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TAP GRAM PREPARED BY THE PUBLIC AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT, PM USA VOL.4 NO2, April 1982

Date: 1983 (est.)
Length: 13 pages
TI22622128-TI22622140
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Abstract

The tobacco industry and millions of consumers breathed a sigh of relief in late January when President Reagan saying he would not ask Congress to balance the federal budget on the backs of taxpayers rejected poposing higher excises on gasoline liquor

Fields

Box
2411. News Clippings
INFOLOG
Tobacco/Candy Dist.
NYSA numbers
0518 B1793 03A
Type
REPORT
Named Person
Abernethy, Robert
Alexander, Manion
Alford, Dwight
Alkinson, Sam
Alklnson, Fi
Allen, Glen
Allen, Patrtcfa
Ames, Bob
Anderson, Barry
Arcari, Suzanne
Arvin, Eartha
Atiyeh, Vic Governor
Bellamy, Melsa
Benschop, Monroe
Bentle, Shirley
Berg, Elizabeth
Berry, Margaret
Bickers, Annie
Bickers, William
Black, Jeanine
Blaine
Blanton, John
Blunk, Dave
Boehning, Arlette
Bond, Christopher
Boone, Paul
Bowers, George
Bowling, James C
Bradshaw, Paul
Brashear, Linda
Brashear, Ronald
Brendan, Governor
Brian, Liberty
Britton, John
Brooks
Burke
Butler, Hazel
Butler, James
Buyalos, Chris
Byrne
Cameron, Lewis
Campbell, William
Carrell, Mike
Cart, Leo
Cash, Diane
Cash, Gary
Chang, John
Chaump, Joe
Clay, Harold
Conner, David
Crabb, Dale
Crafton, James
Crafton, Julie
Crawford, John
Cunningham, Cathy
Cupil, Cheryl
Dalling, Dell
Damon, Tom
Deangelis, Paul
Deiss, Joe
Dies, Bill
Diuguid, Janice
Diuguid, Larry
Dortch, Bernard
Draggoo, Dwayne
Dunaway, Patricia
Dupuis, Elizabeth
Dyer, Dennis
Dyke, Ed Van
Easter, Dan
Eberlin, Gary
Escudero, Ellen
Fahey, Sheila
Faulk, Monty
Ferguson, Michael
Fitzpatrick, Jerry
Florio, Bob
Fohrer, Jean
Foudriat, Don
Frank, Alan
Garrahy, Joseph
Genzale, Roxann
Gibson, Jack
Giles, Virginia
Gittings, Carl
Gittings, Sandra
Glaser, Dallas
Gonzales, Junior
Good, Gary
Gordes, Rob
Gorney, Diana
Gorney, Stephen
Graham, Allen
Grannis, Alexander
Granns
Gransbury, Bob
Gray, Henry
Gray, Paula
Hammett, Cynthia
Hanson, Ted
Harmon, Larry
Hassett, William
Hatch, Orrin
Heagey, Janet
Heavilon
Hein, Paul
Herin, John
Higgins, John
Hookana, Kathy
Hopewell
Hulchinson, Sr Bob
Hurban, Sr Bob
Hussey, George
Jacobson, Jerry
James J
Janssen, Am Elaine
Jim Ch, Sr
Johnson
Jones, Lance
Juriew, Mike
Kilpatrick
Kirkendall, Bob
Koch
Kraft, Pete
Kruk, Bob
Lapierre, Scott
Leav, Tobacco
Lind, Jim
Lopez, Steve
Lopofsky
Lowen, Nick
Mabou, Gary
Macdonald, Michael
Macdonald, Mike
Maglio, Bob
Maitino, Mart
Mayekawa, Vern
Meadows, Tim
Melton, Pegg
Milchum, Rick
Mize, Henry
Moline, Dick
Moore, Bob
Moroni, Chef
Moss, Janet
Mumford, Walter
Munroe, Sr Bob
Nancy, L
Nelson, Len
Nembhard, Norman
Nieds, Chris
Northcuft, Mark
Oberstar, James L
Ohirok, Ted
Olson, Les
Olympia
Packwood (Senator)
Parker, Ray
Paul
Pelio, Anne
Petroski, Jim
Phillips, Ray
Piper, Sr Jody
Poleto, Bob
Pope, Larry
Price, Ruben
Ralph, Sr Rayburn
Ramirez, Rudy
Reagan, Ronald, President (Two-term U.S. President (1981-1989))
Reed, Joe
Reed, Shawn
Reed, Sr Shawn
Reinsch, Darrel
Renney, Glenna
Risser, Fred
Robert
Rockefeller, Governor
Rockefeller, Jay
Roseland, Celia
Ross, Elaine
Saldana, Ron
Sandman, Roger
Scanlon, Larry
Seaton, Sallie
Sessions, Doug
Severtson, Dick
Schnieder, Ron
Simpson
Sivils, Ray
Sorenson, Mert
Soulier, Ltnda
Spampneto, John
Spurgeon, Sr Lu
Stauftero, Jan
Studebaker, Chuck
Sullivan, Paul
Sullivan, Sr Paul
Swartz, Fred
Thompson
Thorne, Governor Charles
Thornton, Gary
Thornton, Mickey Seymour
Timm
Hanrahan, Bob
Todd, Bill
Truss, Sr Dean
Virgta
Wagner
Wahl
Waiter
Waller, Bud
Walsh, Jane
Waxman, Henry A. (U.S. Representative)
(D-CA) Was chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Health and the Environment in 1994.
Williams, Gordon
Wortman, Karen
Wren, Glen
Named Organization
Albany Times Herald Record
American Health Foundation (Health Research)
Plaintiff
Association Of Counties
Black Police Association
Business And Society Review
Caball County Little League Association
Community Relations Department
Dane Co
Director Of Communications
House Appropriations And Revenue Committee
House Of Representatives
Miller Brewing Co. (Subsidiary of Philip Morris Co.)
Subsidiary of Philip Morris Co.
National Review
Philip Morris Companies Inc. (Parent company of Philip Morris USA, Kraft, Miller)
America's seventh-largest industrial enterprise in 1993, owns Kraft, Miller Brewing, General Foods, and more.
Senate Health Committee
Senate Revenue And Taxation
State Association Of Chiefs Of Police
State Bowling Proprietors Association
State Hotel And Motel Association
State Restaurant Association
Stone Mountain
Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service (U.S. Federal government public health advocate)
The U.S. Surgeon General's office has found since 1964 that tobacco use causes disease in humans.
Tobacco Action Network
Purpose was to encourage people in the tobacco industry, as well as any others who were concerned about what was happening to the tobacco industry regarding the misinformation that was being put out by government and by the private health organizations, to write and try to correct the incorrect information that was disseminated by HEW and others in the government, as well as the Cancer Society and Lung Association.
Tobacco Distributors Association
Tobacco Institute (Industry Trade Association)
The purpose of the Institute was to defeat legislation unfavorable to the industry, put a positive spin on the tobacco industry, bolster the industry's credibility with legislators and the public, and help maintain the controversy over "the primary issue" (the health issue).
United States Congress
United States Securities and Exchange Commission
Ways and Means Committee
Subject
Grassroots (Tobacco company efforts to organize smokers)
Wanted to create the appearance of a massive, upset electorate becoming vocal and active to oppose public health smoking restrictions, tax increases on cigarettes, etc.
legislation
smoking restriction
taxes

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Page 1: TI22622128
IN THIS ISSUE PAGE 2 68 TAPers Honored ByTAN 5 Wisconsin SB 80 Fa~s To Pass 7 W. VA. TAPer Makes Politics Work For Him 10 TAPers" Letters To Editors Printed New TI Publications See Page 12 Higher Excises: A Bad Idea at Any Level of Government The tobacco industry and millions of consumers breathed a sigh of relief in late January when President Reagan, saying he "would not ask Congress to balance the federal budget on the backs of taxpayers: rejected p~oposing higher excises on gasoline, liquor, and tobacco products. Even though the President is on record as against such taxes, the issue is tar item resolved. Support for increased excises continues among certain lawmakers who see these taxes, including those on tobacco prod- ucts, as a way of helping to reduce massive deficits for Fiscal Year 1983 and beyond. Will "New Federalism" Mean Higher State and Local Cigarette Taxes? While the debate over higher federal excises rages in Washington, the President's plan to phase in the turn- back of some 40 federally run programs, including Aid to Families With Dependent Children, has caused states to step up lheir search for additional revenue sources. Long before the President announced his "New Federal- ism" program, state legislatures across the country were giving serious thought to raising excises in order to reduce their own mounting budget delicits (see Legisla- tive Update, page 4). Some lawmakers have reluctantly taken the suppos- edly politically safe position in an election year of sup- porling boosts in cigarette excises to help their states comply with charters requiring governments to live within balanced budgets. Other elected officials did so with much less reluctance, using the excuse of budget deficits to lobby for increased cigarette taxes as a way of discouraging smoking. Regardless of their motive, lawmakers who vote to raise cigarette taxes may be in for an unpleasant sur- pr~se in November. Survey after survey shows that voters are vehemently opposed to tax increases of any kind-- personal income, proper~ sales, and excise taxes. Consider what the editors of the National Review recentiy had to say: Until President Reagan quashed the idea, the pundits were making a tax on alcohol and tobacco sound like the...most innovative scheme to hit representative democracy, h punished the wicked; it rewarded the virtuous; it replenished Washington's touchingly depleted coffers... "Sin taxes' appeal first to those who wish to hike any and all taxes, and second to those with a yen/or pater- nalism. In the former group are many Administration advisors. In the latter are [those] who seem to support such taxes primarily as a way to change behavior--that is, to restrict liberty--and only secondarily to raise money. It is baffling that excise taxes should appeal to any- one who cares about equality. One family would pay heavily; the family next door would pay nothing. The working clc'ss would pay more relatively--perhaps even absolutely--than the rich. In a 1976 essay in Business and Society Review, James C. Bowling. St. Vice President Corporate Affairs and Asst. to the Chairman, equated today's excises with medieval "sumptuary" taxes. The purpose of sumptuary taxes, "invariably obscured by the invocation of moral righteousness and social benefiqence: he wrote, "was to keep people in their place:' President Reagan rightly said "No" to relying on this form of "revenue enhancement:' Now it's time for law- makers at all levels to follow the President's lead. Raising excises in the midst of a deepening recession will do little to o~et multibillion-dollar budgetary shortfalls and ma~, in fact, make the problem worse. What we need are some new ideas. T122622128
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TAPers Honored by TAN All around lhe country, Ph/lip Morris TAPers gained recognition for their ongoing support of TAN and the tobacco indust~ At various ceremo- nies this ~nter and spring, 68 Philip Morris volunteers were named either "Distinguished TAN Activists" or "(Slate) Distinguished Activists:' The latter award is presented to the one or two TAN volunteers in each state who have done the most for the organization during lhe past year. Winners of the "Distinguished TAN Activists Award" received a special plaque; outstanding activists in a particular state get a set of framed tobacco leaves. Tobacco Leav~:~ Louisiana: Sec. 51 SSM Lance Jones Maryland: Sec. 22 ADM Ray Parker Michigan: Sec. ,41 SR Bob Hulchinson TAN Honors Section ~" ~ : ADM Ray Parker, holding framed "Tobacco Leaves:' was honored as Maryland's "'TAN Activist ot the Year" at a TAN ceremony in Annapolis. With Parker are "Distinguished Activists" SR Shawn Reed (far left) and SRO Bob Maglio (right). Also present are (back row, l-r) DM Bob Poleto, SSM Fred Swartz, and SHA Norman Nembhard. Missouri: Sec. 54 SSM Charlle Finch Near Jersey: Sec. 15 SSM Joe Chaump Oklahoma: Sec. 52 SR Lu Spurgeon Texas--North: Sec. 52 SSM RayWh/le Texas--South: Sec. 53 SRO Paul DIGeronimo Wisconsin: Sec. 44 SR Paul Sullivan Plaque Winners Ari:~ona: Sec. 73 DM Celia Roseland and Spec. Rep. Mert Sorenson Arkansas: Sec. 54 AMCS Jana Blnns, DM Sam Alkinson Cal|fornia-- Norfh: Sec. 71 SRO Bob Florio California--South: Region 7 DRS Mart~ Maitino and SSM Ted O'Hirok Colorado: Region 6 DRS Ray Phillips Florida: Sec. 34 DM Larry Pope and SR Cathy Cunningham Illinois: Sec. 43 SSM Larry Scanlon Indiana: Philip Morris U.S.A. Louisville Mfg. Center Kansas: Sec. 61 SSM Dwight Alford and SR Bill Todd Louisiana: Sec. 51 SRO John Spampneto. DM Earl Bagley, AMCS Gary Mabou Maryland: Sec. 22 SRO Bob Maglio and SR Shawn Reed Michigan: Sec. 41 SRs CathyAdams and Harold Clay Nevada: Sec. 73 DM Bob Kirkendall New Hampshire: Sec. 11 SRs Don Foudriat, Scott LaP/erre, Brian Liberty, and Michael MacDonald Oklahoma: Sec. 52 ADM John Blanton, DM Rick Milchum, and SR Ralph Rayburn Oregon: Sec. 63 SRs Ellen Escudero, Steve Lopez, Pegg~ Melton, Janet Moss, Mark Northcuft and Ltnda Soulier Pennsylvania: Region 2 Region Trainer Suzanne Arcari and Sec. 21 SSM John Chang Rhode Island: Sec. 11 SSM Ed Van Dyke, DM Bob Kruk and SR Bill Yinusa Texas--North: Sec. 52 DMs Gar~ Thornton, Mickey Seymour, and SR Junior Gonzales Texas--South: Sec. 53 DMs George Bowers. Rudy Ramirez, George ThornelL and SRO Joe Reed Utah: Sec. 62 AMDS Dell Dalling ~ermont: Sec. 12 SRs Walter Mumford and Sue Will Washington: Sec. 63 SSM Barry Anderson. AMDS Pete Kraft, and SRs Roxann Genzale, Vern Mayekawa, Elaine Ross, Jan Stauftero Chuck Studebaker, Merch. Asst. Carol Whftehurst and Adrnin..~L Nancy Simpson Wisconsin.- Ted Hanson of the Koch Label Company (FI. Alklnson) Ti22622129
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Utah A~tivI~t:AMCS Dell Dalling CSec. 62) displays TAN award at a March presentation. Four from Section 11 Named in NH: Proudly displaying their" plaques from TAN are (l-r) SRs Don Foudriat, Scott LaPierre, Brian IJberly. and Mike MacDonald. Section 62 TAPers Share in Boss'$ Honors: Region 6 DRS Ray Phillips (front row), receives "Colorado TAN Activist Award" from TAN Director Judy Wiedemeir. Looking on (l-r) are: AMCS Les Olson, SSM Jack Gibson, AMDS George Hussey, Judy Mflsapps, SR Paul Boone, and Candy and SR Dave Timm. Section 12 Sales Rops Win Vermont Award: SRs Waiter "Gator" Mumford (photo. 1) and S.ue Will. both ot Seclion 12. receive "Distinguished TAN Activist" awards from TAN Director Dennis Dyer at a recent dinner in Killington. APRIL 1982 DM Celia Roseland (Sec, 73) receives "Distinguished TAN Activist Award" for 1981 from TAN Director Ron Saldana in Phoenix. T122622130
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LEGISLATIVE UPDATE FEDERAL New Surgeon General's Report Criticized • The media gave the latest Surgeon General's Report, The Health Conse- quences of Smoking: Cancer, the usual amount at heavy publicity-- much of it favorable. The Tobacco Institute's report on the same subject got far less exposure, but its conclu- sions did not go unnoticed. Syndicated columnist James J. Kilpatrick is one who continues to have serious reservations about the government's claims against smok- ing. Commenting on the TI's paper, Cigarette Smoking and Cancer; A Scientific Perspective, Kilpatrick says, "The tobacco people are quite right: The causal relationship of cig- arettes and cancer hasn't been proved; it still is only statistically inferred. ,.. If cigarettes were carcin- ogens...,every person who smokes would come down with cancer. But this is not so....To assert, as the Sur- "In the few rema/n/ng m/nutes, Senator, cou/d you briefly give us some idea what you°re been ta/k- /ng about for the last hour?" " geon General asserts, that tobacco is a 'major cause' of cancer is to put more weight on statistical scaffolds than the structures were meant to bear." ED. NOTE: For a copy of the TI's Cig- arette Smoking and Cancer: A Sci- entific Perspective, write or call 1he Poblic Affairs Department. Bill Would Require Rotating Warning Labels TAP volunteers who are constituents of members of a House subcommit- tee and two committees in the Sen- ate are writing to their Representa- tives and Senators in opposition to leg~lation that would impose dras- tic new curbs on cigarette labeling and advertising. The bflls--HR 5653 sponsored by Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA), and S 1729, co-sponsored by Republican Senators Orrin Hatch (UT) and Robert Packwood (OR)- in addition to other e~fects, would require cigarette manufacturers to change the warning labels on ciga- rette packs and advertisements periodically. Both bills are couched in the guise of better informing the public about the alleged health consequences of smoking. The Wax- man bill is in the House Subcommit- tee on Health and Environment~ while the Senate bills are being reviewed by the Committee on Labor and Human Resources (chaired by Hatch) and the Commit- tee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation (chaired by Pack- wood), Wants 28¢ Federal Excise Tax In late February, Rep. James L Oberstar (D-MN) introduced HR 5629, a bill that would raise the fed- eral cigarette excise tax from 8¢ to 28¢ a pack and provide an annual adjustment in the tax based on the annual change in the Consumer Price Index. The bill has been referred to the House Ways and Means Committee. Oberstar wants to make the tax what it would have been ff it had been adjusted for the rate of inflation since 1951, when the 8c-per-pack rate was imposed, STATE New York Grannis Bill Passes Assembly, Awaits Senate Action For the fifth consecutive year. the State Legislature isconsidering AB 2746, the "New York Clean Indoor Air Act:' sponsored by Assemblyman Alexander Grannis (D-66-Manhat- tan). The bill passed out of the Health Committee on February 9, by a vote of 13-3, and passed the full Assembly on March 29, 84-59. The Grannis pro- posal restricts smoking in public places, including restaurants, work- places, and retail stores. This is the fourth straight year the bill has passed the Assembly, but each time it has stalled in the Senate Health Committee. Tl'fis Committee will not consider the bill until late April. TAPers throughout the state, Duwayne Draggoo, PM USA Sales Training and Development (NYO), was one of several New York TAPers who staffed TAN phone banks to remind other TAN volunteers to contact their leg'islalors about the Grann~s bit1. TAP~RAM T122622131
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Petitions Galore Against Grannis: Some of the more than 4.000 petition signatures collected by Sections 13 and 14 against the Grannis bill. including volunteers from the NYO and the Miller Brewery at Fulton, once again wrote letters to their assemblymen, collected petitions, and participated in TAN-sponsored phone banks, just as they did last year when the bill narrowly passed the lower house. Joining the TAPers is a strong coa- lition of business and labor groups opposed to Grannis's efforts to get a stiff statewide anti-smoking bill on the books. The coalition includes the Business Council o! New York State, the N~w York Chamber of Com- merce and Industw, the New York State Restaurant Association, the Public Employees Federation, the State AFL-CIO, the Association of Counties, the State Association of Chiefs of Police, the State Bowling Proprietors Association, the National Black Police Association, and the State Hotel and Motel Association. Sales Force TAPers Collect Over 4,000 Signatures SSMs Henry Mize (Sec. 14) and Monty Faulk (Sec. 13) both praised sales force volunteers who collected more than 4,000 signatures against the Grannis bill. "Everybody in our section responded beautifully on very short notice:' said Mize. "We received the same enthusias- tic support as last year from Section 13 volunteers:' added Faulk. "Judg- ing by the number of people signed the petitions, we're not alone in wanting to see this bill defeated once and for allf' Missouri A/l-Out TAP Effort Against Tax Increase On April 6--two days befor~ the leg- break--the Senate voted 21 to 13 to pass an amended version of HB 1,548, which raises the cigarette tax from 9¢ tol 3¢ per pack.Earlier this winter, the House passed its own version of the bill which calls for a 7c increase. The Senate bill includes a "sunset" provision that would require the leg- islature to renew three of the four cents that would be added to the current tax two years after the law would take effect. The House now has the option of accepting the Senate version and if it does, the bill would go to Governor Christopher Bond (R) for his signa- ture. If the House rejects the Senate bill, a joint conference committee of both houses will try and work out a compromise. If a compromise is agreed upon, the new version of HB1548 would then have to be approved by each house prior to going to the Governor. DM Ray Sivils, who has been using the TAP Hotline to keep the NYO abreast of the bill's status, was one of six members of Section 54 who attended a March 3 hearing in Jef- ferson Ci~ Also there as part of a coalition that included representa- tives ol the Missouri Candy and Tobacco Distributors Association and other tobacco groups in the state were SRs Gary Eberlin, Mike Kelley, Bud Waller, Mark Brown, and Darrel Reinsch. DM Len Nelson of Section 61 was among the many TAPers --including volunteers from the Seven-Up Com- pany--wh.o also made their opposi- ,. tion known through letters to legisla- tors. In a letter to Senator Paul Bradshaw (R-Springfield), Nelson called the proposed tax hike "regressive in nature because [the higher taxes] would burden lower- middle-class and poor consumers most severely." At the March 3 hearing, John Brit- ton, the industry's Legislative Coun- sel, testified that the revenue propo- nents hoped to derive from the tax increase was based on the incorrect assumption that Missourians pur- chased all their cigarettes in the state. Britton argued that ff the tax bill passed, many consumers were lJ.kely to cross over into neighboring Illinois and Kansas to buy cigarettes. On the public smoking front, TApers also wrote letters in opposi- tion to HB 1192, which restricts smok- ing in most public places. No further action on the bill has been sched- uled. The Missouri Legislature is scheduled to adiourn on May 15. Wisconsin SB 80 Dies with Adjournment; Tax Bill Awaits Special Session After a long struggle, the tobacco industry and its allies scored a m~or victory on Ap~l 2, when SB 80, the "Wis- We're Against SB S0! Bob Moore of PM Industrial (3rd. 1) and seven members of Section 44 at a February hearing in Madison to oppose the W~sconsin Clean Indoor Air Act (l-r) AM Elaine Janssen. SRs Dick Severtson and Dave Blunk. AMDS Bob Ames. a local tobacco wholesaler. DM Jerry Jacobson. and sr~s Paul Sullivan and Jane Walsh Although different vers~cns of the bill passed the Assembly and Senate. SB 80 died when both houses fatted to concur on various provisions before the legislature adlourned April 2 APRILI982 T!22622132
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consin Clean Indoor Air Act," died with, adjournment belore the regular ses- sion ende~Anotherbi~ SB 783. which calls for an/ncrease in the excise t~x ~rom 20¢ to 23¢ per pack and which also mfises the sales tax from 4% to 5% (applicable to cigarettes), passed the Senate on March 22 by avote of 18-5 and is expected to be considered in a special session sometime Lhis spring. The failure of SB 80 to get enacted is significant because the bill's chief sponsor was Senate President Fred Risser (D-Dane Co.). Although the Sen- ate had passed an amended version of SB 80 last October, it wasn't until March 30 that the Assembly passed its version by 64-2(2. The Senate was required to concur with the Assembly version before the close of business on the last day of the session, which it tailed to do For the past three years, TAPers, including volunteers from Section 44, Philip Morris Industrial, and the Miller Brewing Company, took part in letter- writing campaigns, phone banks, and petition drives and also attended hearings to show opposition to the bill, which would have banned or restricted smoking in a wide variety of indoor public places. TAPers made their case with newspaper editors, too. This winter, Kathy Hookana of PM Industrial's Corporate Affairs Depart- ment had a letter printed by the Wis- consin Journal, a paper that had pushed lor passage of the "Risser bill:' Kathy told the editors that she objected to their blatant lobbying for the anti-smoking measure. "Please get o~I our backs and stop trying to run our lives," she wrote. Michigan .-." -. "- .... ~,..-.,; E~.',i ." ":':.'. --, d ". Four TAPers trom Section 41 were in attend- ance when a Senate committee voted to table SB 486, the "Michigan Clean Indoor Air Act." in mid-February. The bill is not expected to be reconsidered this year Shown above are (l-r) ADM Leo Cart. the Tl's Bob Hanrahan, SSM Tony Johnson. and DM Mike Juriew. SR Jody Piper (not shown) also attended. Rhode Island Nation's Highest State Tax: 23¢ The nation's smallest state now has the nation's highest cigarette tax--. 23¢ a pack--as a result of a 5c-per- pack increase in March. The bill (HB 7206) passed, despite the strong opposition of TAPers and others who felt the previous 18c-per-pack tax was too high. In his State of the State Message. Gov. ,Joseph Garrahy (D) had asked the legislature to raise the cigarette tax to help reduce a pro- jected $23 million deficit. Section 11 volunteers distributed these posters to customers in Rhode Island. Besides keeping the NYO aware of the bill's progress, TAPers includ- ing ADMS Chef Moron~i, DM Bob Kruk, ADM Tom Damon, and SRs Sieve Scowcrott and Paul DeAngelis attended a February hearing in Providence. Other volunteers from SSM Ed Van Dyke's section also took part in TAN phone banks, distributed anti-HB 7206 posters to customers they called on, and wrote letters to their legislators. Among those writing was Cynthia Hammett o! the N'~O, who has a resi- dence in the state. In a letter to her state senator. Cynthia noted, "There is no question that this is a regressive tax that unduly penalizes those in the lower socio-economic groups who are consumers of cigaretles. Does it make any sense to /urther burden these people who are already con- tributing more than their fair share?" TAPGRAM TI22622133
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Grahmn was an important pl ~ay~ fn the industry's recent campaign against abH1 th.a~ would have raised West Virginia's cigarette tax 5¢ a pack, to 22¢. He and other TAPers in his section wrote letters, attended a hearing, and distributed posters against the measure. In the more than three years that Graham has been an active mem- ber of TAP and TAN, the political "know-how" he has gained has brought him some unexpected side benefits. Last year, Graham applied his new-found experience in politics to organize a grass roots campaign to get state and county funding for the improvement and lighting of Caball County's 18 Little League baseball fields. The story of how he used the political process to improve the, quality of lite in his home county offers a case study of why get- ting involved in government is so important. "The drive that culminated in the installation of lights last summer started in 1980, when I suggested that our organization, the Caball County Little League Association, try to obtain money to improve the county's baseball fields. My involve- ment in TAP and TAN since 1978 had made me aware of what citizens could do to influence the govern- mental decision.making process and I made good use of that experi- ence~' Graham told the TAPGRAM. Armed with a detailed proposal Graham attended a public meeting of the Caball County Commission and told the commissioners what fields, Liking what they heard, the commissioners voted to authorize funds to kick off the project. S~I lacking money for lights, Gra- ham set up a task force of associa- tion members who had contacts with state officials to see Jf state funding could be obtained. The task force met with key people in government, including representatives of Gover-, nor Jay Rockefeller, and effectively argued the case for the ligh~ "The rest is history," said Graham. "Last July, we put on a 'Light the District' ceremony in Ona in honor of the first Little League night game played in the coun~ I got to meet the Gover- nor, who was being saluted for his support of the lighting project~' Graham feels that his personal contacts with state and local law- makers during his campaign for baseball field lights enhances his effectiveness as a member of TAP and TAN. "Tve found that once you've met an elected offihial face- to-face, he's going to remember who you are when you contact him again about other issues, like tobacco:' Graham thinks that lawmakers in the state are much more knowl- edgeable about tobacco's impor- i tance than they were a few years ago. Recalling his first contact with lawmakers over a tobacco issue, Graham said, "I was amazed at how little they knew about the subject, other than what they had read in the newspapers. Many didn't know that tobacco's direct contribution to th~ state's economy amounts to some APRILI982 Allen Graham 525 million each year and that tobacco means lots of jobs and taxes paid to help support vital govern- ment services. "Governor Rockefeller was able to get the cigarette ta~ raised from 12¢ to 17¢ per pack in 1978 without too much opposition. That was the last cigarette tax increase the state has had;' he said. "There's tremendous interest in TAP and TAN among the sales force. In the past few years they've written letters, made phone calls, a~ended hearings, collected petitions, and taken advantage of every opportu- nity to educate lawmakers and the media about proposed laws that it passed, could be detrimental to the people and economy of the state;' he added. Not surprisingly, Graham thinks everTone should consider getting active in government. °'A person can have a real impact on an issue if he gets involved. Get to know the peo- ple who represent you. It's the best way I know of making your opinions count:' '.~r.:..~ Virgta',c s C:.;~et~. "Fax ~ H~..~• E~. :ugh~" Shown at left are tour the nine TAPers from Section 24 who attended a late January hearing in Charleston to oppose a 5¢-peropack increase in the cigarette tax: (l-r) Diane West. Gary Davis. Gary Good. and Dan Easter. Also at the hearing were DM Jim Lind. CAM Nick Lowen (and his mother), and SRs Alan Frank. Tim Meadows. and Cheryl Cupil. DM Allen Graham (see box) coordinated the TAP effort, which also included a letter-writing campaign to state legis- lators. The tax hike. endorsed by Gay. Jay Rockefeller, failed to make it out o/a House committee and died with adjourn- ment. The legislature last raised the c|g- arette ~ax in 1978. from 12¢ to TI22622134
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Nebraska TAPers Don't Wahl More Taxes: Section 61 TAPers attended a hear- ing, wrote letters to their legislators, and helped out in a statewide TAN petition drive against a bill that would raise the 14¢ cigarette tax to 18¢ per pack. The unicameral (one-house) legislature is expected to vote on the measure some- time in April. At the hearing in Lincoln are (l-r) ADM Jerry Fitzpatrick, SR Karen Wortman0 DM A1 Brooks, and SI~ Ron Schnieder. According to TAN Director Roger Sandman, more than 16,000 people have signe(~ petitions against the measure, which has the support of Governor Charles Thorne (R). Elsewhere Around the Country New Jersey: Assemblyman Martin Herman (D-Gloucester), as expected, reintroduced bills that would regulate smoking in various public places, including restaurants and workplaces. Similar legislation failed to pass in 1981, although three other restrictive smoking bills intro- duced by Herman did pass and were signed into law in December by outgoing Governor Brendan Byrne. The three covered education and health care facilities, doctors' offices, and elevators. Meanwhile, the new Governor, Republican Tom Kean, has asked the legislature to apply the state's 5% sales tax to ciga- rettes. The estimated $30 million the Governor hopes to raise would go toward offsetting a projected $729 million budget deficit for Fiscal 1983. California: Region 7 TAPers from Sections 71, 72. and 73 wrote appre- ciation letters to the five members of the Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee who voted to defeat a bill that would have raised the ciga- rette tax from 10¢ to 20¢ per pack. TAPers had.earlier written the|r state assemblymen and senators in sup- port of maintaining the current 10¢ rate. SSM Ted O'Hirok of Sec. 72 was one of the many who wrote and received a reply. "I do not believe that [such] a tax increase will elimi- nate our current budgetary prob- lems. Rather, a cut in state spending is necessary if we are to avoid a defi- cit:' wrote Assembly Minority Leader William Campbell. Indiana: A bill calling for a ban on smoking in government building elevators and other areas of state- owned facilities died when it failed GRIN AND BEAR IT by IJchty&Wagner "How can the.y" analyze Wh~t I say wl~en ! don't even know why l said it?" to get full House consideration with- in the required 18 days of introduc- tion. A similar measure introduced in 1981 died in the Public Health Committee. TAPers from Section 42, PM Industrial, and the Louisville Manufacturing Center had earlier written letters to their state represent- atives. Oregon: Confronted with an esti- mated budget shortfall of $360 mil- lion, Governor Vic Atiyeh (R) signed a bill into law in March that raises the cigarette tax from 16¢ to 19¢ per pack. This marks the second time in less than six months that the finan- cially troubled state has raised its cigarette tax. Section 63 TAPers urged lawmakers to consider other alternatives. Maryland: SSM Fred Swartz and SRO Bob Maglio of Section 22 con- tinue to provide the NYO and TAN with information about a bill that would raise the 13¢ state cigarette tax to 20.5¢ a pack. Mississippi: Even though the House of Representatives voted 98-15 in early February to pass a bill that would have raised the cigarette tax from 11¢ to 16¢ per pack, the mea- sure eventually died Jn a ~enate committee on March 2. According to Section 51 SSM Lance Jones, state legislative rules require all bills to be out of committee by March 2 or be considered "dead" for the session. Jones, SRO Glen Wren, and Area Manager Joe Pate monitored the bill for the NYO. Kentucky: Joe Deiss of th~ Louisville Community Relations Department tells us that no immediate action is expected on a bill that seeks to raise the state cigarette tax in two phases: from 3¢ to 6¢, effective July 15, 1982, and from 6¢ to 8¢, effective July 15, 1985. The bill is now before the House Appropriations and Reve- nue Committee. Pennsylvania: Section 21 TAPers showed up at a January hearing of a House State Government subcom- mittee to oppose a bill restricting smoking in restaurants, workplaces. and other indoor public places. Vol- unteers from SSM John Chang's sec- tion are providing the NYO with updates on the status oi this bill. TAPGRAM T122622135
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, ! Evanston, IL 5¢ Tax Imposed, Despite TAP Efforts On March 23, the Board of Alder- men voted 11-5 to impose a 5c-per- pack tax on cigarettes. Evanston smokers now must pay 33¢ in com- bined cigarette taxes: federal (8c), state (12¢), county(5¢), city (5¢). and sales tax (3¢). Chicago, which last year raised its city cigarette tax to 10¢, has the highest combined cigarette tax in the U.S. Earlier in ".~'ers at ~v~nston. I'... ~'~:::.." l l TAPers from Section 43 at a March 8hearing the month, TAPers from Section 43 ol the Board of Aldermen to urge rej ection of a 5c-per-pack cigarette tax (back attended a hearing to show opposi- row. l-r) SRs Dallas Glaser. Cindy l~uetsche. Gordon Williams, SRO Fred Heavilon, tion to the proposal. Members of SSM DM Dick Moline, and SR Bob Hurban; (front row. l-r) SRs Chris Nieds, Sheila Fahey, Larry Scanlon's section also wrote Anne Pelio, DM Mark Lopofsky. and SR Jim Ch/anelli. and called their aldermen. LOCAL Punta Gorda, FL Thumbs Down on Smokin Ordinance The City Council rejected a pro- posed restrictive smoking ordinance that would have put the city in com- pliance with a Charlotte County law regulating smoking in a wide vari- ety of public places. According to SSM John Crawtord of Section 34, Punta Gorda had the option of adopting or rejecting the county Washl.~ton Anti-Smoking Bill Dies: TAP volunteers from Section 63 outside the law. Prior to the council's action, state capitolin Olympia, where they attended a late January hearing on a pro- TAPers called councilmembers to posed anti-smoking bill that later died with the adjournment of the legislature. voice their opposition. Crawford Above (l-r) are SHABen Nechanicky, AMDS Pete Kraft, and $I~s Jeanine Black, and two other volunteers attended a John Higgins, and Chuck Studebaker. council hearing on the measure in early February. Special thanks to SRO Jim Petrosky for keeping the Public Affairs Department well- brleted on the proposal. Louisville TAPers Urge Alderman to Abandon No- Smoking Drive Louisville TAPers from the Manufac- turing Center and from Section 42 called and wrote letters to the Presi- dent of the Board of Aldermen urg- ing him to give up his campaign for no-smoking areas in local restau- rants, Although no ordinance has yet been introduced, the proposal by Dr, Mike Carrell has received consider- Getting Ready for the Hearing in Punta Gorda: (l-r) Outside City Hall are SSM able publicity in the press and on TV~ John Crawford. SR Bob Munroe, TAN D~rector Doug Sessions, and DM Larry Pope. APRIL 1982 TI22622136
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TAP HAPPENINGS TAPers' Letters Printed Glenna renney of Sec. 33 must be doing something right because she had her third letter to the editor printed in the Orlando (FL) Sentinel Star in the past year. This time, Glenna wrote to set the record straight about the recent Surgeon General's Report. "After reading [your anti-smoking column], my Vir- ginia Slims weren't the only things burning. I think |he truth is that they don't know what causes cancer and therefore cover up their inadequate findings with a "smoke screen: I've had it with scare tactics....The Sur- geon General's Report is quickly los- ing its credibility" Also reacting to bias in media cov- erage of the latest government report on smoking and health was Ruben Price of Section 14. In a letter to the Albany Times Herald Record, Price asked, "Are you establishing yourself as a holier-than-thou news- paper? Is it possible that people... enjoy smoking?" Paul Hein of Section 33 told the editors of the Ft. Walton (FL) Dally News that the decision to smoke or not to smoke is a personal one: should be permitted to weigh the evidence or lack of evidence and decide for myself. Those who choose not to smoke have my respect for their decision, and I make no attempt to recruit these people into the world of tobacco. I expect no less from nonsmokers for my decision to use tobacco products? Finally, there's this letter from retiree Sallie Seaton to the editors of the Louisville Courier Journal on the subject of cigarette taxes. "Tobacco ...has helped feed little children as well as the elderly I don't think any- one should even think about putting more tax on a pack of cigarettes, Everything we get now is taxed too high, People on fixed incomes have a hard time paying taxes on their homes and utilities:" she wrote, A Good Sign: Section 52 SR Dean Truss noticed this sign in the storefront of a Texarkana. TX, retailer who has been a Marlboro smoker for many years. Thornton. Has a Better Idea Section 52 DM Gary Thornton has come up with an innovative way of keeping his supervisors, the NYO, and TAN informed of news items he and members of his division notice. Thornton designed a form that tells the name and city where the item was printed, the date of publication, and what action, if any has been taken. The form also includes space for the name of the TAPer sending in the information. SSM Ray White thinks Thomton's suggestion makes it easier to keep accurate records of news items that are important to PM USA and the industry. So do we. S. oking Is Permitted, DM Celia Roseland (Sec. 7~) noticed this item in her local paper and thought it should be shared with TAPGRAM readers. A couple in Arkansas have given up on their personal campaign against ciga- rettes after nearly ~ ye~ of b~aniag smoking at their "Good Eats C~e" in Eurek~ Springs. The restaurant owners r~n ~n ~d in their Io~l p~per receafty that s~id, "We Give Up. Smoking Is Now Permitted:' Thei~ ~e~soaing? "People in town s~ [ou~ restaurant] is g good plgce, but they wonl even g~ve if ~ chgnce becguse they enjo~ h~ng ~ ciga- rette with dinner~' s~id one of the o~ers. Get Involved with a Winning Team. Join TAP-TAN Today! I'd like lo volunteer to help support lhe tobacco industry. Please ada my name (our names) to the other members of the Philip Morris family who've joined TAP-TAN. Let me know how I can help. NAME (Please print) SPOUSE'S NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE PHONE ( SOCIAL SECURITY PM DIVISION (e.g. PM USA. Int'l.) ....... SIGNATURE Return. to: PM USA Public Affairs Department 100 ParkAve. NewYoric NY 10017 10 TAPGRAM TI22622137

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