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Ppg Firestone Indy Lights Championship Powered by Buick

Date: 1994 (est.)
Length: 24 pages
92745331-92745354
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B, R.
Bailey, R.
Clark, M.
Michaelian, J.
Saal, A.
Area
EXECUTIVE FILE ROOM
Alias
92745331/92745354
Type
PAMP, PAMPHLET
CHAR, CHART/GRAPH/MAPS
PHOT, PHOTOGRAPH
Named Organization
Audi
Bell
Buick
Cart
Championship Auto Racing Teams
Chevrolet
Cosworth
Cross Keys Advertising
Delta Airlines
Deltron
Eka
Espn
Espn Intl
Ferrari
Firestone
Ford
General Motors
Goodyear Tire + Rubber
Imsa
Indycar Safety Team
Isuzu
Jaguar
Kenneth E Lowe Aircraft Sales
Lola Cars
Lolas
Mclaren
Mercedes Benz
Nascar
Neiman Marcus
Oldsmobile
Penske
Ppg Industries Automotive Products
Ppg Pace Car Team
Rh
Scca
Simpson
Team San Diego
Team Valvoline
US Auto Club
Williams
Women Sports Foundation
Arai
Arca
Named Person
Harroun, R.
Hogan, P.
Horton, C.
Nasa
Pollack, K.
Document File
92745326/92745622/Missing@ 92745327/92745593/Newport - Racing
Date Loaded
05 Jun 1998
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R1-003
Author (Organization)
Firestone
Ppg Industries Automotive Products
Litigation
Stmn/Produced
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N105
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92745330/5354

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Page 1: joj70e00
® ~' Iirestone INDY LIGHTS C H A M P I 0 N S H I P POWERED BY $uICK 0 0 0 0
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, ~ A~111,11411 1 , , ~' rirestone INDY LIGHTS C H A M P 1 0 N S H I P POWERED BY B,ujCjK 1 :=- L-4°-----~ ®1 HN ]BuicK '- CRAl1El.S1110`1E\Se.1~9`"" ~ ~ qh UM35 sk+Ih o~scN,~: , ~IE~;*~ ('L.~~~~f. 0
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SHS bLZ6 73obby 1'G lndRahal on the µ,a Y Car ~porld y to his third S eries title. Now in its 14th year of sponsorship, / /qutomotive Products of PPG Industries will contribute over $3.75 million in total prize money to the 1993 PPG Indy Car World Series. The largest prize fund in motor sports, this includes $3.25 million to IndyCar, which will be distributed as cash awards during the season and
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through the PPG Cup fund, divided among the top drivers in point stand- ings at the end of the season. A minimum of $1 million will be paid from the PPG Cup fund to the PPG Indy Car World Series champion in 1993. In addition to the prize money contributed to IndyCar, PPG will post $430,000 in cash awards at the Indianapolis 500, where it offers $100,000 to the winner of the PPG Pole Award and $330,000, or $10,000 each, to the 33 starting cars. The balance of PPG's $3.75 million prize fund is in special cash awards or project underwriting for the series. Reinforcing its status as the world's richest racing series, the PPG Indy Car World Series is expected to pay a total of more than $23 mil- lion dollars in prize money for the. 16-race 1993 season, including PPG prize money, purses for the 15 Championship Auto Racing Teams gov- erned events and the Indianapolis 500, and money from television and manufacturers' contingency funds. To date, PPG has contributed well in excess of $100 million to the Indy Car World Series. For 1993, PPG Industries' Automotive Products unit will present the Indianapolis 500 PPG Pole Award, the PPG Indy Car World Series Championship PPG Cup, the Refinish Award and the Spectacular Finish Award for best use of color and design by an IndyCar and an Indy Lights team owner, as well as the Indy Lights PPG Refinish Rookie of the YearAward.  PPG Cup Point System In the PPG lndy Car World Series, points are awarded toward the PPG Cup (national champions'hip) in each race as follows: lst-20; 2nd-16; 3rd-l3; 4th-12; 5th-10; 6th-8; 7th-6; 8th-5; 9th-4; 10th-3: llth-2; 12th-1. Also, one (/) point i.r awarded the faste.rt qualifier in each race and one (1) point is awarded the driver who leads the most laps in each race. T he Automotive Products business of PPG Industries, sponsor of the PPG Indy Car World Series, will again field a team of specially pre- pared, high-tech, high-performance pace cars, built in cooperation with major automotive manufacturers to pace all of the IndyCar races. The 1993 line-up of PPG Pace Cars wears Deltron automotive refinish pain colors specially developed in the styling laboratories of PPG's Automotive Finishes Group. Goodyear tires are also specifically chosen to fit the perfor- mance needs of each vehicle. 1992 PPG Cup Champion Bobby Rahal is flanked by Co-owner Carl Hogan (left) and t{ears Pollack, Vice President-Automotive Products for PPG Industries. 1993 IndyCar World Series Year-End Point Fund Position 13onus I . . - . . . . $1,000,000 2 ......... 500,000 3 ......... 300,000 4 ......... 125,000 5 ......... 100,000 6.......... 75,000 7 .......... 50,000 8 .......... 40,000 9.......... 30,000 10 ......... 25,000 Buick Regal: a modifted version ofa production model, with a Buick 3800 ec sacpercharged V-6 engine which pulls 330lep, and with 5-speed manual transaxle, the Regal is ftnished with an aqua silk paint; PPG Cup Champions 1979 Rick Mears 1980 Johnny Rutherford 1981 Rick Mears 1982 Rick Mears 1983 Al Unser 1984 Mario Andretti 1985 AI Unser 1986 Bobby Rahal 1987 Bobby Rahal 1988 Danny Sullivan 1989 Emerson Fittipaldi 1990 Al Unser, Jr. 1991 Michael Andretti 1992 Bobby Rahal Cadillac Allante: a world class, open-air. haury roadster, powered by a sneclally built 390 hp engine, with 4-speed man}cal transrnission, the Allante is painted in a pacesetter red candy finish; ~ 96 1 StrL~.'.6 ~nor
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T he 1993 PPG Pace Car Team features 13 well-known women race drivers, all of whom have earned recognition in various forms of auto racing. The team members pilot PPG's fleet of exotic, high-performance pace cars a,round the tracks in parade laps at all TndyCar events, and provide rqr PPG customers and guests during intervals when the tracks are tl~r~tl for practice and qualifying. The PPG pace cars they drive lat3t nea Qe }re a L1liiqtl~, collection of top-line production models, carefully modified f~~t~lr ir;~c~ ~.Elx}uit duties. After the team completes its pre-race laps, a yelefan J;luy (:~ar driver takes over one of the cars for the race start and ~tlbsequenl yellow flag situations. =Vhls year's PPGr pace car driver line up includes Laura Barnes, Terry IV~iacDoriald-Cadieux, Robin McCall-Dallenbach, Margy Eatwell, Kim Giilt:tte,lVfargie Smith-Haas, Trisha Hessinger, Patty Moise, Rhonda Regrller, Alice Ridpath, Kathy Rude, Janey Smith, and Desire Wilson. Ken I-oWe, a veteran technician on the Indy Car circuit, serves as manag- er of the pace car program and non-driving team captain. Chevrolet Camaro: featuring a modifred high performance 450 hp, 401 cu- in. fuel injected V-8 engine, the Camaro is painted in light mandarin orange pearl; Chevrolet Corvette: an open-airspeedster, the Corvette is powered by a fuel injected 351 cu. in. engine and fini.rhed with Patriot Blue mica paint and Scud Ckartreuse accents; Barnes Ken Lowe - owner and president of Kenneth E. Lowe Aircraft Sales, Inc., Aurora, CO; worked as chief test driver for the Research and Development Division of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., and as a Goodyear Racing Division tire engineer on the Indy Car circuit; serves as Director of Competition for the Pikes Peak Auto Hill Climb and is a CART steward. Laura T. Barnes - began racing in 1987, competing successfully with Formula Fords in Skip Barber Series; president of Cross Keys Advertising. Doylestown, PA, which special- izes in automotive, industrial and racing relat- ed marketing and public relations; resides in New Jersey; 4th season on pace car team. Terry MacDonald-Cadieux- began rac- ing go-karts at age 13; competed in slalom events and oval tracks with three. top It) fin- ishes; in 1989 started competing in the Firestone Firehawk series; in 1990 she was the first female in Canada to be awarded "Rookie of The Year" title; finished the '92 season l0th in points; winter of'93 started Ice Racing; test drives new vehicles and writes weekly column for local newspaper; 4th sea- son on pace car team. Dodge Intrepid: a /993 addition to the pace car fleet, the modified 3.51iteroverhead tam, 24-valve V-6 multi-port fuel injected Intrepid feature.r Chry.rler's unique cab fntward design and is finished wlthftre red candy and silverntetallic; F 1\TacDonatd-Cadieux BicCall-Dallenbaeh Robin McCall-Dallenbach - began racing quarter midgets at age eight; drove first stock car on quarter mile track at age 14; competed regularly on ovals, consistently finishing in the top five; started road racing in 1986 for the factory of Oldsmobile, finishing 4th in points; in 1989 competed in Corvette Challenge series; lives in Charlotte, NC, with husband, Winston Cup Driver Wally Dallenbach; 10th season on pace car team. Margy Eatwell - from age I 1 to 21 competed nationally in quarter and half-midget open wheel racing, consistently finishing in the top 10; won the Rocky Mountain Division Showroom Stock B regional championship in 1990; in 1991 - 1992 finished 2nd over all in SCCA GT-4 Division; competed in 1992 Denver Grand Prix in SCCA World Challenge Series; successfully tested Indy Lights car at Willow Springs, Laguna Seca, and Firebird Raceway; driver and instructor for ProFormance Driving Events, demonstrating new vehicle dynamics; sales associate in men's clothing at Neiman-Marcus in Denver; 4th season on pace car team. Kim Gillette - model/actress from Santa Ana, CA; drives cars for TV commercials; Dodge Stealth: highly modifted and powered by a 24-valve DOHC twin turbo-charged intercooled V-6, 3 liter engine, the Stpalth is finished in an acid yellow enhanced by vibrant magenta accents;
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does ride and drives for car manufacturers; co-drove first race at age 15; 1990 Rookie of the Year in Southern California SCCA; in 1990, set track record at Las Vegas track in a Formula Ford; holds track record in mini- stocks at Willow Springs oval track; first female to race in a premier series in Mexico - Super Formula - 1992 Montana Grand Prix; 4th season on pace car team. Margie Smith-Haas - began racing career while teaching school in Phoenix; only woman to compete in 24 Hours at LeMans in 1984 and 1985; finished 6th in GTO in 24 Hours at Daytona, two 3rd place finishes in Group B at Brands Fiatch, England and Mugello, Italy in 1984; driving for Team San Diego in the American City Racing League in 1992, finished 5th in the Drivers' Championship placing her as the highest ranked professional female road racer in the United States; won her first professional race on an oval track (1989) as well as the 1990 "ACRL Rising Star Award;" recently chosen as a national spokesperson for Team Valvoline's "Say NO to Drugs" program; founder of TFA (Toys For Adults); 1 1 th sea- son with pace car team. Ferrari: the ftrst European product in the pace car jleet, the Ferrari is a.rpecially-designed and engineered concept vehicle powered by a modified Ferrari four valve, V-8 engine, painted in Ferrari red with black cherry on the lower body frotn lV/, PPG's Italian paint subsidiary; Smith-Haas Hessinger Trisha Hessinger - A double gold medalist in figure skating and a professional skating coach for 15 years; native of Allentown,•PA, now living in Toronto; began racing career in 1983, successfully driving Formula Fords in Skip Barber Series, winning several events and earning "Simpson Most Improved Driver Award;" continued racing in IMSA Firestone Firehawk Series, driving various showroom stock cars; instructor for several racing and driving schools; worked with Mercedes-Benz, Ford, Audi, Jaguar and Isuzu on new product introductions at race tracks across the country; an accomplished equestrian competing on the dressage circuit; 8th season on pace car team. Patty Moise - set a closed course speed record in a stock car at Talladega Super- speedway in 1990 with a speed of 217.498 mph; first woman to win an individual victory in a professional road race (Portland 1986); finished 2nd in IMSA's American Challenge Series Championship in 1986 (and was wom- en's champion 1983, '84, '85, and 1986); competing in NASCAR's Busch Grand National Series since 1987, winning a qualify- ing race at Charlotte that year; first woman ever to win an event at Martinsville, VA Ford Sport Boss: a uniquelV designed light truck, the Ford Sport Boss is powered by a 455 lip, 395 cu. in. V-8 engine, and finished in iridescent pearl white paint with flamingo and iris accents; Moise. Regnier Speedway in the 40 year history of the track; has competed in seven Winston Cup races; won four pole positions in ARCA Races at Talladega and Daytona, becoming the first woman to win a pole position on a super- speedway; married to Grand National Driver Elton Sawyer; lives in Greensboro, NC; 10th season with pace car team. Rhonda Regnier - 1988 Int'l SuperKart Champion, 250cc; 1989 W KA Western Region Champion; 1990 World Karting Champion, (1991 fast lap); driving instructor with Mercedes-Benz on corporate and cus- tomer programs; in 1992 won a Formula Russell Race at Laguna Seca; one of three women ever to competee in the Zerex Saab Pro Series, setting fast laps at two separate tests; won the final two races in Skip Barber's West Coast Formula Ford Series; passed Indy Lights Rookie Test with Lanford Racing; 4th season on pace car team- Alice Ridpath - won the South Florida Solo 11 championship in 1978 and 1979; has three SCCA National victories and lap records in road racing events; as SE Division runner-up earned an invitation to the SCCA National Championship run-offs in 1985; several top GMC Syclone: powered by a 4.3 liter, 280 lip turbocharged, intercooled Vortec V-6 engine with port fi.el injection• the Svclone is ftnished in splashes ofmagenta and aqua accented with purple tinted clear over s•ilverfoil; Ridpath Rude three finishes in the Escort Endurance series in 1986 and impressive finishes in the IMSA Firestone Firehawk series 1987-1988; a pro- fessional race driving instructor, an active member of the Women Sports Foundation and a flight attendant for Delta Airlines; resides in Deerfield Beach, FL; 8th season on the pace car team. Kathy Rude - began racing go-karts in 1977, winning several races, consistently fin- ishing in the top five; in 1978 voted SCCA Driver of the Year-Oregon Region; raced Formula Ford in 1979, achieving two pole positions, one win, and eight top four finishes; in Kelly American Challenge Series; in 1981, voted SCCA Oregon Region Professional Driver of the Year, first in class Suzuka, Japan 6 hr. race, had several top three finishes in IMSA's GTU class, was Mazda Factory Driver; in 1982 became the first woman on a team to win a professional road race at Daytona when her team finished first in GTU class Daytona 24 hour race, Toyota Factory driver; earned recognition as one of the top women drivers in the world until a near-fatal accident interrupted her career; after dozens of operations now fully-recovered; principal Lexus LE 400: this top-of-the-litte lururv car is powered by a 4.0 liter, 270 hp, 32-valve, DOHC aluminum V-8 enginer and frnished in pearl white with ruby graphics; 9EEStiLZ6 __ r . . . n N M 
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Smith Wilson woman; only woman to win overall World Championship events - World Sports Car Championship races: Monza 1000KM and Silverstone 6 Hr; only woman to win Formula One race (Brands Hatch, 1980 British Championship); winner of 17 other profes- sional races, with 74 top three finishes and I 1 pole positions; drove for Team Tyrrell, 1981 South African Formula One Grand Prix; 1978 Sportswoman Of The Year; has raced over 73 different types of race cars in 13 countries; raced in 1993 Daytona 24 Hour; lives in Denver. CO; 9th season with pace car team. in Kathy Rude Advanced Driving Techniques, Inc.; commercial pilot; 1 1 th season on pace car team. Janey Smith - began racing career as a crew member, then SCCA official before driving in competition; in 1984 was consistently in the top four in SCCA events, in an otherwise all- male field: in 1986 won season's opener; in 19919 finished first in Racing Drivers Club .!li}fnptoqship and 2nd in SCCA Regional (;'hqhlptonship; 1990 and 1991 competed pucei;,~nfully in the SCCA ITB class, 1992 tZegiot hl Champion; Pacific Coast Road l.a..lnv (_'hampion holding lap record for 1992 In Pr ppt~?tl Turbo class at Laguna Seca k2aceway; instructor for SCCA in San franGisco region since 1989; instructor for 4uto intcttductions, ride and drives, and auto cr,tstonts~r sales since 1991; resides in the Kjattptwtlr~ iaf Santa Cruz, CA and practices ]nl9-tor design in the San Francisco Bay area; Hth season with pace car team. besii'e Wilson - only Indy Car driver on pacee car team; has driven in 11 Indy Car races with finishes as high as 10th; her lap of 191 mph at Indianapolis in 1982 stood for 10 years as the fastest official lap ever run by a Mustang GT: a powerful cousin of the SVO production model, the Mustang is powered by a 396 cu. in. engine pulling 450 hp with a 4-barrel carburetor; painted white pearl and lavender pearl with hot pink accents; b>;E:S~iLGb I    Mazda RX-7: this addition to the PPG fleet sports a deep aquarius paint which changes to tangerine and ends in vivid canary yellow. The Mazda features a potettt 2701tp sequential, twin-turbocharged,intercooled two-rotor engine; IIhIDY WORLD> f SERIES }o )-~t~ _. 18 Molson Indy Toronto Exhibition Place. Held on the grounds L~ of the Canadian National Exhibition, track runs past the Hockey Hall of Fante. Fame. AUGUST 1 Marlboro 500 MARCH 21 Australian Indy Car Grand Prix Surfers Paradi,,e. t-leld on the streets of Surfers Paradise, the back !/ straight runs alongside the beach. APRIL 4 Valvoline 200 Michigan International Speedway. After 2001aps there are still fifty to go on this two mile, high banked speedway. AUGUST 8 New England 200 New Hampshire International Phoenix International Raceway. Desert ~ Speedway. State of the art mile oval. sun and heat make for Gckle conditions first Indy Car race in 1992 was biggest on thts one mde oval. Road America. From bratwurst to fresh corn on the cob, the best track food in the country. APRIL 18 Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach AUGUST 29 Molson Indy Vancouver P f PI~ ~ T k ; ~l BC Long Beach, California- Fint Long Beach Grand Prix in 1975 sparked a renaissance in street racing in the United States. rac act tc a.c, en trc es MAY 30 Indianapolis 500 ~ Place donted stadimn against the ~ Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The spectacular backdrop of Vancouver month long build-up makes for unique and the Coast Range. mental pressures at the "Brickyard"- SEPTEMBER 12 Pioneer Electronics 200 JUNE 6 Miller Genuine Draft 200 ! Wisconsin State Fair Park Speedway. Next to htdy 500, the longest tradition in Indy Car racing. sponing event in New England history, AUGUST 22 Texaco/Havoline 200 Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course. Abrupt and numerous elevation changes make this htdy Car racing's version of a roller coaster. JUNI:13 SEPTEMBER 19 ITT Automotive 1)etroit Grand Prix Bosch Spark Plug Grand Prix -Bclle Isle Park. In 1992, moved from Pennsylvania International Raceway. '~ the streets around the Renaissanee ~ ~ Combine a downhill straightaway with Center to Belle Isle in Detroit River. an uphill Turn Three and you get non- JUNE 27 Budweiser/G.l. Joe's 200 stop action on this u-i-oval- ~ Portland International Raceway. OCTOBER 3 Circuit based on strects of post- Toyota Monterey Grand Prix World War It suburban housing tract. Laguna Seca Raceway- With Monterey, ,)ULY 11 Cleveland Grand Prix ~ Carmel, Big Sur, Pebble Beach and San Burke Lakefront Airport. For three Fransisco nearby, it's a great way to end z~,'~) days, Burke Lakefront Airport the season. become.s Indy Car racing s fastest road circuit. Nissan 300 ZX: modified and powered by a 3-0liter V-6 engine with twin turbocharger,s, the Ni.ssan's upper body is coated with dark elderberry inetallic Fading to light elderberry metallic and hot pink at the lower body level; Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme: a modified version of the production model, the Cutlass is powered bv a l6-valve quad 4 engine with intercoaled turbocharger and it is finished with gold pearlcoat; ------- ---- ~i >
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T he contemporary Indy car is the world's most versatile single seat racing machine. Today's Chevrolet, Ford and Buick-powered Penskes, Lolas and RH chassis may not be quite as fast on a road course as an ultrahigh technology Formula One car, but they would run Pontiac Turbo Grand Prix: - a,nodi,/ied version of Pontiac"s• Turbo Grand Prix built by ASC/McLare:n, this pace car is powered b_y a turbocharged 3.1 liter V-6 engine and itnished in sunburst vellow; Subaru SVX: a unique all-wheel drive Suborn sporting a 260 hp turbocharged overhead cam V-6 engine, the SVX is coated with deepening concord ntist paint; rings around anything from Williams, Ferrari or McLaren on an oval or a speedway. And be much safer while doing it. Some of the very elements that limit an Indy car's road course perfor- mance - mainly a higher minimum allowable weight than a Formula One car - enhance safety when lapping the big speedways such as Indianapolis and Michigan at average speeds in excess of 230 mph. Although similar in size (Indy cars are permitted to be a maximum of 195" in length, 78.5" wide, 36" high and typically have a wheelbase of around 110"), Formula One and Indy cars are quite different beneath the skin. For openers, the minimum weight permitted for Formula One is 50,0 Kg (about 1100 pounds) while Indy Car rules stipulate that cars must weigh at least 1550 pounds including lubricants and coolants. Unlike Formula One, where every team builds its own chassis, most Indy Car teams buy their chassis from Lola Cars, Ltd. in England. Penske Racing has long built its own chassis at a facility in England, occasionally selling customer cars to a limited number of teams. The Rahal/Hogan team recently followed suit, and is now building its own cars at its shop near Columbus, Ohio. Three types of engines are permitted in Indy Car racing: tur- bocharged, four cycle, overhead camshaft engines with eight cylinders and maximum displacement of 2.65 liters; production-derived, single, turbocharged engines with pushrod operated valves and a maximum dis- placement of 3.43 liters and, at Indianapolis only, naturally aspirated, domestically produced, six liter V-8s. CART, which sanctions the IndyCar Races, and the United States Auto Club (USAC), which sanc- tions the Indianapolis 500, differ on their turbocharging rules as CART permits manifold pressures of 45" on the 2.65 liter engines, and 50" on the stock blocks. USAC keeps the 45" on race engines but allows the stock blocks to run 55" of boost. Toyota Celica All-Trac Turbo: a modi,/ted version of the production model with turhocharged 2.01iter, 4-cylinder, 16-valve. twin-cant engine, the Celica is painted in a seal.skin mica finish. OfrESVLZ6 ~ /_ /./_0
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In contrast, Formula One engine regulations are less restrictive. Where Indy Car engines are limited to a maximum of eight cylinders, F-I engines can have as many as 12 cylinders; where Indy Car rules dic- tate maximum displacements based on engine types, F-1 has just two restrictions - a maximum displacement of 3.5 liters and no turbocharg- ing. While Formula One cars run on gasoline, Indy cars are fueled by methanol, a commercially manufactured fuel with a high octane rating but which is less volatile than gasoline. For all their differences, though, Indy Car and Formula One engines are good for around 750 horsepower. Curre.ntly, both Chevrolet and Ford produce competitive 2.65 liter Indy Car engines. Working in association with the Ilmor Engineering group in England, Chevrolet introduced its first recent Indy Car engine in 1986 and went on to dominate the sport in the late '80s and early '90s, winning five straight PPG titles and 66 of 68 races in one stretch. Ford entered the fray in 1992, with its Ford-Cosworth XB engine and was immediately competitive, earning the pole in their first outing and win- ning five races during the season. In reply to the Ford challenge, Chevrolet has produced a new engine for 1993 - the Chevy Indy V-8C. Meanwhile, the" Buick V-6 is another option- especially at Indianapolis where the extra turbo-boost makes it quite competitive with the Chevy and Ford engines - despite the fact that Buick eliminated its Indy Car racing program at the end of 1992. Perhaps the biggest contrast between Formula One and Indy cars, however, is the differing philosophy which governs the sport. While Formula One emphasizes ultra-sophisticated technologies such as com- puterized suspension systems; steering wheel mounted, push button transmissions; and traction control, the administrators of Indy Car racing have taken specific steps to limit the application of high-technology in an effort to enhance competition and focus on driver ability. And, there can be little doubt, in order to win the 1993 PPG Indy Car World Series, a driver must be every bit as versatile as the car he - or she- drives. The PPG Champion must be equally at home hustling around the 40 mph hairpin onto Shoreline Drive at Long Beach as they are guiding a car into Turn One at Indianapolis at upwards of 235 mph - all the while assessing any one of a hundred different race strategies based on pit stops, full course yellows and fuel consumption. Add to the requisite driving skills, the smarts and demeanor necessary to serve as a spokesperson for team sponsors and you have the makings of a uniquely gifted athlete.  I ndy Car races begin with practice and qualifying to determine the starting positions for Sunday's big event. Practice sessions enable the drivers and crews to experiment with various suspension and aerodynamic configurations in an attempt to find the optimal combina- tion (or "set up"). They also offer spectators a chance to sample different vantage points around the track. Practice and qualifying schedules differ depending on the type of track. On road and street circuits, there is a morning practice, followed by a 75 minute qualifying session which is split into two, thirty minute halves separated by a fifteen minute break. Friday's qualifying session begins with the top finishers from the previous race in the first part of the session, with the remainder of the field in the second half. Saturday's session is based on Friday's qualify- ing times, with the slower half of the field going first and Friday's fastest ti#ESbLZ6
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cars qualifying in the second half hour. Starting order is based on a driver's fastest time regardless of the qualifying session in which it was set. The ovals feature a single qualifying session, held one car at a time, on Saturday afternoon. The qualifying order is detertnined by a draw following Saturday morning's final practice and the cars line-up on pit road in order. Drivers take a couple of warm-up laps, then two qualify- ing laps, the fastest of which determines their grid position. Practice and qualifying at Indianapolis is unique. Practice begins in early May and runs every day from 11 am until 6 pm. Qualifying is held the two weekends before Memorial Day, and a car's starting position is based on both its average speed over four laps AND the day on which it qualified. Only those cars that qualify on the first Saturday of qualifica- tions are eligible for the pole; those who qualify on Sunday line-up by order of speed BEHIND Saturday's qualifiers. A similar procedure is in effect on the second weekend of qualifying, when each day's qualifiers line-up by speed BEHIND the previous day's slowest qualifier. Indy Car race days begin with a final warm-up on Sunday morning, giving the drivers and crews a chance to make final adjustments or to evaluate the results of any changes they made to the car since qualifying. The race gets underway with the PPG Pace cars leading the field around for two laps. At the conclusion of the first pace lap, all but the lead pace car pull off the track, with the lead PPG car pacing the field one more time before pulling off. The pole sitter is then responsible for bringing the field to the starting line in an orderly fashion. If the starter Green: Start The Language of Flags Yellow: Caution, slow and hold position Black: Pull into the pit for consultation Red: Stop Ii Blue with a Yellow with Yellow Two Vertical Diagonal Red Slashes: Stripe: Oil on track Move over to anotherlane EEE White: Checkered: Entering last The race is lap finished Z bESi7LZb *Ie I~ judges the field to be in order, he waves the green flag and the race is on. If not, he waves a yellow flag and they try it again, with the pole sitter again responsible for leading the field around. The start and run to the first turn are the most exciting - and potential- ly dangerous - moments of any race. Cars are closely bunched and the opportunity to overtake an evenly matched competitor may never be bet- ter. Once the cars get through the first couple of turns, the field settles down into single file. There are usually lots of position changes during the opening laps as cars that were quick in qualifying prove problematic under race condi- tions and cars beset with troubles in qualifying suddenly come right. Drivers also pace themselves in order to conserve their cars, tires and, perhaps most of all, fuel. CART rules require cars to average 1.8 miles per gallon of methanol during a race, so each car is allotted the precise amount of fuel needed to get from the pace lap to the checkered flag at the mandated rate of fuel consumption. Drivers can change their driving styles and their equipment according to their fuel situation, adjusting the fuel-to-air mixture from the cockpit or shifting gears at lower RPMs, for example, in order to conserve fuel. With each car carrying forty gallons of fuel, and burning that fuel at 1.8 mpg, they can go 70-75 miles before making a pit stop for more fuel. While taking on fuel, a team will normally slap four new tires on the car and give the driver a quick drink before returning to competition. Quick pit stops, of course, give a driver an enormous advantage in a race where every second the car is stationary on pit lane the competition is gobbling up the length of a football field on the race track. With most Indy Car races covering a distance of 20,0 miles, there are usually two pit stops per event around the 70 and 140 mile marks. Should there be an incident - such as an accident, a car stopped in a dan- gerous place, debris on the race track - which results in a full course cau- tion and the pace car being dispatched to slow the field, all bets are off. Obviously, a driver who pits and takes on fuel and tires while the rest of the field is following the pace car at 60 or 70 mph, will benefit when his competitors pit under green flag conditions. On the other hand, if the timing of the yellow is such that the driver will have to make a three pit stop race - or hope for another yellow flag later on - it may not be worth the gamble. The old adage of "follow the leader" usually holds when it comes to Indy Car pit stop strategy, but more than one race has gone to the tortoise as a result of a successful gamble on pit stop strategy. Another facet to ful I course cautions, is that they can negate the lead car's advantage. A driver can have a lead of fifteen, twenty seconds or
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Roberto Guerrero's pit crew in action. more reduced to a few car lengths if he is forced to follow the pace car while the field forrns up behind. On the other hand, a driver who has the leader in his mirrors and is in danger of being lapped, can vault back into contention thanks to a full course yellow; for when the pace car picks up the leader, the all-but-lapped car can catch-up to the back of the field and rejoin the chase of the leader. Remember, anything can happen in Indy Car racing as long as you're on the lead lap. As the finish approaches, watch for some cars slowing dramatically in order to conserve fuel. Of course, there are a myriad of reasons for a car slowing in the final stages of a race, from any of a thousand mechanical problems, to tires that have overheated or blistered as the result of abuse. The final laps are always the most nerve wracking for the leader, especially if he has a big advantage over second place. Does he back off a bit to save the equipment and risk interrupting his rhythm and perhaps make a mistake? Or does he continue to run hard to the finish, knowing it may overtax some critical $1.25 part on his car? Once the leader sees the starter wave the white flag, though, he knows there's only one lap before he receives that cherished checkered flag.  ONEVEOCIOUNDODUNUELALOL Tires Goodyear is currently the exclusive supplier of Indy Car racing tires, and Firestone is the exclusive supplier of Indy Lights racing tires. The radial tires come in two forms: treadless slicks, used in normal conditions; and grooved tires for the rain. Indy cars race on road and street circuits regard- less of weather conditions, but do not race in the rain on ovals. Tub The basic structure of an Indy car, constructed with a blend of carbon-fibre and aluminum honeycomb. Turbocharger Turbochargers use engine exhaust gasses to power a compressor which compresses the intake air and forces it into the intake manifold, resulting in increased engine efficiency and increased power output. Pop-Off Valve A device which controls the intake manifold pressure (created by the turbocharger) to a maximum of 45" for racing engines such as the Chevrolet and Ford, and to 50" for production-based engines such as the Buick V-6. At Indianapolis, the Buick is permitted to run 55" of turbo "boost." Underwing More than just the bottom of the car, the curved shape of the underbody Suspension All aa elemtion, accelerates the flow of air beneath the car, creating an braking and directional area of low pressure which changes are transmitted dramatically increases comer- through the tires which, in ing speeds. turn, / are dependent on suspen- sion settings such as camber, castor, toe-in, as well as spring stiffness and the damping effects ofthe shock absorbers. Stagger On oval nacks where all turns are to the left, the right side tires have a slightly larger circumference than the left side tires to help the car turn. Sidepod Body-sections on the side of the car that control airflow and house the radia- tors, oil coolers and computer- ized engine management sys- tems. The sidepods also help protect the driver in case of a side impact. Wings Primary purpose (apart from giving more room to display sponsor names) is to manage airflow. Shaped like inverted airplane wings, they create negative lift, or down- force that helps "plant" the car on the track, increasing corner- -ing speeds.
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A utomobile racing and safety have not always been synonymous. In recent years, however, great strides have been made in improving safety at all levels of auto racing. Certainly, Indy Car racing has taken a lead role in improving safety in the sport, from its peerless IndyCar Safety Team to constant improvements in track, car and driver equipment safety. Founded by Carl Horton in 1985, the IndyCar Safety Team provides state of the art rescue, safety and medical services to the PPG Indy Car World Series through its staff of 22 professionals and six specially- equipped vehicles. The team, financially supported by corporate spon- sorship, utilizes two GMC first-response trucks built exclusively to meet the unique requirements of Indy Car racing. The units are staffed by medical and emergency professionals, outfitted with fire fighting, res- cue, emergency extrication and medical equipment and are stationed at each event in order to respond immediately to any incident. Stationed in the paddock is the Safety Team's mobile trauma unit, an MCI Custom Coach equipped with a full compliment of medical trauma capabilities equal to those of a small hospital. An onboard computer system containing the medical records of all Indy Car drivers and all Indy Car credentialed personnel is also available for instant access to the Safety Team doctors and support personnel. Rounding out the fleet of Safety Team vehicles is the unique MR-10, a fully-equipped miniature trauma and rescue cart, designed to serve limited access areas such as pit lane and the paddock. Of course, a perfect weekend for the IndyCar Safety Team is one in which they are never called upon. Given the nature of the sport though, it is unlikely that any weekend will go by without at least some minor incident. Indy Car rules are constantly reviewing regulations concerning chassis construction, track and driver equipment safety in order to reduce the risk of injury. For example, after a number of serious lower extremity injuries last year, new rules for 1993 mandate an additional bulkhead forward of the driver's feet, as well as, a wider, deeper chassis to enable a driver to pull his or her feet back in case of an impending impact. The race tracks themselves also get safer year by year. Gone are the days when a few haybales were the only thing between an out of control car and a tree. And no longer are the steel guardrails that were once viewed as a panacea enough. In many cases, they have been replaced by sturdy concrete ("New Jersey") barriers fronted by piles of interconnect- ed tires to lessen the severity of impact. Meanwhile, today's drivers are encased from head to toe in several layers of flame-retarda-rt clothing, topped by helmets made by Bell, Simpson, Arai and other manufacturers. Each year brings improvements in the drivers' safety equipment, be it more comfortable suits or helmets designed to reduce aerodynamic buffeting at 230 mph. Like the pursuit of speed, the quest for safety never stops.  r trt~ESbL-6 ~. 1 111__ 000 0 . 7. _111 l~~~~~~~~ III XW6
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W e've all heard how Ray Harroun became the first person to bolt a rear view mirror on a car before going out and winning the 1911 Indianapolis 500. But did you know that four wheel brakes and hydraulic shock absorbers were first proven successful on Indy cars; or that ethyl gasoline was pioneered in racing and that low pressure tires were a direct outgrowth of racing? Fuel injection has been universal at Indianapolis since 1954, but it was not available on any passenger cars until 1960. Turbocharged Indy cars were winning races long before they were adapted to cars and trucks, and disc brakes were standard equipment on Indy cars long before they became available on passenger cars. More recently, General Motors developed a fuel system that can use either gasoline or methanol as a result of research on the Chevrolet Indy V-8. Of course, there's not always a direct connection between the automo- tive technology being put to use on the race track and the products for sale in your local showroom. But just because you can't bolt a Lola side- pod on your Taurus or shoehorn a Chevy Indy U 8 into your Lumina doesn't mean the knowledge gathered by the automotive industry at Indy Car races doesn't make for better road cars. As Mario Andretti once observed, "The general aviation industry enjoys the type of navigational equipment it has today because of the technology originally developed for NASA...racing is the NASA of the auto industry." For example, while you would be ill-advised to drive down the local interstate on racing slicks with their thin sidewalls and lack of tread, the lessons learned in Indy Car racing by Goodyear, and in Indy Lights by Firestone, will show up in tomorrow's passenger tires. The low aspect ratio (or short sidewall) performance tires, now commonly available, are the direct descendants of the racing tires of the 1970s. Meanwhile, many of the lessons learned in the process of making race cars safer, such as, proper packaging of a car's occupants and spreading impacts throughout the car rather than to the driver and passenger, have been applied to today's passenger vehicles. And, in an environmentally conscious society, racing's lessons in aerodynamics and fuel manage- ment technology are being put to use in today's increasingly efficient engines and cars.  Sb>;SbL~6 9--)M
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Indy Car racing enjoyed a period of unparalleled growth in the 1980s and into the '90s. While established stars such as Mario Andretti and Rick Mears continued to prosper, a new generation of drivers including Bobby Rahal, Danny Sullivan, Michael Andretti and Al Unser, Jr. came to the forefront of the sport. Now Mears is retired, Mario is thinking about it and Michael Andretti is pursuing his life long ambition in Formula One. And the young lions of yesterday - Rahal, Sullivan and Al, Jr. - are the established veterans of Indy Car racing. Where will tomorrow's stars come from? Increasingly, Indy Car team owners are looking to the Firestone Indy Lights series, the official support series of the PPG Indy Car World Series, for new talent. Roger Penske, Bobby Rahal and Dale Coyne have taken advantage of the fertile ranks of the Indy Lights series by hiring former champions Paul Tracy, Mike Groff, and Robbie Buhl to drive their Indy cars. All Indy Lights chassis and engines are identically prepared, which emphasizes driver talent rather than superior equipment. In contrast to the variety of chassis and engines found in the PPG Indy Car series, the Firestone Indy Lights series features a single engine, a normally aspirated Buick V-6 and identical Lola T93/20 chassis. With equally matched engines and chassis, driver ability is the principle factor in deciding the outcome of the race. As a sponsor of the PPG/Firestone Indy Lights series, PPG is helping to contribute to the long-term future of Indy Car racing. In 1991, PPG's Automotive Refinsh Group became a major co-spon- sor of the Indy Lights series and the PPG "Spectacular Finish" award was established. This annual award of $10,000 cash prize goes to the owner who displays the best use of color and design on his race car. In addition, $10,000 is awarded by PPG's Automotive Refinish Group to the Indy Lights PPG Refinish Rookie Of The Year. All Indy Lights cars wear tough urethane finishes by PPG, eye-catch- ing colors from PPG's Bright and Bold palette.  9t,CStrL73b              6
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Automotive OEM Products (Original Equipment Manufacturer) PPG Industries leads the world in the manufacture, technology, servicing and supply of coatings to the automotive industry. Our OEM products include pre- treatment chemicals, adhesives and sealants, primer surfacers and topcoats, as well as, electrodeposition primers used to protect metal car bodies from corro- sion. Our major trademarks include UNIPRIME electrodeposition coatings, ENVIRACRYL powder coatings, BPR body panel reinforcing adhesives, CHEMFOS pretreatment chemicals, ENVIROBASE waterborne topcoats and DIAMOND COAT clearcoats. PPG automotive products provides a full line of products and services into 19 countries around the world, serving all major automotive producers head- quartered in North America, Europe and Asia/Pacific. Our products provide protection and decorative appearance to fulfill the range of customer require- ments on luxury sports cars to heavy duty trucks. PPG was the first coatings producer with the ability to fully test products prior to introduction and current- ly have two application facilities in North America and one operating in Europe. PPG also pioneered the "satellite service" facility concept that locates facilities close to the customers manufacturing site to provide "just-in-time" delivery, customer service and quality assurance. Automotive Refinish Products Automotive Refinish Products supplies a full range of surface preparation, primers, topcoats, clearcoats and associated products to the automotive after- market for the repair and refinishing of vehicles. Our color pallet includes more than 90,000 colors covering virtually every vehicle model manufactured over the past 70 years. Our major trademarks are DELTRON acrylic urethane coat- ings, CONCEPT air dry coatings, DELSTAR acrylic enamels, DELTA fleet coatings, and DURETHANE polyurethane coatings. The Refinish Products business unit is managed regionally with a broad range of distribution and training centers, and a large sales force and distributor base. The products are sold to distributors who in turn sell to body shops, new and used car dealers, and fleet operators. Lti£S'vLZb
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PPG Industries, Inc. Automotive Products 19699 Progress Drive Strongsville, Ohio 44136
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e / INDY LIGHTSw C H A M P 1 0 N S H I P PowEawav BUICK rr.•r. :•rr.wr INS INDY WNTS 04AMMMsHP MIEs =NMLE Event Date March 5 April 2 April 9 April 23 June 4 June 11 June 25 July 16 July 23 August 20 September 3 September 10 RB:sg •Released at Mid-Ohio 8/14/94 Event Location Miami, Florida Phoenix, Arizona Long Beach, California Nazareth, Pennsylvania Milwaukee, Wisconsin Detroit, Michigan Portland, Oregon Toronto, Ontario, Canada Cleveland, Ohio Loudon, New Hampshire Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Monterey, California /NO!'CAR TRAVlL, 1395 Wheaton Ave. • Suite 700 • Troy, MI 48083-1967 .(810) 528-3470 • Fax (810) 528-8119 Your officiai Travel Agency 800-274-2278
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Ra 7994deL a*71 The race event and ESPN broadcast schedules for the 1994 PPG-Firestone Indy Lights Championship, powered by Buick, reach thousands of people on 12 race weekends throughout North America while millions more view the action at home. Your company can be part of this Road to Indy. April 10 Phoenix International Raceway, Phoenix, Ariz. (75 miles, 75 laps, 1-mile oval course) April 17 Texaco System 3 Challenge, Long Beach, Calif. (74.730 miles, 47 laps, 1.59-mile temporary road course) June 5 Milwaukee Mile, Milwaukee, Wis. (75 miles, 75 laps, 1-mile oval course) June 12 Belle Isle, Detroit, Mich. (75.6 miles, 36 laps, 2. 1-mile temporary road course) June 26 Portland International Raceway, Portland, Ore. (76.05 miles, 39 laps, 1.95-mile road course) July 10 Burke Lakefront Airport, Cleveland, Ohio (75.808 miles, 32 laps, 2.369-mile temporary road course) July 17 Canadian National Exposition, Toronto, Canada (74.76 miles, 42 laps, 1.78-mile temporary road course) August 14 Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, Lexington, Ohio (75.55 miles, 33+ laps, 2.25-mile road course) August 21 New Hampshire International Speedway, Loudon, N.H. (75.118 miles, 71 laps, 1.058-mile oval course) September 4 Pacific Place, Vancouver, Canada (75.808 miles, 46 laps, 1.648-mile temporary road course) September18 Pennsylvania International Raceway, Nazareth, Pa. (75 miles, 75 laps, 1-mile oval course) October 9 Laguna Seca Raceway, Monterey, Calif. (75.276 miles, 34 laps, 2.214-mile road course) All Indy Lights events will be televised on a tape delayed basis on ESPN and distributed on ESPN International. T,restone Terestene 0 a 0 19941ND r L/GHTS CHAMPI01 WS AWARDS The 1994 PPG-Firestone Indy Lights Champion's awards package is one of the most lucrative in all of motorsports. In addition to $20,000 in cash, the winner also receives a new Buick passenger car and the use of a 1995 Indy Car chassis through the Lola Indy Car Award. The 1994 series champion is also eligible for the $100,000 Firestone Indy, Car Bonus which is designed to-Yurther assist the driver in the move up to Indy Car competition. Bryan Herta, the 1993 Indy Lights champ, receives his Lola lndy Car Award for the 1994 season (bottom) from (left to right) Indy Lights Chairman U.E. "Pat" Patrick, Indy Lights President Roger Bailey and Lola Cars Chairman Eric Broadley. i ILIrirestone INDY LIGHTS C H A M P I 0 N S H I P POWERED BY Bt1ICK . ` %MMeM. .MMMM% ~
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7~e .44cd,ietcef 1The PPG-Firestone Indy Lights Championship, powered by Buick, is annually targeted to an ever increasing national audi- ence made up of prime consumers in North America's top markets. MARKET ANALYSIS LOCATION Phoenix, Ariz. MARKETS - POPULATION 9 - 2,677,740 ADI 20 Long Beach, Calif. 12 - 14,899,000 2 Milwaukee, Wis. 11 - 12,970,700 3 Detroit, Mich. 17 - 14,258,344 8 Portland, Ore. 9 - 2,609,140 27 Cleveland, Ohio 9 - 16,027,000 11 Toronto, Canada NA - 9,546,200* NA Lexington, Ohio 9 - 16,027,000 9 Loudon, N.H. 11 - 13,218,000 6 Vancouver, Canada NA - 3,044,200* NA Nazareth, Pa. 13 - 27,981,000 1 Monterey, Calif. 10 - 5,781,360 5 `Source: 1992 World Almanac CONSUMER PROFILE GENDER Male 69.3% EDUCATION Non-High School Grad, 3.9% Female 30.7% High School Grad. 28.4% Some College 31.9% AGE College Grad or 35.4% Under 21 5.7% Post Grad Degree 21 - 29 28.8% No Answer .4% 30-39 32.1% 40 - 49 20.2°!0 MARITAL STATUS 50+ 12.8% Single 38.5% No Answer .4% Married 54.1 % Divorced/Widowed 7,4% INCOME Under $15,000 4.6% $15,000 - $24,999 10.2% $25,000 - $34,999 16.9% $35,000 - $49,999 22.3% $50,000 - $74,999 22.3% $75,000 16.0% No Answer 7.7% IN ® Sandy Brody and his pit crew celebrate a win in the season-opening race at Phoenix International Raceway last year (top), while the battle between race winner Franck Freon (3), Fredrik Ekblom (11) and Greg Moore (99) at Portland was a highlight of the season (bottom). Phoenix, Portland and 10 other major North American markets will once again host PPG- Firestone Indy Lights races in 1994. 12 rirestone INDY LIGHTS C H G. M P 1 0 N S H I P POWERED BY $uICK '. %.Y: .r: .%'e."V
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rrrr.-rrrr.-. C H A M P I 0 N S H I P POWERED By B111C1{ 1993 INDY LIGHTS EVENT ATTENDANCE EVENT ATTENDANCE Phoenix, Arizonia 95,000 Long Beach, California 226,000 Milwaukee, Wisconsin 110,000 Detroit, Michigan 160,000 Portland, Oregon 132,000 Cleveland, Ohio 139,000 Toronto, Canada 160,000 Loudon, New Hampshire 58,000 Vancouver, Canada 164,000 Lezington, Ohio 156,000 Nazareth, Pennsylvania 63,000 Monterey, California 110,000 TOTAL: 1,573,000 AVERAGE/RACE: 131,083 Figures are based on a three-day estimate for all 12 events. -4 .P1 ~ Souce: Championship Auto Racing Teams, Inc. w cn N 12/13/93 IHVrest,¢ reAVCL.- r395 Wheaton Ave. - Suite -00 • Troy, Michigan 48083 •(810) 528-3470 • Fax (810) 528-8119 ,,our Offics Travei Agency 800-274-2278
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7ke 7/tw%4tef The Lola Buick GS Indy Lights car is the series first new design since the introduction of the original March-based chassis in 1986. Designed to be the standard "spec" chassis of the PPG-Firestone Indy Lights Championship, powered by Buick, for at least three years, the car employs the latest in motor racing technology and safety standards. CHASSIS Flat-bottom (no "ground effects") carbon and aluminum honey- comb composite monocoque conforming to FISA crash testing regulations. Wheelbase of 111" is only a few inches shorter than a regulation Lola Indy Car. TIRES Firestone's 15" Firehawk racing radial, in both oval and road course versions, are used on all competing Indy Lights. The tires are wide: 10" up front and 14" in the rear. The low profile 30 and 35 series aspect ratios are at the cutting edge of today's high performance tire technology. This provides Indy Lights cars with precise and consistent high speed handling. ENGINE For the ninth consecutive year, the Buick V-6 returns as the series "spec" engine. Producing 425 horsepower, the engines are sealed to prevent modification by competitors who lease the motors from the series. Engines are equipped with Bosch spark plugs. BDDYWORK Durable composite panels precision jigged to ensure proper fit and uniformity of replacement parts. Each car features a dis- tinctive line of paints provided exclusively by PPG Refinishes. TRANSMISSION Lola "slimline" cast-magnesium integral transmission/bellhous- ing with standard Hewland 5-speed internals. DIMENSIONS Front Track: 68" Maximum width: 79" Rear Track: 63" Maximum height: 37.5" Wheelbase: 111" Weight: 1,4001bs. Bodywork width: 52" _.~..~....~....._ The new Lola Buick GS Indy Lights chassis was a major contributor to the renewed popularity of the Indy Lights Championship in 1993. Competitors from around the world are once again expected to take up the challenge of the PPG-Firestone Indy Lights Championship in 1994. Here eventual 1993 cham- pion Bryan Herta (16) and Pedro Chaves (2) put their Lola lndy Lights cars through their paces on the New Hampshire oval in 1993. ' M 'Firestone INDY LIGHTS ~ ~ C H A M P 1 O N S H I P W Cn POWERED BY $ujCK Cu w%ti,.%%%w.V
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1,12- Tirestone C H A M P 1 0 N S H I P POWERED BY $LjjCK Roger Bailey, President 1395 Wheaton Ave., Suite 700 Troy, Mich. 48083 Mike Clark, Marketing Adam Saal, Media 3000 Pacific Ave. Long Beach, Calif. 90806 Jim Michaelian, Executive Producer 3000 Pacific Ave. Long Beach, Calif. 90806

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