gov't -owned tobacco company)
Japanese government -owned tobacco company, until 1994.
Liggett Group Inc. (American cigarette manufacturer)
American cigarette manufacturer, was the first to start selling discount brands (GPC)
Marsh & McLennan
Mobil Oil
North Carolina State University
Olin
PepsiCo Inc.
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd. (Cigarette manufacturer, incorporated in U.S. in 1902)
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd.., was incorporated in New York in April of 1902; half the shares were held by the parent company in London, and the balance by its U.S. distributor and his American associate. Its overall sales in 1903, its first full year of U.S. operation, were a modest seven million cigarettes. Among the brand offered, besides Philip Morris, were Blues, Cambridge, Derby, and a ladies favorite name for the London street where the home companies factory was located - Marlborough.
Philip Morris Companies Inc. (Parent company of Philip Morris USA, Kraft, Miller)
America's seventh-largest industrial enterprise in 1993, owns Kraft, Miller Brewing, General Foods, and more.
Philip Morris Incorporated (Philip Morris U.S.A.) (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Philip Morris Co., Inc.)
A wholly-owned subsidiary of Philip Morris Co., Inc.
Philip Morris International Inc. (A subsidiary of Philip Morris Cos (1994))
A wholly-owned subsidiary of Philip Morris Companies in 1994
Philip Morris U.S.A. (See Philip Morris Incorporated)
See Philip Morris Incorporated
Pinkerton Tobacco Co. (Leading producer of chewing tobacco in 1987)
the leading producer of chewing tobacco in 1987
Proctor & Schwartz (Made Dryers for RL Process)
R.J. Reynolds Corporation (second tier subsidiary of RJR Industries)
R.J. Reynolds Industries, Inc.
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. (Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral))
Cigarette manufacturer (Camel, Winston, Doral)
RJR-MacDonald
Rothmans International
Rutgers University
Sigma (Plastic bag manufacturer)
Standard Commercial (Leaf buyer)
TAN (Tobacco Action Network)
Organization created by the tobacco industry to galvanize "grass roots" political action from among those who work in some capacity for the tobacco industry: growers, manufacturers, retailers of cigarettes, etc.
Tobacco Associates Inc.
Tobacco Chemists Research Conference (Formerly known as the Tobacco Science Research Conference)
Tobacco Institute (Industry Trade Association)
The purpose of the Institute was to defeat legislation unfavorable to the industry, put a positive spin on the tobacco industry, bolster the industry's credibility with legislators and the public, and help maintain the controversy over "the primary issue" (the health issue).
Tobacco International
U.S. Department of Agriculture
University of Hawaii

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CONTENTS ARNE SI'~ELTON Ec~i:er PEGGY GOOCR As~.,ociate Edgier DAYTON MATLICK P~b~sher P-~EORGE ROUSHKOLB Ma.n~gerlPnnting & Production JOANN LOBUR Art & Gr~ph;cS Super'~ls0r JOAN WOODALL Cernpos~tioe Supervisor FRANCIS ZANKOWSKI CORRESPONDING EDITORS Dr. Murntaz Ahrn~d AFGHANISTAN Dr. J. Sobastlan Zirnnrnel AUSTRIA Paule Granja, BRAZIL Peter Wood WEST GERMANY S.Y, Nee HONG KONG Chandraka.nt Kakodk~,r INDIA Or Murntaz Ahrn~,d IRAN J. Cart ISRAEL S. Amjad Ali PAKISTAN Or~ Mumtaz Al~mad PAKISTAN JuanltoV. Jabat PHILIPPINES O~ar Vi~lasls PHILIPPINES Peter Pachi THAILAND Mal'k Stone UNITED K|NGDOM Mike Rosen ZIMBABWE ADVERTISING SALES Publllher & Ganerel Manaser Day%on Mailick Account Representatives U SA,,CANADA *AFRICA= FAR EAST=PACIFIC Sue Rosen USA.INDIA*PAKISTAN Elise Ward 3000 Hig.~wocds B;~d , Su~t~' 300 Ra~tgh, NC 27625. USA Phone: 9191872.5040 T~gx: 602-736 SPEC AG RAL EUROPEAN CONTINENT Erich Hil~erbr~nd 4~0 Dusseld0~ ~ West Germany P~o~e ~.11-65-20.31 Telex: 8-5~2~g7 CH]LD UNITED KINGOOM Peter E. Ho~Zoway t57 ~mbedey Avenue London SEt5 3XD P~one; 01-~39-1~5 EDITORIAL • PRODUCTION * CIRCULATION FOR THE INTERNATIONAL TOBACCO INDUSTRY TOBACCO REPORI'ER March 1984 Volume 111 Number 3 COVER: Photo by Mumtaz Ahmad FEATURES Iran: Cigarettes in short supply .................. 20 Technology on display: TR previews The Hague .... 36 Symposium program ......................... 38 List of exhibitors ............................ 39 Descriptions of displays ...................... 44 Bulgaria sets sights on light leaf market .......... 64 U.S. flue-cured growers search for buyers ......... 66 DEPARTMENTS EDITOR'S MEMO ................................ 4 OVERSEAS MEMO ............................... 7 TOPLINE REPORT ............................... 8 INTERNATIONAL NEWS ......................... 12 FINANCIAL REPORTS ........................... 68 BRAND NEWS .................................. 70 NEW PRODUCTS & EQUIPMENT .................. 76 NEWSMAKERS ................................. 78 INDUSTRY PATENTS ............................ 86 EVENTS ....................................... 88 ADVERTISERS' INDEX ........................... 92 ~/~1~ SPECIALIZED AGRICULTURAL PUBLICATIONS, INC. ~#'BP~ SPECIAUZED AGRICULTURAL PUBLICATIONS. INC.: Dayton Mathck. President; Jarnes P. SwindelL Vice President. EDITORIAL, ACCOUNTING. ADVERTISING, PRODUCTION. ~nd CIRCULATION OFFICES SuiIe ~C,O. 3000 H~,hwoods .~.ou~w~r~, RzJmgh, I~ ~"~h Car~a 276~ US A. Phi: 919~.~ Te~ ~2-7~ SPED AG ~L C~e: ~SPECA~ TO~A~O REPOR~R ({5SN 03~1-5~93) ~s pu~sh~ mon~h~ ~ ~pec~ A~r~cu~tur~ Pub~c=t~ons. Inc., Su~:o ~, 3~00 H~hwo~ B~d., R~eigh. N C 27625. S~b~rip~n R=te~ In t~ Un~t~ Sta~ee ~n0 C~n~d~ year, US$~; m U S ~s.] Sm~e c~pt~s: US~ ~ in the Un~ Stoics ~nd C~n~da: US~ 50 in =~] oIher cou~trz~s Se~d c~ 2 TR--Mazch, 19~4 T1563052(
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We offer the best value for money in Flue Cured. Now you can get the same from us in Burley. Our personal touch makes all the difference. We supply the best Burley and FC grown in Brazil. And we export and trade in the largest volume of tobacco leaf, worldwide. If you require the best in Brazilian leaf, get in touch with the best partnership in the business. Souza Cruz Compc.nhia de C,:9:rras S¢:uz~ Cruz Pga. Pereira Oliveira, 16-1.° e 2? and. 88000 IrlorianSpolis, $C-Brazil Caixa Postal D-118 Telephone (0482) 22-5138 Telex (482) 291 _/~~ Trans. Continental Leaf Tobacco Corporation Aeulestrasse 38 P.O. Box 588 FL-9490 Vaduz, Fiirstentum Liechtenstein Telephone 61144 Telex 77 815/77 862 T156305266
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v/ EDITOR'S MEMO Anne Shelton Eliminate the program? ELI~,ilt4ATE THE TOBACCO PROGRAM? It's an idea that's never found popular support among the various segments of the U.S. tobacco industry. The consensus has been that such a move would devastate the entire industry, perhaps signaling its demise. Re- cent changes in the program have mainly changec] only the govern- ment's role in funding the program's operation, with little of sub- stance being done to restore long-term viability to the program itself. What would be the economic consequences of eliminating the pro- gram, with its price supports and production controls? A report recently prepared by ~vo economists at North Carolina State Univer- sity, Daniel A. Sumner and Julian M. Alston, examines that question and offers some very interesting conclusions, which we summarize for you here. Given four important factors, say the economists--that ownership of quota is concentrated in rural areas of the Southeast, that the potential for production expansion is great in many of these areas, that increased demand for U.S. tobacco would allow signifi- cant expansion if prices were reduced, and that tobacco is storable at a low cost relative to its value--the maior effects of deregulating tobacco production in the United States would be: • elimination of the capital value of quota and the resultant loss of about $800 million in annual income to quota and allotment owners; • an increase in output of 50 to 100 percent or more with resultant expansion in resources used in tobacco production and marketing; • a reduction of about 20 to 30 percent in the price of tobacco; • a substitution of domestic tobacco for most imported leaf (other than oriental types) used in U.S. cigarette manufacturing; • for U.S. cigarettes, a three percent drop in price, a one percent rise in domestic sales, a 10 percent increase in exports, and a small expansion in the quantity of tobacco used; • an increase of about 100 percent in the quantity of leaf exports; * a total increase of at least 50 to 100 percent in leaf demand; • an increase of 25 to 75 percent or more in the total revenue to the U.S. tobacco production industry; • some increase in price variability for tobacco relative to the 1950-1980 period, but no major problems of price or producer in- come variability, especially in relation to the recent period of regulatory instability; • a movement to and concentration of tobacco production in the least-cost regions (the counties which have high quota lease rates under the current policy); • a continuation of, but no major change in, the tendency for the size of tobacco farms and enterprises to expand; • a loss of up to three percent of total personal income in counties in which a high proportion of income is derived from quota, especially those from which tobacco production would migrate; • a gain in total agricultural and personal income in areas which would experience major expansion of tobacco production; • some changes in tobacco marketing procedures and institutions, but no increase of monopsony power by tobacco buyers; ~ the possibility of major costs of dislocation and disruption if price supports and production restrictions were eliminated suddenly, although if tobacco deregulation were to be implemented, such costs could he reduced by a clear, definite and gradual policy change. TobAcco g~OgT~g W~ publish a full examina~on of the SumnerlAlston study in next month's issue. 4 TR--March, 1984 T!56305267
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SUBSCRIBE NOW TO TOBACCO REPORTER THE INDUSTRY'S STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE FILL OUT THE CARD BELOW, CHECK OFF ALL APPROPRIATE ANSWERS AND MAIL TODAY! 'YES Please send me the next 12 issues of TOBACCO REPORTER. I have checked the price below that is ap. plicable for my preferred mail service. [~] U.S.A./CANADA $20 - Bill me later INTERNATIONAL []AIRINTERNATIONALMAIL [] SURFACE MAIL $55 - Payment enclosed $40 - Payment enclosed ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE IN U,S DOLLARS - ALLOW 4.6 WEEKS FOR PROCESSING NAME: COMPANY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE ZIP: COUNTRY: SIGNATURE: DATE: t- (FOLD HERE) PLEASE CHECK ONE OF THE FOLLOWING TITLES THAT IDENTIFIES YOUR AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY 10 ~ CEO, Chairman, Presi- 20 ~ General Manager 40 " Vice-President dent. Managing Director. 30 ! Manager, Director 50 " Secretary-Treasurer .! Other - Please Specify PLEASE CHECK YOUR PRIMARY JOB ACTIVITY 01 . ~' Marketing & Sales 04 " ] Production, Plant 02 :.'1 Leaf Purchasing Operations 03 'J Purchasing OtherThan 05 -; Research & Leaf Development • Other, Please Specify. 06 Finance 07 ;~ Engineering 08 Traffic 09 Communications, PR, Advertising PLEASE CHECK AND DESCRIBE FULLY YOUR COMPANY'S PRIMARY ACTIVITY Leaf Tobacco:. Tobacco Manufacturer: Tobacco Supplier.- T156305268
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(DETACH BUSINESS REPLY MAIL FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO, 1789 RALEIGH, POSTAGE WiLL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE TOBACCO REPORTER P.O. Box 95075 Raleigh, N.C. 27625 NO POSTAGE NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES III II III III III I IIIIIII IIII II SUBSCRIBING TO TOBACCO REPORTER BRINGS YOU THE WORLD TOBACCO NEWS ~FAST AND ACCURATELY EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR USE THE OTHER SIDE OF THIS CARD TO ORDER YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW! T!55"3052~
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OVERSEAS MEMO Mark Stone 1.0,000 lobs THE ECONOMIC SIGNIFICANCE OF NORTHERN IRELAND'S tobacco in- dustry is the subject of a new report just out, a report whose findings are particularly important in light of the critical Irish unemployment situation. The tobacco industry supports 10,000 full- and part-time johs in Northern Ireland, the report says, and plays a vital role in the economy of a part of the United Kingdom par- ticularly badly hit by unemployment. It also points out that the significance of tobacco in providing jobs is far greater in Northern Ireland than in the U.K. as a whole: In recent years, the tobacco in- dustry has provided 4.6 percent of all manufacturing jobs in the province compared with only 0.6 percent in all U.K. manufacturing employment. Further, based on 1981 figures, it shows that the tobac- co fraternity provides personal incomes of more than ~117.6 million a year before tax. Today, about one in seven jobs in the British tobacco industry is based in Ulster, with Gallaher as the largest employer in the private sector. Unemployment here is one in five. On a more local level, an even greater reliance on tobacco is seen. The report estimates that in the immediate vicinity of Ballymena, ten percent of the jobs are with Gallahers, and Carreras employs about five percent of the labor force in Carrickfergus. The report, prepared by two economists and a professor of econo- mics, also examines the chain linking manufacturing to the employ- ment of people associated with tobacco--suppliers, packaging com- panies, transportation and similar arms of the industry. It reveals the high dependence of Northern Ireland's industry on materials purchased from mainland suppliers. And it notes, too, that as a re- sult of jobs in the tobacco industry, the wages of workers supported significant purchases of locally-supplied goods and services. Adam Butler, Northern Ireland's minister of state, with respon- sibility for industry, commented: "The tobacco companies have deep roots in our community and have for many years provided a stable source of employment. [ value their presence in the province and especially welcome their continuing investment here which is a sign of their confidence in North Ireland and its work force." Dr. George Chambers, chairman of the confederation of British in- dustry (the employers' organization) in Northern Ireland added that the report showed the "importance of the industry in terms both of johs and its contribution to the economy and to exports--an impor- tance which had remained remarkable stable throughout the recession." And John Freeman, Irish secretary of the amalgamated transport and general workers' union, also had a good word to say of the in- dustry. He spoke of its involvement in creating opportunities for ad- vancement in the education spheres through comprehensive training for workers and the participation in university research and development projects. Northern Ireland is not too far from Glasgow in Scotland--as the crow flies. But what a world of difference exists! Contrast these comments just noted with the attitude of the elders of Glasgow who have launched their crusade to make Glasgow a non-smoking city by the year 2000. This plan has at least sparked off a vigorous cam- paign of resistance from the local tobacco industry employers and workers. May their efforts open the eyes of Glasgow's leaders to the economic importance of the tobacco industry before it's too late. TR~March, 1934 7 T!5~30527
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TOPLINE REPORT Warning labels Crops & markets Tobacco trade Product sales v/Sponsorships Corporate moves Bilingual {French/English} health warnings and tar and nicotine delivery figures are now required on all packs of foreign-made cigarettes which are imported and/or distributed in Canada by the member companies of the Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers' Coun- cil, according to a new agreement between the CTMC and the Cana- dian government. The change will be gradual, becoming widespread by mid-year. In addition, the bilingual health warning must also ap- pear on all cigarette billboards and on all cigars, cigarette carton wrappers, and pipe tobacco packages which are manufactured or im- ported by CTMC members. Serious crop damage from blue mold is reported in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico. Ridomil-resistant strains are suspected. Flue-cured crop production estimates from India indicate 1984 out- put will total only 72 percent of last year's level. Leaf production reached record levels in Moldavia, USSR, last year--ll percent above target, 26 percent above the previous year, and 17,000 tons above the 1984 target--indicating that total sales to the government could approach the ambitious'340,000-ton target. The state purchased a highest-ever 320,000 tons of the 1982 crop. The tobacco industry in the United States registered a 1983 trade surplus of $1.887 billion, the excess of tobacco leaf and products ex- port value over imports. This was accomplished in a year when the U.S. total trade balance showed a record deficit of $69.4 billion. The value of tobacco exports declined 6.8 percent to $2.648 billion, and the value of imports fell 11.4 percent to $761 million. Taxable removals of cigarettes, cigars and little cigars in the United States rose in November, compared with the same month in 1982. Taxable cigarette removals totaled 53.1 billion--up 7.1 percent, with the 11-month aggregate down 4.6 percent. Taxable cigar removals of 321.2 million were up 3.4 percent, but down 3.1 percent for the 11 months. Little cigar taxable removals of 124.5 million increased 3.4 percent for the month and 4.2 percent for the ll-month period. United States imports of clove cigarettes from Indonesia during the first 11 months of 1983 nearly tripled from the year before, to a total of 111.5 million units. R.j. Reynolds Tobacco International has undertaken a major launch of Camel Filters and Camel Mild in Japan, in large part, it has in- dicated, to test the openness of the Japanese market. The substantial newspaper and television advertising campaign will focus principally on the Tokyo market. The Canadian government has threatened to cut off $2 million in support of the Canadian Ski Association unless RJR-Macdonald drops its sponsorship of association activities. British American Tobacco is dosing its cigarette sales and distribu- tion operations in the United Kingdom. See page 12 for details. 8, TR--March, 1934 T!56305271
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For more information, ¢o .ntact R.G. Slaughter,~ Director- Intern~tiona~ Sales, Liggett Group lhc., InternationatTobacco Division, Durham, North Carolina .2~702, U.S.A. Phone: (919)683z9267,-Telex: 802845 Liggett Group Inc. is now offering Class 'A' cigarettes with a unique profit opportunity to select customers in the overseas market. Class 'A' originates from the successful, high- profit private label concept that has become the fastest growing cigarette c~tegory in America. Class 'A' cigarettes deliver the same high quality as name brands and are available in kings, 100'sj and 80mm box. So don't miss your profit opportunity that's ready for export - Class 'A'. Liggett Group Inc. The wortd~s leading producer of contract-manufacturing cigarettes. T156305272
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Focke ltinge Lid We don't ask whether you want to run standard or laminated blanks! We don't ask whether you want to run cellophane or poly- propylene and other ftlm qualities. We certainly make no difference whether you want to pack lO's, 12's, 14's, 20's or 25's! OUR COMPLEX HANDLES THEM ALL - OUR TRACK RECORD SHOWS IT! MER! Filter t :ILTER CI Marl KENT T156305273
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ii Packer Complex Federal Republic of Germany TeleX: 24201 fopac d e ~ ~ I~OCKE & CO berl Divisiom of Focke & Co Verden-Oermany FOPAC Enterprises (1978) Ltd. 1470, Graham Bell Boucher~ille (Montreal) Qtl.~be¢ Cartada J 4B 6H5 Tel. B~uch.: (514) 641-1850 Tel. Mont.: (.514)522-5541 Telex: 055-61634 fopae ent intl. Foeke & Co. Inc. 20 Industrial Avenue E O. Box 546 Upper Saddle River, N.J. 07458 U.S.A. Tel: (201) 825 8440 Tx: 0642 380 rodi¢onlne upsr. T15630527z
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INTERNATIONAL NEWS B.A.T abandons plan to capture major U.K. market B.A.T Industries PLC has abandon- ed its five-year effort to capture a major share of the British cigarette market. Sales of three major brands will be turned over to an indepen- dent distributor, while the fate of four other brands is undetermined, according to the company. Sales.of B.A.T's three meier brands--State Express 555 Filter Kings, du Maurier and Ardath-- will be handled by an independent distributor. The contract is under negotiation, but the company said the accord should make sales of these brands profitable. The future of low tar and nicotine Express 555 brands, and Kim and Kent are uncertain, B,A.T hopes that the elimination of direct sales and distribution of cigarettes in Britain ~vill be beneficial to its wholly owned sub- sidiary, B.A.T (U.K. & Export) Ltd. British sales account for one-fourth of the subsidiary's annual produc- tion of 24 billion cigarettes. But the unit has posted Io,sses of more than us$75 million since 1978. B.A.T has managed to capture only six percent of the U.K. cig- arette market, despite massive ad- vertising campaigns, putting the company fourth behind Imperial Tobacco, Gallaher Ltd. and Roth- mane International. Closing the sales operations will eliminate 850 jobs, primarily from two manufacturing plants in Liver- pool and Southampton. B.A.T also announced it is reduc- ing its production workforce by 990 employees, with 665 job losses over the next 14 months. High taxation and competitive price wars were blamed for the company's decision. "These changes are being made with great reluctance," says B.A.T. "We have invested heavily in the U.K. for more than five years,.. [and] have lost more than $75 million in the venture. We could not see a time when we could begin to get any significant return on our invest- ment with our present structure." AWARDS: Distinguished Achievement in Tobacco Science Nominations for the 1984 Philip Morris Inc. Award for Distinguish- ed Achievement in Tobacco Science must be received by May 1, I984. Each year Philip Morris recognizes an outstanding young scientist with an award for his research activities in tobacco science. The Award, consisting of a medallion and a cash award of $2,0130, will be presented at the Tobacco Chemists' Research Con- ference next October in Atlanta, Georgia. The Award is given for an outstanding early career in either basic or applied tobacco science which may include one or more of the following: • scientific achievement in the development of fundamental knowledge related to the growth, harvesting, or curing of tobacco; • scientific achievement in the development of fundamental knowledge concerning the proper- ties and qualities of tobacco or to- bacco products; • scientific achievement in the development of methods for the evaluation of the properties of tobacco or tobacco products. To be eligible for the current Award, nominees must be working in research or development, residing in the United States, and be less than 45 years of age as of March 1,19114. Anyone acquainted with a qualified individual is in- vited to submit a nomination for the Award. Nominations shall be on the prescribed form obtainable from and submitted to the chair- man of the Editorial Board of Tobacco Science: Dr. W.H. Johnson, Editorial Board, Tobacco Science, P.O. Box 7625 N.C. State Universi- ty, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7625. 12 TR--March, 1934 Nominations for the 1984 Award must be in the office of the chair- man by May 1,1084, The recipient of the Award will be selected by a special Awards Committee elected hy the Editorial Board of Tobacco Science. BRAZIL: Cigarette makers battle in low-priced segment New inexpensive cigarette brands have the become the weapons of manufacturers as they battle for ad- ditional market shares, according to an article in Advertising Age. Smokers in Brazil have traded down almost to the bottom of the ll-tier price structure {A through K, with K being the most expensive). The current battle is in the C category--third from the bottom at 29 US cents a pack--which now has a 21 percent share of the market, compared with one percent a year o ago. The latest marketing strategy has two new C brands in test market. B.A.T introduced Montreal last September, apparenty to counter- act ReynoId's Monaco brand. Although the C brands are too marginally profitable to justify ad spending beyond minimal radio and outdoor use, they are being pushed in a fierce give-away war to wholesalers and retailers. As recently as one year ago, cigarette sales were evenly split be- tween the H through K upper end and the A through G cheaper brands. Now, cheaper brands ac- count for 59 percent of the market. The very cheapest brands (A, B and C) increased their market share from 6.5 percent to 26 percent in a year. Cigarette manufacturers are con- cerned that the government- controlled 50 percent price in- crease for all brands, previously pricedbetween 25 US cents and 63 US cents per pack, will accelerate the downtrading trend and will top last year's two to three percent drop in over-all sales, says the article. Belmont, B.A.T's newest C category brand, achieved 15 per- cent of Brazil's 130 billion cigarette T156305275
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INTERNATIONAL NEWS market in seven months after its in- troduction last April. R.J. Reynolds introduced it new cheaper brand, Mustang, just prior to Belmont's launch. It has become Reynolds's best-selling brand with a five per- cent market share. Both Belmont and Mustang were introduced in the B category (27 US cents), but were moved up to C because the companies weren't making any money, one executive told Ad Age. CANADA: Former OFCTGMB chairman named to export agency A new agricultural export agency, Canagrex, has been established in Canada. Ted Raytrowsky, former chairman of the Ontario Flue- Cured Tobacco Growers' Mar- keting Board, has been appointed a director of the agency. Edwin Story, a former vice presi- dent of RJR-Macdonald Inc. in charge of leaf operations at Tfllson- burg, will serve as president and chief executive officer of the agen- cy. Canagrex has 11 directors, six farm organization representatives, one processor and three federal civil servants. The agency has a $75 million up- per limit on loans it can advance an- nually, but a roll-ever clause could increase this, if loans are repaid during the year, according to Raytrowsky. In addition, the agen- cy has a three year budget of $12.3 million for administration. One of Canagrex's first efforts will be to establish a dialogue with Canadian agricultural enterprises to inform them what the agency has to offer in export assistance, ex- plained Raytrowsky. "I hope Canagrex is able to achieve all the things that will be demanded of it," says Raytrowsky. "It will be quite a task, but I am pleased to be appointed to its board of directors. I hope I am able to For Your Total Burley Requirements Guatemala Talk with us. ~hh're Cas~ E.xlmrt-- Guatemahn farmers, aided by our agmnom~ts. ~e hon~t pr[da ~ grow- ~g fine Bu~ GASA ~PORT, UMITSD APARTA~ POSTAL No. 21~ GUATEMA~ Cl~, GUA~MA~ CENT~L AMER;CA PHONE 3240~ eerK~ey Cone, vic~ President Hugh Tmsth~m, R~d D~r~t~r 14 TR--March, 1934 serve the industry, not only from the standpoint of tobacco, but all agricutural commodities." Imasco Ltd. concludes food division sale Imasco Ltd. of Montreal has finaliz- ed an agreement to sell its food divi- sion to Culinar Inc., also of Mon- treal. The sale price was $85 mil- lion. Food industry analysts say Im- asco Foods Ltd. represents less than five percent of Imasco's total assets. Market rumors continue that Im- asco is looking for another major acquisition in Canada or the U.S. Among the possibilities mentioned are Woodward Stores Ltd. of Van- couver, Cara Operations Ltd. of Toronto, or a drugstore chain. Culinar is a leading Quebec Com- pany, that operates through two divisions, bakery and confectionery and restaurants. Major share- holders are the Quebec Govern- ment and the Desjardins Caisse Populaire movement of Quebec" City. EUROPEAN COMMUNITY: Export subsidies set for 1983 baled tobacco The export subsidies for the 1983 crop of baled tobacco have been set in the European Community Com- mission Regulation Number 24184. The export refunds vary from 0.34 to 0.72 European Community Units (ECUs) per kilogram, depending on the variety and country of destina- tion. At the current exchange rates, us$1 equals 1.222 ECUs. The sub- sidies will apply until December 31, 1984. EEC takes formal action protesting U.S. tariffs The European Economic Com- munity (EEC) and its member states have taken formal action, called '°Demarch,'" notifying the U.S., through GATT, of their opposition to U.S. Custom's reclassification of certain tobaccos from "semi- manufactured leaf" (TSUS 170.80) tO "stemmed cigarette leaf" (TSUS 170.35}. The reclassification be- came effective August 28, 1983. ~ T156305277
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The expertise of the Baumgartner filter s reflected ~lex ments- is you~ assurance for superior filters L~ilored to exacting needs. Baumg~rtner Papiers SA P.O. Box CHAO01 Crissi~r- T156305280
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INTERNATIONAL NEWS The U.S. was given two options by the EEC: either rescind the re- classification or compensate with a tariff reduction on another com- modity. Otherwise, the EEC will bring the case to formal court pro- ceedings for a resolution. If this should happen, the Special Trade Representative's office (STR) says it would defend on the grounds that when GATT was formalized in 1949, machine-threshed leaf did not exist. Tariffs on machine-threshed leaf were raised from 17.5 US cents per pound to 32 US cents per pound. However, the tariff is now 29 US cents, under Tokyo Round staged reductions. Current agreements drop TSUS 170.35 to 20 US cents per pound on January 1, 1987. The goal is to accelerate this reduction GET THE DART HEAD START. We specialize in steamship service to and from Europe, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and the Far East. Nobody knows tobacco better. Our bottleneck-busting savvy and experience assure your cargo the smoothest sailing from your door to your customer's. That means you've got a head start crossing the Atlantic or the Pacific. So you can count on delivery of your shipment -- with the right paperwork -- safe, sound and on-time. Dart and tobacco are the perfect blend. SEAPAC SERVICES, INC. Five World Trade Center. New York. NY 10048 212-432-9050 18 TR--March, 1934 to January 1, 1986. The STR did not support the reclassification decision because of the large U.S. tobacco trade surplus, the continuing discussions on the movement towards har- monized commodity description, and commitments made by the U.S. in the Tokyo Round which bound these tariff classifications under the GATT. The Office argued that such a change would invite EEC retalia- tion. Now, however, the STR is re- quired to defend the decision. Meanwhile, the Foreign Agri- cultural Service has reported that the EEC may eliminate export sub- sidies to third countries for EEC grown oriental tobacco. During the first 11months of 1983, the U.S. im- ported 173 million pounds of orien- tal leaf worth $275.6 million. INDONESIA: Smuggling persists despite law enforcement Illegal entry of cigarettes into In- donesia from Borneo continues, despite strict enforcement of anti- smuggling laws by Indonesian police authorities. A report from of- ficial sources in Jakarta showed that about us$120,000 worth of smuggled cigarettes were con- fiscated by police in 1983. Most of the cigarettes come from Sabah on Borneo Island, but the original source is Hong Kong. The cigarettes--American and British brands--are either sold locally or re-smuggled into the Philippines via the small islands in the Sulu Ar- chipelago, which is close to Borneo. KOREA: Monopoly completes burley and Virginia buying program The purchasing of Virginia and hurley leaf by the Korean Monopo- ly has been completed, vcith final figures totaling 64.7 million kilo- grams of flue-cured and 36 million kilograms of hurley. Both flue-cured and burley have proved to be of above-average quali- ty in comparison to recent years, according to one buyer. The Monopoly has maintained T1563052E
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ers'toth~ ~ince the 1960s your business has been wrapped up in ours. With six manufacturing facilities in the United States, Canada and Europe, we provide the expertise, technical support and available film supply you need to realize packaging economies. Mobil produces two types of high quality, cost effective OPP films especially for tobacco applica- tions. For years, cigarette manufacturers around the world have chosen 370 AB-5 for the wide sealing range and excellent surface properties provided by our acrylic coating. Our newest introduction, 83 OP560C offers the outstanding Each o~ these films provides easy ma.chinability and unsurpassed performance efficiencies (with minimum conversion time and expense) even on less modern packaging equipment. The choice is yours. Bicor 370 AB-5 or 83 OP560C. Wrapping it up for you everywhere in the world. For further information, contact Mobil Chemical Films Division or Mobil Chemical International, Ltd: 1150 Pittsford-Victor Road, Pittsford, NY 14534; 7161248-8320; Telex 510-253-1360. ~B~cor is a registered trademark of Mobil Oil Corporation. M bil T15~305282
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INTERNATIONAL NEWS the 1983 export prices for green flue-cured, and only increased hurley export prices by three per- cent over last year. The total quan- tity allocated for export is 50,000 tons green of flue-cured and hurley. Exporters have purchased slightly more than 45 million kilograms. MALAWI: Tobacco auctions close to lower sales volume The 1983 tobacco auctions ended November 24 with sales totaling 72,243 tons valued at 119.8 million kwachas. This compares to a sales total of 58,520,~{T valued at 133.8 million kwachas in 1982. Flue-cured sales in 1983 were 21,123MT valued at 40.4 million kwachas for an average price of 1.91 kwachas (us$1.60) per kilo- gram. For 1982, flue-cured tobacco sales were 22,103MT at an average price of 2.13 kwachas (us$2.38) per kilogram. Total hurley sales were 36,307MT with an average price per kilogram of 1.30 kwachas (us$1.15). In 1982, 27,602MT of hurley were sold with an average price of 2.16 kwachas (us$2.41) per kilogram. During 1983, 13,014MT of hurley were sold under a government support pro- gram at an average price of 1.64 kwachas (us$1.45) per kilogram. Non-supported hurley sales totaled 23,293MT with an average price of 1.11 kwachas (us$0.98) per kilogram. Fire-cured sales were 8,384MT at an average price of 2.79 Kwachas (us$2.46) per kilogram. In 1982, flue-cured sales totaled 7,125MT at an average price of 3.31 kwachas (us$3.70) per kilogram. During the Indo-Soviet trade talks, India asked the Soviet Union to take large quantities of leaf during 1984, according to Indian Commerce Minstry officials. TRA NSPOR TA TION: Farrell Lines expands service to Egypt Farrell Lines has expanded its ser- vice into the Egyptian market with a regularly scheduled, on-time 17- day transit from the U.S. East Coast to Alexandria. "With 40 percent of U.S. exports now going to the developing na- tions, including Egypt, the less developed countries are the fastest growing market in the world, and provide outstanding opportunities for exporters," said Richard V. Parks, president of Farrell Lines. The line's U.S. flag container- ships, which sail fortnightly to the Mediterranean, connect with direct weekly Ro/Ro service from Naples to Alexandria. "Farrell Lines' regularly schedul- ed Egyptian service will save ship- pers time and money by avoiding the congestion at Alexandria incur- As exporters, we can supply virtually anything American--agricultural equip- ment, supplies, fertilizers or chemicals --to the overseas buyer. But even bet- ter, we'll provide the service and tech- nical assistance to make absolutely sure that whatever you buy works.. ,,Aja, d works properly. V~ 11 make sure that equipment from different manufa .ct3trers match, your,people are completely trained and you re com- pletely satisfied. Our consultants are also available for planning and feasi- bility studies. Contact Gene Akins or Red Barnes at 1185 Pineridge Road, ~Norfolk, VA 23502. Tele- phone (804) 855-0191, ~Telex 828-385-call back Dominican NFK. 20 TR--March, 1984 T156305283
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D ] $ C © V E R Y Nearly five centuries ago, while exploring the Americas, Columbus observed natives inhaling the smoke of an herb out of hollow bowled sticks. This "discoveD'" of tobacco and the custom of smoking later proved more productive to the Spanish crown than that of ,~ the gold mines of the Indies. Five generations ago, in 1909. G.F. Vaughan started a tobacco company that would provide the finest quality and service to their worldwide customers. More than 70 years later, you mo can "discover" this dedication to excellence. T156305284
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INTERNATIONAL NEWS red by conventional vessels. The Re/Re vessels move in and out of the port in just one day, without the need for container cranes," added Parks. "In addition, the Re/Re vessels are capable of carrying most types of oversize cargo, and 20- and 40-foot containers." As a U.S. flag carrier, Farre|l Lines offers a direct bill of lading from the U.S. East Coast to Egypt, and meets all shipper requirements, according to Parks. UNITED KINGDOM: Carreras Rothmans closes manufacturing facility Carreres Roihmans has announced that it will close its Basildon, Essex, cigarette manufacturing facility in April. Approximately 1,200 jobs will be eliminated with closing of the plant. The announcement close- ly followed a retail price increase on all Carreras Rothman cigarette brands. Basildon has a daily capacity of 60 million pieces, but recently pro- duction has been down to 28 million. The company blames the slump on both declining domestic consumption and exports. Con- sumption in the U.K. has fallen about 18 percent since 1981 as taxes have risen by 17 pence. Carreras Rothmans exports about 50 percent of its production, but is experienc- ing difficulties in some overseas markets where imports are being banned. Carreras Rothmans will continue to produce cigarettes in its three other plants--one in Northern Ireland and two in northeast England--which together employ 2,500 production workers. //UNITED STATES: Smokeless cigarette to be marketed next year A smokeless cigarette that uses tobacco in a liquid form has been developed by Advance Tobacco Products Inc., based in San An- tonio, Texas. The new brand, Favor. looks and feels like a regular cigarette, but allows users to inhale nicotine vapor instead of smoke. The pre]iminary prospectus describes the cigarette as a tube of cellulose acetate wrapped with cigarette paper and topped with brown cork tipping. The tube is fill- ed with liquid tobacco blended with the same flavor inhancers used in cigarettes. As air is drawn through the tube, the liquid turns into a col- orless, odorless vapor with a cigarette-like taste. Because there is no smoke, Favor has no tar or carbon monoxide. Of- ficials believe that Favor could be consumed in smoking-restricted areas and could be advertised on television, since the product does not fit federal definitions of a cigarette as a "roll of tobacco." A pack of Favor will contain six cigarettes to be sold at price com- petitive with that of a 20-pack of regular cigarettes. Each pack of six Favor cigarettes will have a nicotine delivery intended to satisfy the average smoker of conventional cigarettes for an entire day, accor- ding to the company. Favor will be available in regular, menthol and light versions. The smokeless cigarette will not be promoted as an anti-smoking product designed to help smokers quit. Its makers believe it will be us- ed by smokers "who wish to reduce their health concerns or who wish to enjoy nicotine in restricted smok- ing environments or when others may be offended by conventional cigarette smoke and odor." Advanced Tobacco plans to begin marketing Favor in Texas next year and to expand its sales throughout the U.S. and into selected foreign countries. It has budgeted $4.5 million to cover initial advertising, mostly by television. The company plans to finance the manufacturing and marketing of Favor by selling its stock publicly. Edmund G. Vimond Jr., vice chair- man, chief marketing officer and a director, was previously chief ex- ecutive officer of R.I. Reynolds Tobacco International from 1980 to 1982. Other principals in the corn- pan)' include Gerald R. Mazur, chairman and chief executive of- ricer, and }'. Philip Ray, president and chief operating officer. 22 TR~March. 1984 T1563052
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v~Nicotine gum available as smoking deterrent The U.S. Food and Drug Ad- ministration (FDA) has cleared the way for physicians to prescribe a smoking-deterrent chewing gum. Merrell Dew Pharmaceutical Com- pany has received exclusive American distributorship of the first nicotine-based smoking deter- rent to be approved by the FDA. Unlike other anti-smoking aids, ~vhich rely on active ingredients other than nicotine, Nicorette gum contains two milligrams of nicotine, similar to the amount drawn from a cigarette. The buff- colored gum is designed to provide "a short-term alternative source of nicotine" for those who are trying to quit smoking, said the FDA. The gum is used to ease nicotine crav- ing, thus allowing the user to focus attention on changing behavioral patterns to break the smoking habit. The intended short-term use of Nicorette poses a smaller health risk than cigarette smoking, accor- ding to an agency spokesman. The gum is expected to be most effective in treating the smoker whose habit is more strongly tied to chemical dependency than to social and ritual factors. The fact that it is available only by.prescription binds the intended link between product use and a physician-supervised behavior modification program. Chewed too rapidly, the gum can cause light-headedness and nausea. Headaches and heart palpitations are also possible side effects. Some users also reported that it tastes like soap and may stick to teeth. Merrell Dew, which obtained U.S. distribution rights from the gum's developer, AB Leo in Swe- den, intends to have supplies in U.S. pharmacies by the middle of this month. Abox of 96 pieces sells for about $20, and smokers are ad- vised to chew 10 pieces a day at first, tapering off as the no-smoking program continues. Nicorette "isn't a great tasting" gum, officials from Dew acknow- ledge, instead it has a "spicy, pep- pery taste" that is intended to resemble the taste of a cigarette. Makers of other smoking-de terrent products are not very con- Ne vs from ANH It's worth a tcsfi We at A_NH are specializing in tobacco flavors and casings and we offer you full insider-sere'ice and cooperation on a strictly confidentiai basis. Why not send us samples of your tobacct)~, and tct us try to upgrade the quality of your "suffering" brands? There is no charge nor obligation fo(3"our part! \Vc don't advertise %vender flavors", but we can assist you in modifications of tobacco blends as well as "tailoring" the most suitable cusiug and top flavor formulations. Please contact our R& I) I)ct)artmcnt and let us start working for you right away - see address below. TR--March. 1934 23
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In the ood old a man co tomor rogvs being ,jtgt l[ike his yes Back then.for the people in d~c to, ,acc:~ g, ~unt on their markets growing.Comueti: business, time seemed to move more slt, ,Ix trom other countries was~ft so tough~nt,. Those who came before us could ~: w'i~vs rates weren't so unpredictabte. TI56305287
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dc cnd his L O1"~ We're experts in the world's marketplaces. Each year, we*fred and process th.e .type and g Y . g • ~_.._ J__ ___l_ B u t t~ed ~ ~,~Vr~r~adcOefs fade ofleaf ou need,'~vherever ~t ,s town [[~il[~l,VSochange.T " " t, So while it may be difficult to depend on -'-- 7 - a turlSulent marketplace. . anything from one'day to another, thbse who iorl. Evenso, you can still de end on Monk to relyonqualitytobaccosata]~ ~" l P . ~. ~ ~,~ ~h~ c~oi~e tob~co~ ~o~,~ ~nd~ ~qu,~, ~ pr~ ~" ~.," o,~ Mon~-lVlOI-iK a d ahvays at a competitive price. A.c Monk £- Comfan);Fanmqllt:.\i, rrh Gm, lina.['.S.4. T156305288
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INTERNATIONAL N;=WS cen~nue~ cerned that the costly prescript/on gum will create a signicant dent in their trade. The market for products designed to help smokers quit is estimated at $30 million. USDA eliminates four-leaf program for flue-cured The U.S. Department of Agri- culture has eliminated the program that permitted growers to plant more flue-cured tobacco than their acreage allotment if they did not harvest the four bottom leaves of each stalk of tobacco. The program, which went into ef- fect in 1978, permitted farmers to plant up to 120 percent of their allotments, and remain eligible for price support, if they agreed not to harvest the bottom leaves. Later, the amount was reduced to 110 per- tobacco ,trag.!.ng traOltlOn efficient of Hamburg CALL US IN NEW YORK (212)514-8220 OR WRITE TO: Mike Kutney, Port of Hamburg, 26 Broadway, Suite 911, New York, N.Y. 1C004 Tel: 212;514-S22D. TWX o~;g504. 26 TR--M~rch, 1984 cent. The four-leaf program was designed to minimize the build-up of hard-to-sell bottom stalk tobacco in loan stock inventories, according to a USDA spokesman. Beginning with 1980, however, price support loans were made unavailable for certain lower-stalk grades, and the amounts of this tobacco going under loan was reduced sharply, making the four-leaf program un- necessary. Burley quota reduced by maximum allowed by law The basic marketing quota for the :t984 burley crop will be 583 million pounds, a reduction of the max- imum 10 percent allowed by law from the 646 million pound basic quota for 1983. The announcement was made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. After adjustment for over- and under-marketing, the effective quota will be 708 million pounds. Because of carry-over of massive o 1983 under-marketings, this effec- tive total is far higher than the com- parable 1983 figure of 641 million pounds. Manufacturers cut staff and shorten workwe.ek R.J, Reynolds Tobacco Company has eliminated 422 temporary em- ployees from its manufacturing and shipping operations. The company also operated a four-day workweek for two weeks in mid-February. Declining cigarette demand led to the dismissal of the temporary " employees, a company spokesman said, while a normal first-quarter slowdown was responsible for the shortened workweek. A shortened workweek this time of the year is typical in the cigarette industry in order to stabilize inventory during the seasonal sales downturn. Lorillard also began a four-day workweek at its plants in Greens- boro, North Carolina and Danville, Virginia. The shorter week was ex- pected to continue until the end of February. Philip Morris U.S.A. furloughed 4.6 percent of the workforce at its Richmond. Virginia, facility last November. Layoff notices were T!56305289
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Tobacco's Message Is Free Choice Ycu, as a consumer ~ t~;E~co prc.~u~b, occupy an iml;~rtan! p~silion in pramoting t~ba~cVs message. Your v~ce will ~elp keep the industry alive. Despite the effor~ by vaaous groups in many countries to intimidate smo~e~ and make them feel guil~ for their habit, the tobacco indust~ is still su~ivin~ In order to insure that tobacco, as an indust~, maintain its position in the future, it is impo~ant that all involved .... product manufacturers, sales companies, suppliers, equipment manufacturers and growers as well as smokers themselves, do their pa~ in promoting tobacco's message of free choice. W.A. Adams is doing its pa~ to offset the widespread campaign to treat smoking as a crime instead of a custom, and brings you the following promotional offer with the hope that you and your company will welcome W.A. ADAMS COMPANY, INC. the oppo~uni~ to spread P.O, Box 159 * Phone 919/69~7111 tobacco's message and secure O~ord, North ~rolina 27~65 its future. Protesso~ an4 ~po~ ~ Fine tea~ Tobacco Sinte 1885 Samples Dispatched by ~/~ble Ad~ms~o TELEX 519483 Items ranging from coffee mu~,s and decals to T-shirts for giveaway or promotion and all bearin~ the copyrighted sen,~icemark of "'My Pleasure My Choice". are available in bulk from the North Carolina tobacco Growers ~so:iation, a non-proflt organization, All money from sa~es g~es to the association WA. Adams sfmp~ brings b, ou the message Fer a free ¢atalo,~l =~nd pri~e lis! write: FREE CHOICE P.O. Bo~ 19848 Raleigh, NC 27019 T15~3052~0
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INTERNATIONAL NEWS cantm~ed given to 591 of the 12,896 hourly tobacco-production employees, ef- fective on November 12. The action was caused by the decline in unit sales of cigarettes at- tributable to the effect of the strong U.S. dollar on the company's ex- ports, most of which are produced in Richmond, and to the doubling of the federal excise tax on ci- Vgarettes. Advertising series explains industry's point of view A series of advertisements dealing with a variety of public issues about smoking has been launched by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. The ads, which discuss Reynold's point of view on such subjects as passive smoking, youth smoking, smoking courtesy, and smoking and health, are appearing in various national newspapers and news magazines. "We recognize thai some of the messages will be controversi- al,"said E.A. Horrigan Jr., chair- man of the board. "But we believe that by not speaking out more fre- quently over the years, we have led people to helieve we have nothing to say, and that is not the case." Reynolds initially wanted the en- life tobacco industry to sponsor the advertising series, but the six domestic companies could not agree on the approach for the cam- paign. The companies have work- ed together before, through The Tobacco Institute, to buy ads urg- ing smoking courtesy instead of legislation to restrict smoking in public places. Reynold's decided to mount the campaign as "another dimension" of the Institute's ads. The first ad that appeared asked the question: "Can we have an open debate about smoking?" It de- scribes the debate among scientists concerning the health risks of to- bacco use. "We believe that reasonable peo- ple who examine all the evidence concerning smoking and disease would agree this is an open scien- tific controversy, not a closed case," adds Horrigan. USSR: Leaf imports and cigarette output expected to rise Imports of unmanufactured tobac- co into the Soviet Union continue to rise. The latest estimate ['or 1983 is 135,000 ~netric tons. compared to 124,122 ~tTin 1982. and 104,735~T in 1981. The forecast for 1984 is projected at 140,000MT. India and Bulgaria are the maior suppliers, and in 1982 they provided 38 per- cent and 32 percent, respectively, of total tobacco imports. Other sup- pliers were Greece, North Korea, Turkey and Yugoslavia. The Soviet Union also continues to import large amounts of cigaret- tes although quantities have declin- ed since the peak reached in 1981. Bulgaria supplies about three- Max Schlatterer Endless tapes GmbH & Co. KG for cigarette and filter P. O, Box 1265 production D-7922 Herbrechtingen Tel, (07324)2045-47 Telex 714 834 - W.-Germany T15fi305291
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I INTERNATIONAL NEWS fourths of the total cigarette im- po~ts. In 1982, total imports of 66.5 billion pieces were 10 percent below 1981. A further decline to 60 billion pieces is estimated for 1983. Cigarette output in 1983 is likely to exceed the target of 373 billion pieces with the current estimate at 380 billion. Cigarette production for 1984 is projected at 385 billion pieces. Revised estimates for 1982 and 1981 are 359 billion and 365 billion, respectively. YUGOSLA VIA: Production increases with shift to light leaf The Yugoslav Association of the Tobacco Industry estimates 1983 leaf production at 80,000 metric tons from 66,000 hectares-- compared to 7S,000MT from 62,000 hectares in 1982. This increase in 1983 is due to a larger planted area as average yields fell from 1,26MT per hectare in 1982 to 1.21MT per hectare. Favorable weather saved the crop from further yield losses, as the weather turned hot and dry during July and August. Virus diseases were also reported to be a problem in some regions last summer. Production by tobacco type in 1983 was: oriental, 38,000MT; semi- oriental, 11,000MT; Virginia, 22,000MT; hurley, 9,000MT; total, 80,000MT, Last October, the government an- nounced a 1984 average tobacco leaf price of 177.82 dinars per kilogram, up 31 prcent over the 1983 average selling price. Holy- ever, the actual producer selling prices for the 1984 crop were not announced at that time. Prices for 1984 crop were set higher to en- courage greater production, and to help offset soaring production costs. The forecast for 1984 area is 70,000 hectares, producing a pro- jected 83,000~T. The steady shift towards Virginia leaf is expected to continue, both because of the grow- ing Yugoslav preference for this type of leaf, and also because of the high labor input cost required for oriental varieties. ZIMBABWE: Cooperative weather gets crop off to a good start The 1984 tobacco crop has had one of the best starts of any crop for many years, and it appears that the target of 110 million kilograms will be reached. Last year's crop total- ed 94.3 million kilograms. Most growing areas had early rains followed by hot, dry weather, and then more rain, resulting in good root structure. Distribution of rainfall has been far more optimal this year than last, and a favorable range of qualities is expected. Loss from disease has been minimal to date. Budworm has ap- peared in some areas, but growers are reportedly taking action. Frutarom Good news for U.S. customers A TOLL FREE FLAVOR HOTUNE 800-621-4117 FOOD MATERIALS CORPORATION, a leading custom flavor house and the exclusive distributor of HERTZ & SELCK FLAVORS provides you with the most economical and sophisticated ,~ FRUTAROM CONCENTRATES for Cigarettes, Cigars, Chewing Tobacco, Snuff + Band Tobacco Made in Germany Delivery from U.S. stocks - No import problems You'll want samples, so dial ;N FOOD MATERIALS CORPORATION 2711, W. irving Park Road Chicago, II. 60618 800-621-4117 Your partners in Brand Main- tenance with over 100 years of combined flavor experience HERTZ 8. SELCK EUROPEAN FRUTAROM CORPORATION TR--March, 1984 29 T15~305292
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East AZARBAYJAN CASPIAN SEA ZANJAN SEMNAN YAZD FLUE-CURED VIRGINIA .:.::~;~;~ BURLEY .:.:-:'::::::~ ORIENTAL KHORASAN TAMBAK Afghanistan .:....~, Pakistan :~'.i: KERMAN '%~ SISTAN & Kuwait ,~ • ".":.:,... -"'" BALUCHESTAN Saudi Arabia OMAN SEA An exclusive report Iran: cigarettes in short supply By Mumtaz Ahmad TR correspondent Efforts to increase out- put are beginning to show results, but the black market continues to thrive on the great imbalance between supply and demand. THE ISLAMIC Republic of Iran is an arid and semi- arid country with a geographic location that gives it cold winters and hot sum- mers. Precipitation occurs mostly in winter. In the Caspian regions precipitation varies from 400 to 2000 mm at places. However, in other parts of the country pre- cipitation is generally less than 400 mm per year, thus irrigation is re- quired for most crops outside of the Caspian regions. Iran can roughly be divided into four regions: the mountains, the desert plateau, the coastal lowlands and the Khuzestan Plains. The core of [ran lies on a high central plateau between the Elburz Mountains in the north, the Zagcos mountains of the south and west, and the lowlands adjacent to the Afghan- istan and Pakistan frontier in the east. Most of this plateau is dry and barren dominated by the Great Salt and Great Sand deserts though there are several large and fertile basins. According to 3.976 census Iran had a population of 33.59 million people. Current estimates, based on projected population growth rate, put the present population figure at 39.60 million people in an area of 1.624 million square kilometers, giving a population density of a little over 24 per square kilometer. The nation is divided into 23 administrative regions called pro- v~nces in addition to the metro- politan area of Tehran (see map). 30 TR--March, 1984 Tl55305293
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1 The Iranian Tobacco Company has embarked on a plan to achieve sell-sufficiency in cigarettes during the next five years. It has recently increased its daily output to 60 million pieces. Shown here are an ITC leaf sorting and grading establishment and an ITC redrying factory. Tehran has an indigenous popula- tion of 5 million which has now swelled to 7.5 million with war displaced persons. Thus Tehran alone has 18 percent of the total population of Iran. Rural popula- tion living in 50,000 villages of an average size of 300 persons ac- counts for about 38 percent of the total. CULTIVATED LAND in Iran re- presents only about five per- cent of the total land area. About 45 percent (3.5 million hectares] of this crop land is irrigated and about 15 percent is in the high rainfall areas of the Caspian region. The re- maining 40 percent area is under dryland farming. Agriculture employs about 00 percent of the labor force and contributes about 30 percent to the national GDP. Irrigation sources are natural springs and streams, man-made an- cient under ground irrigatiou system called "qauats" and modern irrigation system based on dams on the River Dez, on River Karaj and on Safid Rud. Principal crops are wheat, barley, rice, cotton, vege- tables and fruits. Tobacco is comparatively a minor crop in Iran and production in recent years has fluctuated bet- ween 15,000 to 20,000 tons in- cluding all types belonging to both rust/ca and tob,~cum species. Tobac- co types produced are flue-cured Virginia, hurley, oriental and tam- bak (rustica tobaeeo). Flue-cured and hurley are produced in Guilan, T156305294
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Mazandaran, Eastern and Western provinces of Azarbay]an and parts of Khuzestan. Oriental tobacco is grown in Eastern and Western Azarbayian, Kurdestan and Kar- manshahan. Tambak, the famous "Ishhani" type rustica tobacco used in water- pipes, is grown mainly in the pro- vinces of Isfahan and Fats though some quantities are, also, produc- ed in Khorasan, Kerman and Hor- mozgan. BEFORE THE REVOLUTION in 1979, Iran imported large quantities of oriental, hurley and Virginia leaf for her burgeoning cigarette in- dustry. The large cigarette factory near Tehran was capable of produc- ing 50 million cigarettes a day on single shift. In 1975, for example, 15.5 billion cigarettes--including 64 million Winston made under license--were manufactured. Dur- ing that time, filter cigarettes ac- counted for 50 percent of the total. By November 1983, filter cigarette output had risen to 80 percent of the total cigarettes marketed in lran. Based on a population of 33 million in 1975, per capita produc- tion of domestic cigarettes was 464 per annum. Added to this in- digenous production were about 3.7 billion imported cigarettes, making a per capita availability of Three of Iran's filter tipped brands--Zar, Shiraz and Huma--are show at left. Below are the brands Azadi and Bahman which are manufactured in Europe for Iranian Tobacco Company. 582 cigarettes for the year. Assum- ing a three percent annual gro~h rate until 1979, an assessment of cigarette consumption just before the revolution comes to 636 cigaret- tes per annum. Iranian Tobacco Company, a monopoly called "Dukhaniyate Iran," has a large cigarette factory at Qazvin near Tehran. After the revolution, the ITC factory was run- ning at one shift through September 1983. Since October 1983 ithas in- creased operation to two shifts and makes 60 million cigarettes a day, producing six brands--four filter tipped and two straight--of cigarettes. ITC also imports and markets two local brands produced abroad to meet the taste of former Winston smokers: Azadi, a brand of American type blend, is made in Bulgaria; Bahman is reportedly made in West Germany and im- ported through a Swiss company. Making machines formerly used for local production of Winston are currently used for producing a brand called Shiraz. Iran Cigarette Prices Brand Stylefpacking Local Shiraz Filter 20s Zar Filter 20s Zarfn filter 20s Huma Filter lOs Ushno Plain los Huma Plain los Imported B~hman Filter 20s .~.adi Filter 20s Official Open market price' price' 50 100 40 80 50 100 30 60 20 50 2O 50 85 300 70 250 CIGARETTES REMAIN in short supply in Iranian market and sell at prices 100 to 300 percent higher in the open market than their official retail prices. Foreign made cigarettes, English or U.S., are either not available or, if available, sell at six to eight times their normal price. In spite of these recent local pro- duction increases, the cigarette shortage continues in the Iranian market, perhaps as much as 2 to 2.5 billion pieces per annum. There ap- pears no other recourse for Iranian Tobacco Company but to import cigarettes if the shortages and black marketing are to be abated. Mean- while, ITC has embarked on a plan to achieve self sufficiency in cig- arettes during the next five years.~ 34 TR--March. 19~4 T15630529]
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I! The supply you demand. 209 Broad Street/P.O. Box 1027/Oxford, N.C. 275651(919) 693-2683/Telex: 802525 Trading OXNC T158305298
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Previews The ue Technology on ..:: Holland's chill April winds~i=J Netherlands Congress Centr~i.~ll be with the attractions of new techn0Io warm with the fellowship which accomt gathering of the international tobacco industr~[?i:~ The occasion is the 4th World Tobacco Exhit~ifiti~ and Symposium to be held next month in Th~ Hagtie: On the following pages, TOBACCO REPORTER a preview of what you can see and hear at this 1984 edition of what has become a quadrennial industry. Included in our preview: The programand schedule for the three-day symposium (pages 38-39}~ a listing of exhibitors (pages 39-40}, and detailed:- descriptions of many of the machinery, products and services which will be on display (pages 44-62}: Tl56305299
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IN EUROPE/IN THE U.S.A. Alleghany Warehouse... The Leader Alleghany Warehouse continues to strengthen its posit~o~ as the toad|rig storage and distribution centre lot leaf tobaccos in Western Europa. LARGE With the addition of Alleghany's third warehouse on the quay at Vlissingen--Oost will have neady 45,OOOM2 available to handla any size and shape of hogsheads, cases, cartons, bags or bales. MODERN AND SAFE Your tobaccos are stored with care. Our modern sprinkler systems meet aU NFPA and FOC standards and alfords lower insurance rates. New heating and humidity conbols make aluminum phosphide fumigation available year around EFFICIENT Our unique location makes =t posszbIe to receive tobaccos directly into the warehouse No roland transportation is necessary. We c~n handle oceangoing vessels (breakbulk or container) lighter, r~,tl or truck Off quay sh=pments can be arranged by truck, rail or lighter. FAST As the leading storage and distribution centre in Western Europe, Alleghany guarantees prompt deliveries throughout tt~e continent, the United Kingdom, ~reland and other destinatloz~s. I1__ For more information on Alleghany Warehouse please contact one of our offices listed below. IN THE UNITED STATES -- ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE COMPA[W. P.O. Box 24597, Richmond, VA. 23224, U.S.A. PHONE; OFFICE 6~4;231-523~ CABLE: E~LUEEOLISE RICFIMOt,ID (TELEX. ~2.7341~ WA~E~-:QLISE: IN EUROPE -- ALLEGHAt'~Y WAREHOUSE EUROPE BV VLISSI,~GEN 0OST -- tIEDERLAt~D P.O. BoX 1020 43BBZG -- 00st Souburg P~O.~E: It I84) 6753~) ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE R0"I-IERDAM BRAI~,ICH P.O. 80X 2516 3000 ZM -- ~th~rlands PFIO~E: (tO~ t3 57 7~ ALLEGHANY WAR Tt5~3053~C
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Previews The Ha.gue • ~i..~:i.!'!Sunday, April 15, 19B4 ~" ~:,:++:.~2:00 Official opening of the Exhibition ~ ~ ~&0:00-18:00 Registration for Symposium .i:" • ~,:~_2..0:30~.~ Cocktail Reception • i~l~.I~ ;~.~-0~]8:~0 Registration ten, hues TOWARDS SELF~UFFICIENCY IN LEAF TOBACCO? 09:30-11:15 ~ Introduc~on by ~e Chairman, Mr. A.L. van Beek :~ ;~ ]~: ~ The facts on leaf produc~on and ]~" .~ .... impo~ant trends: " .~:~:~, -- EEC incentives to use Communi~-grown leaf -- ~e imbalance between what the EEC grows and what it needs ~ What is being done to remedy the imbalance and to bring ~e quali~ of EEC-grown tobaccos up to internation~ standards? 11:15-11:45 Coffee Break 11:45-13:00 [] The Iberian peninsula as a new inside-the-EEC leaf source. [] Insiders and outsiders (~insiders' being countries in the EEC and overseas associates)--What can the outsiders do to preserve traditional trade? 13:00-14:45 14:45-16:30 19:00-20:30 Luncheon [] Are quality defects in European bright tobaccos remediable? [] What is the future of EEC tobacco price support? Cocktai! Reception Tuesday, April 17, 1984 09:00.18:00 DAY 2: 09:30-10:30 10:30.11:00 11:00-12:45 12:45-14:30 14:30-17:00 19:00 Registration continues THE MANAGEMENT OF CIGARETTE SMOKING PERFOPu~ANCE [] Introduction by the Chairman, Mr. John E. Cole [] The challenge from legislation: world trends. [] The challenge from consumers"~ how marketing men interpret smokers' needs and design trends that satisfy those needs. [] How processing can help: selectivity in .making and using reconstituted tobacco sheet. Coffee break [] Primary processing: the role of sophisticated enhancement techniques, including tobacco expansion systems. [] Primary processing: the achieve- ment of economy and product consistency through advanced engineering techniques. Lunch [] The contribution of filter technology, present and future, including possibilities for on-line measurement and control. [] Cigarette papers and tipping materials, current and under development. [] How today's thinking may impact upon tomorrow's cigarette-making processes. Cockta/l Heception and Gala Evening 38 TR--,~arch, 1934 T158305301
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Wednesday, 09:00-09:30 DAY 3: 09:30-11:00 11:00-11:20 11:20-12:30 12:30 13:15-14:40 14:40 April 18, 1984 Registration continues THE DUTY-FREE HIGHWAY INTO INTERNATIONAL TRADE [] Introduction by the Chairman, Mr. Vivian F, Raven [] Definition of duty-free trade in tobacco product terms. [] A case history of winning fame in duty-free trade as a preliminary to broader international trade. [] Who is the duty-free trader and how does he buy? [] What considerations affect stock selection? The practical limitations of product range. Co~ee break [] Duty-free structures: Can the supplier make a profit? [] Customer profiles of duty-free shop customers, with thoughts on buyer psychology in duty-free buying situations. [] The future of duty-free trade in the EEC and beyond. [] Achieving high visibility in and through the duty-free trade. Departure by bus to Schiphol Airport Lunch at Schiphol, followed by a short talk explaining what the tour will demonstrate. [] A guided tour of the substantial and imaginative duty-free shopping facilities at Schiphol Airport--a living illustration of the doctrine covered in the morning session. Return to The Hague by coach in late afternoon. AccuRay Corporation Alleghany Warehouse AMF Legg Anacon (Instruments} Ltd. Arjay Equipment Corporation A.S.P. Enterprises van Beek International BV, A.L. Bell Flavors & Fragrances Bericol-National S.A. BCP British Cellophane Limited Burley & Dark Leaf Tobacco Export Assn. Cardwell Machinery Co. (UK} Ltd. Casalee Chambon Comas s.r.L Compania Comercial Greco Uruguaya Convertec International Craggs, Vernon H. Cubatabaco Dannemann Decoufle S.A.R.L, Degesch GmbH. Delft-National Chemie B.V. Delft-National Chemie GmbH. Dexter, C.H. Dickinson Engineering Limited Ecusta Paper & Film Group [Olin] Edwards, Marden Eurofill BV Verpakkingsindustrie Fabreeka Products Company Feurstein Ges.m.b.H, Dr. Franz Filtrona Instruments & Automation Finnbaand Fishburne International Fletcher, Robert Focke & Co. Gandy Belting G.D SpA. Gerlach, Eduard Gooding Group Ltd., A.J. Hambro Machinery Ltd. Hauni-Werke Koerber & Co. KG Hauser Endlosband Heinen GmbH Maschinenfabrik Hellmering, Kohne & Co. TR--March, 1~- 39 T158305302
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Hercules Hogfeldt & Co., AB ICI Infrared Engineering International Tobacco Machinery Japan Tobacco & Salt Public Corporation JOB, Societe Kaymich & Co. Limited, C.B. Knight Brothers Koerber Group Kopp Vakuum K-Tron Corporation K-Tron International Inc. K-Tron Soder AG Maschinenfabrik K-Tron Soder S.A.R.L. Leder & Co. Ling Systems Limited Lippoel Leaf BV Lloyd, Nathaniel LNI Electronics S.A. LTR Le Tabac Reconstitue Mallet S.A. Mauritius Tobacco Board Metalised Films & Papers Miquel y Costas & Miquel Mobil Plastics Europe Moisture Systems Molins Machine Company Montedison Group Moplefan SpA Naarden International National Adhesives & Resins Ltd. National Starch and Chemical National Tobacco Board of Greece Network Consolidated Container Agencies Niepmann, Maschinenfabrik Ft. GmbH O.C.M.C. Olin Ecusta Onlar Ontario Tobacco Growers Marketing Board Papeteries Braunstein Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH PMB Patent Machinebouw Payne Engineering, John Payne Packaging Philip Morris International Pollyflame Internat/onal B.V. Proctor & Schwartz Inc. Pyramid Installations Systems Quester Maschinenfabrik, Wilh. Queutelot, Eta, SA Rentsch AG Rizla Limited SASIB SpA Scandura Limited Schiff & Stern Schlatterer, Max Schmermund, Alfred, Maschinenfabrik GmbH Schoeller & Hoesch GmbH Sea-Land Services, Inc. Senzani Brevetti Sluts Cigar Machinery B.V. Sodim Softal Electronics GmbH Souza Cruz, Companhia de Cigarros Standard Commercial Tobacco Company Steinbrecher Corporation Tabak Export & Import Compagnie Tabak Journal International Tabaknatie Tamag Basel Tann Ltda. Tann-Papier GmbH Tann-Paper Ltd. TDC Technical Development Corporation Tillburgsee Tingey Tobacco International TOBACCO REPORTER Tobaccos de Filipinas, Cia. General de Tobacco Associates Trans-Continental Leaf Tobacco Corp. Union Cooperative Planteurs Tabac de France Veco Vernhaut & Van Sluyters Vosacec Wattenspapier Wiessner GmbH Winkler Wolff Walsrode AG 40 TR--March, 1E3¢ T!58305303
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YOUR TICKET IS WAITING! THERE ARE TWO SEPARATE TOBACCO REPORTER STILL HAS PLANS: RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE FOR • PLAN A - Conference plus airfare, THE HAGUE CONFERENCE AND hotel accommodations, daily American breakfasts, ground transportation, taxes, TOUR OF WEST GERMANY gratuities and more. CALL 919/872-5040 • PLAN B- All of PLAN Aplus7 days AND ASK ABOUT OUR COMPLETE guided tour of Germany including a cruise up the Rhine, Munich, Heidelberg, two TOUR PACKAGE festival dinners, full American breakfasts, hotel accommodations, roundtdp airfare, taxes, gratuities and a whole lot more. RoundtHp airfare tram Atlanta; d~pa~ture Saturday April 14. All rooms are doub~ occupancy w~th s!ng~e.~ available =t a h.~h,r r~te. T!56305305
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A cut a:bove KTC 80, Hauni's advanced cutter design for automated tobacco processing, sets new standards in noise reduction, controls etc.: [] Output up to 8000 kg/h. Less sensitive to varied blends due to redesigned compacting section. [] Rigid machine construction and consistent sound absorption. Noise emission below 82 dB (A). • Reduced operating costs. Easy maintenance and improved service life of wear parts (e.g. knives, grinding wheels). [],Programmable microprocessor offering individual control modes and complete integration into any primary process. Features which make the new KTC 80 a cut above oil other cutters! Hau ni TI5~0530~
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Prewews The Hague Arjay Equi~pment Corporation 401 North Main Street PO Box 2959 _Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27102 U.S.A. A Subsidiary of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Stand C-10 Arjay Equipment will feature photos, printed material and video tapes of its G-13 and G-13C tobacco expan- sion processes. Arjay offers the G-13 process under license agreement, including plant design, equipment purchase and installation, training and startup. Representing Arjay will be: J.E. Ingram M.L. Hartman I' A.S.P. Enterprises 8065 N.W. 54th Street Miami, Florida 33166 U.S.A. Central American office: PO Box 18 Esteli, Nicaragua Stand N*9 A.S.P. Enterprises, Inc., is one of the largest growers and dealers of shade grown tobacco in Central America and the Caribbean, supplying the tobacco needs of many cigar manufacturers, with principal markets in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Germany, the Canary Islands, Belgium and Venezuela. On display will be the various types of tobacco in which the company specializes--shade grown natural, Candela and Cuban seed wrappers, long Cuban seed fillers, natural leaf binders, all types of cigar tobacco and ASP premium hand-made cigars. In attendance will be: Alfredo Perez, Vice president Anacon (Instruments) Ltd. St. Peters Road Maidenhead, Berks SL6 7QA England A subsidiary of the Anacon division of High Voltage Engineering Corporation Burlington, Massachusetts U.S,A. Stand C-8 Anacon has been a major supplier to the tobacco in- dustry worldwide for over ten years, providing a reliable and cost effective method of moisture determination. Most recently, Anacon has announced the Micromoist, a microprocessor controlled on-line moisture analyzer with remote diagnostics, re-calibration and check-out facilities. Anacon will be represented by: Christoper Townsend, Export sales manager Laura Stopps, Sales engineer 44 TR--March, 1984 AccuRay Corporation 650 Ackerman Road PO Box 02248 Columbus, Ohio 43202 U.S.A. Manufacturing: Finnabar Industrial Park Dundalk, County Louth Republic of Ireland United Kingdom office: AccuRay House Coronation Road High Wycombe HP12 3TA England Stand C-30 AccuRay is a high-technology company specializing in automation systems for quality control, process con- trol, and information commur~ications in secondary cigarette manufacturing operations. On display will be graphic representation of Ac- cuRay's 7000 MICRO family of systems designed to control processes and product quality for cigarette makers and packers, and which can also be applied to filter plug makers and combiners, packers and other secondary manufacturing equipment. The company will also introduce several of its latest hardware and software developments for the tobacco industry, including a new technology approach to cost- effectively extend monitoring capabilities to a broader range of secondary manufacturing operations; improv- ed detection of visible cigarette quality defects through enhancements made to its automated, on-line inspec- tion devices; new and enhanced products for informa- tion storage and display; and several other new pro- ducts and application programs which will be an- nounced. AccuRay also plans to introduce some newly developed techniques for using the information current- ly available from installed 7000 MICRO systems to solve quality and productivity problems. AccuRay personnel in attendance will be: John DeWitt, Senior vice president John Fleckenstein, Division manager--Americas Paul Barker, Division manager--International F.So Bryant, Senior account manager Dwight Hart, Technical director Richard Bunting, Product manager P.J. Lynch, Director of operations--Asia/Pacific Colin Bunting, Marketing manager--International T!56305307
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A.L. van Beek (International) B.V. Eendrachtsweg 71 3012 LG Rotterdam Netherlands Stand C-24 A.L van Beek will feature the Group's leaf tobacco ac- tivities throughout the world, embracing a broad diver- sity of leaf buying, processing, packing and exporting faci}ities in North and South America, Africa and Asia, handling virtually all types of leaf tobacco that enter into world commerce. In attendance will be: F.G. Kenber, President Arie Maan, Director Wilfried Storck, Director Willem M. Vet, Director Fred H. van Beek, Manager G.R. Sterken, Manager Jan A. Unger, Manager •.. as well as other representatives of the affiliated and associated subsidiaries: Albeek Santo Domingo C.porA. (Dominican Republic) Albetraco International Pte. Ltd. (Singapore) Balkan Handelsgeseltschaft GmbH (West Germany) A.L van Beek Italia A.L van Beek (Malawi) Ltd. A.L. van Beek (Zimbabwe)(Pvt) Ltd. Van BeekJVitastalis S.A. (Greece) Comercial Overbeck Ltda. (Brazil) Cosmos Tobacco Company (Pvt) Ltd. Exportadora Catharinense de Fumos Ltda. (Brazil) Felemenk Turk Tutun A.S. (Turkey) Hofor Tobacco Corporation (U.S.A.) N.V. Hollandsch Turksche Tabak Mij. P.T. Indonesia Indah Tobacco Corp. Ltd. Stancom Tobacco Packers (Malawi) Ltd. Tabacos del Caribe (Colombia) Ltd. Tobacco Packers Export Co. (Pvt) Ltd. (Zimbabwe) Tobacco Packers (Pvt) Ltd. (Zimbabwe) Tobacco Suppliers Company (Malawi) Ltd. Tobacco Suppliers (Zambia) Ltd. Bell Flavors & Fragrances, I.nc~ Fries & Bro. Division ~ • 500 Academy Drive Northbrook, Illinois 60062 U.S.A. Stand 49 -- On display will be the Fries Resinoids made from orien- tal, burley and Virginia tobaccos; the Fries Rum Ether and Rum Congenerics type products; Fries casings, natural extracts, flavor additives, fruits and fixatives which all impart brand distinction to all types of tobac- co products. Representing the company will be: Edward N. Heinz E.N. "Reb" Heinz Jerry Stehnach Chambon 6, Rue Auguste-Rodin B.P. 6329 45063 Orleans Cedex g France CHAMBON Stand N-34 Chambon will have available information about its range of packaging materials--hinge lid, soft packs, slides and shells, outer cartons, foil overwraps, tax banderolls, and interleaved cigarette papers. Representing Chambon will be: Mr. F. Gay, Chambon France Mr. Radwanski, Chambon Ltd. London Burley & Dark. Leaf Tobacco Export Association / Tobacco Associates. 1101 17th Street NW, Suite 912 Washington, D.C. 20036 U.S.A. Stand G-12 The Burley & Dark Leaf Tobacco Association and Tobacco Associates are non-profit farmer-financed organizations representing the interests of the U.S. tobacco farmers. Their purpose is to promote, develop and expand the export and domestic markets for hurley and dark leaf tobacco and flue-cured tobacco. The exhibit, co-sponsored by the two groups, will show leaf tobaccos in their final stage of curing in the barn. Also on display will be samples of the final pro- duct and printed materials giving additional information on the marketing system. Representatives will be: Frank B. Snodgrass, Vice president--B&DLEA Kirk Wayne, President--TA Ronald L. Whitehead, Vice president--TA Casalee Belgium N.V. ~ Jan van Rijswijcklaan 76 B-2018 Antwerp, Belgium Stand G-10 The Casalee stand at the WT Exhibition will be an ex- tension of the Casalee Belgium office, offering on the spot full leaf service. Samples will be available to pro- spective customers. Full representation of the Casalee Belgium office will be headed by John A. Bredenkamp, President. TI56305309
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Comas s.r.I Via Cendon, 1 31057 Silea (Treviso) Italy Stand C-4 Comas will introduce its system for the regulation and control of primary process variables by means of high- technology microprocessor-based equipment sup- ported by CRT-color display, printer, and up-and-down loading of software via floppy-disk units especially designed to ensure the correct standard deviations and tailor-made to primary specific requirements. Using photographic panels, slides and video tapes at its stand, Comas will also illustrate its whole range of machines and equipment. Of particular interest are the tobacco processing plants; including a new elec- tronic grader, threshers, redryem and presses; the cut stems expansion plant; and the reconstituted tobacco line. Comas will be represented by: Giuseppe Zanini, Vice president Cesare Martin, Sales manager Tore Astrand, Manager of Swiss office Compania Comercial Greco Uruguaya Misiones 1481 Montevideo, Uruguay Stand F-1 CCGU is an independent tobacco-producing company which cultivates more than 600 hectares of flue-cured tobacco at present on its two plantations. The company also has complete processing facilities, offering redried tobacco in loose leaf, bundled or threshed form. Samples of its tobacco will be on display. In attendance will be: Nicolas Konialidis Gregorio Pantazoglu Luis Perez Hornus Gillermo McClew Eduardo Albanell Cados Acle Philtip Georgeogiou Convertec International Ltd. Tonypandy Mid Gfamorgan CF40 2LA United Kingdom A member of the A.J. Gooding Group Ltd. Licensor to Twinpac Inc. (Ontario, Canada) Stand N-6 Convertec will exhibit examples of its wide range of vacuum metallized materials specifically developed for tobacco and cigarette packaging. Samples will demonstrate the use of standard vacuum metallized papers in both hinged lid and soft cup packs and for use as overwrap papers for 200's, with special em- phasis on their promotional and point of sale benefits. In addition, there will be information available on the use of metallized papers as cigar box liners and of metallized films in tobacco packaging. Of principal interest will be the first public showing of Convertec's vacuum metalized boards specifically developed for the cigarette industry. These boards may be employed as both carton board and innerframe assemblies. In attendance will be: D.A. Leonard, Managing director--Convertec W. Llewellyn, Sales manager--Convertec S. Coulson, Marketing manager--Twinpac Compania General de Tabacos de Filipinas S.A. Aptado 18 Ramblas 109, Prl Barcelona 2, Spain Stand N-50 Compania General de Tabacos de Filipinas will display samples of its handmade cigars. The company maintains a complex of leaf growing, buying centers, warehouses and manufacturing facilities around the world. It currently has offices in Brazil, Colombia, Paraguay, Dominican Republic, In- donesia, and the Philippines to handle leaf buying, grading and export. It also has a number of factories for the production of cigars and cigarettes, one of which is La Flor de la Isabela, which has been making and selling ciga.rs around the world for more than 100 years. Attending will be: Manuel Meier Urchaga, President & Chairman of the Board Julio C. Moran Menendez, Assistant General Manager Julio Cesar Martinezde Abolafio, Assistant manager of the cigar factory Manuel Alegre Tejadas, Cigar department--Barcelona TI5630531
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Delft-National Chemie B.V. PO Box 13 7200 AA Zutphen Netherlands Delft-National Chemie GmbH Posffach 1240 672 Speyer/Rhein Deutschland National Adhesives & Resins Ltd. Galvin Road Slough, Berks SL1 4DF England BericoI-National S.A. PO Box 248 69658 Villefranche SISaone, France Stand N-52 These four subsidiaries of National Starch & Chemical Corporation in Bridgewater, Connecticut, USA, will of- fer complete information on their adhesives products. N otional W.H. Dickinson Engineering Limited Moorside Road Winchester Hampshire SO23 7SS England Stand C-28 Founded in 1969, W.H. Dickinson Engineering designs and manufactures leaf and primary processing equip- ment for the tobacco industry worldwide. Among the range of machinery available are case handling equip- ment; continuous conditioning equipment for com. pressed lamina; casing and conditioning cylinders for all applications; band, vibratory and pneumatic convey- ing systems; flow control systems; cutter feed systems; stems conditioning and shredding plants; dryers for cut stem and lamina, incorporating the latest enhancement techniques; bulking and blending silos; box filling equipment; and complete control systems offering all levels of present technology. During the Exhibition, special emphasis will be plac- ed on the ITM dryer, drying in high humidity steam, shredding, cutter feed systems, and general product enhancement techniques. Representing Dickinson will be: E.J. Allen, Managing director N.J. Ctuett, Sales director DICKINSON Ecusta Paper & Film Group A Division of Otin corporation PO Box 200 Pisgah Forest, North Carotina 28768 U.S.A. Stand C-14 Ecusta will illustrate its full range of tobacco-related papers, including cigarette papers, tipping papers and plug wrap. Representing Ecusta will be: Michael Kirby, Director of International Sales R.P. Weslake, Regional manager--South Africa & Mid- dle East William Alverson, Regional manager--Latin & South America Max Layton, Regional manager--Western Europe Tom Toering, Regional manager--Far East E.E. Stewart, Technical services manager J.W. Townsend, Director of sales John R. Thompson, Tobacco products manager Peter Adams, Marketing communications manager Eurofill BV Verpakkingsindustrie Grote Tocht 99 I I 1507 CE Zaandam I I Netherlands Stand C-27 Eurofill Aerosols will feature its wide range of gas lighters and aerosol refills which are available for pro- motional activities. Shown here is Eurofill's new factory in Zaandam. In attendance will be: Jan Aupers, Sales director Ti5630531:
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YOU S :P EAK WITH AUTHiO RITY, Our port managers thrive on Bill and his crews didn't challenges.Whenyou call miss abeat.Thirteen days they listen hard and act fast. later they had the area ship- Just recently,Wilmington shape.And anew container got operator shipping through B~ll Edwards and Bob Goia~ N C Ports mar~gr~ a callfmm oneofthe world's latest container operators. "We'd li,,k~ to ship through your port,' their traffic man- ager said,'"out we'll need a five and a half acre area paved and fenced','he h,e, sitat- ed,"within two weeks'. Wilmington. Meanwhile, Morehead City manager Bob Coins had a challenge of his own. ATurkish tobacco company traffic manager wanted to increase his Morehead shipments. "But we'll need 100,000 more square feet of storage space and an all- wea, t,,h, er rail loading fadlity And', he added,"we need it fast1' Theygot it fast.Bob and port engineers qtfickly combined four sheds over the all-weather fadlity, more storage space and more Turkish tobacco business. At the North Carolina Ports, g,o~d. ~ customer ser- vice isn t just talk. We know that if we can't deliver, you'll find someone else who can. And giving you what you ask for is very good for busi- ness. Yours and ours. So if you're not speaking with as much authority as you'd like, call Bill at 919/762-8307 or Bob at 919/726-3158 or call toll- free at 800/334-0682. Just saythebossiscalling. ~o~h - North Carolh,a State Ports Authon'ty, P. O Bar 9002 Wilmington, N C 28402 and RO Drauer 822 Morehead Ci~ N C 2855Z Offices: Wilmb~gton, Morehead Cil'~ Raleigh, Winston-Salem, New York Tok)v. TI56305314
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Fabreeka Products Company, Inc. PC Box F 1190 Adams Street Boston, Massachusetts 02124 U.S.A. Fabreeka-Canada Limited 3279 Lenworth Drive Mississauga, Ontario L4X 2G9 Canada Fabreeka Products Company Chasetown Industrial Estate The Ring Road off Cannock Road Chase Terrace WS7 8JS Staffordshire, England Fabreeka b.v. Grotendorst 18 Postbus 50 1720 AB Broek op Langedijk FA EEKA Stand 1'6 Fabreeka will exhibit samples of its conveyor belting which is manufactured specifically for the tobacco pro- cessor. Featured will be specialty conveyor belts in- cluding Ribbed Asendor, Chevron Asendor, Cleated, and others for use on Silos and Selvage Edges. Attending for Fabreeka will be: Frank B. Summers Jr., Vice president C. Stanley Bell, Manager--U.K. Jan W.H. van Hoogerwou, Manager--Holland Ronald T. Mason, Canada Andre Kruger, Holland Hauni-Werke Koerber & Co. KG Kampchaussee 8-30 D-2050 Hamburg 80 West Germany A. Heinen GmbH Maschinenfabrik PC Box 1320 D-2030 Varel 1 West Germany LNI Electronics SoA. PC Box 250 CH-1211, Geneva 16 Switzerland Decoufle S.A.R.L. 6, Bd. Jourdan F-75014 Paris France Stand G-2 These four members of the Koerber Group will have a joint display featuring information about their range of machinery: tobacco processing, cigarette and ~ter rod making, electronic control systems, complete tobacco factories and processing plants, and other Filtrona Instruments and Denbigh Road, Bletchley Milton Keynes MKI IDH England Stand G-8 The trend of quality assurance instrumentation towards increased application of microprocassors--as describ- ed in TOBACCO REPORTER's January 1984 issue-- will be strongly highlighted at Filtrona's stand. Out in front will be the new family of automatic test stations, first seen in Richmond last September and now com- prehensively re-engineered and enhanced. Filtrona's latest design strategy permits various combinations of weight, circumference, ventilation, pressure drop and hardness measurements, with or without indexed col- lection of rods. Show for the first time will be Filtrona's new |ully automatic paper permeability meter (PPM 300). This console-mounted instrument also reflects the current use of programmability and computing power to offer users the widest ever choice of protocols on the widest ever range of paper types and sizes. Other exhibits will be a low-cost computerized weight classifier and the recently introduced reel-to-reel non- destructive tipping paper monitor. Among Filtrona's representatives will be: Nick Lanigan, Managing director Keith Holland, Technical director Chris Thompson, Marketing manager Dennis AIIman, Senior technical engineer AB Hbgfeldt & Co. Master Samuelsgatan 9 S-111 44 Stockholm Sweden AB Hogfeldt will exhibit its new APS mechanical tipp- ing perforator BLP 85 500, a new heavy-duty model featuring stronger frames, electrically operated grinding equipment, sophisticated web control and other options. Representing Hogfeldt will be: Hans Brodin, Sales director special equipment for the tobacco industry. Fred Bignall, Technical director 52 TR--March, 1984 Ti56305315
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Hellmerin.g, Kohne & Co. Am Wall 196 2800 Bremen 1 West Germany Stand F-6 On display will be information about products and ser- vices available from this company of leaf tobacco mer- chants, packers and exporters. Hellmering, Kohne are founders and partners of the Bremer Tabakboerse and the Deutsch-lndonesische Tabak-Handelsgesellschaft. Representatives will be: Walter Koehne, Partner Wotfgang Koehne, Partner H. Heitmann, Director F. Engelsman, Director H.G. Vassmer, Assistant director I'nfrared Engineering Limited 40/42 High Street Maldon, Essex CM9 7PN England Associated with: Infrared Engineering Inc. (U.S.A.) Infrared Engineering SARL (France) Infrared Engineering KK (Japan) Stand F-7 Available will be full information about the company's range of infrared based moisture measuring in- struments for primary production, including its latest on-line instrument, the MM44. In addition, the company offers a microprocessor based display and control package, the DS4/T, which is used to monitor and con- trol operation of dryers, belts and humidifiers. in attendance from Infrared will be: M.D. Nolan, Managing director P.H. Hindle, Director M. Allen, European sales coordinator K-Tron Soder AG Maschinenfabrik CH-5702 Niederlenz Switzerland Associated with: K-Tron Corporation (U.S.A.) KoTron International Inc. (U.S.A.) K-Tron Scaler S.A.R.L. (France) Stand 65 K-Tron Soder will show the latest design of its weigh belt feeder, type WF-600, suitable for tobacco feeding. The new model is equipped with the digital mass transducer DMT-ED 60, a weighing element which determines weight by means of mass comparison. Also being shown is a model of the company's loss-in-weight feeders, featuring the latest self-adaptive microprocessor-controller. Representing K-Tron will be: W. Luescher, General manager R. Lanz, Regional sales manager U. Wiedenbeck, Regional sales manager C.B. Kaymich & Co. Limited Leigh Street Sheffield $9 2PR England Stand N-17 On display will be a complete range of Kaymich - adhesive application equipment, including the new model GF3 gravity feed hot melt unit for porous wrap filter plug making and the latest Mark 11 gravity feed cigarette side seam nozzle gluing system for high speed making machines. Kaymich personnel in attendance will be: G.B. Bedford, M~naging director P.D. Leverick, Technical director P.D. Raddon, Director--Eurotechnik TR--March, 1984 53 TI56305316
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Societe JOB 83 Btd. Exeimans 1'A1~ 75781 Paris Cedex 16 ~ France Papeteries Braunstein B.P. 43 74201 Thonon-les-Bsins France Stand N-51 Societe JOB and its affiliate, Papeteries Braunstein, will display information about a wide range of high quality paper products for the cigarette industry, including cigarette papei', tipping paper, plugwrap, acetate filter rods, paper filter rods, soft pack wrapping paper, and papers in booklet form for the roll-your-own market. Representing JOB will be: Claude Papet, Commercial manager Michel Laurence, Export manager Michael Braddock, Area sales manager Jean-Marie Nerou, Head of laboratory--paper division Francois Coq, Head of laboratory--filters division Uppoel Leaf B,V, O.Z. Voorgurgwal 266 1012 GL Amsterdam Netherlands Stand N-1 Established in 1981, Lippoel Leaf supplies both bright and dark leaf tobaccos to the cigarette and cigar in- dustry around the world. Visitors to the stand will meet the company's team of leaf experts and be able to discuss the companies activities in various parts of the world. Lippoel's associated companies are: Lippoel Leaf Italy, s.r.I. (Italy) Lippoel Leaf America, Inc. (U.S.A.) Lippoel Africa (Pvt.) Ltd. (Zimbabwe) P.T. Pandu Sata Utama (Indonesia) Ling Systems Limited Uttle End Road Eaton Socon, St. Neots Huntingdon, Cambs PE19 3JH England Stand C.44 Featured will be a new product from Ling Systems-- STOR, Standard Tower On-line Reservoir. STOR has been developed to protect and maintain production flow on high-speed cigarette packaging lines by providing on-line high density accumulating storage between dif- ferent types of machinery. Representing the company will be: H.E. van de Stadt, Managing director G. van Hattem, Director R.C. Resink, Leaf manager for bright tobaccos J.P.M. Otto, Leaf manager for dark tobaccos Nathaniei Lloyd & Co. Ltd. Bridge Street ~ Horwich, Bolton Lancashire BL6 7BT England Stand N-33 Featured on the stand will be the company's range of tear tapes for cigarette and cigar manufacturers worldwide. Of special interest are the three new addi- tions to the Nathaniel Lloyd "Sefer" family of tear tapes: a pre-coated tape which features a novel coating pat- tern de=~g.ned to minimize bleed-out; a co-extruded OPP tape which gives gre~ter yield and does not suf- fer from UV browning as does the coated OPP after- native; and an 11mm wide tape suitable for promotions. brand launches and special offers. 54 TRmMa~h, 1984 Miquel y Costas & Miquel, S.A. Tuset, 10 ~1~ Apartado Postal 629 Barcelona 6, Spain Stand F-10 Visitors and customers to the stand will be able to ob- tain information about the company's recent developments in its range of cigarette papers, plugwrap and tipping papers; its progress in process control and future possibilities; and the state of the art in electroper- foration of ventilated tipping papers. Miguel y Costas personnel present will be: Alberto Gabarro, Commercial director Cristina Miquel, Director cigarette paper division Me|ct',or Sit,tee, Director technical services Cyr Perez, Area mar~ager Luis de la Aides, Area manager TI5630531;
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Previews The Haque ,, Moplefan SpA A Subsidiary of Montepo~imeri--Montedison Group Via T. Taramelli, 26 20124 Milan, italy Associated with: Montedison SpA (Milan) Montedison Austria GmbH (Vienna) Montedison Belgio SA (Brussels) Montedison France SA (Paris) Montedison Deutschland GmbH (Frankfurt) Eschborn BEI (Frankfurt) Montedison U.K. Ltd. (London) Montedison Nederland N.V. (Rotterdam) Montedison Hispania S.A. (Barcelona) Montedison Skandinavien A/S (Goteborg) Montedison Suisse S.A. (Basel) Montedison U.S.A. (New York) Stand C-6 Moplefan will display its coated OFBS and OLS coex- truded OCS polypropylene films manufactured special- ly for cigarette wrapping and multi-packing. Personnel in attendance will= be: Jan van den Bos, Export manager F. Mattioli, Technical depart.ment G. Maroni, Marketing department Naarden International N.V. 28 Huizerstraatweg ~F~ 1411 GP Naarden Netherlands Stand N-42 On display will be highlights of the company's range of flavorings for the tobacco industry. Representing Naarden wilt be: Wiebe Mutder, Product group manager--tobacco Henk W.M. van Drooge, Senior flavorist--tobacco Frans J. Tempelman, Product manager--tobacco lnge Boomsma, Secretary--tobacco group Ontario Flue-Cured Tobacco Growers Marketing Board 4 Elm Street Tillsonburg, Ontario N4G 4H4 Canada Stand N-IO On display will be samples of Canadian flue-cured tobacco. Board representatives on hand will be fully qualified to provide information on Canada's tobacco, including details on the new earlier maturing varieties being produced. Attending will be: Albert Bouw, Vice chairman D. Burgess, Director G. Demaiter, Director C. Szucs, Director M.E. Lepage, Assistant secretary PMB Patent Machinebouw B.V. Dillenburgstraat 9b 5652 AM Eindhoven Holland PMB Svenska AB PO Box 914 S-391 29 Kalmar Sweden PMB Inc. PO Box 34410 Richmond, Virginia 23234 U.S.A. Stand N-22 On the PMB stand will be displayed pictures and video films of the company's wide range of machines and equipment, particularly the latest developments for cigar manufacture--the advanced multi-cut system, AMC. PMB's delivery program includes: feeders, threshers and separators, driers, blending and silo systems, etc., for tobacco primary plants for cigarette, cigar, pipe tobacco and snuff manufacturers; waste tobacco recycling systems--the bandtobacco machines of the DIB-system and the Austria ARL process; a wide range of cigar machinery, such as rod-bunch systems, over- rolling machines for natural and sheet tobacco wrap- per, bobbin systems and the AMC; speed-up kits for cigar overrolling machines; trays, tray loaders and unloaders; cigar finishing equipment, such as tipping, banding, film wrapping, cedarwood wrapping, hole pier- cing, etc.; KDM boxmaking machines; new develop- ments of cigar model parts; spare parts, modification kits, and model conversion parts for Arenco and PMB type machines; and spare parts for other makes of cigar machinery such as AMF and York. Re presenti ngP M B will be: g :M=B J. Holland, PMB-Hogand R. van der Heiden, PMS-Hoiland B. Almen, PMB-Svenska TI56305319
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John Payne Engineering Limited Winchester, Hampshire i England ~ Stand F-9 John Payne Engineering will exhibit a selection of rebuilt machinery and sub-assemblies in working con- dition as examples of the range of machinery which the company is able to supply. The range includes tobac- co cutters from Molins, Hauni and Legg; stem roller, cigarette makers and ~ppers from Molins and Hauni; soft cut, hinge lid and shell and slide packers from AMF- Sasib and Molins; wrappers, parcellers, boxers and overwrappers from Molins, Marden Edwards, G.D and Schmermund. Also on display will be John Payne's electrostatic per- forator, introduced last year. A range of spare parts and rebuilt assemblies will complete the illustration of the company's offerings. In attendance will be: M.J. Payne, Managing director R.F. Woodthorpe, Production director R. Mayo, Sales manager R. Beedle, Commercial/technical sales manager P. Gasson, Development engineer F. Smith, Engineer Proctor & Schwartz, Inc. 251 Gibraltar Road Horsham, Pennsylvania 19044 U,S.A. Stand N-19 On display will be Proctor & Schwartz's complete line of leaf and strip redryers, dipped filler dryers and stem dryers, as well as the new Model 820 DM weigh belt with microprocessor control and a line of butking and blending silos. In addition, a range of tobacco products processed on Proctor dryers will be prominently displayed. Pol.lyflame International B.V. De Lasso 4 PO Box 175 2370 AD Roelofarendsveen Holland Stand C-27 Makers of disposable and refillable cigarette lighters, Pollyflame will be introducing its new product, a Piezo/electronic disposable lighter to be launched on the European market. Representing Pollyflame will be: Richard Peersmann Bob Hoyng Bart Smit Carul Knippenberg Luc Vulto Proctor personnel in attendance will be: James P. Schwartz Walter Frick C. van Altena lain Gillies Norman Young Burke Owen Start Moyer ~, 1984 57 TL563~5320
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Previews The Weismullerstrasse 28-40 D-6000 Frankfert am Main 61 West Germany Stand N-24 Degesch GmbH manufactures, sells and applies highly toxic gasses for pest control puspeses. Especially in the field of hydrogen phosphide, Degesch products are used to keep tobacco clean of pest infestation. The latest developments in fumigation technology are Degesch-Plate and Degesch-Strip which prevent any negative impact on tobacco flavor by residues. These new products are magnesium phosphide- based formulations which release hydrogen phosphide upon exposu.re to atmospheric moisture. The active in- gredients are embedded in an inert plastic matrix and fabricated in the form of a semi-rigid plate covered on both sides with a moisture-permeable paper. Representing Degesch will be: G.E. Mayr, President R. Geiss, Vice President--sales H. Reif, Director of research & development E. Taslidza, Technical consultant K. van Schalksijk, Chairman--Degesch Benelux Schoeller & Hoesch GmbH PO Box 1155 7562 Gernsbach West Germany Stand C-16 Available for examination will be the company's high- technology product range of papers, including cigarette paper, both standard and porous types of plugwrap paper, tipping base paper, and metallized bundling tissue for cigarette packs. Representing the company will be: Hans-Dieter Richau, General sales manager Inge Beermann, Sales manager--cigarette paper Thomas Interthal, Sales manager--cigarette paper Hans-Joachim Leichnitz, Sales manager--metallized paper Ferdinand Meixner, Department head of research and development & HCtESCH Sea-Land Services, Inc. Network Consolidated Conta}ner Agencies Weena 723 3014 DA Rotterdam Netherlands Stand N-29 Sea-Land will have available information about and per- sonnel to discuss its services for the tobacco industry: providing containerized transport to and from the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Central America, the Far East, the Middle East, India and Sri Lanka, as well as within Europe and the Mediterranean. Representatives will be: C. Smits, Benelux sales manager--Sea-Land O.R. van Amen, General manager--Network SeaRLand Scandura Limited PO Box 18 Cleckheaton BD19 3UJ Yorkshire, England Stand N-27 In addition to its comprehensive range of endless woven garniture tapes for cigarette making machines, Scandura will display nylon suction tapes, heat resis- tant tapes, cigar bands, endless woven bands for pack- ing machines, checkweigher bands and food quality belts for the transport of raw tobacco. Representing the company will be: J.A.J. Wood, Sales manager for industrial belting D.A. Johnson, European sales manager $1uis Cigar Machinery B.V. PO Box 126 8260 AC Kampen Holland Stand C-18 Sluis Cigar Machinery will exhibit its high speed com- plete maker for cigars with natural binder and wrapper. Representatives will be: H.G. van der Sluis D.F. Patijn TI56305321
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one telex does it all... Contact. Information. Answers. That's what the tobacco world is all about -- getting in first then moving fast. Casalee supplies information and comes up with answers -- fast. Because worldwide, through our network of offices in the leading tobacco centres, we're on the spot. The Casalee nerve-centre is the head office in Antwerp where a continuous flow of information is processed, collated and on tap for you. When you want tobacco information, anywhere in the world, telex us. We have the answers. • Harsre, Zimbabwe: • Chisngmai, Thailand: • Limbe, Malawi: • Rome, Italy: • Winston Salem, USA: • Santa Cruz, Brazil: 35365 CASA B 2342 CASAZ ZW 4331 CASFAR TH 4348 CASA MI 610.402 CASALE i $06478 'TOWNSEND WSL 51369/CAFU BR CASALEE BELGIUM N.V. Jan Van Rijswijcklaan 76, B-2000 Antwerp Telephone (03) 216 0(~ 40 The total leaf service, worldwide.
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Companhia de Cigarros Souza Cruz Praca Pereira Oliveira Caixa Postal £)-118 88.000 Florianopolis Trans-Continental Leaf Tobacco Corporation Aeulestrasse 38 ~ FL-9490 Vaduz Liechtenstein Stand N-31 The joint stared of Souza Cruz and Trans-Continental Leaf Tobacco Corporation will depict the wide activities of these two companies as partners in the Braz~fian tobacco industry. All aspects of the leaf tobacco business--growing, field extension services, harvesting, classifying, redrying, packing and shipping--will be clearly represented. Designed and decorated to reflect the leading role which Souza Cruz and Trans-Continental play in the industry, the stand will feature samples of Brazilian flue- cured and hurley tobaccos. TV monitors will show films of the companies' activities in Brazil. Representing the companies will be: Affonso Braum, Export administration manager-- Souza Cruz Gerson Cardoso, Quality control manager--Souza Cruz John Armstrong, Area manager for Brazil-- Trans-Continental Standard Commercial Tobacco Company, Inc. 2201 Regency Road Wilson, North Carolina 27893 U.S.A. Stand C-20 Depicted will be the worldwide activities of the Stan- dard Group of Tobacco Companies. All subsidiaries and associated companies of the Standard Group will be clearly represented through features and photographs of the various growing areas and the many leaf processing factories. Also displayed will be the many varieties, origins and types of tobaccos which the Group handtes. Personnel in attendence will be: Volker Hahnsen, Assistant Group sales manager Peter Dom, Sales representative Norman Hansen, Group sales representative--Benetux British Cellophane Limited Bath Road, Bridgwater Somerset TA6 4PA England Stand N-37 The theme of BCL's stand features the company's ex- pertise as the wodd's tobacco film specialist. On display will be many examples of tobacco packaging end uses and the BCL films which are available to meet customers' needs, in particular, its range of cellophane and shorko coextruded polypropylene films for packet wraps, cartons, multiwraps, tobacco pouches and cigars. As well as showing end uses, BCL will outline its ma- jor new investment in shorko films, the world's widest range of coextruded polypropylene films--an invest- ment which will bring BCL's production capacity in Europe for Shorko Films to 34,000 tons. Representing BCL will be: John Campin Paul Mason TOBACCO REPORTER 3000 Higbwoods Blvd., Suite 300 PO Box 95075 Raleigh, North Carolina 27625 U.S.A. Stand N-15 TOBACCO REPORTER, founded in 1873, is the in- dustry's favorite magazine. Published each month, TR has subscribers in more than 145 different countries around the world. Extending its service and hospitality to the industry, TR will sponsor a stand at The Hague that features cof- fee and tea for visitors in a sidewalk care setting--a place to sit back, relax and talk with old friends, new acquaintances and other guests. While the re- freshments are provided with our compliments, TR will offer for sale copies of the newly revised 16th edition of its Chart--lnternconnecting Interests of Major Tobacco Manufacturers. Subscriptions may also be purchased, and gratis copies of the March and April issues of TR will be available. Representing TOBACCO REPORTER will be: Dayton Matlick, PresidenUPublisher Anne Shelton, Editor Peter Holloway, Sales representative--U.K. Erich Hillerbr~nd, Sales representative--Europe TI5630532:
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Tannpapier GmbH & Co. KG A-4050 Traun, Austria Dr. Franz Feurstein GmbH A-4050 Traun, Austria Papierfabrik Wattens GmbH A-6112 Wattens, Austria Associated with: Tann Ltda. (Antioquia, Colombia) Tann-Paper Ltd. (Woodstock, Canada) Stand F-4 There will be available information and samples of the paper prod,ucts from Wattenspapier, Feurstein, and Tannpapier, a group which can meet a wide range of needs for the cigarette industry. Feurstein concentrates on making tipping base paper for Tannpapier; Wattens specializes in cigarette and plugwrap papers. In attendance will be: Ignaz Worndl, Director--Feurstein Kurt Neuhauser, Commercial director--Tannpapier J. Christof Kautzky, Director--Wattenspapier Folker E. Wolfsgruber, Senior sales manager-- Wattenspapier Eva Torok, Sales manager--Tannpapier Ernst Meinhart, Sales manager--Feurstein Heinz Saxl, Sales manager--Wattenspapier Ewald Weiss, Sales supervisor--Tannpapier Christian Trierenberg, Manager of Tann Ltda. Steinbrecher Corporation 185 New Boston Street Woburn, Massachusetts 01801 U.S.A. Stand C-40 Steinbrecher will introduce its new PMA, Precision Moisture Analyzer, which can determine the moisture content of all types of tobaccos in less than one minute through the use of a new technique called the Permit- tivity Measure (PM). The PMA consists of two components: a sample chamber and a mainframe. Within the sample chamber is a carefully designed electric field. The value of the PM is determined by analyzing the changes in this elec- tric field which are caused by the dielectric interaction of the tobacco sample with the field. A microcomputer in the mainframs calculates the moisture content bas- ed on the sample's weight and its PM measure. Sam- ple preparation is not required, and the sample remains unaltered by the analysis. Representing Steinbrecher will be: Donald H. Steinbrecher, President Diane E. Gilbert, Marketing manager Dara L. Giglio, Marketing/communications associate 1984 61 Ti56305324
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Previews The ue SASIB SpA Via de Corticeila 87/89 40128 Bologna, Italy Stand C-46 Sasib will display the hopper of its new ALFA packer with single cigarette rejection. In addition, audiovisual presentations of the new ALFA packing line and the new Sasib system for ventilated cigarette production will be made. In attendance wilt be: G.C. Vaccari, Managing director F. Orsi, Sales director M. Salmon, Technical director A. Gazzotti, M. arketing manager E.O. Sagmanli, Managing director--TMC Tobacco Machinery Company R.D. Ruggles, Managing director--SASIB Corporation of America SODIM S.A. Societe de Diffusion d'Appareils de Mesure Rue Andre Dessaux B.P. No. 2 F-45401 Fleury-les-Aubrais France Cedex, ~ Stand 35 Sodim will display selections from its wide range of measuring instruments for research and quality con- trot designed to meet the needs of modern data pro- cessing, including: Sodimatic, an automated quality control system for determination of the most important quality factors of cigarettes or filter rods--weight, diameter, pressure drop, ventilation rate, and hardness--and the Sodim "Mini," a small but efficient laboratory cigarette slitter. Representing Sodim will be: A. Artho, Commercial manager J. Berthou, Technical manager G. Chotet, Development manager A. Rousseau, Engineer C. Vatlee, Engineer 62 TR--March, 1984 Vernhaut & Van Sluyters' Drukkerijen B.V. Houtmarkt 7 Postbus 945 2003 RX Haarlem Holland Stand C-43 On display will be Vernhaut & Van Sluyters' products-- hinge lid cartons, soft cup packet labels and outer car- tons in litho-offset as well as in rotogravure. Of par- ticular interest will be a five-color "Chambon 520" rotogravure machine, specialized for the manufacture of hinge lid cartons on one operation. In attendance will be: J.H. Meyer, Managing director Ch.H.A. Meyer-van Weeghel V.A. van Haren, Export manager F. Fortgens Wolff Walsrode AG ~ Postfach, D-3030 Walsrode 1 West Germany Stand C-32 Wolff Walsrode will display packaging films for over- • wrapping cigarette packs and cartons, and tear tapes for all commercial systems, on spools or as reels. The main focus, however, will be on the economical biax- ially oriented polypropylene film, Walothen CT, a film which withstands both winter and tropical environments to protect the tobacco from drying out or absorbing moisture and losing its aroma. Representing Walsrode will be: Martin Hebekus, Sales manager Bernd Neubauer, Service engineer Tabaknatie Van den Wervestraat 66 B-2000 Antwerp Belgium Stand F-11 As specialists in handling, forwarding and warehous- ing of tobacco and all kinds of tobacco products, Tabaknatie will have available information about its ser- vices and facilities--including its 60,000 square meters of warehouse space in the heart of the port of Antwerp, and its computer-equipped administrative department. Representing Tabaknatie will be: H. Heyndrickx, Chairman J. De Maeyer, Commercial delegate Ti56305325
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THE STARCH WHE L SYSTEM IN ITS PROPE,R PLACE ? See YOU on ,.%~an~ N17 at the 4th WO SYMPOSIU RID TOBACCO EXH M. The Hague, Nethedands . fBITION & • Apnt 15----I 8 1984 Introduced just 10 years ago, the Kaymich Gravity Fed Nozzle Applicator System has already sent countless starch wheels to the scrap heap. And now accounts for sealing some 50% of all cigarettes manufactured worldwide. Easy to install, simple to maintain, the Kaymich System cuts out cams and gears, tricky preparation of adhesives, and wheels that need to be re-ground. The Kaymich System is at home with all kinds of ready-made adhesives- sealing often at Time-worn starch wheel system first introduced in the late 19th century temperatures of under 100°C, and a huge range of cigarette papers and plug wraps. In fact, its simpler design - with just one moving part - and greater versatility mean that in most instances it's substantially increased overall effidency. Small wonder that so many manufacturers are switching to Kaymich - and that the prospects for the starch wheel are going up in smoke. If you're not already using it, find out more about the Kaymich Nozzle Applicator System. C.B. Kaymid~ & Co. Limited, Leigh Street, She_~eld S9 2PR, U.K. Telex 54 I71 Telephone She.~tld (0742) 446071 Kayrnich Inc., 420 Southlake Boulevard, Richmond, VA 23236. U.S.A. Telex 828312 Telephone Richmond (804) 7941648/9 TI563053,26
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Spotlight' on Bulgaria: Setting sights on light leaf market By Peggy Gooch LIKE OTHER MEMBER coun- tries of the Union for Mutual Economic Assist- ance (UEMA), Bulgaria is encouraged to concentrate on cer- tain industries and agricultural pro- ducts for which it is best suited, Bulgaria has the distinction of be- ing particularly well suited for the production and manufacture of tobacco, and because of that specialization is one of the largest leaf producers and cigarette manufacuters in the world. Eighth in the world in leaf production, and ninth in cigarette production, there is no other sector of world economy in which Bulgaria plays such an im- portant role as in the tobacco in- dustry, says Bulgartabac, the state monopoly. Approximately 80 percent of cigarette production and 65 percent of leaf production is exported, primarily to other UMEA coun- tries. About 25 percent of all the tobacco produced in the UMEA is grown in Bulgaria, which supplies nearly 40 percent of the total import requirement of these countries. The Soviet Union is the major market, buying more than 40 percent of its leaf imports and 90 percent of its cigarette import~ from Bulgaria. But strides have been made in ex- por~s to West Germany. France, Japan, Switzerland, the United States, Iran, Iraq and Turkey. Ex- ports to other eastern European countries, plus Mongolia, China and Tunisia, have enabled Bulgaria to surpass the United States as the world's number one cigarette- exporting country. Traditionally a producer of orien- tal leaf, the BuJgarian tobacco in- dustry is focusing its attention on light leaf production. Tighter economical situations that seem to plague every country have en- couraged Bulgartabac to put more emphasis on its own profitability by considering alternatives to oriental leaf production, which is extreme- ly labor intensive and costly to pro- duce. Light leaf, especially hurley, is appealing because it requires less labor and is more marketable out- side of .Bulgaria. Prospects for growth in exports of both leaf and cigarettes are view- ed with optimism. "There exists a relative stabilization of export de- mand for both types of leaf; and there is a definite upward trend in cigarette export," Dimitar Yadhov, president of Bulgartabac told TOBACCO REPORTER. "As far as the factors of influence are concerned it's worth mentioning the stable de- mand for oriental l~af, and the growing demand for big leaf tobac- co as a substitute for imported tobacco. "There is also a strong demand for Bulgarian cigarettes on the in- ternational market. An increase in cigarette manufacture and export is expected during the next five years, while retaining the level of the leaf exports," Yadhov added. TOTAL TOBACCO PRODUCTION in 1983 is estimated at 131,000 metric tons, down 13 percent from the 1982 estimate of 150,242MT. Dry weather was the principal culprit in reducing oriental and Virginia yields. However, extensive use of ir- rigation combined with more favorable growing conditions kept hurley yields nearly unchanged. The outlook for this year's crop: increased burley and flue-cured plantings at the expense of oriental. Oriental leaf production is estimated at 99,500MT in 1983, down 22 percent from the 128,011MT output in 1982. By type, production is estimated as: Small leaf oriental ..... 79,600MT Large leaf oriental ..... 19,900Mr Virginia flue-cured .... 21,000MT Burley ............... 10,500MT Bulgartabac estimates the year's oriental leaf yield to be about 1,200 kilograms per hectare, down significantly from the 1982 high of 1,371 kilograms per hectare, and down slightly from the more nor- mal 1981 yield of 1,245 kilograms per hectare. By calculating the area required to produce 79,600MT Of small leaf oriental, it appears that an area of about 66,000 hectares was planted to this variety. Using an average yield of 1,440 kilograms per hectare, an area of about 13,000 hectares is estimated for large oriental leaf production in 1983. The total area of 79,600 hectares planted to oriental leaf is down by about 9,000 hectares from the reported 1982 area of 1~9,000 hec- tares. It is likely that planted areas dropped because of total losses to drought in some locations, and because of the switch to burley and flue-cured. Area planted to flue-cured and burley, grown principally in the north, is increasing significantly. Preliminary estimates of area planted to these types are: flue- T15~30532;
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cured, 10,500 hectares; hurley 4,200 hectares. Land allocated to these types is expected to be increased, as the area alloted to small leaf orien- tal is decreased. Officials at Bulgartabac an- ticipate considerable improvement in yields, especially for burley, where their goal is 3,000 kilograms per hectare. Final trade statistics for 19.83 have not been published at this writing; therefore, only broad estimates of imports and exports have been made. Leaf imports are estimated to be betw~n 25,000 and 30,O00MT, which is a substantial in- crease over the 22,000MT of leaf im- ported in 1981. Low production in 1983 makes it reasonable that leaf imports would increase, since Bulgaria tries to maintain its roughly 140,000MT per year export market for all tobacco and pro- ducts. U.S. trade statistics show that Bulgaria imported 2,711MT of leaf in 1983, the highest in four years. Leaf, imported to prepare the required blends for cigarettes, is supplied by China, North Korea, U.S., Brazil, Zimbabwe, Malawi and Greece. Approximately 63,266MT of oriental leaf and 1,462MT of flue- cured were exported in 1982, ac- cording to Bulgartabac. Export totals in 1981 were slightly higher: 64,755MT of oriental and 2,141MT of flue-cured. Buyers, other than European countries, include Aus- tralia, Morocco and North Korea. Bulgarian officials contend that U.S. taxing of Bulgarian leaf is discriminatory. Other oriental leaf suppliers, such as Yugoslavia, pay only 22 US cents per pound, they point out, while Bulgaria pays 35 US cents per pound. D~.VSt~'MSNT of the cigarette in- dustry has been helped great- ly by the availability of raw ma- terials, says Bulgartabac. Cigarette production in 1944 totaled 4,000MT, compared to 90,00OMT in 1981. Popular brands made in Bulgaria are BT, Stewardess, Inter, Fenix, Vega, Opal and Poldiv. In 1981, BT won the International Award for Export and the international award, Gold Mercury, for develop- ment of production and interna- tional cooperation. Recently Bulgartabac introduced several brands to the market: Sredetz, Bu[gartabac Lux 100mm, Welcome, Victory, and Alfa for both the local and international markets. Already famous for its oriental blend cigarettes, Bulgaria has developed a new blend that is becoming more popular. Further growth in the cigarette industry is prelected by the increasing demand for these cigarettes. Bulgartabac also produces Marl- boro, Astor, Winston, and HB under license, as well as licensing its own brands to be produced in other countries. Every tenth smoker in the Soviet Union and every fourth smoker in East Ger- many smokes Bulgarian cigarettes. In the past few years, Bulgarian cigarettes have found satisfactory markets in the Middle East. An anti-smoking campaign has been implemented in Bulgaria, which resulted in the banning of advertisements and the publishing of medical reports about the alleg- ed risks of smoking. The campaign, however, has had little effect on cigarette consumption which rose from 12.468 billion pieces in 1981 to 13.982 billion units in 1982. Cigarette manufacturing tech- nology has advanced rapidly in the past decade as multilateral coopera- tion was established with major in- ternational cigarette makers from the United States, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and some Scandinavian countries. Cigarettes can be produced at speeds ranging from 2,000 to 7,200 pieces per minute in Bulgaria, on equipment manufactured by Molins, Haunt and Skoda. Leaf processing, how- ever, is done exclusively on Bulgarian made machinery. The traditional oriental leaf pro- duced in Bulgaria has low tar and nicotine content and good burning qualities, reports Bulgartabac. Stem content, which is less than 14 per- cent of the total leaf mass, is very fine and can be used in cigarette production. The leaf is resilient, with stable moisture absorption. Scientists at Bulgartabac's Re- search Institute investigate all aspects of tobacco--from seeds to smoke. Specific work includes: selection of leaf types; physiological plant protection; mechanization of tobacco production, drying, manipulation and processing; technology of cigarette production; smoke chemistry; and economics of tobacco production. Laboratories, vegetation houses, drying equip- ment and experimental fields are all part of the Institute's facilities. ~ Bulgada Year ProdacUon Exports $mdot UoiI~ 1978 80,000 64,164 51,570 1979 82,000 65,000 53,390 1981 88,591 74,440 55,72~ 1882 88,132 74,742 WA TR--Ma~rch, 1984 65 Ti56305328
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U.S. perspective: Growers in search of buyers Furthering its efforts to ease the burden of higher leaf stocks, flue-cured growers' cooperative has cut its prices again on some styles in its 'old crop' inventory. the By Chris Bickers ALTHOUGH it iS still far from declaring a "fire sale," the farmer coop- erative of flue-cured growers in the United States con- ceded in January that its stocks, at least some of them, are not likely to sell at a price that will return all the costs incurred in acquiring and maintaining them. When the Flue Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization Corpora- tion issued the new price schedule for loan stocks in 1984, it included significantly lower prices for some of its tobacco in the hopes of stimulating new purchases. "We made some rather substan- tial downward adjustments in the price of tobaccos we have in inven- tory, particularly in the price of those 'old crop' tobaccos that had been moving into the trade at the slowest rate," explained Jim Sineath, assistant general manager of Stabilization. "The objective was to place special emphasis on the movement of old crop tobaccos and at the same time try to move some of the newer tobacco stocks from 1982 and 1983 crops." The downward adjustments in the new price schedule, which went into effect January 16, ranged from a low of about one percent to a little in excess of 32 percent. Specifically, the 1976 crop was ad- justed downward 32 percent, 1977 Mr, Bickers is edRor of THE FLUE CURED TOBACCO FARMER mag- azine in Raleigh, N.C. down 25 percent, 1978 down 22 percent, 1979 down 14 percent, 1980 down three percent and 1981 down one percent. The selling price for the 1982 crop was reduced approximately two percent. "In addition, we at- tached a special purchase incen- tive: Between now and June 30, the first 75 million pounds purchased from the 1982 crop under this pro- gram will be discounted a further 10 percent in price," said Sineath. "The 1983 crop, the new one, is priced for the first time, so obvious- ly there is no reduction on it. It is priced at what we would consider normal price levels reflecting the normal markup. "This pricing structure would recover all the principle on all crops, and it would recover all the interest on all crops except for 1976 and 1977. We will not quite recover all the interest accrued for those two crops under this schedule." Sineath described the new sched- ule of prices as "commonsense merchandising." "As tobaccos get older and we carry these inventories longer, there must he more effort made to move these tobaccos into the trade. We can't keep them indefinitely. The longer they're in our inventory, the more effort we must make to move them." Much of this relates to oversup- ply of particular grades in par- ticular crop years, Sineath explain- ed. "In the 1977 crop, for instance, there is an extremely large quanti- ty of that crop that is in dry-weather tip grades. These tobaccos are total- ly acceptable on a grade for grade basis as we have it packed." ALITTLE OVER four million pounds were purchased in the first week the new price schedule was in effect. "It appears that there is also some increased interest in the trade, if we can judge from the number of requests for samples from potential buyers," said Sineath. "I might point out that the crops that we have sold the most tobacco from since the new schedule went into effect have been those crops where the adjustment was greatest: 1976 and 1977. "In the first week under the new price schedule, we sold 1.9 million pounds from the 1976 crop, leaving 16.9 million pounds in inventory; 1.8 million pounds from the 1977 crop, leaving 113.1 million pounds in inventory; 100,000 pounds from the 1978 crop, leaving 18 million pounds, and a half million pounds from the 1982 crop, leaving 247 million pounds." Through January 31, the total of other crops in Stabilization inven- tory are 1979 (20.6 million pounds), 1980 (64.6 million pounds), 1981 (91.8 million pounds) and 1983 (190 million pounds]. The 1983 crop, by the way, re- flects the 163 million pounds Stabilization received from the warehouse floor, which was 18.4 percent, plus the 30.9 million pound carryover from 1982. ~ Ti56305329
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RNANCIAL REPORTS Austria Taba,k Austria Tabak will recognize a net profit of 102 million shillings in 1982, according to the director general. Kurt Leidinger. The tur- nover of the Austria Tabak group in 1982 was 18.5 billion shillings, up 13.7 percent; 11.85 billion shillings alone were taxes. Cigarette sales results for the first 10 months of 1983 showed an in- crease of 3.-7 percent in quantity. Due to the recent price increase the total increase in cigarette sales for 1983 is estimated to be up 2.5 per- cent. The highest increase in sales is reported from Austria Tabak's brands Milde Sorte and Memphis, and also from German cigarette brands produced under license. Austria Tabak sold 3.4 billion cigarettes in the first six months of 1983 on foreign markets (exports and production under license). The competitive German market be- came rather difficult for Austria Tabak's subsidiary, but the produc- tion of generics has so far been successful, Austria Tabak investments dur- ing 1983 included new sales facilities and expansion of the fac- tory in Linz; new research and development facilities in Vienna; new sales facilities in Vienna; and new sales and leaf tobacco stores in various parts of Austria. Culbro Culbro Corporation has reported record fourth quarter earnings of $3,143,000 or $.74 per share on 4,247,000 shares, after certain tax benefits, on record sales of $251,578,000. In the fourth quarter of 1982, the corporation reported $2,444,000 or $.58 per share on 4,184.000 shares, after similar tax benefits, on sales of $113,113,000. Net income for the year amount- ed to $12,088,000 after tax benefits, or $2.86 per share, on 4,230,000 average shares on record sales of $733,683,000. This compares with $12.529,000 in 1982 after tax benefits, of $2,61 per share, on 4,802,000 average shares on sales of $441,760.000. Culbro stated that 1983 sales and earnings for the year and the quarter benefited significantly from the inclusion of the results of The Eli Witt company acquired in July 1983. Improvements in operating profit were realized in all divisions except Nursery operations. Imasco Imasco Limited reported con- solidated earnings, before an ex- traordinary gain, for the nine months ended December 31, 1983, or $154,736,000, an increase of $28,094,000 or 22 percent over ear- nings of $126,642,000 in the nine months last year. Earnings per share for the nine months were $3.25 basic and $3.03 fully diluted. Earnings, before an extraor- dinary gain, for the third quarter in- creased 20 percent to $57,956,000. comparable figures for the third quarter last year were $48,462,000. An extraordinary gain, which ulted from the sale of Imasco Foods, Collegiate/Arlington Sports and Embassy Cleaners, increased third quarter and nine-month earnings by $22,045,000. Net earnings for the nine months were $178,781,000 or $3.73 a share basic and $3.46 a share fully diluted. System-wide sales of all seg- ments of business, including sales by franchised retail stores and restaurants were $4,113,293,000 for the nine months and $1,403,183,- 600 for the third quarter compared with $3,763,094,000 and $1,302,- 885,000 for the comparable periods last year. Consolidated revenues in the first nine months were $2,216,197,000 compared with $2,075,219,000 last year. Third quarter revenues were $734,239,000 compared with $700,037,000 last year. Commenting on the issue of in- creases in tobacco taxes, Paul Pare, chairman and chief executive of- ficer, said "The accelerated creases in tobacco taxes at both federal and provincial levels have had a negative impact on the tobac- co industry. It is to be hoped that the federal and other provincial governments will follow the exam- ple of Ontario and New Brunswick and ease this burden.'" Philip Morris Inc. Philip Morris Incorporated has an- nounced record 1983 revenues and earnings. Consolidated operating revenues for the year ended December 31, 1983, increased 12.0 percent to $13.0 billion from $11.6 billion reported in 1982. Operating income increased 14.1 percent to $2.0 billion. Pro-tax income was up 21.9 percent to $1.6 billion. Net income grew 15.6 percent to $903.5 million from the prior year's net income of $781.8 million. Earnings per share were $7.17, up 15.1 percent from $6.23 in 1982. Philip Morris U.S.A. reported operating revenues of $5.5 billion, up 27.5 percent from 1982. Op- erating income increased 21.4 per- cent reaching $1.3 billion. "Philip Morris U.S.A. gained market share for the 21st con- secutive year; its share reached 34.4 percent." said George Weissman, chairman and c~o. Philip Morris International operating revenues were $3.6 billion, up 2.3 percent over 1982, Operating income declined by 18.0 percent due to several factors: in- tense price competition in a number of markets, import restric- tions, price controls combined with inflation and the strength of the U.S. dollar. Virginia Port Authority Hampton Roads general cargo ter- minals saw an increase of 4.2 per- cent in tonnage during 1983, accor- ding to J. Robert Bray, executive director of the Virginia Port Authority. The total general cargo tonnage moved through Hampton Roads terminals rose from a 1982 level of 2,564,559 tons to 2,670,914 tons in 1983. The increase was due to an 8.1 percent increase in container ton- nage. That rose from a 1982 total of 1,726,616 tons to 1,867,01g tons in 1983. Breakbulk tonnage suffered a slight decrease in 1983. dropping from the I982 figure of 837,943 tons to 803,895 in 1983, a loss of 34,048 tons, or a drop of 4.1 percent.
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Marlboro Lights 100's in new flip-top box launched Philip Morris U.S.A. has announc- ed the national introduction of Marlboro Lights 100's in the flip-top box. The new entry enables Marlboro to take advantage of the three fastest growing categories of the cigarette market--low-tar, 100's and box packings. The new entry will receive heavy media support in magazines, newspapers and outdoor, as well as strong merchandising at point-of- sale. "Marboro Lights, which became the number one selling low-tar brand in 1982, continues to show strong momentum this year," said William Campbell, executive vice president of of marketing. "This in- troduction is a natural move which further positions Marlboro Lights for future growth." Craven A relaunched in British market A famous name returned to the British market when Carreras Rothmans re-introduced Craven A King Size Filter and Special Mild at us $1.42 per pack of 20. Both brands have a completely new blend of tobacco, says a company spokes- man. Craven A King Size is in the mid- dle tar range and Craven A King Size Special Mild is low tar. The brands are supported by a full and comprehensive range of point-of-purchase material and for the first four weeks all independent retailers will be given a special rate on all orders, plus us$1.41 per 1,000 bonus for an eight-week period, ac- cording to the company. "The economy sector in the cigarette market is growing both in volume and market share," said Martin Southgate, brand manager, "and Carreras Rothmans has recognized this fact with the re- launching of these cigarettes. The new pack will retain the world- famous black cat emblem." PM launches Raffles, an exclusive for Britain A massive advertising and promo- tional campaign supported the launch in London and the southern areas of the United Kingdom for Raffles, a British-made, longer- than-king-size cigarette, retailing at $1.48 for 20 (at $1.40 to the pound), A me}or billboard push broke in early February on outdoor sites, cabs, buses and underground sta- tions, complemented by national press, Sunday color supplements and regional newspaper advertis- ing. As the first Virginia cigarette from Philip Morris, Raffles re- presents a major development for the company. CIGARS AT REVOLUTIONARY PRICES The British Ai,rports Authority is going all out to sell its duty-free and other goods to the traveling public k~ all of its seven airports in the United Kingdom. The current campaign makes great use of puns, as seen on this billboard at Heathrow. Photo: TOBACCO REPORTER 7g TR--March, 1964 Notes Iohn Speakman, managing director, "Our new cigarette is be- ing made in Britain exclusively for the British market and is a reflec- tion of our new direction in the United Kingdom." Cigar promotions abound in the U.K. market Following up on last year's three percent increase in sales, Tom Thumb, Britain's best selling miniature cigar, is combining a money-off flashpack campaign with a holiday competition. Each person submitting a correct entry will receive a pack of 10, The com- petition began in early February and will continue through October. In the medium and large cigar sector, Castella Panatellas is being featured in a money-off campaign which offers eight cents off the recommended retail price of 63 cents each. Castella Panatellas holds 40 percent of the market in medium and large cigar sales. Panama, the second largest sell- ing cigar in the U,K.. is being pro- moted with a four-cents-off offer on its box of six cigars. In addition, customers can apply for a calf leather personalized cigar case for $7.14 and six Panama pack fronts. The case holds six cigars and can
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Foremo~ in Oriental Tobaccos for over 50 years Leaf Tobacco Co., Inc. 90 Park Avenue NewYork, N.Y. 10016 Geneva, Switzerland Izmir, Turkey Salonica, Greece
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these new Virginia blend cigarettes are packaged in striking red and gold which "reflects the quality associated with the name of Ron- sons," notes spokesman Colin Southern. Priced at $1.47 for 20 (at $1.40 to the pound], the new brand was launched sporting introductory bonuses and a range of point of pur- chase material including window hills. The cigarettes are in the low- to-middle tar bracket. "A revolutionary new distribu- tion pattern is being adopted for this product," says Vaughan Rich- mond, sales director. "The min- imum order will be for one case of 10,000 cigarettes which will be delivered to customers straight from bond. Effectively, this means that the vast majority of stockists will obtain their supplies from wholesalers and cash-and-carries." Mature, open-grained, ripe, orange, separated stalk position, and free from foreign matter! Because you need a ripe, mature leaf tobacco with a full-bodied flavor, you need Piedmont's quality leaf! PIEDMONT TOBACCO CQ, INC. ttt East tOth Street. RO Box 756 Winston-Salem. NC 27102 USA Answer BOCk - P~eoieof ;,~. =o :t,e ~19" ~22 ~70. {9i9} 722-5524 Generic chewing tobacco making sales impact Sales of U.S. Tobacco's generic chewing tobacco have almost doubled in poundage each month since it was introduced last winter. Packaged in white foil with the words, "Chewing Tobacco" in bold black serif lettering over a bulls-eye, the loose leaf product is distributed by U.S. Tobacco's Private Blends of Richmond, Virginia. A three-ounce package sells for 69 cents, rather than 89 cents. "We were approached by a major supermarket chain to produce.a private label chewing tobacco for them," said Aubrey Evelyn, man- ager of private blends. "This private label chewing tobacco is marketed in Ohio, Pennsylvania and the South. Other accounts sell our loose leaf tobacco under the brand name "Quality Chew," which is franchis- ed in certain areas of New Hamp- shire. Maine and Ohio." U.S. Tobacco expects to sell 140,000 pounds of loose leaf this year and, adds Evelyn, "'We have some big plans, including another brand in the experimental stages with a unique flavor which en- hances the tobacco taste." TI5630532
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Sales clout you can count on. The news is...Kent, Kent III, and Kent Golden Lights are united under the Kent Family name. Kent, a sales leader in low tar, now has a hard- hitting advertising and promotion campaign that establishes the Kent Family among the top advertisers in the industry. It all adds up to greater pulling power for each individual Kent brand you carry. The only business we do is the business you do. We never forget that. Ti56305338
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NEVV PFIODUCTS & EOUIPMENT Fully automatic uniform cut case sealer introduced The Loveshaw Corporat~onhas an- nounced the Little David Model LD-16B, an automatic uniform pressure sensitive taper, as a com- panion model to the LD-16A, in- troduced last year. The 16B is identical to the 16A in design and performance with only two exceptions: the larger 16B will accommod.ate a greater range of box sizes and it will apply up to three-inch wide pressure sensitive tape. The 16B seals boxes of uniform size ranging from eith to 36 inches long by seven to 26 inches wide by four-and-a-half to 30 inches A few of the significant features include the automatic indexing, automatic flap folding and taping, and electrically interlocked safety gates. ]For more information contact The Loveshaw corporation, 61 East Industry court, Deer Park, New York 11729; telephone: (516) 586-3434; telex: 510 227 61378. New single screw feeder controls volumetric flow A new model of low-profile single screw feeders has been introduced by K-Tron Corporation, The Model $500 feeder provides intermediate- to high-rate volumetric flow control of a wide range of bulk solid mate- rials. With the screws located at the bottom of the hopper, the unit is self-purging. Two types of interchangeable stainless steel metering screws are available. Open-flight screws are used for free-flowlng non-flooding powders. Closed-flight screws are 76 TR--~, 1984 used for free-flowing and slightly floodable or compacting/sticky powders. Both types handle granular, pelletized, fibrous and flaked materials. The Sh00's design features a large infeed section and a gear-driven four-flight agitator for conditioning materials. The screws are driven by a three-fourth horse power motor, with an independent one-half horse power drive motor. For additional information con- tact K-Tron Corporation. 2O War- rick Avenue, Glassboro, New Jersey 080:18; telephone: (609) 881-6500; telex: 83-1675. Photo electric controls scans production line A line of photo electric controls that can check, count and scan along a production line, is being produced in the United Kingdom by Visolux Company. The new ML4 series has been developed to give versatility, via optical heads, which are uni- form in style and size. The small control consists of single path light switches, reflection light switches, reflection light scanners, and background suppression scanners. The ML4 will operate via in-line cable amplifiers or remote mounted amplifiers in a control panel, and can count 2o0 products a second without touch or damage. One example of ML4 use in the tobacco industry is to check cus- toms seals on cigarette packages. For additional information con- tact Visolux in Cambridge, Eng- land. High capacity applicator available from Slautterback The new adhesive applicator sy- stem, Model KAIO0 from Slautter- back, is the largest airless ap- plicator currently offered by the company. Model KAIO0, which can load up to 100 pounds of ad- hesives, operates with any form of hot melt--blocks, pellets, chips or granular. Both the KA100 and the KA50, which loads up to 50 pounds, pro- vide a melt rate of 60 pounds per hour, with multi-zone temperature control, and may be used in au- tomatic operation or with hand guns. The models can drive up to six hoses; and they include melt grids, front-panel electrical controls and operate from 1201240 vac without compressed air. For additional information con- tact Slautterback Corporation, P.O. Box 391, Monterey, California 93942; telephone: (800) 722-0358; telex: 176047. Five new features upgrade Yale electric lift truck Yale Materials Handling Corpora- tion has announced several new features and improvements for its model ERP-T 3000-pound, three- wheel electric lift truck. The Hi-Vis mast is designed with two lift cylinders, located behind mast uprights, to improve forward visibility for better load handling. A new 190-degree power steering system allows the ERP-T to pivot within its own centerline. Differen- tial action in sharp turns is provid- ed by dual 24-volt drive motors, which also incorporate drum-type brakes for positive stopping. Also new is the EV-t SCR drive control. located in the counterweight. More information on the ERP-T is available by requesting Bulletin -2315-10 from Yale Materials Handling Corporation, Department 167, Routes 523 & 3"1. Flemington, New [ersey 08822: telephone: toll free 1-800-345-8112.
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reliability What counts is achieving your planned daily output at the required quality standards The SIGMA MAKER guarantees this SASlB ¢~NI~RAT|~N OF AMERICA RICHMOND - V~RGINIA (U,',',',',',',',',',~ PER AZIONI - BOL(~3NA IITALY) TMC TOBACCO MACHINERY COMPANY ~ - ZUG (SW'ITZERLAND) TI56305340
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ASSOCIATIONS: Tampa Cigar Mfgrs. Stanford ]. Newman, president of Standard Cigar Company, Tampa, the manufacturing division of M&N Cigar Manufacturers, has been re- elected president of the Tampa Cigar Manufacturers Association for 1984. Elected vice president was Codes Fuente, Fuente Cigar Factory; secretary, ~V/anuel Corral, Corral- Wodiska y Ca.; and treasurer, lose Llaneza ]r., Viltazon & Company. Charles W. Lee Jr. wiI1 serve the association as executive director and Mary Ordway as executive secretary. Elected directors for 1984 were Stanford I. Newman and Millard W. Newman, Standard Cigar Com- pany; Thomas D. Arthur and W. Tommy Morgan III, Havatampa, In- corporated; lames ]. Corral and Manuel Carrel, Corral-Wodiska y Ca.; Jose Lloneza Jr. and Frank Llaneza, Villazon & Co.; and Carlos Fuente and Arthur Fuente, Fuente Cigar Factory. AWARDS: Distinguished Alumnus Dr. Santiago R. Obien, director of the Philippine Tobacco Research and Training Center (PTRTC), has been elected recipient of the UPCA Distinguished Alumnus Award for Research Administration by the board of directors of the Universi- ty of the Philippines College of Agriculture Alumni Association (UPCAAA}. The UPCAAA board of directors elected Dr. Obien to receive the award in recognition of his visions and missionary zeal in setting the directions of the PTRTC as a trailblazer in tobacco research. Dr. Obien was previously assis- tant researcher at the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center, 1970-1972; agronomist at the Cyanamid Agricultural Kesearch Foundation, Inc. {CARFI}, 1973- 1975; agricultural officer of the Food and Agriculture Organization {FAO} at the Central Plant Protec- 78 TR---March, 1984 tion Training Institute in Hy- derabad, India; and a consultant of the Philippine Council for Agri- culture and resources Research and Development (PCARRD), 1977- 1978. MANUFACTURING: R.J. Reynolds James W. Johnston, executive vice president of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., has announced his resignation. Johnston, who was responsible for the company's marketing, sales and new product activities, said he has decided to pursue other in- terests. Before assuming his position at Reynolds Tobacco in October 1981, Johnston was president and chief executive officer of R.I. Reynolds Tobacco International, Inc.'s Asian and Pacific operations. He joined RJR International in lune 1979 as executive vice president of the Asia/Pacific group. U.S. Tobacco Barry Nova, president of U.S. Tobacco Company's tobacco divi- sion, resigned on January 27. He had been with the company for ten years, the last two as president. "It was a productive time both for me and the company, but in the end, Louis Bantle did not have a suf- ficient confidence level in me," Nova told Advertising Age. His ex- it does not signify sweeping cor- porate change, nor does it reflect disparate views concerning Skoal Bandits, whose marketing blue- print for the next two years is already planned, Nova stressed. "It was a general feeling between myself and the chairman that it was not working out as it should," he added. "It does not signify any fur- ther shakeup." Manuel Leitau will temporarily replace Nova. Leitau is senior vice president of finance, a title he will retain. In moves unrelated to Nova's departure, two other executives have left. Per Lindvquist, formerly marketing director, has been reassigned to the international divi- sion. William Nelson, previously marketing servicers director, has [eft the company. Successors have not been named at this time. Pinkerton Tobacco ]ennings M. Agner has been ap- pointed vice-president of opera- tions of The Pinkerton Tobacco Company. Formerly vice-president of manufacturing, Agner has been with the company 32 years and par- ticipated in the opening of the smokeless and smoking tobacco manufacturing plant located in Owensboro, Kentucky. In addition to his current respon- sibilities for planning, directing and controlling production of the com- pany's products and overall direc- tion of its support function, lenn- ings will now assume responsibili- ty for the company's material management function, consisting of purchasing, distribution and customer service departments. Jack W. Bergstom has been nam- ed director of manufacturing at Pinkerton. Bergstom joined the company in 1953, and has been plant manager for the past four years. In his new position, he has overall respon- sibility for production manage- mont. R.J. Reynolds Industries Dr, Roy E. Morse has been elected vice president of research and development for R.]. Reynolds In- dustries, Inc. Morse will coordinate R&D efforts at the corporate level to maintain a strong technical link between RJR operating companies. Morse had been senior vice presi- dent of research and development of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company since April 1982. He joined Rey- nolds Tobacco in August 1980 as vice president of research and de- velopment. He was a professor in the depart- ment of food science at Rutgers University before joining Reynolds Tobacco and was previously vice president of research for Pepsico Inc. and Thomas I. Lipton. Inc. Earlier, he served as research direc- tor at the William J. Strange Com- pany of Chicago and Kingan and Company of Indianapolis. ~" T!56305341
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To; E'ORLDTOBACCO EXHIBITION ANI) SYMPOStIM 19~ John Ad~ Street. IJmdon W(~2 6J H, England. Tck'x: 948669. N~c~ Position TI5630C:~M2
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NL~WSMAKERS com~Jed Brown & Williamson Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. has announced that W. Lee Sanders will succeed John K. Madsen as director of distribution. Madsen retired January 1, 1984, aRer 20 years with the company. Sanders has been with the com- pany 24 years, most recently as branch manager of the Winston- Salem, North Carolina, plant. He previously held a variety of manufacturing positions with the company's Louisville, Kentucky, plant, including factory superinten- dent, assistant factory manager for fabricat/on, and factory manager. In 1976 he was named branch manager of Brown & Williamson's newest plant in Macon, Georgia. He assumed the duties of branch manager of the Winston-Salem PROCESSOES AND EXPORTERS OFALL TYPES OF QUALITY LEAF TC ACCOS R.P. Watson Company ESTABLISHED1895 Wilson, North Carolina, 27893, U.S.A. (919) 243-3191 Cable: WATSON plant in 1981. Madsen ioined Brown & William- son in 1963 after serving as man- ager of shipping and warehousing for Marathon Paper Corp. RdR-Macdonald The following executive appoint- ments have been announced at RJR- Macdonald Inc., the Canadian sub- sidiary of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco In- ternational, Inc. Martin G. Bourbonnois, formerly vice president of personnel and in- dustrial relations, has been named vice president of human resources and administration. In addition to previous responsibilities for per- sonnd and industrial relations, Bourbonnais now also is responsi- ble for legal affairs. Gregory D. Tribble has been pro- moted to directo~ and general manager of leaf operations at the subsidiary's leaf processing facili- ty in Tillsonburg, Ontario. Former- ly manager of leaf administration, Tribble now has overall respon- sibility for the Tillsonburg plant. Bourbonnais joined RJR-Mac- donald in April 1982 as director of industrial relations, and was nam- ed vice president of personnel and industrial relations in March 1983. Prior to joining RJR, he held several senior management positions with General Foods Ltd. in Canada. Tribble ioined RJR-Macdonald as supervisor of accounting in 1974. He moved to Tillsonburg as con- troller in 1976, and was named manager of leaf administration in 1983. SALES & MARKETING: Lorillard Lorillard has named Joseph P. Mostandrea vice president of sales, and Lou Gordon vice president of trade development for the com- pany. Mastandrea joined Lorillard in 1952 as a sales representative. He bacame division manager in 1958, field manager in 1966. area sales manager in 1970, and director of merchandising in 1978. In 1979, he was promoted to director of sales in the United States, continued 80 TR--March. 1984 Ti5630534~
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NEWSMAKERS cor~k'~ed Gordon's career at Lorillard began as a sales representative in 1949. In 1952 he became division sales manager, field manager in 1961, regional sales manager in 1966, director of sales planning in 1972, general sales manager in I973, director of wholesale ac- counts in 1980, and in 1981 was made director of trade develop- ment. Mastandrea Gordon RJR International Armando G. Ruiz has been named director of marketing planning with R.J. Reynolds Tabacos do Brasil, Ltd. Ruiz was previously director of marketing research at RJR Tobac- co International's Latin American/ Caribbean headquarters. He will be relocating to Rio de Janeiro. Ruiz joined the company as an assistant marketing research ma- nager in November 1979. He was promoted to manager of marketing research and services in 1981, and to director of marketing research in 1982. Philip Morris U.S.A. Vincent ~. Buccellato has been nam- ed vice president of sales for Philip Morris U.S.A. Buccellato replaces Robert H. Cremin, who becomes vice president and director of special programs of Philip Morris Incorporated. Buccellato had been group direc- tor of brand management and serv- ed as vice president of marketing of Benson & Hedges (Canada) Ltd., a Philip Morris Incorporated af- filiate, from 1981 to 1983. K! EDWARD SO GOOD THAT... it's the largest selling brand in the world! Jno. H. Swisher & Son, Inc. Quality Cigars since 1861 Jacksonville, Florida 32203, U.S.A. Export Agent--Martir~ Brothers Tobacco Co~ |r~. 60E 42nd St. NY.N.Y. Buccellato ioined Philip Morris in 1967 as a marketing analyst. He was appointed assistant to the director of distribution and customer service in 1972 and in 1975 was named assistant to the vice president of finance. He as ap- pointed brand manager of new pro- ducts in 1975, [or Merit in 1976, and brand manager for Marlboro the following year. Zorn Buccellato SUPPLIERS: Haarmann & Reimer Tilman Zorn has been appointed treasurer and chief financial officer for Haarmann & Reimer Corpora- tion (H&RI, Springfield, NJ. Prior to joining Haarman & Reimer, Zorn was vice president of administration and finance with MG Industries, Inc., Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, a subsidiary of Messer-Griesheim GmbH, West Germany. Earlier in his career with Messer-Griesheim, Zorn served as controller of the firm's welding division and manager of that divi- sion's machinery profit center. DuPont Company Dale E. Wolf, a DuPont Company group vice president who heads the company's agricultural chemicals business, was elected president of Groupement International des Associations Nationales de bricants de Produits Agrochimi- ques (GIFAP). GIFAP comprises 25 trade associations representing 950 com- panies which manufacture more than 90 percent of the world's crop protection chemicals. For the past two years Dr. Wolf was. chairman of the National Agricultural Chemicals Associa- tion (NACA), the United States- based trade association represen- TI56305345
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Should be of consistent, superior quality with excellent |~.rtbrmance on your machines. We ha~e our ov,'n fine paper mill with 12(I years of experience. Only ~l combination between paper mill and con~enion plant ensures the exad control from pulp to bobbin! ",.'0 L3 Lq_ L--- Lq_L= L,,,L Requires a low coefficient of vllriation - our tipping t'ms approx..3 %! Who e.lsc Ctill Offer this'? Our world markel share is more than 10%- cerufinly a proof of our customers' confidence. lipping. Try TAN N ! Ask tbr sam ples! Tannpapier "Emn-lX, tpier (ies.m.b.tt. A-4050 Ii'aun/Austrut . ~ 31 Sent "gel. 1072 291 3", • " lclcx 22741 tann a T~nn Ltda, Apdo. Aer~J 172. En,,igad~) ,'kndOtluia - Cokm~hia T~L 't:~lr~, ll 1i75 Ti56305346
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N~=WSMAKERS con~nued ting manufacturers of agricultural chemicals. He continues to serve as a NACA director and executive committee member. Dr. Wolf joined DuPont in 1950 as a research biologist at the com- pany's Experimental Station near Wilmington, Delaware. Crompton & Knowles Rudy M. Phillips has joined Cromp- ton & Knowles Corporation as president of flavor and fragrance division. Prior to joining C&K, Phillips was a general management marketing consultant for Urban, Alexander & Tarrant, Inc. He was previously group vice president and general manager for the PFW flavor and food systems division of Hercules, Inc., where he had worldwide responsibility for all flavor and food ingredients marketed to the food, beverage, tobacco and pharma- ceutical industries. R/chard T..Maier has been ap- pointed director of manu[acturing for the flavor and fragrance divi- sion. In his new position, Meier will be responsible for all the manufac- turing, purchasing, inventory man- agement, engineering, facility maintenance and management for the flavor and fragrance operation. Prior to joining the flavor and fragrance division, Meier was flavor manufacturing manager at Givaudan Corporation and Hear- mann & Reimer Corporation. FD&O Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott, Inc., an- nounced the opening of a new million dollar plus expansion in Oc- tober at the Kanazawa Industrial Center of Yokohama by its sub- sidiary FDO Japan. The Yokohama plant has facilities for fragrance and flavor creation and production, as well as distribu- tion and storage of raw materials and quality assurance laboratories for creative fragrance and flavor development. Executive sales, ad- ministrative and marketing offices remain at Kawasaki which is the corporate legal address. FDO lapan also has sales offices in Tokyo and Osaka. DCE Vokes DCE Vokes, Inc., has appointed two new district engineers for its Cleveland and Boston territories. John Dorwart is the new district engineer for the Cleveland area. Mark Manzo will hold the same position for the Boston area. Before joining DCE Vokes, Dor- wart handled sales for Capwell- Bennett Inc., and for Oyt-Air Equip- ment Co. Manzo will serve as DCE Vokes' district engineer for Maine, western Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Manzo had previously been sales director for the Interna- tional Ski Association and assistant regional manager for the American Ski Association. What can Marsh McLennan tell you about the tobacco business? Hbw to protect it. When it comes to insurance, come to the leader. 11 South 10th St., Richmond, Va. 23215 Telephone (804) 649-4100
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......... It ll_l ..... we are exhibiting at . _ EXHIBITION & SYMPOSIUM A,pr~ 15-181984 The ~k~gue, Netherk~nds Stand C 16 Your problem: Reduction in specific smoke compo- nents. Take advantage of our experience. We produce: Porous paper combinations for air ventilation of your cigarettes. Please apply for trial bobbins Papierfabrik ~ Schoeiler & Hoesch GmbH • porous cigarette papers • electroperforated cigarette papers • super high porous plug wrap papers • porous tipping base papers. P.O. Box 1155 • D 7562 Gernsbach West-Germany Phone (07224) 66-0- Tx 07-8925 Telegrams Schoelterhoesch TI5630534~
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INDUSTRY PATENTS Philip Morris: Cigarette mouthpiece for filter-tipped product A mouthpiece for a filter-tipped smoking product or a filtered cigarette holder which has an inlet end adjacent the mouth end of the filter and an outlet end opposite the inlet end through which smoke may leave the cigarette or cigarette holder for passage into the mouth of the smoker. The outlet end has at least one orifice therein and the orifice is. of smaller area in transverse section than the filter. The inlet end is of substantially the same transverse area as the filter and is connected to the orifice by a continuous channel which con- tinuously decreases in transverse sectional area from the inlet end to a point between the inlet end and the outlet end and from which point to the orifice is either the same or continuously increasing until it is the same transverse sectional area as the orifice. Smoke exiting the filter passes into the channel at the inlet end of the mouthpiece, passes exclusively through the channel and exits through the orifice in a narrow pattern. U.S. Patent 4,413,641. Developed by R. William Dwyer, Jr.; Mable L. Fleming, both of Richmond, Va. Assigned to Philip Morris Incor- porated, New York, N.Y. Hauni-Werke: Apparatus for transporting rod-shaped articles A junction zone between the first and second sections of a conveyor system for sidewise transport of cigarettes or analogous rod-shaped articles communicates with the first opening of a reservoir which normally constitutes a surge bin for temporary storage of those articles which are delivered by the first sec- tion but cannot be accepted by the second section. The reservoir has a second opening which is normally separated from the first opening by a reciprocable partition but is free to discharge articles into a tray fill- ing machine when the reservoir is filled to capacity and the rate at which the first section delivers ar- ticles continues to exceed the rate at which the second section removes articles from the junction zone. U.S. Patent 4,13,640. Developed by Gunter Wahle, Reinbek; Willy Rudszinat, Dassendorf, both of Fed. Rep. of Germany. Assigned 1o Hauni-Werke Korber & Co. KG, Hamburg, Fed. Rep. of Germany. Sasib S.p.A: Electropneumatic testing of cigarettes A device for the electropneumatical testing of the air permeability wherein each cigarette is subjected to at least one test consisting of ap- plying pneumatic pressure to one end of the cigarette and determin- ing the resistance or the pressure drop at the input to the cigarette. The measured pneumatic pressure is transformed into electric meas- rement signals which are compared with electric reference or threshold signals. According to the invention, the electric measurement signals are compared with the electric reference signals which are shaped as saw-tooth signals and are generated in synchronism with the cigarette tests, that is with the measurement signals. The ascen- ding portions of the sawtooth re- erence signals have a rate of in- creasing magnitude which corre- ponds approximately to the rate of increase of the electric measure- ment signals. U.S. Patent 4,424,707. Developed by Giovanni Pezzi, Bologna, Italy. Assigned to Sasib S.p.A. Bologna, Italy. Brown & Williamson: Porous filter rod with non-porous wrapper A filter for a cigarette includes a porous filter rod circumscribed by a non-porous or air impermeable wrapper, and ventilating air grooves embedded in the wrapped filter rod which extend from one end of the filter rod a preselected distance generally longitudinally thereof. The ends of the grooves are recessed a predetermined distance or depth inwardly of the end of the filter rod and communicate with radially extending open channels formed in the one end of the filter rod. An air permeable tipping material circumscribes the wrap- ped filter rod which provides a path for ventilating air flow into the grooves. Due to the air imper- meable wrapper, the air flowing in the grooves is segregated from the smoke flowing through the filter rod so that ventilating air is the on- ly substance flowing in the grooves. U.S. Patent 4,424,819. Developed by Donald A. Silberstein, LeMans, France; Andrew McMurtrie, Louis- ville, Ky. Assigned to Brown & Witliamson Tobacco Corporation, Louisville. Ky. Union Camp: Method of making smoking-material rods A rod of smoking material, for use as a smoking article or a part thereof is formed by a multiplicity of laminiform self-sustaining smok- ing-material elements, for example discs, extending transversely of the rod and located in face-to-face con- tact with one another. The thickness of the elements, which may be up to 2.5 mm, is suitably within a range of 0.1 to 0.8 mm. It may vary within the rod or from ele- ment to element along the rod. The material of the elements may have inherent smoke-permeability suffi- cient to afford an acceptable pres- sure drop through the rod or the elements may be formed or provid- ed with smoke passages there- through, with either the same re- lative distribution of passages from one element to the next or with ad- jacent elements so oriented in rela- tion to each other as to provide smoke passages of predetermined form through the rod. The smoking material of the All new patents for the tobacco industry afe supplied exclusively to Tobacco Repot'mr by Inventions, Inc. They are reviewed and sum- realized by Tobacco Reporte¢'s staff. To get a copy of a p~tent, send the numbe~" and 50 cents to the Cort~misstonm" of Patents. Wash- ington, D.C. 20231, U.S.A. (Design patents are 20 cents each.) To reach inventor or assignees, if the ~'ddress is insufhc~ent, write them in care of the Commissione~ of Patents, being sure to cite patent number. TI56305349
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INOUSTRY PATENTS elements preferably extends over an area less than the cross-sectional area of the rod, suitably over 10 to 40 percent of that area. One or more additives may be applied to some or all of the elements either uniform- ly or in selected parts thereof. The elements may be secured together by adhesive and or by being enclos- ed in a wrapper. The elements may be formed w/th protrusions fi'om or undulations of faces thereof. U.S. Patent 4,416,295. Developed by Colin C. Greig, Salisbury, Richard G. Hook, Winchester, both of England. Assigned to Union Camp Corporation, Wayne, N.J. Rothmans: Measuring the moisture content of materials There is provided a method and ap- paratus for measuring the moisture content of materials, e.g., tobacco. In cases where the material flow is intermittent, the maximum moist- ure content of the last sample is in- d/cated and held either for a pre- determined time or until the moist- ure content of the next sample is de- termined. U.S. Patent 4,419,627. Developed by Juergen F. Schmelzer, Bolton Canada. Assigned to Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada Limited, Toron- to, Canada. Powell Manufacturing: Bulk curing tobacco with solid fuel Apparatus for bulk curing tobacco comprising a barn having a heat ex- changer therein defining interior flow paths for heated water and ex- terior heat exchange surfaces disposed within the curing air flow path within the barn, hot water storage tank unit, a power operated pump for circulating hot water be- tween the hot water storage tank unit and the heat exchanger, a hot water heating unit and a power driven pump for continuously cir- culating water between the hot water heating unit and the hot water storage unit. The hot water heating unit comprises an inner casing structure defining an in- terior combustion chamber, an outer casing structure extending over a portion of the exterior of the inner casing structure and defining therewith a water circulating space communicating with the conti- nuous circulating pump, a grate assembly within the combustion chamber for supporting solid fuel for combustion therein, a forced draft blower for establishing a forc- ed flow of combustion air into the combustion chamber, an induced draft blower for inducing a flow of comhusted gases from the combus- tion chamber, and the operation of the blower being controlled to con- trol the combustion rate of the sup- plied solid fuel and hence the amount of heat added to the water circulating in the water circulating space. U.S. Patent 4,424,024, Developed Simcoe Leaf Tobacco Company Buyers, Packers, Exporters of Canadian Flue-Cured and Burley Tobaccos. Simcoe, Ontario N3Y 4LI Canada Phone: 519/426-2201 Cable: 'Simcoeleaf' Telex No.: 061-81169 Simcoleaf TRY, 1984 87
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INDUSTRY PATENTS construed by Robert W. Wilson, Charlotte; Olin C. Trull, Monroe, both of N.C. Assigned to Powell Manufacturing Company, Inc., Bennettsville, S.C. R.J. Reynolds: Laser beam chopper and scanning system An optical laser beam chopper for converting a continuous beam in- to a series of scanning impulses for use in perforating a moving web is disclosed. The system utilizes a coherent light source which pro- duces a beaiu for use in performing a thin paper web of the type used in producing cigarette filters. The beam passes through a rotary chop- per, or shutter, system "which incor- porates a plurality of rotary discs each of which carries one or more annular rings divided into seg- ments. Selected segments on each ring are formed of a reflective material to act as mirrors for the laser beam, while the remaining segments are in the form of aper- tures which allow the beam to pass through the disc. By properly align- ing the various apertures and re- flective surfaces, rotation of the discs will cause the beam to be cyclically directed along a variety of paths through the disc arrange- ment to periodically strike selected target areas on an adjacent target such as a web of paper, the re- petitive cycling causing the beam to scan the various target areas. In the preferred form of the invention, the beam produces spaced perforations in the web, with motion of the paper web in a direction perpen- dicular to the direction of scan of the beam producing longitudinal rows of perforations, adjacent per- forations being spaced in accor- dance with the speed of the web and the rate of scanning. The rotary disc segments thus serve to chop the laser beam into short impulses, EVENTS MARCH. 22-26 National Association of Tobacco Distributors (NATD) Convention and Exposition Loews Anatole Hotel Dallas, Texas Contact: Mr. Terry Burns New York 212-599-3344 MARCH 23 Tobacco Associates Annual Meeting Mission Valley Inn Raleigh, North Carolina Contact: Mr. Kirk Wayne Washington 202-659-1160 APRIL 15-18 4th World Tobacco Exhibition and Symposium The Hague, Netherlands Contact: Mr. Michael Barford London 01-839-6171 APRIL 24-25 Burley Leaf Tobacco Dealers Association Annual Meeting Lexington Kentucky Contact: Mr. John Logan Bowling Green 502-781-9540 MAY 6-9 LTEA/TAUS Annual Meeting The Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs West Virginia Contact: Dr. Hugh Kiger Raleigh 919-782-5151 MAY 17 Tobacco Merchants Assn. of the U.S. Annual Meeting New York, New York Contact: Mr. Farrell Delman New York 212-239-4435 MAY 25 Flue-Cured Tobacco Coop. Stabilization Corporation Annual Membership Meeting Raleigh, North Carolina Contact: Mr. Charlie Finch Raleigh 919-821-4560 May 30-JUNE 1 Burley Auction Warehouse Association Annual Convention Grove Park Inn Asheville, North Carolina Contact: Mr. Thomas Edwards Mt. Sterling, KY 606-498-2002 JUNE 21-23 Bri~lht Belt Warehouse Association Annual Convention Mariner's Inn Hilton Head, South Carolina Contact: Dr. Kenneth Keller Raleigh 919-828-8988 SEPTEMBER 27-29 Burley & Dark Leaf Tobacco Export Association Annual Convention Knoxville, Tennessee Contact: Mr. Frank Snodgrass Washington 202-296-6820 OCTOBER 4-5 Tobacco Growers' Information Committee Annual Meeting Mission Valley Inn Raleigh, North Carolina Contact: Reginald Lester Raleigh 919-832-3766 OCTOBER 7-12 Coresta--8th International Tobacco Scientific Congress Vienna, Austria Contact: Mr. G. Mayer Vienna 52-68-39 NOVEMBER 6-8 38th Tobacco Chemists' Research Conference Westin Peachtree Atlanta, Georgia Contact: Dr. O.T. Chortyk NOVEMBER 13-15 Tobacco Farmer Show Farmers Warehouse Greenville, North Carolina Contact: Mr. Jim Swindell Raleigh 919-872-5040 NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 2 Cigar Association of America, Annual Meeting The Breakers Palm Beach, Florida Contact: Mr. Norman Sharp Washington 202-466-3070 8B TR--March. 1984 Ti56305351
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INDUSTRY PATENTS each of which is directed to a target area corresponding to the angular position of the rotary disc. U.S. Patent Re. 31,478. Developed by Colin S. McArthur: Douglas C. Clark, both of Winston-Salem, N.C. Assigned to R. l- Reynolds Tobac- co Company. Winston-Salem, N.C. Mitsubishi: Method for producing a tobacco smoke filter plug A method and apparatus for pro- ducing a tobaccco smoke filter hav- ing a double structure composed of one inner core phase in a special fibrous arrangement and an outer skin layer in a different fibrous ar- DEALERS Oriental • Bright Flue-Cured Maryland LEAF TOBACCOS rangement surrounding the core phase. The tobacco smoke filters made according to the present in- vention possess high collapse strength and physical and chemical characteristics in which the tastable components are filtered with low efficiency, while the tar and other particulate harmful mat- ter are filtered with high efficiency. U.S. Patent 4,411,641. Developed by Migaku Suzuki, Kawanoe; Takashi Sakai, Toyama, both of Japan. Assigned to Mitsubishi Ra- yon Co. Ltd.; Mitsubishi Acetate Co. Ltd., both of Tokyo, Iapan. IFF: Material for augmenting aroma or taste Described are methyl substituted pinyl oxopentenes and mixtures of same and uses thereof in augmen- ting or enhancing the aroma or taste of consumable materials in- cluding foodstuffs, chewing gums, toothpastes, medicinal products, chewing tobaccos, perfume com- positions, perfumed articles (in- cluding perfumed polymers, solid or liquid cationic, anionic, non- ionic or zwitterionic detergents, fabric softener compositions, fabric softener articles, optical brightener compositions, and cosmetic pew- ders), colognes, smoking tobacco comp~itions and sraoking t~bacco articles including cigars, cigarettes and integrated and separated filters therefor. Also described are pro- cesses for preparing such com- pounds including the steps of react- ing alpha and/or beta pinene with carbon monoxide and hydrogen via an oxo reaction in the presence of a catalyst to produce a mixture of aldehydes and then reacting the resulting mixture of aldehydes with methyl ethyl ketone in the presence of a basic catalyst to produce the compounds of our invention. U.S. Patent 4,424,378. Developed by Braja D. Mookherjee, Holmdel; Robert W. Trenkle, Bricktown; Robin K. Wolff, Point Pleasant; Richard M. Boden, Ocean; Takao Yoshida, West Long Branch, all of N.J. Assigned to International Fla- vors & Fragrances Inc., New York, N.Y. Hauni-Werke: Detecting soft sections of tobacco fillers A cigarette rod making machine has a beta-ray detector which monitors the density of successive increments of the condensed filler in the continuously moving cig- arette rod and changes the distance between the trimming device and the conveyor for the tobacco stream. The height of the tobacco stream lupstream or downstream of the trimming device) is monitored, and the thus obtained first signals are compared with second signals denoting the distance between the conveyor and the trimming device. The machine ejects those cigarettes whose fillers have caused the generation of first signals denoting that the corresponding portion of the stream contains less than a minimum acceptable quantity of tobacco. The height of successive increments of the stream can be monitored by an opto-electronic or capacitive detector or by a device which employs sound waves. U.S. Patent 4,423,742. Developed by Joachim Reuland, Neu-Borrmen, Fed. Pep. of Germany. Assigned to Hauni-Werke Korber & Co. KG, Hamburg, Fed. Rep. of Germany. TI563053~
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MOLINS
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CLASSIFIED RATES: $3.00 per line (mirtimum. $15.O01. Boxed or d~spiay ads S30.00 per column inch. Ads repeated in consecutwe issues cha~ged at 80% of initial charge. For ads using blind box number, add $500 to total cost of ad. Agency commission w~ll be given only when camera-ready artwork ~s supphed by agency. MAIL AD COPY TO: TOBACCO REPORTER. P,O. Box 95075, Raleigh. N.C. 27625. BOX NUMBER REPLIES: Mail box number replies to: TOBACCO REPORTER. P.O. Box 95075, Raleigh, N.C. 27625. EQUIPMENT Spec|allz;ng in Kentucky and Tennessee Dark Teobac¢os Meyfield, Kentucky 42066 U.S.A. f Telex: 213606 (KEN LEAF MYFD). RE'BUILT PACKAGING MACHI,N, ERY: PACKAGE MACHINERY FA and FA 2 Over- wrap Machines, rebuilt with Hercules high speed polyproplene kit. SCANDIA 707, 710, STS8, 607, 507 and SFA-6 Wrappers w/wo Tear Tape. PACKAGE MACHINERY CA2 & CM3 Wrappers. BARTELT PACKAGERS HAYSSEN Wrappers, PETERS, BRIGHT- WOOD, PALMER and BARTELT Cartoners PADLOCKER, STANDARD KNAPP, ABC & FERGUSON Case Sealers. WANTED YOUR SURPLUS PACKAGING EQUIPMENT. UNION STANDARD EQUIPMENT CO. 805 E. 141st St., Bronx, N.Y. 10454 Phone 212-585-0200, telex 220547 or 422513. TOBACCO REPORTER Products of Gerlach research ~Gerlach tobacco foll the special burning tobacco, prepared according to the Gerlach aroma-preserving process true tobacco flavour GTF fast-burning natural tobacco characteristics EDUIT special matting agent without legally binding designation colour-hue ~nd improved burning for light and dark cigars EDUIT special agent to improve burning white ash and light ash Solution of problems in the cigar industry EDUARD GERLACH GMBH 0-4990 Lubbecke 1 Postfach 1165 • Tel. (05741)8028/29 92 TFt~Ma~,ch, 1984 Advertiser Page Accuray .......................... 41 W.A. Adams Co .................... 27 Agaliem Trading .................. CV2 Allegheny Warehouse ............... 37 Austin Company .................. 13 Baumgartner Papiers ........... 16 & 17 Canadian Leaf ..................... 90 Carolina Leaf Tobacco Co., Inc ....... 47 Casa Export, Lid .................. 14 Casalee Belgmm ................. 59 Catalytic Gene~'ators, Inc ........... 20 Dart Containedine, Inc ............ 18 Oibrell Brothers, Inc ................. 1 Export Leaf Tobacco Co .......... 89 Fillrona international Ltd ............. 81 Focke & Co ................... 10 & 11 G. O. Societa per Azioni ........ 32 & 33 Get'tach, Eduard ................... 92 Gonzalez International Inc ........... 22 Haarman & Reimer Corp ............ 55 Hauni Werke ...................... 43 Alfred N. Hertz .................... 23 Hertz & Selck ..................... 2g Job Export ........................ 69 Kaymich .......................... 63 Kennedy Leaf ..................... 92 Liggett Group ...................... 9 L.L. Loritlard ...................... 75 Marsh & McLennan ............... 84 Max Schlalterer ................... 28 Mobil Chemical Co ................. 19 Molins ........................... 91 A. C. Monk ................... 24 & 25 Philip Morris U.S.A ................. 15 N.C. State Ports Authority .......... 51 Oriam Tobacco Corporation .......... 90 Piedmont Leaf ..................... 74 Port of Hamburg ................. 26 Rothmans International ............ CV4 Sasib Per Azioni ................... 77 Schoeller & Hoesch ................ 85 Simcoe Leaf Tobacco Co ............ 87 Socotab .......................... 73 Jno. H. Swisher & Son .............. 82 Tann Papier ...................... 63 Tobacco Associates ................ 71 Tobacco Trading Corp ............. 35 Trans-Continental Leaf .......... 3 & 67 Universal Leaf ..................... 49 Vacudyne Altair, In¢ ................ 72 G.F. Vaughan Tobacco Co ........... 21 R.P. Watson Co .................... 80 Wattenspapier .................. CM3 World Tobacco .................... 87 TI56305355
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YOUR 'PERSONAL INVITATION TO THE VOTR'E INVITATION PERSONNELLE IHRE PERSI~NLICH'E EINLADUNG ZUR EXHIBITION CONGRESSCENTRE THE HAGUE NETHERLANDS 15.18 APRIL1984 10.00 - 18.00 SU INVITAClON PERSONAL A LA Sponsored & organised by WOR LD TOBACCO Present this invitation at the Exhibition entrance for FREE ADMISSION
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Wo /dTobucco EX!HIBITION CONGRESS CENTRE THE HAGUE-NETHERLANDS 15-18 APRIL 1:984 THE 1984 WORLD TOBACCO EXHIBITION will be the industry's largest and most comprehensive international trade show in recent years. Over 110 international exhibitors will be displaying the very latest in tobacco machinery, manufacturing supplies, leaf tobacco and finished tobacco products. Also exhibiting will be companies providing business services to the trade, including warehousing, forwarding, machinery renovation and printing. gon't ,miss this unique gathering, of the internatinnal tobacr.n industry!
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