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International Tobacco Exhibition Conference Souvenir Catalog

Date: 14 Sep 1983
Length: 75 pages
TI04431114-TI04431188 [Err]
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Abstract

Now that Ar Z has made Vicloia Falts the most easily access the world at little or no extra cost can you really gO home and admit you missed There are daily flights to the V Falls item both Harare and Johannosbu Once you re there top hotel is

Fields

Box
0422. K. Becker - Public Smoking Miscellaneous
NYSA numbers
--- B1793 ---
Type
Catalog
REPORT
LEGAL LANGUAGE
Named Person
Agee, Curds
Akim, G
Alexandre, Thien
Alfred, Maschmenfarl
Allan
Allen
Allis
Allis, Chalm
Andre
Andrews, M
Barker, Paul
Baskevitch, Nicolas
Bassett, Lowell, Ph.D. (Economist, U of Washington, Anti-Tobacco Expert)
Bassett, Rebecca B
Beckman
Bedford
Bell, Stephen
Betty
Birsfelden
Blazekovlc, Zdenko
Boshkovski
Bottger, John
Bradley
Braunstein
Breen, Stanley
Brinker, Alfred
Brock, Thomas
Brooks, W
Bryant, Fred
Bunting, Richard
Burley
Busch
Butler
Caliahan, James P
Cardwell
Carrington, H Nash
Carrington, John I
Carrington, T M
Chalmers
Charles A
Christopher R
Clark
Clis, Jacques
Coates, Carles
Coena, Noah
Collins, Michael
Colquhoun, A B
Comas
Craggs
Cundiff
Dans
Danza
Danzas
David
David B
Dempter, E V
Derrick
Dickinson
Dobbins, Marianne M
Dorset, B H
Dreyfuss, Stephen
Duhan
Durocher, Donald F
E E Coman
Eberhardt, Marianne
Edwards, Arden
Edwards, Gordon
Eggleston
Fenton, David
Finifter, Rachel Berger
Focke
Forbes
Fraser, Jaraes A
Frear, Ronald H
Gasper, David
Geiss
Gerald B
Gevelsberg, W
Girons
Gooden, Beldon D
Gordon
Gould, J P
Grau, J Richard
Harming, Peter
Harper, Emmett
Harrison
Hart, Dwight
Hawksworth
Heinz, Edward N
Heal, Thomas D
Hess, Rudi
Hesse, Klans
Hill, Harold C
Hirs, Anne
Hood
Hotchktss
Huckepak, Busch
Jean
Jegilza, Wolfgang
John
Jose
Judy
Kavanaugh
Keith
Keithley
Kelly
Kemp, Wayne
Kimberly
Krohn
Langschultz, Frederick P
Laprade, Norman
Lashta, David
Laskim, Meyer
Laurence, Michael
Lawson, Luther
Legg
Lewis, Theodore E
Lockvood, George E
Lockwood, Brown
Lockwood, Frederick A
Lockwood, Robert M
Lohmueller, Karl
Lowden Nowack, Dwight
Luehrman, David C
Lungiey, Colin
Lynn, Hugh
Machon
Maker
Maline
Marden
Marden, Edwards
Marshall, David
Mcalexander
Mcohn
Mcrinery
Merrick
Michael E
Molins
Moore, Larry
Moormann
Morris, Chris P
Mulligan, Randy
Mutschall, Hugo
Naegle, Douglas
Ncwcomb, Douglas N
Neal, M F
Nerou, Marie
Neubtr, Dieter
Newcomb
Niepmann
Nottingham
Oconnor White, John
Odhana
Odoall, Frank
Paulette, James
Pease, William M
Pendergrass, Liazy
Peter F
Phil
Pittman, Dean
Plackett
Pope, Norman
Powel
Prather, Gent
Price, Patrick L
Ralph
Raynor
Reid, M
Rich, James
Richard E
Robe, L
Rose, Betty
Rowe
Sanderson, Michael D
Sayers, E
Schetfler, H
Schmermund
Schractmund
Schroeder, Phil
Schumacher
Schwartz, Larry
Schwartz, Rodolphe
Scnweltzer
Shaheen
Shuturkov, Damcho
Simpson
Sland
Smith, E
Stehnaeh, Jerry
Straus, H
Suhr, Eckhard
Tama
Tanner, Mark
Tele
Therry
Townsend, J W
Vicino, Robert
Ward, Edward H
Wattens
Wawer
Welch, Nick
Whitman, H
Willi
Woodard
Zadar
Zanini, G
Zoelckers, Peter
Named Organization
Aaa Manufacturing & Service Co
Acco Processing
Accuray Corp
American Machine & Foundry Co. (AMF (Founded in 1900. Made automated machines for the industry)
Ariay Equipment Corporation
Arkote
Astra (Drug company)
Bell Flavors
Box Manufacturing Co
BV
Cardwell Machine Co
Carotek Inc
Carrington & Michaux Inc
Catalytic Generators Inc
Cb Kaymich
Cb Kaymich & Co
Cdl International
Cem Moisture
Dexter Corporation
CHEM
Chesapeake Container Co
Chessle System
Chevron Oil
CMN
Coresta (Industry-affiliated Int'l scientific/research group)
An international organization whose objective is "to improve cooperation in scientific research and tobacco." Consists of 186 member companies/institute from 54 countries, including tobacco, paper and filter companies, and universities engaged in tobacco research.
Covington & Burling (Tobacco Industry law firm)
Tobacco industry law firm. Was involved in organizing the Whitecoat Project.
Curdwell Machine Co
Danzas Commercial Delegation Inc
Degesch America Inc
Itr Inc
Eb Corp
Eblec-S Technology
Ebtec Corp
Ecusta (major cigarette paper supplier)
ES
Fabreeka Products Co
Filtrona (Manufacutre Reynold's Filters)
Fishburne Equipment Co
FMC
Focke & Co
Food Engineering Corp
Forte Technology Inc
Fries & Bro
Fumigators Inc
*General Electric Company (use General Electric Company)
General Paper
GES
GMBH
Hambro Machinery Ltd
HC
Hercules Incorporated
Hg Block
Hipage Co Inc
Hurley & Harrison
Imperial Tobacco Co. (of Canada)
International Paper Co
International Tobacco Conference
Itr Inc
John Payne Engineering Ltd
Kaymich Inc
Kinki Printing Co
Kinki Printing Co Ltd
Leaf Tobacco Co
Leder Inc
Ledw Belting Canada Ltd
LIS
Ltd Arkote Ltd
Macandrews & Forbes Co
Mactavish Machine Manufacturing Co
Makonia Leaf
MAS
Maschnenfabrlk Ft Nmpmann Gmbh & Co
MF
Mf Neal & Co
Mf Neal Co
Micro Quad System Incor
Mikropul Corp
Miller Machine Manufacturing & Engineering
MJ
MM
Mobil Oil
Mobil Chemica Films Division
Mobil Chemical Canada Ltd
Mobil Chemical Commercial Films
Mochmo Co
Molins Tobacco Machinery Ltd
Mund Industries Ltd
Mundet Industries
Mundet Industries Ltd
National Tobacco Board Of Greece
Nonhca
NRO
OB
OCMC
Clark Corp
ONT
PDI
Phipps & Bird Inc
Pmb Inc
Powell Manufacturing Co
Proctor & Schwartz Inc
Rayco Industries
Raymond Heinz
Raynor Adams & Associates Inc
Rizla International
Robert Burton & Associates
Robert Fletcher & Son Ltd
Robert Keith & Co
Roberts Systems Inc
Robes Systems
RP
Rutt & Company
Sasib
Schmermund Gmbh & Co
Schroeder Co
Shell Oil
Tamag Basle Ltd
Tasc Drives Ltd
Tech Inc
Terminals Inc
THS
TI
Tobacco And Salt Public Corp
Wattens & Tann
WD
WG
Wh Dickinson Engineering Ltd
Wilbur Chocolate Co
WILH
Wolverine Corp
Subject
tobacco industry sponsorship

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Page 1: TI04431114
International Tobacco Exhibition Conference SEPTEMBER 1447, 1983 RICHMOND, VIROlNIA, USA Souvenir Catalog CALENDAR OF EVENTS ..... 3, 13 CONFERENCE SCHEDULE 4, 109 EXHIBITION FLOOR PLAN .... 5, 16 LIST OF EXHIBITORS ....... 6, 17 T104431114
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FLUID BED DRIER A NEW' RANGE OF HIGH CAPACITY AUTOMATIC CUT ROLLED STEM DRIERS |/ THE NEW TECHNIQUE PERFECTED FOR TOBACCO PRODUCTS BY CONTACT.US FOR ALL YOUR PRIMARY TOB.ACCO PROCESSING M~CRINERY.i MACHINERY LIMITED Chandos Street Netherfield Nottingham NG42PF Telephone Nottingham 879450 Telex 377421 Telegrams HAMBRO, N O'I-rlNGHAM. COLISEUM EXHIBIT BOOTH LAYOUT ENTER HERE EXIT HERE LEIGH STREET ~ ~ INTERNATIONAL TOBACCO EXHIBITION CONFERENCE SEPTEMBER 14-17, 1983 RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, USA See reverse side for company names and locations "[OBA(~O INTERf~ATIONAL--5
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your way through Africa, seeing the Victoria Falls won't cost you a pot of gold... Now that A~r Z=mbabwe has made Viclo~ia Falts the most easily access=bleWonderin the world at little or no extra cost - can you really gO home and admit you missed There are daily flights to the V=ctoria Falls item both Harare and Johannosbu[g, Once you're there, top hotel accommodahon is incredloly reasonable, and the spectacle of "The Smoke that Thunders'-where the mighly Zambez= river plunges tO0 metres lille a vast chasm 1 700 metres wide - =s one of the World's most brealhlaking sights. Fly all the way with Air Z~mbabwe. Our trequenl Air Zimbabwe services meal of them non-stop. link Harare w~th London, Frankfurt and Athens. all of which have convenient connectlorls wllh Victoria Fells through Harare. And once you're =n Zimbabwe. take advantage of our fteouenl services 1o Soulh Afrca, Kenya. Zambia, Malawi. Botswana and our Sunday evening serwce to Perlh and Sydney $o now we've 4 made it this ' easy foryou to see V¢ctoria Fails can you reailygo home and admd you missed it? Ask your T,evel Agenl Io in- clude Victoria Fells in your schedule. z ' c ,bwe FAST AND FRIENDLY TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--7
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COMMONWEALTH of VIRGINIA A blESSAGE FROM THE GOVERNOR On the occasion Of the first International Tobacco Conference/Exhibition, ~ extend my war~est greetings, Th~ Commonwealth - where tobacco was first cultivated - is a fitting place to discuss the "State of the Art" in cigarette manufacturing and to review the tremendous growth of the tobacco industry. This growth is reflected by the represe~tatlves at your conference, who come from seventeen states and as many nations. On behalf of the people of Virginia, ~ welcome you a~d hope that the conference will be an informative and rewarding one. '~'o~ernor
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WATTENS &TANN MAKE A PERFECT COMBINATION CALENDAR OF EVENTS .................... 3, 13 EXHIBITION FLOOR PLAN ................... 5, 16 LIST OF EXHIBITORS ...................... 6, 17 EXHIBIT DESCRIPTIONS ..................... 18 ADDRESSES OF EXHIBITORS .................. 89 CONFERENCE SCHEDULE ................. 4.109 SYNOPSIS OF CONFERENCE PAPERS ............ 110 ADVERTISERS' INDEX ...................... 152 ROBERT M. LOCKWOOD ............................. PUBLI-qHER GEORGE E. LOCK~VOOD ............................. PUBLISHER FREDERICK A. LOCKWOOD ........... : ........ ASSISTANT PUBLISHER Ti IOMAS COOAN ................................. EDIT3R ANNE HIRS ................................ ASSOCIATE EDITOR VIRGINIA LOCKWOOD ................ EXHIBITION/CONFERENCE AIDE BETTY-BROWN LOCKWOOD ......... EXHIBI iqON/CONFERENCE AIDF'. REO BUTLER ............................... REPRESENTATIVE MARIANNE EBERHARDT ......................... REPRESEN'IArlVE ED RO'F]ER ................................. REPRESENTATIVE Wattenspapler Papiedabrik Wattens Gesellschaft m.b.H, A-6112 Wattens/Austria Tel: (0 52 24) 22 22 TeIex: (0) 53741 ciwat a Tannpapier Ges. m.b.H. & Co. KG Erzeugung technischer Papiere A-4050 Traun/Austria Tel: (0 72 29) 27 31 Serie Telex: [0) 21934 feutan Ser:u 3=.;'~ to 5'31 F~,ffr A':er, ue New ",ore. N Y 101'76
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WeYe proud.to see our work go up m smoke. ~ work w4h taba'~co: a new ~e~:~bcr ~f :ha~e':~ =~".¢.k,~ tcDacco Ilav~rs consisting al ~c.,' ~~, ~ 8u[~ey. Vi~9~O,a. F:?[ F~-- ~ ~i& & "identity crisis". ~7"r: . ,~i ~curse. we'd I~ke to ge{ W,. ~s "~ ".". : ",+ . .'~" " "riced up'" oi:out ou~ il,~v~ a~ .~+e ale. "+" "" "" :+'~ "'"~" ;~';" I ~o dease £~[ in touch wilh ,.~..
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INTERNATIONAL T 0 B A C C 0 EXHIBITION ',1 II I I IIII I bus nes'S he:s been wrapped u~ in ours. manul~cturing |acilities in the United Steles, Cenz~da and Europe we provide the expertise, technical support and available film supply you need to realize packaging economieS. Mob produces two types of high quality, cost ellective C)PP films especial y for tobacco applica- tions. For years, clgare te manufacturers around the world have chosen 370 AB-5 for the w de sealing range and excellent surface properties ~nrov~ded by our acrylic ¢oatlng. Our newest troductiO~o 83 OP560C offers the outstanding rain mun~ time end e~)ense) even on less modern packaging equ pment. The choice is yours. Bicor 770 AB-5 or 83 OP560C. Wrspping up for you everywhere in the wor d. For further in[ormation, contact Mobil Chemica Films Division or MObil Chemlcat International. Ltd: 1150 Pills|oral-Victor Ro~d, Pittsford. NY 14534; 716/248-8320; Telex 510.253-1360. M~bii
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COLISEUM EXHIBIT BOOTH LAYOUT ENTER HERE EXIT HERE ~<" LEIGH ST,REET "~ .~ ::::::::::::::::::::::::::: INTERNATIONAL TOBACCO EXHIBITION CONFERENCE SEPTEMBER,!4-17, 1983 RICHMONO, VIRGINIA, USA 10--CATALOGUE • -xMb|tar.."; * Booth No. AAA Manufacturing .......... I?.A AMF Legg .': .............. 45.45 AccuRay Corp..,. ". .... 50.51 ,(52.63 Adamantine (Fi.Tech. Inc,) ....... ~.~ Allis Chalm~ (Car~ek. Inc.) .... 168 Atlegha~yWare~u~ Co.. lnc ...... 1. ArOusSt~l ~oducts ......... 147 Ark~e {R-~. Inc.) ........... 7.8 ~ra~-l~.. :.. : 135.136 Reinr. ~rg~afdt ......... 148. Papeterles Bra~n~ein ....... 69:10 Burlsy~ Dark To~cco ~ ....... 39A0 CDL International ........ ~e ~rdwe]l ~achine Co... 101.102 Camt@~. Inc. ;.. • : ............ 168 Cardn~on & MJchaux. Inc .... 42 Ca[al~ic Generators. Inc ...... 16 CEM ~rp....... ............... 55 Chesapeake C~ntainer Co ........ 88 Chevron Chemlcal Co ....... 8g 90 Comas SrL .:..~ .. ........... '76.?7 Commercial Cam ~v. ........ ~ra~ Natallno SpA (Robe~s Systems) ....... 14~.144 Cra~s. Inc ............... 123 Dan~s, 1~ ................. 139 D~e~h GmbH ..........53.5~ C.H. Oexter Div. ............ 22.23 W.H, O[ckin~n Engln~ring Lt~ ........... Oucon. Inc. (Catotek. Inc.~ ...... Eb~ Corp.,. ~ .............. 145 FMC ~rp .................. 7435 Fabr~ka ~uG5 Co .......... Rl~mnaln~rumemsLtd . . 141 Fishburne Equipment Co.. Inc. 72.'/3 R~ch, Inc ................ ~,8 Robe~Retcher&~ns.l.td.. 24.25 F~ke &~. ~4.5.6A748.49,~,65.65 F~d Engin~ring ~rp .......... 8 Fo~eT~hnol~y. Inc ........... 57 Fumigators. Inc ............. 53.~ Bxhlbltor • Booth No. GDSpA ......... 107,108,10g.IZ4 General Magnaplate Carp ...... 96 Godloli 8. 8ellanti SpA ...... 133.13.1 Griffin&Co ............... National lbbacco Board of ~r~ce 173 Haarmann&RelmerGmbH . .18.1g Hal/mark Fabrica:ors. Hambto Mezhmely Ltd.. . ?.0 Hauni.Werke Korber & Co. I~G ....... 58.59.60 Hercul~. Inc ..... Hermitage. Inc .......... 79.80 ThoH~paqe~mpany.lnc ..... 139 Hurlpy&Harri~x~.tn¢ ... 145 ~R: Instrumems Technical R~presentatwe~ .... IS3.1S3 Interna:ionatPoperCo ...... 6~.68 ~clete~b ........... 6930 C 0 Kaym~ch ~Co~ Ud .... Ro~e~ Keith 8 Co, Inc ... ~mberly Clark Carp (Scnweltzer D~v,) ...... 37.38 Kmk~ Prmt,n9 Co., Ltd. (~:Tech, Inc.) ............. ?.8 LTR In~u~n~ .......... M~ Andrews $ For~es, Manuf~uring Ltd.. Mactavlsh Machine Manuf~turing Co Mak~onia Leaf Expo~.lm~R.. 137 Marden-E@#ards & ~ ........ 110 Pape~etles de Malaucene .... 35.36 Papeterlesde Maudult ...... 35.36 Merdck~les. In¢ (Carotek) ... 168 Mikropul. tnc .......... I~.t67 M~ller Machme (formerly Mobil Chemical Films Div. ..... Moisture 5y~ems Carp ..... 43.~ Maline Mochmo Co. Ltd.. Mundet Industries. lnc .... 79.~ M.F. Neal &Co .Inc .......... Nowcomb's Ente~d~ ........ I;xhlbltar Booth Fr. N~epmann OmbH 8 Co. t31.132 Nard Gear Carp (Te~:hn~.geps) GCMCA/5 ............ Tn~ Ontario ~ue.Cur~d Gravers Mar~etmg Bo~rd, .30 PMB BV ................ Porometdcs. Inc. ~chnl.Bep]] . . 11 Pa~kl.= Tnbac~o CO. Inr .... JohnPayneEngmeerlngL~d. .. g5 Phlhp Mnrr[sU.S.A ......... 159 Pntpps&Blrd. Int. . . ql Powell Ma~ra~urtng Co.. ln¢. . Pfo~(~r & ~hwaR= In~ ..... 12.56 Wl~h MascPtnenfabnR ,, B2 g3,B4,B5 Raynor.Adams&A~oclal~. InC 150 R~cnmond Wate¢rant Termlna's. Inc ........... ~e Hou~of Rtzla ...... 98.g9 Robenssystems. Inc.. . 143 1~4 ~and~a Packaging Machl~e~Co .... 92 Maschmenfa~rl~ Alfred GmbH & ¢o. l12j13.H~.l ig.t201El St~l~ng America. In: ., .17 T~% Drives Ltd CDL International Inc.} ~1 Tochn=ca Oevelopment Carp ...82.83 g4 8~ Technicon Indu~trlal Systems 14 T~hnI.Reps. Inc ...... ".. tl Thlole Eng]n~rlng . .. Thwi,g-Al~ Inst~ment Co . T~nge? & Co. (Engineers} Ltd.. I I I. Tohuc:o Associates ..... 3040 Tohac~o Board of Ii~a .. , lbbacco Gro~wrs of No~h Carolina .......... ~bac:o Repo~er .... 1~3 Vffglma Po~ Authon~y , ,, Wimot Wear Pan~, Lid, Wolverlne Corp ..... 138 World ~bacco .....
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Exhibitors at the Richmond Coliseum ACCURAY CORP., Stands so, $1,62 and 63 A high.technology company specializing in automa- lion Systems for quality control, process control, and }nformation communications in secondary cigarette manufacturing operations. Since 1953, the company has been ~. pioneer in automating cigarette weight measttrement and control. Personnel attending will bc John DcWitt, st. vice president; John Reckcnsteln, dividon manager, ~ericasl Paul Barker, divblon m~ager, intcma- tion~l F,S, Bwana, st. account manager; Philip On dleplay Wilt be AccuRay's 7000 MICRO. t B--GATALOGUE White, st. account manager; Dwight Hart, technical director; Richard Bunting, product manager. The stands will feature the 70O0 MICROTM family of systems. The 70~0 MICRO, introduced in 1979, .controls processes and product quality for cigarette markers and ~_~ckcrs. The Cigarette Inspection Module (CIM) will also be exhibited. Other pro- ducts to be displayed include the 7500 Information System"r~ and a number of new features developed for the 7~0 MICRO ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE CO., Stand I Engaged in the storage, storage handling, shipping, receMng movement, and fumigation of tobacco. Warehouse facilities in lhe U.S. and abroad arc served by rail, truck and ship transportation. Aileghany has in this country approximately 3 million square feet of storage space located close to the port of Rich- mond, and approximately 600,000 square feet at the headwaters of the S~clde River at Viissingcn, Holland. The company employs about 200 people, has its own fork lift machines, and operates two shifts per day. Alleghany has been in the tobacco storage business for three generations and is said to be the largest in- dependently.owned facility of its kind in the world. Personnel attending will bc T.M. Carrlngton, chairman; John B. I.ottimer. president; H. Nash Car- rington, vice president; John I. Carrlngton secretary; H.E. Bedeli assistant secretary, and others, The exhibit will include maps, photographs, and descriptive literature. ARGUS STEEL PRODUCTS, INC., Stand 147 Although Argus Steel Products has been a supplier of specialty items for over 13 :,'ears, it was ndt until ]9g0 that the company started to manufacture wire cloth. Since it was already supplying perforated metal to the major industries in our area, the addition of wire cloth was a natural progression. Argus Steel is now in a position to take care of all sfrccuing, dry- ing, sizing, sifting, and grading requirements Soon after introducing its wire cloth to the tobac- co industry, the company learned that service is the most important requirement to a tobacco processor. When their customers want a different s~reen through- pat, there is not enough time ro set up and weave the wire cloth. In order to serve the tobacco industry, Argue Steel had to have in stock the particular mesh and wire sizes required. The company now stocks in Richmond an extensive inventory of meshes used by the tobacco industry, all of which we can ship im- mediately. Whereas most wlrc cloth manufacturers will stock 8 x 8 mesh in one or two wire sizes, Argus Steel stocks five different wire sizes, thereby allow- ing a processor to vary his open area from 50% to 750/o. Argus Stcci is sensitive to the limited, seasonal nature of the tobacco business and will do anything possible to fill a rush rcquircmcm, it ships by truck, UPS, bus, and air--it even has had sales people deliver critical rcquircmcats. John Bottger and Bey Eggleston will be in the Argus Stccl booth--146--to demonstrate and discuss screening problems. Argus Steel will be exhibiting all types of wire cloth~ from test shakers to SWECO separators; from dust screens to sand reels. AMF INTERNATIONAL LTD., AMF LEGG DIV., Stands 4s and 46 Founded Jn ! 850 as the Robert Legg Co, of London, England, it is a supplier of tobacco primary process- ing equipment. The company offers a full range of futilities through consultation, design, manufacture, ins~l~ation, comn~ssiorfing, tt~n;mg, projec~ manage- ment ~d after s~es, spar~ ~d sewicc. The product range Jnclud~ the following. Green leaf threshing ~d ~l~f~ng plants, Auwmatic leaf inspe=ion and grading equip- ment. S~d r~, ord~g cy~d~s, spra~8 cylinders and flavoring cySnd~s, High vacuum coa~tio~ng plants, compressed tobacco con~tJo~ng plums and continuous precondidoners. Bulking and blending silos and cut tobacco storage silo systems. Automatic dumpers and feeders, Stem rolling machines. Rotar~ tobacco cutting machines, Metering bands, metering tubes and weighing conveyors. Cut tobacco driers and stems driers, Cleaning and ciassifying plant~, Rotary coolers, spiral coolers and pneumatic coolers. Automated cut tobacco storag= systems, Mechanical handling systems, Band conveyors~ vibratory conveyors a~Id pneumatic conveying systems. Dust collection systems. Moisture measuring systems, Automatic electronic process control systems. Cigarette weight control systems, Representation will be by Gerald B, Edwards, m~ug- ing dkcc~ar; Anthony E, Cia.rket direclor orsales~ Dr, Michael D. Sanderson, director of englneer[ng; Alfred AIdrldge. deputy director of sales; Christopher R, Mabcy, area sales executive; Peter F, Nor~h~ area sales executive; Richard E,O, Nettle, research & develop- meat manager. The ex~bit vdll include pictorial displays of the range of tobacco cutting and drying machines together whh the automatic tobacco weigher and automatic circ. ironic procc~ control systems, Static dlsplays will In, elude a rotary CUlling dram from the type RC4 cut- ting machine, a scale mode] of the annu|nr tubuIar high pressure hot water heated drier together whh an automatic electronic drier control system with V,D.U, display and components front the ttutoweigher, ASTRA, EXPORT/IMPORT Sfands 135 and 136 Astra is one of the more recent members of the Yugoslav tobacco and cigarette exporters, in tile past seven years it has achieved significant resuks In that area, realizing an export volume of 3-4,000 tons of cigarettes, and 4-5,000 tons of tobacco per annum, Tobacco export has been based on cooperation ~th tobacco producers. Duhanprodukt-Pitomaca~ Virzinija-Vh'ovldca, Duhan-P. Sladna and PPK Kut, ]cvo are producers of flue-cured Virginia tobacco. PodubMetkovlc and Vlao-Duhan-Voce-lmotski pro. ducc semi-oriental tobacco (Herzegovina Ravn- jak). In addition to the above types Astra exports hurley and oriental tobaccos. Exporting dgareues has been based on coopera. TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--lg
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xoldmo3 .[o~oF,(~
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don with three factories: Cigarette Factory Zagreb, Cigarette Factory Rovin}, and Cigarette Factory Zadar, realizing 25-30% of the total Yugoslav clgarcll¢ production. A;tra is a regular member of the General Associa- tion of Yugoslav Tobacco Economy, the Fund for port Promotion in Yugoslav Tobacco Economy, and the Business Association of Tobacco Economy of Sit Croatla. Astra also cooperates with the Tobacco Institute In Zagreb and through, the Institute offers complete tobacco growing technologies. Through various business arrangements Astra im- ports for its producers the necessary materials for primary tobacco and cigarette production. Madnoimpcx, a division of Astra, imports the equipment for the tobacco industry, In attendance will be Zdenko Blazekovlc, tobacco department manager, Astra will have on display flue-cured Virginia and semi-oriental (Herzegovina Ravnjak) tobaccos as well as cigarettes, BELL FLAVORS & FRAGRANCES, Stand 61 The Fries & Bro. division of Bell Flavors & Fragrances was founded in 185,1. It develops and manufactures flavorings and compounds for tobacco. Representing the company will be Edward N. Hclnz, vice president; Jerry Stehnaeh, director tobacco flavor;; and Raymnnd Heinz, vice president, On exbiblt will be the latest devclopmcms in flavor- ing compounds and extracts created specifically for low tar and nicotine cigarettes, Also available will be dais describing many of the flavoring ingredients. HEINR. BORGWALDT, GMBH; Stands 148 and 149 A mnnufzcturer of smoking machines, instruments, favors and addhives. Personnel will include Eckhard Suhr, manning dlree- tor~ Uwe Krohn, sales manager laboratory, equipment; Iteinz Drcscher, technical manager laboratory equipment, 22--CAYALOGUE BUSCH, Sta.d An industrially oriented pump manufacturer. The company is based in West Germany and has been in the LI.S. for eight years, selling t~ough distributors in 31 sales offices. Attcnddng will be .~ohn Shad<e/ford, Busch marketing manager; Luther Lawson and Phil Schroeder of M.C. Schroeder Co., Inc. {Busch's authorized distr;.butor in Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina}; Wayne Kemp, southeast regional manager. On display will be a Huckepaek rotary vane vacuum I~ump for use in primary process tobacco conditioning. CARDWELL MACHINE CO., Stands 101 and 102, A designer and manufacturer of machinery for processing of tobacco leaf. The company was founded in 1829 us a manufac- turer of farm implements. Ownership of the company changed hands several times, most recently in 1982 when a group of its employees purchased the corn- puny from its then owners, the Swedish Match Co. of Stockholm, Sweden. Cardwell's marketing area is the entire tobacco world. Cardwell-Richmond markets its" ~roducts in North and South America, and the Pacific Ocean area, front Korea and Japan to Australia, including the Peoples Republic of China. !: ".~es imagination based on a ;olal knowledne of the world .acco inc~ustry to wegh up the supply and ~emand of • ",~.~r tcbacco today. To look 3t ol~o orea at a :~me ,,viii not do. m~s ever.changing wonu requires calm responsible "~zna~ement and ~nvos~ment decis=ons In order to secure
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Europe, Africa, the Middle Iv.use, and the Indian subcontinent are served by a wholly owned subs~dlary, th0 Cardweli Machine Company (U.K.) Ltd., of Faro- borough, Hampshire, England. This subsidiary [s an Jnlegratcd manufacturing unit with hs own technical staff e~tablI~hed in 1954, when it was known ~ Vokeso Cardwel[, Led. Cardwd[ has a Btagdlan licensee, Azmet, S.A. of Campinas, which manufactures Cardwell machinery for sale in Brazil, Cardwell is said to bc a world leader in the area of green leaf threshing and separating equipment, in- cluding design of complete systems, and spedal machinerY designed to meet a customer's pastlcular need. It supplies equipment for cigarette manufac- turer~' primary operations, including systems to automatically deliver cut tobacco to cigarette mak- ing machines. [t does not mmufacture cigarette mak- ing or packing machinery. Cardwell equipment is aide used in chewing tobac- co, snuff, and smoking tobacco plants, ¢o prepuze tobacco for manufacture into the final product. Cardwell h~ made significant contributions to the Industry through the years. It developed the MT thresher, the forerunner of all present horlzonta] threshers, in the late 1940s, followed by the introduc- tlon of the Canadian Classifier separator lhrough a llcens¢ agreement whh Imperial Tobacco Co. of Canada. In the late 1950s Cardwell introduced the lSghtweight Vibe-O-Vey vibrating conveyor. This was followed by the PL separator and the Cardwel! stem tester, both u~nder license from Imperial of Canada. In the [ate 1960s and early 1970s, Cardweli developed the RPL separator, ~mroduced its fine of TT threshers and developed threshing systems of I0,0~ Ibs/hoIJr up to 25,000 lbs per hour, all in a single llne of machinery. Cardwail-UK, in the early 1960s, brought to its parent company the concept of feeding cigarctte makers pneumatically) on an automatic demand basis, enabling machines to maintain a more uniform hop- per ]eve] of tobacco ;rod elLmlnating hand t'ecdlng. The continued development of this method of feeding makers, including the introduction of new types of mechanical devices for introducing the tobacco into the air conveying pipes, such as the Rotadrum Feeder. the use of programmable controllers in controlling the system, have kept the Cardwell companies in the forefront of this technology. A new product wax maxketed in 1982, The machine is named TOP (for tobacco opening process), and is manufactured and sold under license by P.othmans of Pall Mall (Canada) Ltd. It is a continuous open- ing and conditioning process for stripped hogsh¢ads. cases, or bales of tobacco strips. Attending will be Charles A, Hotchktss. vice dent, marketing; Frederick P. Langschultz. manager, USA: Edward H. Ward, regional manager, Far East. Representing the Curdwell Machine Co. (U.K.) Ltd., Farnbotough, England will be .I.D. Darkins, managing director and Colin Lungiey, sales director. The stand will feature a reception and hosphality area where vldtors can obtain information. On exhibit will be many large photos of Cardwail produc~s. CARRINGTON & MICHAUX, INC., Stand 42 A leaf tobacco dealer founded and based in Rich- mood, Va. Carrington & Michaux has leaf toba~o operations in Italy, Zimbabwe, Thailand, Paraguay, Brazil, and Azores, and the U.S. They are prepared to buy and process tobaccos for sale all ever the world. Their principat sales offices are in Richmond and Rotterdam. The company started as Carrington & Co. at dee end of the nineteenth ceutury, and was incorporated into Carrington & Michaux in 1937. Attending will be Emmett Harper, Patrick L. Price, Jr., Tazewell Carrington, IV, and Pdchard W. Carr- ington, Jr. CAROTEK, INC., Stand representing ALLIS-CHALMERS, BUCK.EL, OUCON, iNC., JAMESBURY, MERRICK SCALE AND MIKROPUL CORP. C',trotck. hrc. has bee:) supplying it~dustrlai pn)cess
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equipment to the tobacco industry since the early 1970s, The company has been a supplier to the tobacco industry of solids handling equipment like MikroPni duel callactors, Ducon high ¢ffici*ncy cyclones and wet scrubbers, Merdck in-transit weigh feeders, lad Buck.El belt ¢onv*yors and Buck-El elevators. They also hav~ b,en su~ssful in supplying liquids handling equipment like Jam~sbury manual and actuated control valves and Allis.Chalmers indust- rial pumps. Attendlng will b* Dean Pittman, Gent Prather, Stephen Bell, and Dc~I Bill. On ,xhibit will b* Jamesbury valves and Allis- Cl~almcrs pumps. CATALYTIC GENERATORS, INC. Stand 16 Catalytic Generators, Inc. ~ffers the Tobacco Cu'r- ing Generator and Ethy43¢m concentrate to promote f~ter, more u~fo~ yellowing of ~u~-cur~ tobi- t, ~¢ pros pr~u~ • natu~ pl~t ho~on¢ ~d in ad~tion to f~t~ yeHowin8, th, l~f ~d stem d~- ~ng ph~e Is decr¢~. The resul~ ~ s~d to be bet- tar color, hlgh~r grades, I¢ss curing time, and high~ pri~ for the grower. CatM~ic Gene~tors, Inc. has b~n involved ~ toba~o curing ~incc 1975. ~tai~ic h~ provided ~ to v~o~ r~ch proj¢c~ ~d h~ conducted its own res~ch ~ we~. Representation ~ be by G~¢ Akim ~d 3ack CMn. On display at th¢ stand will be th¢ Tobacco Curing O~nerator ~d Ethy-Gen. Literature will Men be CDL INTERNATIONAL, Stands 1"/1 and 172 CDL [nternatiomd ha* been a supplier of electrical variblc speed drives in Canada for I0 years and the U,S, for six years. The drives are utilized on tobacco processing machinery. Representing CDL International will be Allan Fen- ton and David Fenton. On display at the sand will be Eddy Current electrical varible speed drives under the name of TASC Drives Ltd. 2B--C^TALOGUE 'at Stand CEM CORP., Stand ss A manufacturer of molsturc analyzers. Attending the exhibition will be Judy A~ey, marketing manager and Michael Collins, marketing director. On *splay wail bc the CEM Moisture./So.~d~ An.al. yz~ Model AVC-80. This analyzer province tot rapes ann accurate determinatians in minutes, The instrument utilizes microwave dr~ng and is applicable to solids, liquids and slmries covering a full range of moisture levels. The sp~d and accuracy of this system allow it to be used for process control. Other microwave systems will bc available for review also. CHESAPEAKE CONTAINER, Stand gs A supplier of corrugated containers with high com- pression strength to allow stacking without crusking. The company has capabilities to manufacture con- tainers with A, B or C flut~. The manufacturing ...'.~, faci~ty is und¢rgolng a major ¢xpamion program with leaf tobacco listed as the number one market segment of b~iness. personnd atteriding the show wlil be J .P. Gould, sal¢~ representative; R.M. Hemh, field servlc~ reproach- ".:. tatlvei.C.F. McAlcxander, sales manager. . On display will be container samples and testing equipment. The ¢om,p,,a~y will have a "Name the Chesapcak~¢ Box Contest ' and an appropriate prize will be awaru- ~:." ~:[ to the person who submits the best name for the container. CHEVRON CHEMICAL CO., Stands 89 and 90 A manufacturer of agricultural chemicals. Company rcpresentatlves will include E.E. Coman, product manager, insecticides; Ken Yotter, interna- tional technical service representative; Ron Gras, advertising manager; and sides representatives from the tobacco producing regions of the U.S, On display at the stand will be Orthene Tobacco In- sect Spray, a widely used insecticide in the tobacco market. supply connections and installation work, as well as transformers. Electronic unit: designing and making weigh belts, electronic graders and flow control systems, Attending will be G. Zanini, vice president; C, Mar. tin, sales manager; and T.E. Astrand, director, Through slides and video tapes at its atnnd Comas will show the latest installations; complete primary, CRS puffing and threshing plants, Espresso, the popular Italian c0ff¢¢, will bc carved, COMMERCIAL CAM, Slauds A designer and manufacturer of cam-operated mo- tion control components. Cameo tndex drives, parts handlers, and conveyors are used as original equip- meat or replacement parts for wrapping, packaging, or spcdal mac~ncW. Amcm/C~co suppBes the tobacco ind~t~ ~th cams ofman~ ~ffcre~t shapes ~d mate~ab, each m~ufacturtd to exact specifications. Repr~ntafion w~l be by Phil ~s¢ly~ Bwoa HJll~ L~W G~cm ~d Frank O'Do~all, 6n ¢x~bit ~ll be in-~nc end rot~ tndcxcrs~ came, ~d pros han~ers. |n to~qano~ on th~ use of Odhana Tobacco Inslct Spray welt bS avallablo from Chevron Chamlcal On. at grinds a= and a0. COMAS S.R.L., Stands 76 and 77 A manufactarcr of machines for tobacco processing, including threshing, redrying and packing, complete primary equipment, pneumatic feeders and makers. Comas has six factories, each one specializing in different machinery or types of work. Heavy engineering: threshers, presses, rcdrycrs, drying cylinders, conditioning cylinders, stem flatteners. Light engineering: feedars, blending bins, weigh belts, vlbratory'couvcyors, Sheet metal work: steel pipes, hoppers, stainless steel tanks. Conveyor factory: manufacturing only band conveyors. Electrical shop: making electrical control panel units, switch boards and providing electrical CRAGGS, INCORPORATED~ Stand 123 Sales representative, for more than 50 years, for various brands of new and used machinery for leaf processing and product manufacturing, TOBACGO INTERNATIONAL--2F
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The organization represents wen known names: Schmermund, Marden-Edwards, Tingey, Quester, Pietruska, Machon. Kendia, and WaiseIlo..The com- pany also appraises cigarette factories and tobacco stemmeries in ~ parts of the world. Pcrsonnd attending will be Rachel Berger Finiftcr, president and Theodore E. Lewis, vice president, Craggsl Inc., as a representative for a number of European manufacturers, will be sharing booths whh the following companies: Schractmund--booths 112, I131 114, 119, 120 and 121; Tingey--booths ill and 122; Marden-Edwards--boo~h II0. A~I of the aforementioned will bc displaying some of their latest equlpmem, DANZAS COMMERCIAL DELEGATION, Sta.d 139 Danzas Commercial Delegation, Inc., with offices in l~ichmond, Charlotte, and Atlanta, represents the worldwide Danzas organization in the southeastern A forwarding organization, Danzas was founded in 1815. With head offices in Basel, Switzerland, the various Danzas groups maintain marc 300 offices and I0,000 employees. The fully staffed offices of Danza.s Commercial Delegation at the above locations coordinate and supervise a vatlcty of services from Europe into the southeast: direct air forwardings, consolidated air shipments, direct containerized ocean forwarding, door-to-door containerizad shipments, and con- solidated ocean cargo services. The services concen- trated in the southeastern United States are handled in conjunction with Danzas European groups, located [n Switzerland, France, England, Italy, and West Ger- many. In addition, coordination and information can be provldcd through a local Danzas office for shipments moving between any two points worldwide. Representation will be by Klans Hesse~ Nick Welch, and Karl Lohmueller. DEGESCH AMERICA, INC., Stands 53 and 54 with DEGESCH GMBH Degesch America, Inc., the manufacturer of Phostoxin¢' fumigants, is located in Wcyers Cave,, Va. Within the manufacturing complex, the company has a technical stuff involved in quality control ~d rese.a~h and dcvdopm~t, Technological adv~ncemenl of all Degesch products is the primary goal. In addition to the only domestic production of aluminum phosphide, the company has two sn.[es and service subsidim'ies, J-Chem I~catcd in Houston, Tc~, and Fumigators, Inc. located in Raleigh and Wilson, N.C. Since 1955~ Fumigators has been Involved in assisting the tobacco industry with Its various Insect control programs. Representation will be by Dr. J,I], SulHvan~ president, Degesch AmericaI Don Shaheen, vice president and technical director, Degesch Americal Hugh Lynn~ presldent, Fumigators, Inn; Fred Bryant, manager technical services, Fumigators, inc. The company will be ¢xhibhing its complete line of fumigants. Fotmded in 1919o Deg~h GmbH manufactures, sells and applys highly toxic gases such as hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen phosphide, methyl bromide, and ethylene oxide for pest control pu~oses, Degesch pro- ducts arc standardized for the use of pest control In thetobacco industry, ~pcciv.lly in the field of hydrogen phosphide. Fhustoxln, magtoxin, fumi.cel and rural- strip are used worldwid~ to keep tobacco clean of pest infestation. Degesch GmbH is represented by its own compmtes in five continents, serving the tobacco industry 24 hours a day throughout the year, Attending the exhibit for Degesch GmbH will be R, Geiss, vlcc president, marketing and sales. C.H. DEXTER DIVISION, THE DEXTER CORPORATION, Stands 2Z and 23 An international developer and producer of porous plug wrap for filter cigarettes, The company is the nonwovcns division of the Dexter Corp,, a Fortu|le 500 company. Founded in 1767, Dexter is one o f the oldes! independent manufacturing companies Jn Noah America and the oldest company on the New York Stock Exchange. C.H. Dexter is the inventor of the wet form[ng non. wovens process and developer of numerous perfor- mance materials such as tea bag paper, base matcdai for manmade sausage casings and Single-oat surgical fabrics. At the high technologyend of the aonwovcfls business, C.H. Dexter specially nonwovcns Include porous coating and laminating substrates, cryogenic insulation, absolute filter media, and porous plug wrap. The company has technical-manufacturing opera. TOaACO0 INT£RNA'r/oNRL--21~
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AVACUUM S TEM FOR PRIMARY PROCESS TOBACCO CONDITIONING THATUSES NOWATER Come to Booth 170 at the International Tobacco Exhibition Conference and get the facts on industn/proven Busch Huckepak vacuum pumps. . . , • • , ': . 63"elex: 823.45t 4974 Euclid LDWlDE --" CATALQGUZ Worldwide Headquarters Cente~ ,deans. LA. USA fions in the U.S., United IQngdom and France. C.H. Dexter mazkets its nonwovcns i.n ~0 countries. In attendance will be Jaraes A. Fraser, markctin~ manager; W~ll]am H. Schetfler, PR-advenising; David E. Sayers, sales manager-southeast zone; Michael E, J'eziorski, sales repre~entativ¢; Mark Tanner, product manager-Dexter Znzernafionalo At its stand CH. Dexter will have information on its complete line of porous plug wrap which covers the full range of CORESTA permeabilides. W.H. DICKINSON ENGINEERING, LTD., Stands 33 and 34 The company was fonnded. ~z 1969 to design and mannfactm'e equipm~t for lcaf and primary process- ing. It supplies from i¢s Winchester, England plane over £~ million of equipment annually lo leading cigarette manufacturers worldwide. Dickinson specializes in machinery tailored to customers' individual requirements. A full range of equipment is produced ~nd ~ndudes: automatic handling and opting cqvJpmenl for tobac- co cases: continuous conditioning for pressed lamina; casing and conditioning cylinders for all applications; conveying systems, both band and ~bmtow;, flow con- trol systems, including conlinuous weighing convc~rs; stem conditioning equ~pmem; stem sh~eddlng plant; dryers for cut stem and ]andna, incorporating the latest enhancement technlqucs; and complete control systems at all levels of technology. Delegates to the exhibition will include E.J, Allen, managing director and N.J. CIuett, sales director, During the exhibition Dickinson Engineerlng's staff will be on hand to discuss {is products and particular emphasis w~|i bc placed on the I.T.M. dryer, high humidity drying, stem shredding, cutter by-pass systems for small lamina and cutter feed systems. The company plans to have at least one example of a control system on display as well as a vasiety of photographs and product iileratnre. at=lnl==l It=It ~'Ipp~r bill for clgllllll m=nuf==turlng equip EBTEC CORP., Sland For over ten years, Ebtec has been a supplier of stainless steel suctiOn bands to U,S, c[garettc manufacturers. • Several years ago, Ebtcc pioneered the gripper face for suction bands, and more recently lncoq3omted several ~pmvem~ts ~nto the style b~d, The f~t~ a dlr~onally~t~ wor~g s~face w~ch enhanc~ to,afro movement, lmpmv~ rod pack~n~ ~d ~tends tape Hfe. Introduction of the Improved st~nless steel s~cflon b~ds has enabled manufacturers to operate their equipment at hlihcr than original design speeds. Eb~ec is now ~ the process o~ i~troduc~ng t~s and European M~kcts. Attcndln8 ~II be Thomas Brock, d[v[s(on manager, ~d personnel from Hurley & Harrison, ]no,, of Grecnvi]l~ S.C., which represents Eblec's TechnologY= Di~ in the At the ~d the Bcit T~hnologles Div, of Eb~ec Co~. will be ~bhing a complete llne of~nl~s s(~l lion b~ds for cigarette manufacturing cquJpmenl, TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--31
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We knock them down to s ze, THIS MARKHAS MAD[ ITS MARK ON THE WORLD The Powell leaf trademark is recognized as the symbol of tobacco mechan~t~on from bed to marker~ It represent~ a single goal: provide tobacco growers wRh ~ael- e~fident, labor-satang equipment ~-~t ~c~ases productivity and leg quality. At Powel[, we never forget all parts o[ tobacco producLion are equally h'~!~ru'mt, That's why Powell has m unmatched record in re.~earch and development that year after year has prodace.d more ~nnovations than any ocher firm. Powel| Manufacturing Company, Inc. P. O. Drawer 707 Dept. T184-1 Benne~tsviile, S,C. 29512-0707 Call tln S,C., C~ll ECUSTA PAPER AND FILM GROUP, OLIN CORP., Stand 3~ A supplier of cigarette papers, ptug wrY.p. ~d ping papers to ~hc tobacco Jndus¢~'. Founded ~n 1939 by Har~ H. Straus as the Paper Corp. Ecu~ta w~ the f~st dom~slic U.S. cJgamHe paper mill. When Ecus{~'s fifs[ pRpcr w~ produced {n September, 19~9, .~e~ca had ~ n~w induswy and zhc ~¢fi~ lob~cco industry was no longer dcpcndes¢ upon imported clgarc[¢e paper. Whh a sl¢ady m~¢ of growth ot~r [h~ p~¢ ye~, E¢us~a ~njoys s close prof~ssion~ whh hs dom~lic ~nd international cus{omers. Many E~s~a products ar~ tailored [o the ~quirem~n~s of rite end producL Represemafion will be by J.W. Townsend, dir~mr, domestic s~[~s; B.G, Woodard, tobacco ~ccounes manager; J.R, Thompson, bus~n~s manager, lobac- C.D. Rowe, sal~ acco~nzs and adminlszraHon managc¢; ],R, Thompson, bus~c~ ~a~ager, ¢o papers; M.L Kith); dir~or, ]n{ernafional s~¢s; M.M. ~on, reglon~ manager, Eoropc; R.P. Wcs]ak~ rc~onal m~ager, Near East - AfHca~ T. Tooting, regional manager, Asia - Aus~s; Alsvcrso~, reglon~ manager - ~dn Am~dcnl Adds, m~Rger, group commu~cado~. FABREEKA PRODUCTS CO., S~a.d .~ The originator of (ha thin pJy beh now in commo:l FABREEKA...."~'~-""-" use by zbe tobacco process[rig industry worldwide, The comptmy has been supplying IO II~e lgdustQ' since 1920. managcr and .retry M. Reid, sales represenl.tivc, On cxhibh will be Fah~ekgs new Chevron As¢ndur Bali as sseil as ~hc regular Asendor. ABo on disp~av will be ocher bchs for the tobacco indu~uy: Fablen~, Tobacco Cleated. NRP, ~b~k~ BTi~ at~d ¢~a~p[es of .~plicinss. FILTRONA INSTRUMENTS & AUTOMATION LTD., S(ands IJ~ aad ]4: A m~,~ufac3urer o~" lahore[Cry |ns[rumcR~'~. P~s~n~e[ at~endin~ will ~nclud¢ N. L~mt~n, ing director; E.~V. Demp~ter, ma,agcr--North American operation: K.O. Holland, technical dlrc~. ~or: B.J. C~m. d~[opmcn~ manager; C.R. service manager.
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"the main feature of the stand will be a range of strtm~eats for measuring the air pcrmeabitity of paper. "D~o of these instruments will be on show for the first tlm~ The new Reel-to.Reel Permeability Monitor (RRM 500) measures the permeability of both perforation channels over the andre length of a full-sized bobbin of tipping paper. RRM 500 detects variations permeabiJity or gaps in perforations as the bobhln is rewound at high spe~d. The other new product is the automatic Paper Pcrm~abitity Meter (PPM 300). This fully automatic instrument measures the perraeabiliw of all types of paper, with a calibrated range of 10-40,000 PPM 300 can be programmed to take a range of measurements at sped find points on the paper as it is transported through the measuring head. All measurements and statistics are dJsptaycd on the build. in VDU screen, A manualvcrsion of this instrument, PPM 100, which of fen thesame high I~cl of accu.mcy as PPM 300, will also be shown. Other equipment on display includes an updated version of the Automatic Piastidzer Monitor (PZM 300), This unit can be easily fitt~ m a filter maker to permit the accurate monitoring of plasticizer ap- plication rate, FbTECH, INC., Stands "/=ud 8 representing ADAMANTINE PRECISION TOOLS, LTD, ARKOTE, LTD. and KINKI PRINTING CO. Fi-Tech, Inc. supplies v~Ldous components and eqnil>- ment to the tobacco industry which are manufactured by leading foreign corapanies, Fi-Tech has the du~ve representation in No~Xh America for Adaman- tine Praclsioa Tools, Ltd,, Arkote, Ltd. and Kinki Printing Co,, Ltd. Participating will be C. Leland Bassett, pr~ideut; Harold C. Hill, Jr., vice president; Rebecca B. Bassett, secretary/treasurer. Adamantine is a manufacturer of diamond and borazoa grinding wheels used in tobacco cutting, dgarett¢ maidag and fdter tipping mad~n~ for grind- ing the kalves used in the catting process and for dressing th¢ c~rborundum type wheels. A represen- tative display of these grinding wheels and photos of the manufacturing process will be shown at the stand Arkote is a supplier of knives used in the tobacco indnst~. These knives a~e ~Lscd both for catting tobac- co as wel~ as in the cigarette making and tilter tip- p~ng machin= for cutting the dgareae rods and filter tips. A representative display of these knives, as well as photographs of the manufacturing process will be shown at the stand. The push.up cigarette box and the type ACT 3 P,U.B. packaging machine have recently bccn developed by the Kinld Printing Co. and the ,l'apaaesc Tobacco and Salt Public Corp. This push-up box is an innovative new package for clga~cttes, and should b¢aa interesting addition to the packaging tcclmiques used by the North American cigarette manufacturers. TOBACCO INTERNATIONA'.
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T104431131
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Packers and Exporters of all grades of Greek Oriental Leaf A. MICHAILIDES Leaf Tobacco Co. S.A. P,O. Box 115 Stawoupolls Suburb Thessatonlki Greece Cables: MiK Telex: 412270 MIK QR Telephone: Thessalonik1652602 .,.~ GREEK BURLEY LTD. A new major effort to promote Greek Burley undertaken jointly by A. Michailides and SEKE S.A. 38--CATALOGUE P.O. BOX 115 sTAVROUPOUS suBU THESSALONIKI !~1 GREECE Cables: tvllK ~. Telex," 412270 MIK GR .~ Telephone: Thessalonlki 652602 ~' Thailand, Spain, Greece, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and Bulga_da. The compmty's efforts to develop the most effective and safast crop protection available is evidenced by the $35 milEon addition to its Prlnccton, N.J. resemch center, maMngit one of the best ped facilities in the world. The stands will feature Furadan® insecticidal ROBERT FLETCHER & SON, LTD. Stands 24 and 25 A manufacturer of cigarette paper amd plugwrap. Research and d~elopm~t ~ web.rehashed ~ ~e ~mp~y ~d h~ ~sul~d ~ the co--erda[ d~Iop- meat of high i~¢~nt ~rosity dg~e~e paper, the ability to cont.[ the ~ab~ of ~ch palm witch fine ~i~, and ~hc ~¢rg~c¢ of cig~tte paper the capabiIiW to rest~ c~bon mono~de deliveries. Atten~ng will be Gordon Hem, chief executive of- ficc~ ~ch~d Bo~n, ~ce p~ident, m~ket~g; Nigv[ Plackett, ~c¢ p~idenL mmufa~udng; ~dle F~ton, ~ce prcddem, resc~ch & d~elopment; Andre" Gordon-St~, int~na~on~ ~ manager, tobac- co industry papers; Fr~k ~wton, deputy intema- tion~ sales manager, tobacco indust~ papers. On c~bi[ ar ~he s~d will be thdr r~g¢ papers ~d plugwraps. Cigarette paper is av~iable commcrd~y i~ permeabiEfies up to Coresta 2~. Plugwraps ~c av~labl¢ ~ a range of t~es and ~mages. Canada. The entire group etoploys 750 people, with 420 in Verden, the company's headquarters, For the dgarctte industry Focke mnnufactures corn, plate Hinge Lid packing complexes and Shell & S~dc packing complexes, t.~. mainly c~garctte packing machinery, reservoirs, wrapph~g machines, boxing machines and parcelting teaching, :For the smoking tobacco industry, the company manufactures tobac- co weighers, pouch packers and parcellers. The product range includes furtheron a!Jtomaflc case packers not oa]y for the tobacco industry but also for diversified app]JcaUons in lhc bcvernge~ food, and chemical-technical industries. The following representatives will be |n attendance at stands 47, 48, 49, 64, 65 and 66: Dieter Neubtr, representative of Focke & Co. in the U.S,; Manfrcd Moormann, sales manager of Focke & Co, Verdcn/Germany; Peter Harming, export manager or" Focke & Co. Vcrdcn/Oermany; Hugo Mutschall, chief design engineer of Focke & Co. Vcrdcn/Germnny Fockc will have on display one hlnge-lld packer corn- plex, consisting of Hinge-Lid Packer 350 S, reservoir and vn'apper and boxer. The hinge-lid packer com- plex will be demonstrated in operation at 330 packs per minute. FOOD ENGINEERING CORP,, Stand gZ A manufacturer of dryers and Coolers of cotlveyor and retry types. The company also builds tobacco silos, vibratory conveyors, screeners and belt conveyors. Pa~idpating will be R~ph I]u~gc~s, Don L~ St~ Davis, and Bob Cundiff, The s~d will feature a pictorl~ display; a counttr- ¢op will b¢ at the front of th~ stand and tb~ display ac the rear. Literature on Food Engineering and IZs products will also be available, FOCKE & CO., Stands 4, 5, 6, 47, 48, 49, 64, 65 and 66 A manufacturer of packaging machinery for the cigarette and smoking tobacco industry. Focke & Co. manufactures its machines hl. Verdcn, West Gcrmany, Barss¢[ (Lower Saxony), West Berlin and Montreal, FORTE TECHNOLOGY, INC., Stand A manufacturer of systems for toeasudng the moisture content in cut tobacco, tobacco p~'oducts, bales and hogsheads of tobacco, Forte equipment is used for process control and quality assurance, Attending will be Stanley Brecn, president, Ralph
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St| nd 20 Harrtbro will bo showing • video film on the fluid bed for cut roii~d stem. HAMBRO MACHINERY LTD., Stand Z0 An independent prlvatc company registered in Lon- don, and having its offices and factory at Nottingham, in the Industrial Midlands of England. The company was formed in 59(;8, employing technical and commercial personnel ~,;pcrJenced in tobacco machinez7 technology. The four directors have among them over 100 years experience in serv- ing the machinery requirements of the worldwide tobacco industry. The company owns a modern factory of 4,000 square meters with adjacent commercial and technical offices of 600 square meters situated on a total site of 23,0~0 square meters. It employs over 100 in works personnel and staff. The factory is presently being enlarged by 30°/0. All Hambro tobacco machinery is desi~aned attd built on the company's premises. In addition to special custom built machinery a vast range of standard and semi-standard primary proems, leaf floor and mechanical handling equipment is manufactured for green leaf plants, tobacco factories, and cigarette and cigar m~mnfacturing factories. Personnel representing the company will be Derrick W. Brooks, manal~ing director and Chris P. Morris, sales and engineering director, Thc stand will feature photographs and descriptive literature covering the Hambro range of tobacco primary process plants. Video films will be shown featuring the new Ham- bro Fluidized bed dryer and the Hambro high capacit.v cigarette ripping and tobacco reclaim plant. HAUNI RICHMOND, (NO., Stands 58, 59 and 60 Attending from Hanoi GmbH, Hamburg, W, Ger- many will be Wolfgang Jegllza~ sales managers and H.G. Block, primary manager, Representing Hnunl Richmond wiB be WI]Ii Ru~zln~t, prosldent~ Peter Zoelckers, executive vlc~ presldcnt~ Mantled Schumacher, ~es ~ce pr~ldcnt; ~frcd Hln~ann, tcc~c~ ~ce prudent; Fritz Wc~n~cr, heat truing vice president. The stud will display pictures of equipment and delegates will be available to dlscus~ and coumel o~ the v~ous aspects of Haunl machinery, Hau~ ~¢~ond ~11 pro~d¢ a shuttl¢ b~ween the Cofiteum and pl~t to ~splay thdr machinery. Th=~' will be sho~n$ the Proms Rod-Maker and Tipper linked ~ HCS Tray Figer for cigarettes at th~ speed of 7,2~ eig~ett~ per ~ute, Laboratory equipment will also be on view at the plant, HERCULES INCORPORATED, Stand A multi-national chemical company with muntffoc toting, sales, and service facttkks worldwide, org~izmioa produces ehemt;als for frasr=¢~, pap¢rma~n~, a#cult~re, inks nnd print inS, and water treatment. In addition to I]~e items, Here~es m~ufaet~ pl~tto resins and ~, Hereul~s was a pioneer in the development of ~ cle~ pol~ropylen¢ film for the ovcrwrap of dividual cigarette packages and th~ e~=por: protective overwrap, Through d=vdopment activities wkh th* and smoking tobacco manufacturers, a polypropylene film called BXT was Recently a new polypropyltn¢ product, a whlt¢ que fi~, was developed. This film ls said tn improve package appearm¢¢ and product shelt while improving the economic value o~ the products packaging, Attending from Hercules ]he. will be Ihe produ director, the product manager, soles and managers from worldwide areas, and sal~ alld ~¢ vicn representatives from worldwide The stand ~511 feature clear and opaque films, including convener grade, HIPAGE CO., INC., St.nd 139 The Hipage Co,, Inc. Is a co,¢tulns broker alltl tret~ fore, order. It i~ one of the brokers handilnl~ thd ronaCco "NTE~I',A~IONAt.
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NIEP for cigarette packaging Automatic tray feedem • Cigarette packer- cello-wrapper parcellers • boxers- shipping-case-cartoners M~$ehmentabnk Fr Nlepmann GmbH & Co • 0-5820 Gevelsberg W.-Germany • Tel. {02332) • 186t - Telext 8229405 fairs of the exhibition. incorporation in 194.% Offices are located in the most important shipping centers on the E~st Co~sr. Attending the exhibition wig be Curds Agee from the Norfolk, Va. office. Representative for Ebtcc Corp, in the U.S. Atte,"a~B the exhibition w~|~ ~ W~ H. H~so~, ~wa~ F, Harrison, it., He~y L. H~son, ~r., and 3e~ 2. ~arr~son. Tom Br~k wi~ bc ~cprcscnting Ebtec Co~, On di~plw w~l be kniv~, c~bid¢ ton~, trough rails INFRARED ENGINEERING, Stand "~s A manufacturer Of infrared ganges, Representation will bc by M~cohn Nnian, ch~rmao, and D,L. Robe,s, pr~sldcut, On view at the stand will bc four Infrared producls. The SMR Infragangc w~ designed ~d eng[n~rcd for the htghcs~ possible precision, blend ins~nshNi- ty. rclhbjli~y and case ot calibration. The MM~ Infragange is a new three wavdength tobacco ~auge which combines the adwantages of blend insensitivity with the low cost previously assoclgcd only with two fiRer gauges. Infr~'s MM4 [nfragaugc is a s~plcr inst~en% built to the s~c Hgh standards, but for the slightly less demanding appS~atlo~. The Calibration Standard provides a simpM but precise check on the c~bra~inn of all Infrared EnSnaring gauges. INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO., Stands 67 and 68 A supplier of conugated packaging to the tobacco industry. In 1898, 18 companies in the Northeast merged to form Intcmatinn~l Paper Co, With 20 mills and a million acres of land, IP primarily served the newspr~t market, Today, IP owns 7 million acres of timberland in rite U.S., in the South, Northeast, and the Pacific Northwest. It manufactures and sells pulp and paper and papesbom'd, packaging and packaging materials. and wood products. The company also holds min¢'ml rights for petroleum, natural gas and [ignite, and is working in partnership with other companies to develop these resources. The first stage in the transition from newsprint pro- ducer to a broad-based forest produas company tended from 1898 to I~40 when the company exp:md- cd geographically in North America and horizonta|o ly into new paper and paperboard products. Shortly afler the tur~ of Ll~c century, the av,~}abJiJ/y of low-cost wood and energy, ~ud {he removal of U.S. tariffs on newsprint, led IP and other companies to move newsprint production to mills in Canada. Some of iP's cider mills in the Nonhca$; were remode!cd to produce more specialized primiog nod writing papers, cud others were sold or converted to a dif- fcrem use. Expa,ding into the South during the 1920s 1930s, IP pioneered the develotnneul an~l of kraft paper and pa~crboar-d ftt)m the species of Southern piue, gcco~,.nizing the fiber poten- tial of I);c Somh. the company a:quJrcd milllo~, o~ acres, bought tl~ree paper milk. and baih ~v~.. The next s|age of lP's dcvclopmen~ c~Jne uf:~ i'~; ;0 when the compan.v entered a period of o~'crseas ex- pansion and forward imergrat,.'on in:o Bofor~ World War II, IP's packaging busmCs~ ~--"~ small During the two decades after World W.',~ li, the company embarked on a large expansion in thi~ sector and b~gan producing such pa::kasing a.~ cartons, folding cartons, and labels. Currently IP is committed to one of tl~c capital spending programs in the forcs~ produc~ dustry. From 1979 to 1985, IP expects to invest abnut $6 billion in a progr.q,n designed Io improve munu fac-
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taring efficiency. SLace the mJd-$evemics, ]P has made sttbstantial inves~nen~s La wood prod~ fad~ti~s so that current- ly it is the rough Largest lumber produc~ia the U ~zd the sixth l~gest #~ood m~ufa~urer. In ad~on to m~jor ~ll const~ion ~ro~s, ~e ~mph~s of [P's spen~g up through ~ ~d-198~ wi~ b¢ on cost ~ntrol ~d energy saHng proj~ in- cluing conwr~ion of bolletz ~o use low cost $u~ ~ ~ ~d wood. P~idp~s at ~ ~bifion wiR b~ M.R. H~ood, zouthv~tcm t¢~on gcacr~ manage; L.C. tobacco markcllng sp~; C.R. M~re, account meat m~ag~r; MJ. K~ugh, ~es m~agcr Noah C~oEna d[${dct; W.D. W~k~, ~ South C~o~na district; T.E. Hutc~son, m~ag¢r Tc~es~¢¢ d}sfflct; H.C. Mangles, manager Vir#~a di~trlc~; A.G. NeHII~, nafion~ counts execmJvv; S.J. Goo~]ch, account W.A. Moth account Th~ s~nd at the cxhibitio~ ~[[ outline IP¢s long volvemcnt (over 20 y¢~s) with th¢ toba~o indust~ ~ a suppler ~d i~ovator in cur~gar~ packa~ng. IP's spvcialtF product~, bulk containers and capabi~dcs ~[[ ~so b~ pr~entcd. paper under all circumstances. Personnel participating will be C{ande Paper, com- mercial manager, JOB~ Michael Laurence, export manager, JO~; lean-Marie Nerou, research & development manager; Rodolphe Schwartz, export manager, Braunsteirt. $OCIETE JOB, Stands 69 and 70 with PAPE]'I~RIES BRAUNSTEIN JOB, a private French company established in 1835 and employing some 1~400 people is a manufacturer of c~cttc paper. TM~ they product essentially ~ red/roll ~o~ for industrial end uses but tlso in th= fo~ of book]ets for roD-yo~ m~k~. JOB ~o makes ping.up paptr, fitt,~ rods ~d ~<oatcd pa~r for soft-packs ~¢ir subsi~ B~stcin a~o produ~ cig~ett¢ paper in reel/roll fo~ for ind~tri~ end-users an6 i~ boo~ets for roll-your-own markets (the Zig-Zag br~d), Braunttcin Mso m~ufactut~ [ight-wclght blade-coated paper ~or priming t~b¢~ on pack~ing. Unllkc ~ny othce m~ufacturers orsuch products, JOB, through their ~ubsldiaW com~ in Af~ca, ~o m~fa~ures ci~arcttes, ~cludln8 brands made uoder Lattrnatio~ li~nsing agr¢*m~ts. With two mMn geograp~c~ly distinct production sites i~ Franc~ for the manufa~re of tht~ cigarette pap= (the JOB mill at St. Girons and that of JOB's sbt~ company, Bra~nstd~, in ~oann) ~ iden- tical strict ~ualiw control, JOB can e~ure their customers a continuous s~pply ot 48--CATALOGUE C.B. KAYMICH & CO. LIMITED Stands 28 and 7.9 C.B. Kaymich & Co. Limited was founded in 1971 to operate in the/~eld of specialized control systems to serve the needs of the packaging and industri~. Ka~mlch is al~o a major supplier of adhesive ap plication systems to the tobacco industry. To accommodate and service the needs of the U.S. cigarette industry, which is a major market for Kaymlch, a new subsidiary company was formed in Ftbruary, 1982. It is located in Richmond, Va. Representation ~ilI be by G.B. Bedford, manag,ng d~rcctor, and P.D. Levedck, tcclmicaI director. tending from Kaymich Inc., Richmond, Va. will he A.B. Colquhoun, vice president. On display will be a complete range of adhesive up- .. plication equipment suitable for fitment onto dl tylxs " of cigarette making, plug making and packaging machines. TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL~4o
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K|MBERI.Y-OLARK CORP., stands 3"] .,,d 3g with pAPErERIES DE MALAUCENE, PAPETERIES DE MAUDUIT and LTR INDUSTRIES, Stands 3s and 36 Kimberly-Clark Corp. prodncc~ and supplies to the ponent materials used m me m.anut a~ut¢, u: tea and altars For clgarcttes) these matenas c~ga~cttc paper, conventional plug wrap, PorowraP® porous plug swap, tipping pap.¢r: an_d. r.ccoas!ituted, tobacco, PoroswaP® is a K~l~c1"ly-L:la~g regtsterea trademark for porous plug wcap. In addition, reconstituted tobacco wraR~c is made for little cigars, and r~onstitut©d tobacco f'dler a~d binder is made for large cigars. These tobacco industry-related materials are produced worldwide. years ago the laser perforated processes for tipping paper that are now wcll known in the tobacco dastry. Papetedes de Malaucene is not only.~.pa.per mill producing a wide range of cigarette ann upping papers, but also a converter with multi-colored print- ing facilities and laser perforating futilities. The microlaser and maCrolaser perforated tipping papers devdoped by papeteries dc Malaucane enable cigarette manufacturers to reach a prccisa control of tip vcmilation. Malaucene'S colored cigarette papers, and par- ticularly its new line of pastel shades, are helping numerous cigarette manufacturers around the world to give apcrsonality or a spedai touch to their brands. Papetefies de Malaucene is a subsidia~ of Kimberiy-Clark Corp, Those attending will be Jean-Oande Baccesti, sales and marketing director; lqicolas Baskevitch, director of research; Therry Alcxandre, sales manager. On dL~play will be plain and printed ripping papers, colored cigarette papers, mtcrolascr and macrolascr "- perforated tipping papers. Founded more than a century ago, Papetedes de Mandult manufactures fine papers for the dgarette indastry, With manufacturing facilities in .Q~." ~perl.~, rance, and sales and general management m. yam,.;;t: papetcHes de Mandmtzs alarge exporter of.cagar . paper and one of th" world's top prooucers ot • "::: cigarette paper. Papeteries de Mandoit or PDM services the:a: clg~ett¢ industry on all five contine.ats with ,an ~ teusive network enabling prompt sernc¢ any.,vne~e : ." the world. • The emphasis in its production program is put on. quality and uniformity, PDM is a wholly owned subsidiary of KimberlY~.~;i Claxk Corp. to each customer, i.e. products ~th controlled pro- perties such as tar delivery, nicotine content, flavor, and filling power. LTR Industries is a subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corp. Representing LTR will be Jacques Clis.son, sales direc- tor; Nicolas Baskevitch, director of research; Thien~ Alexandre, sales manager, On view at the stand will be c~stomized reconstituted tobacco made by the Kimberly-Ciark process. ROBERT KEITH & CO., Stands39Aand39B The originator and d~gner of cold-air giant inflatable advertising displays, Major tobacco companies, Including R.J'. Reynolds and Brown & WRliamson, have taken steps toward overcoming advcrtidng restri~ions in recent years by incorporating Keith's inflatables in promotion cam- paigns. For instance, cigarette samples can bc distributed right out of a 30-foot giant pack from a built-in alcove that has room for two people to dispense samples to the crowds. Other tobacco corn- panics have employed Portaboards, wealhes-resistant, freestanding Inflatable and portable billboards with ihterchangeable copy panels; Third-Dimandon Billboards that grab motorists' attention; and van- standers, giant inflatabla product replicas that are tethered to the top of a van to ma~dmiz~ visibility. The creator of the giant inflatable product replica medium is Robert Vicino, a 29-year-old entrepreneur K-TRON CORP., Stands 86 and 87 Persoand attending will be J. Richard Grau, direc- tor, sales and masketing, cigareR¢ papers; Ronald H. Frear, director, sales and marketing, tobacco pro- ducts; James P. Caliahan, direr'tot, sales and marketing spcdalW papers & long fibe~; Dr. Willi_am A, S¢lke, ~ce presidc~t, research & development; Donald F. Durocher, manager, tobacco research & dcvciopment; $oseph Alkn, marketing tobacco products; Randy Mulligan, manager, American sales and tcclmical services; David C. Luehrman, manager, international sales. Ximberly-Cla~k Corp. will display their products at the stand and will have technical rcp~esentatlves available to discuSS the application of the products in the tobacco industry. Papetedes de Malancene is one of the oldest paper mills in Europe, founded in 1527. It combines today old traditions with space-age tedmdiogies, pspetefies de Malauccu¢, in particular, devdoped more than ~O--CATALOGUE tot; Hicolas Baskevitcrt, director oz research; *,~ ¢ Alexandre, sales manager, K-Tron ¢quipmcut is being used by major tobacco processoxs in the ,southeastern U.S., Austr',dla, the Far and Europe. Products exhibited at rand ~ plet¢ rang( and porous cigarette papers, tipping papers, plugwrap papers. LTR Industries (fo~neriy known as Le gccongitute) Olk'a'at es in Le Marts, the s Include a com.-...~, The company's weigh-belt units can feed tobacco . • ~.~- :ofdgarettepapersincludingconventto .~,.~1 at rates up to S0,0001bs/hr. whil¢loss-inweightanits ping papers, ana.~1 tan feed additives at rates as low as ¼ lb/hr. Units are available for batching as well as continuous ~'~ feeding. K-Tron's newest unit, the WFI0~, was F=~nce, thelarg ~..~ tobacco. ti~bac¢o reconSthufion mlil in Europe. LT~ IndtL~'ies has ~h¢ ~p=b~t~_~s~to a ~1 '~legates to the cxhibhlo. ~1 be gobe~ Bar.err. "~ o£ toba~os ~ tobacco uy-pzu~=~, #.= ~mce Lowden, Dwight Nowack, ~d John PeRh. , ht~h~he~vbl~d~d~,m~~ On d~splay at the stud will be two t~es of .......... 22C...OS ~¢ fle~b~ty ot m=~ ~a~mat~e fenders. The high-v01um¢ weigh-ball a~d S~o~g ~uu~ • • ~ by L~g Indas~fi~ r~dcr, th~ WFI~ feeder, h~ a 42" ~d¢ belt and ~berly-Cl~ process ~abl~ t~ comp~ to offer ~o~d pro~a~ ~ deigned for ~gh-rat¢ f~ng of low-dcusiW with an art and advertising background who founded the company in 1978 with wife Ann Wawer, In just five years, the multi-million dotlar company has created a new advertising medium by producing nearly 5,000 gigantic alr-fiHcd replicas of advenlzer's products and characters, and has grown from a one- room operation to a brand new 60,0~ square foot fac~ty in San Diego. Personnel attending will be Tom Watkins~ marketing director, and account executlves Betty Rose and Douglas Naegle, III, On exhlhit will be a variety of giant Inflatable pro. duct replicus of Interest to the tobacco Industry, In- cluding the van-stander.
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mater~aL~ such a~ tobacco. Standard features of the unit ~¢ a constant belt t~sion s~ie~ ~d automate belt trackhag ~d con~fio~ng systems. ~e belt ¢~y removed for cl~g or replaccm~t, ~e low- rate loss-~-wdght f~, the L~ f~, pr~d~ feeds flavorings with K-Tron's ~cluslve t~n-s~ design. K.¥rol¢l low.rate tose-f~wslOht fandlr, th~ LWF20. LEDER, INC., Stand IZS A worldwide company gl-oup supplying conveyor belts for various tobacco handling applications. The company manufactttrcs sl:~cialty bclt~ for easy tracking up to 200" ha width; special covers to avoid any staining or cracking of covers; perforated belts for de-stemming; incline handling belts with cleats, for loose or cut tobacco; extra wldc and long belts for mixing bias; high speed conveyor belts for wrap- ping and pacld~. One hundred percent polyester plies avoid any dimensional change in the belt: even when exposed to humidity, no stretch occurs. Attending from Ledcr Inc. will be Rcudi Hess, general manager, and Vernon Smilb, sales manager. 52--CATALOGUE Representing Ledcr & Co. AO (SvAtzetland) will bc Laurcut litter, hnternational marketing manager; and representing Ledw Belting Canada Ltd. ('Mississauga, Ont.) will be Allan lqteholls, sales manager. MACANDREWS & FORBES, CO., Stand wllh M.F. NEAL 120. The world's oldest and largest manufaetttrar of l~corice extracts and derivatives. The company is 135 years old and is part of a cot-. poratiort that includes Wilbur Chocolate Co., Techni Color, and M.F. Neal Co. Mac.Andrews and Forbes' lasgest facility is in Camd~, N.J. This ~s also the largest licorice produc- ing plant in the world, In attendance wiR be Meyer Laskim, president; Robert H. Whitman, vice president, sales and marketing; Peter Born, director of research and development; Thomas D. Heal, of M.F. Neal subsidiary. Ex.~blt ed at the sland wi/] be various li,'nficc extracts and glycyrrhizim derivatives for use in casings and top dressings. Address Listings Begin Page 89 With over 250 of our QUADRA-BEAM Tobacco Analyzers installed in Richmond, Virginia alone... IT'S HARD TO FIND OUR COMPETITION, Moisture Systems Corporation has installecl over 250 QUADRA.BEAM Tobacco Anab/zers in Richmond atone and more than 11200 worldwide. For teliab~, accurate, and conlinuoue, non.contacting moisture measurement come to Ihe leader .... QUADRA-BEAM. Me OUADRA.BEAM II Tobacco Analyzer provides precise measurement control tobacco produc~ with cont(nuous mofsture analysis, which is insensitive to process material height ot ble~ changes. Moisture Systems' technical staff application engineers are ready to provt(t~ you with full assistance. Call or write lor information on QUADRA-BEAM II... the best tobacco moisture analyzer available anywhere! Visit us at Booths 43 & 44, and see for yourself why we're the leader. Tomorrow's Technology Today,., MICRO- QUAD 80001 PRQCESI INS'rRUM~tTATiON SOUTH STREET. HOPKINTON. MA~S. 0174B U,SJL • TEL: (6~7)435,6881 .TELEX, 95 RUTT~ & COMPANY MO/~URE 8~EM8 LTD. Post~,Js ~45 + En~ch~. HolI~. N~r0e ~aoen 400 ~ CI.~ ~1Sla~o<~ ~0+ ~enh~. No'le~nl~ Nt4~ Teleran 0~d.315g~. Telex 4420~ RUTE~ NL Tel: 1604) 8~606. Tqtox 3124~ f,I5. UR G MOISTURE SYSTEMS CORR
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The Vibrating ConveyOr ~ufS producHon lime and costs for processing, and conveying, Because the conveyor can grade~ screen, wash, dry an.d oool, it la ideal for use in many diverse Induslries--ranglng from food handIMg to tobacco processMg, Ne~omb conveyors =re avsllable wilh eRher standard or cue, tom opttons~ but a~l ~re eaaily cleaned, long I~sting and visually maintenanca.l~ee, FEATURES ~l~ewc0mb's Enterprise, Inc. 4412 T'dt~lr RSI¢, Rk;hl~O~ld, ~i~ ~34, MACTAVISH MACHINE MANUFACTURING CO., Stands 82, 83, 84 and 85 Dcsisners and manufacturers of complete grccn leaf proc¢~i~g #ants. Products ~clud¢ ~¢ new Mac-Tr~ Lift-N-~y conveyors, Mac-Vat Vacuum Condition. ing ~d Fumigation Ch~bcrs ~d the V.L.S.-C, ~¢~i¢~ Lift,s Separator) ~os¢ atten~g ~I b~Eldon D. Gooden. presidem; 3ack A. H~d, m~ke~g d~to~; David B. maa, chief ea~n¢¢r; Rebcc~ E. Smith, s~ ~t; Pat~ck 3, Kcmmey, t~] ~sismat/sa]~; ~c ¢~{bit will feat~e an~u~ presentations of the v~ous ¢q~pmcm mad~ by the company. ~ ~ ma~ r~nfly add~ ¢o ~¢ m~ufa¢~g ~ under a Hc~ ~ent wi~ Wi~. Qu=~ M~fabdk GmbH of Colo~e. W=t ~y. MacTa~h is pl~g a mow to n~. l~gcr queers in lat~ ~¢r. 1983. ~d ~ ~o off~ ¢ours of no,by 83 + 84 MAKEDONIA LEAF TOBACCO, Stand 137 Makedonia speclalizcs in the export ~d import of.i, tobacco, as part of thc Yogotutun complex. At tho stand will be Damcho Shuturkov, deputy genera] manager; and S/obodaa Boshkovski, depuW manager of the leaf tobacco department. Makedonia will be ¢¢hibiting and aromatic types of orl~ta] tobacco: Yaka and Pfilep. Also, medim-a-siz¢ leaf tobacco and large-leaf tobacco of the Virginia type, various brands of cigarettes. THE BOOTHS TO REMEMBER MARDEN EDWARDS & CO., Stand zlo The company has bccn a supplier to the tobacco m- .~,' dustry since its inception in 1962. INTERNATIONAL TOBACCO EXHIBITION CONFERENCE _',~EPTEMBER 14:1~, 1993 RICHMOND. VIRGINIA, USA TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--55 MacTavish personnel will also be on hand to greet - visitors, answer questions and distribute literature. ~!.~ • PRIMARY EQUIPMENT three basic smali-lcd:~-~'~ i] TOBACCO WEIGHING obacco: Yaka, • leaf tobacco Otl~" ~LEA • , , . , . .;] FGRADING '~~] ~CASE PACKING CO., Stand 110
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Originally the company manufactured the ME4-12 range of overwrappcrs for single cartons. Since then it has increased the range to cover all types of for- mats using all heat scalilblt mattr|ais. The most tectnt addition is the KAP tO0 cold adhesive pureeing machin~ for hmdling all types of kraR ~d s~i[~ papers for PVA staling. An advan- tage of this machine is its ability ¢o handle heat s~able t¢ansp~en¢ films with m~imum ch~gcowr. Attending the exhibition will be Gordon Edwards, director~ and John Wrixon, sales managexo The ME~-30 cigarette bundle ovcr~vrapper will b¢ cx- hibited at the stand. METER METRICS, DIV. OF I.T.R., INC., Stands lS2 and lS~ Meter Melfic~ is a wholly owned subsidiary of I.T.R., Inc, and is, major distributor of approximately 30 major lines of electrical and deetroni¢ test equipment, including Fluke, Simpson, Triplets, Amprobe, Beckman, General Electric, Keithley, Newport, and Yokogawa. For approximately 10 ],'ears, Meter Metrics has manufactured instrumentation and testing devices specifically for the tobacco industry, Primary in- struments include a pressure drop ventilation, a tip- ping air flow instrument, and a ventilation instrument. All instruments are complete operating systems and require only electrical service to function. Because of the instruments rugged design, the}' may be used as production llne testers, as well as laboratory in- Modll 3000.02 Tipping Air Flow Inslromant (TipperS. 58--CATALOGUE struments. All instruments are calibrated to COR- E$TA standard 1050 c¢ per minute and are supplied with BCD outputs as a standard feature. Personnel attending the exhibition include P.,$. Kavanaugh, president; Liazy Pendergrass, senior engineer; and R.S, Kavanaugh, Jr., senior technician. On display for the first time at the exhibition will be instruments with RSo232 output for direct computer interface. For faster, more convenient operration, a solenoid actNated foot switch is now optional for the PD|, the PDI/DD[, and the Tipper. A combining test option is now available for the PDI and the PDI/DDI instruments, "RESULTS THROUGH INSTRUMENTATION', PRESSURE DROP/VaNTfLATION TIPPING AIR FLOW VENTILATION 'TESTER Model Iggl-21088A Model ~O~O~ or 30~02 Modal 21011~lD1-500BA percent ~lOcm H20 0-35cm H20 t~Dfe llll 7 1o 21 m~ tram tiller lionel " 3.5 dlgll dl~play ' range ~5.00" H20 or ~88.00 cm ' 110V, ~Hz, sl,ndl~d; ~20.2~0V~ * instruments are complete operallng systems roqutring only electrical aervicuo Dnalgilad for" both Laboratory or Produotton Line use. digital displays. MIKROPUL CORP., PULVERIZIN MikroPul Corp., located in Sumnfit, N.J. is a .-sldiary of U.S. Filter Systems which is a unit Ashl~d Oil Co. MikroPul's h~tory goes back to th¢~ Puh-eriz{ng Maehinery's primary busin~s w~ and ~ today, the manufacturing o~ equipment used in title fiz: reduction of products used ~ the cosmetic, ~ood, tobacco, and drug industries. Puliv~rjzinB systems typically rtquire a dust TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--57
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,NIEPI for cigarette packaging Automatic tray feeders • Cigarette packer • cello-wrapper parcellers • boxers • shipping-case-cartoners Masch~nenfabrlk Ft. Nmpmann GmbH & Co D.58~0 Gevelsberg • W.-Germany Tel. (02332) . 1861 Telo~ 8229405 PRECISION, WEAR RESISTANT, CEMENTED CARBIDE PARTS FOR CI MAKING The Premier Process for expanding tobacco ARIAY EQUIPMENT CORPORATION, PC BOX 2959, WINSTON-SALEM, NC 27102, USA. Telephone (919) 777-$I08. Telex 806483. • Greatest potential ior savings in cigare:te maRui,tcture since homogenized tohac~-o, • Used in hundreds of cigarettu brands worldwide. • Importanl in production of "'light" cigarettes. • proven process -- m ope~ahun on lhrec-shift, five-day ~ eek basis since 1968. ~ Proce~splantsde~nedandin~taHali°n supervised ~urld~i(le by experienced "'tobacco engineers." . impro~edc~garetteCluahly(bett~rfirmnu~'less loose ends) or receiver into which the entire production is air con- vcycd at extremely high grain loadings. The produc- tion from the pulverizer is dependent on the dust filter's ability to maintain a stable pressure drop and handle a constant air flow, particularly with heat sen- sitive products. While many types and models of dif- ferent dust filter manufacturers had been used in this severe application, only a few were even minimally ac- ceptable. Recognizing the need for a dust filter to fill these rcqulrcments and primarily to enhance the marketing of palvcrizcrs, MikroPul began develop- ment on a new concept in dust filters. In the latter half of the 1950s, Pulverizing Machinery Co., obtained U.S. patents and introduc- ed to the industry the Micro-Pulsalrc dust filter. Now commonly known as a "pulse-jet type" dust filter, it beta.me the most significant single innova- tion in the history of industrial fabric filtration. In tha 1960s, following its rapid growth in the air pollution control equipmenl field, that segment of the company was separated under the name of MidroPul Corp. while the Pulverizing Machinery Co. continued operations as the industry leader in particle size rcduclton equipment. Meanwhile, MikroPol had broadened its activities into reverse-air and shaker type dust fihcrs as well as electrostatic prccipltators. As more than equipment suppliers, MikroPul has developed technology in dry scrubbing systems for removal of particular and gaseous fluorides in the primary aluminum reduc- tion process, coke oven emissions control systems, and fluc gas dcsulfurization systems. In the tobacco industry, MikroPul markets the Pulsaire for removal of the leaf and dust particulate from ambient air at various process points in the making. Their Pulverlzing Machinery Division manufactures equipmgnt used in the pulverizing of leaf tobacco, both reconstituted scrap and virgin. MIIIIt Machine will pro=enl IIs 42*' labaceo thtllhllr unit Stand 12A. 42", 48", 60". 72" and 96" threshers, single and dual rotor threshers. Capacities are 4,000.20,000 pounds per hour. Other products and services are fabflcatlon and machine work replacement and maintenance parts for all types of tobacco processing cqu pmenh end all types of sheet metal work used in the tobacco industry. The company has customers In North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Pennsylvania and Canada, The company's representative will be Larry Moore, On display will be the 42" tobacco thresher unit, Literature is to be available on other products as well. MILLER MACHINE MANUFACTURING & ENGINEERING CO., (formerly AAA MANUFACTURING & SERVICE CO.) Stand A manufacturer of tobacco processing equipment, with a full llne of tobacco threshers including 30", MOBIL CHEMICAL, FILMS DIVISION~ Stand 106 A supp[ier of polypropy]cnc films to tobacco producl manufacturers worldwide. Mobil utilizes tenter frame technology to produce oriented polyprupylene (OPP) films, Mobil began developing the tenter frame process for OPP film In See us at Richmond,Va., Sept. 14.17,1983. Booth no. 85 TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--g0
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the 1950s and did not recogn~e apprcclable sales until the mid 1960s. The industry's acceptance of Mobil films provided the impetus for a continued dedica- tion to tobacco. Representing Mobil Chemical Canada Ltd. will be David Lashta, sales representative, and Ran Duchesn¢, sales representative. Attending from Mobil Chemical Commercial Films will be David Marshall, vice president, North American operations; David Gasper, general manager commercial films; Larry Schwartz, marketing manager commerdal films; Tom Hawksworth, national sales manager; James Rich, manager market planning and support; Joe Kelly, product manager; Norman LaPrade, manager inter- national sales and new product development; O.B. Meadows, district manager; Bob Hedges, Pat O'Con- nor, John White, sales representatives; Ed Bradley, technical service representative; Jose Cal'ie, product manager international. The stand will feature Mobil's 370AB5 and 830P560C oriented polypropylene films. Both are particularly well-suited to pack and carton overwrap. In the dgar portion of the industry these films are being used as individual unit wrap and package overwrap. MOISTURE SYSTEMS CORP., Stands 43 and 44 A manufacturer of on-llne infrared moisture gauges and controls Representation will be by Johu Fordham, vice pre~ ddent; WiLliam M. Pease, Jr. ~ales manager; R,Iph J, Joliettc, regional sales manager, On display will be the new microprocessor based high speed tobacco moisture gauge. The new instrument's features are its ability to instantaneously analyze tobacco processes using a non-contacting Infrared reflectance technique. The Micro Quad System Incor- porates a printer, keyboard and video display, thus enabling the user to monitor and control, A TIPPING with Improved t~p release and superior appearance. A' P,,SATULE NEW Fnm. FROM HERCULES, OF COURSE. Introducing new opaque white OPP packaging film from Hercutes, the leading supplier of dear OPP o~rwrap ~m to the cigarette industry. Our new WT5.00~!.m. offe~ you better appearance better feel, better snell ~ite, ar~ at a better vaLue. And best of all, ll~s ready for ira. mediate delivery. For complete information, wdte Hercules " Incorporated Hercules Plaza, WilmingtOn, DE 19899, Attn:H.Citino. Or cal (302) 594-6500, Ext, 4447. MOLINS TOBACCO MACHINERY LTD., Stands 103, .104, 129 and 130 A manufacturer of cigarette making and packing machinery. Anending will be Stephen Dreyfuss, sales and m~rkedng director, a~d the technical/sales staff fror~ the O.K. and Molins Richmond, The stand wig feature information facilities which In. clude a comprehensive products video library and a range of sales literature on the company's broad range of cigarette making, plug manufacturlng~ inspection, TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--01
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moss.flow, trayfilling and packlng/wrappi~g equipment, MUNDET INDUSTRIES INC.r Steads 79 aud gO HERMETITE DIVISION The Mender Group is made up of the following com- panies, all of which specialize in the production of cigarette tipping paper: Mundet Industries Ltd., Canada; M~ndet Tipping Pie., U.K.; and Mundet ln- dustd~ Inc. Hermefite Division, U.S, As well as supplying the above countrlcs domestically, the group exports to tobacco compa.,dc$ in over 30 different countries. The group also owns 50% of Hermex, a company that produces cigarette tipping paper in Mexico City for sale in the Mexican maxket. The Mundet Group is owned by a Canadian, W.G, Spaxkhal/, who purchased the Canadian operation in 195g and Hermctite in 1980, Muodct Tipping PIe., a wholly owned subsidiary of Mund~ Industries Ltd., was estab~hed in 19(~, Thegroup operat¢~ from four production plants, two in the U.$., one in Canada, and one in the U.$. The Mundet Group is completely independent and has no affiliations with any tobacco or paper com. panies. It is this independence that has enabled Mundct to remain a leader in tipping technology. Methods of perforating tipping paper have bcco pioncercd and perfected by the group and it can of- on.line, have been devdoped and these ~nable customers spedfications to ba accurately adhered to, while the fipp'mg is being p~rforatcd. On-llne moaJtor- ing, combined with stringent quality control at eve~ stage of the production process, ensures that customers always receive tipping produced to the highest possible standards. Tipping, produced by the Mundet Group, is run- ning in the plants of aU the major tobacco companies as wall as those of many independents, The ¢xperlcnce gained by the Mundet Group dur- ing Its twenty-five years in the clgaxctte tipping business is at the disposal of any customer or poten- tial customer who wishes to draw on it. Experts in tipping technology, most of who have come from the tobacco industry, axe available for consultation and tronbleshnodng at customers plants, regardless of where these are located. Those attending will be W.G, Spaxkhall, owner of Mundet Group; Stcphco Young. president, U.S. divi- - sion; C~arles Coates, vice president, sa~es (U.S.); Robert Gaxd~er, president, Cansdlan d~vision; David Bailc)', Canadian divLdon; .~ohn Shannon, vice prcd~.: ".. dent, group marketing; Norman Pope, managing ;.. dircctor, U.K. division. .,~: On display at the stand wiI[ be various tippings • . . duccd by the Mundet Group. Th~s will mdode ducts perforated nsing laser, electrostatic, and~ mechanical methods. fer its customers base papers, produced to exacting specifications, by paper mills in many different THE NATIONAL TOBACCO BOARD ,: countries OF GREECE, Stand 173 Decorated tipping ca~ be produced in up to six col- can be applied. Perforating methods cu~'¢ntly used Economy and ¢ntrugcd with the responfibility of pro- by Mundet ate electromcchanical, electrostatic and tcct~g tobacco growers a~d tobacco AA products a~ ~.~! la~cr, instrumcoLs to measure and control porosity for ths promotion of tobacco production and expods. CUSTOM FLAVORS [ Impeders, expo~le~s, manufacturers, }l tOt ever 100 years I Tele~ Licorice Extract • Glycymiz~ Cttobs- Getgtonla II 123~1) U.S.~ ~[ ~. P,O. Bo~ 24 Tel, I~) 64~5891 'sin You can do away with end labels for some packs and print product information on the ovenNra!~. This is poss b e with square end fold opbon ova able on Marden E'~warcls KAP 'J00 overwrapper. The KAP 100 incorporates a unique . adol formahon Effective positioning of the ~. ~'~ . . , ~" , adhesive dots for securily anO presentation iS a ~,~ feature of the machine w~ich ove~raps laminatereCtangulartypePr°dUCtpapers.ends in' a variety ol Kralt or The versatile KAP 100 offers a wide size of speed .=~ ,, range in single packs or oarcels Send for details ~ hpw ~0ur production could ~'enefit from paperoverw o6er makes lhemosioh[ ~ragg~, Inc., 10 E. Baltimore Street ~arden Edwards and Co., 9al~more Maryland 21202 U S ~ ' ~-- ~arn~own industrial Estate, ~hone 30J~3~4005 Cnh~,. ~= ~ ~ W=mDorne, Dorset BH21 7PD "Fe ¢x: ~7~8 ........... ~'" ~~ ~e~: Ferndown (0202[ 075312 ' ~ Y ~e~ex: 4] 202
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..TAMAG R ,F, ADYFLAKE SYSTEI~I '", +1:'1"~ MAIN ADVANTAGES O FL ~'U R SYSTEM,~RE:. • .'+' " '."~~I"AN'-~+Y:'I~i~ ~:'I:OBACCO WASTE" OF'ANY SIZE:6~,N:BE 'U~ED :.~E PaN~ iS 5~AC~-SAV~N~ AND mM~Y Cd~SmUCTED " "~ IUNITCO~STRUC~N SYSTEMI. ' . POWER CONSUMPTION ~S ~_OW. ~N GENEhA[ U"DE~ • ~ KG, OF FU+:ES. '• -THE' PLAN:I:"~AN BE STARTED WITHIN A:FEWlMINUTES AND WORKS IN A CONTINUOUS WAY. • : " " • THE FLAKES ARE GENTLY DRIED IN FLOATING STATE. • LOOK AND FORM OF THE FLAKP:.S ARE VERY CLOSE TC SMOKE IS MILD AND CORRESPONDS WITH THE NATURAL CHARACTER ( THE USED TOBACCO. • SHARPNESS AND HARMFUL SUBSTANCES CAN BE SIGNIFICANTLY REDU~ • THE YIELD OF FLAKES IS MORE THAN 100%. TAMAG BASLE LTD, STERNENFELDSTR. 16 CH--4127 BIRSFELDEN/SWITZERLAND TELEX 63403 " 661 F|llh Avenue. New York, N. Y, 10176
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• .TAMA TAMAG BASLE LTD. STERNENFI~LDSTR, 16 CH4127 BIRSFELDEN/SWITZERLAND TELEX 63403
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Attending the exhibition will be the president of the National Tobacco Board of Greece, and two other representatives, At the stand samples of Greek tobacco will be exhibited. NEWCOMB'S ENTERPRISE, INC., S~nd 10 Newcomb's Enterprise, Inc. is in machine manufac- turing, sales and service. At the stand will be Douglas N. Ncwcomb, president; Marianne M. Dobbins, corporate officer; C.A. Sat- t¢~vhke, St., service manager; and James Paulettc, cnginear. Newcomb's will exhibit its vibrating conveyor;, 14/18 tangential separator; and fan unit. The vibrating con- veyor moves the tobacco product 70 feet per minute and is designed with interchangeable screens for various sizes and separation of product. "Foe 14/18 tangential separator feeds the vibrating conveyor in an even product flow, The fan unit circ~lates the pro- duct from the vibrating conveyor into the tangential separator; thus, the circulator motion of the product. Attending the show for Niepmann will he Dr. Alfred Brinker, managing director; and Udo Kreftcr, sales manager. The complete machinery program for the cigarette in. dustry will be displayed by video fihn and brochures. Detailed explanations will be given concerning the newiy-devdoped data-acquisition device for packing systems; computer programs for the comparison of cost effectiveness of various makes of packing machines; and a newly-designed feeding system for materials or cigarettes. O.C.M.C. A/S, Stand 9 O.C.M.C. A/S produces flavors to meet the in- dividual requirements of customers in the tobacco business. Attending the show will be O.M. Christiansea; K..! Mortensen; and J.A.H. Brown. MASCHINENFABRIK FR. NIEPMANN GMBH & CO., stan~ 131 and 132 Niepmann, founded in 1919, has been designing and manufacturing dgarette packing mach~es since 1923. At prc~ent, it manufactures machinery for the secon- dary, such as tray feeders; soft-cup packers (single and double track); fdm wrapping machines (single and double track); parceIIers; boxing macldnes; shipping case cartoners; and various types of colJecting and stacking devices. New developments include feeding systems for cigarettes. 66--CATALOGUE The Ontario Flue.Cured Tobac. ¢o Growotl* Dutch Auction Clock on view OI Stand 30. ONTARIO FLUE-CURED GROWERS' MARKETING BOARD, Stand 30 production and marketing duced in Onta.rio ~ of the Canadian crop). At Stand 30 will be George A. Demeyre, and J.A. Lenthong, secretary. The board looks forward to meeting of Canadia: the latest spect samples of Canadian witness a demoastratio~
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PARKER TOBACCO CO., Stand 31 A leaf rebate merchant and dealer with storage facilities and processihg capacity of 22,000 pounds per hour. Personnel attending wig be S. Alex Parker, Jr., chair- man| Ernest B. Hillcnmeyer, president; W. Frank Mnebesger, executive vice president; Samuel S. Parker, assistant vic~ president; C. Wi|llam MarshaLl, assistant vice president. The stand will feature either slides or a movie show- ing the new Parker Bale Cutting Concept which will be in conjunction with threshing of leaf tobacco. Parker has a patent pending on the machine mad the process. A movie on other innovations in the handl- ing of leaf tobacco may also be shown. JOHN PAYNE ENGINEERING LTD., Stand 95 John Payp¢ Engineering and John Payne Machinery Spares offer a comprehensive machinery overhaul and spare parts service to the tobacco industry. Drawing from their stock of over 600 machines, or using customer supplied machines, John Payp¢ rebuilds a wide range of primary and secondary machines, and can install, corarn~ion and train customers' operators anywhere in the world. Current rebuilds include: Meting, Legg and Haunt cutters; Legg and Hanni stem rollers; Molins HLP packers; Mollns shell and slide parketg $chmermand soft packers; AMF and Sasib soft packers; Motins wrappers; Schmermund wrappers; Scandia wrappers; Marden Edwards and Mollns boxers; a wide range of parcdlers and overw~appers; Meting Mark 8 and Mark 9 makers; Meting PA tango of tippers; Haanl Max tippers; and a range of associated ¢qulpment. 3ohn Payee is also sales agent in the U.K. for Fock¢ and Co, of Verdun, West Germany, selling, commissioning, installing, and stocking a large range of spares for Focke's wide range of tobacco autoweighers and pouch packer~, cigarette tray unloaders, HLP 350 packers, reservoirs, wrappers, parceilers, boxers, overwrappers and case packers. Tho~e attending will be M.J. Pa~a¢, managing direc- tor; P. Gasson, electronic design engineer, perforating machine; and R. Mayo. On display will be the developed Elephant 2 Elec- trostatic Perforator designed to be used as a laborator~ tool to aid cigarette design. The com- ponems can be easily applied to any production situa- 6a--CATALOGUE lion for on line running. The machine offers finger- tip control for brand W wldth, paper speed, hole hole frequency, and can provldc permabilities up to 200 l/hr/4cm/10cm W.G. on 5ram band width at 35 m/rain paper speed. The John Payne tar predictor also on ,Aew, is ed to determine the particulate matter cOntent of cigarette smoke from base tobaccos without the need for cigarette manufacture weight and pressure drop selection and multi-channel smoking. PHIPPS & BIRD, INC., Stand 91 Phipps & Bird, based in Richmond, Va. has been a manufacturer of laboratory apparatus for almost 60 years. In the early 1930s in conjunction with Philip Morris and later American Tobacco, Phipps & Bird began producing equipment specifically designed for the tobacco industry. The research staff was in- strnmental in establishing the quality control stan- dards for processing leaf. Devchapments in machinery for smoke analysis followed alter WWIL Smoke analysis has been the area of concentration for Phlpps & Bird since the sixties. The second genera-. tion machines produced now axe twenty port smokers for measuring TPM and CO. While three standard models are available, the machines to a customer's unique specifications. Each machine is carefdly built by hand, talcing about three montks to complete. Microcomputers have been incorporated "; into the machines as that technology has d~vcloped. All models, I00, 200 and 400, conform to USIFTC and CORESTA testing standards. One twenty port smoking machim at the Phipps & Bird stand. Technical staff will ~e in attendance to answer questions and demonstrate the machine. PMB, Stand 3 The PMB group consists of four companies. PMB B.V. in Eindhoven, the the cigar making machines, tobacco equipment. PMB lnc. in Richmond is the sales and organization of the PMB group in North and Cent~ tral America. PMB Svenska in Kalmar, modelparts and mesholizatinn units : makers and special products. PMB E + D B.V. in Eindhoven, the Netherlands provides the research and development expertise re- quired by any customer. Attending the exhibition will be J. Holland, marketing and sales manager, PMB, BV., Holland; 3.C.A. Verhappen, president and C,B, Joyner, vice president, PMB, Inc., Richmond. At the stand will be a slide presentation about PMB's equipment. Also information will be available on the follow- ing equipment. Tobacco filler threshers Sand reels Conditioning drums Dyring drums Conveying systems Bandtobacco plants for cigarette filter Snuff tobacco installations Metholization up.its for all types of cigarette makers Hingelid box maker for cigars and cigarettes Film and wrapping machines POWELL MANUFACTURING CO., INC., Stand 16 A manufacturer of agricultural machinery. Powell not only provides machines to handle tobac- co from transplanting to final grading, but also allows the proper matching of equipment size and capacity to mesh with farm size, local conditions, and finan- cial needs. Powell manufactures transplanters, aerotoppers, tobacco combines, high-clearance sprayers, and bulk curing barns. Representation will be by Phillip S. Wilson, Paul Greenfield and C.N. (Red) Barnes. PROCTOR & SCHWARTZ, INC., glands 1"~ and 56 Proctor shipped it's first continuous tobacco dryer to an overseas customer in 1894. The company has customers in more than 60 countries around the world. Proctor manufactures machines for leaf and ~trip rcdrying, stem drying, cased filler tobacco dry- hag plus strick and apron drying. A patented, balanced Cooler, specially designed ordering compartments and close control of final moisture content are other ~roctor design concepts, Personnel attending the cxhlbitlon will be Burke Owen, Jr., field sal~ aug|near; Norma~ Young, field sales engineer; Edward Hine I1, product managcrl . Charles Price, product Sl:~-ci~st; Kermcth Wood, pro- duct specialist; Walter Frick, international sales m~agcr; James P. Schwartz, director of marketing; Robert Gocttelmun~ advcrtlslng manager, Proctor will be exhibiting the latest developments In tobacco dryers and redryers together with n new Model 820 DM Microprocessor Controlled Well~h Belt. l fllVl Intormmllon WILH QUESTER MASCHINENFABRIK Stands 82, 83, 84 and 85 This company owned by tile Quester family, was founded tn 1854 and cont[nu~ to manufacture equip. meat for the tobacco industry, It specializes In plan- ning, designing, and constructing plants and mackinery, especlaIIy for prlmary processing of lobac. co with the latest technology for process control, handling, and treatment of expanded tobacco. The manufacturing schedule comprises precondi. tinning equipment, bundle opcntngs and cutting machines, bale Iooscners, &odors, ttpping devices for hogsheads, ca~es, any kind of cylinders for condition. hag, casing and flavoring, silos for blending and bulk. in~, reran, driers, single and muhlband driers, borley. toasters, automatic weighing belts, dosing feeders0 automatic casing and flavoring devices, cooling and siring equipment, stem flatteners, vibrator,/ con, veyors, conveyor belts, pneumatic conveyors with c/ass[tiers, separators and loosening devices, container fitting and presdng units, shredders for stems ~d win. TOaACCO INTERblATION/~I ~(~[I
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Leading manufacturer of primary tobacco processing machinery tn south-east asta THE THE TOBACCO BEETLE SLOWLY KILLS YOUR MONEY - DETIA BAG QUICKLY KILLS THE BEETLE ! ~...as the DeLia Phosphine Fumigants solve your problem fist and residue-free. please contact: DET1A Export GMBH ' P.O~ Box I0 • 6947 Laudenbach • Fed. Rep. ofGesmany • Tel.: 06201/7050 • Telex: 465497 delia d 70--CATAI.OOUB llowings, special equipment for expanded tobacco, laboratory cutters and electric and de~tronie process control systems. For raw tobacco processing Quester supplies: redLy- ing plants, automatic baling presses and other types of hydraulic presses for tobacco packing, including all nccessa~ handling, loosening, classifying .and dos- ing equipment. In addition, Quester manufactures spedal packing and labelling machines for pipe tobac- cos and roll-your-own tobaccos, including automatic weighing machines for the tobacco portions. New products are an automatic plant for filling ex- panded tobacco into cardboard cases, a straightlay- ing system; a stem shrcddlng maehlne of improved design; Quester stem flatteners with capadtles up to 2,4~0 kg/h; and a double track round tin filling and closing machine suitable for filling up to 70 tins per minute with tobacco. Attending will be the technical and sales manager, Due to lack of space, the exhibit will be a slide projection. RAYCO INDUSTRIES, Stand 14o A manufacturer of tobacco conveying equipment. Rayed is a fabrication shop; its line of products in- eludes feeders, conveyors, ordering cylinders, bale tip- pers, threshers, and hogshead and case dumpers. Attending will be Frank Lindberg, Ray Posten, Bar- bara Postcn, Wilson Broach, Sandy Broach, and Stevcn Postcn. RAYNOR, ADAMS & ASSOCIATES, Stand Raynor, Adams & Associates, Inc. is a two-year.old company specializing in three major areas: specially designed machinery, machinery rebuilding, and engineering services. The engineering staff, as well as the machinery technicians each have a minimum of a dozen years' experience working on tobacco machinery. The company rebuilds, converts and upgrades hing- ed lid packing machines, pdiy wrappers, and boxes, They have size changed this group of machinery in pack sizes ranging from 4 to 25 cigarettes per pack in lengths of g0 to 120 ram, and c~rcumference ranges of 21 to 25 mm. The engineering staff has upgraded and redesigned the original Mollns phase I HLP and the machines have attained speeds in excess of Packs per minute. Attending will bc Robert H, Raynor, prcsldenH Robert P. Adams, vice presldcntl and J. Robert Cun. ningham, sales coordinator. On exhibit at the booth will be several bench models, RICHMOND WATERFRONT TERMINALS, INC., Stand 1S An organization which manages the port of Richmond. The port is strategically located at the head of the James River, close to the tobacco centers of Virginia and North Carolina, It provides service between Rich- mond and northern Europe~ the Mcditerranean~ and South America. The port has equipment for loading and off-loading of containers. Also included at the terminal are an alongside wharf, 1,250 feet In lcngth~ 190,000 square feet of ftreproofed warehouse space, In two bulldlngs~ and two unsprinklered warehouses, with 60,000 square feet. Platform space for unloading cars and trucks is ample. A fleet of lift trucks is available, ,long with materials handling equipment suhcd for tobacco In hogsheads, cases or bales. The port ts served by many major trucking lines, and also be Seaboard Co~t L~ne Railroad, the Southern, the Chessle System~ and the R.F. and P, road. Allegheny Warehouse, located near the port~ pro- rides fumigation facilities, and also all necessary ser. vice for preparing the tobacco for export. Tobacco is the most imporlant commodity through the port. It handles tobacco for the major leaf and cigarette companies in Virginia and Noah Carollna, It is able to handle so much tobacco and elgare|tes TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--71
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because of good labor force and management rela- tions, both of widch rcnihc the importance of tobacco. It ~so handles more tmported oriental leaf tobac- cos than any other port in the U.S. RIZLA INTERNATIONAL MARKETING LTD., Stands 9g ,nd ~ T~c House of RJz|a, a manufacturer of cigarette papers, moved into the U.S. masker in 1980 with the purchase of Robcr~ Burton & Associates, makers of the popular e-z wider and Joker cigsrctte papers. GoL'~g back in history 180 years or so, Citizen La Croix spotted a golden opportunity to take advan- tage of the flood of paperwork created by the French Revolution. When Ms application for a license to manufacture Free paper wRs granted on April 1799, hc cotdd h~rdly have foreseen the consequences. For the remainder of the 18th ccmury, L: LaCroix Fils of Angou|eme produced general papers. But, as smoking grew in popularity, attention w~s turned to the manufacture of Free cigarette papers in the latter part of the 19th century. B~ause of their appearance and texture, the first fine cigarete paper was called rice paper. The French word for rice is dr. This was combined with a visual pun on the LaCroix name (croix is French for cross), to prodice Rizla +. This was cvcatually shortened to Kizla, and the name has stuck ever since. In the latter part of the 19th century, soldiers in the Crimean War spread the roll.your-own move- meat, and in spite of Queen Victoria'a objections, it continued to grow in popularity. World War I came and went, and by casly 1930's Rizla had obtained 50% of the British cigarette paper masker. .By 1937, a new factory built in Wcmbley began production. But with dramatic growth during World War If, Wcmbley could no longer keep up with the demand, so Ri~Ja took over the General Paper and 72--cA'rALOGUE Box Manufacturing Co. in South Wales at Treforest. Treforcst was expanded again and again until in 1969 the W~mbley factory was closed and all equipment and key personnel moved to Treforeat. In 1974, long c~tab|ished a part of the every day life of Britain, the Rizla Group set up its headquarters in Treforest with the French parent by then a subsidiary. With factories in Australia, Canada and assOciates in the U,S. and the Bcnclux territories, Rizla has grown from citizen La Croix's small but farsighted beginnings to becoming the largest manufacturer of cigarette papers in the world--annually producing enough paper to make a cigarette long enough to circle the earth no less than 25 times. ROBERTS SYSTEMS, INC., Stands 143 and 144 with CORAZZA NATALINO Designers and fabricators of custom machines with extensive experience in packaging and process. The company currently has several on-going projects in the tobacco industry although it is not active txclasivt- ly in that industry. Roberts systems maintains a well-equipped facili- ty and a staff of meat and fabrication of equipment to solve manuf~-. turing problems. Founded in 1978, the company has grown steadily to its current annual sales volume of approximately $2,000,000.00. The company is also the North American distributor of packaging machinery manufactured by the ItaLian firms of Corazza Natalino S.p.A. and .Pack s.r.l. Their lines include case packers, cartoncrsi-~ tray formers, ovcrwrappcrs and portion paekagin$ systems, The equipment of Cora2.za and Mac Pack:~ is manufactured to the high standards of quality and is completely ~ Systems offers total systems service combining in- house design and fabrication capability with the machinery of Cora.zza and Mac Pack to produce com~i~:. ' plctc packaging systems. - Personnel attending will be John Roberts and J. Allen Blount, sales manager. Personnel froth. Corazza Natalino will also be in attendance, At thestand the IC.64 ovcrwrappcr wlil o .v.trwrapping cartons of cigarettts of 140 cartons per minute. The in-line, feed system makes the machine especially to applications requiring hard to handle films or The in-line feed system also allows the easy ~ reliable application of tear-tape, option. THE TOBACCO CURINI t;EHERATOR CAH HELP YOU SAVEUPT032 HOURS CURING TIME, PER CURE, In tests at Clemson Universi~ the average number of hours saved was 24, yet many growers saved as many as ~2 hours. Eifl~er way, that's an entire extra day's curing ~rne saved. On every cure. And these hours can add up to some vet/useful and profitable ways. ~£rst of ~lI, using theTobacco Curing Generator allows you the most efficient use of your barn. Th/s makes staying 1105 Pineddge Road, Norio~, VLr#a ~350~, 804/855.0191 Telex 828-385 Callback Dominican NFK. ahead of Your crop lots easier. The final proo~ will always be on the warehouse floor. And once again, tobacco cured using the Tobacco Curing Generator had better color, h graded higher, And it brought its growers better prices, See your nearest Cataly'dc Genera. tot dealer for the Tobacco CAIALYIIC ~uring ~onemtor. t~ll~ll~,l~C. TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--73
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74--CATALOGUE vice; Pare Bronander, customer serdce. Scandia will exhibit two rebuilt cigarette "mappers, namely the Model 708S for soft packs of 20 dgarct- tea and the Model 712 asjustable package size wrap- per, each capable of handling cellophane and polypropylene films and opening tapes. Also on exhibit will be the new model 310 dmign- ¢d to overwrap cartons or collations of cigaxette packs simply, economically, and with minimal op~talnr training. MASCHINENFABR|K ALFRED SCHMERMUND GMBH & CO., Stand~ 112, 113, 114~ 119~ 120 and 1~1 Since its inception in 1934, Maschinenfabrik Alfred Sctunermund GmbH & Co. has become one of the leading suppliers to the tobacco industry, mainly as a packaging specialist. The company manufactures tobacco, cigar and cigaxctte packing machines in line with "mappers directly llrd~cd or combined via collators with parccllcrs, boxers, ovcrwrappers and case packers.'~/; Production fis~r¢s ot up to 500 packets/rain, and more are possible with Schmermund machines. Persurmel attending w~ be Hclmut managing director; Norbert Hohenschuh, asst. to managing director; Walter Paulus, cldc£ of service engineers and technical advisor. Also, the representative, M~ssrs. Craggs, Inc. Baltimore, Md, and others from all over the world. Three machine~ will he shown at the single-track "mapper I-LV, Foremost Specialists in Oriental Tobaccos for over 50 years SOCOTAB Leaf Tobacco Co., 90 Park Avenue New York, N.Y. 10016 (~eneva, Switzerland Izmir, Turkey Saloniea, Greece TOBACO0 INTERNATIONAL--
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T104431151
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The M~h,speed wrapper I-LV with a capacky o~ 360 pac~s per minut~ is able ~o hand~= any dim or tear s~rip material available on the m~rket. Directly connectS. Sc~mermund will demonstrate box- ~r/ovc~wapppr FHZ/NK. a mos~ reliabl~ machine combination to ~ro~ac¢ ~ther ~oms ~th/withoat ad- ditional film wrap or naked wra~ p~cds omitting t~¢ display c~tons. Kraft paper or ~uminum foil wra~- per ~arc¢ls/boxps are also possible. These macMncs are d~signed tbr the hl !ink,up wkh the high-speed packer MS or ~y others, The machines can be viewed in h[l operation several dm~s each day. SIEGLING U.S.A., INC., Stand 17 An international manufacturer of power transmission bching and conveyor beldng to the tobacco indnstry. Siegllng belting producus are suppliad ~o tobacco pro- cessors, dgare~ze manufacturers, and O~M,accoums Ihroughou~ lh¢ world. Delegates to t~¢ exMbidoa will be John S. Pham president: Ronald H. Lemon~. dis~rlct manager; Thomas E. Rickel. sales represemadvc; Gaylc R. ,Holmes, office manager. Featured at ~he stand will b¢ power transmission behln~ and conveyor samples and literature. Equip- meat and accessories used ro prepare and finish belting ~ilI also be on view. TABAK JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL Stand 118 A trace pubfi~ation serving :he German and in'.e:na- lionel tobacco inoustrT. Attending wiiI be Donna gizio and Manfred To.ames. Presemcd at rite stand will be issues of Tabd," Jour- nal Imernational, a magazine which is printed in s~x languages every two months. Other tobacco trade publications and books wiil also be exhibited. Available will be Die Tubak Zelnttt~. a weekly newspaper for tobacconists and Pipe Club. a quarterly magazine for pipe smogers. lnformadon will be available on the Tobaccu cyclopedia. I'his reference book for the internattona~ tobacco trade and industry will be published in ,Xlarch. 198-!.. The work contains more than 6,CO0 entries and is illustrated with color platen. tlon~l w|ll b~ T.~CHNICAL DEVELOPMENT CORP. Stands ~2, 83. 8;1 and 85 A manufacturer of shag and pipe tobacco wei.-.ning and packing equipmem and case packers. The com- pany plans and manufactures compJete tobacco manipulation plants, including threshing equipment, conditioning cylinders, and bulking silos. It is also involved in the mann lecture of electronic tobacco leaf grading equipment. Participating will be Emil S. Aslant, presider.t and Ruth Bossharo, administrative assistant. At the stand will be 8enera[ information cn TDC Fro- duct lines and services, Tel: 706641 Telex: 4'386 RH P.O. Box 2554 TECHNICON INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS, Stand 14 T¢chnicon industrial Systetm is headquartered in Tar- r.vtown, N.Y., with locations around the United Sates and in over 19 countries worldwide. The company produces the Tecnnicon Au- toAnaiyzer which has become a wideiy accepted laboratory, insert:meat worid~vidc for ti~c wet cncmic;d anaiysis of nicotine, .-educing sugar, -,no ;o;',t :,;[utile ba~es. Cvcr the last two ye~s another Technicon crcduct, tnc InfraAlyzer, using a different tecimoiogy, Near infrared Reflectance Analysis ~NIRAL has made an impact on li~e tobacco industry. The lnfraAlYzer analyzes a tobacco sample for moisture, oven votatiies, reducing sugar, and nicotine iu under 30 seconds, provides rapid anaiyticai data SALISBURY ZIMBABWE Customs clearing Shipping Forwarding Warehousing Shipbroking Insurance Agents Air Freight 7CBACCD ~H't'ERHAT'ZH~,.--" ~
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that can be used to t~tiate process changes, provides data for accurate blending and provides tremendous time savings in the laboratory without the use of ex- pensive chcmicais. The system is said to be ¢nsy to operate, and once calihratcd, can be used routinely by non-technicid l~r~onne~ maid.get idca.I/'or use on the proems floor in the stemmcry. Pcrsoane! attending the exhibition wil~ be WiLliam L. Bcll~ scztior maxketing manager, food and agricultural sclcnccs; Bcu Hayden, southeast regional manager; Rich Kelley, sales engineer. On exhibit will be the InfraAlyzer 400. TECHNI-REPS, INC., Stand |! representing PARAMETRICS, INC. TASC DRIVES, LTD., and NORD GEAR CORP. T~chal-Reps, Inc. aze manufacturer's represcntadvcs for power transmission equipment and varible speM drives. The company covers the entire southe~t with locations in Greensboro, Charlotte, Atlanta, and Richmond. Personnel attending wilt bc Robert R. Wilson, presi- duet, Gr~.sboro, N.C.; John W. Taylor, vice prc.sl. dent, Charlotte, N.C.; Sid Oraumlich, sales reprc~cn. tafive, Atlanta, Ga.; Harzy M. Brooks, Jr., represcmafive, ~chmond, Va. The stand will display equipment by Parametrics, Inc., TASC Drives, Ltd., and Nord G~r Corp. On view from Parametrics, Inc. Will be variblc frc- quency controls for eatable speed of three phase AC motors for both constant torque and vm'iblc torque loads. Thousands of installatlons exist on cunveyors, ~appcrs, scales, pumps, fans, and feeders, They aJ'e available through 100 HP. Equipment to be extdbited by TA$CDrtves, Ltd., will include the simple, reliable, r~gged Eddy Cur- rent d~ves with all vafible speed drives. It has been c~cd the standard of the tobacco Industry for thresher drives, It is available through 75 HP, On display from Nord Gazer Corp. will be helical in line gcurmotors, C l'ace reducers mad vmlblo belt t
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drives. They are known for compact design and ~e said to be 98% effcci~nt. They are available through 125 HP. THIELE ENGINEERING CO. S/ands 125, 126 and 127 A Division of the Paxall Group, Inc. Tlflele EngineerLng has built packaging equipment for over 30 years. The company manufacturca cartoners, case packers, placers, ftllers, and specially engineered machines for a wide va.~ety of needs. Key to Thicle's success h~ been the strength of the engineering group, Many have been with the company since its inception. In add]don to c~pand]ng the basic product handling techniques Ed Tld¢le and these engineers developed and have ref'med over the years is an ongoing research und devdopmcnt g~oup wldch constantly surveys the changing needs in the packag- ing field and provides crentlv¢ answers to new probJems. In 1979 Ed Thiel¢ retired from the company giv- ing way to Dr. Peter Pan who steers the second generation of management. Pan's background as bead of research and development for a major packaging company has brought new markets to the forefront at Thlcle while maintaining the integrity of an ah'cady growing l~ne of equipment in the packaging field. Twelve years ago Tldelc placed case packers handl- ing cartons at speeds up to 800 cartons per mlnntc into the tobacco industry. As the number of brands has grown this requirement has changed. Thiele now has a much smaller machine on the drawing board for current day rcqulremcnts. It has provided ear- toners automatically collating pouches tobacco, car- ton erectors, carton inserter/mailer machines, high speed miniature coupon and flyer placers,.rcciprocal $2--CA'fALOGU~: motion flyer and tax stamp placers and a host of specially designed machines for a variety of produc- tion and promotional requirements. Representing Tldcle will be Dave Ambuchl, sales manager; Ron Lawson, product manager; John Ruha, product manager. Garvey Corp. will be.showing conveyor system providing product for Thi~le' speed placer. Sal MacarclIa will be available questions on their products. :"" Exhlbitcd at the ~and will be a Rotary feed of the pack wrapper. Design speed is 450 per minute; production speed is 360 The unit features a driven rotary motion placer. The hand load cartoner at the stands is of the building block cartoner s began November, 1982. be field or factory ton loading, overhead compression, feed, and automatic side seam giulnB cartons. • A large screen telcvldon will show video Thiclc equ|pment in the tobacco and industries. THWING-ALBERT Stand 169 co industry with instrumentation for testing physical properties of cigarette paper, tobacco, packaging medium for over 50 years. Thwing-Albert newest developments INTELECT-[I, a second generation ndcro- based universal testing instrument: TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--83
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TOBACCO GROWERS ASSOCIATION OF NORTH CAROLINA, Stand 146 The Tobacco Growers Assooiation of North Carolina, Inc. is a non-profit organlz~tion of tobacco ran'airs and others who have a firiancial imerest in the prO- duction of tobacco. The association is car ready pro* motlng a campaign on smokers' rights utilizing the slogan and logo, *'My Pleasure, My Choice." Attending the exhibition will be William B. Griffin, pr¢fideat, F.H. Schakelford, Jr.. Ist vic= president; and John Percival, It. of Percival Sp¢Clalty Advertising. The booth will display, and offer for sale, a wide ranga of articles (decals, T-shirts, coffee cups, cigarette lighters, caps, etc.) each imprinted with the smokers' rights logo, "My Pleasure, My Choice." TOBACCO REPORTER, Stand ~63 TobaccO Reporter covets the world in pursuit of per- dnant information for the tobacco industry, Serving GOOD TASTE o=... tram good blind=. Good ~lende |m mlde with our equipment, Our Mitering Pumpl i~ Blending Systems provide ~--CATALOGUE their readers with up-to-date, vital facts is their top priority. For an illustration of the completeness, the variety, and the quality of their coverage, visit them in booth #163. Attending the exhibition will be Anne Shclton, editor; Peggy Coach, associate editor; Dayton Matlick. pub~her; Bob Anderson, group advertising manager; Suc Rosen and Elise Ward. account representatives. VIRGINIA PORT AUTHORITY, Stand 4t The Virginia Port Authority owns the five general caxgo maxine terminals in the Port of Hampton Roads--the largest tobacco port in the U.S. All five terminals are equipped with fumigation chambers. Tobacco is handled in containers and break-bulk. General cargo service from the port of Hampton Roads is providesl to 397 port~ in 132 overseas natiom. Representation will be by Joseph A. Doric, senior managing director, marketing services, Virginia Port Authority; Raymond R. Brewer, assistant general manager, Virginia International Terminals, Inc.; Ed. Tol~cco Conveyor Belting INCLINE BELTING *Pyramld Belts Corrugated Belting Cleated Belting ALL TYPES OF ENDLESS BELTING CONVEYOR APRONS All Widths and Types The Dresco Belling 0o., Inc. 122 East Street East Weymouth, Moss. 02189 Telephone: 617-335-1350 ward B. McCaskey, Mid-Atlantic regional manager, marketing s~rvices, Virginia Port Authority; Wil~am C. Regenthal, southeazt regional manager, marketing services, Virginia Port Authority. The Virginia Port Authority will have a portable hibit displaying color photographs of tobacco handl- ing at the port, and aerial photographs of the general cargo ma#ine terminals Also av~able will be literature about the port and statistics about tobacco moving through the port. WIMET WEAR PARTS LIMITED, SANDVIK, INC., Stand 9"/ A producer of cemented carbide wear resistoazt com- ponents for use in cigarette making and packaging machinery. The company has been manufacturing precision parts for the tobacco industry for around 20 years, and the range has expanded to cover square section and circular knives, drum and]s, shoes, scrapers, rails, steel spring bands and a wide selection of bespoke specials. The product range is distributed throughout the world by Sandvik subsidiary companies located in Austria, Argentina, Belgdum, Brazil, Ckile, Canada, Columbia, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Hang Kong, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea, Kenya, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Russia, Netherlands. Norway, Peru, philippines, Portngal, Poland, SingapOre, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Taiwan, Tarkey, United States, West Ger- many, Venezuela and Zambia. Represemation will be by John Powell, managing director and Tony Gibbs, marketing manager of Wimct Wear Parts, Ltd., Coventry Engined. Also at- tending will be Jack Steel, marketing manager, Sand- vik, Inc., Fair Lawn, N.I. On display wilt be carbide wear parts for cigarette machines including cork knives, circular knives, drum anvils, shoes and scrapers. WOLVERINE CORP., Stand Wolverine Corp. has supplied JetzoneTM dryers, reorders, feeders and conveying equipment and pro- ccsses to the tobacco industry for more than 35 years. Jetzon¢TM guarantees uniformity of tobacco pro- cessing and has both small batch and pilot plant facilities to prove performance. At these facilities the customer's owe products can be tested and judged, Wolverine can be contacted in Methuen, Mass, to" establish a convenient time for a test. In attendance will be Donald D. Taylor, corporate vice president sales; Albert A. Thompson, Jr., d~restor of tobacco industry marketing; Daniel E. Russell, sales manager. Jetbalt Conveyors. Wolverine will display small operating demonstration models of the JetzoneTM patented process tobacco reorder and JetbeitTM conveyor. Photos of installatinns will nine be Bn VIew. WORLD TOBACCO, Sl..d 100 A quarterly magazine for the International tobacco industry. Attending vail be Michael F. Barfordt editor arid director; Gerald Hamilton, advertisement director; Svcnd Elkjaer, exhibition executive, At its stand V,'ofld Tobacco will be reminding visitors about the diverse services that it renders to the inter. national tobacco industry from its base in London, England, and offices in New York, Geneva and Tokyo. They include publishing World Tobacco and its hard-cover directory and who)s who~ staging tcrnational c.xhibldons and symposia (details of the next one, in the Netherlands in 1984, will be available at the stand), and conducting the confidential world tobacco consultancy scrvice~ whose director will b~ in attendance. The stand will also feature other Journal, directory) exhibition sad symposium activities of the same cam, pany, notably in the fields of tobacco products distribution and the bonded store, duty frc% trade, TOBACCO INT~RNATIONAL~er
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your processed tobacco AND increase production, no other compare with MOHR. penetrate every hogshead steam completely through to the center before It is evemJated. y packed hogsheads ~OHR c~n engineer ~ you¢ ~cle time ~o ss ~duce steam consumption by as mu~h :'as 65% end increase moisture content from 3 to 5%. Too good to be true? Wd~ for the fa~s~ Because of our expanding 8ctlvlfies, we have an opportunity for a quafified agent to represent us in a growing ~rea of the world. Inquiries am invited. ------~ ~pOrter I ~ MOdern Processing pler~t t ~loose feat and FLUE-CURED/ _ ~ ~ Supplies the most quarried C00PERATIVA DE TABACALEROS DE JUJUY LTDA. Av. San M~n s/n, 4606 C, Pence, Jujuy ARGENTINA Phone: 91.1391239--C~bles: Coolab~co Telex66116 COOTA AR 88--CATALOGUE AMF Savoy Chambers, London St. Andover, Hents, England Telex: 477428~MMAFOG S~ds 45 & ~ AMF Legg ~ Dlatdbutor Dr. Richmond, Va. ~225 Studs 45 & 46 ~u~y P.O, BOX 022~ ~gmbu=, Oh(o 43202 Telex: 2~675 St~s ~, 51.62, & 63 Dun~k ~nty Loulh Republic OI Irel~d U~IM K~gdom ~1 High Street RIC~Swo~h (London) He~o~=hke WD3 1EQ Tel. 0~37-7~11 A~antln~ P~lllon Tool~ Lid. 40 Noah ~L, Uppl~gh~, Leics, LE15 ~L ~t~s 7 & 8 All~y WI~hOUS= ~., Inc. P.O. Box 2~97 ~21 ~m0~o Rosd Richmond, VA ~224 Stud 1 P.O. BOX 102~G Oo~I 8ouberg N~edand TeL (011~) 67~ Tell: 37~5 (b~ue NL) Rotte~ Rotte~ N~ed=nd TeL 01~1~774 Addresses of Exhibitors U.S. Substdtarla= ai'e: ~tar Wamhuuso Cor~, 1800 Sammes Ave, Richmond, V~ 23224 Rinhmond. VA 23224 Atils.Chatmers CO~p. 1150 Tennessee Ave. C~nc~nnati, Ohio 45229 TeL ~6B.2082; In Vlrglni~ 8~.~2.274~, 004~59.4~0 H~wk Wo~ke Ma~ Street Slan~s 7 ~ 8 P,O. 80x 1 ~eL ~41) ~1922 Telex: 215~ AQRQIM YU St~ds 135 & 136 Noflhbmok, IlL ~2 Tel. 312-~91~ Telex: ~: 910~ Fde~enweg 4 2~ Hamburg ~ Telex: 021443~ S~ands 148 & 149 TeL (3~) 1~512412 Budoy and Dark Leaf A||oclaflon~ Room 3~ 11~ 17th Slreet, NW W=shlngton, ~tanda 39 & 40 ~uach Inc, 4974 Euclid Rd, Virginia TeL Telex: B23.45t Stand ~70 Telex: 92-74~2 Caralak, Inc, 10804 T~ado Richmond, Tel, Covington 115 6hoodoo Sllp R~hmond, Tel, ~04~8.~230 Telsx: 82,7341 6rand 42 11~ Pl~lddgo Road Tel, 6~.855~191 Stand 16 COL Inlomattonat+ P,O, Oox Station B Rexda~+ Onl, ~V 4~3 Tat. 410.74~.1 t24 Standl 17~ & 172 GEM Corp, P.O, Box Indian T~a[I, N,G, 28070 TeL 704,B21,9204 ~land 58 Chesspa|ka Cmnllnlr CO. P.O, Box 7604 5640 Lewis Road Richmond. V=. ~.3231 TOBACCO INTERNATION^L--I~I]
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TeL 864-226-155~ Commsrc(al elm Bit,. Chevron C~eml~ Co,, Oflho ~ Callfoml~ StJSult~ 9~ . Sin Fr~c~sco, C~llt, 94111 Gomzz= Natal[no Comas Sd. V|a Imnl=, ~0 Tel. (~) ~ VISIT US IN RICHMOND, BOOTH NO. 128 LEBER INC, 652 Browns Fsrr/RO, P.O. 6ox 3~1 Can~|ch~els, Pa. 15320 perforated belts for destsmmlng. blending silo belie up to 200" wide, n'o stretching, easy to track. continuous wefghtng belts with no weight deviation. packaging belts for hlgh speed wrappers. Incline and cleated belts. LEPER BELTING CAN, LTD. LEDER & CO. AG 2320 Tedo St. Flubs,tress=, Unit=, ~ & 4 CH.6640 Rapperswli Mlealeeuog=. Ont. LSA4A2 Switzerland (4r6i 275~ CANADA SWITZERLAND Leder Inc. Csrmichaels PA 15320 ~ L '' 652 Browns Forty Ro~d Tel. (412) 968-5084 Telex 510 489 3582 , ;.~.~';,, , Crlgge, lnc, 10 East Baltimore St, B=,t(Imore, Md. 2f2~2 Tel. 53g~5 Stand I~ SURe ~2, TWO C~ot/e, N.G. 2~10 TeL Telex: 572 ~4 St=nd 139 O~isoh ~bH Postfa~h ~4 D~ F~uN~ C.H. Oexter Ol~slon Windsor ~k=, Conn. Tel, ~: 71~2~593 Sleds ~ & 23 C~a L?R 2E4 Tale¢ (3~) ~xtlr Fir ~ Inc. Kowa Building No. 6 15.21, Nlshi-~u, 4chores Mln=to-~u TOWO 1~, J~ ToL 781.~750 P,O. rex 57 N,S.W. ~, TeL 011~1.24~21~ (Oirect) Engl~d Tel. Tal. ~1.~ Olxlir (ntemal[~ ~. Nlededassung D~ F~nkfud 71. Go.any FROM TECHNICON. . . "THE NIRA COMPANY" THE INFRAALYZER FAMILY OF SYSTEMS FOR NEAR INFRARED REFLECTANCE ANALYSIS A MAJOR BREAKTHROUGH IN INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY! Wherever you need rapid, reliable analytical information - whelhet for process centre( in manufacturing or stemmeries, for routine analysis in QA laboratories, or for methods development or product rsseamh in R&D - you need the unparalleled potential of an InfraAlyzer system. / TyplealApplications for • Nicotine • Menthol Tobacco: • Reducing Sugars • Nitrogen • Moisture • Others • Oven Volatiles 914-631.8000 ~For more Information on Toba(:oo $yete, Name, T~l~ . A(:~ross. icI~y, Sial0, ~., .~ .....
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Dickinson Era.tin,sting Limiled P O. Box 465 W~nche~z¢~. Han~s. S023 7SS T~I. 4~3.7~393 England Stand 145 S~ands ~3 & 34 Pisgan For¢~t. N.C. 287E8 Du~n Co.. ~n=, Stan~ 32 Tobacco Re(overu Plachines Tel. 704-68~.3521 Fi.Tech. Inc. Cigarette Papem ..... . POROWRAP~ Poro~is" p/ug • ' Wrap Papers Conventional Plug "" .Wrap Papers T/;ojo/ng Papers ' ""' Rec:o~~t~u Cigare#e i~;;::"! ' ::"" ~d .~:" ....., ,~: , :, ~ ' ", .. Tobabco • !:~.' i! ..:.~,Reconstitu~ed C/gar Wrapper ..... . ;" and B/nder Produ¢~ Oroc, p 1400 Holcomb Bridge Road Rosw¢I~, GA 30076
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C~nton, Me;s. 02021 Telex: 642924 Tel. B~7.~8.7478 Stand ~ Fumlgatorl i~¢. Ventur~ Catif. 93003 ~821 Weltem Blvd, TeL ~5~42~262 Tel. 919~32-3~ ~O1 Avenue G. Tel. 817~8~B9 1~1 U.S. POUle t The Thai Tobacco Producers Co-operative Limited • 29/1 Singharaj Road, CHENGMAI, THAILANI] Cables: TAITOPC0-0P Ph0~e: CHIENGMAI 221376 DIRECTORS Mr, Ou~ngsang KhoJal T T P Cbiengmai 240 ;! registered Nan 19 ~PORTER of L~m~ocn ~OR~ Maehongscrn 2 Utar~ith 2 THAILAND , • Produced by a co-operative of 636 curets g~--CATALOGUE Tel, 42~111 5Ier=~e 107, IO0, 109 & 12.:. G.D. Plcgage Meehine~/Inc. Telex: (00231 827322 G.D. DO Btlsile Caixa Post=l 144~ 02116 5~il ~el. 2~1.0811/292~165 C~bi¢: Gi~unl ~-12 Camden Hi0h London N.W. 1 0JH Tel. 101.387] 91~ Texex: 264427 Cable: G~D( LGnoon NW,1 Inert GmbH ~elex: 2~7331 C~ble G.D. E~ve~oppc~ses F.75CO~ "eL E2B2425 - 52E~3~1 Telex: 290956 3C~ Eerqma~ St~.l
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The Hipnge Company Inc. 1212) 37¢,';02S // ./ /! ./
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From the West to the Val de Loire, from the South-Wesl to the Dauphine, from Alsace to Ihe Pyrenees, the production of dark tobacco has beet" part of the French agricultural landscape for over 150 years Thanks to a favourable climate and particularly suitable conditions, every year, 26.000 small farming lamlllet produce with love and patience 40,000 tons ol fine assorted tobacco. Benaflllng from a proved experlcse. this production represents e harmony between tradil, ional and modern techniques. For 5Q years thfougl emarkable re- search the Bergerac Tobacco Instltule has brougltl :entinual improvements to the plants and their varieties, As well as Ihis, the Further ;r.ucation Center for Tobacco Growers proviQes a~l producers with the ncoossar:., aining to acquire new melhods and lechniques, Assorted, natural, abundant anr.t romatic, according to their variety, French dark tobacco is adaptable to multiple nlenulaeturing ilities: cigarettes, cigar filling, cul tobacco or chewing tobacco. FRENCH TOBACCOS.
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6;32 Browns Fort~ Read Thi{d St. & Jefferson Ave. Garmlvheela, Pa. 15320 Camden, N.J, 08t04 T~I, ~12.~6-508~ Tel. 60g-~4.8840 6rand 128 Stand 71 Plrent CH.~640 Rap~ersw~l P.O. ~x SwitzeH~nd 1~ MacTavish Avenue Richmond, V¢ 23~ ~ldlr B=ltlng Canldl Ltd. TeL 2320 Te01o ~treet Telex: 82-7741 U~ill 3 & 4 Stands B2, Canld~ LSA 4A2 MlcAndrlw~ & Fo~8=, inc. Mlkedonla Leaf ~poR.Impo~ t~--CATALOGU~ 12 Udama Srigsda Sir., BB P.O. BOx 72 91000 Skol~ie Yugoslavia Tel. (Y:Jl/239.126, 239.725 Telex: 51125 MAKTBYU 51339 MAKT~YU Stand 137 Married.Edwards & Fernaown Industfl~l Estate Wlnbome, Dorset. B4217PD Engt~d Stand 110 Tel. 524 43 22 ~elex; 620 ~7 TABREC Studs 35 & 36 7 Avenue Ingre= 75016 Pari~ TeL 524 43 22 Tetex: 620 ~? TABREC M~k Scale Manufacturing Co. 180 Autumn P~sale, N.J. 07055 TeL 201.779.0697 Stand 188 M~ler Metric= Tel. B04-275.1 Stands I~2 ~ MlkroPul Corp. 10 Ch~mam Summ;t. N,J, ~e~. Telex: 13.0157 2227 Easl 8eR ~.tond 12A Stand 1~ Moisture Syste~ Corp, P.O. Box 97 ~eL 617-435~8~ PURCHASE FROM. THREE UNIFORMLY LIT LOCATIONS ONE MILLION POUNDS DAILY ON EACH 63,000 SQ. FT, FLOOR • " " ' ' ' ~ ~u~-~~----~--~-= Tobacco , ,',~ ', '" , ,.." Growers'lVIarke~: o~ - ;". "' ~ . " * P,C.~ox70 ~ ~ ". ~ ~ ~ " .;,~ -~ .. ~ilSc',~u'g. Ontario, Cannon N4G 4H t k, ;. ~ " " '~ '~ Came Acotess: Fluman ~ T~eX, 56~-7~578 ., Telephone: 1519) 842-3~ 1
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Production and processing., We do both. i Moltno Moehlni Co., Ltd. 2 Evelyn St. London S E B 5OH Englanci Telex: 883 0~i and 886175 Stands 103. 104, 129 & 130 Mundat Induslrles, Inc. Helmotila Divioion U.S. Division Suite 660. Colonial Plaza Roanoke, Ve. 24011 Stands 79 & 80 Canadian Divcsion 210 Midwest Road, Scamorough Ontario, Canada MIP 3A9 U.K, Division Snow Lane Gloooop Derbyshire, England Nations( Tobacco Board of Greece 36 Kapodistdou St. Athens. 102. Greece Tel. 5247.311 5tend 173 M,F. Neel and Co. Ins, 1900 E. Flanklin St. P.O. BOX 24 INTELECT !1 ® The Programmed Electronic Precision Universal Materials Testing Instrument :-" "" ¢ The most advanced eleclron=cs ~ ano programming techniques g vo NTELECT II abilities never before available in a umversal tester. The microprBcessor, which .o I• con(rots every ope~l=on of this orecision inst;umen(, tees:yes and evaluates data and issues instrucuons to the instrument ano the operator to assure proper !eslmg procedures. SOME INTELECT II FEATURES INCLUDE: + $e:l Test diagnostics + S~anda'd oroq~sm i~el ;c,l:ser .. + "Help" plogi'~m Io promct o~'.srator reounements: measures c~o, VISIT BOOTH 169 international Tobacco Exhibition A GENERAT/ON AHEAD Richmond, Va, 23201 Tel. 804-6,18.5891 Gland 71 (Between R(. 60,310) Richmond. Vs, 23234 Tel. 804.276.5630 Gland 10 Ft. Nlepmann OmbH & Co. Bshnnofotr, 21 Po~llach 182 TeL (02332) 1861 Glands 131 & 132 Herd Gear Corp, Mlddlelon, Wise, 63562 O.C.M,C. OX.2900 Hellerup, Denmelk The Ontario Flus.Cured Tobacco Grower=' Marketing Board Telex: 084.73578 Stand 30 P.O, Box 7115 =~605 JO ElndhovaP Tel. (31) 40.526225 Telex: 4844) 61299 PMB Richmond, Vs. 23234 "el. 804.276.1737 ":'elex: 82,7423 PMB Sveflokl AB Tel. |46) 480-88360 Telex: (864i 43315 P~tEI S TOBACCO
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Number I i Sturvesant B:\R C LVi [DO k#rn
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T104431164
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Thursday, September 15, 8:45 A.M. Tobacco and the Peoplcz Republic o/China Dr. William K. Collins Professor and Philip Morris Extension Specialist (Tobacco) North Carolina Stoic University, Raleigh, N.C, Dr. Collins holds B.S. and M,S. degrees from North Carolina Stets University (NCSU) and the Ph.D. degree from Iowa Stale University. He worked four year= In the Olficial Tobacco Variety Testing Program at bICSU and tl~ree years as an agronomist for R,J. Reynolds "Tobacco Co. before joining the Crop Science Department at NCSU in 1966 as an assoclele professor and extension spec(allst (tobac- co} and l~as fought a graduate course on tobacco since 1967. He was advanced to professor in 1970 and in 1918 to Philip Morris Extension Specialist. In 1981 he received Ihe Agronomic Education Award from the American Society of Agronomy and was made a fellow by this organization In 1982. The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) has the polentia] to beconte a very important country for ~uteruatioflal tobacco frade. The PRC tobacco Industry needs technical assistance from inter- nationally oriented companies to be able to grow, cure, aud process leaf that can be manufactured and marketed in modern cigarctles. The PRC tobacco industry is changing, however. It is considered to be 30 to 40 years behind the U.S. tobacco industry. Some tobacconists compare the opportunity for development that exists to the one found in Japan more than 30 years ago. The PRC has a national goal to industrialize and raise incomes. As lhis is achieved, the potential increases for gains in cigarette consumption. Also, over one-half of the population of one billion people is under 25 years old. The PRC leadership is encouraging economic development through joining ventures with private foreigu firms= rewards for increased productivity'; attd decentralization of management authority. The country is expected to generate foreign exchange from /nternationa[ trade, particularly from natural resources such as oil and coal. Labor requirements for field production of flue-cured tobacco are 3,600 hours per acre because only very limited equipment or ehemicols are used. • Much of the flue-cured tobacco produced in the PRC is considered by many tobacconists to be of poor quality. Cured leaves are characterized as small (8-12 inches long) and narrow (about 6 inches wide), extremely thin with no oil, and have considerable immaturity. Only Hmi(ed agricultural research is underway to improve the usability of the cured leaf, A large need exists in this area for technical assistance. Leaf processing and cigarette manufacturing is being done with equipment that is about 50 years old. The dgarette machines make ooly about 1,000 cigarettes per minute and the efficiency is poor with only about 1,000 cigarettes made per 1.1 kilogram of cured leaf. Ouly companies with a patient long-elms com- mittmeot to the PRC market should iuitiatc trade negotiations with the PRC because of the complex- ity of this business venture. This is especially so since negotiations may not occur at the provincial level Thursday, September 15, 9:20 A.M. Producing Quality Tobacco Leaf Furney A. Todd Professor Emeritus North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. President, Tobacco Consultants, Inc. Furnsy Todd is quite often referred to as "Mr. education, and promotional programs in tobacco, at Tobacco" by hie many friends in industry and North Carolina State University and more recently tobaccO growers throughout the U.S. and in several through his own organization, Tobacco Consultants, foreign countries. He earned his title through hard Inc, work and by conducting successful research, His Interest In tobacco dates back to his boyhood 110--CATALOGUE Yesterday, Packing Tobacco Was Simple... Today, We Make It Simply Better...For You. Because times have changed. Varied cemsumer demand and high technology means that for you to produce your final product, our final product must meet more varied and stricter specifications. Rio Grande Tabaco and Middle Belt Suppliers have the capacity to meet any Recognizing the manufacturing indnstry's strict specifications in processing, Rio Grande and Middle Belt Suppliers took the initiative and today offers the most up.m-date tobacco pro- cessing plant in Brasil. specification and deliver to you n product that you can use and achieve the high standards your product must meet. Simply pur,,dn today's complicated high technology, we're making our product better. Rio OrandeTabsco and Middle BeltSuppllers,,, We're making things simply better. N~r Marketing Infi~rmatlon Cunta~t: Rio Orande Tabaco S.A. Middle Belt Supplicrs, Inc. Caixa Pasta} 680 P.O. Box 174- 90.000 Porto Alegre (RS) - Brasil Oxtbrd, NC 27565 Cable "ROGOLD" Telex (05 [ ) 1468 or Cable "MIDBELT" Telex 579483 or Telex (051) 1290 Telex 216925 TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--111
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NIEPMANN for cigarette packaging Automatic tray feeders • Cigarette packer, cello-wrapper parcellers - boxers • shipping-case-cartoners Maschlnentabr~k Ft. I'liepm~nn GmbH & Co D-SSYO Geve~be~9 ~-Oe, rmany Tel (02332) last Telox= e929405 days on a tobacco farm near Wendell, N,C. He is a graduate of N.C.S.tate University and organized and operated the Extension Research on Wheels program 1hat Involved conducting 60 or more replicated lobacoo tests each year on farms In problem fields. This expanded research and demonstration program providod the necessary Information for most of the disease control and ~roduction practlces in current use. One of the Ighllghts of his career was the development of a program of disease management and general production thee Is quite clean referred to as "The System Plan," Todd has published more than 800 scientific and papular articles on ell phases of tobacco production. R~ceatly, he published a book entitled Flue Cured Tobecco--P[oduo/ng A Healthy Crop. The book Is unique in that it Involves a description of 40 problems (diseases and otherwise) illustrated with 200 color prints and describes some 100 tasks necessary in producing a sucoossful ~rop. He introduced the calendar systom of production in his book and has published an update for both flue-cured and hurley types. He also has a daily radio program that provides tobacco information to growers in five states. Honors in his field Include special recognition by sovera~ farm groups: man of the year, Progressive Farmer (1972); recipient of the Outstand]ng Extenslon Award (1972); recognized by TOaACCO INTERNATIONAL as "Man of the Year" 1976; Raleigh tCews and Observer "Tarheel of the Week" (1977). He was named first Philip Morris Extension Specialist, Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology (1978) and received the Fellow Award, American Phytopathologlcat Society (1978). Tobacco activities were expanded following reUrement from N.C. State University as Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology in 1981. He organized Tobacco Consultants, Inc. and is now nerving as president. Career No. 2 has provided an opportunity to visit and study tobacco of all types in the U.S. and several foreign countries--disease, Insect, weed and sucker control, and general production. • ll~lhat is high loaf quality? Some growers VIII'comment that it is the kind of tobacco produced Iast year or the one before. Others say it is the type of tobacco in high demand. The term is really difficult to define because there are several elements used in describing this characteristic. Ripe or mellow tobacco is better in quality compared ~th unripe. Open leaf structure is considered better than closed or tight. Strong color intensity is usually associated with a high grade and improved quality as compared with weak or pale. The length, width, amount of waste and uniformity --all contribute to a quality product. Producing quality leaf is a difficult and season- long job. Several factors contribute, including soil type, disease, insect, weed and sucker control, weather, production practices used (land prepara- tion, fertillzalion, cultivation), end harvesting and curing methods. Growers have control over some of these inputs but not all. For example, there is not much that can be done about weather except talk about it. Irrigation can be used to offset the effects of both high temperature and drought. Transplant- ing and certain other practices can be delayed or altered slightly to fit more suitable weather conditions. On duly 1, 1975, Hugh C. Klger was appointed executive vice president of the Leaf Tobacco Exporters Association and the Tobacco Association of United States. He succeeded Judge Malcolm Seawall who retired from this position. Prior to his present asslgnmenl, he was director of the Tobacco Division of the Foreign Agr}cuitural Srvlce of the U.$. Department of Agrlculture. He carved in that posit/on from May, 1961 until his retirement from government on June 6, 1975. In that position ha was responsible for directing trade The first step for successful and high qualhv leaf production is to design a discase control prdgrnm (variety, cropping system, ch~mlcal soil trealment) that results in a healthy root system, The second ts to build around this plan production inputs that assure a normal yield of high quality leaf, Third, select harvesting (including time, method~ and rate) and curing methods that malntaln field quality. The final task involves proper sorting or grading and general market preparation. Technology is e long word that means In simple terms "know-how." The know.how of producing quality leaf is available but interpreting and organizing to fit soil type and weather conditions is a real challenge and worthwhile accomplishment, In summary, quality leaf production is s season long job that involves selecting and eemp}otlng more than a hundred different tasks correctly and on time. Thursday, September 15, 9:55 A,M, Availability of tobocco for modern cigarettes Hugh C, Kiger Executive Vice President Leaf Tobacco Exporters Association, and Tobacco Association of United States, Raleigh, N.C, programs, market intelligence, competition studies, trade policy, end other activities deslgn(]d to expand foreign markets for U.S, tobacco, From 1954 until May, 1951 he was chief of Ihe division's Foreign MarRotlng Branch. He Joined lho USDA in 1949 and worked for several year= In Iobacoo market activities with toe Farm Credll Admlnlstra- t/on prior to Joining the Foreign Agrloultural Service. He is the author OI numerous speeches, article,,, and publications on lobacco marketing aod international trade, He has personally heat]ed numerous special missions concerned with tobacco prospects and problems In foreign trade, In 1972 ho headed a speolal team which traveled Io West Germany and was assigned the task ol helping resolve problems relating to pesticide residues on U.S. leaf. In 1973 he wan loam landor for a mission to the Soviet Union Which o×plored prospecls tot two-way trade in tobacco, He was born on a tobacco farm nasr Winston-Salem, N,C, He received his 8,6, dogtoa with high honors lo agricultural economies from TOBAGCO INTERNATIONAL--
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N.C. 8tare University. He did graduate studi~ at N.G, State University and the University of Horth Carolina and received his Ph.D. degree In 1949. During his graduate studies he w~ awarded fellowship by the General Edu~ffon Board of the R~kefeller Foundation s~d taught agricultural Iconomlcl ~nd tob~o and ~tton marketing at N.G. ~tate, In 1973 he was named a Toba~o Man of the Year by ~os~o INTERNATIONAL ~g~lne. In 1974 he was Ihe recipient of the U.S.D.A.'s Superior Service Award for "leadership, professional s~ppo~, and outst~nding performance in dev¢loplng presowlng foreign market~ for U.S. tobacco and m~ing more eff~tIve U.S.D.A. poff~ programs for the International toba~o industry." In 1978, he was honor~ as on of the "Toba~o Gre~tl" by N.C, 3rate Unlv~Bity. H~ Is vice ~resldent of the Nodh Tobacco Foundation, vi~ chairman of the gowrnmenl'~ Agricu~tural T~hnl~l Advisow ~mmittee on Tobacco, and a member of the Agdc~Rur&t Policy Advlsow ~mmRtee for Trade N¢0ol}aflon~, He I~ a member of the ~ard of directors of th~ Tob=cco Tax Coundl, Tob~co Grow~rl' Information ~mmlttee, ~nd Tobacco HJ~lory Foundation, He Is a member of the Governor's Advisory ~mmfft¢~ on Agriculture, Fore~tW and Seafood ~O~t of lhe 8ro~h ~ world clg~re~e output and ~nscquently tobac~ p~ductinn has taken piece in this century. In 1900, U,S, cigarette ~nsumption was duly 2.5 billion cigarettes, and per capita consumption was only ~out 54 pieces annually. U.S. cig~rc~e ~nsumptlon increased shanty after the tier of rapid cigarette making machines in the ~tccns and consumption has almost doubled since World War II, Total U.S. output of cigarettes about 7~ billion piece~ and domesllc ~nsumption is now ~bout 634 billion pieces, World cigarette output, which now totals a~ut 4.6 ttiJlion pieces, has fo~owed a pattern slmilu to the ff.S. du~ng this century. KENNEDY KENNEDY L~F TOBACCO COMPANY, INC. May~dd, Kentucky U.S.A. Telex number 213~ (KEN LEAF MYFD) The growth in world cigarette output {excluding China) is increasing at about 2~'0 per year, which is less than half the annual growth rate in the 1960s. In the period ahead, world cigarette output is expected to increase at about 2% per year. The U.S, and most other developed countries are expected to show little or no growth in cigarette output. Most of the growth.in world cigarette output ~s expected to take place in the developing countries of Asia and Africa. World consumption of light cigarette tobacco is expected to expand at a slightly tower rate than world cigarette output. The big question is--which countries wilt supply this additional leaf? In recent years, there has been a stronger demand for cigarettes made from light cigarette tobaccos such as flue-cured, hurley, and oriental Thus, production and use of these types has expanded worldwide in recent years. Most of the gains in flue-cured production have taken place in such developing countries as Brazil, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Thailand. The U.S, uncounted for 80% of the world's production of barley 20 years ago, but its share has now dropped to about 50%. Some of the countries which have stepped up barley production and trade in recent years include Italy, Mexico, South Korea, Greece, Brazil and Malawi, The rapid shift to filter cigarettes in recent years, the more recent trend toward lower tar and nicotine cigarettes, and the trend toward generic and low-priced cigarettes have all affected both the quality and volume of light tobaccos required to produce a cigarette, Full utilization of the leaf and such processes of puffing, etc., have also adversely affected the amount of leaf required per cigarette. Major manufacturers around the world have a preference for good quality U.S. flue-cured and barley tobaccos, Use of these types of U.S, tobaccos has been dcciinlng in recent years because they have become less price competitive. If the U.S. can take the necessary steps to produce adequate supplles of good quality leaf at compml- Jtutokraft Box Corp. Everything for the Cigar Manufacturer except ,~obacco P.o. Eox Is?0 YORK, PENNSYLVANIA 17405 717-843-0941 116--CAl'ALOGUE us one of : Brazilian service • capabilities Together, . Dibrell and TEIC will grow, process and export the finest flue.cured, hurley and cigar leaf available from Northern and Soulhern Brazil, in ~dd~tion to worldwide services already provided by lho Dibrell group, TEIC offers expanded, reliable services to and from Z~mbabwe, Ge~any, Dominican Republic and ]n otherclgar growths.
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dye prices the domestic and foreign market for hs flue.cured and hurley can he expanded. Otherwise. the U.S. will continue to have a smeller share of the world market for these types. At the present t|me, |t appears that there are adequate supplies of light cigarette tobaccos to meet the needs of manufacturers over the near Dr, Sullivan holds B.$, and M.S. degrees from Mas|achusetta College of Pharmacy and a Ph,O. degree in pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of Washington. in 1976 Sullivan ]oined Degesch America, Inc, as president. In this position he is responsible for directing vii aspects of the c0mpany'a business in the U.S, In addition, ha is responsible lot coordinating all Oegesch research worldwide in ~operation with the dir~ter of research of the Oegesc~ Research Laboratories Fr=nkfurl, We~ Germany, He advises users of pesticides manufactured by Degesch Frankfurt in t~e U.S.A., Canada, Lalm ~merlca, the Far Eas~ and other countries aS requested by the m~n~gi~g and t~hnlca( d(r~tor of D~esch Frankfurt. He is also Adjunct Prolessor at Chemistry at James M~dison University. The to~acco industry has had to face the problem of lus~ due to [nscc~ {nfc~tatlon dt rhlg storage sinc¢ [he early days of tobacco production. ~m iudustry has ~aced this problem and has effectively used (muigaB[~ and other methods of ~nsec¢ control. We ca~ div[de these trcatmems imo three sections, the Yesterday. Today. and Tomorrow aspects of pest control, The Yesterday period saw tile use of acrked and hydrogen cyauide. Storages Thursday, September 15, 10:45 A.M. Pest control in stored tobacco Jeremiah B. President Degesch America. Inc. had to be sealed in order to have effective fumigation. During this period, sealing techniques were developed for such storages. The Today period began in 1969 with the approval of the first alomlnum phosphide prepara- tion for tobacco fumigation. This product known throughout the world by its trademark, Phostoxln"-" revolutionized fumigation of stored tobacco. All tobacco warehouses constructed since the appear- ance of Phostoxla were designed to be made gas tight to increase the effcct|veness of the liberated hydrogen phosphide gas. Also during this period, mcthyl bromide was t~sed to a great extent in vacuum chamber fumigations of tobacco. T/re last two )'ears at" this time period have seen the introduction of products to be ased in the Iomorrow period of iasect control. These products are a new recta| phosphide impregmatcd in plastic known in the U.S. as the Fumi-Ce]~ and a new tablet known as Magtoxin* . These products. again, {ibcrat¢ hydrogen phosphide but at a faster rate once gas release has been initiated, It has been demonstrated that the Fumi-Ccl which is not dependent on temperature ibr gas release is effective in cold weather fumigations of tobacco, This can be an important adjunct for year-roand insect control We COn expect to see more use of pilernmoncs, juvenile hormone iubibltors, and other chemical control products. [n add|lieu, we may see the return of products such as carbon dioxkle utilized in specially sealed warehouses. The possibility at" temperature controlled warehouses also exists, provided that |nw co.~t methods can be found for maintaining cold storage tobacco warehouses. for cigarette packaging Automatic tray feeders • Cigarette packer- cello-wrapper parcellers • boxers- shipging-case-cartoners M~schlnenlabnk Ft. Nmpmann Gmt~H & Co . D-SS20 Gevetsberg W.-GerKmny Tel. (02332) 1861 • Telex: 8229405 See ut at RichmonO, Va.. Sept. 14.'7,1SS3. Booth no. 85 ~ I 1 IB--CATALOGU~
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W. Guy Farmer was graduated from Virginia Polytechnl~ & State University In 1950 with a B.S. de0ree ~n mechanical engineering. From 1950 to 1953 he was plant engineer for Taylor & Caldwell Inc., Walkerton, Va. He then joined Export Leaf Tobacco Go, as assistant chief engineer, in 1973 he was advanced to chief engineer, and in 1981 I~e retired. For the past three years he has been a consultant to tl~e Mat processing industry. Leaf proccssing (green leaf threshing) has made outstanding progress throughout the world in 1he last 30 years, Thursday, September 15, 11:20 A.M. Leaf processing--state of the art W. Guy ]Farmer In the area of leaf eondkioning we have conic from the manual fed wooden apron type ordering machine to continuous revolving cylinders as large as 8 feet in dlameter by 32 feet long, These ordering cylinders have auxiliary equipment such as heater/" fan sets, exhaust fans, special steaming nozzles and pipes that give them the flexible capability of increasing the moisture content of the leaf or decreasing the moisture content with either being accomplished within acceptable leaf temperatures. A leaf plc]fing conveyor is now most likely to have an electronic picldng machine at the discharge end instead of manual pickers on each sido. At a production rate of 500 pounds per hour per conveyor one can readily visualize the tremendous labor savings in a sizeable plant with muldshift operation. Threshing and separation has progressed from 30 inch wide threshers and air legs at a capacity of 2,500 pounds per hour to 8 feet w~dc threshers and separators rated at 25,000 pounds per hour. Pneumatic closed circuit conveying and separation has practically eliminated open belt convcyors and Fo~ 16 yea~s, custqmers .li • bug • , , • .~ eppiic~t one Now that ,ame precise stab e |itaeat toi" t6w oensity materia~ ~lKe tobacco. ~ pt~ormince Is avollable ~t high rates. ; ] S~and~rd features one.the ne~ 42" u@ include: ....... ~"~ : "ance and lnstant~n~us re~ponse to ~nanges ~ t in p~oduct denslty and flow cham~eristlcs Exclbsive Ral I = Master/slave ratio control ~, ~ ~ Oonstfint belt tensioning. easy belt remova~ I -'~ 7965 E. Redfield Road $cottsdale, Arizona 8.5260 (602) 998-0343 120--CATALOGUE The new dimension in tobacco fumigation ® ~ .... • easy application DEGESCI~ ~)P'~=~.~ I I~ • simple collection "~~ after fumigation ®DEGESCi-~.~ ~STRIP • no contamination ~/~=~b. with residual ®t, EG si( iJMI-CEL spent mi.gant ® ~(~~ • economical DEGES MI-STRIP Afghanistan Albania Angola Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Bolivia Brazil Belize Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Central African Republic Ceylon Chad Chile Colombia Congo Costa Rica Cyprus Czechoslovakia Dahomey Denmark Dominica Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Ethiopia Finland France Gabon Ghana Great Britain G reece Honduras HongKong Iran Iraq Ireland Jamaica Japan Lebanon Liberia Malawi Malaysia Martinique . Morocco NepaJ Netherlands Norway Pakistan People's Republic Philippines Poland South Africa Romania Guatemala Haiti Hungary Indonesia Ivory Coast Jordan Kenya Kuwait Libya Madagascar Mall Malta Mexico Mozambique Nicaragua Nigeria Panama Paraguay Peru Portugal Republic of Saudi Arabia Senegal Somalia Spain Sudan Surinam Sweden Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tunesia Turkey Upper Volta Uruguay USA Venezuela Vietnam Yugoslavia Zambia DEGESCN DEGESCH GMBH O D -6000 FRANKFURT AM MAIN 28-40 W~SMCILLERS'IRAS~E
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dust bags, Ou~dity improvement has paralleled this InCreSse in production rate through the years. Apron I,,mina dryers now routinely dry, cool, and reorder up to 25.000 pounds per hour in a total time of 6.7 minutes. These machines have special insulated panels and provisious to direct a portion ef the hot exhaust air from the cooler to serve as makeup air for the drying sections to conserve energy. The dryers have automatic temperature controls for drying and cooling plus automatic moisture control of the lamina exit dryer via high pressure atomized water with continuous moisture meter. The current automatic lamina presses are quite a contrast to the original water operated uppresses. Dual cylinder/charger presses are custom designed to fill virtually any size and shape container desired with single stroke operation. Special features such as weigh conveyors, distributors, unique hydraulic systems, and forced air cooling of hydraulic oil all insure e[ficiem operation and energy conservation. Edwin W, Hlne II earned his electrical engineering degree at Lehigh University. He sewed In the Navy during World War II and Joined Proctor & Thursday, September 15, 11:55 A.M. Casing and drying cased tobacco E.w. Hine, II Proctor & Schwartz, Inc. Schwartz, inc. in lg45 as an industrial engineer. He worked in various departments of the company and In 1960 became manager of the special industries group of Proctor's marketing department. This group specializes in tobacco drying machlne~ as .well as rayon dryers and ether specialized equipment. The typical methods widely used to blend tobacco during primary processing will be reviewed. Casing and particularly drying of cased tobaccos will bc discussed and reviewed. The importance of flow control and s~,me methods to obtain uniformity of flow control will also he examined. Thursday, September 15, 12:30 P.M, Recent trends In tobacco portion autoweighing Michael D. Sanderson Director of Engineering AMF Legg, Andovcr, Hunts., England Recent trends in tobacco pro-conditioning Richard E. G. Neville AMF Legg, Andover, Hants., England Michael ganderecn graduated first in chemistry and Sword Ltd. He was also reaponsible for the sa~e of then In metallurgy, razor-b~ede technology and machinery in many He w~ for many years technical director and parts of the world. lately international marketing director of Wilkinson He holds more than 60 putents~ mostly related to t22--CATALOGUE .~e uS at Richmond, Ve., Sept. 14-17,1983, BOOer no. 85 the coating of surfaces and cutting edges. He joined AMF Legg 18 months ago as director of engineering. ACCUrate portions of tobacco for roll-your-own brands are traditionally weighed by hand in conjunction with an automatic bucket conveying system which trattsports portions onwards to packaging. Some automatic machines based upon grave- mechanical principles, which achieve accuracy by an "add back" of small tobacco, are also available. This paper dcscHbcs a totally new technology similar in concept to the method now used for cigarette rod weight control. Roll your own tobacco is fed down u column into a measuring conveyor consisting of two timing belts, the speed of which is controlled by a computer. ]'~Vhen a Swiss thinks of endless tapes he thinks of HAUSER. Period. You know how demanding the Swiss are. Why should you go for less? Try us[ Within the measuring conveyor the density, or mass flow of tobacco, is measured by recording the transmisslon of gamma radiation from an Ameri- cium source with a radiation detector. The alining signal from the detector represents tile amoutlt or radiation which has pa~sed through the tobacco and is thus an accurate and continuous measure of density which can be processed by the computer and hence used to control the flow rate, Individual tobacco portions are cut offby a double sided knife and they will be checked via a checkweigher. Richard Neville In one ot the best known and most experienced Innovators In tobacco technology, He joined AMF Legg more than 35 years ago and during his long career with them has designed t~nd developed many new machines for all aspects nf the primary processing of tobacco, His creativity and flair have earned him more CONVEYOR BELTING & PARTS' ~r To5=c¢o Appllcallon~ ~ TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--12~
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T!04431173
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Agents (TFA's). These sre highly Concontrsted individual components to increase and/or harmon- Ize the basic tobacco fisvor notes. Types ~nciude continental, hurley, and Virginia. Due to their low do~age, exislJng valuex for nicotine ~nd condensate are no[ increased. This, pl~s other positive aspects like heat ~tabiSty amd fixation, allow for wid~pr~d use in tobacco, foil, and stems. This first generation was tailored for the mba¢~ Itself whereas the second generation, to he Intro- duced in the fall of 1983, was developed for flsvoring the fdters. These products are colorless, sensoHcaliy similar to the TFA's mentioned above, and they feature an even flavor release during smoking. The incorporation into the fitter is done via rriacetin. All products can be treated as individual building blocks in combination with suitable top flavors. TPA's are natural, derived from tobacco. Friday, September 16, 9:55 A.M. Characteristics and applications of licorice products in the tobacco industry Pramathesh S. Vora MacAndrews & Forbes Co. Peter Vora is director of research, development, and quality control at MecAndrows Forbes Co. The compsny le the world's largest producer of licorice products for the Iobscco and food industries, Vora is In chlrge of product and process development, quality control, end technical services for both the domestic and international markets. He has B.S. degrees In chemistry and chemical engineering, and am M.$, degree in chemtcal engtneedng from Penn Slate University. He belongs to Tau Beta Pi, and Phil L~mbds Epslton. Licorice products, derived from ltcorlae root of the plant Glycyrrhlza Glubra, have bccn in existence for many centuries and have been utilized exten- slvcly in American blend clgarc~es and other tobacco products for many years, The principal applications of licorice products in the tobacco industry are as flavorlng/sweetening agents, molsturizingAveflh~g agents, and flavor harmoni- zing agents. The optimum benefits can only be .~chieved by using premium and consEtent quality licorice produce derived ~om the welt established, selested stock of raw matcH~s and manufa~red under coat.lied operating parameters. ~h¢ quality and cost-~fformance ratio of licori¢¢ produ~s should be detcmffacd by lh¢ mile of glyc~hizin- glyc~rh~ic acid, ratio of sucrose-reduCing sugars, elemental =n~lys~ and understand~g of flavor~g ch~acterisfics of li~ce pmduc~. Th~ approach ~ specific, accurate, and ~dependent of any ¢hemic~ or other ty~s of modi~cadoes of licorice products. Recently. new lico~ce products have been devel- oped tub¢ ~m~atible with low and ultra l~w tar cigare~es. ~ese pr~nc~ are also designed to harmonic the flavor profile of ~e ~garettes regulated ~dth in~eased amounts of inferior quality tobacco, ~constitutcd tobacco sheets, ~d c~anded tobacco stems, In addition, these p~d- ucts have unique physlcat and ~¢mlcal characte~s- tics tu si~ifi~ntly reduce application costs ~ the manu~cturing pr~ess. & SI/RVICE INC. T.M, Cart, after years with lmpcr/al. ¢stablkhcd ESS which io~tcs and sdls new and used equipment, ft dismantles, rcfurhishcs (in its own plant) and instaits machinery anywhere worldwide. If you are locking to buy or sell used, tefurb/shed, or new machinery contact ESS which has and will do business on ever conclnent. F.55 ALSO SELLS - - ~ _QUALITY C, ON~ROL STEM TESTER DISCS " ' S TOBACCO TEMPERATURE ~M'EASURING INSTRUMENTS: Durable, BatteD. Operated, Rechargcable ar any Voltage, Fahrenheit or Cds us Readou!.s. FOR PRICE QUOTES PLEASE CONTACT: P..O. BOX 3114 WILSON. N.C. 27893 CABLE: ESSINC WILSON N.C. 919/291-0817 126~CATALOGUE William M. Pease, Jr., studied zoology at the Universily of Massachusetts In Amherst, Mass. For eighl years he worked for W.R. Grace and Co. studying various aspects of the polymer chemistry Friday, September 16, 10:45 A.M. Developments in the field of near infrared reflectance analyzers W.M. Pease 3r, and R.3. Jolette Moisture Systems Corp. of paper coattngs, adhesives, and cantalnee sealants. Fur the Past SIx years he has been employed by Moisture ~ystams Corp. ¢oncenlrallng on the application of near Inlrared analyzers 1o the process Industries, The introduction of near tuEarcd .nalyzurs and early efforts in the field are sumn)a~ed, Th~ most recent uses of near infrared analyzers are enumerated and som~ di~cultles arc caamiaed In detail. Projections are made for the future of near infrared ~eflectanc~ gauges. Higher level funellens are discussed and ~¢ benefits of a microcomputer based system, the Micro Quad 8000, arc examined, William A. Selke, vice president, R&D, of the Kimberly-Clnrk Technical Paper and Specialty Products Group. holds S.B. and $.M. degrees in chemical engineering from M,I.T. and a D. Eng. gol~aps~Ie Container Ca., Inc. Mcmv/~der, r~ ol Collapz~bfe Hogsh~ad~ C=~= ~1~o~ Stews end H~ads Wil~n. Ne~ ~l~a 278S3 Friday, September 16, 11:20 A.M, Control of cigarette per.formance with ~vermeable papers ~nd reconstituted tobacco~the choices to be made ~r. Wflfiam A. Selke Vice President, Research & Development gimberly Clark Technical Paper & Spe~ Products Group Roswel], from Yale. After leeching at Columbia University ~nd working for the AIomlc Energy Division of duPont, In 1955 he Jolne~ Peter J, Sehwel zer, lag ~ which i~ 1957 became a division of lho Klmberly.Clark Corp. and he was appointed director of research, In July, 1982, the S~hweltzer Division was merg~ Into a new corporate unlh K-C Technl~l P~per ~nd Specialty Products. ~hortly allerwards, its R&D a~tlvltles on cigarette papers and re~nstttuted tobacco were moved from Lee, Mass, tu the group headquarters In Roswell, near Atlanta, Ca. Through choice of the three papers of which dgarettes are constructud~the tipping, the ~m~w~l~ To~ ~., l~ ..... '" ALL Types COLLECTOR TUBE~, ~test Threshlna Equl~lnt NICKEL AND STAINLESS SeePage ~ci~ B~ ~ShMdl STEEL TAPES FOR GIGAR~E MAKING MACHINE~ TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL~I2r
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IF THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY WON'T PROMOTE IT... MY PLEASI MYCHOICE WHO WILL? Despite restrictions imposed from without, despite concer~ed efforts in many countries to intimidate smokers, the worldwide tobacco industry is surviving. And it is up to us. the tobacco community, to see that our industry keeps Its place in the world economy, W.A. Adams Company brings you this message in the belief that tobacco product manufacturers, sales companies, equipment manufacturers, suppliers, growers - and yes, smokers - will want to speak out with this symbol. Because tobacco's message is free choice. ~'ll~ W.A. ADAMS COMPANYt INC. Stop by the Tobacco Growers Association P.o. Box 159 • Phon~ 919/693.711 I of North Carolina's booth number 146 Oxford, Norlh Carolina and 'pick up your free decal. processors ~nd Exporters ~i Finr Levi To~ao Samples Dlsp~rcl~ed by Nr:Cabl© Adamsca TELEX ~'/94fi3 128--CATALOGUE
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plug wrap, and the cigarette paper, itself---one designing a cigarette today has the oppbrtunlty for independent control of many aspects of cigarette performance. The choice of reconstituted tobacco in its many modifications extends that range even ~rther, Gas phase delivery, puff profile, ~uff count, and redstance-to.draw, together with, of course, parti- culate delivery, can be adjusted. Indeed, the degrees of freedom are so numerous as to make decision= difficult. And, as thol~gh the choice of papers were not challenge enough, the selection of modified recon- stituted tobacco permits further adjustment of the tobacco blend. Nicotine content can be adjusted, up or down, as can the burning rate. Particulate delive~ can he reduced, as can certain gas phase constituted of the smoke. A generation ago, choosing the tobaccos for the blend was the principal challenge in developing a new cigarette brand. Today, the availability of these other powerful tools for control makes product development u most com- plex task. Friday, September 16, 11:55 A.M. Quality cigarette manufacture John R. Nowers Product Planning Manager Molins Tobacco Machinery Ltd., London, England John R, Nowera has been 34 years with the tobacco Indu=try~ Initially with BAT on the production side, working mainly in the Far E~t and Central Africa. He Joined Mollns In 1~4 with =ales responsibilities In Western Europe, until made responsible for slatting up and managing product planning. This hal subsequently Involved extensive traveling to clgaretle factories In many other paris of the world. Cigarettes can only be as good as the cut tobacco put into them. However, considerable changes have been made to cut tobacco blends (mainly driven by economic reasons), especially since the early 1970s, with the increased use of expanded tobacco, reconstituted sheet tobacco, etc. These changes in cut tobacco blends have requked changes within the cigarette makers, specifically in the hopper or distributor section. To help understand what happens within the cigarette 'ma,ker and why changes have been made, cross sections of various types of hopper will be shown, to ifiustrate technology advancements. AddRionally, again for economic reasons, speed increases have brought with them the potential for greater degradation of the end product. Therefore the handling of the cigarette tI~ough the machine, after the hopper, will he an area of exposition. A question which is often asked is, What is the ideal length of tobacco strands which give the best firmness or fi/ling power? Unfortunately, there is no straight answer to this, because of different characteristics of leaf grades and blends. However, even if one cannot say exactly what it should be. it is possible to identify what it should not be, and examples Illustrath~g possible diffdrences will be presented. Because the tobacco feed hopper is such a critical LEAF TOBACCO 37, Frankrljklei, Antwerp. Cable address: Lancosales Phone (03) 232-5836 Telex 32410 I~0--CATALOGUE TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--I~)I
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OL D FASHIONED 132--CATALOGUE part of the maker, one is continually trying to improve it. Two examples of recent improvements are illustrated, the suction enclosure and double winnowing. The benefits in improved quality and cost savings will be explained. It is not possible to go into all the detail of the cigarette maker in 30 minutes. A summary of some of the new technology now available will he given, with the possible benefits arls]ng from the use of microprocessors and control and inspection sys. terns. Friday', September 16, 12:30 P.M, Fi/tratton of cigarette smoke J.V. (Pat) Taylor Vice President, Sales American Fihrona Co., Richmond, Va. J.V. (Pat) Taylor grow up in Richmond, Va. He graduated from Virginia Military Institute with a B.S. in ohemistry and taught freshman chemistry there for one year. After a couple of years in the U.S. Army, he returned to school and earned an M.B.A. from the University of Virginls. His work experience includes three years with Rohm and Haas in chemical sales and 11 years at American FiRrona Co., all of which have been mainly spent in filters for the tobacco Industry. Currently he Is vice presiOnnt, sales, To understand filtration of cigarette smoke it is first necessary to examine the important pro- cesses related to the formation of cigarette smoke and its composition. This involves pyrolysis, vapor- ization, condensation, and coagulation. The hot gases formed at the burning coal contain a large number of vaporized compounds having a wide range of boring temperatures. The temperature of these gases cools as they move through the cigarette. This forms an aerosol, and for filtering purposes we broadly divide smoke Into the partlcu, late phase (aerosol) and the gas phase, Acetate filters are used on about 90% of filtered cigarettes on the market today. They remove only the paniculate phase of smoke es the gas phase passes though without any intc~ion with ~tvfing medium. ~¢ amount removed depends mainly on the draw r~istanc~. The removal p~iculates Is a mechanical p~cess that clap:ads on ~ ~ndom collision of ~aHiculates with fibers. Many spatially filters have bo~a developed ~rovid~ selective or additional filtration, Although none have ~v~ed the success of slmplo acetate filte~ ~ market penetration, they provide useful role h special applications, Examples these follow. Pure cellulose (paper): slightly higher filtration at pressure drops equal to Addition of carbon: selective removal of the svmi-vaiatRc compounds such as acrolcin~ b~nv. zinc. SC5: 40% higher padieulatc femoral at oqua} pressure drops compared to acetate, Air diluti0m only practical way cogently to r~movc some of gasc phase. COD: selective removal of the gas phase. High PD/low fihration. MPF: match acvtato pe~ormancc wRh 15-25% less tow, Saturday, September 17, 8:45 A.M. Modern tipping materials, a summary John F. Shannon Vice President, Group Marketing Mendel Industries Ltd., Manchester England John F. Shannon Joined Gallaher Tobacco Co. materials, used by the group, (U.K.)in1964esanessisiantchemistandlaterasa In 1975, joined RJR-Macdonald, Ins. In Men- chemist. For five years he was head of material treal, Canada, as packaging devetopmertl manager, standards for the Gallaher Group of companies, and later, value analysis manager, with responsibility for thewriting and maintenance He oined the Mundet Group In 1979 as vice of specifications for all packaging and making pros dent, leohn ca aerv cos and In 1981 beoamo TOBACCO INTERNAT|ONAL-- t;]~l
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QUESTION: What do these 30 countries have in common? Argentina Australia Austda Ecuador Belgium France Brazil West Germany Canada Guatemala Chile .~ Denmark ~ Dominican Republic El Salvador Honduras Mcaragua Japan Panama Lebanon Peru Mex'mo Portugal Netherlands Spain New Zealand Sweden Taiwan United Kingdom Un|ted States . ANSWER: H.B. Fuller Company Adhesive Plants and Technical Service Centers i H.B. Fuller Company The World Wide Leader in Cigarette Adhesive Technology 134--CATALOGUE We take great pride in the knowl- edge that ORTHENE~ Insecticide plays such a significant part in insuring tobacco qua/l .tyand yield. Probably no tobacco insec- ticide controls so many Insects so effectlvdy: budworm, aphids. hornworm, cutworm, flea.beetle. cabbage loopers, grasshoppers. white fly. thrips and leafndncrs. ORTHENE IdlIs these pests both on contact and as a stomach poi- son. S.vstentlc action gives lasting residual activtt.~: OR'flIENE even controls those ll}sects that have tlcldes. ORTHENE'S low tnxlelty thm~ most other insecticldes.-a big advantage when applied by backpack sprayer or ha.qd duster, The product poses Ilttlcdanger to field workers and can be pro. grmnmcd iuto almost any hlsectl- tide program. Approv,'d lbr use r~s a soluble or wettable pmvdcr has been granted 111 many tobucco- producing countries and is pend- Ing in othem. In short, yotl can now grow quality tobacco In moreareas than ever belore. = ORTHO
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CHIENGMAI COMMERCIAL CO., LTD • THAILAND'S most modern packing plant • Complete with threshing line and all quality control equipment Available for commercial packing to the highest international standards 90 Ch]engmal L~mpoon Road, Sarapee, Chiengmai, Thailand CABLES: OHIENGOOM PHONES," 321001, 321013. 3Z1016 I~S--CATALOGUE vice president and genera| manager of Mundet Industries Ltd. in Toronto, Canada. He is currently vice president, group marketing, and having spent one year with the group's Hermetite Division in the U.S., is now based in Manchester, England, with the U,K. Division. The paper deals with the development of cigarette ripp~ng from the 1940s, when tipping was basically n eosmetio concept, to the present time, when the use of perforated tipping it the most popular method for cootrolling the tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide contents of cigarettes. The different types of perforated tipptng current. ]y available are described and brief descdptinns of the techniques used for their production are included. The advantages and dissdvantsges of each type are commented on, The development of base papers during the past decade and trends in this area era discussed. The need for ongoing paper development, in relation to new generation making machines and perforating techniques, is dealt with. Finally, the devclopmcnt of on.line porosity monitoring equipment, and the need for the standardization of porosity measuring methods end instruments within the tobacco industry, is dis. cosscd. Gary Tucker has spent 18 years In the industrial adhesive field, all of them with H.B. Fuller. Since graduating from 8all State University with a major in chemistry, Tucker has held positions In his company dealing with all aspects el the cigarette adhesive business, including production, quality TRANSMJSSION SUPPUES INC. WItson ('Toll Free); (800) ~2.6534 Greensboro: (919) 378.0573 Charlotte: ('/04} 377.9522) Spsrtanburg: (803) 576.8650. SPECIALISTS .... for: power transmission and electronic controls Saturday, September 17, 9:20 A.M. Cigarette adhesives--state of the art, ]983 Gary R. Tucker Strategic Business Manager--Tobacco Group H.B. Fuller & Co., Louisville, Ky, control, sales, and management, Tucker Is currently the strategic business manager for the tobacco industry with H,B. Fuller, heading a small group of specialists concentrating specifically on this important Industry. He Is responsible for all company services [o the manufacturers of tobacco and related products, Tucker ls married, residing with his wife Carolyn0 and their two children, In Louisville, Ky, He has held membership In such organizations as Tappl, the packaging Association of Loulsville~ and the American Society of Quality Control. [. Basic adhesive types used in the cigarette in. dostry. II. The 10-plus d|ffercnt adhesives used in cigar. ~.~Y~C~aD~,~m~On 91g SaT.OrS9 ~.. .... ~ • CIRCLE5 AND ~~i CO~UGATED .... " ' ~ ~ELINE~ Sou~¢~ Container TOaACCO INTERNATIONAL--13?
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ctte manufacture. [IL Important physical characteristics of cigarette adhesives and how they relate to product per- refinance. IV. Changes in component cigarette materials and how they affect the performance of adhesives. V. Cigarette making and packing machinery lutlon and ho~v it affects the choice of ad. hvslvcs. VL Present and future llmitatlons of the varlous adhesives used in cigarette manufacturing. VII. Current trends in adhesiv¢ formulation for cigarette manufacturing to address trends in the industry. Dr. F.S. Bryant, B.S.E.E., T~o Citadel; M.S.E.E., Clemson University; Ph.D.E.E,, University of Florida, Is currently sen~or account manager for Saturday, September 17, 9:55 A.M, Automated quality control Dr, F.S. Bryant Senior Account Manager/ AccuRay Corp., Columbus, Ohio AacnFlay Corp. and represents the company !o major cigarelte companies In lhe United States. He joined AccuRay In 1975. In adclltlon to working with the cigarette industrT, he has expsrlenae In process control in the metals, textlles~ and carpet Industries. Prior to his association with AcouRay, Dr, Bryant was director of applications englneurlng, oorpsrate R & D for Burlington Industries, He has on many occasions been an Invited speaker-lecturer fur tllo Institute of El~trical and Electronic Engineers In the subject area of real-lime monitoring and process control. Dr. Bryant holds patents In the fields data monitoring and electron gun design, Dr. Bryant Is a registered professional engineer The well known secret. MAPLEINE After mote than 50 years in worldwide distribution. Mop- le=ne is still one of the most popular flavors used to help make any tobacco m~Id and mellow. The redpe is unique. consistent, reliable and well known os the secret we st/ll keep year of~er year. After all,why camper with success? CRESCENT Wilson. North Carolina. 27893. U.$.A, (919) 243,3 t 91
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In the states of Florida and South Carolina. He is also a graduate ot the American Management Association's Managera ~chool. Th~s presentation begins by examining the importance of quality control Jn manufacturing |nternatiooal-slyle cigarettes, included in this intro- duction is a discussion of the relationship between automated qeaiity ¢ontro[ and certain aspects of productivity. Several examp[os from the secondary manufac- luring processes are used by Dr, Bryant to describe hoxv automated quality control systems ,are imple- mented. Using these examples, he also explains how substantial cost savings can result from application of these systems. At the conclusion of his presentation. Dr. Bryant discusses briefly the value of informatioe, a by-product o[ automation systems. Information can be used effectively to improve quality in cases where automation cannot be applied economically. KeRh Holland, technical director of Filtrona Inatruments & Aulomation Ltd., Is a qualified mechanical and electrical engineer. Alter seven years with the Marconi Co. and two years In computerized printing, he joined Filtrona as a process development engineer. Foe the past 16 years he has worked on tl~o design and production of lnstrument~ lot tl~e liRer and cigarette Saturday, September 17, 10:45 A.M. Trends in instrumentation for cigarette and filter testing KeRh O. Holland Technical Director Ftltrona Instruments and Automation Ltd., Milton Keynes, England Industries: in his spare time, he is a radio ham. "~"~. ood product quality requires the ~ppllcatien of reliable measuring techniques. This theme will be explored with reference to the evolution of measurement needs and changes in instrument technology. As the broad emphasis of new cigarette design has passed from unfiltered, through filtered, to ventilated brands, the parameters of interest to manufacturers and researchers have changed accordingly. Available instrumenlation will he illustrated with particular attention to the differeeces in measure- ment needs dictated by local conditions in different parts of the world, Dr, Carlo Grosel, .sales manager and tobacco operation<= coordinator tot G.D Societa per Azloni, |40--CATALOGUE Saturday, September 17, 11:20 A.M. High speed cigarette packaging Dr. Carlo Grossl Sales Manager & Tobacco Operations Coordinator O.D SocJeta per AzJoni, Bologna, Italy is a mechanical engineering graduate of the University of Bologna. The Italian company G.D is a relatively new machind supph'cr to the tobacco ind~try, hay/rig entered the picture in the mid-l, gS0s with its 4350/ PACK groups, which opened a ~ew era in the forming of cigarette packs. It claims to produce 10- peeks and 25.packs, soft and hinged-lid, at the highest production speeds and efficieecies, with systc~ls that are not traditional for cigarette manufac- turing. G.D also considers that a maker/packer seems One of the world's finest cigarillos. are available in two types: Sumatra = mild and mellow Brazil- rich and aromatic a really good smoke )'4980 Buonde PAPASTRATOS GREECE exporters ofquallty oriental tobacco and manufa¢~ of cig.a.rettes for over fifty years Out lCe.g expeder~ce in the tobacco b~siness combined with the la(esl PAPASTRATO$ ACHIEVES QUALITY THROUGH TRAOiTION AND MOOERNIZATION THARRtNGTON POT-TYPE CURER , MADE OF HEAVY GAUGE STEEL • VAPORIZED BURNER FOR ECONOMICAL USE • he ELECTRICITY t~ REQUIRED , DUAL VALVE CONTROLS TWO STOVES • ALL HARMFUL FUMES GO UP STACK Manulactuted by T~RRINGTON INDUSTRIES, INC. P.O. BOX 4226 R~CKV MOUNT. N.C. 2Z~[, U S ~, TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--14t
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inevhablc, other packaging developments that will be ~)f great We c;1~) e.'sp¢cl G,~ Io discuss h:i~ and intcresl to the conierence. Saturday, September 17, 11:55 A.M. The total p#ckage N.$o Cardamone Produc~ Manager Hercules Inc., Wilmington, Del. Nichola S, Cardamone. a native of ClarRsburg, W. Ya., received a B.$, degree in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacxsburg In 1956. He began his career wRn Hercules as a development engineer at Allegany Laboratory (ABL), Cumberland, Md., in 1961. He was named project engineer in 1965. Later that ear. he transferred to ~acctcus, Utah, as project WIDE RANGE OF USED TOBACCO EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Complete AMF stemm- tag lines from ~,6£,O Lb. to 35,000 Lb/h, Fishburne strip packers, Sargent land Proctor dryers, buik- !lag silos, various'sized conditioning cylinders, Isand reels, AMF Icigarette makers. AMF soft packed and hingedl lid packers. T~DEWATER INDUSTRIAL COMPONENTS 601 Gordon Ave, Richmond, Va, 20224 Att: David Burke TELl (804) 230.0331 engineering supnrvisor. Cardamone returned to ABL as senior doveloomem engineer in 1966. in 1967. he came to corporate headquarters, Wilmington, DeL, as eevetopment engineer, fibers and film. and was named sales engineer the next year. He joined ~he Northeastern regional office in Richmond. Va. as a development engineer for tobacco films m 1966. The i¢llowlng year, ~e was advanced to senior sales engineer, tobacco films, in 1974, he was ~dvanced to district sales manager. tobacco films. He assumed his current ~osition in 1982. Areview of the "~ot~l ~acknge'" concept is made ~nsidcring the interaction Of the many groups involved and also :he physical [o~a) package using new produc~s. ~e introduction of the ~olypropylone plastic film into the cigarette market joint efforts of ~he cigarette mamOhc:urers. BUYS AND SEIJ..S USEI) TOBACCO MACHINERY OVER '[HE WORLD • -'2 -GATALCGUE A century of combining skilful creativity with choice raw materials since 1879 uel q oostas & rniquel, s.a. ues at your service
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suppliers, and machinery suppliers, end film are presented. ~J~e presentation covers Peckagh~g designs us~g an opsqu¢ polyp~o[~y|. ~mproved graFhics a~t product ~rotec~ion. Satu~:day, September 17, 12:30 P.M. Smoking and Health James E. Morals Morris Associates,. Inc. Tappahannock, Vs. Jsmes E, Morris is president of Morris Associates, Inc. founded Jn 1968 to provide consulting services 10 the world tobacco Industry which he has served for noarly 40 years In more than 20 different countries, He was educaled In London ~hools and univer- sity to be a mechanical engineer. His lobaeco experiences include 23 years with Mollns as a manager and executive In London and Richmond, where he supervised many famous developments and operations for them. He was later appointed divisional vice president of the AMF World Tobacco Group for the U.S. and Canada and successfully directed them for six years. He t~as assisted a vaciety of reputab/~ organizations to resolve grob- lems related to the industry. He Is a special volunteer executive for the International Executive Service Corps,, working for many months in the Far East and In South America assisting developing tobacco manufacturers to Improve their products and organizations, He is author of "This Tobacco Business," a continuing series of articles published by TOSAGCO INTER. NAtqONAL, Anti-smoking campai~s, once.aged by the record decline in cigarette smoking in the UK, are now hoping to extend their campaigns into the developing countries or the third world. It is reported that the campaigns want to damage the cigarette manufacturers usage as much as their profits. This discussion will attempt to ttvlew the effects of anti-smoklng campaigns, to evaluate the source of the statements and claims made by the campaigners, to make an assessment of the progress made in the cancer researches, and to provide guidttlnes for countries which have not been subjected to anti-smoking campaigns. Clark Perforated Suction Tapes Highest ¢[U~,(tly, precise, st~dnles= CLARK MANUFACTURING COMPANV P.O. 8ox ~7 T~ ~01) 494~5~ West Point, MIS~Ss~D~ 39773 SPECIALISTS IN INDONESIAN CLOVE CIGARETTES /V~NUFACTURED "~i GUDANG GARAM GROUP INDUSTRIES KEDIRI - INDONESIA Export to all parts of ~e wadd [mquir]es from anywhere welcomed .~xpod-lmpod Dept. JaPan Pangl[~ S~i~on ~ SU~BAYA INDONES~ Phone No.: ~I ~2~I & 42632 Telex No,: 31462 ggrcm sb CaBle address: GGA~ SU~6AYA 144--CATALOGUE TOBACCO INTERNAT1ONAL--14~I
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ShiPS90% tfmacco much closest "to the of America Richmond Wat(~rfront Terminals, Inc. Operators of Richmond Deepwater Terminal 5000 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234 146~CATALOGUE • EFFICIENCY • QUALITY CONTROL • DEPENDABLE PERFORMANCE • ECONOMY HERE'S HOW TO MEET YOUR TOBACCO PROCESSING PRIORITIES. Efficient processing of strip and cut filler tobaccos, takes special care, special equipment. Food Engineering Corporation offers you the top quality processing machines and systems to meet the needs of your most challenging applications, Process Equipment Available; • Apron D~ers end Coolers • Rotary D~ers and Coolers • Casing and Conditioning Cylinders • Bulking and Blending Silos • Vibratory Conveyors end Screeners • Belt Conveyors TELL US YOUR PROCESSING NEEDS'. Food Engineering Corporation can respond with equipment and system suggestions to answer your needs for price and performance. Free literature with full details of equipment operation and illustrations avai(able upon request. Call or write today! PHONE; (612) 559-52g0 Vlbrl~oP/Convlyot~ FOOD ENGINEERING CORPORATION 2765 NIAGARA LANE . MINNEAPOLIS. MINNESOTA 55441 TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--t47
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News from ANtt It's worth a test! We at A,NH are spccintizing In tobacco flavors and casings and we offer you fidl hmhlcf-~c~'tc~ and cooperation on tobacco~ .~nd let us tn" to upgmdc ~¢ qu~ltv of your "s~e~nR brm~ds? There is ho ch~ge tmr obl~ga~oh fo~your p~l We don2 advm~sc "wtmder finYors: but we crux assist you hl modlflcat~ons of tobacco blends as w~ll as "taik~ng" the mos{ su]lable casing and top flavor fomnnladons. Please contact our R&D Dcp~mcnl and let ~s sla~ working for you Hght away see address below. EMPRESAS TABACOS TIOPICALfS (I~MINGO) C. po~ A. Telephonel ~¢='~ 5494 "~='8474 Cable Address.. TABATROP Telex: 34~i1013 TABTROP Santiago, Rep. iXim. Can~em l.as Ci~.aeflaS, Jacalua Apart-ado {P.O. Box| 343 Your personal business planner ...... If you read "Tobacco Inter. national" only once in a while, or are far down on a routing list, you may be missing out on news that can help you in your bust. ness planning--while it's new~, To receive a subscription for "Tobacco International," you have only to complete and mail this form today! The International magazine o! the tobacco/ndustp/and aclence. TOBACCO INTERNATIONAL--149
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Sea-Land. Where tobat:co Sea-Land can offer you more speciali.~ts, more equ|pment, mor~ exclusive terminals and more [requent sailings than anybody' in the businc.~s. For fast, economlcal : and from [ Ser~tic~ to a full network '.,, tobacco Sh~ Sea-Land, OSCAR S. FIELDS, INC. 1808 MACTAVISH AVENUE CUTTERS RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, 23230 SEPARATORS DISCHARGERS 804-358-3888 804-358-3888 FIRE DAMPERS MACHINERY REBUILDING OVER 75 YEARS OF CHANNEL BELT CONVEYORS COMBINED EXPERIENCE DUMPERS W/SCREW FEEDERS CUSTOM ENGINEERED MACHINERY SPARE PARTS FOR PRODUCTION EQUIP, "THE NAME IN METAL FABRICATING CRAFTSMANSHIP" MADDI LAKSHMAIAH IN,THE FIELD OF TOBACCO MACHINERY and Company pdva[~ Limited ~ Buying points throughout main tobacco belt E3 Two modern threshing and redrying plants TOBACCO THRESHERS REDRIERS PACKERS EXPORTERS P.O. Box NO, 18 Chllakalutipeta 522616 Guntur Dr. South India Cables: MADDIS Chilakaluripsta Telephone: 08646-486; 487; 488 Telex: 4712~4 MLCOIN 150--CATALOGUE TOBAGGO INTERNATIONAL~151
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ADVERTISERS INDEX t~orl[w=tdt Heinr ....................... 76 ausch ................................ 30 C Ch~tron Chem~¢=l Co ................ 13.~ D D¢=et'~= ........................... 121 De~l~ ............................... 70 DrcscO R~UniCo ................... ~6 H=mbro ............................. C.2 F/=u~r En~tl~sb+m~l AO ................ H~nsd Woo~I ......................... H~rcu~¢s ............................. 60 A|~'~'~ No Hertz ....................... 149 |l;p=g¢ ............................... 96 I ITR ........................... J Japan Tab=tea & $~[~ Job So~i¢ie ........................ t ~uj~.~ ............................... K K-T~on ............................... Kenn~.v ............. : .............. ! [6 L Lancotab N,V, .................... 130 Lcdcr ............................. 90 Lykes .............................. ~O Edward payor & Son Lad .............. ~ .A, .~{ichailld;~ $.A ................... 3~ Export Lee! ................. F FO,;ke ~ Co ..................... 20.2! Fr,¢z~hc O(~te & O~cot~ .............. I tiller ............................. 134 (; G D ....................... G,~Ibu,o %rL .......................... | 25 ~i','udzn Dub~ndoff[ ................. | Z~ Had & Cotlon ....................... 13:: M/~ropu] .............................. 32 ~ohn~toh~ &Suns .................. 8~ ~oi~tur¢Sv~lcm ................... ~3 MOn~ ....................... 4~A~ M.F..Next ........................ 62 H,C. Pon~ ..................... I~ O Pow¢ll ........................ 32 1S2~CATALOGUE S Schocllcr & ho~¢h ................... Sic~tlin8 ............................... 36 Technic/D¢~etopmcnt Co~p ............. Technicon ........................... 91 Thai Tobacco Coop .................... 94 Th|el¢ ................................ 42 ¥ w This ~iex t~ prcvldecI (or the raa(:[ers' convenience, How(~ver, Tobacco Inter- IN EUROPE/IN THE U.S.A. Alleghany Warehouse... The Leader arrzn~e~ by truck, rail o¢' lighter. For more information on A/leghany Warehouse please contact one o/ our o/flces flsted below, IH THE UNITEO STATES -- IN E~ROPE-- ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE COMPANY, I~,C, ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE EUROPE B V ~LLEOHANY WAREHOU~ C0&~P,~Y ;:~C P,O. ~ 24597, Richmond, Va. ~3224. U,S.A. VLtSSiNGEN 00St - NE3ERLAND ROTTERDAM 8RANCH ALLEGHANY WAREHOUSE
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