Jump to:

Lorillard

America's Oldest Tobacco Company Celebrates Its 200th Anniversary Lorillard

Date: 03 Apr 1960
Length: 20 pages
88121161-88121180
Jump To Images
snapshot_lor 88121161-88121180

Fields

Author
Gruber, L.
Type
NEWS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLE
ADVE, ADVERTISEMENT
PHOT, PHOTOGRAPH
Area
LEGAL DEPT FILES/BASEMENT GMP
Alias
88121161/88121180
Site
G29
Named Person
Cobb, I.S.
Cohan, G.M.
Cramer, M.J.
Crosby, B.
Davidson, G.W.
Davies, G.O.
Dawley, M.E.
Dorsey
Gruber, L.
Henderson, D.A.
Hoffman, G.A.
Kent, H.A.
Lardner, R.
Lorillard, G.
Lorillard, P.
Lorillard, P., I.V.
Michener, J.
Parmele, H.B.
Petty
Schreder, H.X.
Searle, F.G.
Sinatra, F.
Tarkington, B.
Temple, H.F.
Waring, F.
Whiteman, P.
Yellen, M.
Date Loaded
28 Apr 1999
Document File
88121094/88121314/P. Lorillard Company Appln. For Registration of Trademark 'kent' Extra Copies of Some Exhibits to Affidavit of 691216
Named Organization
Adventures in Paradise
All Star Golf
Bethlehem Steel
Board of Directors
Bourbon Street Beat
Colgate Palmolive
Cumberland Univ
Diamond Match
Diamond Natl
Distributors Group
Eastman Chemical Products
Factory Management + Maintenance
Federal Paper Board
Federal Tin
Hermetite
Hershey Chocolate
Interstate Container
Lever Brothers
Lord + Taylor
Lorillard Magazine
Ny Botanical Gardens
Ny Daily Advertiser
Original Amateur Hour
Reynolds Metals
Ripleys Believe It or Not
Shell Chemical
Strawberry Hill Press
Supreme Court
Tiec, Executive Comm(TI)
Tn Eastman
20th Century Fox Film
Abc Tv
Litigation
Nyag/Produced
Author (Organization)
Lor, Lorillard
Ny Times
Brand
Century
Egyptian Deities
Embassy
Helmar
Kent
Murad
Newport
Old Gold
Sailors Delight
Spring
UCSF Legacy ID
xeq00e00

Document Images

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size:

Page 1: xeq00e00
Advertisement LEWIS GRUBER was born in NewYorktity.and reared'inDollas, Texas. He received a law,degree at Tennessee's CumberlandUniversity, then switched from, law to sell- ing. Getting his first jqb with Lorillord in 1922, he rose steadily through therank's until August,.1956when he was eMmed PresidbnEt of the company, Now. Chairman of the Board (since 1958); h'ee remains executivee head of Lbrillard and,, as one biog- rapher puts it, "a crack salesman whose single,, all+consuming passion is tobacco." WtmN A countty; or a company reaches the age of'20d, most people would agree that it has' earned something special in the way of a birthday party:,We at the P' Lorillard Company certainly think so. Although our natioci s bicentennial will not come until 1976, we are celebrating our own right now. For it was in 1760 -16 years before the Revolution-that Pierre Lorillard opened a modest tobacco "manufactory" in New York and thus started what is now the oldest tobacco com- pany on earth. This special Sunday' magazine section is designed! to tell you something of Lorillgrd at 200, and of how we attained that respectable age. Our '7ongevity secret" is simple enough: for 200 years we have supplied fine tobacco products to a publie that knows and appreciates good smoking.. But that is only half of our biithday'story. The other half is that, even at 200, we have no patience with old ways of doing things just because they are o1d; Instead, we place a premium on finding new and f~~~ ~ better ways. In the past few years alone we have learned many new things about "YQ~ \~/®!rQ 'J00 the very foundations of our business-tobaoco blends, filters, paper, flavorings., vw7! ~~ v v~~++ And from these have come cigarettes which have set new standards for the entire industiy. ' ®~~ ~~®y ~ The reeord speaks for itself, Of the Lorillard cigarette brands' whose labels are ~.6 i1i E~d reproduced on this' page, not one existed'i ten years ago. True, today's vastly, improved OLD COLDS-Straights and Spin Filters-carry on a name popular as ~~ Iy g far back as 1926. But these new OLD GOLDS, along' with &EN'f, NEWPORT and d66/!/iAAL i~1'! , SPRING, are the direct result of wartime and postwar research which convinced''-- ~_ ~a# bettur c~ ~es~be made -and that Lorillard should make-them• ---- The outcome has been headline news unancial section.. by Lewis Gruber Understandably, I am proud of~ my own part in all this. But Lorillard's success CNAiRMAN OF THE BOARD aN,vays has come from team effort• Today'we have,approximately 7,000 employees, AND CHIEF EXECUTIVF OFFICER ' more than 32,000 stockholders and some 1,500,000 retail outlots servicedd by 6,000 " P. LORILLARD COMPANY - wholesalers. Each off these.e is a'member, of the LOIillardd team. From the newest factory hand to the rnost' seasoned executive,, from the streamlined supermarket: to the crossroads store, each contributes a definite,,measurable share to the total team effort. As we round out our second century, I salute everg man and woman associated with Lorillard and say, "Well done! Now, shall we try for three?" . I also salute the great and' growing public which now buys Lorillard products at the rate of nearly half a billion dollars' worth a year. Without v,ou there wonld be no 200th~birthday-indeed, no Lorillard. So this magazine is one way'of saying "°Thanks!" By showing you what lies behind your favorite Lorillard smoke, we hope to give you added reason for appreciating Loriihrrd quality. There are seven articles on the following pages. The first (page 6)'tells the history of the P.ILorillard Company, with special emphasis oni the striking postwar devel- opments I mentioned. Next you will learn how we manufacture cigarettes in the world's most modem plant (page 9). Because research is the keystone of our "new look," there is a photo report just on'that (page 11). The way we make our products available and~ bring them to the public's attention is described'. in articles on mer. chandising (page 13)',and advertising (page 14). Next comes the story'ofLori.llard's expanding overseas operation (page 17). Finally, there is a look ahead into Lorillard's third'century,'(page 19). I hope you will find all this material both inter- esting and~ informative. One more2hought. If by any chance you haven't tried a Lorillard prodbet'lately;, right now-on our birthday-is a good time to learn how muchyou've been missing! w. KENT „ 3 ' 88121163 TFis..d.ertisins suPP4ement va rpunsored,PaP-d .nd ceyrriyhtsd bT P. Lbrill.rd'ComPanr„171o•. ' 3
Page 2: xeq00e00
LORILLARD YESTERDAY: The old stone snaffmill.ased by Peter and George L'oril(ard still stands imThe New York$otanicol Garden:.Here an earfyscene isre-enacteds for a company, film. V ~ere's How It 1111 escran . . . From a simple "manufactory," Lorillard has grown up with America IvxrtE Yens 1760, in the bustling little city of New York, a very young man started a very small tobacco business-and inadvertently founded an industrial empire. - His name was Pierre Lorillar& and he was a.. French Huguenot. His family'onee lived in Porren- truy, Switzerland, but Pierre was born at Montbe- liard,,across the border in France. Like many others before and since, he left home seeking freedom of wnrship-first' in Holland, then in America. Appar- ently he traveled with his father. He was still a bay when he 6rstcame ashore on Manhattan Island. And when he set himself up as a tobacconist there, he .vas just 18. Though young;, Pierre went about his business with mature thoroughness. He bought his leaf care- fully, in person. Though snuff could be made simply by rubbing tobacco through a grater, he iiistalled' grinding stones because they'gave far better results. He developed or acquired'recipes for a cvide variety' of popular snuffs, which soon attracted' imitators. He pioneered the idea of putting up snuff in tanned animal bladders to keep it fresh, (Later, glass Lorillard snuff jars were to becomecollector's items.) Offering products of "the best' quality and flavor," the young immigrant asked only that critical New Yorkers verify his claim for themselves.,That many did'is,attcsted by the fact that his tobacco business is the orrly one from that period to have survived. The business Pierre pieked, was a risky one, but' Pierre married and fathered fi've sons, Then, only there was no doubt of its potential market. 1bough 34;, he was cut down by a Hessian's bullet in the man's enjoyment of tobacco had begun with t11e Revolution. To his nnirlolv oes credit'formaintain- Ltdi,ms of the illewVl'orld, the later white settlersg , who c•ultivated it were rarely privilhged'~tosavonthe inGthe business until the two oldest ' beys,Peter and Geor oe, could'take over. h d h snuff an pipe tobacco w ie then were its usual end-prodncts. The reason was simplt;,the leaf'went tii England. and most of it stayed there.- A little rc•-crossed the Atlantic for "the best peopln," but mast enlonists had to process their own or rely on small local "manufnctories:" It was one of the latter that Picrre Lorillard undertook to establish in a shop on the IliLli Road to Boston-later ChathamiStroct, and now Park Row. 4 Vl'ithi Pierrc's'sons his modest enterprise'entered a new phase. The young United States had ailimit'- less future, and the Lorillardk were determined to share in it: Inventive as well as ambitious, in 1787 they began ASnerica's first known tobacco advcrtis ing campaign (see page 14); Five years later, expand- ing trade forced them to move their main iplant' to the banks of the Bronx River, in what now is northern 3 ~ LORLLiARD TODAY: The company's new.factary at Greensboro, - Pm~
Page 3: xeq00e00
New York City. There they set up a wooden ~ snuff mill=one of the nation's first uses of industrial water power. There, too, they set a precedent in labor relations by giving a farm to each of their workmen. Later the, wooden mill was replaced by a much larger fieldstone structure (photo left); which was the center of Lorillard's increasingly varied output until'it, too, was outgrown. The use of tobacco has gone through several cycles, and im the early 1800s the vogue for snuff began to wane. (Ultimately Lorillard stopped making iti) Its place in favor was taken by chewing tobacco, popularized by clipper-ship sailors who had'trouble keeping their pipes alight in a gale. Lorillard pro- duced ''"chewing" in many forms: loose, fine cub (also used in roll-your-own cigarettes); lump and plug. One of its early brands was named,, appropriately, SAILORS DELIGHT. Another meaningful brand was CENTURY, brought out in 1860 to mark the fiist' 100 years of continuous Lorillard: operation. By this time Pierre's sons had been ~ laid' to rest and a new generation was at the helm. Business kept gro-wing, and in 1875 Lorillard's production facilities weie brought together in what was then America's largest tobacco factory. Located in Jersey City, N. J.,, it stood seven stories high, covered' more than two city blocks and employed upward of 3,000 workers, many of' them women who wore long dresses with bustles as they wfapped and packed Lorillard prod- ucts for shipment all over the country. In line with the traditional Lorillard standion labor relations, the factory offered such progressive features as baby- sitters for women workers, an 8,000-volume libraryy for all employees, a school that could'take 350 of their ehildren-all' paid' for by the company. Cigars began to move up in popular favor, and Lorillard continued to lead the nation in plug- tobacco sales. Plug was the center of Lorillard's ex}~ubiY-the only one representing manufactured tobacco in the U. S: at tlie 1893 Chicago World's Fair. Partly because of its position in this field, the company was able to retain its corporate identity when it joined the nation-wide tobacco trust in the mid-'90s. And when the Supreme Court dissolved the trust in 1911, Lorillard got back the right to more than 200 trademarks. Among them were famous brands of cigars (such as MURIEL), little cigars (VAN BIBBER; BETWEEN THE ACTS )~ and'. that rela- tively new vehicle for smoking pleasure, the ciga- rette.. In a sense„ the cigarettee hadl slipped into the market while other products, backs were turned. Though pre-Columbian Indians smoked! tobacco rolled in corn wrappers„the use of'paper for.vrap- ping ca ne much litter and spread slowly:,Popular in the Near East'in the early 1800s, it gradually caught on in Europe and America. The advent of modern machinery made cigarettes more generally available, but their Levantine origin lingered'on. For decades the U. S. preference was for so-called Tnirkish ciga- rettes, made with a large percentage of highly aro- matic Turkish tobacco. Lorillard entered the cigarette field later than some„but moved ahead quickly. Soon after the dis- solution of the tobacco trust; the company-with such brands as MURAD, HELMAEi and EGYPTIAN DEITIES' -was producing nearly 80 per cent of the Turkish cigarettes made in America. Then came World War I, and suddenly Turkish tobacco was virtually unobtainable. Other compa= nies turned to so-called blended cigarettes, using only a minimum~of Turkish. Lorillard marked time, hoping to regaiinits prcwar position1 after the Armi- stice. But bit by bit it became evident that the public had'veered once more: blends had taken over.. Lorillard pondered the situation long and care- fully. To meet the competitionhead-on would'take more than "just another cigarette." Thus it was that the company entered the blended field with a shrewd eye for catching public interest as well as offering a top-notch smoke. The year was 1926. The brand was Advertisement OLD GOLD. The attention-getting devico was a "blindfold test" whereby smokers from coast to eoast't were invited to compare unnamed blends and'.state their preferenee: Overwhelmingly, that preference was for OLD GOLD: Off, to a fast start, OLD COLD within a few years was : solidly' established among the best-selling blends. Meanwhile Lorillard'was pioneering the use of laboratory research (see page 10) to make a good cigarette even better. OLD GOLD ~ became the first cigarette ever wrapped in ccllophane to lock air out and flavor in, and the first to be blended with aro- matie Latakia tobacco from the eastern, Ivlediter- ranean ("Something, new has been added"). Other,Lorillard brands also were thriving. The depression years saw merited popularity for SENSATION; a low-priced cigarette, and RIPPLE, a tobacco made especially for roll-your-own smokers. UNIONLEADER.and other smoking tobaccos made steady gains. Lorillard cigars sold well. Chewing tobacco stayed popular with many users.. As king-size cigarettes began to appear, Lorillard rode the trend'with a new brand, EMBASSY. Winning great popularity overseas„ EMBASSY eventually was taken outof the domestic market entirely (see page 17)', and replaced with king-size OLD GOLD: - And'. L.orilldcrd kept expanding. No longer a lone colossus, the Jersey City factory was augmented by facilities in states from Connecticut to Wisconsin. Approaching its 200th~amliversary, the P Lorillar& Company could look back on a remarkable r~cordi Like America it5elf„ the firm had grown beyond Pierre Lorfflard's wildest dreams. But more, much more„lay ahead. It began as a cloud' no bigger than a cigarette's tip. It grew into KENT, the cigarette with~ the famous "Micronite" filter, With Lorillard leading the way; the:h~Yswitch to filters began. And it still is gping on. For the KENT story-and what happened next-turn the page N.: C., is.the heart of torillard's manudacturing activityand Americo'smost modern cigarette plant. At peak copacity.itlcan,produce moreJhan 10e'mil0ion cigarettes in one elphr-hourshlh.. 5
Page 4: xeq00e00
HOW IT BEGAN, continued PACRAGE 'With KENT, Lorillard PRI~lTERS FO~i GII LE te.~ ~"• ' Y Y YY ic.~ STRAWBERRY HILL PRESS is serving such leading buyers of package printing as LORILLARD„LEVER BROTHERS„ COLCATiE•PALMOLIVE and HERSIIEYCHOCOLATE CORP. . WI'c tiattery of 5- and 7- ~, _ igravure presscs and' 5-color Cottrell Rotaries„ Strawberry Hill prints millions of labels, wraps, soft packs and' package inserts daily. A coorrl irtcted plnrc o f quaL it}!Controf. is your insur-artce n f satisf action. S Craflsrrterrship t in Cravure and LetterpresJ.'* Tbis beauti full,y illustrated arud' infbrrnative booklet r,uill be sent to tleosemho request it' on their brcsf,ess letterhead. S'I'RA4V'SERRY I-3ILL P?-T-~fi'..•'..~S. INC. 2'.a'2L VAh A-. I1nn,. f..,.nd Cty I. New Y~ork.. 2A-n..,n.1 'l 6b03 BsI~I~„~.r /rcCm„mnmi~n• tif.Lw„ T onAY,whenKENTisknown the world over as the pre- ferred smoke of millions, i6 is hard to remember when filter- tip cigarettes made up less than 1 per cent of UI S. pro- duction. That was true only nine years ago. Then KENT was born, and with it a smok- ing revolution. Lorillard s decision to enter the filter field! was based on keen observation. American smokers were growing filter- conscious. In Europe, filter-tip cigarettes already were selling strongly and the'trend seemed certain to cross the Atlantic. No filter then available in the U. S. had become an impor taa factor in the industry: A filter cigarette with a really good taste ought to be just what the public was looking for. The search for such a filter began. Nothing suitable ap- peared. Then one day a report on asubstaneeused too screen out'radioactive dust in atomic plhnts came to Lorillard"s at'« tention. Of obvious value in America's war cffort, it onlyy now was being declassified for civilian use. Maybe itcould be adapted for cigarettes? Lorillard moved fast to get hold of a sample. Laboratory tests showed that the material would indeed make an ideal filter for a cigarette that smok- ers could enjoy. And ~ because, it actually removed from thee smoke particles as small as, two-tenths of a micron, (2/10,000 of' a millimeter), it was named "AZicronite." Rlith that„Lorill ard decidedi on a secret gamble. Known as Project 7-11, this involved' many months of work on the filter, on papers on tollacco blends and flavorings. No group concerned! knew what the others were up toq, thosee testing trial blends for taste,, for example, knew neither what they were smoking nor why. Even when everythingg was brought to the degree of perfection insisted on by top management', rigid secrecy' was maintained. Private,hotel rooms, were rented for draft- ing the first advertisements of KENT (inamed for H'. A, Kent,, formcr President and Chair- man of~ the Board of Lorillard). Wholesalers were persuaded to buy- it eight' unscon,- on Lorillard's reputation alone. Retailers were alerte& to a new, premium-pricedcigarette but given no details. Finally in ~ March, 1952 KENT was un- veiled. The verdict was im- mediate: Project 7-11 had won its gamble, and the revolirtion was on. KENT's first year was a dra- matic success, and soon other tobacco companies: leaped onto the filter bandwagon. But they offeredl their brands at popular priee.. Meanwhile a rash of anti-cigarette propa- ganda was', breakiitg out; con- fusing the public as to thee relative merits of any brand. KENT began to lose momen- turn. What saved the day was a new management team - in- stallcd! in August; 1956andi headed by Lewis Gi~uber- which was convinced that! KENT could'come back strong- ly if its price were made com• petitive. Virtually the first move of the new management {1' FEW LOfi!L.fp^,;,D"FI:STS'• 1760: PierrA iorrihrd';"menufactary" lawcisrs the U: S: tobacco industry. 7i37:Aacr:cc's first to~>^.rco advert%ing.is rvn bythe lbrillards. 12.'.OS: Theloriliard t+n tog on.plCg tobacco sets-tradcmoxk preoedent foniha indu5ry, 18°`?s:':o•iU!crd p'c-•ers in ocdcrnleSor re!eelcns. 1976: Counc:~:ny O.D6C/D; ll;re!lord nfFer: t'no flrst:ci'csorette fi7:t,ceRophane .. . ~. „ ~r.. rt+.ar'aca. c, .. , . +i:c , ....,. roen;~ fca ;vper . 1952: vF•-.%,th.•.he'•,V,~_' idter, is,born. 1t ., c.rcJ .as1's:^ cigarefle foctcry. iOJ<l. \'J'~. a9a- rdits.fas 881Z1166 Advertisement Set New Records ~ ~ 1KErT~AE.T E T , ,L. , ENT.1.E T'IY ~ ~ ..- > TIkENTi kE'NT KENT1 C IT 'L T~ .-~,. V. .., .. -..-.. ,_ .. .. . .. .. t. -%=- sil., _!~, PUBLIC ENTHUSIASM for KENT with the "Micronife"fller produces scenes like this. Men.and women ~aliike respond to KENT's good taste. was to cut KENT's price. Its sales volume ttiplod within ten months. The year 1956 also saw the once-mighty Jersey City, faa tory close, replaced!by a superb modern plant in Greensboro, N. C. (see photo on preceding pages): There, with expanded facilities, an intensive research program was begun to develop new Lorillard produc(s and improve existing ones. Not even KENT was spared. Ex- haustive study showed tliat KENT, good"as it was, could be made even better. The ordr:r was given: "Do itl"The result appeared just in time to be in- cludedlin a comparative study by a national magazine of all the leading filter cigarettes. By the rigorous standards of the study itself', KENT emerged as the brand! most deserving of commendation in the pub- li$hed report. Wh;d followediwas a stam- pvd'e . to ~ KENT (photo above), Owtheheels of this triumph, Lorillard research has per- fi!cted other cigarette brands in rapiilifire succession: OLD COLD~STRAICIITS (non-filter)J. OLD. GnLD SPIN FILTER, NEwPORT' (nvithr a "hint of - - - * ~ ' KE t I, h a ~.,., ; lK r,T~.KE• _ ,t. mint");, SPRING (the "air-con- ditioned" cigarette):All'caught on-for the public increasingly is aware of just how much Lorillard research can db to increase smoking pleasure. In 1958 the company moved its New York headiluarters office to a handsome new build- ing,aC200 East 42nd Street. In this modern structure - offi• cially named the Lorillard Btulding,- executive and re- lated functions now are car- ried out with ever greater effi- ciency. blaving sold ntost of it3 cigar brands to concentrate on cig- arettes„ Lorillard today still' makes BETWEEN THE ACTS and MADISON! little cigars, BRIGGS, UNION LEADER, INDIA HOUSE and FRIENDS smoking tobaccos, BEECH- NUT, BAGPIPE and'~ HAVANA IILOBSOmchewing tobaccos and even two old Turkish ~ friends, MURAD and HELNtAP., Thus, except' for snuff, the P. Lorillard Company maintains the product variety of its long past. Its,manufacturing meth, . ods, hoa•every are noticeably different. Tosee how Lorillard cigarettes are made today, turn the page. ~_ 6
Page 5: xeq00e00
Teamwork That Produced Lorlllard's Outstanding Filters How Lorillard and Eastman Combined Research Forces to Find the Answer to a Challenging Problem .1 ':M.~a... a:., ,v.ii-i. _.,... _.._.;:... . .. . . ,.:...-.. .. _ CELLULOSE ACETATE TAKES FORM byy being "spun th'ot is,, eattvdedi., from solution into the.individual filaments which make.vp Estron filter tow., Advertisement ~Axi.y in the 1950s Lorillard'~ decided to launch an all-out offensive #o find the cigarette filters that would best meet their needs. Fully realizing thatTennessee Eastman Company and its marketing affiliate, Eastman Chemical Products, Inc:,, were leading, specialists in the manufacture utci tieveiopment ut Ogarette Eilters; ll,uriilard technicians joinedl torces with Eastman's Research and! Development tow in this filter is manufactured espe- cially for Lorillard - by Eastman - to Lorillard specifications and only Lorillard new filter f'or KENT cigarettes: After- exhaustive research; Lorilliird had devel- oped'an outstandingly unique filter. The staff in 1954.. Shortly after that! date, Eastman sent Lorillard the first samples of filters made from Estron tow, a special cellulose ace- tate filter tow, patented by Easttnan.. The close cooperation that followed between Lorillard and Eastman technical staffs led to the subsequent development and adoption of a special grade of Estron filter tow for OLD COLD FILTER ciga- rettes in July, 1955. Simultaneously, joint experimental work also began~on the development of a uses this tow. At this point„further steps are taken by Lorillard to physically manipulate this tow to prodt,ce the out', standing filters for which Lorillard is famous throughout the industry. In 1957, Lorillard developed another set of specifications of Eastman Estron tow for NEWPORT filter cigarettes. Since the first' association~ with Lorillard, Eastman Research and Devel-. opment staffs have cooperated! closely with Lorillard research departments to attain Lorillard objectives for various types of filters. In particulars in recent years, this work has concentrated on, and has resulted in; the development of the unique filters which Lorillard now employs in~ all its filter brands. This close teamwork, over the past seven years, between Lorillard' and Eastman~ has resulted in research tri- umphs for both sides - and a healthy gro.xtiv in the national sales popularity for KENT. OLD GOLD FILTERS, and NEWl'ORT FILTER CIGARETTES:. 7
Page 6: xeq00e00
Advertisement From The Good Earth To You The manufacture of a Lorillard cigarette is a painstaking process requiring time, complex machines-and dedication - --~ Ho>:.D A Lorillard cig- arette arette in your hand, look at it, sniff its naturali fragrance pon- , ~- --- -- - ° ~ ~ der the pleasure it gives, Does it seem a:small an&simple article? Small; yes -but to place it in your fingers took years of time, the dedicated labor of many men an& women, and some of the most complicated machinery to be found anywhere. The time period starts with the planting of the tobacco seed in: warm soil. Roughly four months later the mature leaf is cut, then cured for several! ~~•eeks. Lorillard leaf is of four main types: Virginia or, Bright (flue-cured);, Burley an& Maryland (both air-cured) and Turkish or Greek. When ready for market, the domestic leaf is soldat auction in huge warehouses located in the growing regions-chiefly Virginia, the Okrolinas and Georgia (for flue-cured) and Maryland, Kentucky and Tennessee (for air- cured): Lorillard scouts visit each warehouse a week or so before the auction begins. Picking up samples of the leaf to-be sold, they rush these to the company laboratories. There they go through eight separate tests for composi*';ott (s.icotine„nitrogen and the like) and quality. Result: an exeell8nt idea of which will meet Lorillard's precisely planned needs. Once the leaf has been bought, it goes to the stemmery(for all Lorillard'.production facilities, see box on opposite page). Here the stems are removed from all leaves, which then are "prized" into 900- pound'.hogsheads„sealed an&shippe&to a storage warehouse to age. Aging is the biggest time factor in making your cigarette. Two years is the average period, though it may run higher. During aging, the leaf loses its "green smell~7 and acquires the familiari natural to- bacco aroma• Its chemical composition also changes for the better, as exemplified by a reduction in nicotine. Once manufacturing begins, the time element speeds up and machinery comes into play. The best place to see the latter at its most'modern is Lorillard's huge new factory in Creensboro, N. C., where the photos on these and the next'two pages were taken. The Greensboro plant was opened in.19o"6. Costing $13 miilion, it is the largest privately financed project Ie.+.:.o .r...._-,,.r..w THE BEST LEAF is the only kind bought,by Lorillard: After rrpeningiab'oveJ It is sold at auctions from July (Georgia area) through January (KentuckyTennessee area): ever undertaken in North Carolina. It'is built on one levell this lets the tobacco move quickly andAirectly through every stage of processing, making, packing and shipping. Because tobacco is very sensitive too atmospheric changes, amautomatic?'climate control" systt>m regulates temperature and humidity in each FACTS AND F1GUIZiS ON LL)RiLl.A:1LZ'S Ga^cEEAfSB't>PO PLANT SIZE: Stretching nearly a fifth'ofamilealiong.U.Sh tiigh, CaNSUhSRTIi,7N: In a yearr thsplamt's stcamgeneratorsm wey 70, tSe plant covers 13 acres -of an EO-re p!otiunee enou_chigosto fi!l a tank.501feet in diameter and 10 wir{ch :reans room to grow„It3 core, the shiny making and miles Ieng ,,„andIhe air-conditioning system,usqs enough pc:cking, roo:n, hos as much.spoce ass three football flelks. ' refrigerotdon to maV,e about 120,000,000 paur.di. of ice.. OUTPUT: AtlpeaS;.ccpacity it con produce moret4'on100 LUi:CR TNM?: The ce`.etEria ;.rvea 20. -o!s a minute••. .~.r,.in.- eighe-hourshift-enough~to maked a: J.!-o.. vp~ ~,ich en~ actomatic d'iNwashor that can o!;n e 4,=-:0 m+ ,dong... hcnci!e S,cO:J ciSl:es anho~r. 88121268 section of the building: Because smokers' tastes can shift so rapidly(and because of the requirements of making regular, king-size and filter-tip cigarettes), there is maximum flexibility-that is, room for move- ment, alteration or replacement of'machinery abwill. Other feahtres include special laboratory areas,,am- ple office space, a streamlined' cafeteria and restful decor (even the machinery is an eye-soothing green), The only major cigarette factory of this design in the Uhited States, it was named one of the ten "Top Plants of 1950" by Factony Management and bfainte- nance magazine-the first time any tobacco4actory had been so~bonored: Tobacco ~ arrives at the Grcensboro ~ plant in its original hogsheads. Once it'entcrs the processing (or hl6nding) stage, handling becomes automatic. Until' finished cigarettes roll out ofl eachof'~the plant s mak- ing machines at a rate of more than 1,200 a minute, virtually every step -conditioning, blending, mixing,, dipping, spraying with humectant, bu]king, cutting, I 8
Page 7: xeq00e00
LORILLARD PRODUCTION t=•••ACILITIES MAIIUFACTL'RI f.G PLANTS: Greensboro,,N. C.JouisviIle; .Ky.;. Richmond, Va. (Ilttle cigars) ~ RESEARCHILABORATORiES:: Greensboro„N. C.; Louisville, Ky. LEAF•STORAGE WAREHOUSES: Louisvitle„Ky.; Richmond, Va.; L'erington;,Ky:.; Danville, Va.; Loncas!er; Pa.; Madison,.Wis.;. LaCrosse, Wis.; E'varsvflfie, Wis: STEMMERIES:.louisvi[Ie,.Ky.; Lexington, Ky.; Danville, Va. SUBSIDIARY; Federal Tin Co.,Inc.,Baltimore,Mds Stin~.paper- board and othenpockcging; PROPERLY AGED tobacco arrives.at Greensboro in its original hogsheods (above),, then iss removed for careful blending. BLENDED and moisturized to Loritlard requirements,.tobacco moves from casing dfum (above) to cutting, making machines. drying, flavoring, "fluffing," making, packing - is handled' by tnachincry, some of' it so complicated that it had' to be designed especially for Lorillard. Additionally, every step is guarded by automatic controls or recording devices to ensure uniform quality. A device called"Accuray" controls the indi: vidual cig;vette's weight. A "mechanical brain" even "feels" every cigarette„in groups of 20, to make sure the full count is there - and that each cigarette is firmly packed: When~yoLU natural-tobacco smoke leaves Greens- boro (or Lorillard's other cigarette-making plant at Louisvillc);, it has had painstaking care from the moment the seed was planted to the thoroughness with which,packing and shipping are supervisecl:,In. this o1•er-all l blendl of talent and dedication -which echoes the way the cigarette itself was made-there is one ingredient in which Lorillard takes special pridc: Its name is research. You will flnd more about it, on~thenext two pages. FILTER CIGARETTES-in this:case KENTS-come from the m~akimg machine joined at the tip, two by two-Cut apart, half of them are turned over by this automatic belt so that alll can be pack'ed painting the same woyi filter end up. OD GD N tU N N c0 PACKED AND READY for placement incartons,n finished cigarettess emerge in steady sequence onto: a conveyor belt. This partial Iview of.the making and packing area gives some idea of,the unbrokeasweeppf the Greensboro plant. 9
Page 8: xeq00e00
AdverfisemBnt .~. . .w.rn~.;a./.p~..._.. Research: LC > THREE DOZEN AT.ONCE.lbrilllarddesigned "smoking machine" takes onepuff a.minute-the averagesmok'er's rate-from eoch of J6cigarettes. Flasks collect small amounts of candensate-tSe "row material'." for basicreseatch on <igarette smoke. From scientific probing come dramatic tobacco discoveries e* ou CAN depend on Lorillard to be first with the ~fiuest', cigarettes-thrnuAli Lorillard research." This proacl': statement has had meaninfi since 1929, when Lorillard sotup its ownrescarch laboratory. That initial effort oceupied one room in a plant Lorillard thon had in Middletown, Ohio. It was sta(Fcell by one man. Space ancl' personnel grcw slowdy,-httt surely. . Then canie the big change in smokiiig„ heralded by l,orillard's breakthrough with uGNT in the filter- tip field. Almost overnight, research was in the spot- ligliti At Lorillard„it still!is there. Now filling more than seven laboratories in a special wing of the new Greensboro p]ant (4ugmentECl by a branch control laboratory in the Louisville factory), the Research t - ... - ........._' TITRIMETER is used to find ocid'andf'soponification values for the various Flavon constituents in cigarette srnoke. DISTILLATION APPARATUS serves mamy purposes. Somee of that above measures nitrogen in Lorillard leaf. I 10~
Page 9: xeq00e00
rillard's Special Ingredient i t .%~ EXACT HEAT oha burning cigarette is indicated'by a, thermocouple.(ab'ove) placed in the zone.of combustion: , Disision is mn.ing ahcacf on a non-stop program iti tleptli to leam,u.•er mure aliout evcrydhin}; that };acs, intn cigarettes and their smuke: And the prtt}{ram, wurks.'Vot only t;ENT (original and improvecl vcr- sinns) biq also OLD GOLD (straight and filtcrversions);, VERPORT ancl! SYRI\Gare the direct outgrowth of f basic work that was clbnc+ in Lorillarcl's laboratorie+. Lvrillard'roscarch covcrs thrco maiii areas. f1irst is contrrrl =tlic detailed :tnatlysis of every compuneut in cvcrything Lorillard makes, from the scc res of dilFcrc!nt tobaccos in its blcndh to the fla.coriiy,, humectants, paper„ink; cellbphane., even the compo- sitioncrf cart<rnsandl shippinl;,containers. Second is: sthtistical ytiulttycontiol-the precise, continuous tcstin}; of every Lorillard product to makc snrc4hat f.orillarcl's ezacting,st:utdarcls are bcing,mat. Third is 1nn•e and applied res¢arcl(-tlic prctbing search iutn the very nature of tobacco itkclf: its eaxtrcmcly c<xmplicuted cheinical makeup, the true natitrc ancl fnuctibn of tars and uicotiue in the smokc; the effects of every typv of filter on smoking taste, and much nnrc bosicles. The photographs bclbw show, sunx• of the aspects of Lorillstrcl research iwaction. What will Ix+ its nest clra nactic achievement? Wait ancl xce! ~. ~_, y.._ ~.. _,~ _ . ~......~..~.._...~,,.V...s.: ELECTRIC FURNACE iss used to reduce nicotinee salf, isoloted! fromtobacco, to ash Weighed; ash indieatesnicoeine content; BOTTLES IN A ROW: Researcherschecks refiux flasks used to measure some of the components in leof4otloccao samples. VARIETY of Lorillord',equlpment in,ocorner of one G+eensboro laboro/ory.includes analytical balance (righ't foreyround) ) ond',(counter.cfocRwlsei.ganchromotogroph, torsion~balance, laboratory h'ood;.di~stilloti!on apparatus fonsolvent purificotion. 11
Page 10: xeq00e00
r It held ',ar, .Peace-and' tobacco t This ancient tobacco and pipe pouch was the most impressive item in an Indian chief's ward- robe.. His appearance with it was a signal that' big,doings were afoot-a tribal conclave, a war council, a peace treaty. The braves needed no further insttuctions. Each scurriedl into his own ceremonial feathers, and told the little woman not to wait up. The American Plains Indians made the pouch of buck or elk skin. Before the white man brought over beads, it was decorated with dyed'porcupine quills just as you see in this excellent specimen from the Crow tribe. F•edcral Paper Bozrd opcnud its first plant during the post-treaty era with the Crow Indians: This year, Federal plants will turn out' more than 250 tF.ou,anLl toms of paper board-much of it for tobacco packaging. Packaging Through the .JTges ........ ederal' paper Board Company; 7nc. vwEFOO~FO-EOLDINC C~NTONE.COCXUOATEO'CONinw'EVlGLXSSW~N[ EXEC'U?IVE OEEICES:BOOOTA• NEW JER'.6EY FEDERAL 12

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size: