Jump to:

Lorillard

Literature Search No. 628 Toxicity of Dicamba

Date: 05 Jun 1987
Length: 119 pages
87760061-87760179
Jump To Images
snapshot_lor 87760061-87760179

Fields

Author
Schultz, F.J.
Alias
87760061/87760179
Master ID
87760040/0180

Related Documents:
Type
COMP, COMPUTER PRINTOUT
Document File
87760000/87760310/Dicamba
Characteristic
PARE, PARENT
Litigation
Stmn/Produced
Date Loaded
12 Feb 1999
Area
SPEARS,ALEXANDER/EXEC CONF ROOM STORAGE
Site
G65
UCSF Legacy ID
soc40e00

Document Images

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size:

Page 1: soc40e00
June 5, 1987 LITERATURE SEARCH NO. 628 TOXICITY OF DICAMBA
Page 2: soc40e00
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES DATABANK 1985/NOV , ic HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES DATAPANK NUMBER RECORD DATE NAME OF SUBSTANCE CAS REGISTRY NUMBER RELATED HSDB RECORDS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS 'SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS " SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS WISIrJESSER LINE NOTATION 311 851101 DICAMBA 1918-00-9 -- ND 2,5-DICHLOEO-6-METHOXYDENZOIC ACID **ACCEPTED** 2-METHOXY--3,6-DICHLORObENZOIC ACID **ACCEPTED** 3,6-DICHLOOR-2-METHOXY-DENZOEIZUUR [DUTCH] **ACCEPTED** ?,6-DICHLOft--~-METHOXY-LENZOESAEUFiE [GERMAN] #*ACCEF' T ED** 3,6-DICHLOSO-2-METHOXYDENZOIC ACID **ACCEPTED** 3,6-DICHLOR0-0--ANISIC ACID **ACCEPTED** ACIDO (?,6-DICLORO-2-METOSSI)-NENZOICO [ITALIAN] **ACCEPTED** BANEX **ACCEPTED** BANLEN **ACCEPTED** BANVEL **ACCEPTED** BANVEL 4S **ACCEPTED** BANVEL 4WS **ACCEPTED** BANVEL CST **ACCEPTED** BANVEL D **ACCEPTED** BANVEL D (VELSICOL) **ACCEPTED** BANVEL II HERBICIDE **ACCEPTED** BENZOIC ACID, 3,6-DICHLOFcO-2-METHOXY- *#ACCEFTED** BRUSH BUSTER **ACCEPTED** COMPOUND B (VELSICQL) **ACCEPTED** COMPOUND B DICAMBA **ACCEPTED** DIANAT [RUSSIAN] **ACCEPTED** DIANATE **ACCEPTED** DICAMBE **ACCEPTED** DICHLOFt0-0-ANISIC ACID **ACCEPTED** MDBA **ACCEPTED** MED I F3EN **ACCEPTED** 0-ANISIC ACID, 3,6-DICHLORO- **ACCEPTED** VELSICOL 58-CS-1i **ACCEPTED** VELSICOL COMPOUND "F:" **ACCEPTED** Go ~ ~ C8-H6-CL2-O3 -x•*ACCEFTED** Q QVF BG EG FO1 **ACCEPTED** ~ 3V `
Page 3: soc40e00
RTECS NUMBER N I OSH/DG75~''-.5o00 OHM-TADS NUMI-DER 7800095 ` SHIPPING NAME/NUMDEF' ._. NA 2769; Dicamba DOT/UN/NA/IMCO STCC NUMBER EPA HAZARDOUS WASTE NUMBER ASSOCIATED CHEMICALS ND ND ND METHODS OF MANUFACTURING REACTION OF 2,5--DICHLOROPHENOL (FROM METHODS OF MANUFACTURING IMPURITIES FORMULATIONS/F'REFARATIONS HYDROLYSIS OF 1,2,4-TF.ICHLOROBENZENE) & CARBON DIOXIDE TO GIVE 3,6-DICHLOROSALICYLIC ACID WHICH IS THEN METHYLATED WITH DIMETHYL SULFATE [SRI 7 #*ACCEF'TED*# IT IS PRODUCED FROM 1,2,4-TRICI-ILOROBENZENE BY HYDROLYSIS IN METHANOLIC SODIUM HYDROXIDE, TREATMENT WITH CARBON DIOXIDE UNDER PRESSURE OF RESULTING 2,5-DICHLOF.OF'HENOL & SUBSEQUENT METHYLATION BY DIMETHYL SULFATE. [Worthing, C. R. (ed.). Pesticide Manual. 6th ed. Worcestershire, England: British Crop Protection Council, 1979. p. 165] **ACCEPTED** ND DIMETHYLAMINE SALT (4 LB/GAL AND 1 LB/GAL) AND SODIUM SALT (2 LB/GAL). ALSO AVAILABLE AS 10% GRANULES. FORMULATIONS ARE AVAILABLE CONTAINING BANVEL IN COMBINATION WITH 2,4-D & MCF'A. TANK M I XES W I TH NUMEROUS COMMERC I AL HERBICIDES ARE REGISTERED FOR USE... [Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984. Willoughby, Ohio: Meister Publishing Co., 1984. C-24] #*ACCEF'TED*# FORMULATIONS/rREf'ARATIONS ... DICAMEiA IS USUALLY FORMULATED WITH ONE OR MORE PHENOXYALKANOIC ACIDS, OR WITH HERBICIDES OF VARIOUS OTHER CLASSES... ITS OIL-SOLUBLE SALTS WITH (?-AMINOF'ROE'YL)OCTADEC-9-ENYLAMINE...& FURFURYL ESTER ARE /ALSO/ USED FOR CONTROL 00 OF BRUSH. DICAMBA IS A COMPONENT OF NUMEROUS OTHER FORMULATIONS INCLUDING TERNARY ~ O~ MIXTURES WITH BENAZOLIN & DICHLORPROP & 0 MECOPROP & MCPA. INCLUDE.. . "BANVEL-M" (20 G .. 0 DICAMBA + 250 G MCPA/L) AS POTASSIUM SALTS; .<<;,1 "DANVEL-t." (20 G DICAMBA + 250 G 2,4-D/L) AS_.:. POTASSIUM SALTS; "LANVEL-F" (27.5 G DICAMBA' '
Page 4: soc40e00
44:'5 G MECOPROP/L) AS POTASSIUI`7 SALTS. EWorthing, C. F:. (ed. ). Pesticide Manual. 6th ed. Worcestershire, England: British Crop Protection Council, 1979. p. 1651 **ACCEPTED** FORMULATIONS/PREPARATIONS THE TECHNICAL ACID...CONTAIN/S/...ADOUT 83-C'7% /DICAMBA/, THE REMAINDER CONSISTING MAINLY OF T,S-DICHLORO-2-METHOXYBENZOIC ACID. CWorthing, C. R. (ed.). Pesticide Manual. 6th ed. Worcestershire, England: British Crop Protection Council, 1979. p. 1653 **ACCEF'TED** OTHER MANUFACTUR I NG ... US PATENT =, 013, r754. INFORMATION EWorthing, C. R. (ed.). Pesticide Manual. 6th ed. Worcestershire, England: British Crop Protection Council, 1979. p. 1651 **UNREV I EWED** OTHER MANUFACTURING IT HAS BEEN SUGGESTED FOR USE IN INFORMATION RAF•E...MUSTARD...SUGARCANE...COLE CROPS °y CERTAIN ORCHARD CROPS... [Kearney, F'. C. , and D. D. Kaufman (eds.) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975: p. 564] **ACCEPTED** ~ OTHER MANUFACTURING INFORMATION OTHER MANUFACTURING INFORMATION FOR CONTROL OF BOTH ANNUAL AND PERENNIAL BROADLEAF WEEDS IN FIELD & SILAGE CORN, GC;A I N SORG HUM , SMALL GRA I NS ... SUGARCaNE , ASPARAGUS, GRASS SEED CROPS, TURF PASTURE, FiANGELAND & NONCROPLAND AREAS SUCH AS FENCE ROWS, ROADWAYS & WASTELAND. ... ALSO REGISTERED FOR SPOT TREATMENT OF PERENNIAL BROADLEAF WEEDS IN CROPLAND TO BE ROTATED TO WHEAT. FOR CONTROL OF ANNUAL AND PERENNIAL BROADLEAF WEEDS AFTER HARVEST OF ONE CROP BUT BEFORE PLANTING THE NEXT CROP... [Far-m Chemicals Handbook 1984. Willoughby, Ohio: Meister Publishing Co., 1984. C-243 #*ACCEF'TED** ...FOR WEED CONTROL IN CEREALS (NOT UNDERSOWN), IT IS USUALLY FORMULATED WITH ONE OR MORE PHENOXYALKANOIC ACIDS...SO THAT DOSAGE OF DICAMBA LIES IN RANGE 80-130 G AE/HA. ...IT IS...USED FOR CONTROL OF DOCKS IN ESTABLISHED GRASSLAND & FOR CONTROL OF ~ BRACKEN. CWorthing, C. R. (ed.). Pesticide ~ Manual. 6th ed. Worcestershire, England: Qj British Crop Protection Council, 1979. p. O 1651 **ACCEPTED** O
Page 5: soc40e00
MAJOR USES SELECTIVE PRE- y< POSTEMEF~,GENCE f-IEFLjICIDEq PLANT GROWTH REGULATOR EKearney, F. C. , and D. D. Kaufman (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, 6th ed, Warcestershire, England: Eiritish Crop Protection Council, 1979. p. 165] **ACCEF'TED** SHIPMENT METHODS AND ORM-E; LALjLE: NONE REGULATIONS CU.S. Department of Health-and Human Services, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute f or Occupational Safety Health. Registry of To:, DATA LOST TOWARD TERMINAL Effects of Chemic .(RTECS). National Library of Medicine's current MEDLINE file. 84/8401] **ACCEPTED** STORAGE CONDITIONS ND CLEANUP METHODS ND (Treat Disposal F'estic Wastes): 69-95 (1984)] **UNREVIEWED** OD ~ RADIATION LIMITS AND ND ~ POTENTIAL TOXICITY SUMMARY ND ~ O DISPOSAL METHODS Pesticides (including dicamba) and their degradation products were analyzed in samples taken from two disposal pits located at Iowa State University, Ames, IA. The f i rst was an 8 year ol d30,000 1 conc.rete-lined pit where over 50 kg of more than 40 different pesticides had been deposited. The 2nd was a 2 year old 90,000 1 pol yethyl ene l i ned pi t where 150 kg of 24 different pesticides had been deposited. Water, soil and air samples were also collected and analyzed to evaluate the possible contamination of the surrounding environment. Conclusions from these investigations are: 1) pit disposal systems are effective in containing many pesticides to the extent that release to surroundi_ng air and water is insignificant; 2) possible environmental effects can be established by avoiding the extreme difficulties associated with solid samples and taking only liquid samples f or analyses; 3) pit disposal systems are effective for pesticides as well as other organic chemicals. CJunk: GA, Richard JJ; Pesticide disposal sites: sampling and analyses; ACS Symp Ser 259 C11
Page 6: soc40e00
f TOX I C 1-IAZAIRD F:f-1T I NG ANIMAL TESTS PLACE,..DICAMDA NEAR THE riORDERL I NE BETWEEhI TOX I C I TY CLASSES ?°y 4. 3= MODERATELY TOXI': PROBABLE ORAL LETHAL DOSE (HUMAN) 0.5-5 G/k;G, BETWEEN 1 OZ & i PINT (OR 1 LB) FOR 7o F,:G PERSON (150 LB) . 4= VERY TOX I C: F'F;OBAL LE ORAL LETHAL DOSE (HUMAN) 50-500 MG/KG, BETWEEN 1 TEASPOON pc 1 OZ FOR 70 t;G PERSON (15i0 Lfi ). C Gossel i n, Fi. E. , H. C. Hodge, F:. P. Smi th , and M. N. Gleason. Clinical To:<icology of Commercial Products. 4th ed. Baltimore: Williams and Wi 1 k:i ns, 1976. I I-2113 **ACCEPTED** POISONING POTENTIAL ND le ANTIDOTE AND EMERGENCY SEE GENERAL POISONING. GENERAL: 1) TREATMENT ESTABL I SHMENT OF f;ESF' IRAT I ONS & Cf,EAT I ON OF ARTIFICIAL AIRWAY IF NECESSARY. CHECK ADEQUACY OF TIDAL VOL... 2) TREAT HYPOTENSION WITH FLUIDS OR F'LASMA- TRY.TO AVOID VASOF'RESSOF,S IF POSSIBLE. ... PREVENTION OF ABSORPTION (ORAL INGESTION) : A) EMESIS- ALTHOUGH VOMITING WITH SYRUP OF IPECAC F'FtODUCES ONLY MEAN RECOVERY OF TG% OF INGESTED DOSE, IT IS STILL PROBABLY A USEFUL PROCEDURE. SAVE INITIAL EMESIS FOR ANALYSIS. /GENERAL F•OISONING/ [Rumack, B.H. (ed. ) F'ois.index. Microfiche Edition. Denver, Colorado: Micromedex, Inc., in association wi th the Nat i onal Center f or F•oi son Information, with updates, 1975-present. MGT 3/EXP 84117 **ACCEPTED** ANT I DOTE AND EMERGENCY SEE GENERAL FO I SON ING. F'FiEVENT I ON OF TREATMENT AFsSORF'T I ON (ORAL I NGEST I ON ): B) LAVAGE /PRC- WITH TAP WATER FOR CHILDREN, SALINE FOR ADULTS/... C) CHAFCOAL...MANY AGENTS ARE ADSORBED BY ACTIVATED CHARCOAL. THE DOSE IS 5-10 TIMES THE E STIMATED WEIGHT OF THE DRUG OR CHEM I CAL I NGESTED ./F•RC-- 30 G I N 3-4 OUNCES OF WATER (CHILDREN), 100 G IN 8-10 OUNCES OF WATER (ADULTS)/ D) CATHAFTICS...DOSE: SODIUM OR MAGNESIUM SULFATE 250 MG/EwG ORALLY /CHILDREN/... ADULT: 20-30 G/DOSE TO 100 G TOTAL. /GENERAL F•OISONING/ CF(umack:, B.H. (ed. ) Poisinde•r.. Microfiche Edition. Denver, Colorado: Micromedex, Inc., in association with the National Center f or Poison Inf ormation, with updates, 1975-present. MGT 3/EXP 84113 **ACCEPTED**
Page 7: soc40e00
~^-,i•dTIDOTE A(,4u EMERGENCY SEE GENERAL POISONING. DECONTAMINATION: TREATMENT SAFEST DECONTAMINANT IS WATER WITH SOAP. ... IF... ANY QUESTION OF EXPOSURE SKIN DECONTAMINATION SHOULD BE THOROUGH. ORAL, PARENTERAL OR DERMAL EXF'OSURE: D) DIALYSIS- MAY BE CONSIDERED IN THOSE PATIENTS NOT RESPONDING TO STD THERAPEUTIC MEASURES TO TREAT A DIALYZABLE DRUG. ... EYE EXPOSURE: A) .../IRRIGATION OF EYES/ SHOULD BE DONE AT HOME OR AT WORK W I TH PLA I N TAP WATER. /GENERAL F'OISONING/ [Rumack, P. H. (ed. ) Poisindex. Microfiche Edition. Denver, Colorado: Micromedex, Inc., in association with the National Center -For Poison Information, with updates, 1975-present. MGT T/EXp e4113 ##ACCEF'TED.x•# MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE ND HUMAN TOXICITY EXCERPTS ND NON-HUMAN TOXICITY . Dicamba is a cmpd of low acute EXCERPTS to.;icity.../Singl.e oral dose LD50 in male rats was 757 mg/kg, in female rats was 1,414, and in male rats receiving single ip dose was E30 rng/kg. / Signs of acute poisoning include myotonic muscular spasms, urinary incontinence, and dyspnea, cyanosis, and e: hautstion following repeated spasms. Most survivors recovered in 2 to 3 days and thereafter showed normal weight gain. Survivors of oral or dermal doses showed no macroscopic pathology, but most of those / that survived ip dose showed visceral adhesions, and most that survived sc doses had centrally necrotic or fluid-filled' abscesses...conjunctival swelling and corneal clouding if entered the eye; effect cleared in 5-7 days. [Hayes, Wayland J., Jr. Pesticides Studied in Man. Baltimore/London: Williams and Wilkins, 19132. p. 5:'6] **ACCEPTED** NON-HUMAN TOXICITY A dietary level as high as 3,162 ppm did not. EXCERPTS produce illness or retard growth. However, there was slight increase in the absolute and relative weight of the liver at dietary levels as low as 1,000 ppm. The no effect level was 316 ppm (corresponding to dosage of 43 to 19 mg/kg/day as rats grew older and ate less). [Hayes, Wayland J., Jr. Pesticides Studied in Man. Baltimore/London: Williams and Wilkins, 1982. p. 5367 ~ **ACCEf'TED** ~ ~ ~ O O 6 Qj .
Page 8: soc40e00
NON-HUMAN TOXICITY EXCEhF''TS Dicamb_I is a cmpd of low acute to;;icity.../Single oral dose LD50 in guinea pigs of 566 and 3000 mg/kg and in rabbits of 566 and 2000 mg/kg have been reported. / Signs of acute poisoning include myotonic muscular spasms, urinary incontin.ence, and dyspnea, cyansosis, and exhaustion following repeated spasms. Most survivors recovered in 2 to 3 days and thereafter showed normal weight gain. [Hayes, Wayland J., Jr. Pesticides Studied in Man. Baltimore/London: Williams and Wilkins, 1982. p. 5?67 only slightly toxic or not toxic (L.C50 of 178 to greater than 500 lbs/acre; 199-560 k:g/ha). [Hoffman DJ, Albers PH; Evaluation of potential embryotoxicity and teratogenicity of 42 herbicides, insecticides and petroleum contaminants to mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs; Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 13 (1): 15-^8 (1984)] **UNREV I EWED DATA LOST TOWARD TE :M I NaL NON-HUMAN TOXICITY Six beagle dogs were orally intubated with EXCERPTS mixtures of a urea-based fertilizer, 2,4-D, mecoprop (MC>='F'), dicamba and bensulide or chlorpyrifos. The mixtures were formulated as they were used in liquid application to lawns. The dogs were given volumes of 10 ml/kg body weight, delivering the following quantities of each ingredient: urea, 623 mg/kg; P205, 24 mg/kg; E:.2O, 66 mg/k:g; 2,4-D, 6.5 mg/k:g; MCPP, 3.26 mg/kg; dicamba, 0.55 mg/kg and bensulide, 60.93 mg/kg or chlorpyrifos, 6.77 mg/kg. The dogs were given 3 consecutive daily doses of the mixture containing bensulide (round 1) or the mixture containing chlorpyrifos (round 2). The dogs did riot exhibit any clinical signs of illness associated with the - treatments. Effects on hematologic values or routine clinical chemical analyses did not accur with the round 2 mixture. Serum lactic dehydrogenase activity decreased by 50'/% after a single dose of the round i mixture was given. Plasma cholinesterase decreased to 50% of control values following the round 1 or 2 mixture; this decrease was not accompanied by cholinergic signs of intoxication. CYeary RA; Oral intubation of dogs with combinations of fertilizer, herbicide and insecticide chemicals commonly used on lawns; Am J Vet Res 45 (2): 288-90 (1994)] *#UNREV I EWED•*# 00 .~ ~ ~ O O 47 7 ~ SS' a
Page 9: soc40e00
'NON•--i•-IUh''AN TO X I C I-f Y EXCERr='TS y=.i.: different mixtures o-f dicamba, picloram, :'., 4•--D butyl ester, 2, 4--D i Cooctyl ester, and ^, 4•-•D pr-opyl ene gl ycol butyl ether ester were tested wi th cutthroat trout. Except far 2,4-D isooctyl ester, the median lethal cancentratians (LCS0's) resulting- from mixtures of 2,4-•D esters and picloram were lower than LD50's of those herbicides tested individually. Dicamba and 2,4-D isooctyl ester were the least toxic individually and mixtures of dicamba or 2,4-D isooctyl ester with the other herbicides tested did not result in increased toxicity. [Woodward DF; Acute toxicity of mixtures of range management herbicides to cutthroat trout; J Range Manage 35 (4): 5T9-40 (1982)] **UNREVIEWED#* HUMAN TOXICITY VALUES ND NON--HUMAN TOXICITY VALUES LD50 MICE ORAL 1190 ,"la/f'S [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, F'ublic Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety Health. Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS). National Library of Medicine's current M`DLINE file. 84/8401] **ACCEPTED** NON-HUMAN TOX ICITY VALUES LD50 RABBITS ORAL 2000 MMG/KG [U.S. Department of Health and Human Servi ces, Publ i c Heal th Ser-vi ce, Center f or Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety Health. Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS). National Library of Medicine's current MEDLINE file. 84/8401] **ACCEPTED** NON-HUMAN TOXICITY VALUES LD50 8U I NEA PI 6S ORAL 3000 MG/ KO -- CU.S. Department of Health and Human ON-HUMAN TOXICITY VALUES Services, Public Health Service, Center-for. Disease Control, National Institute for Occupat i onal Saf ety Heal th . F:egi stry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS). National Library of Medicine's current MEDLINE file. £i4/a401] **ACCEPTED** DNA REPAIR ESCHERICHIA COLI 5 MG/DISC [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute f or ~ Occupational Safety Health. Registry of ~ ~ Tosa i c Effects of Chemi cal Substances (F,TECS). National Library of Medicine's current MEDLINE file. 84/84U1] **ACCEPTED** C) 0 ~ CD ..~,»l~qnrn... -. - - - r~.,, f .. ...~t~e > >ng}?f?ftAJ~~Nrl~R~j~t[t~+r+~+ar<rir+i+>tye>rN~f9~~+~t~tij~JN~ifl1~, ~ ; ; j;: ~f f i i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ~ . . > >'. a
Page 10: soc40e00
,rv;7i:_._...7r1::: ..i, 6Ri7,c.,.q, .. ...,..... NON--(-1UMAN Tti7X. ICI-4'Y VALUi=S NON-HUMAN TO X I C I TY VALUES ECOToXICITY VALUES ECOTOX I C I TY VALUES ECOTOXICrITY VALUES ECOTOXICITY VALUES DNA REPAIR BACILLUS SUBTILIS S MG/DISC CU.S. Department o-F Heal th and Human Ser-vices, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute -for Occupational Safety Health. Registry of Tox. i c Ef f ects of Chemi cal Substances (f;TECS). National Library of Medicine's current MEDLINE file. 84/B4c_r1] **ACCEPTED** LD5c:r RATS ORAL 104<? MG/k::G [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety Health. Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (F,TF_CS). National Library of Medicine's curr-2nt MEDLINE file. E4/84Cr1] **ACCEPTED** EC50 DAPHNIA MAGNA (]FEATEB THAN 100 MG/L/48 H!"; G21 DEG C, FIRST INSTA R /TECHNICAL MATERIAL, 88G/ [U.S. Department of Interior, Fi sh and Wi l d l i f e Servi ce. Handboo4:k of Acute Toxicity of Chemicals to Fish and Aquatic Invertebrates. Resource Publication No. 137. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Of f i ce, 1980. p. 273 **ACCEFTED** LC50 RAINBOW TROUT 28 MG/L/96 HR G 12 DEG C, WT 0.8 G/TECHNICAL MATERIAL, 88%/ CU. S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Ser-vi ce. Handbook of Acute Tox i c i ty of Chemicals to Fish and Aquatic Invertebrates. Resource Publication No. 137. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1980. p. 27] **ACCEF'TED-x•* LC5Q BLUEGILL GREATER THAN 50 MG/L/96 HR C 12 DEG C, WT 0.9 /TECHNICAL MATERIAL, 88%/ [U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. Handbook of Acute Toxicity of Chemicals to Fish and Aquatic Invertebrates. Resource Publication No. 137: Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 198r7. p. 277 *#ACCEF'TED** LC50 ASELLUS GREATER THAT 100 MG/L/9b HR C 15 DEG C, MATURE /TECHNICAL MATERIAL, 88%/ [U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. Handbook of Acute Toxicity of Chemicals to Fish and Aquatic Invertebrates. Resource F'ublication No. 137. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1980. p. 227] **ACCEPTED** 9 ,yIfl1H?Pf?4}7M.S`r . . . 7 ~yr . . . . . .. ,',.p.« ~ t.r..n . . . ,rr .,., ..oqrervrf.rrnn.: rriS11 , ..~~.~ r.
Page 11: soc40e00
i1fii z 7i1{is:i58liu, , qssos,:,:..,. _, LC50 L A`:1MARU...'-~ EA::aC I A TUS GFiEATL=F- THAT 100 MG/L-/9! l-ff--t @ 21 DEG !`', MATURE /TECHNICAL MAT>=RIAL, 48"l./ CU.c. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. Handbook of Acute Tc,<icity of Chemicals to Fish and Aquatic Invertebrates. Resource F'ublication No. 137. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1980. p. ^7] **ACCEPTED** LC50 PALEOMONETES GREATER THAN 56 MG/L/96 HR C 21 DEG C, MATURE /TECHNICAL MATERIAL, 88'l./ [U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. Handbook of Acute Toxicity of Chemicals to Fish and Aquatic Invertebrates. Resource F'ublication No. 137. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1980. p. 27] **ACCEPTED** NATIONAL TOXICOLOGY PROGRAM REPORTS IARC SUMMARY AND EVALUATION MINIMUM FATAL DOSE LEVEL POPULATIONS AT SPECIAL RISf`4 ND ND ND ND ADSORPTION, DISTRIBUTION AND EXCRETION ABSORPTION, DISTRIBUTION AND EXCRETION Dicamba was excreted rapidly by rats mainly in the urine, whether admin orally or sc...1 to 2% appeared in feces...about _2c7% was conjugated with glucuronic acid... Following oral admin of dicamba to a cow it was possible in 7 days to account for 73% of dose by excretion of unchanged cmpd in urine none...detected in feces or milk. [Hayes, Wayland J., Jr. Pesticides Studied in Man. Baltimore/London: Williams and Wilkins,- 1982. p. 5?6] **ACCEPTED** /IN" RATS/ AT DIETARY LEVELS OF 10-20,000 PPM /((14)C-CAF:BOXYL)DICAMBA/, TISSUE CLEARANCE WAS RAPID & URINARY EXCRETION REACHED 96% OF THE RATE OF DIETARY INTAKE AFTER 24 HR. [Kearney, F.C., and D. D. Kaufman (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 567] ~ *•*ACCEF'TED-#* ~ ~ ~ O O .1 10+ 10 n1sW"Mu+MM;14 3iliE?f~li3s
Page 12: soc40e00
.......... ... ......... I AL.SORF'TION, DISTRIDUTION ... /IT/ I':; RAPIDLY A,'_~;SOF,LED DY PLANT TISSUES AND EXCRET I OP.I °: I S FtEAD I LY TRANSLOCATLD I N E I TFIER SYMPLAST OR AF'OF'LAST. MOBILE FORMS OF HEI:D:ICIDE.,. . INCLUDE t!NCIHANGED DICAMBA, 5-OI-I-DICAMDA & ITS CONJUGATE. RATE OF ABSORPTION, MOVEMENT & DISTRIBUTI,ON OF ASSIMILATES WITHIN F'LANT...VARY WITH SPECIES & STAGE OF GROWTH. [Kearney, P. C. , and D. D. f:az-.fman (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 5691 -**ACCEr'TED** ABSORPTION, DISTRIBUTION DICAMBA I S RAPIDLY AEs SO~'.ErED BY EITHER ROOTS AND EXCRETION OR FOLIAR TISSUES. ... ROOT-ABSORBED DICAMgA I S TRANSLOCATED TO FOL I AR T I SSUES I N GRAPE (VITIS VINIFERA L), JOHNSONGRASS, BEAN, PURPLE !1IUTSEDGE, TARTARY BUCKWHEAT, WHEAT, BArLEY, WILD MUSTARD, & CANADA THISTLE... CI':earney, !_'. C. , and D. D. f:au:Finan (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, DLgredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 5671 **ACCEF'TED#* ABSORPTION, DISTRIDUTION ...DICAMBA WAS TRANSLOCATED PRIMARILY IN THE AND EXCRETION XYLEM, BUT SOME ACCUMULATION IN YOUNG GROWING LEAVES OF ROOT-TREATED CANADA THISTLE WAS OBSERVED...LITTLE HERBICIDE REMAINED IN TREATED ROOTS. IN TARTARY BUCKWHEAT, WILD MUSTARD, & GRAPE, E'iOOT--APF'LIED DICAMBA WAS TRANSLOCATED ACROPETALLY. ...f.EDISTRIBUTION...FtESULTED IN LOCALIZED CONCN IN YOUNGER LEAVES & MERISTEMATIC TISSUES AT THE SHOOT APEX & IN LEAF AXILS. FOLIAR-ABSORBED DICAM[A IS TRANSLOCATED $AS I F'ETALLY & ACROPETALLY & I S MOBILE IN BOTH XYLEM & PHLOEM. MOVEMENT /IS/ OUT OF MATURE LEAVES.../WITH/ CONTINUOUS REDISTRIBUTION INTO YOUNGER LEAVES & MERISTEMATIC TISSUES... /IT HAS BEEN SUGGESTED THAT/...THE SYMPLASTIC TRANSLOCATION OF FOLIAR-APPLIED DICAMBA FROM MAIN CULM TO NEW TILLERS IN WHEAT WAS OBSTRUCTED BY INTERCALARY MERISTEMS. IN STUDIES WITH CANADA TI-IISTLE...DICAMBA WAS Tf,ANSF'ORTED OUT OF TREATED LEAVES CH I EFLY UNCHANGED. LIMITED BASIf-ETAL TRANSLOCATION TO ROOTS, ACCUM IN ROOT TIPS, & EXCRETION OF UNCHANGED FOLIAR-APPLIED DICAMBA INTO SURROUNDING SOIL OR NUTRIENT SOLN HAVE... BEEN REPORTED. FlASIPETAL PHLOEM TRANSPORT TO ROOTS OF FOLIAR-TREATED BEAN PLANTS WAS PREVENTED BY STEAM GIRDLING THE STEM. [Kearney, F'. C. , and D. D. Kaufman (eds. )
Page 13: soc40e00
.. ......,. „ . ., ~,.. . 7 . ...... . . . :1:• ... .. .. . ........ .a Herbicide_: Chemistry, Degredatit_n and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and ?. 2nd ed. New Yor-r::: Marcel Delek:nr, Inc., 1975. p. 5683 *x-ACCEPTED*-x• ABSORF'TION, DISTf;TE.UTION A 61-•y>>ar--o].d woman committed sui.cide by AND EXCRETION ingesting an unknown quantity of Killex, containing in aqueous solution 100 g/l of 2,4--D, 50 g/l of mecoprop, and 9 g/l of dicamba as amine salts. Concentrations of herbicides •found weres in blood-- 52<]-mg/1 2,4-D, O•T0-mg/1 mecoprop, and 17u-mg/1 dicamba; in urine--67r?--mg/1 2,4-D and 520-mg/1 mecoprop; in bile--340-mg/l 2,4-D, 53r]-mg/1 mecoprop, and 14r]-mg/i dicamba; and i n l i ver---04ry-mg/i:g 2, 4-D, 500-mg/kg mecaprop, and less than 100-mg/kg dicamba. [Fraser AD et al; Toxicologic studies in a fatal overdose of 21,4tment of the Interior, Fish, Wild-life Service, Special Scientific Report - Wildlife No. 184, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1974. p. 164] **UNREVIEWED** METABOLISM/METABOLITES ...DIETARY (CARBOXY-(14)C)DICAMBA WAS RAPIDLY EXCRETED IN THE URINE OF RATS. AT DIETARY LEVELS OF 10-20,000 PPM TISSUE CLEARANCE WAS RAF•ID AND URINARY EXCRETION REACHED 96% OF THE RATE OF D I ETARY I NTAKE AFTER -4 HOURS. ... URINARY EXCRETION PRODUCTS WERE TEN DATA LOST TOWARD TERMINAL TIVELY IDENTIFIED AS UNCHANGED DICAMBA, EITHER FREE OR CONJUGATED WITH GLUCURONIC ACID. [Kearney, P.C., and D. D. Kaufm_n (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes I and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 5677 **UNREVIEWED** - - METABOLISM/METABOLITES UNCHANGED DICAMBA & ?,6-DICHLOROSALICYLIC ACID HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN THE URINE OF A HEIFER FED DICAMBA... [National Research Council. Drinking Water & Health Volume Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1977. p. 5223 **ACCEPTED** 1. METABOLISM/METABOLITES IN LACTATING COWS, DICAMBA-WAS RAPIDLY ABSORBED, ONLY PARTLY METAB & RAPIDLY QD EXCRETED. IN 6 HR 89% EXCRETED IN URINE, 2% ~ ' IN FECES, 0.02% IN MILK. 84 /. EXCRETED ~ UNCHANGED & 2u`/. AS Q 3,6-DICHLORO-?-HYDROXYEsENZOIC ACID (DCHBA) & ~ 2,5-DICHLOROPHENOL. [OEHLER DD ET AL; ~ METABOLIC FATE OF HERBICIDE DICAMBA IN 12
Page 14: soc40e00
LF:C-~ AT I NG CUWy.J (~)cRI C FOOD CHEM 28 (4): 685-9 (1980)] **UNREV I EWED.#* C L~ :( OLnG I CAL !-iALF-L I FE ND MECHANISM OF ACTION DICAMBA STIMULATED THE GROWTH OF TOLACCO PITH CULTUtiES, PROMOTED ELONGATION OF AVENA 1ST INTERNODE SECTION, & CAUSED APOLAR CALLUS GROWTH OF...VASCULAR TISSUE EXPLANTS... /EFFECTS OF SOIL-INCORPORATED DICAMDA ON ALTERNANTHERA PHILOXEROIDES (MART) GRISED 4 DAYS AFTER TREATMENT INCLUDc/...DAh1AGE TO PHLOEM & PARENCHYMA CELL WALLS, FORMATION OF MULTINUCLEATE COAGULATED PROTOPLASTS, & DESTRUCTION OF CORTICAL PARENCHYMA CELLS ADJACENT TO VASCULAR BUNDLES. /EFFECTS OF SOIL-INCORPORATED DICAMBA ON ALTERNANTHERA (='H I LOXER OI DES ( MAC:T ) GR I SEB 4 DAYS AFTER TREATMENT INCLUDE/...INDUCED GROWTH OF.ROOT INITIALS IN LOWER PORTIONS OF NODES.,. [Kearney, P.C. , and D. D. f.:aufman (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode o-F Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 5697 **UNREVIEWED** MECHANISM OF ACTION ...HIGH CONCN (1X10-2 TO iX10-S MOLAR) OF FOLIAR-APPLIED DICAMBA DECREASED MEMBRANE PERMEABILITY & RESPIRATION RATES (OXYGEN UF'TAE;E ) I N LEAF T I SSUES OF PURPLE NUTSEDGE. [Kearney, P.C. , and D. D. K%aufman (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 570] *#ACCEF'TED** INTERACTIONS ...F'RETREATMENT OF WILD GARLIC (ALLIUM VINEALE L) SHOOTS WITH LOW CONCN OF - 2-•CHLOROETHYLPHOSF'HONIC ACID...INCREASED BASIPETAL TRANSLOCATION OF FOLIAR-APPLIED DICAMBA. PRETREATMENT OF EXCISED BEAN'LEAVES W I TH ENDOTHALL (7-•OXARICYLO- (2, 2, 1 ) HEF'TANE-2, •'--DICARBOXYLIC ACID) GREATLY REDUCED SUBSEQUENT DICAMBA VE I N LOAD I NG & TRANSF'ORT. POLAR TRANSPORT WAS ACTIVATED BY ATP & INHIBITED BY DNP. DICAMBA UPTAKE & RETENTION WERE INCREASED E I THER BY ADD I T I ON OF 22'/. SUCROSE OR BY PR I OFt 00 EXPOSURE OF PLANTS TO SUNLIGHT. CF.earney, ~ F'.C., and D. D. Kaufman (eds. ) Herbicides: ~ Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. O Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel ~ Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 568] **ACCEPTED** 64 1:: 1Y''j3',ii#ji
Page 15: soc40e00
., ., .a r~:: >:.ei;;:.. ..,.a...._ TNT.- F;:AC:.'TICPdi INTERACTIONS I NTEF;ACT I ON S NATURAL OCCURF:ING SOURCES ARTIFICIAL SOURCES PROBABLE ROUTES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE AVERAGE DA I LY I NTAf:E PROBABLE EXPOSURES BODY BURDENS IMMEDIATELY DANGEROUS TO LIFE OR HEALTH ACCEPTABLE DAILY INTAf-:ES ALLOWABLE TOLERANCES OSHA STANDARDS NIOSH FECOMMENDATIONS AhdT!~iG:'N I ST I C RESFOI4SES BETWEEN CAFtE:AMATE I-IEFiEj I C I DES & D'' CAM3jA HAVE... ISHf]WN/ THAT DICAMFiA-Ih.lDL.1CED SOYBEAN HYf'OCOTYL ELONGATION ?< CURVATURE L1JERE I NH I BI TED I N PRESENCE OF... C:HLORFROFF-IAM. .. OF EFTC (S-ETHYL DIFF;r1='YLTHIiJCAF;33AMATE?, & THAT EPTC INJURY TO SORGHUM WAS... REDUCED I N PRESENCE OF D I CA6YIE+A .;3YNLhG I S'T I C RESPONSES BETWEEN DICAMBA & SEVERLA PHENOXY HERBICIDES HAVE...BEEN F.EFOrTED... C}'earney, P.C., and D. D. Kaufman (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, I nc ., 1 R75 . p. 5701 **ACCEFTED** SYNEFtG I ST I C RESPONSES BETWEEN D I CAMBA & SEVERAL FHENOXY HERBICIDES HAVE...BEEN hEPOI"TED... Lf'.earney, F. C. , and D. D. F;aufman (eds.) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 21. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 570] *#ACCEF'TED** ...DICAMBA METABOLISM BY WAY OF 5-OH-DICAMBA CONJUGATION...WAS SIGNIFICANTLY INHIBITED BY 1 X 10--5 MOLAR CONCN OF SEVERAL ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDES. [Kearney, P.C.., and D. D. Kaufman (eds. ) Herbicides: Chemistry, Degredation and Mode of Action. Volumes 1 and 2. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1975. p. 566] *#ACCEFTED** ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND 14
Page 16: soc40e00
. .. Lo.i73711)718;lii THRESHOLD L I M I TVr-LUES OTHER OCCUPAT I O^dAL PERMISSIBLE LEVELS WATER STANDARDS ATI`1OSr HERI C STANDARDS SOIL STANDARDS CERCLA REPORTABLE QUANTITIES TSCA SEQU I F:EMENTS RCRA FtEQU I f.EMENTS FIFRA REQUIREMENTS FDA REQUIREMENTS ANALYT I C LABORATORY METHODS ANALYTIC LABORATORY METHODS ANALYTIC LABORATORY METHODS !V D ND ND ND Fersons in charge of vessels or facilities are required to notify the National Response Center (NRC) immediately, when there is a release of this designated hazardous substance, in an amount equal to or greater than its reportable quantity of 1000 lb or 454 I..-:g . The to]l l f ree tel ephone number of the NRC is (SUU) 424-88r:ri; in the Washington metropol itan area (202) 4^6-•2675. The rule for determining when notification is requi r ed i s stated i n 40 CFR 302.6 (see section IV. D.•_T•.b). CS0 FR 13456 (4/14/F35) ] **UNnEV I EWED** ND ND ND ND DICAMBA DETERMINED BY INFRARED SPECTROPHOTOMETRY. CAssociation of Official Analytical Chemists. Official Methods of Analysis. 10th ed. and supplements. Washington, DC: Association of Official Analytical Chemists, 1965. New editions through 13th ed. plus supplements, 1982. 13/ 10.^ 6.2653 **ACCEPTED** F:ES I DUES I N PLANTS MAY BE DETESM I NED BY GLC. M SMITH ET AL, J ASS OFF AGRIC CHEM, 48, 1164 (1965). CWorthing, C. R. (ed.). Pesticide Manual. 6th ed. Wcrcestershire, Englanda British Crop Protection Council, 1979. p. 165] **ACCEPTED** A high-pressure liquid chromatographic method was developed -for liquid herbicide combinations that contain different combinations of , active ingredients including 2,4-D, MCPP, and dicamba. CGrorud RE;, Forrette JE; Liquid chromatography of 15 u>t,a;s~;~s-,;,
Page 17: soc40e00
liquid form!il•_.tions containing ~,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, and 2-- (2-methyl--4-chloropheno:.;y) propionic acid as their salts; J Assoc Off Anal Chem 66 (5) : 1220-5 (1903)3 **UNREVIEWED** AhALYTIC LABORATORY A sensitive gas liquid chromatographic METHODS method was devel oped f or mul t i resi due analysis of 10 acid herbicides (one being dicamba) in sediment. Recoveries of all herbicides from -f>>rtified sediment samples were better than 80% at the levels studied. PracticaJl detection limits of this method were 10-25 mug/kg (ppb). CLee HB, Chau AS Y; Analysis of pesticide residues by chemical derivatization. VI. Analysis of ten acid herbicides in sediment; J Assoc Off Anal Chem 66 ( 4): 102~-d3 (1983)] #*Uh1nEV I EWED#* ANALYTIC LABORATORY A method is descr ibed for the simultaneous METHODS separati on of di camba and 2, 4-D or di camba and MCPA using high-performance liquid chromatography. CFer-ez RL; Determination of 2-metho;:y-i,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2-methyl-4-,hlorophenoxyacetic acid in emulsifiable pesticide concentrates by high-performance liquid chromatography; J Chromatogr 259 (1): 181-5 (19C'?)] **UNREV I EWED*# CLIhlICAL LABORATORY Chlaropheno:.y acid herbicides pronamide, METHODS pi cl oram and PCP were deter-mi ned simultaneously in human urine. Samples were hydrolyzed with mineral acid to liberate conjugated residues. Acids were isolated from the urine hydrolysate by acid/base partitioning and derivatized with ethereal diazomethane. Pesticides were determined quantitatively by electron capture gas chromatography and structures were confirmed by computer-controlled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Detection limits for herbicides in urine were 0.05-0.1 mg/1 by EC•-GC and 0.1-0.5 mg/i by GC-MS. [Draper WM; A multiresidue procedure for the determination and confirmation of acidic herbicide residues in human urine; J Agric Food Chem 30 (2): 227-31 (1982)3 **UNREVIEWED**
Page 18: soc40e00
00 '1 HAZARDLINE 1987/MAY ~1 AN ACC` SSIC?N NUMBEF:: 244. G7o5. CN CHEMICAL NAME: BANVEL. SY SYNONYMS : 3,6-DICHLORO-O-ANISIC ACID. i--MET~-IOXY-?, 6--DICHLORODENZOIC ACID. 3, 6-DICHLORO-?-METHOXYBENZOIC ACID. DICAMBA. MDBA. VELSICOL COMPOUND R. BANEX. BRUSH BUSTER. BENZOIC ACID, ?,G-DICHLORO-2-METHOXY-. BANLEN. BANVEL D. COMF'OUND B DICAMBA. O-ANISIC ACID, 3,6-DICHLORO-. DIANATE. DICAMBE. ~,5-DICF=LORO-6-METHOXYF3ENZOIC ACID. MED DIANAT. IE.EN. VELSICOL 5Ec-CS-11. RN CAS NUMBER: 1918-00-9. F;EG. TOXIC NUMBER: DG7525000. CHEMICAL FOF,MULA: C8H6CL2Oti. F'D F'HYS I CAL DESCF; I FT I O N : WHITE CRYSTALLINE S OLID. MOL WT: BOILING PT: SOLUBILITY: 221.04 N/A VERY SL IGHT FLASH PT: VAPOR PRES: MELT F'T: N/A 0.003 M 241 F M UEL IN AIR: LEL IN AIR: MEC IN AIR: N/A N/A SPEC GRAVITY: VAPOR DENS I TY: ODOR THRESHOLD N/A : OCTANOL/WATER CO-EFFICIENT:. EL F'ERMISSABLE EXPOSURE: NONE ESTABLISHED MUTAGENIC DATA (RTEC) CERCLA HAZARD RATINGS - TOXICITY 2 - IGNITABILITY 0 - REACTIVITY 0 PERSISTENCE 3 TOXICOLOGY: BANVEL IS A CONVULSANT POISON. THE MAJOR SYMPTOMS OF INTOXICATION ARE VOMITING, TREMOR, AND CONVULSIONS. SEE DDT. ORL-RAT LD5U:104O MG1KG ORL-MUS LD50:119U MG/KG ~ ORL-RBT LD50: 20ni> MG/KG ~ ORL-GPG LD5c.z: 3ci00 MG/FtiG ~ ORL-GPG LD50:3Dn0 MG/KG ~ UNK-MAM LD50:1c70c> MG/KG O O OD
Page 19: soc40e00
OSHA STANDARD ^?CF=R1910.12200 HAZARD COMMUNICATION REQUIRES CHEMICAL MANUFACT4.J{;rF~tS AND IMPORTERS TO AS SESS THE HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS WHICH THEY F'RODUCE 07 I MF'OFiT , AND ALL EMPLOYERS HAV IING WORKPLACES I N THE MANUFACT!!RING DIVISION, STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION CODES 20 THhOUGf i= ?,, TO F'ROV I DE I NFORMAT I ON TO THE I r: EMPLOYEES CONCERN I NG HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS BY MEANS OF HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM INCLUDING LABELS, MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS, TRAINING, AND ACCESS TO WRITTEN RECORDS 48FR53280 11/25/83 FOLLOWING OSHA STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO SUBSTANCES LI STED 29CFR1910, OTHERWISE ADVISE. IC CL DANGEROUS EXPOSURE: NONE SF'EC I F I ED WH I TE C;YSTAI--I_ I NE SOL I D. INCOMF'ATIBILITIES: STRONG OXIDIZERS. OXIDIZERS. OXYGEN. F'Ef:OXIDES. STRONG ACIDS. CLDTHING: NO NIOSH/OSHA DATA; RECOMMEND PREVENT REPEATED OR PROLONGED SKIN CONTACT WEAR IMPERVIOUS CLOTHING WEAR GLOVES WEAR FACESHIELD (8 INCH MINIMUM) PLACE CONTAMINATED CLOTHING IN CLOSED CONTAINERS FOR STORAGE UNTIL LAUNDERED OR D I SCAf,DED I F CLOTHI NG I S TO BE LAUNDERED, I NFORM PERSON F'ERFOnM I NG OF'EFCAT I ON OF CONTAMINANT'S HAZARDOUS PROPERTIES. WEAR EYE PROTECTION TO PREVENT: NO STANDARD REQUIREMENT, BUT ADVISE EYE PROTECTION TO SEE NIOSH CFITEF:IA DOCUMENT FOR GUIDANCE PREVENT REASONABLE FROBAB I L I TY OF EYE CONTACT. EMPLOYEE SHOULD WASH: NO STANDARD REQUIREMENT, BUT ADVISE WASHING SEE NIOSH CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR GUIDANCE PROMPTLY WHEN SKIN BECOMES CONTAMINATED. WORK CLOTHING SHOULD BE CHANGED DAILY: NO STANDARD REQUIREMENT, BUT ADVISE CHANGING NIOSH CRITERIA DOCUMENT EXISTS IF IT IS REASONABLY PROBABLE THAT CLOTHING IS CONTAMINATED. REMOVE CLOTHING: NO STANDARD REQUIREMENT, BUT ADVISE REMOVING SEE NIOSH CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR GUIDANCE PROMPTLY I F I T I S NON--• I MPERV I OUS AND CONTAM I NATED . 2 .. , ..,. „ ~ f w{n,r.ry~rf $ n,,,rfrr.ryr
Page 20: soc40e00
r.. ;y.; i. N THE f'OILLi1WING EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE AVAILABLE: NO N I OSH/O S{'-fA DATA, ADV I SE: I'dIOSI-d CRITERIA DOCUMENT EXISTS F_YE•-•WAS}-I F"OUNTA I N W I THI N I MMED I ATE WORK AREA WHERE EMPLOYEES ' EYES MAY BE E XF'OSED TO SUBSTANCE QUICK DRENCHING FACILITIES WITHIN IMMEDIATE WORK AREA WHERE EMPLOYEES MAY BE EXPOSED TO SUBSTANCE. RF-• !".E SP IRATOR SELECT I ON ( Ur'F'ER L I M I T DEV I CES F'Ef,M I TTED ): NO SPEC ADVISE - CF4EM I CAL CAF,TR I DrE RESP I RATOR WITH AN ORGANIC VAPOR CARTRIDGE MS H I G{-I LEVELS - SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING AF'PARATUS WITH A FULL FACE-PIECE, HELMENT, OR HOOD FIREFIGHTING - SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS W I TI-I A FULL FACE-P I ECE OPERATED IN PRESSURE-DEMAND OR POSITIVE-PRESSURE MODE. MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE: NO NIOSH/OSHA DATA; ADVISE: SEE NIOSH CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR GUIDANCE. EKG RECOMMENDED IF EMPLOYEE TO WEAR FULL-FACE RESPIRATOR. GENERAL MEDICAL HISTORY. 40CFR717 RECORDS AND REPORTS OF ALLEGATIONS THAT CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES CAUSE SIGNIFICANT ADVERSE REACTIONS TO HEALTH OR THE ENVIRONMENT TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (TSCA) SECTION S(C) RULE REQUIRES MANUFACTURERS AND CERTAIN PROCESSORS OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES AND MIXTURES TO }-::EEP RECORDS OF SIGNIFICANT ADVERSE REACTIONS TO EMPLOYEE Hz ALTH FOR 30 YEARS 48F1-:38187 08/22/83 48FR'9225 08/30/83 (EFFECTIVE DATE CORRECTION). PHYSICIAN EXAMINATION INDUSTRIAL EXF'OSURE HISTORY. PRE-PLACEMENT AND ANNUAL EXAMS. MEDICAL WARNING FOR REFUSAL OF MEDICAL EXAMINATION. fiRE-EMPLOYMENT ERYTHROCYTE CHOLINESTERASE, TWO TESTS TO DETERMINE MEAN NORMAL LEVEL: TEST MUST NOT DIFFER BY MORE THAN 15%. BLOOD CHEMISTRY. COMPLETE BLOOD COUNT. PULMONARY FUNCTIONS. RESPIRATORY HISTORY. SKIN EXAM. RE ROUTE OF ENTRY: INHALATION. SKIN AE+SORPTION. INGESTION. SKIN OR EYE CONTACT. TO TARGET ORGANS: SKIN. CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM. SYSTEM. m ~ ~ ~ RESP I FiATORY p ~ O
Page 21: soc40e00
SYMF'TOMS: SK:IN, COVERING OF BODY (SC0174) 5 IrRITATION, EXTREME REACTION TO A CONDITION (SC0?<.390) . MUCOUS MEMBRANE, MEMBRANE LINING PASSAGES/CAVITIES (SC0109) ; IRRITATION, EXTREME REACTION TO A CONDITION (SC009D). COUGHING, FORCEFUL EXPIRATION (SCO173). DIZZINESS, FEELING FAINT, LIGHT-HEADED, UNSTEADY(SCO048). GASTROINTESTINAL, PERTAINING TO STOMACH & INTESTINE (SCOU70)q DISTURBANCE, INTERRUPTION OF A NORMAL STATE (SC0047). VOMITING, F'ERTA I N I NG TO NAUSEA ( SCn 166 ). WEAKNESS, LACK OF STRENGTH ( SCO167 ). NUMBNESS, COMBINED ANESTHESIA AND PARESTHESIA (SCO12G); EXTREMITIES, ARMS OR LEGS (SC0Cy6: ) . ABDOMINAL, RELATING TO THE ABDOMEN (SC00U1); PAIN, SUFFERING, EITHER PHYSICAL OF: MENTAL (SC<?182). SALIVATION, EXCESS DISCHARGE OF SALIVA (SCO146). TREMORS, TREMBLING, SHAKING (SCO197). ANXIETY, A TROUBLED FEELING (SCO009). EXCITATION, CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM STIMULATION (SC0289). MYOTONIA, TEMPORARY MUSCLE R IGIDITY (SCta111 ). ACIDO SIS, ACID IMBALANCE (SC0290). FEVER BODY TEMPERATURE ABOVE NORMAL (SCO0b7). TACHYCARDIA, ABNORMAL RAPID HEARTBEAT (SCo15S). SWEATING, EXCRETING MOISTURE THROUGH THE SKIN (SCO156). COMATOSE, STATE OF DEEP UNCONSCIOUSNESS (SCO186). CONVULSIONS, SUDDEN MUSCLE CONTF,ACTIONS (SC00'4). FA FIRST AID. (1 OF S) IF THIS CHEMICAL GETS INTO THE EYES, IMMEDIATELY WASH THE EYES WITH LARGE AMOUNTS OF WATER, OCCASIONALLY LIFTING THE LOWER AND UPPER LIDS. GET MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY. CONTACT LENSES SHOULD NOT BE WORN WHEN WORKING WITH THIS CHEMICAL. (2 OF 5) I F TH I S CE•lLOR I NATED HYDROCARBON GETS ON S6`•. I N, I MMED I ATELY WASH SKI N WITH SOAP AND WATE R, RUBBING ALCOHOL, OR TINCTURE OF GREEN SOAP. (3 OF 5) IF A F'ERSON BREATHES IN LARGE AMOUNTS OF THIS CHEMICAL, MOVE THE EXPOSED PERSON TO FRESH AIR AT ONCE. IF BREATHING HAS STOPPED PERFORM AF'T I F I C I AL RESF' I RAT I ON . KEEP THE AFFECTED PERSON WARM AND AT REST. GET MEDICAL ATTENTION AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. (4 OF 5) WHEN THIS CHEMICAL HAS BEEN SWALLOWED, IMMEDIATELY GET MEDICAL ATTENTION. IF MEDICAL ATTENTION IS NOT IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE, GET THE AFFECTED PERSON TO VOMIT BY HAVING HIM TOUCH THE BACK OF HIS THROAT WITH HIS FINGER OR BY GIVING HIM SYRUP OF IPECAC AS DIRECTED ON PACKAGE. TH I S NON-F'RESCR I PT I ON DRUG SHOULD BE KEPT W I TH EMERGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES IN THE WORKPLACE AND IS AVAILABLE AT MOST DRUG COUNTERS. DO NOT MAKE AN UNCONSC I OUS PERSON VOM I T. 4
Page 22: soc40e00
..5.h..;,51./ 51.:.3f:1..i{LZf3.1+_+~:`2i.$FIi.72{a;{~yfff~{I1lfaali~).{i{211Hfii4}it i&& (5 O F 5) IF THIS t-,ALOGENATED PESTICIDE IS SWALLOWED, INDUCE VOMITING WITH SYRUP OF I!='ECAC. ADM I N I STER AC.T I VATED CHARCOAL FOLLOWED BY GASTR I C LAVAGE WITH 2 TO 4 LITERS OF TAF' WATER. FOLLOW WITH SALINE CATHAfiTIC. DO NOT GIVE FATS OR OILS. PERFORM LAVAGE WITH 200 ML OF :_'0X MANNITOL USING A STOMACH TUr;E. ADMINISTER DIAZEPAM (1i:1. ML) INTRAVENOUSLY AS AN ANT I CONVULSANT. I F CONVULS I ONS FERS I ST , USE A NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKI NG AGENT. FOR HYF•EF:ACT I V I TY OR TR EMORS , G I VE 100 MG OF F'HENOE;ARB I TAL SOD I UM SUBCUTANEOUSLY HOURLY UNT I L CONVULSIONS ARE CONTROLLED OR UNTIL 0.5 G HAS BEEN GIVEN. DO NOT GIVE STIM!!LANTS. (DF:EISDACH - HANDBOOK OF POISONING, 11TH ED. ). DT SPECIAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS AND INDEXES OF EXPOSURE: TRUE ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE. PSEUDO OR BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE. PULMONARY FUNCTION. RS REGULATORY STATUS. (1 OF 2 1) OSHA STANDARD 29CFR1910.12h0 HAZARD COMMUNICATION REQUIRES CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS TO ASSESS THE HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS WHICH THEY PRODUCE OR IMPORT, AND ALL EMPLOYERS HAVING WORKPLACES IN THE MANUFACTURING DIVISION, STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION CODES 20 THROUGH --9, TO PROVIDE INFORMATION TO THEIR EMPLOYEES CONCERNING HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS BY MEANS OF HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM INCLUDING LABELS, MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS, TRAINING, AND ACCESS TO WRITTEN RECORDS 48FR5?280 11/25/83 FOLLOWING OSHA STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO SUBSTANCES LISTED 29CFR1910, OTHERWISE ADVISE. (2 OF 21). (•' OF ii ) OSHA STANDARD 2-"iCFR1910.20 ACCESS TO EMPLOYEE EXPOSURE AND MEDICAL RECORDS. (4 OF 21) OSHA STANDARD 29CFR191CJ.1T2 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT. (5 OF 21) OSHA STANDARD 29CFR191U.141 SANITATION. (6 OF 21) OSHA STANDARD 29CFR1910.151 MEDICAL SERVICES AND FIRST AID. (7 OF 21) OSHA STANDARD 29CFR191«.133 EYE AND FACE PROTECTION.
Page 23: soc40e00
(^ OF i 1) 40CFR71 7 RECORDS AND REPORTS OF ALLEGAT I ONS THAT CHEM I CAL SUBSTANCES CAUSE S I GINI F I CAh,!T ADVERSE ;EACT I ONS TO HEALTH OR THE ENV I(";ONMENT REG1U I FiES MANUFACTURERS AND CEfiTA I N PROCESSO rF;S OF C1-IEM I CAL SUBSTANCES AND M I XTUFtES TO KEEP RECORDS OF S I GN I'FI CANT ('~DVEf:SE REACT I ONS TO HEALTH OR THE ENVIRONMENT ALLEGED TO HAVE BEEN CAUSED BY A'• SUBSTANCE OR M I XTUF:E . EPA MAY I NSPECT AND REO!J I Fif REPOF;T I NG OF SUCH RECORDS. 48FP38170 08/22/83. (9 OF 21) SUBSTANCE LISTED CALIFORNIA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE, TITLE 3, SECTION 2450. REQUIRES PERMITS FOR PESTICIDE USE. (10 OF 21) 49CFP172.101 TABLES OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, THEIR DESCRIPTION, PROPER SHIPPING NAME, CLASS, LABEL, PACKAGING, AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS DESIGNATED IN HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE AS HAZARDOUS MATERIAL (UNDER N.O.S CATEGORY) FOR THE PURPOSE OF TRANSPORTATION. 41FR15996 04/15/76 45FR34588 05/22/80 (AMENDMENT) 45FR46420 07/10/80 (AMENDMENT) 45F P62t78ca 09/18/80 (AMENDMENT) 45FR74649 11/10/80 (AMENDMENT) 46F-R177=9 03/19/81 (AMENDMENT) 46Ffi19?.'5 0.'/=i~/81 (AMENDMENT). - (11 OF 21) SUBSTANCE LISTED TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT INVENTORY. (12 OF 21) ~. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE DATA COMPLETED/PUBLISHED CLEAN WATER ACT (CWA) ~' SECT I ON 311. (125 OF 21) FiEGULAT I ON PROMULGATED CLEAN WATER ACT ( CWA ) SGCT I ON 311 4C#CFF:117. (14 OF 21) RISK DOCUMENTATION/ASSESSMENT COMPLETED/PUBLISHED FEDERAL INSECTICIDE, FUNGICIDE, AND RODENTICIDE ACT (FIFRA). (15 OF 21) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE DATA COMPLETED/PUBLISHED FEDERAL INSECTICIDE, FUNGICIDE, AND RODENTICIDE ACT (FIFRA). (16 OF 21) LABEL I NG F,EG?U I f,EMENT SECT I ON 3 FEDERAL I NSECT I C I DE , FUNG I C I DE AND RODENTICIDE ACT (FIFRA). (17 OF 21) SUBSTANCE SUBJECT TO CEDUI fiEMENTS OF GENERAL I NDUSTRY SAFETY ORDER OD (GISO) 5194 OR TITLE 8 OF CALIFORNIA ADMINSTRATIVE CODE AND DIVISION ~ 5, CHAPTER 2.5 OF CALIFORNIA LABOR CODE. .~ ~ O (18 OF 21) 4~ZCFP 12'~ . 21 T'EST I NG fiEOU I REMENTS FOR NAT I ONAL POLLUTANT D I SCHARGE ~ ELIMINATION SYSTEM (NPDES) PERMIT APPLICATIONS APPENDIX D - TABLE V w - TOX I C POLLUTANTS AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES FiEOU I F"ED TO BE I DENT I ED `. 6Y EXISTING DISCHARGES IF EXPECTED TO BE PRESENT 48FP14153 U4/41/83:
Page 24: soc40e00
c19 OF ~1) OSHA STANDARD 229CFFi 191 0. 94 VENT I LAT I ON OSHA STANDARD 219CFFr 191 0. 1•34 RESPIRATORY PROTECTI ON. LS (20 OF' 2 1 ) THIS SUBSTANCE TESTED FOR NEUROLOGIC/BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY BY. THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL AND COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS AND STROKE (NINCDS). (21 OF 21) THIS SUBSTANCE TESTED FOR MUTAGENESIS/GENETIC TOXICITY BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES (NIEHS). CT DOCUMENTS SAVED FOR EMPLOYEE RECORDS: NO FEDERAL AGENCY REQUIREMENT, BUT DUE TO HAZARDOUS NATURE OF SUBSTANCE, ADVISE FOLLOWING: SEE NIOSH CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR GUIDANCE. HEALTH STATUS CLASSIFICATION. OSHA RESPIRATOR CERTIFICATION 29CFR191U.114. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION IF OPERATES HEAVY EQUIPMENT. EMPLOYEE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EDUCATION RECEIF•T. EMPLOYEE MEDICAL RECORDS RECEIPT TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (TSCA) SECTION 8(C) RULE REQUIRES MANUFACTURERS AND CERTAIN PROCESSORS OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES AND MIXTURES TO KEEP RECORDS OF SIGNIFICANT ADVERSE REACTIONS TO EMPLOYEE HEALTH FOR 30 YEARS. CONTACT: JACK P. MCCARTHY, OFFICE OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES, EPA (800)424-1404. 48FR38178 8/22/83. MEDICAL WARNING REQUIRED FOR MEDICAL EXAM REFUSAL SIGNED BY EMPLOYEE. LEAKS, SF' I LLS, F I RE AND EVACUAT I ON PROCEDURES. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARD CLASS 49CFR172. 101 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE. NONE. INTERGOVERNMENTAL MARITIME ORGANIZATION HAZARD CLASS 49CFFi172.102 OPTIONAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE. NONE. 1 7
Page 25: soc40e00
WD t4ASTE DISPOSAL. (1 OF 1) TH I S MATES:I AL NOT L I STED AS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, AS DEF I NED I N SECT I 1 t71 ( 14 ) OF THE COMP ±Ei-IEN S I VE ENV I RONMENTAL RESF'ONSE,' COMPENSATION, ALIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) OF 19811, PURSUANT TO ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING: * FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT (FWPCA) SECTION .'-;11 (B) (2) (A) * SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ACT SECTION 3001 * CLEAN WATER ACT (CWA) SECTION 307(A) * CLEAN AIR ACT (CAA) SECTION 112 * TOX I C SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ( TSCA ) SECT I ON 7 * COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILIT ACT (CERCLA) SECTION 102.
Page 26: soc40e00
~,~. . .~ r . ....- . . ' . .' . ~.-. t.. ;ryl: ~ 1 ~.. ,.r~< . ~..... ..~ r, . . . .....r r.r~u ..'ti'~. .::i::: i : ~ .... .. RTECS 1987/MAR ~ SECC•NDARY SOURCE I D N I OS}•I/DG7525_zt i0i i CAS TYPE 1 NAME BENZOIC ACID, T,6-DICHLORO-2-METHOXY- CAS REG I STRY NUMBER CLASSIFICATION CODE CLASSIFICATION CODE CLASSIFICATION CODE TOXICOLOGY/CANCER REVIEW STANDARDS/REGULATIONS 1918-oo-9 AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL MUTATION DATA HERBICIDE TOXICOLOGY REVIEW DTTIAF" Deutsche Tieraerztliche Wochenschrift. 80(20),485,73 DOT-HAZARD:ORM-E; LABEL:NONE CFRGBR Code of Federal Regulations. 49, 172. 101,86 STATUS EPA GENETOX PROGRAM 1986, Positive; B subtilis rec assay STATUS STATUS STATUS STATUS EPA GENETOX PROGRAM 1986, F'osi ti ve: E col i polA without S9 EPA GENETOX PROGRAM 1986, Negative: Histidine reversion-Ames test EPA GENETOX PROGRAM 1986, Negative: In vitro UDS-human fibroblast; TRP reversion EPA GENETOX PROGRAM 1986, Negative: S cerevisiae-homozygosis STATUS EPA GENETOX PROGRAM 1986, Inconclusive:-D STATUS melanogaster Sex-linked lethal EPA TSCA TEST SUBMISSION (TSCATS) DATA BASE, DECEMBER 1986 SYNONYMS ACIDO (3,6-DICLORO-2-METOSSI)-PENZOICO SYNONYMS (Italian) o•-AN I S I C AC I D, ": , 6--D I CHLORO- SYNONYMS bANEX ~ SYNONYMS BANLEN ~ SYNONYMS BANVEL ~ I SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS BANVEL CST ~ O BANVEL D O BANVEL HERBICIDE BANVEL II HERBICIDE C? ANVEL 4S 17
Page 27: soc40e00
SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS cYNOP!YMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS ... ..,~fr,1,;.. ,. . .i'~_ „ ..~. ,.i S.. .b3f1S~):11 3>1f.: ~.,..,. _ , .2~ ... .. ..... . .... . . ..... . ..f . .,~. Efs..a1 S.1?:drf::.23 1 .~.~..,.... . . ... MOLECULAR FORMULA MOLECULAR WEIGHT WISWESSER LINE NOTATION ENTRY MONTH TOXIC DATA SOURCE TOXDATA KEYWORDS TOXIC DATA SOURCE TOXDATA KEYWORDS TOXIC DATA SOURCE TOXDATA KEYWORDS TOXIC DATA SOURCE TOXDATA KEYWORDS TOXIC DATA SOURCE TOXDATA KEYWORDS SANVEL 4WS BRUSH BU STER COMPOUND B D I CAML-+A DIANAT (Russi an) DIANATE DICAMBA D I C; aMDA ( DOT 3 D I CAMEiE 3,6-DICHLOOR-2-METI-IOXY-DENZOEIZUUR (Dutch) 3,6-DICHLOR-•'-MET}-IOXY-BENZOESAEURE (German) _,u-DICHLORO--o-ANISIC ACID 5-DICFELOfiO-6-METHOXYE}ENZOIC ACID .',6-DICHLORO-2-METHOXYD'ENZOIC ACID MDBA MEDIBEN 2-METHOXY-3,6-DICHLOROBENZOIC ACID NA 2769 (DOT) VELSICOL COMPOUND "rr%" VELSICOL 58-CS-ii MUREAV Mutation Research. 136,233,84 MUTATION;METABOLIC ACTIVATION;S. TYPHIMURIUM BACTEtiIA; 5T500 nmol /L NTIS** National Technical Information Servi ce. F'EsEU-113226 MUTATION;DNA REPAIR;E. COLI;BACTERIA;5 mg/disc MUTAT I ON; DNA REF'A I F,; E+. SUDT I L I S; BACTER I A; S mg/disc TGANAK Tsitologiya i Genetil:a. 16(1),45,82 MUTATION;CYTOGENETICS;MOUSE;RODENTS UNk-.EF'ORTED; 500 mg / k.g FAATDF Fundamental and Applied Toxicology 7,299,86 ORAL; fiAT; F;ODENTS; LD5D; i O'9 mg / kg ; TOX I C EFFECTS; HYSAAV Hygiene & Sanitation: English Translation of Gigiena Sanitariya. -'••5(7-9),14,70 ORAL; MOUSE; RODENTS; LDS0; 1 190 mg /kg I
Page 28: soc40e00
C Tf_1X Ir DATA f_:OUf;CE TOXDA i•A ~ ~:EY1:?OF"i,?S TOX IC DATA SOURCE TOXDATA KEYWORDS TOXIC DATA SOURCE TOXDATA F,EYWORD s TCANA[-: Tsitoloqiya i renF=ti.~;_.. 16(1),45,82 UIvREF'l:IRTED; MOUSE; f'trJDE-NT_ ; LD`;i a, 700 r mg / k: g q TOX I C r=F•FECTS6 HYSAAV Hyg i ene & San i tat i on : Eng 1 i sh Translation of Gigiena Sanitariya. ,. 35(.7-9),14,70 ORALg RABE;IT; FODENTS; LD5Cr, 2C+ni_r mg/kg OF;AL; GU I NEAF' I G; RODENTS; LD50; Yr?Cr() mg / E:g •T•0ZDA9 "Chemi stry of F'esti ci des. " N. N. Melnikov, New York, Springer-Uerlag, 1971 -,147,71 UNREF'OFTED, MAMMAL, NOSp : LD5r_r; 1Cj00 mg/kg
Page 29: soc40e00
CHEMICAL EXPOSURE 1974-87 C < ic_r21946 SUEtF I LE: HUMAN Priority Toxic Pollutants in Human Urine: Their Occurrence and Analysis Fatiadi, A.J. Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV 89114 SPONSORING AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Priority Toxic F'ollutants in Human Urin, : Their Occurrence and Analysis, Aug. 1983, 60 p 1983 DOCUMENT TYPE: Report TISSUE MEASURED: Urine COMMENT: Review. General information, reported levels, sourcesc_ of exposure, metabolites, and methods of analysis for: phthalate ester plasticizers, chlor-ophenoxy acid herbicides, chlorophenol biocides, p--nitrophenol, simple phenols, benzenediols, and toluene. CA NAME(S): Benzoic acid,3,6-dichloro-2-methoxy- CAS REG I STf:Y NO : 191 L-q0-9 FORMULA: C8H6=03' CHEMICAL F'ROF'ERTIES: MW 221. 04; MP 114--116 C, VP •_ . 75X10(E-3) -mm Hg at 100 C SYNONYMS: Acido (T,b--dicloro-2-metossi)-benzoico; Banex; Banlen; Banvel; Benzoic acid, 3,6-dichloro•-2-methoxy-; Brush Buster; Compound B dicamba; Dianat; Dicamba; Dicambe; MDBA; Mediben; o-Anisic acid, ',6--dichloro- Velsicol compound "R"; Velsicol 58-CS-1i; 2-Methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid; ~,5-Dichloro-b-methoxybenzoic acid; 3,t,-Dichloor-L'-methoxy-benzoeizuur; 3,6-Dichlor-T-methoxy-benzoesaeure; T,6-•Dichloro-o--anisic acid 3,6-Dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid 1 11 : ~;t~~ ~r , {>s~, :;~ .... .. . ...... ....... ~~..
Page 30: soc40e00
0 () ~1 /i- rS s3LJrtFILE: HUMAN Toxicologic Studies in a Fatal Overdose of 2,4-D, Mecoprop, and Dicamba Fraser-, A. D. q I sner, A. F. ; Perry, Fi. A. Victoria General Ho_pital; Toxicology Laboratory, Hali-fa:<, N.S., Canada i_ =H i VG Journal o-F Forensic Sciences, 29(4) : 1^37-i241 1934 DOCUMENT TYF'E: Journal TISSUE MEASURED: Liver EXPOSURE f•:Ol.lTE: Ingestion ANALYTICAL METHOD: HPLC SEX: F CASES: 1 RANGE: Not applicable MEAN ::: 100 mg / i<: g COMMENT: Autopsy samples after unknown dose of Killex (a mixture of 100 g 2,4-D/L, 50 g mecoprop/L, 9 g dicamba/L). Death within approximately 5 hr. DEMOGF;AF'HIC INFORMATION: 61 yr old suicide victim with history of mental illness and chronic alcoholism PATHOLOGICAL/MORPHOLOGICAL EFFECTS: Elevated white cell count. At autopsy, large volume of blood in pleural cavity HEALTH IMPACT: Comatose, distress, low blood pressure, peculiar odor on breath, heavy breathing, distended abdomen, vomiting CA NAME(S): Benzoic acid,3,b-dichloro-•2-metho:<y- CAS n^EG I STfiY NO: 1918-00-9 FORMULA: CSH6C1 2O? CHEM I CAL F'F'Or'EF:T I ES: MW ^21 . 04; MP 1 14-1 16 C; VF' ?~. 75X 1 O( E-? ) mm Hg at 100 C - SYNONYMS: Acido (=,a5-dicloro-2-metossi)-benzoico; Banex; Banlen; Banvel; Benzoic acid, 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxy-; Brush Buster; Compound Es dicamba; Dianat; Dicamba; Dicambe; MDBA; Mediben; o-Anisic acid, ?,b-dichlor-o- Velsicol compound "Ft"; Velsicol 58-CS--11; 2-Methoxy-3,b-dichlor-obenzoic acid; 2,5-Dichlor-o-b--methoxybenzoic acid; T,6-Dichloor-^-metho:<y-benzoeizuur, 3,'O-Dichlor- :--methc-a:<y-benzoesaeure; T,u--Dichloro---o--ani sic acid ?,b-Dichl.oro-2-methoxybenzoic acid 2 l<i;~E{F;iI1E~~'s
Page 31: soc40e00
0021447 SJFIFILE: HUMAN Toxicologic Studies in a Fatal Overdose of 2,4-D, Mecoprop, and Dicamba Fr-aser, A:D,y Isner, A.F.q Perry, R.A. Victoria iaenAral Hospital, Toxicology Laboratory, Halifax, N.S., Canada ii'H 1 VS Journal of Forensic Sciences, 29(4):12?7-1241 1984 DOCUMENT "rYF'E: Journal TISSUE MEASURED: Bile EXPOSURE ROUTE: I ngest i on ANALYT I CAL METHOD: f-IF'LC SEX : F CASES: 1 RANGE: Not applicable MEAN : 140 mg/L COMMENT: Autopsy samples after unknown dose of Killex (a mixture of 100 g 2,4-D/L, 50 g.mecoprop/L, 9 g dicamba/L). Death within approximately 5 hr. DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION: 61 yr old suicide victim with history of mental illness and chronic alcoholism PATHOLOGICAL/MORPHOLOGICAL EFFECTS: Elevated white cell count. At autopsy, large volume of blood in pleural cavity HEALTH IMPACT: Comatose, distress, low blood pressure, peculiar odor on breath, heavy breathing, distended abdomen, vomiting CA NAME(S) : Benzoic acid,3,6--dichloro-2-methoxy- rAS REG I STRY NO: 1918-t7c7--9 FORMULA: C8H6C1 203 CHEMICAL PROPERTIES: MW 221.04; MP 114-116 L, VP 3.75X1O(E-3) mm Hg at 100 C SYNONYMS: Acido (3,6-dicloro-2-metossi)-benzoico; Banex; Banlen; ~ Banvel; Benzoic acid, 3,6-dichloro-2-metho:<y-; Brush Buster; Compound B dicamba; Dianat; Dicamba; Dicambe; MDBA; Mediben; o-Anisic acid, 3,6-dichloro-- Vel si.col compound "Ft": Velsicol 58-CS-11; 2-Methoxy-ti,6-dichlorobenzoic acid; '.?,5-Dichloro-6-methoxybenzoic acid; ?,6-Dichloor--2-methoxy-benzoeizuur; 3,6-Dichlor-3-methoxy-benzoesaeure; 3,6-Dichloro-o--•anisic acid 3,6--Dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid
Page 32: soc40e00
00^ 144F• Sl. IraFI LE : HUMAN To icologic Studies in a Fatal Overdose of 2,4-D, Mecoprop, and Dicamba F'ra•--r, A.D.q Isner, A.f=.; Perry, Fi.A. Vi cto a Gcncral Flosp i tal , Tox i cal ogy Laboratory, ,} 1 i f a;: , N. 5. , Canada L; •:; H 14'r Journal o Corensic Sciences, 29(4):12•'7-1241 :84 DOCUMENT TYK_c Journal TISSUE MEASUF : Blood EXPOSURE FtOUTE: Ingestion ANALYTICAL METHO HFLC SEX: F CASES: 1 FtANGE: Not applicabl_ MEAN : 170 mg/L COMMENT: Autopsy samples after un4:no dose of Killex (a mixture of 100 g 2,4-D/L, 50 g mecoprop/L, 9 dicamb /L). Death within approximately 5 hr. DEMOGRAPHIC INF'ORMATION: 6 yr d suicide victim with history of mental illness and chronic alcoholism PATHOLOGICAL/MORPHOLOGICAL ECTS: Elevated white cell count. At autopsy, 1 arge volume of bloo in eural cavity HEALTH IMF'ACT; Comatose distres low blood pressure, peculiar odor on breath, heavy breathing, d'atended abd en, vomiting CA NAME(S): Benzoic ac' ,?,6-dichloro---metho:<y- CAS REGISTRY NO: 191 00-9 FORMULA: C8H6C1203 CHEMICAL PROPERT S: MW 221.04; MP 114-116 VP •?. 75X 1O(E-3) mm Hg at 100 C SYNONYMS: Aci (:~,6-dicloro-2-metossi)-benzoico; L~anex; Banlen; Banvel; F3en~ 'c acid, ',6 dichlaro-2-methaxy-; Brus Buster; Compound B ~ dicamba; Di at; Dicamba; Dicambe; MDBA; Mediben; o-Anisic acid, 3,6-dichlor - Velsicol compound "F:": Velsicol 58-CS-11; L-Methos;y- •:,6-•dichlorobenzoic acid; ?,5--Dichloro-6-metho::ybenzoic acid; 3,6-Dichloor-2-metho..y-benzoeizuur; ?,6--Dichlor-3-inethoxy-benzoesaeure; ?,6-•Dichloro-o-anisic acid T,6-•Dichloro-2-methoxyben~-oic acid ~ ~ ~ C7 Q O t0 0 N 4
Page 33: soc40e00
~,s „ h,r3~i,it47fe3i~~i:.ial Ltif3f.~-:~:,..., ~ •.i{:i. ., .. CHEMICAL REGULATIONS AND GUIDELINES SYSTEM 4-,:r7--O Pesticide Chemicals. EPA Citation: 40 CFR 455 F'ubl. Date: 780425 Ef-Fective Date: 780425 Jurisdiction: US Doc. Type:REGULATION Status: FINAL Authority: CWA No. of Ftevs; 0 No. of Chemicals: 81 604-0 Designation of Hazardous Substances. EPA Citation: 40 CFR 116 Publ. Date: 780323 Effective Date: 780313 Jurisdiction: US Doc. Type:REGULATION Status: FINAL Authority: CWA No. of Revs: 0 No. of Chemi cal s: 332 60S-0 Determination of Reportable Quantities for Hazardous Substances. EPA Ci tati on: 40 CFR 117 Publ. Date: 790829 Effective Date: 790829 Jurisdicti on; US Doc. Type:REGULATION Status: FINAL Authority: CWA No. of Revs: 1 No. of Chemicals: 2'~'96 608-0 EPA Administered Permit Programs: The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System; The Hazardous Waste Permit and the Underground Injection Control Program. EPA Citation: 40 CFR 122 Publ. Date: 800519 Effective Date: 800718 Jurisdiction: US Doc. Type:REGULATION Status: FINAL Authority: RCRA No. of Revs: 26 No. of Chemi cal s: 241 5 3t~ `;:is3:<3•s:'iti~~p J
Page 34: soc40e00
C ,~;, , . ~.,. ..,...r:. r5•_ 2'-( )_ Tolerances and Exemptions from Tolerances for Pesticide Chemicals on Raw Agricltural Commodities. EPA ; Office a-f Pesticides and Toxic Substances Ci tat i on: 40 CFR 'i nt i F'ubl. Date: 711125 Effective Date: 711125 Jurisdiction:-1JG Doc. TypesREGULATIQN Status: FINAL Authority: FIFRA No. o•F Revs: 148 No. of Chemicals: 1032; INCOMPLETE DISPLAY. i n or
Page 35: soc40e00
CRIS/USDA 1975-87/MAY 0008107 AGENCY ID: SAES UTA PROJ NO: UTA0C?419 PROJ TYPE: STATE PERIOD: 01 JAN 86 TO 01 JAN 91 INVEST: WILLIAMS M C PERF ORG s Ei I OL OGY LOCATION: UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY LOGAN UTA 84322 DIAGNOSTIC AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC ASPECTS OF PLANT POISONING IN LIVESTOCK OBJECTIVES:Develcp diagnoses and prognoses -For toxicoses in livestock caused by Delphinium, Senecia, Pinus, G+atierrezia; Lupinus, Veratrum, and seleniferous plants. Determine physiological responses of livestock to Delphinium, Senecio, Pinus, Astragalus, and photosensitizing plants. APPROACH: Clinical signs, blood chemistry, physiological functions, and microscopic morphology will be monitored in livestock-fed subject plants or their toxins. Data obtained will be correlated with that on field intoxications acquired by tests, symptoms, and microhistological identification of ingested plant fragments. Changes in cardiovascular function, intravascular pressures, electrocardiographic response, muscular activity, and neurologic function will be identified. Data will be correlated to develop diagnostic procedures for subject plants, prognoses ~ for poisoned animals, and strategies to prevent intoxication. Pt-tOGRESS:Bb/{?1 Sh/1^ Eight herbicides or herbicide combinations applied to Wasatch milkvetch (Astragalus miser •rax•. oblongifolius) significantly reduced the concentration of miserotoxin in the plants four weeks after treatment. Wasatch milkvetch treated with triclopyr at 1.7 and 2.2 kg ae.ha and in combination with dicamba at 1.1 + 1.1 kg ae.ha contained significantly lower concentrations of miserotoxin compared with other treatments and the controls. Triclopyr applied at 1.7 and 2.2 kg ae.ha and 2,4-D applied at 4.5 I<g ae.ha controlled Wasatch milkvetch. These herbicides also controlled mulesears (Wyethia amplexicaulis) and greatly increased the density of grasses. Clopyralid, picloram, and dicamba did not satisfactorily control Wasatch milkvetch at the rates tested. The addition of Na, K, and N did not significantly increase the concentration of nitrates or soluble oxalates in kikuyugrass (Pennisetum clandestinum). When K and N were not limiting, kikuyugrass accumulated T% soluble oxalates and 2% nitrates. These concentrations o-f soluble o:;alates and nitrates are toxic to livestock. The foliage of two grooved miLkvetch (Astragalus bisulcatus) and western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii) was analyzed for Se after plants were fed selenium compoi.tnd_ in nutrient solution. Two grooved milkvetch absorbed the greatest quantities of Se from Na2SeO3 and least amounts of Se from Na2SeO3 an selenomethionine but only half as much Se fr-om selenocystine. UU .~ ~ ~ O 0 W Ul 13
Page 36: soc40e00
.ia.~io<._...;o #-'L!T"~LICA-rIO#`dS, 86/0? n6%12 ?;/ILLIAMS, M.C. AND rCMCZ--•S(7SA, E. 1966. To:aic nitro compounds in species of Astragalus (Fabaceae) in Argentina. J. Range Manage. :;9:._41•-344. RALPHS, M.f,. AND `:4 ILLIAMS, i'1.C. 1986. Total al4~:aloid, crude protein, and •fiber concen•a_rations in velvet lupine (Lupinus leucophyllus) followng herbicide application. Weed Sci. 34:948--952. SHAW, R.J. AND WILLIAMS, M.C. 1986. Consider the lillies of the field .. .30 Utah Science =!7a 3~~--~:5. WILLIAMS, M.C. 1986. The importance of poisonous introduced plants to livestock and humans. Froc., Weed Sci., Sac. of America, Houston, TX, p. 40 (Abstract). WILLIAMS, M.C. AND MOLYNEUX, R.J. 1986. To;:icity and pyrrolizidine _al~:aloid content of Crotalaria seed. Proc., West. Soc. Weed Sci., San Diego, CA, p. 187 (Abstract). 14 ,;;s: 1's, `'i'ss'zf~~P!!~~ii#"t#i##:.s: ,ss's`~s1# Is- . . .
Page 37: soc40e00
^4D5'7 8•'-{~7-,_c i25'~ y (Hygiene regulation for the diamet-D residues in foods.) FSTA 1969-87/JUNE maximum permissible Kagan, N. A.; Aleksashina, Z. A.; Buslovich, Kolosovskaya, V. M.; Prismotrov, Yu. A. L rT'T~ri'r {si-.nc. ~`~ nZ3 .; i L t3t . . . . concentration of S. Yu. ; Karaseva, A. E. ; Belorusskii Nauchno-issled. Sanitarno-gigienicheskii Gigiena i Sanitariya, 11982, No. 8, 8b-87 Language: Ru Note: 1 ref. The herbicide di amet-D (a mixture of Inst., Minsk, USSR MCPA and dicamba), used on crops was assessed in animal toxicity trials, on foods made with contaminated flour. A max. mg/kg was established for diamet-D residues in being the max. permissible concn. of the main (MCFA). Application of diamet-D at 1-1 resulted in no residues being detected at the technical ripeness stage; thus a proposed. (RAW) and in organoleptic cereal studies permissible conr-n. of 0.05 foods, this cancn. also constituent of diamet-D .6 kg/ha at the tillering stage 45 days after application in grain delay period of 45 days is 198741-8 81-43-cOO86 Metabolic fate of the herbicide dicamba in a lactating cow. Oehler, D. D.; Ivie, G. W. 'det. Tos: i c:ol ogy ,- Entomol ogy Res. Lab. , USDA, Col l ege Stat i on, Texas 77840, USA Journal of Agri cul tur-al and Food Chemi str-y, 1980, 20, (4), 685-689 Languages En Note: 11 ref. The herbicide dicamba (Banvel, 35,b-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) was, rapidly absorbed, only partly metabolized, and rapidly excreted by a lactating cow after oral treatment during a 5-day period at a dose equivalent to 2.2 rng kg - i day - 1 or about 60 p.p.m. of dietary dicamba. Within 6 h after the final ( 1 4C)dicamba dose, about 89% of the administered 1 4C had been excreted in the urine, LESS THAN 2% in the f aeces, and about 0.02% i n the mi l k:. The excreted radi ocarbon was primarily unchanged dicamba (about 80'/.), but the compound was metabolized by aryl-0--demethylation to 3,6-dichloro-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (DCHBA), which was the major metabolite in urine and in extracts of tissues (liver and kidney) and was the only radioactive component extracted from milk. 8esul ts i n these stucii eG suggest that 1 ow-1 evel exposure of rumi nants to dicamba through contaminated feed, forage, or water will not result in appreciable retention of residues by edible tissues or their secretion into milk. (AS)
Page 38: soc40e00
005067 69-()6•--Gc7234 METABOLISM OF BANVEL-D HERBICIDE IN A DAIRY COW. ST. JOHN, L. E. , Jft. 5 LISK, D. J. DEPT. OF ENTOMOLOSYti CORNELL L1NIU., ITHACA, NEW YCfiK, USA JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE, 1969, 5s (•_) 7392-93, L anguage: EN Note: 2 CEF. BANVEL-D (2-METHOY,Y-T,u,-DICHLOfiOBENZOIC ACID) RESIDUES WERE NOT DETECTED IN THE MILK' OR FAECES OF A COW FED 5 PPM OF THE COMPOUND IN ITS EVENING GRAIN RATION FOR 4 DAYS. CONCN. EXCRETED INTACT IN THE URINE BETWEEN THE 2ND AND 7TH DAYS OF Tl-!E EXPT. WERE 3. 4, 4.6, 4.', 4. 2, 4.1 AND 0.1 PPM, .ESF'ECTIVELY; THIS WAS 73% OF THE TOTAL FED. THE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS USED HAD SENSITIVITIES OF 0. 0S9 0, 1 AND 0.1 PPM WITH MILK, URINE AND FAECES RESPECTIVELY. (CDA) c
Page 39: soc40e00
File 155:MEDLINE - 66-87/JUNE 05286098 e421 0s?9f3 Toxicity of dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid) to Azotobacter vinelandii. Gonzalez-Lopez J; Moreno Jq de la Rubia T; Martinez-Toledo MV; Ramos-Cormenzana A Folia Microbiol (Praha) 1984, 29 (2) pi27-'0, ISSN 0015-5632 Languages: ENGLISH The effect of dicamba was studied in N-free medium inoculated with,,. Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC 12837. Nitrogen fixation was determined by acetylene reduction. Dicamba at a concentration of 500 micrograms/mL had a strong inhibitory effect on nitrogenase activity. However, no inhibitory e-ff ect on microbial respiration was detected. 04223683 81051683 [Morphological studies of chronic toxicity of Chwastox D] Badania morfologiczne nad skrocona przewlekLa toksycznoscia chwastoxu D. Luci ak• M; Ki ta K; E.:i ta I Med Pr 1980, ?1 (3) p177-84, ISSN 0465-5893 Journal Code: M0J Languages: POLISH Summary Languages: ENGLISH Chwastox D--herbicide for killing dicotyledonous weeds was evaluated to::icologicailyj basing on studies on the mass and morphological picture of internal organs of rats receiving, over 1•T weeks, 15, 60, 240 and 960 mg/kg ~ of feeding stuff containing this herbicide. The animals exposed for 1.:~ weeks to different doses of Chwastox D were found to develop inspecific pathomorphotic changes, 1_k:e disturbed circulation, retrogressive, progressive and inflammatory changes. The pathomorpohologic changes were found to be increased with 240 and 960 mg of stuff. The observations indicated that the maximum allowable dose for rats is 60 mg/kg of the feeding stuff. 04847628 83080628 - [Enzyme activity of the blood and tissues of individual_organs long-term exposure to dianate7 Ak.tivnost' riada fermentov krovi i tkani otdel'nykh organov dlitel'nom vozdeistvii dianata. Zhidkova LV pri Gig Sanit Oct 1982, (10) p77-9, ISSN 0016-9900 Journal Code: FPZ Languages: RUSSIAN Tags: Animal; Comparative Study; Male Descriptors: *Alk:aline Fhosphatase--Metabolism--ME; *Benzoates--Toxicity --TO; *Dicamba--Toxicity--TO; *Fructosediphosphate Aldolase--Metabolism--ME ; *Lactate Dehydrogenase--Metabolism--ME; *Succinate Dehydrogenase --Metabolism--MEy Dicamba--Analogs and Derivatives--AA; Kidney--Enzymology --EN; Liver-•-Enzyrnology--EN; Myocardium--Enzymology--EN; Rats; Time Factors CAS Registry No.: 1918-00-9 (Dicamba); 2300-66-5 (dicamba dimethylamine) Enzyme No.: EC 1.1.1.27 (Lactate Dehydrogenase); EC 1.3.99.1 (Succinate Dehydrogenase); EC ti.1.-=.1 (Alkaline Fhosphatase); EC 4.1.2.13 (Fructosediphosphate Aldolase) 7
Page 40: soc40e00
05744< 1w 31-1'~ 8 5 (156 0 '~9 Toxicologic studies in a fatal overdose of 2,4-D, mecoprop, and dicamba. Fraser ADi Isner Af=: F'erry RA J(orensic Sc i 0__t 1984, 29 (4) pi-'37-41, ISSN 0Ca:'-2-1i.98 Journal Code: I5Z Languages: ENGLISH - A,ulcadal poisoning committed by a 61--year--old woman, who ingested an unknown quantity of Killex, containing in aqueous solution 1o0 g/L of (2,4-dichlor-opheno::)acetic acid (2,4-D), 50 g/L of mecoprop, and 9 g/L of dicamba as amine salts is described. Quantitation of chlorophenoxy acids was performed by extraction Trom an acidified mixture and concentration before high per•formance liquid chromatography analysis. All three herbicides were separated in a phosphate bu-Ffer/acetonitr-ile mixture at 280 nm on a RP-8 column. Concentrations of herbicides found were: in blood--520-mg/L 2,4-D, 5•_+0--mg/L mecoprop, and 170-mg/L dicamba; in urine---670-mg/L 2,4-D and 520-mg/L mecoprop; in bile--:l4n-mg/L 2,4-D, 5?i?•-mg1L mecoprop, and 140-mg/L dicamba; and in liver--540-mg/Kg 2,4-D, 500-mg/Kg mpcoprop, and less than 10()-mg/I;g dicamba. Liquid chromatography was found to be a reliable method ;or herbicide quantitation in biological t-i ssues and •f l ui ds. The techn i que of fered def i ni te advantages over ultraviolet spectrophotometry and avoids the derivatization requirement for gas chromatography. • U5i5.~-'_75.' 84176753 Oral intubation of dogs with combinations of fertilizer, herbicide, and insecticide chemicals commonly used on lawns. Year y RA Am J Vet Res Feb 1984, 45 (2) pi88-9o, ISSN 0002-9645 Journal Code: 4<?C Languages: ENGLISH Six Beagle dogs were orally intubated with mixtures of a urea-based fertilizer, 2,4'-D, mecoprop (MCPP), dicamba, and either bensulide or chlorpyrifos. The mixtures were formulated as they are used in liquid application to lawns. The dogs were given volumes of 10 ml/kg of body weight, delivering the following quantities of each ingredient: urea--623 mg/kg, inorganic phosphorus (P205)--24 mg/kg, potassium (K20)--66 mg/kg, '2,4-D-•-6.5 mg/kg, MCPP--3.26 mg/kg, dicamba--0.55 mg/kg, and either bensulide--60.93 mg/kg or chlorpyri-fos---6.77 mg/kg. The dogs were given 3 consecutive daily doses of the mixture containing bensulide (round 1) or the mixture containing chlorpyrifos (round 2). The dogs did not exhibit any clinical signs of illness associated with the treatments. Eff ects on hematologic values or routine clinical chemical analyses did not occur with the round 2 mixture. Serum lactic dehydrogenase activity decreased by appro:: i matel y 50% af ter a si ngl e dose of the round i mi :, ture was gi ven. P1 asma chol i nesterase decreased to appro;, i matel y 50'/% of control val ues following either the round 1 or the round 2 mixture; this decrease was not accompanied by cholinergic signs of intoxication. 10
Page 41: soc40e00
05321611 Q -1, 24 5 6 1i An evaluation of the genotoxic properties of herbicides following plant and animal activation. Plewa h9J; Wagner ED; Gentile GJ; Gentile JM Mutat ;e s Jun 1T-84, 136 (?) p23•=-4.5, ISSN 0027-5107 Journal Code: NNA Language=: ENGLISH Commercial and technical grades of 11 herbicides and 13 combinations of commercial grade herbicides were evaluated for their genotoxic properties with Salmonella typhimurium, Saccharomyces cerevisiae directly and following plant and animal activation, or with Zea mays. The herbicides were related by their use in commercial corn (maize) production. Commercial grade formulations of each herbicide and combination of herbicides were also evaluated in situ with the pollen waxy locus assay of Z. mays. Eradicane and bifeno:: were negative in all assays. Alachlor, propachlor, procyazine and SD5C}09:' (a formulation of cyanazine plus atrazine) were positive in one assay. Cyanazine, dicamba and metolachlor were positive in 2 assays. Atrazine, _,imazine and butylate were tested only in situ. Atrazine and simazine were positive and butylate was negative. Of the combinations of herbicides evaluated with the 3 genetic assays, alachlor plus bifeno:: and procyazine plus metolachlor were positive in 1 assay and metolachlor plus atrazine was positive in 2 assays. 0f the combinations of herbicides evaluated only in situ, butylate plus ai_razine, eradicane plus atrazine, eradicane plus cyanazine and metolachlor plus cyanazine were positive while butylate plus cyanazine was negative. 04251943 81079943 ~ Morphology of the neoplasms of the thyroid gland in Fischer 344 rats treated with 4,4'-methylene-bis-(N,N-dimethyl)-benzenamine. Murthy AS Toxicol Lett Oct 1980, E6 (6) p--91-7, ISSN 0378-4274 Journal Code: VXN Contract/Orant No.: NIH-NCI-74-?5-10b0V2; 76-32-106002 Languages: ENGLISH Fol 1 i cul ar neop 1 asms of the thyroi d g 1 and devel oped i n 79 of 200 Fi scher 344 rats of both sexes, fed ei ther 0.0375% or 0.075% 4,4'-methylene-bis-(N,N-dimethyl)•-benzenamine (MDBA) mixed with the diet. Hyperplastic changes in the follicular epithelium occurred in 12 rats fed the higher concentration of this chemical. One of 40 control rats had -a follicular carcinoma of the thyroid gland. 9
Page 42: soc40e00
33~i3iF3itsi$I3 i7i~~313viii3?il 3.t:r_r• ~ § (14.795656 0 73 4) .^•_c365 6 LHygienic standard for the maximum permissible level of diamet-D residues in food products] Gigienicheskoe normirovanie maksimal 'no dopustimogo urovnia ostatochnykh kolichestv diarneta-D v pishchevykh produk:tak:h. Kagan NA; Al eti:sashi na ZA; Fjusl ovi ch Slu; K'ar-aseva AE; t;ol osbvak:ai a UM Gig Sanit Aug 1902, (8) p06-7, ISSIV C.)c)16-99c7Cr Journal Code: FPZ Languages: RUSSIAN Journal Announcement : 8302 S>_rbf i 1 e: INDEX MEDICUS Tags: Animal; Female Descr-i ptors: #E-renzoates--To;a i ci ty---TO; •>EDi camba---Tox i ci ty--TO; *Food Contamination; *Pesticide Residues--Toxicity--TO; *2,4-Dichlorophenoxyaceti c Acid--Analogs and Derivatives--AA; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Maximum Permissible Exposure Level; Rats; Time Factors; 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid--Toxicity--TO - CAS Registry No.: 1918-•00-9 (Dicamba); 94-75-7 (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyace tic Acid) o431 1682 81139682 tData for establishing the maximum permissible concentration of the herbicide Banvel D in the soil] Materialy k obosnovaniiu predel'no dopustimoi kontsentratsii gerbitsida banvela D v pochve. Naishtein SIa; Chegrinets GIa; Voronova GF; Nikula RG; Bezborod'ko MD Gig Sanit Jan 1981, (1) p86-8, ISBN 0016-9900 Journal Code: FPZ Languages: RUSSIAN Journal Announcement: 8101, Subf i 1 e: INDEX MEDICUS Descriptors: *Benzoates--To;<icity--TO; *Dicamba--Toxicity--TO; *Herbicide s--Toxicity--TO; *Soil Pollutants; Dicamba--Analogs and Derivatives--AA; Dicamba----Analysis---AN; Drug Stability; Herbicides--Analysis--AN; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Maximum Permissible Exposure Level; Pesticide F:esi dues; Ti me Factors CAB Registry No. : 1918-00-9 (Dicamba) ; 2300-66-5 (dicamba dimethylamine) 03492098 72,126o98 Pharmacokinetic study of a patient intoxicated with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid. Young JF; Hal ey TJ Cl i n Tox i col Dec 1977, 11 (5) p489-500, ISShI 0009-9309 Journal Code: DL6 Languages: ENGLISH A simultaneous pharmacokinetic study of two chemicals has been conducted on a clinically stabilized human who had intentionally ingested a mixture of 2,4-D and Dicamba. The information developed can be useful to the clinical toxicilogist in the management of similar cases. 8
Page 43: soc40e00
(}'^`7_'<~,i8 `?:-,9%1 Pharmacokinetic study of a patient intoxicated with 2,4-dichloropheno yacetic acid and 2-metho:<y-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid. YOung JF; Haley TJ Clin To::icol Dec 1977, 11 (S) p469--OtyC}, ISSN 0009-9309 Journal Code: DL6 Languages: ENGLISH A si mul tanaous phar-macoF~:i neti c study of two chemi cal s has been conducted on a clinically stabilized human who had intentionally ingested a mixture of 2,4-D and Dicamba. The in•Formation developed can be useful to the clinical toxicilogist in the management of similar cases. 03791752 79168752 CSevere, acute erosive-hemorrhagic gastroduodenitis following spraying of the herbicide Banvel M (letter)] Schwere, akute erosiv-hamorrhagische Gastroduodenitis nacti Verspruhen des Herbizids Banvel M= Huep WW; Hessel mann J Dtsch Med Wochenschr Apr 6 1979, 104 (14) p525, ISSN 0012-0472 Journal Code: ECL Languages: GERMAN Journal Annouuncement: 7909 Subfile: INDEX MEDICUS Tags: Case Report; Human; Male Descriptors: *Duodenal Diseases--Chemically Induced--Cl; *Enteritis ---Chemically Induced--CI; *Gastritis-•-Chemically Induced--Cl; *Herbicides --F'oi soni ng---F'0; Di camba--Foi soni ng--F'O; Mi ddl e Age; MCF'A--Poi soni ng--F`0 049 90181 83223,181 CEffect of the most frequently used pesticides on various biological parameters in Daphnia magna Straus (Crustacea)] WpLyw najczesciej stosowanych w rolnictwie pestycydow na nie6:tore parametry biologiczne Daphnia magna Straus (Crustacea). Urban E Rocz Akad Med Bi al ymstoku 1982, 26 p41-•5, ISSN 0067-6489 ;Journal Code: TXD Languages: POLISH Summary Languages: ENGLISH Document Type: English Abstract Journal Announcement: 8309 Subf i le: INDEX MEDICUS Tags: Animal Descriptors: *Daphnia--Drug Effects--DE; *Motor Activity--Drug Effects --DE; *Myocardial Contraction--Drug Effects--DE; .*Pesticides°Toxicity---TO ; Dicamba--Toxicity--TO; Drug Combinations--Toxicity--TO; Fungicides, Industrial---Toxicity--TO; Heart Rate--Dr ug Effects--DE; Herbicides --Toxicity--TO; Insecticides--Toxicity--TO; MCPA--Toxicity--TO CAS Registry No. : 1918-00-9 (Dicamba) ; 8003-31-4 (chwastox D) ; 94-74•--6 ( MCPA ) 11
Page 44: soc40e00
... . ~ . - ~ 1 t lSa60oO~S15L~a2}i}f.~ZHHSiNi~Ss~ NTIS 1964-87/ISS11 1222765 PD07--111944/XAEi Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 8: Dicamba tnvi ronmentLZl f'rotect i on Agency, Washi ngt-on , DC. Of f i ce of F'esti ci de Programs. Corp. Source Codes: r>'1287124 Report No.: EF'A/51•0/FS-87/c749 17 Oct 83 °p Languages: English NTIS Prices: PC A02/MF AtJ1 Journal Announcement: GFiAI8702 Country of Publication: United States • The document contains up-to-date chemical infor-mation, including a summary of the Agency's regulatory position and rationale, on a specific pesticide or group of pesticides. A Fact Sheet is issued after one of the following actions has occured. (1) Issuance or reissuance of a registration standard, (2) Issuance of each special review document, (3) Registration of a significantly changed use pattern, (4) Registration of a new chemical, or (5) An immediate need for information to resolve controver-sial- issues relating to a speca•fSc chemical or use pattern. 1162260 F'B86-105450/XAB ~- Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 83-341-1557, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior, Denver, Colorado Moseley, C. L. ; Anderson, K. National Inst. for Cccupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH. Corp. Source Codes: 052678000 Report No.: HETA--C'3-.?41-1557 Jan 85 : 6p Languages: English NTIS Prices: PC A03/MF A01 Journal Announcement: GFAI86Cr2 Country of Publication: United States Breathing zone samples were analyzed for the pesticides 2,4-D (94757)-, Banvel (1918Cr09) , Buctril (168984•5) , and Roundup (28641940) at field stations of the Bureau of Reclamation (Bureau) (SIC-9511), US Department of the Interior at Fresno, Tracy, and Red Bluff, California and Bismarck, North Dakota in August, 1983 and June, 1984. The survey was requested by the Bureau to evaluate its pesticide application program. Workk practices were ob served dur-ig ng mi >: i ng, sprayi ng , and cl eanup operati ons. Dbservati on of work practices indicated that Bureau employees had a good understanding of the hazards associated with pesticides. Recommendations include employee education, using protective clothing during mixing, and implementing programs of e: posure recor-df~:eeping. 15
Page 45: soc40e00
s-> 97 y''•? T f' D 8:?-1 76719 Occupational Exposure to Leptophos and Other Chemicals (Technical rept,.'• Xintaras, Charles ry Burg, JeAnne R. ; Tanaka, Shiro ; Lee, Shiu T. Johnson, Barry L. ' National Inst. ror- Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH. Corp. Source Codes: 052678000 Report hto. : DHEt4/PdIOSH/FUS/78--1:36 Mar 78 158p Languages: English NTIS Prices: PC A08/MF A01 Journal Announcement: GF:AI8=13 Country of Publication: United States This publication reports the medical findings regarding the health status of the wor kers and the resul ts of a reproducti ve survey o-F wi ves of current and former Velsicol Chemical Co. workers in Bayport, Texas. The difficulty in establishing causal relationships when workers are occupationally exposed to multiple chemicals is also discussed. Also included in this report is a special case study evaluation of Velsicol workers allegedly chemically poisoned and previously diagnosed as experiencing severe neurological problems. Some of these workers were examined during this study and the question af permanent damage was considered in relation to •thei r cur-rent heal th status. 967066 F'B83--162016 Mortality Study of Pesticide Manufactures/Formulators the Velsicol Chemical Company, Marshall, Illinois Plant DiTraglia, David P. Illinois Univ. at Chicago Circle. Corp. Source Codes: 010384000 Sponsor: National Inst. for O,-I. Occupational Report No.: NIOSH-z1ci-76-0173 1979 1 04p Languages: English NTIS Prices: PC A06/MF AD1 Journal Country of Publication: United States Con t r ac t hlo.: F'HS-hf I OSH-21 n-76-0173 Safety and Documentation =;ealth, Announcement: GFtAI8•T11 of Cincinnati, The mortality of pesticide formulators and manufactures at the Vel i scol Chemical Company (SIC-2879) in Marshall, Illinois, was investigated. Employment histories were collected for approximately 2300 workers employed for at through general least 6 months between 1940 and 1964. Vital status was determined December, 1976. Worker deaths were compared to the United States population expected death rates. In general, the employees of the Marshall facility had a lower mortality rate than the general population. The worker death rate from all types o-f cancer also was below the expected rates for workers employed for more than 36 months. Increased time of appeared to increase the risk of death. The authors recommend that eat outside of the worE::place and change clothing at the factory. exposure workers Air sampling determine the should be conducted regularly at the liquid filling necessity of respir•atory protection. 16 h+ . .'f.. . ~ . ~ . . . ~ ~ . . .. . . . . ~~ ' areas to ~
Page 46: soc40e00
SSErb4h I•-'LsF31--•.^_=•`_'rc;:3S Mortality Study of the Montrose Chemical DiTraglia, David F'. T. ~I M ~~~~T~ ;t~trtr:;~~i~. Pesticide Manufacturers/Formulators: Documentation of Corporation, Torrance, California Cohort Medical Center, Chicago. School of Public Health. I1' inois Univ. at the Corp. Source Codess Sponsor: National OH. 1979 86p Languages: English i-)4586.°Ji r: 4 Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, NTIS Prices: PC A05/MF At?1 Country of rualiL.ation: United Journal Announcement: 6hAI8125 States Con t r ac t h!n.: PHS / N I OSH-21 0-76-0173 The mortality of pesticide formulators and manufacturers at the Velsicol Chemical Company (SIC-2879) in Marshall, Illinois, was investigated. Employment histories were collected for approximately .23{ru workers employed for at least 6 months between 1940 and-19h4. Vital status was determined through December, 1976. WWorker deaths were compared to the United States general population expected death rates. In general, the employees of the Marshall facility had :.<a lower mortality rate than the general population. C The worker death rate from all types of cancer also was below the expected stomach, respiratory, and central nervous system cancer excess of the expected rates for workers employed for more Increased time of exposure appeared to increase the risk of The authors recommend that workers eat outside of the workplace and clothing at the factory. Air sampling should be conducted regularly rate, however, deaths were in than 7-6 months. death. change at the liquid protection. filling areas to determine the necessity of respiratory s 17
Page 47: soc40e00
85946.9 i 'BC I •-2^•-'.• 65 = Mortality Study of Pesticide Manufacturers/Formulators: Documentation of ~ the Ve.lsical Chemical Company, Memphis, Tennessee Cohort (Contract rept. ) DiTr-agl ia, David P. Illinois Univ. at Chicago Circle. Corp. SQLirc ~-~' Codes: 010384000 Sponsor: National Inst. for Occupational Sa7ety and Health, Cincinnati, fl H. Rep or t iVo. : N I OSH-21 Cs-76-<a 173 1979 1 00p Languages: English NTIS Prices: PC A05/MF A01 Journal Announcement: GFAIS12? Country of Publication: United States Contract No.: PHS--NIOSH-210-76-0173 The effects of pesticide exposure were studied in workers employed at the Vesicol Chemical Company (SIC-2879) in Memphis, Tennessee. Data was collected including a list of jobs and departments and work histories. The study group comprised workers with at least 6 months of factory experience pr i or to the end of 1964. Wor ker-s were cl assi •f i ed i nto f our study cohorts comprising all workers employed for 6 months or more. Standardized mortality ratios wbrl<:ers employed for 6, 12, or 36 months or more. Standardized mortality ratios (SMf,s) were measured according to exposure. As exposure length increased SMR increased substantially. For all malignant neoplasms, SMRs were 91, 95, 100 and 110 percent in cohorts 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. For neoplasms of the respiratory system SMRs were 122, 128, 1?3 and 146 percent in cohort 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Three deaths • occurred from malignant neoplasms of the respiratory system, after 10 and 20 years of employment. The authors conclude that the data is not complete and recommend that measures be lZaF;en to complete it. If this is not possible, the cohorts should be followed S.ip and "he data reexamined. 18 .;~:=r_
Page 48: soc40e00
. t _ _ . _ _._ . . . . , , 75j9t36t; FF;S0--15-_ 737 Health Hazard Evaluation Determination Report HE 77-73-610, Velsicol Chemical Corporation, St. Louis, Michigan Evans, William A. Nati onal Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH. E-la. ard Evaluations and Technical Assistance Branch. Corp. Source Codes: 052678009 Report No.; NIOSH/TR/HHE-77-73-610 Aug 79 4?p Languages: English NTIS Prices: PC A(:)?:/MF Ar?1 Journal Announcement: GFAI8012 Country of F'ublication: United States Environmental air samples were taken on June 6 to E, 1977 at the currently nonoperating Velsicol Chemical Corporation facility in St. Louis, Michigan and a medical evaluation of facility employees was conducted between October 17 and 22, 1977. The sampling and medical evaluations were prompted by a request from an author-i aed representati ve of empl'byee s of the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers Union regarding past employee exposures to polybrominated biphenyls (:36-?50r_r1B) and current employee exposures to a variety of chemicals. Sampling results show that carbon tetrachloride (5ui•?5) , ethylene dichloride (107062), benzene (71432), trichloroethylene (79016), total particulates, sulfur dioxide (7446095), and ammonia (7664417) were either undetected or below OSHA standards. Two measurements of appro;<i matei y 20 to 30 concentrati ons i n parts of substances for mi 1 l i on parts of air (ppm) were recorded for methyl bromide (74839) near a halogen detecting bunsen burner. These concentrations exceeded the OSHA standard (15ppm). Medical evaluation results reveal that facility workers showed a • high incidence of acneiform skin lesions, probably caused by occupational exposure to halogenated chemicals. Some employees may have adverse health effects upon either their nervous, cardiovascular, hepatic, immune, or respiratory systems. It is recommended that exhaust and ventilation systems be improved and that engineering controls should be instituted or improved on all reactors. Workers should be informed of the extent and severity of health effects and those who show evidence of damage to the hepatic, nervous, immune, or hematologic systems should be removed from further exposure to solvents and other toxic materials. 19
Page 49: soc40e00
j , us._;. .., iti$ii3i&i~i~}331i3 ~1~1.~113333i7i:f3 tlti ` 'N bri:u't3~;h"Lit)2~t~liY~l.M1.~ -te:~: f,:i?97J PL'-'^76 Y(:4/; Simultaneous Gas Chromatographic Determination of 2,4-D and Dicamba in Human E+l ood and lJri ne r.i vers, Jerry B. ; Ya! iger-, Jr. , Wi 1 1 i am L. emmer, :; Howard W. Hawai?. Univ., Honolulu. Hawaii Community StUdi-,:2<s on Pesticides. Sponsor: Food and Drug Administration, Chamblee, Ga. 14 Apr 70 4p Pub. in Jnl. of Chromatography, 50 p-"4-?•47 1970. Included in the report, Journal Articles on Pesticide Chemical Analysis. Gr oup 4, PB-276 303. Document Type: Journal article NTIS Prices: (Order as PB-276 303, MF A01) Journal Announcement: GfiA I 7S09 Contract No.: FDA-B6--•65-79 The compounds 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-methoxy-?,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba).are herbicides commonly used to control a variety of broadleaf plants. An acute poisoning case was recently investigated by the Hawaii Community StUdy an F'esticides in which the victim intentionally ingested a formulation containing 2,4-D and dicamba. The occurrence of this attempted suicide created a need far a rapid and sensitive method for detecting these compounds in small amounts of human blood and urine. The Hawaii Community Study on Pesticides uses the method of Bevenue et al. to determine pentachlorophenol (PCP) residues in human blood. In an evaluation done by this laboratory, the procedure was shown to be rapid, accurate, sensitive and reproducible. Because 2,4-D and dicamba display chemical characteristics similar to those of PCP, these compounds are also detected by the procedure. 597978 PL•+-270 4::.;/7 Drinking Water and Health. Part II, Chapters 6 and 7. A Report of the Safe Drinking Water Committee (Final rept) National Research Council, Washington, D.C. Assembly of life Sciences. Sponsor: Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. Office of ;Partial of contents: Herbicides; Insecticides; Fungicides; Fumigant; Other organic constituents; Background radiation; Abundance of radionuclides in water; Radiation dose calculations; Estimation of risk; Risks from radioactive drinking water. Water Supply. 1977 527p See al so PEs-i70 422. Document Type: Bibliography NTIS Prices: PC A21/MF Ar?]. Journal Announcement: GRA17721 Contract No.: EPA-68-01--3169
Page 50: soc40e00
,asiruii>~;' :imilar toxicity. powder (Hyvar not a sensitizer. bbit eye. Sheep hrs. After daily hologic findings f the adrenals, resembles that ble to tolerate a :erline between ccept increased naterial causes ly with water. :y fats and oils. riety of turfs, :n./kg. in male tation, but no to rabbit eyes •logic effects in ve ingested 50 t ial hydrolysis irboxylic acid issue has been >It (Herbicide ,xicity in rats toxic (LD„s s are obscure I after several )int of death. dogs without Feeding tests I irritation of c absorption mation with >ydroxide gel d, 1951. UseS(:;.oml- SYNTHETIC PESTICIDES '` 211 nal pain, diarrhea, urinary incontinence, nasal irritation, and prostration. A 25% solution in xylene is very irritating to skin and mucous membranes, and there is some evidence of skin absorption in rabbits. No in- formation on the effect of this compound on cholinesterase has been located, but the toxic signs listed above suggest the possibility that it is able to inhibit cholinesterase at least weakly. See also Parathion in Section 111. Ref.: Naugatuck Chemical, 1959. 1075 Hexachloroacetone 1075 Toxicity rating: 3. Used as a weed killer. Irritating to mucous membranes and skin. Appreciable percutaneous toxicity in rabbits. No clinical poisonings known. Chronic feeding studies in rats revealed hypertrophy of liver and kidneys, and slight growth depression. Ref.: Cox Chemical Co., 1957. 1076 Maleic Hydrazide 1076 1,2-Dihydropyridazine-3,6-dione (and sodium and diethanolamine salts), MH Toxicity rating: 3. A growth inhibitor of plants. In animals it causes tremors and muscle spasms. No effect on the skin, except possible sensitization. Ref.: Naugatuck Chemical, 1954. 1077 1-Naphthaleneacetic Acid 1077 Alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid,.Planofix Toxicity rating: 3. A synthetic plant hormone. In animals it produces gastroenteritis and central nervous depression. Slight to moderate irritation of rabbit skin after prolonged contact (not so the methyl ester). The dust may cause nasal irritation. 1078 Sodium Ethyl Xanthate 1078 Sodium xanthogenate, SEX cotton defoliant Toxicity rating: 4. Defoliant and herbicide. Oral mean lethal dose in mice is 0.73 gm,/kg. (about the same in guinea pigs). Concentrated solutions (and presumably dusts) are irritating to rabbit skin and eyes, and percutaneous toxicity is comparatively high (lethal dose less than 1 gm./kg.). Poisoned animals show salivation, loss of righting reflex, pulmonary congestion, pleural effusion, and death. Mild dermatitis is the only lesion observed to date in man. Related to Bisethylxanthogen above. Ref.: Rowe, 1956. -1079 Sodium Isopropyl Xanthate 1079 Isopropylxanthic acid sodium salt Toxicity rating: 4. A herbicide and defoliant. Toxic properties are like those of sodium ethyl xanthate. See latter above. Ref.: McCormick, 1955. 1080 Sodium 1-Naphthaleneacetate 1080 Toxicity rating: 3. A plant growth regulator of moderate oral toxicity in laboratory animals, causing gastroenteritis and central nervous depression. Prolonged application to rabbit skin (as a 10% solution in propylene glycol) produces local irritation. Heavy dust concentrations induce moderate nasal irritation in man. See also 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid above. Ref.: Hollingsworth, 1958. ' 1081 2,3,6-Trichlorobenzoic Acid 1081 2,3,6-TBA Toxicity rating: 3. Animal tests place this weed killer and the closely related Dicamba near the borderline between toxicity classes 3 and 4. Poisoned sheep and cattle showed salivation, tremor, depression and tympanites. Autopsy findings included lung congestion, hemorrhages and kidney inflammation. Rabbits developed erythema and edema after a second skin application of either the pure substance or mixture of its isomers. Ref.: Girard, 1957; Palmer and Radeleff, 1964. 1082 Trifluralin 1082 a,a,a-Trifluoro-2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-p-toluidine, e.g., Treflan Toxicity rating: 3. Selective pre-emergence herbicide available in granular formulations and as an emulsive concentrate. Used on a variety of food and ornamental plants. Benefin is a structurally related herbicide which is presumed to have a similar toxicity. Large single oral doses of trifluralin given to mice, rats, dogs, guinea pigs, rabbits and chickens indicate that the LD„ for each of these species is greater than 2 gm./kg. The compound is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and 80 per cent of an oral dose in rats and dogs is excreted in the feces. Several recognized metabolites also have a low order of toxicity. Ref.: Emmerson and Anderson, 1966; Worth and Anderson, 1965. : + „orrws~q+i+toar>f;r;r,m,rrnrrn+ar;r;~rnrn+th+>nv>rt~;~;rntt~i~~.. > f
Page 51: soc40e00
. .:a. siSiii;b1;1:1i1i1~si37ic1is2A3iiisi~siiS33iS~3;3211i17Li3~~~lll~t4S1S~iN~~~ S U P P O R T I V E T R E A T M E N T TOXICITY RATING CHART Toxicity Rat ing or Class 6 Super toxic less than 5 5 Extremely toxic 5-50 4 Very toxic 50-500 3 Moderately toxic 0.5-5 2 I Slightly toxic Practically nontoxic 5-15 above 15 Probable Oral LETHAL Dose (Human) mg./kg. mg./kg. mg./kg. gmJkg. , gm./kg. gm./kg. T H E R A P E U T I C S I N D E X . T R A D E N A M E I N D E X For 70 kg. petson 41501b.1 A taste (less than 7 drops) Between 7 drops and 1 teaspoonful Between I tsp. and 1 ounce Between 1 oz. and 1 pint (or 1 lb.) Between 1 pt. and 1 quart More than 1 quart (Y.4 lb.) NT ~; FIRST AID & GENERAL EMERGENCY TRE-ATMENT E X EX EX N T E X i 1 N G R E D I E N T S I N D E X . T H E R A P E U T 1 C S I N D E X S U P P O R T I V E T R E A T M E N T . T R A D E N A M E I N D E X G E N E R A L F O R M U L A T I O N S . M A N U F A C T U R E R S' 1 N D E X~ .~ F 1 R S T A 1 D & G E N E R A L E M E R G E N C Y T R E A T M E N T~ 0 I N G R E D 1 E N T S T 1 C S 1 N D E X For 2el Jzrence S U P P O R T I V E V A M E I N D E X GENERAL FORN Nottobe*.aicenfromthisroom ~RERS' INDEX ~
Page 52: soc40e00
!,4-butaneo- rt-butylpu- -505. C~ N 19:42%. 4-(tert-bu- i to Parke. •zytthyl)dl- V.N-dibut- miutn sul- :mmonium ,m sulfate i; mol wt 19.91%. S h Ag Gi9 .nu Cs- V 10.84%. 'onia with s formed: t: Engel, ,t al. U.S. U.S. pat. vtki. U.S. 7601. ne vater. aia Irch. /nd cy-l-iso- hydroxy- i.5.6-tri- I)amino- hydroxy- 33 t7H O lell r ,nd :.: a. Pharm. LE BO 2: 2 a(c4 H9)z nex; Tinostat. Cs HµO4Sn; mol wt 631.55. C 60.86%. H 10.21%a 0 10.13a Sn 18.79%. (CtHs)=Sn(OOC(CHj ) CHt]=. Prepn: Sheverdina et aL. Khim. Prom. 1962 l1aS. 707, CA. 59, 8776f (1963); Fr. pat. 1,320,473 (1963 to Noury & van der Lande). GA. 59, 8789b (1963). corresp to Brit. pat. 975,369. Compd claimed but not described: Eberly. US. pat. 2,560,034 (1951 to Firestone). Soft crystals or ydlow liq, mp 22-24' (Sheverdina et aL. loe. eit). nhO 1.4683. (Fr. pat. 1,320,473). Practically insol in water, methanol. Soluble in petr ether. benzene. ucetone, carbon tetrachloride, ether, organic esters. USE: Stabilizer for polyvinyl chloride resins. Catalyst for curing certain silicones. TBEtuP CAT (vE77: Anthelmintic (vs. chicken tapeworms). 3021. DiCamba. 3,6-Dichloro-2-methoiybenzoic acid; 3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid, 2-methoxy-3.6-dichlorobenzoic acid; dianat (USSR); Velsicol 58-CS-11; Banvel D; Medi- ben. CsHICI=O3; mal wt 221.04. C 43.47%. H 2.74%, CI 32.08%, 0 21.71%. Sometimes misnamed methozydichlono- benzoate. Prepn: S. B. Richter, U.S. pat. 3,013,054 (1961 to Velsicol). Metabolism: D. D. Oehler, G. W. Ivie. J. Agr. Food Chem. 28, 685 (1980). Dicentrine 3023 Grayish to light-brownish powder. Moderately bitter taste. mp 52.5'. Poorly soI in water and alkali; sol in alco- hol. ether, various other organic solvents. The hydrochlo- ride and the gluconate are adequately sol in water. THEaAP CA't: Antihistaminic. 3015. Df-tert-butyl Ether. 2,2'-Orybis[2-methylpro- paneJ. HtsO; mol. wt. 130.22. C 73.78%a H 13.93%a 0 12.29%.C!(CHs)tC]=O. Prepn: R. J. Moore, G. J. O'Don- ndl. Britt pat. 652,809 (1951 to Bataafsche Petrol.); CA. 46, 1023d (1952). Synthesis from t-butyl chloride and silver carbonate: J. Erickson. W. M. Ashton, J. Am. Chem. Soc 63, 1769 (1941); from t-butyl perbenzoates and Grignard reagents: S. O. Lawesson, N. C. Yang. ibid 81, 4230 (1959); by alkylation of t-butyl alcohol with trimethylcarbenium fluoroantimonate: G. A. Olah et aL. Synthesis 1975, 315; from lithium tert-butoxide with aromatic sulfonyl chlorides: H. Masada et al. Tetrahedron Letters 1979, 1315. Clear liquid with camphorous odor. bp 106.5-107.0'. nLO 1.3949; dm 0.7658. Decomposes in the presence of acids. USE: Gasoline additive. 3016. Di-tert-butyl Malonate. Propanediaic acid bis(1,1- dimethylethyl) ester, malonic acid di-tert-butyl ester. C~~ Hm04; mol wt 216.27. C 61.09%. 1-t .9.32%. 0 29.59%. (CH,tIsCOOCCH=COOC(CHs)s. Prepd from malonic acid. liq isobutylene and sulfuric acid: McCloskey et aL. Org. Syn. 34, 26 (1954). Liquid. mp -6.1 to -5.9'. bp 112-115'; bpts 93'; bpt 65-67'. nas 1.4184; nr 1.4161; n# 1.4t58-1.4161. USE: In the prepn of ketones. 3017. 2,6-Di-tert-butylpyridin e. 2, 6-Bis(1,1-dimethyl- ethyl)pyridine. C13HItN; mol wt 191.31. C 81.61%, H 11.06%, N 7.32%. Prepd by reacting tert-butyllithium with 2-tert-butylpyridine: Brown, Kanner, J. Am. Chem. Sac75, 3865 (1953); U.S. pat. 2,780,626 (1957 to Research Corp.). Liquid, mp 2.2'. bpy 100-101'. np 1.5733. pKa 3.58. The base neutralizes HCI but does not react with alkyl ha- lides or boron trifluoride. Undergoes nuclear sulfonation with sulfur trioxide forming a sulfonic acid. CuHrtNSO., mp 310' (decompn). Chloroaurate. Ct3H==NAuCh, mp 184.2-184.5'. t1sE: Has been proposed as an additive for,lubricating oil, gasoline and for stabilizing Cl-containing polymers. 3018. Dibutyl Succinate. Butanedioic acid dibutyl ester; succinic acid dibutyl ater, di-n-butyl succinate; Tabutrex; Tabatrex. C,=HuO ; mol wt 230.30. C 62.58%. H 9.63% 0 27.79%. CHl(CH2~lOOCCH=CH2COO(CHr)sCHs. Prepn from butyl alcohol and succinic acid: Vogel. J. Che.n. Soc. 1948, 624. Liquid. bp 274.5', bp3 121'. mp -29.0'. d~t 0.9768. n~s 1.4299. LD,0 orally in rats: 8 g/kg. USE: Insect repellent esp against biting flies of cattle and household ants and roaches. 3019. Di-tert-butyl Succinate. Butanedioic acid bis(1,1- dimethylethyt) ester, succinic acid di-tert-butyl ester. C- H21O!; mol wt 230.30. C 62.58%, H 9.63%, 0 27.79. (CH~)3COOCCH=COOC(CHs)3. Prepd from succinic acid. Iiq isobutylene. and sulfuric acid in dioxane: McCloskey et aL. Org. Synm coll. vol. IV, 263 (1963). Liquid. mp 36-37'% bp, 109-110'; bN 105-10T. usE: In Stobbe condensation of ketones. 3020. Dibutyltin Dilaurate. Dibutytbis((!-ozododeeyp- aryJstannanr dibutylbis(lauroyloryNin; Butynorate; Davai- , /vC~-_720- 1G Crystals from pentane, mp 114-116'. Vapor press. at 10(': 3.75 X 10-3 mm Hg. Sol in ethanol and acetone. Very slightly sol in water. LD,, orally in rats: 1,040 mg/kg: Bailey. White, Residue Rev. 10, 97 (1965). One of the ingre- dients of Banteneand of Cambilene. USE: Herbicide. 3022. Dicapthon. Phosphorothioic acid O-(2-chloro-4- nitrophenyl) O,O-dimethyl ester, O,O-dimethyl O-(2-chloro- 4-nitrophenyl)phosphorothioate; O,O-dimethyl-O-(2-chlo- ro-4-nitrophenyDthionophosphate; p-nitro-o-chlorophenyl dimethyl thionophosphate; isochlorothion; American Cyan- amid 4124; insecticide ACC 4124; Dicaptan. CsH,C1N- OyPS; mol wt 297.68. C 32.28%a H 3.05% CI 11.91% N 4.71%, 0 26.87%, P 10.41% S 10.77%. Prepn: Fletcher and Geoghegan, McPherson. US. pats. 2,664,437 and 2,784,207 (1953. 1957, both to Am. Cyanamid); Schrader. Angew. Chetrc 66, 265 (1954); idem. Die Entwicklung neuer insektizi- der Phosphorsdure-Ester (Verlag Chemie. 3rd ed., 1963) pp 289-291. co0 3\1 P-O -3 U C1 Crystals from methanol, mp 53. . SoI in acetone, cyclo- hexanone. ethyl acetate. toluene, xylene. ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, some oils. Practically insol in water. LD., in male, female rats: 400, 330 mg/kg orally; 790, 1250 mg/kg dermally. T. B. Gaines. ToxicoL AppL PharmacoL 14, 515 (1969). USE: Insecticide. Caution.• Cholinesterase inhibitor. 3023. Dicentrine. 6.7,7a,8-Tetrahydro-10.tl-dimethory- 7-methyl-SH-benzo[g]-1,3-benzodiorolo(6,5,4-deJquinot ine; 9,10-dimethoiy-1,2-(methylenedioxy)aporphine; 1.2-methyl- enedioxy-9,10-dimethoxyaparphine. CmHttNO4; moI wt 339.38. C 70.78%, H 6.24%. N 4.13%a 0 18.86%. d-Form prevalent in nature. Found in Dicentnv pusilla Sieb. & Zucc.. Papavetaceae and several other Dicentm species. Rdaled to actinodaphnine (q.v.) and laurotetanine (q.v.). Isoln: Asa- hina. Arch. Pharm. 247, 201 (1909). Isoln of /-form from Duguetia A. St. Hil.. Annonaceae: Casagrande. Ferrari. Farmacq Ed ScL 25, 442 (1970). Synthesis of d/-form: Haworth et aL. !. Chem. Sae 127, 2018 (1925); Cava et al. Tetrahedron 29, 2245 (1973). Resolution of isomers: Ha- worth et aL. J. Chem. Soc. 129, 29 (1926). Consult the c.nss indes befon using this section. Page 441 ~
Page 53: soc40e00
2{2-METHOXYETHYLAMINO)PROPIONANILIDE 1776 TOXICITY DATA: 3 slm-mus TDLo:400 mg/kg/40W- VNEO seu-mus TDLo M mg/kg :ETA CODEN: CNREA8 22,78,62 CNREA8 22,78,62 Disaster Hazard: When heated to decomp it emits acrid smoke and fumes. skn-mus TD:620 mg/kg/26W-I:ETA skn-mus TD: 1030 mg/kg/43W- PRLBA4 111,485,32 PRLBA4 117,318,35 5-BETA-(METHOXYETHOXY)-2- (PHENYISULFONYLAMIDO)PYRIMIDINE V ETA THR: An exper NEO, ETA. Disaster Hazard.• When heated to decomp it emits acrid smoke and fumes. N-(2-METHOXY-3-(1,2- DICARBOXYETHYLTHIOMERCURDPROPYL)- o-CARBOXYMETHYL SALICYLAMIDE TRISODIUM rAnt-.., CAS RN: 67479010 NIOSH #: VN 7800000 SYN: TMs TOXICITY DATA: 3 CODEN: ims-rat LD50:51 mg/kg FEPRA7 8,316,49 ipr-rbt LD50:56 mg/kg FEPRA7 8,316,49 THR• HIGH ims ipr See also mercu com ounds , . ry p . Disaster Hazard When heated to decomp it emits very tox fumes of NO=, Hg and SO=. 2-METHOXY-3,6-DICHLOROBENZOIC ACID CAS RN: 1918009 NIOSH #: DG 7525000 mf: CsHsCIzO,; mw: 221.04 SYNS: ACIDO (3,6-DICLORO-2-METOSsI)- BENZo1C0 (RALIAN) COMPOUND B DICAMBA - DIANAT (RUSSIAN) 3,6-DICHLOOR-2-METHOXY-BEN- ' ZOEIZUUR (DUTCH) TOXICIT Y DATA: dnr-esc 5 mg/disc dnr-bcs 5 mg/disc orl-rat LD50:1040 mg/kg orl-mus LD50: I190 mg/kg orl-rbt LD50:2000 mg/kg orl-gpg LD50:3000 mg/kg unk-mam LD50:1000 mg/kg 3,6-DICH LO R-3-M ETHOXY-BEN- ZOESAEURE (GERMAN) 3,6-DICHLORO.O-ANISIC ACID 2, 5-D IC H LORO-6-M ETHOXY BEN- ZOIC ACID 3,6-DICHIARO-2-METHOXYBEN- ZOIC ACID 2 CODEN: NTIS04 PB80-133226 NTIS•• PB80-133226 RREVAH 10,97,65 HYSAAV 35,14,70 RYSAAV 35,14,70 HYSAAV 35,14,70 30ZDA9 -,147,71 Toxicology Review.• DTTIAF 80(20),485,73. THR: MOD orl, unk. Disaster Hazard: When heated to decomp it emits fumes of C1-. 3-METHOXY-15,16-DIHYDRO-17H- CYCLOPENTA(a)PHENANTHREN-17-ONE mf CIeHt402; mw: 262.32 tox NIOSH #: GY 5745200 SYN: 15,16-DIHYDRO-3-METHOXY 17H-CYCLOPENTA(A)PHENAN- THREN-17-ONE TOXICITY. DATA: CODEN: mma-sat 100 ug/plate CNREA8 36,4525,76 THR. MUT data. CAS RN: 339446 NIOSH #: DB 2910000 mE C13HIaNsO4S; SYNS: mw: 309.37 2-BENZOLSULPONAMIDO-5-BETA- GLYCODIAZIN (GERMAN) METHOXY-AETHOXY-PYRIMI- DINE (GERMAN) TOXICITY DATA: 2-1 CODEN: orl-rat LD50:2850 mg/kg ARZNAD 14,377,64 ivn-rat LD50:2000 mg/kg ARZNAD 14,377,64 ~ orl-mus LD50:5300 mg/kg ARZNAD 14,377,64 ivn-mus LD50:1480 mg/kg ARZNAD 14,377,64 THR: MOD orl, ivn; LOW orl. Disaster Hazard: When heated to decomp it emits very tox fumes of SOs and NO=. - METHOXYETHYL ACRYLATE CAS RN: 3121617 NIOSH #: AT 2275000 mf: CsH1oO,; mw: 146.16 Liquid; bp: 61 °@ 17 mm; flash p: 180°F (OC); d: 1.0134 @ 20°; vap d: 4.49. SYNS: ACRYLIC ACID 2-METHOXY- 2-METHOXYETHYL ACRYLATE ETHOXY ESTER 2-PROPENOIC ACID-2-METHOXY- 2-METHOXYETHOXY ACRYLATE ETHYL ESTER TOXICITY DATA: 3-2 CODEN: orl-rat LD50:810 mg/kg AIHAAP 30,470,69 ihl-cat LCLo:500 ppm/4H AIHAAP 30,470,69 skn-rbt LD50:250 mg/kg AIHAAP 30,470,69 Reported in EPA TSCA Inventory, 1980. THR: HIGH skn, ihl. MOD orl. See also esters. Fire Hazard: MOD. To Fight Fire: Foam, COz, dry chemical. Disaster Hazard.• When heated to decomp it emits acrid smoke and fumes. 2-METHOXYETHYLAMINE CAS RN: 109853 NIOSH #: KR 8750000 mE C3H9NO; mw: 75.13 TOXICITY DATA: 3 CODEN: a1 - ipr-mus LD50=400 mg/kg NTIS•• AD691-490 ~ Reported in EPA TSCA Inventory, 1980. C) THR: HIGH ipr. See also amines. ~ Disaster Hazard• When heated to decomp it emits tox ~ fumes of NO=. w 2-(2-METHOXYETHYLAMINO) PROPIONANILIDE mf: C1sHIeNZOs; mw: 222.32 NIOSH #: UE 5290000
Page 54: soc40e00
REGISTRY FILE C RN 7600-50-2 IN &enzoic acid, 2,5-dichloro-3-hydroxy-6-methoxy- SY o-Anisic acid, 3,6-dichloro-5-hydroxy- (SCI) SY 5-Hydroxydicamba MF C8 h16 C12 04 Cl :C. OMe .C: .C02H Cl (9CI) 14 REFERENCES IN FILE CA (1967 TO DATE)
Page 55: soc40e00
~h~3a;itffil#93~itihiil~ft333~3l3S3i1~S33iiii.::~s'li3ii3iiMi~t RN 1918-tj0--9 IN Benzoic acid, 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxy- (9CI) SY Dicamba SY ?,6-Dichloro-o--anisic acid SY : ,5-Dichloro--6--metho;<ybenzoic acid SY SY Mediben 2-Methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid SY L,6-Dichloro-2-metho,;ybenzoic acid SY SY Velsicol Velsicol Compound R 58-CS-11 SY o-Anisic acid, 3,6-dichloro- (8CI) SY SY Dianat MDBA MF CS H6 C12 03 CI COM C02N C1 C: OMe . C. C. C. C. . C: . . rl REFERENCES IN FILE CAOLD (PRIOR TO 1967) 786 REFERENCES IN FILE CA (1967 TO DATE) 2 ~ tftsts3s3t3 U 4 L~.
Page 56: soc40e00
G6/05/87 1. CA'i04(15):1?45f36f TOXICOKINETICS OF DICAMBA (•?,6-DICHLOFi0-2-•METHOXYE{ENZOIC ACID) AND ITS 3,5-DICHLORO ISOMER FOLLOWING INTRAVENOIlS ADMINISTRATION TO RATS Pestic. Biochem. Physiol., 25(1), 98-104 1986 In Eng By Makary, Moheb H.; Street, Joseph C.; Sharma, Raghubir P. The distribution and elimination of-dicam5a (I) C191B-00-9] and another isomer present in its formulation (?,5-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid C22775-37--7]) were studied in rats following single i.v. injections. Cancns. of I and the isomer were-measured at various times in whole blood by after extn. and derivatization with CH2N2. The isomer had diff erent "° toxicokinetic parameters compared to I. The elimination of I from the blood was rapid with a biol. half-life of 0.64 h (following 100 mg/k:g), while the elimination of the isomer from the blood was much slower with a biol. half-life of 16.5 h(•following 20 mg/kg). However, upon combined dosing of the 2 compds., the elimination rate const. of I significantly decreased. The i-somer had a greater 'degree of binding to blood serum proteins than I. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. _ ^ CA104 (25) :2LD434a PHARMACOKINETICS OF DICAMBA ISOMERS APPLIED DERMALLY TO RATS ~... Pestic. Biochem. f'hysiol., 25(2), 258-63 1986 In Eng By Makary, Moheb H.; Street, Joseph C.; Sharma, Raghubir F'. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the herbicide dicamba C1918-44-9] and its isomer 3,5-dichloro~-2-methoxybenzoic acid (I) C22775-:17-7] present\in dicamba formulation were examd. in rats given single dermal applications of 100 mg/kg of dicamba, 20 mg/kg of the isomer, or their combination. The doncn. of the isomer in blood increased .ltoreq.9 h following application and then declined slowly. The rate of clearance of dicamba from the-bloode greatly exceeded that of the isomer and was apparently of 1st order for both. The rate consts. for 1st--order elimination (ke) were 1.7 and 0.19/h for dicamba and the isomer, resp. The rates of absorption of the 2 chems. through the skin as detd. by urinary excretion were 0..0029/h for dicamba and 0.0012/h for the isomer. Urinary excretion of the original dose was 16.5% for dicamba and 7.5% for the isomer. Following the combined application, the kinetics of uptake and clearance were similar to those detd. for each chem. administered alone. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue.
Page 57: soc40e00
..,.,.,~1 c_i6/05/87 _. CA105(11).9'2695t HYGIENIC ASSESSMENT OF CARDIOTOXICITY OF SOME F'EST I C I DES Gig. Sanit., (6), 4-7 1986 In Russ By Shchitsl.:ova, A. P.; Nikolaeva, N. I.; Gadalina, I. D. Chron i c treatment of adul t and newborn rats wi th 0. 400z-d. 03? LD50 of acetochlor (I) C34^56-•82-1], dianate C1918-DQ-9], isophos-3 C42585-08-0], or sumilex C32809-16-8] caused disorder-of oxidative phosphorylation and focal necrosis in the heart. Similar changes were obsd. in rat embryos of dams exposed to the pesticides. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. 4. CA 105 (19 ): 16654•T-•r ACUTE TOX I C I TY OF F'EST I C I DES I N ADULT AND WEANL I NG RATS Fundam. Appl. Toxicol:, 7(2), 299-308 1986 In Eng By Gaines, Thomas 8.; Linder, Ralph E. LD50 were detd. for 57 pesticides administered by the oral or dermal route to adult rats. Thirty--six of the chems. were also tested by the oral route in 1 sex of weanlings. Nine pesticides tested by the oral route Cbufencarb C8~165-?6-9], cacodylic acid C75-6G-5], dialif or C1t~=11-84-97, ~ deltamethrin C52918-63-5], dicamba C1918-OD-97, diquat (I) C85-Cf4-77, quintozene C82--68-&], phoxim C14816-18-R], and pyrazon C1698-60-8]] and 4 tested by the dermal route (bufencarb, chlordimeform C6164-98-3], dichlofenthion C97-17-6], and leptophos C21609-90-5]) were more toxic to females than males, whereas famphur C52-85-7] and 2,4,5-T C9-3-76-5] (oral route) were less toxic to females. Eighteen of the test chems. were more toxic to the adult than to the weanling and 4 compds. (leptophos, methidathion C950-T7-8], pyrazon, and sulfoxide C12<]-62-7]) were more toxic to the weanling. In addnl. studies, the variability of the LD50 over a 1-yr period was examd. for 2 typical insecticides. Six consecutive bimonthly oral LD50 detns. for parathion C56--38-2] and DDT C50-29-3] in adults of both sexes indicated that the L'J50s were little affected by the time of year that the tests were done. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue.
Page 58: soc40e00
()6/()5/87 ~ 5. CA1Cy6 ( 7.5) s 114981h EVALUATION OF THE GENETIC ACTIVITY F'rOFILES OF 65 F'EST I C I DES Mutat. Fies., 168(3), ._•c]1-25 1986 In Eng By Garrett, Neil E.; Stack, H. Frank; Waters, Michael D. The qual. profiles of genetic activity produced by pesticides and efforts to classlfy them according to their genotoxicc effects and chem. ` structures are given. Three main categories may be distinguished based on the qual. results: category 1 pesticides were active in most of the in vitro and in vivo assays employed. These compds. include the structurally similar organophosphate insecticides, acephate C?0564-19-17, demeton C8Q65-48-3], monocrotophos C692'-22-43, and trichlorfon C52-68-6]; the phthalimide fungicide analogs, captan (I) •C1:1?-U6-2] and folpet C1ti?-47-3]; and the thiocarbamate herbicide analogs, diallate C2zry?-16-47, sulfallate C95--06-7], and triallate C?3,03-17-0]. The category 2 compds. demonstrated fewer pos. results and may be subdivided into 2 parts, 1 of which contains 12 halogenated arom. or heterocyclic ring compds., including the phenoxy herbicides, 2,4-D C94-75=7], 2,4-DB C94-82-6], and 2,4,5-T C9::,-76-57. The remaining part of category 2 consists of structurally similar organophosphate insecticides, azinphos-methyl C86-5cj-0], crotoxyphos C7700-17-67, disulfoton C298-04--4], and Me parathion Ci98-O0-Cr]; three similar ethylenebisdithiocarbamate fungicides, maneb C1^c427-L8-21, mancozeb C8018-01-77, and zineb C1i122--67-7]; 3 similar pyrethroid insecticides, allethrin C584-79-27, chrysanthemic acid C10453-89-1], and Et chrysanthemate C97-41-67; and 4 structurally diverse compds., cacodylic acid C75-60-53, dinoseb C88--435-7]{ sec -butylamine C13952-84-6], and benomyl C178D4-:'5-21]. The 3rd category of pesticides gave neg. results in all tests and represents structurally diverse compds. Using the computerized profile matching methodol., from 2080 possible pairwise chem. combinations of the 65 pesticides, 20 statistically significant pairs were selected. The matches showed excellent qual. and, in most cases, excellent quant. agreement. Hence, it appears that specific patterns of test results present in the genetic activity profiles are related directly to chem. structure. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. ~ . ~ O N ~ 6. CA104(17):14?5^1x TOXICITY OF THE HERBICIDE DICAMBA Nanjing Yixueyuan Xuebao, 5(3), 199-220C 1985 In Ch By Yang, Yongnian; Chen, Shuiiin; Zhai, Weilei; Xu, Juanhua; Huang, Leimin; Song, Ling Oral LD5O val ues of di camba (I) C 1918-00-9] were 1710 and 3830 mg/kg for male and female rats, resp.; oral ID50 values of dicamba dimethylamine C2?cJca-66-5] were 650 and 1720 mg/k:g, for male and female rats, resp. Thus, both dicamba and dicamba di{nelthylamine have low acute toxicities f or rats. Growth and development assessment, kidney and liver function tests, and histopathol. examn. of rats fed dicamba for 3 mo indicated that 640 ppm dicamba in feed had no toxic effect on rats. Allowable daily intake of dicamba for humans was estd. to be 0.64 mg/kg. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. .~..,.~ _ ~. _ . ---:'~A -;4 `~-. a.> o , >r.r.rv,.. ............ rsno.,rrnrrnvarjnrrrraflnerryr{?i;±;i~ .trrr{>,{isi;~r;r.safsns»~r tsrresrr{~p~»wnir~j e{n!r!r!?f?~~ ~ ~ . . ~ ~ . . ~ . . , . . .. ~ . . .. ..... ~ . .~.., . f ,.Sl~f~;f.
Page 59: soc40e00
c_lf / 05/B7 ~ 7. CA 104 (3): 16?<74d STRUCTURE-GEhJOTOX I C ACT I V I TY RELAT I OlVShi I FS OF PESTICIDES: COMF'AR ISOfV OF THE RESULTS FROM SEVERAL SHORT-TERM ASSAYS Mutat. Res., 147(6), 343-56 1985 In Eng By F:1 opman , Gi 1 1 es; Contreras, Renato; Rosenkranz , Herbert S. ; Waters, Michael D. The Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation program was applied to the anal. of the genotoxic activity o•f 54 pesticides (31 insecticides, 15 herbicides, and 8 fungicides) in 5 di-fferent shor-t--term test systems measuring gene mutation and DNA damage. The database contains compds. presenting diverse structures including carbamates, thiocarbamates, organophosphates, haloaroms. and other functionalities. Some significant relationships between common structural Trpatures and the genotoxic activity displayed by these chems. were -Found. Among the most relevant fragments,. automatically selected by the program, a methoxyphosphinyl and a chlorovinyl group appear as the common structural subunits responsible for the activities detected in the battery composed of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay, the mouse lymphoma gene mutation assay and recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Page 60: soc40e00
C_l6,/1_l,.j/87 8. Cr'l 1<?0( 15): 1 16116e EVALUAT I C1N OF F'C)TEhdT I AL EMr-.RYOTaX I C I TY AND TERATOGENICITY OF 42 HERBICIDES, INSECTICIDES, AND PETROLEUM CONTAMINANTS TO MALLARD EGGS ... Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol., 13(1), 15-27 1984 In Eng By Ho-Ffman, David J.; Albers, Peter H. The embryotoxicity of 42 environmental contaminants applied externally to mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs including crude and refined petroleum, and com. formulations of herbicides and insecticides, are reported. Many of the petroleum pollutants were embryoto:{ic and moderately teratogenic and had LD50s of 0.3-5 .mu.L/egg (.apprx.b-90 .mu.g/g egg). The most toxic was a;-;_ com. oil used for control or road dust followed by South Louisiana crude oi 1, F,'uwai t crude, no. 2 fuel oi 1, bunker C f uel oi 1, and i ndustri al and automotive waste oil. Prudhoe Bay crude, unused crankcase oil, aviation k:erosi ne, and al i ph . hydrocarbon mi xts. were l ess tox i c (LDSfrs of 18 to >75 .mu.L) and less teratogenic. The median lethal concns. (LCS0s) of - herbicides and insecticides in aq. emulsion were measured by egg immersion; the most toxic were paraquat (I) C46n5-14-7] and trifluralin C1582-d9-8] (LC50s of .apprx.1.5 lbs/A; 1.7 kg/ha). Propanil C709-98-8], bromoxynil-:';- C1689-84-5] with MCPA C94-74-6], Me diclofop C51?38-27-3], prometon C161Cr-18-Q], endrin C72-•2Cr-8], sulpr-ofos L354UD-43-<], and parathion C56-38-21 were toxic (LC50s of 7-40 lbs/A; 7.8-44.8 kg/ha), whereas 2,4-D C94-75-7], glyphosate C1r?71--83-°6], atrazine C1912-24-9], carbaryl C6L-25-27, dalapon L-75-99--0], dicamba C1918-Cr0-9], methomyl C16752-77-5], and phosmet C7•Jti--11-6-1 were only slightly toxic or not toxic (LC50s of 178 to `r50r0 lbs/A; 199-560 kg/ha). Pesticides in nontoxic oil vehicle applied by mi crol i ter- pi pet were up to 18 ti mes more to., i c than when appl i ed i n water vehicle, which was prablably due to better penetration of the pesticide past the eggshell and its membranes. Teratogenic effects and impaired embryonic growth are reported and results discussed in terms of potential hazard at field levels of application. A discussion is provided an the effects of pollutants on the eggs of other species of birds under lab. and field conditions. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. s>1.~.:~:.m..: . . . s}r~a„»Htrrtrir,ar~tM~snan}~n~~»ra~rr~~;t~a~i~3i~1~
Page 61: soc40e00
. s, ,...,.,. 1: 1. .. ........ ..sar,...>a,aa...:<::: ....... 06/05/87 9. CA 1 00( 15 ): 1 1612•'•:e ORAL I NTUEiAT I ON OF DOGS W I TH COMEs I NAT I ONS OF FERTILIZER, HERBICIDE, AND INSECTICIDE CHEMICALS COMMONLY USED ON LAWNS Am. J. Vet. Res., 45(2), 288-90 1984 In Eng By Yeary, Roger A. Six beagle dogs were orally intubated with mixts. of an urea-based fertilizer, 2,4-D C94-75-7], mecoprap -(MCFF') C7085-19-g7, dicamba C1918-00-9], and either bensulide C741-58-^1 or chlorpyrifos C2921-88-2]. The mixts. were formulated as they are used in liq. application to lawns. The dogs were given vols. of 10 mL/kg, delivering the following quantities of each ingredient: urea-623 mg/kg, inorg. P (F'205)-24 mg/kg, K(F:20)-bb mg/kg, 2,4-D°b.5 mg/kg, MCPP-3.26 mg/kg, dicamba--0.55 mg/kg, and either bensulide-6o.93 mg/kg or chlorpyrifos-6.77 mg/kg. The dogs were given 3 consecutive daily doses of the mixt. contg. bensulide (round 1) or the mixt. contg. chlorpyr-ifos (round 2). The dogs did not exhibit any clin. signs of illness assocd. with the treatments. Effects on hematol. values or routine clin. chem. analyses did not occur with the round 2 mixt. Serum lactic dehydrogenase C90C71--60-9] activity decreased by .apprx.50% after a single dose of the round 1 mixt. was given. Plasma cholinesterase C9001--08=5] decreased to .apprx.50% of control values following either the round I or the round 2 mixt.; this decrease was not accompanied by cholinergic signs of intoxication. 10. CA141(11):85251j SEVERAL METHODS FOR FcAF I D DETEFM I NAT I ON OF CHEM I CAL CARCINOGENS IN THE ENVIRONMENT Vestn. Akad. Med. Nauk SSSR, (4), 90-4 1984 In Russ By Shitskova, A. P. Two methods were developed for detn. of the oncogenic properties of : various pesticides: the 1st uses organ cultivation in a,mouse embryo kidney and the 2nd involves a study of the combined action of the pesticide and the carcinogenic virus on Maloney's sarcoma. Studies on 9 diff erent pesticides including lindane (1) C58-89-9] showed carcinogenic properties foi- 8 at threshold and even inactive doses. The methods are recommended for rapid screening of new pesticides. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. . , ,•;,t,. H.t. ...,,.utrrrtxt•rj~~irrl~lra>rrr•,~,~ , nfstrar„tntnr~rt~t~tr,>a~.fxrn~3+i1~+r+it~~~T
Page 62: soc40e00
:..i ;;sl5iti. #3~. 06/ 05/s37 11, CA 101( 15 ) .1^/1-577sr AN EVAL.JAT IOhd OF THE GF_NOTO Y I C E'4tOFEF:T I ES Of- HEF'iBICIDES FOLLOWING PLANT AND ANIMAL ACTIVATION Mutat. Res., 136(3), C_3-45 1984 In Eng By Plewa, Michael 7.; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Gentile, Glenda J.; Gentile, James M. Com. and tech. grades of 11 herbicides and 13 combinations of com: grade herbicides were evaluated for their genotoxic properties with Salmonella typhimurium and Saccharomyces cerevisiae directly or following plant or animal activation, or with Zea mays. The herbicides were related ` by their use in com. corn (maize) prodn. Com. grade formulations of each herbicide and combination of herbicides were also evaluated in situ with the pollen waxy locus assay of Z. mays. Eradicane C51990-04-6] and bifenox C42576-02-3] were neg. in all assays. Alachlor (I) C1597^-6G-87, propachlor C1918-16-7:1, procyazine C32889-42-e], and SD 50093 L58799-44-3] were pos. in 1 assay. Cyanazine Ci1725-46-2], dicanba C1918-r?0-9], and metolachlor C51i1S-45-2] were pos. in 2 assays. Atrazine C1912-24-9], simazine. C12^-:1.4-9], and butylate C2gCrt3-41-5] were tested only'in situ. Atrazine and simazine were pos. and butylate was neg. Of the combinations of herbicides evaluated with the 3 genetic assays, I plus bif eno:4 and procyazine plus metolachlor were pos. in 1 assay and metolachlor plus atrazine was pos. in 21 assays. Of the combinations of herbicides evaluated only in situ, butylate plus atrazine, eradicane plus atrazine, eradicane plus cyanazine, and metolachlor plus cyanazine were pos. while butylate plus cyanazine was neg. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. 12. CA 10e( 15 )~ 126979u Tf:ADESCAtaT I A-M I CIiONUCLEUS ( TFAD-MCN ) TESTS ON 140 HEALTH-RELATED AGENTS - Mutat. Res., 138(2-3), 157-67 1984 In Eng By Ma, Te Hsiu; Harris, Mary M.; Anderson, Van A.; Ahmed, Iftikharuddin; Mohammad, F,:amarutaman9 Bare, Janie L.; Lin, Guangheng The Tradescantia-micronucleus test was used to screen 140 agents, directly or indirectly related to human health, for their mutagenicity. Plant cuttings of young influorescences, in which the pollen mother cells undergo various stages of meiosis, were maintained in nutrient soln. for experimentation. Treatments were made either by absorption of the sol. agents through the stem, by diffusion of gaseous agents through the leaves and buds, by exposure to internal/external radiation or by in situ exposure to air pollutants. Micronuclei formed from damaged chromosomes served as the indicators of mutagenicity. Results of 140 agents tested are listed in 9 different categories: (1) carcinogens/mutagens, (2) common beverages, (3) common chem., (4) drugs, (5) pesticides, (6) common household chem., (7) radiation and radioisotopes, (O) in situ monitoring, and (9) complex environmental mixts. Out of 140 agent=s tested, 52 showed pos., 20 showed borderline pos. responses and 5 showed strong toxicity. Test results of.41 agents in the present study showed 67% congruity with Ames test results found in the literature. 8r7r760122 . ~ ~ ==
Page 63: soc40e00
, ?4 ::j, Y M t:;6/q5/87 13. CA1Cr2 (?3) : 1992=0c PHARMACOKINETICS OF DICAMBA (ti,6-DICHLOFiO-2-MET1-IOXY?"sENZOIC ACID) ISOMERS IN THE RAT 88 pp. Avail. Univ. Microfilms Int., Order No. DA842E30'6 From: Diss. Abstr. Int. B 1985, 45(9), 2905 1984 In Eng By Makary, Moheb Hal eem 14. CA98(19):156179z FURTHER MUTAGENICITY STUDIES ON PESTICIDES IN BACTERIAL REVERSION ASSAY SYSTEMS • Mutat. F,es.,]. 16 (3---4) , 185-216 1983 In Eng By Mori ya, M, ; Ohta, T. ; Watanabe, #.:. ; Mi yazawa, T. ;K.ato, F.:. ; Shi rasu, Y. A total of 2:'8 pesticides (88 insecticides, 60 fungicides, 62 herbicides, 12 plant-growth regulators, 3 metabolites, and 3 other compds.) were tested for mutagenicity in bacterial reversion-assay systems with 5 strains (TA 100, 98, 1535, 1537, and 153e) of Salmonella typhimurium and a strain (WP2 hcr) of Escherichia coli. Fifty pesticides (25 insecticides, 20 fungicides, 3 herbicides, 1 plant-growth regulator, and 1 other compd.) were mutagenic, 5 of which required metabolic activation (69 mix). Among various chem. groups, org. phosphates, halogenated alkanes, and dithiocarbamates had higher ratios of mutagens. Although 22 of the pesticides tested have been reported to be carcinogenic, 7 of them, i.e., captan C1.33-v6-2], DBCP C 96-12-8 7, EDB C 1 0fs-93--4 ], EDC C 1 t77-06-2], ETU C 96-45-7 ], HEH C 1 c_i9-84-2 ], and nitrofen C1836-75-5], were detected as mutagens. Most of the 15 nonmutagenic carcinogens were organochlorine pesticides such as .alpha.-BHC C319-B4-67, chlorobenzilate C51<7-15•-6], DDT C50-29-L7, dieldrin C60-57-1] and quintozene CB^-68-8]. _ 1.
Page 64: soc40e00
,.o„a.. . . . .. .. . .:..:: :.. . (a6/05/87 C 15. CA101 ( 13) : 105L}28c THRESHOLD LEVELS OF SEVERAL PESTICIDES IN RAPID TOXICOLOGICAL EXPERIMENTS IN REGARD TO FORMATION OF DEFENSE MF_C!-IAN I SMS multidirectional response (2-3 days); adaptation mechanism (5-18 days); and compensatory reaction stage (from 21 days). The crit. days of observation in young and adult animals after the administration of isophos 3 C42585-U8-0] and dianat C1918-•0O-9] were the 8th and 15th, resp.• Animal response to different classes of pesticides was more sharp in young animals. Also, sorption properties in the kidney, spleen, liver, brain, and endocrine glands were greatly affected in these animals. Thus, the protective-adaptation mechanisms develop earlier in young animals. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. inhibition of the nervous system and decreased sorption ability of the tissues and permeability barrier of secretary glands and organs were evident. The •3 stages absd. during this study were; primary, intoxication, the crit. days of observation of the effects of pesticides, ' and the resultant defense mechanisms are given. Initial excitation and then Metod. Aspekty Izuch. Biol. Deistviya K%him. Soedin., 55-7. Edited by: Shitskova, A. P. Mask. Nauchno-Issled. Inst. Gig.: Moscow, USSR. 1982 Russ By Pavlenk:o, S. M. y Yudina, T. V. A procedure to bo- followed in studying the development of 16. CA97 ( 9): 674F35h STUDY OF THE MEC}-lAN I SM OF THE F'• I OLOG I CAL ACT I ON OF PESTICIDES - BASIS OF THE HYGIENIC STANDARDIZATION Gig. Sanit.,(h) , 7-10 1982 In F:uss By Shitskova, A. P. The biochem. effects o-f dianat (I) C1918-40-9] and isophos-3 (II) C4^585-C18-ry] on the cardiovascular system, kidney, liver, enzymic and immune processes are described, together with a discussion on the hygienic evaluation of new agrochems. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. .__.oY,.. __....- . . . . .. .. .. . .•.o•••,• .. ~ xnw,r~o~ ~ n 7 ••••>•,nf~nnrxnupyn~qyisra,:~~u~n•sxtrst>i;a~t•~•:'~ofrlp;aava~ryryqf~f~fr~zary~ .~t3'J~.... .... fi.SZ.J: .
Page 65: soc40e00
06/(--)5/87 17. CA97 ((?) : 674f37G:: APPLICATOR EXPOSURE TO 2, 4-D., DICAMBA, AND A DICAMBA I SOI~CF, J. Environ. Sci.}-lealth, Part B, B17(4), •121-39 1982 In Eng By Draper, W. h9. ; Street, J. C. Potential respiratory and dermal exposure to applicators were estd. in a ground boom spray application of 2,4-D C94--75-7] and dicamba (I) C1918-00-9]. Time-weighted avs. for the airborne herbicide residues did not exceed 2.2 .mu.g/m3 in the cabs of application vehicles allowing only minor respiratory exposure. Dermal exposure was important as relatively large- amts. of 2,4-D (1.2-18 mg) and I(0.32-6.6 mg) were rinsed from applicators' hands. Urine anal. showed that the max. elimination of herbicides occurred between 16 and 40 h after terminating exposure. A dicamba isomer (20X of the active material in the com. formulation) were excreted in higher concns. than I in applicators' urine suggesting different toxicokinetic properties for the 2 compds. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. 18 . CA98 ( T). 12627w ACUTE TO X I C I TY OF M I XTUF;ES OF RANGE MANAGEMENT HEF:BI C I DES TO CUTTHROAT TROUT J. Range Manage., 35(4), 539-40 1982 In Eng By Woodward, Daniel F. Six different paired mi.cts. of dicamba (I) C1918-00-9], picloram C 1918-02-1 ], 2, 4-D Bu ester C94- 3Cr-4] , 2, 4-D i sooctyl ester C25168-26-7] , and 2, 4-D propyl ene gl ycol Bu ether ester C 132tr-18-97 were e tested wi th cutthroat trout (Salmo clar!<:ii). Except for 2,4-D isooctyl ester, the median lethal concns. (LCS:rs) resulting from mixts. of 2,4-D esters and picloram were lower than LD50's af those herbicides tested individually., I and 2,4-D isooctyl ester were the least toxic individually and mixts. of I or 2,4-D isooctyl ester with the other herbicides tested did not result in increased toxicity. The results reflect the importance of using combination exposures in detg. the biol. significance of the simultaneous occurrence of >1 herbicide in surface waters. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. . 11 . wwa. r ......................._. -...._.--- . . _ .. . . . . . .. .. .. _.... _.._............. ~.,.....,.....,..... . . .. _......... . , ...........,.,.....,,.....,..,.,...,o . . , t . ................. .,.. .ww
Page 66: soc40e00
c.z6,/i z5/07 1.9. CA.9f3 (5):29•?19v ST}-1D`l OF f'EETICIDE GENOTOXICITY Basic Life Sci., 21 '75--•?^6 1982 In Eng By Waters, Michael D.y Sandhu, Shahbeg S.; Simrnon, Vincent F.; Mortelmans, Kristien E.; Mitchell, Ann D.; Jorgenson, Ted A.; Jones, David C. L.; Valencia, Ruby; Ga.rrett, Neil E. More than 60 pesticides were evaluated for genotoxicity in several prokaryotic and euk:aryatic test systems. The pesticides were divided into 2 groups: those displaying no genotoxic effect and those displaying genotoxic effect. Thirty-five of the pesticides were genotoxic with 19 causing gene mutation and 16 causing DNA damage, but not gene mutation. Pesticides , eliciting a pos. response in several kinds of genetic bioassays were of the greatest concern, particularly as regards to their potential effects on humans. A more specific classification of the pesticides as potential hazards to humans was not possible. 20. trA99 ( 7): 48b94a EFFECT OF D I ANAT AND I TS DER I VAT I VES ON THE IlVTRAUTER I NE DEVELOPMENT AND CHROMOSOMAL APPARATUS OF RAT rfONE MARROW CELLS Fiziol. Akt. Veshchestva, 14, 72-4 1982 In Russ By Barilyak, I. R.; Saglo, V. I. A single administration of dianat (I) C1918--DU-9] and 2-methoxy-•T_•,6-dichlorotsenzoic acid (II) to female rats on the 9th day pregnancy showed pr onounced embryolethal effects. Embryonic postimplantation death increased by 6- and 5.5-fold, resp. 2-Hydroxy-?,b--dichlorobenzoic acid CT401-80-7] under similar conditions showed no lethal effects on the embryo. None of these had any teratogenic effects. Both I and II had weak chromosomal aberration-induction properties i-n bone marrow cells and the ^-hydr-o:;y deriv, had the weakest. Thus, I even at a moderately hi gh dose (0.33 LD50) showed weak embryolethal and- - cytogenetic activities and had no teratogenicity. Potential harm from I to humans is small. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. ....... . t ; - . fT9~1}tH}t};1{ ! ~1 ~ t t
Page 67: soc40e00
.<~r.,..... . . „ ,,,~.,e.<:a~.~.. „r r . ,. ~ .... .:~,.,.v_, . , ,,.< ,. . .,_Si.. .'~......,:r . ..~.,~.....oa~~~ ..... r,.,. . . (16/05/87 .'_1 . CA95 (21 ): 15197^y COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE TOXICITY OF ^-4-IY'J!';OXY-3,6-DICHLOFcOFiENZOIC ACID IN FiEi ATIOh! TO DIFFERENT MEANS OF `NTEr I1JG THE OFtGANISM.. Gig. Tr. F'rof. Zabol., (9), 55-6 1981 In Russ By Pis' I<:o, U. T. ; Tolstopyatova, G. V. ; Tovstenl<o, A. I. Toxic changes in rats exposed to 2-hydro:ay-3,6-dichlorobenaoic acid (I) C3401-£30-7], an intermediate in the dianat C191fl-00-9] synthesis, are described a-fter its administration via intragastric and inhalation routes. Sarne of the effects after 5.23 mg/m3 (inhalation) and 3 mg/kg (intragastric) dioses of I included changes in the state of liver and central nervous _ system, immunobiol. reactivity, and oxidn.--redn. processes. Inhalation of I, in contrast to intragastric administration, af-fected the morphol. compn. of the blood (eosinaphil, monocyte, segmented neutrophil content). Lungs, liver, and kidneys were affected by the above--mentioned doses. However, changes obsd. in the lungs, after inhalatian, were quite pranounced. The recommended max. permissible concns. of I in the working zone and in water - are 1 mg/L and 0.15 mg/L, resp. For diagram (s) ; see printed CA Issue. 22. CA93( 15) : 1442&0j HYG I Eh! I C AF'F'FA I SAL OF SOME I NTEFMED I ATE PRODUCTS OF - D I ANAT SYNTI-;ES I S Gi gi ena Naselen. Mest,!•:i ev, (19), 43-6 From: F;ef. . Zh. , Tok:si kol . 1980, Abstr. No. 67519ci 1980 In Russ Dy Golovan, D. I.; Tolstopyatova, G. V. Title only translated. . .. . 'p.•' •qq••Sql}y)}SH})fT~)p}7{f}f}(!T!f{f~1lftTfNf{f{~TH{J~Tjf7T{fl}/;~f{ }Sr 'r, {y' SfM~~ .. r,r, r r 1fT !fiS ! S
Page 68: soc40e00
i • t,: ti •°t+:`~tatts' tzRt~? t=lt.l2~t•ab 06/05/87 IWA ,N ^'. CA9?(9):#39729e METABOLIC FATE OF THE HERBICIDE DICAMBA IN A LACTATING COW J. Agric. Food CI-tem. ,^8 (4) , 685-9 1980 In Eng By Oehler, Delbert D.; Ivie, G. Wayne Dicamba (I) C1918-<_is_t-•9] was rapidly absorbed, only partly metabolized, and rapidly excreted by a lactating cow after oral treatment during a 5-day period at 2.^ mg/kg/day or .apprx.b0 ppm of dietary I. Within 6 h after the f i nal I-• 14C doCe,.apprx . 89"/. of the admi n i stered 14C had been ex creted i n the uri ne, : 2l i n the f eces, and . apprx. t7. 02% i n the mi l 6:. The excreted radiocarbon was primarily unchanged I(.apprx.80"/.), but the compd. was metabolized by ar-yl-O-demethylation to 3,b-dichloro-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (DCHBA) C34Cr1-8Cj•-7], which was the major metabolite in urine and in exts. of feces and tissues and was the only radioactive component extd. from milk. Minor metabolites identified in urine were 2,S-dichlorophenol C583-78-87 and the glucuronide conjugate of DCHBA C741L5-18-1]. Thus, low-level exposure of ruminants to I through contaminated feed, forage, or H20 will not result- in appreciable retention of residues by edible tissues or their secretion into milk. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. 4. CA93( 1 1) ; 10B6Cr04: ' I N V I TRO '-M I CROBI OL06I CAL MUTAGEN I C I TY AND ~ UNSCHEDULED DNA S1'NTHES I S STUP- I ES OF E I GHTEEN PESTICIDES Report, EPA-sS00/1-79--s-r41; Order No. F'B3t?-13:1?^6, 177 pp. Avail. NTIS From: Gov. Rep. Announce. Index (U. S.) 198O, 80(10), 1621 1979 In Eng By Simmon, Vincent F. Pesticides (18) being reviewed as a part of the EPA Substitute Chem. Program were tested f>>r mutagenic activity by the following in vitro procedures: reverse mutation in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535, TA1537, TA1538, TA98, and TA100 and in Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA; induction of mi toti c recombi nati on i n the yeast Saccharomyces cerevi si ae D3; - rel ati ve toxicity assays in DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of E. coli, and Bacillus subtilis; and unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in human fibroblasts (WI-.Tn cells). Nine of the 18 pesticides were mutagenic in .gtoreq.1 assays. Demeton EE065-48-3] was mutagenic in all the assays. Trichlorofon C52--68-E•] was mutagenic in all the assays except those -for relative toxicity. Acephate C3t=r5h0-19-1] was mutagenic in the S. typhimurium in TA 1Oty, G. cerevisiae D3, and UDS assays. Dicamba C1918-DD-9], 2,4-D (I) C94-75-77, 2,4--DE{ L94-8^-b], and propanil C7ta9-98-8] were pos. only in the assay for- relative to:;icity. Disul•fioton C298-04-4] was pos. only in the UDS assay, and then only in the absence of the metabolic activation system. Crotoxyphos C7700--17-6] was pos. only in the S. cerevisiae D.3 assay. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue.
Page 69: soc40e00
06•/ti5/87 25. CA9")( 1•' ) ~ 9C457 k: THE i1E"i•ABOL I SM OF ATrcAZ I NE , CHLCIF{AMBEN, D I CAMEtA I N EARTHWORMS ( LUMPFt I CUS TE:.'RFtESTFi I-_~-.,' ) FROM TREATED AND UNTREATED PLOTS Weed Sci., 26(4), '31-5 1973 In Eng By Chio, Hang; Sanborn, J. R. The metab. of 3 14C-ring-labeled herbicides, atrazine C1912--24-9], chloramben C13•?--90--47, and dicamba C1918-uU-9] was studied in the earthworm, L. terrestris, taken from plots treated with these herbicides for the past 10 y and from control plots treated with no herbicides. For the 2 benzoic acid herbicides, acetone exts. of sand and earthworms from untreated plots contained more unmetabolized herbicide than similar exts. of sand and earthworms ,from treated plots, indicating a net enhancement of inetab. in worms from treated plots. For atrazine, the amt. of unchanged herbicide in the acetone exts. of earthworm and sand were nearly equiv. Finally, the relative metabolic stability of the three herbicides in decreasing order in earthworms from both control and untreated plots was chloramben > atrazine > dicamba. 26. CA91(21):169563a EFFECT OF HERBICIDES - PHENOXY ACID DERIVATIVES ON SOME PARAMETER S OF CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM A6:tual'n. Probl. Gigieny, ~1:.nsk: 54-6 From: Ref. Zh., 6':him. 1979, Abstr. No. 161579 1978 In F'uss E+y Kagan, N. A. ; Kr y sanova., A. I. Title only translated. 27. CA9•3(11):108476u STUDY OF CUMULATIVE PROPERTIES OF FESTICIDES_AS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT STAGES OF HYGIENIC EVALUATION Ak.tual 'n. Vopr. Tok:si k:ol . v Gigien. Issled., M. 76-81 From: Ref. Zh., Toksikol. 1979, Abstr. No. 775146 1978 In Russ By Shal ' nova, N. D. ; Sapunov, Yu. S. Title only_translated.
Page 70: soc40e00
(:)6,/05/E37 ?C. CA(37 (2R) : 17367f3m F'I-IAF;MACO4.:INETIC STUDY OF A PATIENT INTOXICATED WITH ^, 4--D I ChlL OROF'i-IENO X YACET I C AC I D AND L-MET)-IOXY-3,6-DICHLOFOBEN~ OIC ACID Clin. Toxicol., 11(5), 489-500 1977 In Eng By Young, John F.; Haley, Thomas J. Dicamba (I) C1918-UC7-9] and 2,4-D (II) C94-75-73 ingested by a woman were eliminated with a half-life of about 15 and 59 h, resp. It was possible to est. blood levels and urinary excretion of the 2 toxic chems. simultaneously and accurately predict their biol. half-lives. Such information can be useful in the clin. management of future intoxication , from herbicide mixts. For diagram(s), see printed CA Issue. ^~'i . CA84 ( 21 ): 1459:19g I N V I TRO 5EN5I T I V I TY OF SOME SF'EC I ES OF C!-iLOfiOf f-IYCEAE . TO 'A SELECTED RANGE OF HEf;I.~ I C I DES Weed Res., 15(6), 401-6 1975 In Eng By Cul 1 i more, D. Roy The toxicities of 17 herbicides to 17 strains of algae belonging to the Chlorophyceae were in the order: diuron [330-54-13 `brornacil C314-4U-9] >paraquat C4680-14-7] `mon!lron C1St7-68-5] >diquat C22764-72-9] >linuron C3T0-55-L] >2,4-DB C94-822-6] >barban C1c71-27-9] >dicamba C191B•-0U-97, dichiobenil C1194-6u-63, dalapon C75-99-0], and picloram C1918-Cri-1] `nbromoxyni.l L-16&9-(34-5a, 2,=,6--TL-sA L50-••_1-7] >2,4-DE' C12G-?6-5], 2,4,5-T C93-76--53, and EPTAM C759-94-47. Of the algae, the most sensitive genera were Hormidium, and the species most sensitive to a wide range of herbicides was Hormi di um bar-l owi . 00 ~ ~ ~ O N W 0 . yr».rf7!757frf~nf{~~f ~Nfyli#7~7~7fNJl~~)tNil7ti~ #sst`#;#:########3$#i#3#:#i#i#;#3#i#i a
Page 71: soc40e00
© :. 0c./tr5/f-37 30. C; i`-U' 1(.•_5 ); 1 u4'47w METABOL I C TFA!`•lSFOFiMAT I QNS OF D I SUrRAN 10Y f-"tUMEM FLU I D OF SrsE`F MAINTAINED ON DISSIMILAR DIETS J. Agr. Food Chem< , 22(4), 632-4 1974 in `ng By Ivie, G. Wayne; Clark, Donald E.; Rtrshing, Darcy D. 14C-labeled disugran (I) Cb597-78-0; (5 tim. 10 -6M) was rapidly degraded f ol l owi ng i ncubat i on wi th rumen f l ui d f rom sheep f ed l ow- and high-energy diets. Rumen fluid from animals fed a low-energy diet degraded I within 4 hr after incubation, wherease significant amts. of nonmetabolized I were obsd. in the animals fed the high-energy diet after 24 hr incubation. I metabolites identified were Me 3,6-dichlorosalicylate C53QcS6-25-47, •_,6-dichlorosalicylic acid CT401-80-77, and small amts. of dicamba (II) C191B-0V-97. Direct incubation of II with rLimen fluid resulted in no detectable degradation, indicating that the major pathway of I metab. is through i ni t ial cl Wvage of the Me ether, ,<_znd then subsequent hydrol ysi s of the ester. Although at least 4 unidentified I metabolites were obsd., the 3 i denti f i ed compds. Lompri sed . si m. 95% of the total quanti ty of inetabol i tes generated, 31. CA7b ( 21): 1 227'74:: USE OF THREE S I MF'LE , f.AF' I D b I OASSAYS ON FORTY-TWO ChIEF'FICIDES Weed F(es., 11(4), 257-62 1971 In Eng By Kratky, B.. :1. ; Warren, G. F. Three rapid bioassays were developed for screening herbicides. Inhibition of growth was .geq.5Ci% at 1 ppm with 31 of the 42 compds. tested, and of those remaining, 7 were detected at 10 ppm, 2 at 20 ppm, and 2 at 30 ppm. The plant systems used were: Chlorella pyrenoidosa culture, roots of sorghum, oats, and cucumber, and shoots of sorghum and oats, and the methods took 1, 2, and 4 days, resp. In general, the Chlorella assay was esp. . sensitive to photosynthetic and respiratory inhibitors, whereas the root or shoot bioassays were sensitive to most e:<cept photosynthesis inhibitors. The herbicides tested included: amides, benzoates, benzonitriles, carbamates, diazines, halogenated aliphatic acids, inorg. compds.', phenols, pheno.;yacetates, quaternary ammonium compds., thiocarbamates, triazines, and ureas. 32. CA71(1):2442k: ACUTE T'JX I C I TY DATA FOR F'EST I C I DE5 (1969) World Rev. Pest Contr., 7(3), 135-43 1968 In Eng By Jones, Keith Howard; Sanderson, Derek h1. ; Noakes, Diana N. June 5, 1987
Page 72: soc40e00
f SEARCH TERMS: LITERATURE SEARCH NO. 628 DICAMBA 3,6-DICHLORO-2-METHOXYBENZOIC ACID 3,6-DICHLORO-O-ANISIC ACID 2-METHOXY-3,6-DICHLOROSENZOIC ACID VELSICOL-58-CS-11 VELSICOL COMPOUND R ~ BANVEL MEDIBEN 5-HYDROXYDICAMBA METHOXYBENZOIC ACID DIANAT . MDBA DICAMBE RN=1918-00-9 RN=760<7-50-2
Page 73: soc40e00
... . ...,.,...,. „ .. ..,,,._ e.,. .<,._ oii. .,.. ., ., ..,e.< . ., PRINT SOURCES ,.u .,oi.a<se,~,ns;u,USiuflsiiSfisisSi:?~IHfiliSlSaUi1773S~S/!YSlfAUU13:e:AiiliiiliNV}!S!d'r_i`si38lS$li lYlll9i:'.~k3l~~~~YIO Clayton, G. D. and Clayton, F. E., eds., 1978-F3T. F'atty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology. 3d rev. ed. Wiley, New Yor'k, Commerce Clearing House. 1984?. Food Drug Comestic Law Reporter. Commerce Clearing House, Chicago, IL, Gosselin, R. E.; Hodge, H. C.; Smith, R. P.; and Gleason, M. N. 1976. Clinical Toxicology o-f Commercial Products. 4th ed. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD, Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, 1978. John Wiley & Sons, New York Merck Index. 1983. 10th ed. Merck & Co., Rahway, NJ, National Cancer Institute. 1951-82. Survey of Compounds Which H_ave Been Tested for Carcinogenic Activity. Superintendent o-f Documents, Washington, D.C., Sax, N. I. 1984. Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials. 6th ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, ONLINE SOURCES: DATE NAME 1974-87/MAR CURRENT 1969-87/JUNE 1963-87 / J UNE 1967-87/MAY CURRENT 1974-87 .;t!t,11~.~ik~....;Ei~ :... . .... .... . AGRIS INTERNATIONAL AG("OCHEM I CAI.S HANDBOOK E<IOSIS CANCERLIT CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS CHEMICAL CARCINOGENESIS RESEARCH INFORMATION SYSTEM ~ CHEMICAL EXPOSURE
Page 74: soc40e00
f c 1984-87/MAY NOV 1982 1981--87/ ISS18 1970-87/APR 1974-87/AFR MAR 1987 1974-87 / AF'R 1969-87/JUNE MAY 1987 CURRENT 1978-87/MAR 1981-87/MAY 1966-87/JUNE 1964-•87/ I SS 11 1973-87/JAN CURRENT 1970-87/MAR CURRENT 1970-87/AF'R 1965-87/APF. CHEMICAL HAZARDS IN INDUSTRY CF-IGM I CAL E'EGULAT I ONS AND GU I DEL I NES SYSTEM EMBASE ENVIROLINE ENVIRONMENTAL BIBLIOGRAPHY FEDERAL RESEARCH IN'P'ROGRESS FOODS ADLIBRA - FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY HAZARDLINE HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES DATABASE IRL-LIFE SCIENCES COLLECTION LABORATORY HAZARDS BULLETIN MEDLINE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE (NTIS) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH (NIOSH) PESTICIDES DATABANf•:. FOLLUTION ABSTRACTS REGISTRY OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES SMOKING AND HEALTH TOXLINE
Page 75: soc40e00
TOXICITY SEARCH TEF";MS: TOXIC? IMMUNOTOXIC? NEUf~tOTOX IC? GENOTOX,;t C? EMFSRYOTOXIC? FETOTOX'C? OR FOETOTOXIC C CANCER? CAF.C I NOGEN? CAR CINOMA? NEOPLASM? TUMOft? OF: TUMOUS? MUTAGEN? MUTATION? CYTOGENETIC? CYTOTOXIC TERATOGEN? TERATOLOG? CLASTOGEN? ONCOGEN? ONCOLOG? UNSCHEDULED DNA DNA DAMAG? CHROMOSOM? ABERRATION MICROSOME DOMINANT LETHAL MOUSE LYMPHOMA AMES SISTER CHROMATID BIOASSAY ACUTE SUBACUTE CHRONIC SUBCHfiON I C LETHAL DOSE LD 50 SKIN PAINTING INHALE? INHALATION F.ESP I RAT? PULMONARY POISON? IRRITAT? I F";R I TANT? SENSITIV? HYFERSENSITI? ALLEFtG? ADVESSE EFFECT? BIOLOGICAL EFFECT? BIOLOGICAL ACTIVIT? -4
Page 76: soc40e00
I C ;:, HEALTH HAZARD? REF'RODUCT I VE EFFECT? h1ETAE{OL:.^ ExCRET PNAFtMACODYhlAM I C? P}•IARt'IACOKI NET I C? BIOCONCENTRATION? SI OS`f NTHES?
Page 77: soc40e00
i Zbleranoes--Fbod .68,327- [ 168, 304.641 _ "pyrldinylloxy]phenoxylPropanoate --(fluazifop-butyU, all expressed as flua- zifop, in or on the following foods: ': Tolerances are established for . resi- dues of the insecticide resmethrin [5- (phenylmethyl)-3-furanyl] methyl 2,2- : dimethyl-3-(2-methyl-l-propenyl) cy- clopropanecarboxylate In or on food items at 3.0 ppm resulting from use of the insecticide in food handling and storage areas as a space concentration for spot/or crack and crevice treat- ment and shall be limited to a maxi- mum of 3.00 percent of the active in- space gredient by weight, and as ae treatment shall be limited to a maxi- mum of 0.5 fluid ounce of 3.0 percent active ingredient by weight per 1000 cubic feet of space provided that the ; food is removed or covered prior to such use. To assure safe use of the ad- ditive, its label and labeling shall con- form to that registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and shall be used in accordance with such label and labeling. [21 CFR 193.464 as of Apr. 1, 1985.1 [168, 304.65 ] 193.465 Dicambs. ' •. Tolerances are established for the combined residues of the herbicide di- caanba (3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid) and its metabolite 3,6-dichloro-5-hydroxy- -`o-anisic acid in or on the following processed foods when present therein as a result of application of this herbi- ' cide to growing crops. Fooft 20 [21 CFR 193.465 as of Apr. 1, 1985.1 [168,304:661 0193.466 Fluasifop-butyL Tolerances are established for resi- dues of (t)-2-[4-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)- 2-pyridinylloxy] phenoxy]propanoic acid (fluazifop), both free and coalu- gated, and of (t)-butyl 2[4-[[5-(tri- iluoromethyl)-2- Food Drug Cosmetic Law Reports (21 CFR.193.466 as of Apr. 1,-1985.] [168,304.671 .=. Tolerances are established for. the combined residues of the fungicide imazalil 1-[ 2-( 2,4-dichlorophenyl )-2-( 2- propenyloxy)ethyll-lH-imidazole and its metabolite 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2- (1H-imidazole-1-yl)•1-ethanol In or on the following food commodity: [21 CFR 193.467 as of Apr. 1, 1985.] [168,304.681 0 193.468 Pirimiphos-methyL (a) (Reserved] (b) Interim tolerances are estab- lished for the combined residues of the insecticide pirimiphos-methyl (0- [2-(diethylamino)-6-methyl-4- • • / pyrimidinyll O. O-dimethylphosphor- othioate, the metabolite O-(2-ethyla- mino-6-methylpyrlmidin-4-yl) O,O-di- methylphosphorothioate and in free and conJugated form the metabolites 2-diethylamino-6-methylpyrimidin-4- ol, 2-ethylamino-6-methylpyrlmidin-4- 01 and 2-amino-6-methylpyrimidin-4-ol resulting from application of the in- secticide to the stored commodities with tolerance limitations in or on the following food commodities: Food~ wrrA oa wo.k mwq h.cuau_ wh..L mirrq tr.oYOn. r.n. p« ffd. roe sao I swc z?.Voss. 60.0 00 eo.o oa 21 CFR 193.468 968,304.68 . .. ,,..~. ® a
Page 78: soc40e00
1141 10-29=84 3blerarices ;67, 431-3 ' Parts per nVlion .,.~ Awcados•::. __--_."::_:».: Cottonsaed.... d,urau.•••.___. ~uip' . ._- r~,, aws w 'Fndts t>o"F~s. ......"::~i::...:_..~ ;~..»..~ Faatsft stOna.....__».:...».::~__..:_.; Grain. cruvs ~. ..... _ _ _ . ~_~ I Grassas, lorayt... ~ ._._.. tHops aqumes• Iaage _~ ~.~ ~ _.. __.~_..~._. ~. Nuts....... "...__ . __.:.. ~ ........ _ _ ~ ,y~S~garcane.:... _ ' :~;ysgetaaas. huAirg •._ ~ VeyatatYes kafy ,-...- ~ Y.yeta0les. roW crop......-_:"_.._t~:.......~ »~ Y d seed and Na od se: :ya. 'l.aNlf. kdlNr , Where tolerances are. established at higher -- EP4"1e• M1Of ,., . f--- `~ levels from other uses of diquat on the sub- ~4`Ject crops• the higher tolerances applies also :~~ t`; a~. ~ e_to residues of the aquatic uses cited in,.this _ ' -Goats. -paragraph. WZ •' Goats. uvx , ~ ccan. meat.. [As amended, ~~46 F.R. :30342 ~~~ ~-' •n..,' , .. Noys. tat. _ 0.2 k d ,: ~ s meat~M...~. ~ ~rr °"~~~ ~~ 180.227 Dicamba..tolerancea for residues __.~ia. . - . . ..Sbeap tat 0 2. p es , D ::.. = i. Parts~ .r Par nwllipn Feb. 24 -1982 ~ corrected ~+«is. -._..._.~.:...::.. ~...:..: .; .a oz - s s s ::: . - .:~ *~1p9s. .....i :~7 F R. 16020, Apr: '14, •'1982.] _o.i .ry . .. . ' . . ' , .. . . `Hases. kWMY. ._A t ,, r_ 1 5 r,'~ V 67 , 3 02 . 27 j ~ ~ Morses .w.x._ ~( !Horses. mbyp.... 0.2 . Tolerances are established for - sheep• ki.*+'• k-,,; ~.:the combined residues of.the herbicide ~ shawr~ ~ + „ ..... . , . .-dicamba (3,6 dichloro-o anisic acid) si,aev; m.,t _ ox ,,:~",fg .` ~f = and its metabolite :3.6-dichloro-5-hy = :~ gy„ca.~,a b"o' ; ~ ;oos droxy-o-anisic acid in or on the raw ag- w cultural commodities as follows ol. X ~ _ [As amended.,, 39 F.R.'15126;," 3" Commodnsas - PPa"ers May i; 19 74 ; 48 F. R. 11119 ,_' t 'OWbOfl . 1.__. 7c lno9- Lo-T l"JQi . iv, iJV.J, rv r .a~. ~ 9~ 9rain:_~....... ._..~...:..... -... ~~ ~-! Com, /odder__ ..... ._,._....«_ .. _ Carn• lorags....._. ._.. _ ..~ ~ .". c«o. 9rain......_ _ _._ ._.~ :.. j ~ ~ a:wr: :"` ._ .._.. .. cirasss, rarqelarw_.." - ._„~..._. 6ASlel proso, straw.... "__ ...... __._._.... Oats. P"_-.__._......-..._..__.._. - ~ .......__.-. .~l. Oats straw........ . .. " __. ~ ._«.._ ...............~T.............. ...._........~ . ~ ' -• 0.02 0.02 0A2 o.t .0.02 0.02 0.02 02 •r t0 0.1 x 0.02 0.02 0.1 002 0.02 0.02 0.02 ~0.02 .r,.~ Comnwtlmes _ s. per wheatt straw._....... l •(b) Tolerances are jestablished fdr- the combined residues of the herbicide ' d) dicamba (3.6-dichloro-o-anisic _-aci and its metabolite 3,6-dichloro-2-hy-:- droxybenzoic acid in or on the raw ag= ~. , ricultural commodities as follows: . ..A~,.._ .. ._.. :.~~P! ._~. ~ .~,4f0e, Iat._^r..: 30 • 24364 'June 11983 49FR. ; . ., ., . ... . Wrik~' 'os 37758, Sept. 26, 1984.] 0.5 v ~. ~ . .oo (167,302.281 .0.o s 00 .o.o 0.5 § 180:228 S-Ethyl hexahydro-lH-azepine- os 1-carbothioate; tolerances for residues. 0.5 Tolerances are established for neglt- ~ . 3.o gible.residues of the herbicide S-ethyl -'s0 •hexahydro-lH-azepine-l-carbothioate - W " 0•1 in or on the raw agricultural commod- ~ 0•1 'ities rice and rice straw at 0.1 part per o s mIl lion. { --- ~.. : Ssparean0. todda.......~....___._..._ ._....J ..Y . ./ r.n. oVlJ ,: rwys.kwnar.. - - -Junets,.'tyal; 4 ~ ~~ f-'i~bod"DntgCosc~ietic')Cawltepoitatali~ . :~- 4~-CE'R :228 30r1. s ds
Page 79: soc40e00
Ulm . ...,..«.wunafu+uuof.u<.otsauaaNfasaf•:.uuuWau;ltf~fitSfi41i3i1iNfiS!lit7fiflti~tii~f~tlxi+' "u">'+'3+s:;if"-.~~^ f• ~ . ~:. [168,504.15] .:; 0561-415 0,0-diethyl 6-(2-i.opropyl-6- raethyl-4-pyrimidinyU phosphoroth- foate. 0, 0-diethyl 0d 2-[sopropyl-6-methyl-4- pyrimidinyl) phosphorothioate may be safely used in feed in aocordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Application shall be Limited solely to spot and/or crack and crevice treatment In animal feed handling es- '.tabllshments, lncluding feed manufac- . . turing and processing establishments such as stores, supentnarkets, dairies, ;: :,meat slaughtering and packing plants, ' and canneries, where feed and feed :;'products are held, processed, and sold- ; : ., (1) . Spray and dust, concentrations shall be limited to a maximum of 1 1 percent and 2 percent, respectively, of active ingredient by weight. The spray concentration limit of 1 percent shall include, but not be limited to, encapsu- lated formulations of the additive uti- lizing the encapsulating polymer formed from the reaction of sebacoyl chloride, polymethylene polyphenyli- socyanate, ethylenediamine and/or diethylenetriarnine. -'• (2) Application to areas, surfaces, or utensils contacted by feed, contamina- tion of feed or feed contact surfaces, :and the introduction of spray or dust .:lnto the air is to be avoided. ;.. (3) For spot treatment, a coarse, low- pressure spray shall be used. Applica- tion Is limited to floor surfaces only and to 20 percent of the surface area. `;t'_ Any individual spot treatment shall not exceed 2 square feet. -(4) For crack and crevice treatment, equipment capable of delivering dust or a pin stream of spray directly into cracks and crevices shall be used. (b) To assure safe use of the insecti- cide, its label and labeling shall con- form to that registered by the U.S. En- vironmental Protection Agency, and it shall be used in accordance with such label and labeling. [21 CFR 561.415 as of Apr. 1, 1985.] ~. A regulation is established permit- ting residues of the insecticide diflu- benzuron (N-[ [(4- "1168,504.15 21 CFR 561.415 chlorophenyl )aminolcarbonyl]-2,6- difluorobenzamide) in or on the fol- lowing feed commodities: F..ds [168,504.251 6561.425 2,3-Dihydro-5,6-dimethyl-l.4- dithiin-1,1,4.4-tetraoxide. A regulation is established permit- ting residues of the harvest growth re- gulant 2,3-dihydro-5,6 dimethyl-l,4- dithiin-1,1,4,4-tetraoxide In or on cot- tonseed hulls at 0.7 part per million (ppm) when it is present as a result of the application of the harvest growth regulant to the growing agricultural commodity cotton. [21 CFR 561.425 as of Apr. 1, 1985.1 [1168, 504 .27 ] 8 561-427 Dicamba. Tolerances are established for the combined residues of the herbicide di- camba (3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid) and its metabolite 3,6-dichloro-5-hydroxy- o-anisic acid In or on the following processed feeds when present therein as a result of application of this herbi- cide growing crops. F*M [21 CFR 561.427 as of Apr. 1, 1985.] [1168, 504 . 28 ] 0 561.428 Fluazifop-butyl. Tolerances are established for resi= dues of (t)-2-[4-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)- 2-pyridinyl)oxy] phenoxy]propanoic
Page 80: soc40e00
:;, Society for Testing and Materials ------ [As amended, 43 F.R. 44835, (ASTM), 1916 Race Street. Philadel- 5ept. 29, 1978; 45 F.R. .40 phia, PA 19103, or available for inspec- 58837, Sept. 5, 1980; 47 tion at the Office of the Federal Reg- ister, 1100 L St. NW., Washington. DC F.R. 11846, Mar. 19, 1982; 20408. 47 F Nov. 16 51561 R , , . . (d) Eitracttve Iimitatfo~u. (1) Po- . • lyoxymethylene homopolymer, in the 1982; 49 F.R. 10087, Mar. 19, 1984.1 finished form which is to contact food . _ when extracted with the solvent or [157,047.91 - solvents characterizing the type of food and under conditions of time and res ns sulfi e) hs (c)(3) and (d) of I 145 300 of (poly(1,4-phenylene 8~' ap , _.,~„ .. _ er para n i ) d ns su d Polyphenylene e res • tions of intended use L• the condi- f 177.Z490 Pol7Phealla~e wl~de redas. tem erature characterizin p g lfid i may be safely used as coatings or com- 7 s4a ;,: ~ this chaoter and as limited by nara- ~ ;_>' :,.~rgraph (e) of this section. shall yield ith d i t w n oontac use net chloroform-soluble extractives not ed for repeate to exceed 0.5 milligram per square food, in accordance with the following diti ons. - inch of food-contact surface. prescribed oon (2) Polyoxymethylene homopo- (a) Polyphenylene sulilde resins con- lymer. with or without the optional slat of basic resins produced by the re- adjuvant substances described in para- action of epuimolar parts of p-dlchlor- graph (b) of this section, when ground obenzene and sodium sulfide, such &S.. t the finished resins meet the fol• or cut into particles that pass through lowing specifications as determined by A St d d U S d Si N 6 h a . an ar an . . eve t at o. are retained on a U.S.A. Standard methods titled "Oxygen Flask Com- Sieve No. 10, shall yield extractives as bustion-Gravimetrk Method for De- follows: terianination of Sulfur in Organic Com- (i) Formaldehyde not to exceed pounds," "Determination of the Inher- 0.0050 percent by weight of homopo- ent Viscosity of Polyphenylene Sul- lymer as determined by a method fide, " and "Analysis for Dichloroben- titled "Formaldehyde Release and zene In Ryton Polyphenylene Sul- fide: " which are incorporated by refer- " . Formaldehyde AnalYsis which is in ,- Copies are available from the Di- ~ • corporated by reference. Copies are oi Food and Color Additives available from Division of Food and =`> Bureau of Foods (HFT'-330) Food and - , Color Additives, Bureau of Foods .,_.,. sa..=~..~.r.er~..,. 1)nn n a+ aW (BFF-330) Food and Drug Administra- "° -- "-"--"---' - --' --- - - -• W~~~o~ ~ 20204, or avallable on, 200 C St. SW., Washingtdn, ti DC o n , for inspection at the Office of the F'ed- :: ° 20204, or available for inspection at eral Register, 1100 L St. NW., Wash- • the Office of the Federal Register, 20408 '--n DC 1100 L St. NW., Washington. DC . 20408. (1) Sulfur content: 28.2-29.1 percent h d i f fi i s n e res n. (ii) Total extractives not to exceed by weight o (2) Minimum inherent vLscosity: 0.13 20 percent by weight of homopo- 0. deeiliters per gram . lymer when extracted for 6 hours with p-dichloro- ~~~~ ~idual (3) distilled water at reflux temperature and 0.15 percent by weight of homopo- benzene: 0.8 ppm. Qn lymer when extracted for 6 hours with (b) Subiect to any limitations pre- scribed in Parts 170 through 189 of n-heptane at reflux temperature. ~ ~. (e) Conditions of use (1) Polyoxy- this chapter, the following optional substances may be added to the poly- methylene homopolymer is for use as ~ articles or components of articles in- phenylene sulfide basic resins in an My tended for repeated use. amount not to exceed that reasonably ~ shall not eaceed required to accomplish the intended Q (2) U t t se empera ure 250~ F. physical or technical effect. (1) Substances generally- recognized (3) In accordance with good manu- as safe in food. ~ facturing practice, finished articles (2) Substances used in accordance containing polyoxymethylene homo- with prior sanction or approval. polymer shall be thoroughly cleansed (3) S tances the use of which 1s b u s prior to first use in contact with food. permitted in coatings under regula- Me next page is 57,129-5.] ~ -i,: • Food Drug Cosmetic Law Reports 21 dR 177.2490 157.047.9 `
Page 81: soc40e00
0 1206 1-20-86 CMVMentS--RePeated Use p,rti.cles 57,129-5 tions in Parts 170 through 189 of this chaater. (c) The finished coatings are ther- mally cured at temperatures of 700' F and above. (d) Polyphenylene sulfide resin coat- ings may be used in contact with food at temperatures not to exceed the boil- ing point of water, provided that the finished cured coating, when extracted at reflux temperatures for 8 hours sep- arately with distilled water, 50 percent ethanol in water, and 3 percent acetic acid, yields total extractives in each extracting solvent not to exceed 0.02 milligram per square inch of surface and when extracted at reflux tempera- ture for 8 hours with heptane yields total extractives not to exceed 0.1 mil- ligram per square inch of surface. • (e) Polyphenylene sulfide resin coat- ings containing perfluorocarbon resins complying with 1177.1550 may be used In contact with food at temperatures up to and including normal baking and frying temperatures; provided that the finished cured coating, when extracted at reflux temperatures for 2 hours sep- arately with distilled water, 50 percent ethanol in water, 3 percent acetic acid and heptane, yields total extractives in each extracting solvent not to exceed 0.2 milligram per square inch of stu- face and when extracted at reflux temperature for 1 hour with diphenyl ether yields total extractives *not to exceed 4.5 milligrams per square inch of surface. [As amended, 47 F.R. 11846, Mar. 19, 1982.] [ 1(57,048] f 1772500 /Resen+edJ /Reg. § 177 2500, relating to Polysnlfone resinr, Mas reiaked S1 F.R. 88z lmwmy R 19B6-IX7YJ [157,048.1] 91T7.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. • Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or compo- nents of articles Intended for repeated use in contact with food, in accordance with the following prescribed condi- tions: (a) For the purpose of this section, when extracted at reflux temperatures for 2 hours with the solvents distilled water. 50 percent (by volume) ethyl al- cohol In distilled water, and n-hep- n~ tane, yields total extractives in each extracting solvent not to exceed 0.01 milligram per square inch of food-con-' tact surface tested: and if the finished food-contact article is Itself the suD- ject of a regulation in Parts 1-74, 175, 176, 177. 178 and 1179.45 of this chap- ter, it shall also•comply with any apec-. Ifications. and limitations prescribed for it by that regulation. (Nots In' testing the finished food-contact arti- cle. use a separate test sample for each requlred extracting solvent) (c) In accordance with good manu- facturing practice, finished food-con- tact articles containing the polyvinyli- dene fluoride resins shall be thorough-, ly cleansed prior to their first use In contact with food. [1(57,048.5] 1177.2550 Reverse osmosis membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as reverse osmosis membranes intended for use in processing bulk quantities of liquid food to separate permeate from food concentrate or in purifying water for food manufacturing under the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identit} : For the purpose of this _ section. the reverse osmosis membrane consists of a cross-linked high molecular weight polyamide identified as 1,3.5- benzene-tricarbonyl trichloride polymer with 1.3-benzenediamine (CAS Reg. No. . 83044-99-9). The membrane is on the food-contact surface, and its maximum weight is 62 milligrams per square decimeter (4 milligrams per square inch) as a thin film composite on a suitable support. (b) Optional adjuvanl substances. The basic polymer identified in paragraph (a) of this section may contain optional adjuvant substances required in the production of such basic polymer. These optional adjuvant substances may include substances permitted for such use by regulations in Parts 170 through 186 of this chapter, substances generally , recognized as safe in food.. dnd , substances used in accordance with a prior sanction or approval. ° the polyvinylidene fluoride resins con- . sist of basic resins produced by the po- lymerization of vinylldene. fluoride. (b) The finished food-contact article, [The 11ext page is 57,131.1 Food Drug Cosmetic Law Regacts 21 CFR 177. 2550 157,048..5 i
Page 82: soc40e00
. ~..:af~stxtxeitstSfifsutsts<itiun.ius,oaut.nisniititSrisxaxtfAt~ifiiiltYi9Yli71iYiik3}iY~~!#!~ 's ,. .;;ti. - e:1u.1737ii~tllt~ 1276 s-11-g7 Food Additive PeNtlons 69,037 ;Ls permitted stablizers for polyoxymethylene copolymer intended for use in contact with food. FAP 5B3883, 50 F.R. 50232, 12-9-85. Action taken, 52 F.R 4492, 2-12-87. __ .070 Paper and paperboard component.- Notice is given that a petition has been filed ajth the FDA by Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co., 3M Center, St. Paul, MN 55144, proposing that 1176.170 Components of paper and paperboard in contact with aqueous and fatty foods (21 CFR 176.170) be amended to provide for the safe use of = the polymer reaction product of: ethanaminium, trimethyl 2-[(2-methyl-l-oxo-2-propenyl)- .:; oxy]-, chloride; 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, oxirany- lmethyl ester, 2-propenoic acid, 2-ethoxyethyl ester, and 2-propenoic acid, 2[[(heptadecafluoroctyl)sulfo- i.:y,r nyl]methyl-amino] ethyl ester, as a water and oil repellent for paper and paperboard. FAP 5B3870, 50 F.R. 50233, 12-9-85. Action taken, 52 F.R. 3603, 2-587. .072 0,0-dimethyl 0-(4-nitro-m-tolyl) phosphorothioate.-Sumitomo Chemical America, Inc., in a petition filed with the EPA, proposes amending 21 CFR 193.156 by establishing a regula- tion permitting residues of the insecticide O,4 dimethyl O{4-nitro-m-tolyl) phosphorothioate and its oxygen analog metabolite in or on the following ~ commodities: Milled fractions of barley, corn, milo (grain sorghum), oats, rice, rye and wheat at 25 ppm. FAP 5115476,50 F.R 50680, 12-11-85. .073 Methamidophos.-Mobay Chemical Corp., .y~. in a petition submitted to the EPA, proposes amend- ing ..,, ing 21 CFR 561.277 by establishing a regulation permitting residues of the insecticide methamid,)phos in or on the commodities soybean bulls at 3.0 ppm, and peanut and soybean meal at .0.4 ppm. - FAP 6H5480, 50 F.R. 52850,12-26-85. s 4 r' '''.074 Ethyl 2-[4{6-chloroquinoxalin-2-y1 oay) phenoxy]propanoate.-E.I. duPont deNemours & Co., Agricultural Products Department, Wilming- ton, DE 19898, in a petition submitted to the EPA, proposes amending 21 CFR Parts 193 (food) and 561 (feed) by establishing regulations permitting resi- dues of the herbicide ethyl 2-[4-(&chloroquinoialin- 2-yl oxy) phenoxylJpropanoate and its acid metabo- lite, 2-[4-(6-chloro-quinoxalin-2-yl oxy)phenoxyJ proanoic acid, in or on the commodities as follows:, Part per CFR affected - Commodities million (ppm) 21 CFR Part 193 ... Soybean Flour ........ 0.5 ' -' 21 CFR part 561 ... Soybean bulls ......... 02 . ` Soybean meal ........ 05 r Soybeansaapstock..... 1.0 FAP 6H5479, 50 F.R 52851,12-26-85. .075 Dicamba.-Velsicol Chemical Corp., 341 East Ohio St., Chicago, IL 60611, in a petition submitted to the EPA, proposes amending 21 CFR Part 193 by establishing a regulation permitting residues of the herbicide dicamba (3,6-dichloro-oa anisic acid) and its 5-hydroxy metabolite in or on the commodities as follows: Part per Commodities million (ppm) Toma to utsu p ......................... 0.6 Tomato juice .......................... 0.6 Tomato pomace (wet and dry) ............ 0.6 Tomato puree ......................... 0.6 FAP 5H5455, 50 F.R 52851,12-2655. .076 Triclorpyr.-Dow Chemical U.S.A., P.O. Box 1706, Midland, NI 48674, in a petition submit- ted to the EPA, proposes amending 21 CFR part 193 by establishing a regulation permitting the com- bined residues of the herbicide triclorpyr, [(3,5,6- trichloro•2-pyridinyl)oxy]acetic acid, and its metab- olites, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol and 2-methoxy- 3,5,6 trichloropyridine, in potable water at 0.1 ppm. FAP 6H5477, 50 F.R 52851, 12-2685. 169,034 1986 Filings RM .01 Gellan gum.-Notice is given that a petition ~ has been filed with the FDA by Kelco Division of Merck & Co., Inc., P.O. Box 23176, San Diego, CA 92123, proposing that the food additive regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of gellan gum as a stabilizer and thickener in confections and frost- ings. FAP 6A3903, 51 F.R. 687, 1-7-86. .02 Nylon 6/69 polymer.-Notice is given that a ' petition has been filed with the FDA by EMS- CHEMIE AG, Ch-7013 Domat/Ems, Switzerland, proposing that 1177.1390 High-temperature lami- ; nates(21 CFR 177.1390) be amended to provide for the safe use of a nylon 6/69 polymer manufactured =.~~. Food Drug Cosmetic Law Reports MW by the condensation of E-caprolactam, hex- amethylenediamine, and azelaic acid for use in lami- nates that may contact food at temperatures not to exceed 212° F. FAP 5B3852, 51 F.R. 3844, 1-30-86. .03 Carbon black.-Notice is given that a peti- tion has been filed with the FDA by Cabot Corp., Concord Rd., Billerica, MA 01821, proposing that § 178.3297 Colorants for polymers (21 CFR 178.3297) be amended to provide for the safe use of high purity carbon black (furnace process) as a colorant in polymers. The petitioner also requested that the food additive regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of high purity carbon black 769,034
Page 83: soc40e00
> ?!i(fF3~.a;3 <ii5liii ii!k)3iSli;iW i11111117i1{i~13Tl ~ ltlil11ii57{7if1{f,d.,it~il.ti~~~:~7il~itiat.. . 1272 4-20-87 Food Additive Petitions by,Ul~J pyridinedicarboxylate as a stabilizer for polyvinyl .025 Aspartaate.-Bernard Food Industries, Inc., chloride and/or vinyl chloride copolymers intended 1125 Hartrey Ave., Evanston, IL 60204, has filed a for use in contact with food. petition with the FDA proposing to provide for the FAP 4B3790, 49 F.R.18043, 4-26-84. - safe use of aspartame as a sweetener in ready-to- serve gelatin desserts. .019 Hydrogen peroxide.-E.I. duPont de FAP 4A3775, 49 F.R 21118, 5-18-84. Amended, Nemours & Co., 1007 Market St., Wilmington, DE 19898, has filed a petition with the FDA proposing 51 F.R. 45555, 12-1986. < that the food additive regulations be amended in 21 .029 Ethoxylated octadecylamine. Notice is CFR 178.1005 to provide for the safe use of hydro- given that a petition has been filed with the FDA by gen peroxide for sterilizing food-contact surfaces pre- Matsumoto Yushi-Seiyaku Co., Ltd., c/o Center for pared from ionomeric resins complying with 21 CFR Regulatory Services, 2347 Paddock Lane, Reston, 177.1330, ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymers com- VA 22091, proposing that § 178.3130 Antistatic ".' 177.1630, and to amend 21 CFR 177.1330 to pro- the safe use of ethoxylated octadecylamine reacted a g , n ce m po ye - an or an - ogg~ng agents m pac cagrng mater- rta / oo t :,;:.:>;. r:> .:. P Y ;+,~'<: ylene phthalate polymers complying with 21 CFR ials (21 CFR 178.3130) be amended to provide for ' I'n with 21 CFR 1771350 J d h d d f f d 1 ~ vide for the use of the potassium partial salt of the with octadecanoic acid for use as an antistatic agent ionomeric resins in addition to the ammonium, cal- for stretched polypropylene films complying with 21 cium, magnesium, sodium, and/or zinc partial salts. CFR 177.1520. FAP 483783, 49 F.R.18044, 4-2C.84. .020 Sodium methyl and dimethyl naphtha- lene sulfonates.-Notice is given that a petition has been filed by Economics Laboratory, Inc., Osborn Bldg., St. Paul MN 55102, proposing that § 178.1010 Sanitizing solutions (21 CFR 178.1010) be amended to provide for the safe use of sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates in sani- tizing solutions for use on food-contact surfaces. The sanitizing solution contains decanoic acid, octanoic acid, and a mixture of (1) the sodium salt of naphthalene sulfonic acid; (2) the methyl, dimethyl, and trimethyl derivatives of the sodium salt of naph- thalene sulfonic acid; and (3) a mixture of the sodium salt of naphthalene sulfonic acid, and the methyl, dimethyl, and trimethyl derivatives of the sodium salt of naphthalene sulfonic acid alkylated at 3 percent by weight with C6-C' linear olefins. The methyl and dimethyl substituted derivatives (described in (2) above) constitute no less than 70 percent by weight of the mixture of naphthalene sulfonates. FAP 3H3756, 49 F.R. 18044, 4-26-84; amended, 52 F.R. 10412, 4-1-87. .023 Aspartame.-Shaklee Corp., Shaklee Ter- races, 444 Market St., San Francisco, CA 94111, has filed a petition with the FDA proposing to provide for the safe use of aspartame as a sweetener in natural flavor breath mints. FAP 4A3766, 49 F.R. 21118, 5-18-84. Action taken, 5 1 F.R. 43000, 11-28-86. .024 Aspartame.-Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., 800 Sylvan Ave., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632, has filed a petition with the FDA proposing to provide for the safe use of aspartame as a sweetener in non- carbonated, chilled, ready-to-drink iced tea bever- ages. FAP 4A3769, 49 F.R. 21118, 5-18-84. Action taken, 51 F.R. 43001, 11-28-86. I: 'r~- ~y: ~4 Food Drug Cosmetic Law Reports .~.;s:,~:r- y. . FAP 4B3801, 49 F.R. 24601, 6-1484. .033 Fluazifop. The EPA has received a feed additive (FAP) petition from the ICI Americas, Inc., Agricultural Chemicals Division, Wilmington, DE 19897, proposing to amend 40 CFR 180.411 (raw agricultural commodity), and 21 CFR 561.428 (animal feed commodity), by establishment of toler- ances for residues of the herbicide fluazifop-butyl (t )-butyl-2-[4-[ [5 trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy] phenoxy]propanoic acid (fluazifop), both free and conjugated, and of (f)-butyl-2-[4-[[5 trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy] phenoxy]propa- noate all expressed as fluazifop in or on sugar beet molasses at the level of 2.0 ppm in accordance with the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The analytical method for determining residues, is high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). FAP 4H5432, 49 F.R. 26282, 6-27-84. .039 1-(4thlorophenoxy)-3,3-dimethyl-1 -(I H- 1,2,4-triazol-l-yl)-2-butanone.-Mobay Chemical Corporation, P.O. Box 4913, Kansas City, MS 64120, in a petition filed with the EPA, proposes amending 21 CFR 193.83 by establishing a regulation permit- ting residues of the fungicide 1{4-chlorophenoxy)- 3,3-dimethyl-1{1H-1,2,4-triazol-l-yl)-2-butanone in or on the commodities as follows: Parts per Commodities million (PPm) Cottonseed; cake, meat, and oil ........... 0.05 Molasses ............................. 0.10 Sugar, refined ......................... 0.05 FAP 4115433,49 F.R. 29135, 7-18-84. .042 Dieamba-Velsicol Chemical Corp., 347 East Ohio St., Chicago, IL 60611, has filed a petition with the EPA that proposes amending 21 CFR Part 561 by establishing a regulation permitting residues of the herbicide dicamba (3,6dicholoro-oanisic acid) in or on cottonseed meal (The next page is 69,029-3.] at 6.0 ppm. (PM-25).
Page 84: soc40e00
Petitions-Forms for the safe use of sucrose fatty acid esters as an emulsifier, stabilizer, and texturizer in some foods for human consumption. FAP 1A3564, 46 F.R. 31519, 616-81. .045 ChlorflurenoL-EM Industries, Inc., Plant Protection Division, 5 Skyline Dr., Hawthorne, NY 10532, in a petition filed with the EPA, proposes that 21 CFR Part 193 be amended by establishing a food additive regulation permitting residues of the plant growth regulator chlorflurenol (methyl-2- chloro-9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylate, methyl-9- hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylate, methyl 1-2, 7 dichloro-9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylate) in or on cottonseed oil at 0.1 part per million (ppm) and cottonseed meal at .05 ppm. (PM 5, Robert J. : Taylor, 703-557-7066). FAP 1115305,46 F.R. 34415, 7-1-81. . -'A46 Dieamba Velsicol Chemical Corp., 341 East Ohio St., Chicago, IL 60611, in a petition filed with the EPA proposes that 21 CFR Part 561 be amended by establishing a feed additive regulation be established permitting residues of the herbicide dicamba (3,6•dichloro-o-anisic acid) and its metab- olites 3,6•dichloro-5-hydroxy-o-anisic acid in or on cottonseed meal at 5 ppm. (PM 25, Robert J; Taylor, 703-557-7066). ' FAP 1H5306, 46 F.R. 34415, 7-1-81. .047 Diatomaceous earth.-EPA gives notice that International Diatoms Industries Ltd., 904 West 23rd St., Yankton, SD, has submitted. a food additive petition to the . EPA, proposing estab- lishment of a food additive regulation permitting the residues of the insecticide diatomaceous earth in spot and/or crack and crevice treatments in food processing and food storage areas in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: . (L) It is used or intended for use in combination with pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide for control of insects in food processing and food storage areas: provided that the food is removed or covered prior to imbuse (b) To assure safe use of the additive, its label and labeling shall conform to that registered with the ~ EPA, and it shall be used in accordance with such label and labeling. ,.,FAP 1H5305, 46 F.R. 34416, 7-1-81. .048 N[[(4-chlorophenyl)amino] carbonyl]- 2,6difluorobenzarnide.-Duphar B.V., P.O. Box 54, 1243 ZHSGraveland, Holland, has filed a peti- tion with the EPA proposing amending 21 CFR Part 193 be amended by establishing a regulation permitting residues of thainsecticide N[[(4-chioro- phenyl)amino]carbonyl]-2,6difluorobenzamide in or on dried citrus pulp (orange and grapefruit) at 0.30 ppm, citrus oil at 20.0 ppm, and processed citrus 1•products and citrus molasses at 0.05 ppm. 69,029 FAP 1H5301, 46 F.R. 32313, 6-22-81. Amended, 50 F.R. 32766, 8-14-85. .051 Metolachlor.-EPA gives notice that Ciba- Geigy Corp., P.O. Box 11422, Greensboro, NC 27409, has submitted a feed additive petition to the EPA . proposing establishment of a feed additive regulation permitting the residues of metolachlor [2- chloro-N{2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-f- methylethyl) acetamide] and its metabolites 2{[2- ethylbmethylphenyl] amino) propanol and 4{2- ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-2-hydroxy-5-methyl-3- morpholinone (expressed as the parent compound) on the feed items sunflower hulls and sunflower meal at 0.6 part per million (ppm). FAP 1H5294, 46 F.R. 35349, 7SS1. :054 Dimethylamine-epichlorohydrin copolymer. Notice is given that a petition has been filed with the FDA by American Cyanamid C., Wayne, NJ 07470, proposing that Subpart A- Polymer Substances for Food Treatment of Part 173 (21 CFR Part 173) be amended to provide for the safe use of dimethylamine-epichlorohydrin copolymer for use as a flocculant and/or decolorizer in the clarification of refinery sugar liquors and juices. FAP OA3500, 46 F.R 37565, 7-21-81. .073 Permethrin.-FMC Corp. has Gled a food additive petition with the EPA. The petition pro• poses amending 21 CFR 193 by establishing a reg- ulation permitting residues of the insecticide per- methrin ((3-phenoxyphenyl) methyl-3{2,2-dichloro- ethenyl)-2-2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate] in or on the agricultural commodity apple pomace at 17.0 ppm. (PM-17, Franklin Gee, 703-557-2690.) FAP 1115319,46 F.R. 51283, 10-19-81. .078 MethomyL-E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, DE 19898 has filed a food additive petition with the EPA. The petition proposes amending 21 CFR 193 by establishing a regulation permitting residues of the insecticide methomyl (S-methyl-N-[(methylcarbamoyl)oxy]- thioacetimidate) on the commodity tea at 0.5 part per million (ppm). (PM-12, Jay Ellenberger, 703-557-2386). FAP 1H5320, 46 F.R. 52416, 10-27-81. .084 Cyclic neopentanetetrayl bis-(octadecyl phosphite).-A petition has been filed with the FDA by the Borg-Warner Chemicals, Inc., Technical Centre, Washington 26181, proposing that Part 178 (21 CFR Part 178) of the food additive regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of cyclic neo- pentanetetrayl bis-(octadecyl phosphite).as %an antioxidant and/or stabilizer in ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymers intended to contact food. FAP 2B3591, 46 F.R. 60063,12SS1. . 01986, Commerce Clearing Houselnc.
Page 85: soc40e00
,.. I >>s~-s;' . ,~_,.,. Petitions-Forms as components of articles intended for use in contact with food. FAP 4B3773, 49 F.R. 9472, 3-13-84. .006 Hydrogen peroxide.-Notice is given that a petition has been filed by Keller & Heckman, 1150 17th St. NW., Washington, DC 20036, proposing that the food additive regulations be amended in 21 CFR 178.1005 to permit the use of hydrogen peroxide as a sterilizing agent at concentrations below those that are currently specified for sterilizing food-contact surfaces. ' FAP 4B3777„49 F.R. 9473, 3-1354. - +` 007 Dicamba-In a petition filed with the EPA, Velsicol Chemical Corp., 341 East Ohio St., Chicago, 1] 60611, proposes amending 21 CFR 561.427 by establishing a regulation permitting residues of the herbicide dicamba and its metabolite 3,6-dichloro-5- hydroxy-o-anisic acid in or on the commodity cottonseed meal at 8.0 ppm. FAP 4115428,49 F.R. 10572, 3-21-84. .008 Thiodicarb.-Union Carbide Corp., T.W. Alexander Dr., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, in a petitiou filed with the EPA, purposes amending 21 CFR Part 193 by establishing a repulation, in conjunction with an experimental use permit, permitting residues of the insecticide thiodicarb (dimethyl N' N'-(thiobis(methyl- amino)carbonyloxy)) bis (ethanimidothioate)) and its metabolite methomyl [Smethyl N{(methyl- carbamoyl)oxy)thioatetimidate] in oc on the commodity tomato paste at 5.0 parts per million (ppm). FAP 4115422,49 F.R. 10573, 3-21-84. . '.009 Carbosulfan.-FMC Corp., 2000 Market ..St., Philadelphia, PA 19103, has submitted a petition to the EPA proposing amending 21 CFR Part 561 by establishing a regulation permitting residues of the insecticide carbosulfan in or on the following commodities: a. Apple pomace, dry: 51.0 ppm total, of which 25 ppm is carbosulfan per se, 11.0 ppm is carbamate metabolites, 2.0 ppm is phenolic metabolites, and 13.0 ppm is the dibutylamine metabolite. b. Apple pomace, wet: 15.5 ppm total, of which 7.0 ppm is carbosulfan per se, 2.5 ppm is carbamate metabolites, 1.0 ppm is phenolic metabolites, and 5.0 ppm is the dibutylamine metabolite. FAP 4H5420, 49 F.R. 10573, 3-2184. .012 Metalaxyl.-Ciba-Geigy Corp., PO Box 11422, Greensboro, NC 27409, in a petition filed with the EPA, proposes to amend 21 CFR 561.273 by establishing a regulation permitting the com- bined residues of the fungicide metalaxyl [N- (2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl) alanine methyl ester] and its metabotites containing the 2,6-dimethylaniline moiety, and N-[2-(hydroxyme- thyl)b-methylphenyl]-N.(methoxyacetyl) alanine, :-'¶ 69,032 . . =>JU,.lil4ad.taif3;1.1af1sStStiS2ilfNtSli~fwfi5i4ii7Afwi2t<5m .<Itl:ri9~.s .<i1J3dun4tUvt.11J 1,...,..)i....,SLi4HSiiliSiilfllSUls']7:" . each expressed as metalaxyl in or on the feed com- modities apple pomace (dry) at 2.0 ppm and apple pomace (wet) at 0.4 ppm. (PM-21, Henry Jacoby). FAP 3115401, 49 F.R. 15267, 4-18-84., .013 Nylon MXD-6: A petition has been filed with FDA by Toyobo Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan, `-:; proposing that the food additive regulations be amended in 21 CFR 177.1500 to provide for the safe use of the copolymer of adipic acid, 1,3-benzene- dimethanamine, and alpha-(3-aminopropyl)-omega- (3-aminopropoxy) polyoxyethylene (impact-modified Nylon MXD-6 resin), and of the reaction product of adipic-acid and 1,3-benzenedimethanamine (Nylon MXD-6 resin) containing none of the monomer alpha-(3-aminopropyl )-ornega-(3-aminopropoxy) polyoxyethylene in articles used in processing, handling, and packaging of food FAP 3B3752, 49 F.R. 16839, 4-2084. .014 Cyano (4-fluoro-3-phenoxyphenyl) methyl 3{2,2dicltloroethenyl)-2,2-dimethylrylo- propanecarboxylate.-Mobay Chemical Corp., P.O. Box 4913, Hawthorn Rd., Kansas City, MO 64120, has filed a petition with the EPA proposing the establishment of tolerances and/or regulations for residues of the insecticide cyano (4-fluoro-3-phen- oxyphenyl) methyl 3-(2,2-dichloro- ethenyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate in or on refined, deodorized soybean oil at 0.09 ppm, soybean hulls at 0.3 ppm, refined, deodorized cottonseed oil at 2.0 ppm, and cottonseed hulls at 2.5 ppm. . FAP 4115427, 49 F.R. 17809, 4-25-84. Amended, 50 F.R. 20625, 5-17-85. . .015 Diquat.-A petition has been filed with the EPA by Chevron Chemical Company, Ortho Agricultural Chemicals Division, 940 Hensley St., Richmond, CA 94804-0036, proposing to amend 21 CFR Parts 193 and 561 by establishing regulations permitting residues of the herbicide/desiccant diquat (6,7-dihydrodipyrido (1,2-a:2',1'-c) pyrazidiinium) (calculated as the cation) in or on wheat milled fractions at 1.0 ppm, both as food (21 CFR 193.160) and as animal feed (21 CFR 561215) in conjunction with experimental use permit 239-EUP-RNL and temporary tolerance petition 4G3045. The proposed analytical method used to determine diquat residues involves extraction with boiling 18N sulfuric acid, dilution with water pH adjustment, concentration and cleanup on an ion exchange column, reduction and measurement by spectrophotometry. (PM 23). FAP 4H5426, 49 F.R. 17809, 4-25-84. .018 Didodecyl 1, 4-dihydro-2, 6-dimethyl-3, 5- pyridinedicarboxylate.-M&T Chemicals, Inc., P.O. Box 1104, Rahway, NJ 07065, has filed a petition with the FDA proposing that the food additive regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of didodecyl 1, 4-dihydro-2, 6-dimethyl3, 5- 01986, Commerce Clearing House, lna at-a •.. ~,n~,r~ra„r~lN{!u+li1j13N11!!liaal~AllHhl~
Page 86: soc40e00
~i~if, „ {<itts WOMMiM M ifimm Niumm AGROCHEM I CALS HANDBOOK C ° 000131 Common TAH Name: DICAMBA (BSI, ISO, ANSI, WSSA) ACTIVITY: Herbicide CAS REGISTRY NUMBER: 1918-00-9 MOLECULAR FORMULA: C8H6C12O3 MOLECULAR WEIGHT: 221.04 CHEMICAL NAMES: 3,6-dichlor-o-o-anisic acid (IUP:'1C) 3,6-dic:iloro.-2.-methoxybenzoic acid (IUF'AC, CA) OTHER NAMES: DIANAT (US SR) TRADE NAME(S): Banvel; Mediben; Banex MANUFACTURER: Vel s i c ol PHYSICAL STATE: Colourless crystals. MELTING POINT: 114-116 Deg C., VAPOR PRESSURE: 5 times 10-3 mbar at 100 Deg C. SOLUBILITY: In water at 25 Deg C, 0.79 g/104 g. Readily soluble in ethanol (92 g/' 00 ml ), acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and other k-etonQs. Less readily soluble in xylene (7.8 g/100 ml). Sodium salt: In water ca. 4•D;:. Di methvl ami. ne sal t: I n water ca. 85%. CORROSIVENESS: The dimethylamine salt is regarded as slightly corrosive. STABILITY: The acid is very stable to hydrolytic and oxidative influences, but is decomposed in sunlight. -ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTS: Acidification, extraction with acetone or determination of the IR absorption at 9.89 nm (M. A. Malina ether, and Zweig 1973, VII, 548-561). ANALYSIS OF RESIDUES: Extraction from acid media with ether, gas-chrornatographic determination with electron-capture detection (M. Smith et al. J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem. 1965, 48, 1164). See also M. Malina (Zweig 1973, VII, ~4S-`,61) and H. K. Suzuki et al. (ibid. 1978, X, 3V6--.:'10) . MODE OF ACTION: Absorption via leaves and roots, -Followed by translOcation. M USES: Selective post-emergence her-bicidal control of broad--leaf weeds, ~ especially black bindweed, cle-avers, common chic4:weed, F::notgrass, ~ mayweeds, and redshank in cereals, grassland, and grass-seed crops. p . Also controls clover and (::notgrass in turf, and docks in established `bA apple and grassland. `dettle control.
Page 87: soc40e00
,= O Rr'f U L A T I GNS: G r- .z :, Ul e_ y L i qui d rnMPATALjIL-T`y' WITH ~]THER F'Rl1DLJCTS: l~i;<a.nc~ a.~ij_~h so1~~.bae ~~eavy-met~?.1 salts - ~Y. causes ;?re.cipitation. Acidic media cause thc.~ salts af:.-the -free acid tc be precipitated out o; aqUeoU.s solution. TOXICITY: MAMMALS -Acste oral LD50 for rats 1040-2900 mg/!::g (2629 mg/kg for dimethyl•ami nr.~ salt and 6764 mg/k:g for sodium salt). Feeding to rats at 500 mg /6::g diet and to dogs at 50 mg/kg diet for two years has no injurious ef•fects on health. Acute dermal LD50 of technical and dimeth•; lamine salt for rabbits ;>^i.aOs-i .mg/kg (::::?Cr,00U mg/l:g -for sodium salt). FISH -- Not i:o::ic: to -f:islh. LC50 for rainbow trout :35, bluegill 40, carp 465 mg/z (4E3 hours). BEES - Not tox i c to bees. DEGRADATION AND i1ETABOLISh9: Following uptake by grasses, dicamba is degraded within a few days, in the course of which the 2-methoxy group is presumably converted to a hydroxy group. In other plants, the compound remains stabie over weeks. tdlarm--blooded animals eliminate dicamba rapidly in urine, partly as a glycine conjugate. Period of residual activity in soil is about 3 months (at 4 kg/ha). PRECAUTIONS: General precautions. Avoid skin and eye contact. Prevent drifting. ANTIDOTES AND MEDICAL TFtEATh1ENT: No speci-Fic,antidote known. Symptomatic treatment. I f swallowed, drink water and induce vtirniti ng. RECORD DATE: S6s7S''0
Page 88: soc40e00
2 1~`~ ~`F. . .~ '. a..iasas sa43i;3u,,uiaiias,i~s,l s> Wit PESTICIDES DATABANK - CURRENT E AN: 104100 P_a,ticide. Manual ltlumbar: 04100 ENTRY NAME: EN: 1/ Dicamba 2/ dicamba-dimethylammonium 3/ dica.rrtba--tris (2-hydro:,yett-,yl ) :•.mmoniUm 4/ dica.mba-potassium 5/ dicamba.-sodium CN: Common name dicamba (BSI, E-ISO,, (m) F-ISO, ANSI, WSSA)l dianat (former e,:r-epti on, USS(') : MDBA (JMAF). COMMON NAME: IUPAC NAME: CD: Chemical name (=UF'AC) 3,6-•dichloro-o-anisic acid (I). CHEM I CAL ABSTRACTS NAME : CA: (C. A. ) 3,6--dichloro-x--methor:ybenzoic acid (9CI) (I) (3CI); RE: Reg. No. E191(3--00-93 dicamba (2.,ci0-h6-c7 ::Ji camba--dimethylammoniLtm E 1000,•-85--911 di c«mba--potassi um C 1982-h9--07 dicamba-sodium. DEVELOPMENT: DE: Its herbicidal properties were described by R. A. Darrow & R. H. Haas (Proc. South. Weed Conf., 14th, 1961, p. 202). Introduced by Velsicol Chemical Corp. PATENT: PA: US 3013054 FIRM'S CODE NUMBER: FC: code no. 'Velsicol 5a-CS-11'; TRADEMAR(':S : TR: trade marks 'Danvel ' 'Mediben'. MOLECULAR FORMULA: FO: i/ C8HbC120:1 2/ C10H13C1^N03 3/ C14H21C12N06 4/ CSH5C1 2tt0:' 5/ C8H5C12Na03 1
Page 89: soc40e00
~ ti siii.s,..i.as~3i3i3i3iiu~i3ii33#liii333331313~3;331li~3333#3lil~#~}333~~i11#i#3#~1~333siiiii#i#~#133 3i#i33ii#i'.i#3#~#li~#iii3~`,3#i#i#~~1~~ 3~~~t~~~~ C Mtll_EC1JLAR :;iC I rFiT : MIAJ: 1 / (.•_21 . 0) 2/ (^ucS. i) 3/ '._'^6.^' 4/ (259.1) 5/ (243.0) WISWESSER LINE NOTATION: WN: 1/ QVR EiG EG F01 4 PROPERTIES: F'R: The technil cal product i s a pal e buf f erystal 1 i ne sol i d, puri ty R0•-90% m/m, the remainder mainly being 1,5-dichloro-o-anisic acid. Pure dicamba is a colourlesn _,olid; m.p. 114-116 <degrees>C; relative density 1.57 (25/- <degrees>C); v.p. 4.5 mF'a (25 ::degrees>C) ;? t decomposes r_. 200 <degrees>C on attempted distillation. Solubility (25 <degrees>C): 6.5 g/1 water; (310 g/1 acetone; 260 g!1 dichlorornethane, 1.18 k:g/i dio>:a..ne; 922 g/l ethanol; 130 g.•'1 taic.«ene°; 78 g/1 xylene. It is resistant to oxidation and to hydrolysis under normal conditions. Dicamba is acidic, forming salts that are appreciably soluble in water: sodi _im sal t, 360 g 7. <-_. /l water-5 potassium salt, 480 g aI e. /1 water; dirnethylammoni:_im salt, 724) g a.e./1 water. ACTIVITY: AV: I-3erbicide Selective herbicide USES: US: It is a foliar-- or soil-applied herbicide which is readily absorbed by leaves and roots and is translocated throughout the plant. It effectively controls many annual and perennial broad-leaved weed speciez in asparagus, cereals, grain, maize, perennial seed grasses, sorghum, sugarcane, turf between cropping systems. It is also used for woody brush and vine control in pasture, rangeland and cropland. Dosage varies with specific use and ranges from 105 g to 112 v;,:g a. i. /ha. Dicamba is rapidly degraded i n soi l wi th 50% l oss i n •': 14 d. HOST CROP: HC: asparagus cereals mai z e sugarcane turf sorghum LIST OR ORSAIVISMS: LO: Dicotyledons (annual) Dicotyledons (perennial) 2
Page 90: soc40e00
( ['n;t IC.[7LOGY: TY, u ricF-lt,~ oral LD5ir for rats 1700 mg/kg; f or mal l ard duck 2000 mmg/kg. Acutc ,a(_1rc!;t_anMzou_= L.D50 for rabbits :'-•2ot?<) it is extremely i rr:i ta.ti ng and cor'r-osa ve to thez r eyE?x~~:.~.nd moderatel y-:1::r-ri tati ng to their >;k:in; in a_^:•_1"-•d dermal study in r.:_7bbits F.a:{posed to ;.more +~r- >1:'rc'; ,i-ig/f:g dz:.i 1 y evi dence o•;~ sl i ght to mo-der,te i rri tati on was C)b: t?r Vi?d m_f:i"osci>plcally. It is a moderate d?rma.i 4'-aensitlser to guinea-pigs. In 2-y feeding trials no adverse ef-Fect was noted at the highest levels: for rats 500 mg/kg dietM ; or dogs 50 mg/kg diet. Enlargement of the hepatocytes of the liver was observed in mice in a dose-related incidence and degree at 1<-acY-1c_: 000 mg/kg diet. LC5G (8-d) for mallard duck and :bobwhite quail were >10 000 mg/k:g diet. LCS0 (96-h) for rainbow trout and bluegill is 135 mg/1. It was not teratogenic in rabbits at iir mg/kg daily or in rats at 400 mg/kg daily. No effect was observed in a;-gnneration reproduction study in rats at the top dose, 500 mg/kg diet. Bacteri al and mammal i an i n-vi tro and i n-vi vo tests showed 'i t i s not a mutagen; however, EF'A has obtained weak:ly positive results Yrom bacterial mi-Itogenicity assays. TEST ORGANISMS: TO: rats mal 1 ard duck rabbits guinea-pigs dogs bobwhite quail rainbow trout bluegill FOfiMJLAT I 0NC s FM: 'Banvel Herbicide' (480 g a.e. dicamba-dimethylammonium/1); 'Banvol 2 5' (Siapa), SL (212 g/1); 'Banvel II' (240 g a.e. dicarnba-sodi _rm/1 ); GFt (50 or 100 g a, e. /k:g) . t'I I XTUiE$ v MN: Mixtures include: 'Ban-Dock' (Shell), (dicamba + mecoprop + 2,4, 5-T - as amine salts) 'Banlene Plus' (FBC Limited), SL (18 g a.i. dicamba + 252 g a.e. MCPA + 84 g a.e. mecoprop/l (as sodium and potassium salts)) 'Banvel K' (Velsicol ) , (Reg. No. C51bn2-<-y2-97) , (15i0 g a. e. dicamba-dimethylammonium + ?c.ici g a.e. L,4-D-dimethylammonium/1) 'Banvel M' (150 g a.e. dicamba-dimethylammonium +:'00 g a.e. MCF'A-dimethylammonium/l) 'Bio Lawn Weedkiller' (Pan Britannica Ind.), (dicamba + 2,4-D -F- i o.a yn i l) ' Cambi l ene' (FI)C Li mi ted ), (di camba + MCF'a + mecoprop +^, L, 6-TBA) 'Di-Farmon M' (Farm Protection) 'Endox' (FCC) 'Farmon Condo•a M' 'Erbito:a Grano' (Siapa), SL (21 g dicamba + 230 g a.e. (Farm Protection), 'Hyban', 'Hygrass' (Agrichom), (dicamba + ~ mecoprop) lj~ 'Docklene' (FBC Limited), 'Herrisol' (Bayer), 'Hyprone', 'Hysward' ~ (Agrichem), 'Paddox' (Farm F'rotection), 'f='asturol ' (f=CC), ~ 'Springcorn E•r.tr a' (FCC), 'Tetralex-Plus' (Shell ) , (dicamba + MCF'A. CA: + mecoprop) Oz
Page 91: soc40e00
~iit:..u.3o,sisi4rsrdi,_373.~>ac73tsts3.f3iEi51{7S7fr,i?,S{]iiti:i,,73f37{{3:ii311b1.73i1i1{311i$~{1 i1333Ei2{hj{333.~47R38~i~Ei~~3it#i~{~{}~f~~Ei~ili s'~E'`•~E;==E:E=E;, c-Yt,tit=tTn~li`~ t.. . 3t _. _ . .. .1,. :<t_. MCr.A•- _:odiurn/ l ) 'Fet'_e1 '(Farm r'roteci.i•on), EC (78 g dicamba + 130 g:•ner_c}prop + 72 !;a trlcIrcpyr-/1) 'Harbar•-c,^r D' !L a ' i.ttor-a1e) ,, (24 g didamb:>. + ?bc_i q a.a;;-, mc=coprop- (2•-:-•auto:. yt?i:hy? ),?.^•_Ci 9 a. e, bromo: yni 1 oci.:anbate/ 1) 'hdettle-?ian' (Shell) ; (dicamba -+•• 2.r4-)3 -;- 2,4,S--T -• as amine salts) '0r-Ainoi^P?:;one SP`;(27C g dic:7mba +• 425 ii mc?copropr'1 - as 'sodium and pot:assiLl;D. 5al t=,) 'Tr-ina3 Super' (La Littorale) SL (20 g a.e. dicamba (as amine salt) + ^2ig a.e MCF'A..-pot,assium -~- 200 g a.,e, mecoprop-potassi L cn/:E• ) dicamba + di chlorprop (pot~rssium salts) dicamba + dichlorprop + MCPA (potassium and sodium salts) dicamba + MC!''A (f,eg. No. C(l0<7.?--T1--4]) (potassium and sodium saits). ANALYSIS: AL: Product analysis is by i.r. spectrometry (ADAC Methods, 1984, u. 3f i.---6. 6.:'20; CIPAC Handbook, 1980, 1A, 1204; M. A. Mal ina, Anal. Methods F'rastic:. Plant Srowth F',egul., 1973, 7, 545) or by hplc (AOAC Methods, 1984, &_''21--5.?:27) . Residues in plants and soil may be determined by glc of a suitable ester (idem, ibid.,; H. K. Suzuki et al., ibid., 1978, 10, 305; T. H. Byast et al., Tech. Ftep. ARC Weed Res, f:)r-gan. , No. 15, (2nd Ed. ), p. 7 G) .
Page 92: soc40e00
~~.~3l38~~Ys~ EiIOSIS 1969-87/JUNE I Wl3'?t~ ()<-:1^s''8474;? r;IOST._ ~ '_crrtaet'., 2 =C-1'.: :^ ORGAN CULTURE OF EMBRYONAL TISSUE AS A SCREENING TEST FOR EVALUATION OF BLASTOMOGENIC ACTIVITY OF CHEMICALS RYAZANOVA R A; DEDOVA L S F. F. Er ISfIAN MOSC. RES. INST. HYG., MOSCOW, USSR. G I G SAN I T 0 (4). :t. 981 . 44--46. CODEN : G I SAA Language: RUSSIAN Subfile: BARRM (Biological Abstracts/RRM) S 0013283760 BIOSIS Number: 76041252 REALIZATION OF THE PESTICIDE CYTO GENETIC STUDY PROGRAM PRIMARY ESTIMATION OF CYTO GENETIC ACTIVITY AND POTENTIAL MUTAGENIC HAZARDS OF 24` PESTICIDES k::URINNI'I A I; PILINS}`;AYA h1 A; GEf;MAN I V; L`VOVA T S ALL-UNION RES. IhiS-1. HYG. TOXICOL. PESTIC. POLYM. F'L AST. , KIEV, USSR. TS I TOL GENET 1•~ (?). 19821. 45-49. CODEN: TGANA Language: RUSSIAN Mutagenic activity of 24 pesticides of differer:t chemical classes was studied when applied to mouse bone marrow. Ten substances CActellic, Banvel-D, Dalapon, Dimili.n, Dithane M-45, Thiodan, Neopinamin, rhonite, diphenylamide, EF-2] induc=d cytogenetic effects of different degrees of manifestaticn. Cytogenetically active pesticides were arranged in groups according to their potential mutagenic hazard. 0c-i 12278T29 E' I 08 I a h•.umb e r. 74;'.50C3c ig X A MULTI RESIDUE PROCEDURE FOR THE DETERMINATION AND CONFIRMATION OF ACIDIC HERBICIDE RESIDUES IN HUMAN URINE DRAFER W M PESTICIDE CHEMISTRY, TOXICOL. LAB., DEP. ENTOMOL. SCI., UNIV. CALIF., BERKELEY, CA 94720. J AGRIC FOOD CF•IEM- 30 (2). 1982. 227-231. CODEN: JAFCA Language: ENGLISH Chlorophena;y acid herbicides (2,4-D, 2,4,5--T, - 2,4-DP [2-(2,4-dichloroph?noxy)propionic acid], 2,4-DB C4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)but anoic acid] and silvex), dicamba, pronamide, picloram and PCF Cpentachlorophenol] were determined simultaneously in human urine. Samples were hydrolyzed with mineral acid to liberate conjugated residues and to convert pronamide metabolites to 3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid. Acids were isolated from the urine hydrolysate by acid/base partitioning and derivatized with ethereal diazomethane. Pesticides were determined quantitatively by electron capture gas chromatography (EC-GC) and structures were confirme+d by computer-contralled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC--MS). Recoveries were Fi0--104% for- 'or-ti-r'ications at 0.1 mg/1 and detection limits for herbicides in urine were Cr.CrC-0.1 mg/1 by EC-GC and 0.1-0.5 mt;/1 by GC-MS. Derivatization with peritafluorobenzyl bromide was unacceptable for several reasonsi: it enhanced the electron capture response of urinary acids and the specific detection of the PFB Cpentafluorobenzyl7 analogs by mass spectrometry was limited by the similarity of their electron impact mass spectra. 3 S776+0152 C?c'.M?
Page 93: soc40e00
.~u~~1sl~I~Y3 333:3:ifi~ili~~s1+33i?liiil2~11ii3~fli:fii~323 3ij!jt~;>{~ISi~sI 1~F1i~~S~~ifaiifl3N~Ylii~ CANCERLIT 19b7•-87/JUNE t Rm (: ^ 79025 I CDt:i/t? 1::2+:r4B'7 CUSE OF ORGAN CULTURING OF EMBRYONAL TISSUE IN THE SCREENING FOR THE TUMORIGENIC ACTIVITY OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES7 ORGANNOE f':L'L'TIV7FtOVANIE EMEiFiIOhIAL'NOI TE'ANI KAK SK("tININGOVYI METOD OTSENKI BLASTOMOGENINO I AKT I VNOST I t~:HI M I CHESF::I KH VESHCHESTV. Ri azanova F:A; Dednva L S F. F. Erisman Res. Inst. I--lygiene, Moscow, USSR ui g San i t; ( 4• );44--46 1981 Goden s G I SAA I SSN 0i r 16-99i frj Languages. RUSSIAhJ, Document Type; Journal Article Journal Announcernent: B1C?8 The efficacy of organ culturing of the embryonal tissue in the screening for the potnnt i al .c ar ci nogens was studi ed i n BALLr/r mi ce. Pregnant femal es were subjected to po administration of pesticides nitrochlore, isophos-32 and dianat. On d,y 19•--2.<_r of gestatien mice were sacrificed _..nd the explants of embryonal kidney b•:er e subjected to organ culturing. All three pesticides induced difi fus_ hyp~~rp).a:_i a of ' he epithel ium of renal tubules, cystic dilatations, and pro1i r Tcrative foci. (3 Refs) 0244248 ICDB/Q? 0R_6':c=:5 - MORPHOLOGY OF THE NEOPLASMS OF THE THYROID GLAND IN FISCHER 344 RATS TREATED WITH 4,4'-METHYLENE-BIS(N,N-DIMETHYL)-BENZENAMINE F;ri shna Murthy AS E.G. and G. Mt.son -'es. Inst., 57 Lnion St., Worcest_r, y MA, ir1G08 Toxicol Lett; !:!6.• .3'?1•-3?7 1980 Languages: ENGLISH, Document Type: Journal Article , Journal Annou.ncementa 8101 Fi scher 344 rats were f ed ei ther O. 0375'/% or 0. 075% 4,4'-methylene-bis-(N,N-dim~~athyl)-benz~.i~namine (MDBA) mixed with the diet -for 18 mo followed by 6 mo of stock diet, and necropsies were performed at the end of the experiment (2 yr) in order to determine the c=ffect of the compound on the rats. Hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the thyroid g1 and were i ncreased i n both max e and femal e rats treated wi th MDBA. The number of follicular cysts, incidence of hyperplasia, adenomas, and carcinomas generally increased with increased dosage of. MDBA. Follicular carcinomas were found in 44/100 rats fed 0.075% MDBA, in 7/100 rats fed 0.0375% MDBA, and in 1/40 control rats. Follicular neoplasms were vascularized. In the neoplasms, roci of mineralization, golden brown pigment, and cholesterol clefts were found. In some tumors the stroma was hyalinized. Squamous mntapl asia occurred in one tumor. The tumors had infiltrated into the capsule in 51 rats and into the blood vessels in 8 rats. Fol l i cul ar carci noma had metastasi zed to the 1 ung i n one rat. ( 1 F:ef ) 87"760153: ; ;
Page 94: soc40e00
EMBASE 1974-87 ( S '3603i? r<_r3 C=46Ci2._ ;7i:: 926 Ability of 0-anisate degrading other related herbicides Ferrer Dept. Granada SFAIN microorganisms to cometabolize dicamba and M. R. z Del Moral A. ; Sui v-Uerr-aquero F. ; of Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, CF•lEt1QSF'HEF,E ( ENrLAND ) Languages: ENGLISH 9 i9S`J 9 Ramos-Cormenzana A. Uni ver-si ty of Granada, 18001 14/10 (.1b45-1B48) , Coden: CMSHA C-anisate degrading microorganisms were isolated -from soil samples and cometabolism to the herbi ci des di camba, 2,3, 6--TBA, 2, 4-D and MCPA, respecti vel y. identified. 80, 24, 64 and 64% of the isolates showed 85147561 052(v 07i7 ;_ c_?i-I(389 Procedure for the determination of 2,4-D and dicamba in inhalation, dermal, hand-wash, and urine samples from spray applicators Grover F,. ; Cessna A. J.; Kerr L. A. Research Station, Agriculture Canada, Regina, Sask. 34P 3A2 CANADA J. ENVIRON. SCI. HEALTH (U. S. A. ) , 1985, 20/1 ( 113-128) , Coden: JF'ECD Series: PART B PESTIC. FOOD CONTAMIN. Languages: ENGLISH Analytical procedures for the simultaneous determination of residues of 2,a•---D and dicamba arom polyurethane from plug air sampler s, ethylene glycol impregnated a_Jlass-+iiter filter paper dermal samplers, 1% sodium bicarbonate hand wash solution, and urine are presented. Residues were derivatized with diazomethane and quantitated using electron capture gas chromatography. Recoveries were greater than 80% at the limit of detection in all substrates. The limits of detection for both herbicides were 0.1 mug/foam plug and 0.5 mug/filter paper, and in the urine, 1.7 mug/10D mL and 5.0 mug/100 mL for dicamba and 2,4-D, respectively. 3
Page 95: soc40e00
•-~~ ~.• ~~ '~ ~ ~ r~ ~-~ (:? j, .,{ ~t- ~ _ ,a °lc `~_:__~ ~ ; ii ilr_ .i iJ ; ._l.~'_I F'heno:;y and picolinic acid herbicides in sheep N_'.hnl l ...W.", i1o'_i=i A.s). v fl`3nner i.^liflii=al `=:chooJl o; : )E'•.J .•-E:a(_Ah#^ LAi4CE T !ENGL^h:D) 51`?e-r, L ang,ua.ges ; F=!`dr;L I SH A study of age 4tf:d sex hi 1l , and hi gh--c;Duntry Zealand to investigate and small-intestinal adenocarcinoma r. „ #"# , W1=1 1 ]. iigton C/i141S ( 1:'0i__a•_,7C ., %dena LANCA matched groups o," adult female sheep farms was cand>acted i n the South the i n-f l uence of breed and cer-tai n from 88 flat, Island of New environmental factors on the prevalence rate of srr.al l°-intestinal adenocarcinoma (SIA). 2C?678, f F,ma 1 r> >hr 2r -~~.r)e_d i. 5-7. 5 years were ex ami ned at sl aughter , 1 25 cases of SIA were found (6 per- t!housand) in animals from 61 farms (69%) and the prevalence rate fcir individual farm groups varied from 0 to 38 per thousand. Differences in tumour'rate between breed groups were significant but di ffer-ences between -far-m type were not. Exposure to phenaxy (Ph), picollnic acid (F'i ) h~-~rbicides, or both (F'hPi ) was associated with significant increases in tumour rate. The increase in rate was significant for exposure to each of the 3 herbicide groups. Exposure to recently sprayed feed stulffS was associated with a significantly larger increase in tumour rate than exposure to less recently sprayed food. There was no difference between tumour rates of sheep exposed to Ph herbicides with or without 2,3,7.;?-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Rates rose si gn i f i cant]. y wi th the total number of Ph, F'i, PhPi sprays used on the farm. The variation in rates associated with herbicides is sufficient to explain the breed dif-ferences recorded. - C 79057174 Cytogenetic studies of pesticide and herbicide sprayers Crossen r.E.; Morgan W.F,s Horan J.J. Cytogenetics Unit, Christchurch Hosp., Christchurch NEW ZEALAND N.Z. MED. J. (NEW ZEALAND) ,1978, 88/619 (192-195), Coden: NZMJA Languages: ENGLISH Fifty-seven herbicide and pesticide sprayers were studied for the incidence of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in periph2iral blood lymphocyte chromosomes. Overall there was no difference between the control group and the sprayers. Five sprayers had an SCE rate three standard deviations outside the mean of the control group. Possible factors contributing to this elevated SCE rate were the failure to use protective clothing and the length of time spraying. Many sprayers failed to take adequate protective measures when mixing and spraying and chemicals were often improperly stored. It is recommended that all persons using herbicides and pesticides take adequate protective measures so that the risk of fatal poisoning and possible long-term genetic hazard be reduced. 4
Page 96: soc40e00
herbicides r.~_NVIf"t7N. SCI. TECHNOL_. (U. S. A. ) , 1977, 11/S (756-761 ),.. Coden: ESTHA Languages: rNGLI5{-: iflra. t..vu,u3raa:r3r353r3!1,u:,:v3f311!:fifatitSUa:910 1 0.lR1 iltsts~,r:i ~3}3}]ftdi~1~i11l21L:}L3}~ii3A ui.t]s's:A.hi.t :paiiCa3l,.uf .. 70167409 The pesticide scorecard Webar J . D. North C._+rol i na State lJri v. , f"tal ei gh U. J. A. 77200818 Fluorescence labelling of picomole amounts of acidic herbicides for toxicological analysis Dvenges W. F'harmak:ol. Inst., Univ. Mainz GERMANY, WEST CHROMATOGRAPHIA (GERMANY, WEST) , 1976, 9/12 (624-626), Coden: CHR6B Languages: ENGLISH 76111898 Analysis f or Yip G. Di v. Chem. U.S.A. (U.S.A. ) 9 1975! N. C:a" 27607 1 3/0 (225--23a0) , 20204 Coden: JCHSB A review is made of recent work in the analysis of herbicides and their metabolites. The common and chemical names of 65 herbicides are listed, and details are given on current methodology for extraction, clean up, and determination by gas liquid chromatography and colorimetric methods. Analytical methods -'or determination of groups of herbicides such as chlorinated phenoxy acids, S triazines, phenylureas, carbamates, phenols, itili ,ll001113048100t and metabolites Technol., Food Drug Adm., Washington, D.C. J.CHROMATOGn.SCI. Languages: ENGLISH dinitr-oanilines, described. Some herbicides and advances in this bipyridiniums, and chlorinated benzoic acids are also of the major problems encountered in the analysis of their metabolites are considered and possible future field are discussed. F Qzusrsr;rmr~ F1.
Page 97: soc40e00
~r3A~'•~~; ';~~~;~k:7 75t1`.` 3_4Plutagens and potential mutagens in metabolites, polychlorinated biphenyls, hydrocarbons, haloethers i=ishl7?i.n '__. Nat. Cent. Tomicol. iJ , i:; . A. F;es., jefferson, SC I. TOTAL ENV I f;Ohi. ( h[ETI-IERLANDS ) Languagras: ENGLISH the biosphere. I. DDT and its chlorodioxins, po].ycyclic aromatic hs . Ar';. 72079 , 1974 ; 2/4 ( 30S-34r? ) , Coden : STEVA For a proper assessment o-f actual interaction•s between di•t ferent modes risks, it is essential that the pf admi n i atrat i on of a tox i cant be understood and that the rrob abl e i mpi ngement of the envi ronmental s, tbsi:ances upon the var i ou_ por•` a1 r: oreritr y be k:nown. To best understand th i s last requi r?ment we must knor-i how the tc;s i cants i n quest i on are distributed in and are transported through the environment to finally i mpact on man. Thi s revi ew i s an attempt to eval uate onl y a smal 1 number of mutagenl and potential mutagens (e.g., DDT and its metabolites, ;aolychlorinated bi•phenyls:, chlorinated dioxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halmethers) in terms of their occurrence, use patterns, distributions and impact in the environment. In many cases, the information is fragmentary. For example, patterns of region and local variation of the toxicants have been only superficially investigated and the detailed pathways o,f residues within the trophic networks are poorly understood. The physiologic and ecologic effects of the toxicants at sublethal levels are also to a large extent unknown. More information is needed as to the production (nature of reactants, amounts, reactivity, disposal, etc.), import and export data for specific potential environmental toxicants, the P'~ nature and routes of their global transport, and the concentration, ~; longevity, and biochemical and toxicologic activity of their residues (including specific chemical nature) that occur in ti,ei r- various biosphere compartments including air, water, =oil, and biota. '''f! 6
Page 98: soc40e00
I ENVIROLINE 197()-87/APR C c A, c!1 ' 22 '1 + ~t?.' _i:c?!=r!` ~ REPORT OF EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDY OF THE EMPLOYEES OF VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORPORATION PLANT, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE-JANUARY 1952-DECEMBER 1979, VELSICOL CHEt•1I':AL CORP REPORT, MAR 81 (33) Sf='EC I As_ FF';=F'ORT A RECENTLY COMPLETED EP I DEM I OLOG I CAL STUDY SHOWED NO EVIDENCE THAT WcDRE4ERS INVOLVED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF THE INSECTICIDE HEPTACHLOR ARE PRONE TO INCREASED INCIDENCE OF CANCER. THE STUDY WAS CONDUCTED ON 1115 CURRENT AND FORMER EMF'LOYEES AT A VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORP. PLANT I N "{Ef":-!-~i r^~ r"f c NN ., 7f IAT BEGAN i'{~ODlJC € Nr HEF TAC4iLOR I N 1952. MORTAL I TY DATA ON VELSICOL EMPLOYEES WERE COMPARED TO THE OVERALL MORTALITY OF THE U.S. POPULATION AT LARGE (BY AGE AND SEX) TO DETERMINE WHETHER MEMPHIS PLANT EXf'f?S UF:E PRODUCED ANY D I SCEF;N I EiLE VAR I'AT I ON S i N EXPECTED MORTAL I TY FROM ALL CAUSE`_ AND FROM SELECTED SIGNIFICANT CAUSES, SUCH AS HEART DISEASE AND CANCER. T'HERE IS NO COI•JCLU_IVE EVIDENCE THAT THE MEMF'HIS OCCUPATIONAL ENVIRONPiE!`•I T 171 RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DELETER IOUS EFFECTS ON THE LIFE EXPECTANCY OR GENERAL HEALTH OF THE PLANT'S EMPLOYEES. (2 GRAPHS, 7 TABLES) AND EFFICIENT. (3 REFERENCES) 0149228 85 1 -(. ~ ii2 2,'i:;? INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL SAFETY TESTING: ONE COMPANY'S APPROACH, ATALLAH, Y. 1-!. ;WHITACRr D. M. VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORF•, ILL, ECOTOXICOLOGY & ENV SAF ETY, DEC f3c?, V4, N4, F'-57 (5) SURVEY REPORT IN 1976, VELSICCL CHEMICAL CORP. INITIATED A COMF'r:EHENS T_ VE , THF:EE-T I~C-.r?ED TEST I NG PROGRAM FOR ALL I NDUSTR I AL CHEt1 I CALS BEING CONSIDERED FOR DEVELOPMENT. THE PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO ENSURE THAT THE BASIC SAFETY DATA ARE DEVELOPED, AND TO IMPLEMENT PROCEDURES AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT APPROACHES THAT FACILITATE COMPLIANCE WITH FEDERAL REGULATIONS. FIRST, A THOROUGH LITERATURE SEARCH IS UNDERTAKEN TO OBTAIN PHYSICOCHEMICAL, ACUTE TOXICITY, AND INITIAL MUTAGENICITY DATA. WHEN A DECISION IS -MADE TO MARKET THE CHEMICAL, ACUTE, SUBACUTE, AND SPECIAL -TOXICITY STUDIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES ARE CONDUCTED. BEFORE THE CHEMICAL REACHES FULL COMMERCIALIZATION, SUBCHRONIC AND CHRONIC TOXICITY TESTING, TERATOGENICITY AND REPRODUCTION STUDIES, AND ADDITIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STUDIES ARE CONDUCTED. VELSICOL'S PROGRAM IS FLEXIBLE 0023907 7T-c7~.}s3S2c? EFFECT AUXIN-LIKE HERBICIDES ON NUCLEOHISTONES, ALI, A.p CHEN, L.G.; FLETCHER, R.A.; STEPHENSON, G.R.p SWITZER, C.M. WEED SCIENCE MAY 73 V21 N3 P181 (4)
Page 99: soc40e00
7S s~7~r!af; LIrIZ SCIENCES COLLECTION _r?~c: •a _• •.:.J : 0 Hygienic evaluation of water polluted by pesticides entering water bodies in surface runoff. t::osachevsk:aya y F'. I. (l:iev Inst. Adv. Med. Training, }':iev, USSR) Gig. Sanit. ; 6, Q-11 1980 Language: nussi an Summary Language: f:r-rssi an ; Engl i sh Document Type: JoLUrnal ar-ticle--originzl research Subfilee 24 Toxicology Abstracts; A-Form±rlation of the pesticides Chlor-amp and Banvel-D when present in a body of water activates biochemical oxidation processes to a greater extent than do v~e active principles of these pesticides in the same ccr!cer,trcati on. Af ter- enttri ng ~i ;rater- body i n a near-thrnshol d concentration (as estimated on an organoleptic basis?, the tested mixtures of the pe1'•:_ic idc=s will participate in biochemical oxidation resulting in reduced levels of dissolved oxygen in the water and a deterioration in water qual i •L-y.
Page 100: soc40e00
i i313i~ :dua,3.t'sili{?fEli ta lili3'a; ffii, ;:.,;?`i23tilf{S3f3 3i;i~i3}?s S{73~3~#!~{ji~~ Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) -73-87/Jan c C 01:31 521 •N.1JSH-00156326 Pesticides: Mutagenic And Carcinogenic Potential Waters, M. D. , S. Nesnow, V. F. Si mmon, A. D.. h1i tchel l, T. A. Jorgenson, and R. Valencia 1='esticide Chemist and Modern Toxicology, ACS Symposium Series No. 160, pages i39-11 3, 7 1 re-f-erences 1981 A phased approach for evaluating chemi cal:s -for mutagenic and carcinogenic effects was examined. Tn-vitro test procedures included reverse mutation in Salmonella-typhimurium strains TA-1537, TA-1538, and TA-199; reverse mutation in Escherichia-coli; mitotic recombination _in Saccharomyces-cer-evi si ae; di f f er-ent i al toxi c i ty assays i n DNA repai r proficient and deficient strains of E-•-coli and Esacillus-subt•i~1is; zrnschedul ed DNA aynthesi s i n human -1'etal 1 ung f i brob l asts; Drosoph i 1 a-mel anogaster- sex 1 i n!:.ed recessi ve l ethal tF3st •, mouse domi nant lethal tes+_; and oncogenic transformation in C:'H1UT1/2 cells. The pesticide mutagenesio/cai'"cinogenesSs evaluation was grc uped into three classes:, group 1, pesticides eliciting a positive response in point or gene mutation and DNA damage in prokaryotic and eukaryotic s>ystems; group 2, agents requiring further evaluation; and group 3, pesticides negative in all tests. Group 2 was further divided into three subgroups: low, medium, and high priority pesticides -ror furthPr evaluation. For 19 of the 38 pesticides testedd in the bioassays, a mutagenic or related effect was found; il of the 19 were positive for primary damage to DNA only. Malathion (121755), parathion (56302), pentachloronitrabenzene (82608), and phorate (293022) were negative for heritable Schromc,somal e-=fects in the mouse dominant lethal test. nc-_'p!-,a'•_e (3ci5o0:.91- and mc:•nocr>>:uphos: (6923224) produced mutagenic effects in S-•typhimuri!ini, an increase in mitotic recombination in S-cer-evi ;i ae and unscheduled DNA synthesis. Chlorpyrifos (2921882), :?,4-D (94757), dicamba (1918009), dinoseb (88857), and propanil (709988) were pbsitive in bacterial toxicity assays. Increased mitotic recombination was induced by azinphos•-methyl (865ci0) , crotoxyphos (770o176), cacodyl ic-acid (75605), and methyl-parathion (298000) in S-cerevisiae. The authors -conclude that a phased testing strategy is useful for identifying carcinogens and mutagens, particularly when large numbers of chemicals must be investigated efficiently, accurately, and quickly.
Page 101: soc40e00
( C • :- ': :_ 1: 17 I' I`~ 3 I-i- _ t 1:;1 ~~'.1 1 c~ Exposure Of Finnish Farm Workers To Phenoxy Acid Herbicides Mai1nini-'I'1 j A, , J. Yc31-igasi T. K1 ef1 ~ q.rd ;.-I. i? ati`(ol 1.inFr'1 Archives _.: E'1v1r-onmen'Fal Contamination and TC?mlcoli)gyj 101. 15, hlo. 1, pagr_ 107~ -..[ t .i ~-1_i _,, '!.11 r__' pr::nces January C1: QDE_I\I: f1~CT~Ur'CT~U Fl -t-ield study of pheno:;y---acio herbicide e:-:.posure .w<_as c_onducted among. 7innish farm workers. Twelve di.•fferentt sodi _tm and potassium or dimethylamine salt formulations containing /I--chloro-^-methylph2noxyacetic-a cid (94746) (MCPA) with variably 2--(^,4-dichlcraphc-no.,y)propanoic-acid (1?03U5), ^-(4-chloro-2-methyYpheno;.y)prapancic-acid (7:]°519t1), or v,b-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic-acid (1918009) were prepared as powders or liquids and diluted from 2.5 to 1^F= grams per liter. Applicators sprayed Yor-mulati._ns by tractor with a spray boom with 16 to 26 nozzles at a rate nf about 1.4 kilograms per hectare. Most sprayers wore protective clothing. Air samples at the breathing zone of each applicator were collected into impinger flask:s and on glass fiber filters. Patch samples of.filter papers wer e placed an the back, chest, thigh, and inner and f1u.ter forearm. Urine sa:rjples ;wer;- taken after work and the following morning. All collected samples were analyzed by gas chromatography for phenoxy-acid, sodium and potassium. The biological hal ;' ife of flCr'A was det?rmined> Phenoxy-acid in the ai r v?.r-i ed between 0.001 to 0.200 mi i l i gr ams per cubi c meter. Ski n p ztch tests showed that prot ecti ve =1 othi ng ef f ect i•,rel y prevented a inajor part of the material fram reaching the skin. Skin exposure was considerably greater than that through inhaled air. Urinary excretion o-f all herbicides was correlated to doses absorbed in the body dur-ing spraying. Excretion rates were dose dependent. Urinary sodium and potassium excretion rates were related to herbicide urine concentrations in dose related and time related fashion. The biological half li-Fe of MCF'A was dose dependent. The at-tthors conclude that pheno::y--acid herbicides could have an influence an the sodi!tmlpotassiUm pump in the kidneys. 0103898 h(1081-1-00127820 Evaluation of Herbicides for Possible Mutagenic Properties Andersen, K. J., E. C. Leighty, and M. T. Takahashi Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 20, No. 3, pages 649-65Es2, 17 refer-ences 1972 CODEN: JAFCAU Herbicides and other chemicals were examined for their ability to cause point mutations in certain microbiological systems. Histidine requiring mutants of Salmonella-typhimurium were exposed to 110 test compounds and assayed for frequency of reversion to histidine independence. Experiments were also performed using mutants of T4-bacteriophage (rII-T4). Characteristic o-f herbicide diffusion into an aqueous nutrient medium were studied using radiolabeled diuron (330541), atrazine (1912249), picloram (1918021), and bensulide (741582). Mutagenic frequencies were compared with those of 5-bromouracil (51207) and 2-aminopurine (452062). No herbicides registered as mutagenic in the Salmonella system. Four herbicides, isocil (314421), dicamba (1918009), and dipropalin (1918087) showed mutagenic frequencies of about 7 to 9 percent of the control in the rII-T4 test. In the diffusion experiments, picloram diffused the least rapidly; however, radioactivity was detected all the way to the edge o-f the plate and showed a pattern expected if there were some volatilization. The authors conclude that mutagenic rates of organisms treated with herbicides do not differ significantly from spontaneous rates. 8rT760161 2
Page 102: soc40e00
au~. tu.H•:iltijJi]~ij.°fiiiai222~21~{1~W2{'21133ti4lf~rrfiS2r~N~~iY51tl~r~;r~7~.1r~2~.7~tiHfU[7ZiiHfi ( S {_j_,9 N i D:_i'I-'{1(Si_?.7i:Jn.7 Chemical and Thermal Aspects of Pesticide Disposal 1K.:?nl'7lTa_1Y5 M. kf., , .r_.;. •1'. St.o_Janov1_, _:And F. sL. ..](-iuillan, Jr. ~. vC irllll t~r Er'1vii'C)nmentai. C_l;:li~:yy ~t~01. 1, h~r, i, taqe5 f•=-F~5, 11 r-e5•f :_irenc~:s March 1972 The pesticides atraz-#ne, ~i--methyl!.tr-aci L, or crramacil, cariDaryl, d-,lapon, nDT, dicanba, tirldrin, d iuroa, -:11 1noseb, DS!'dA, malathion, nemagon, paraquat, piclor-a{ri, F''MA, tr-i-FlUralin, 21,4-D, ^,4,5-T, vernam, and zineb are studied for chemical and thermal decomposition. Data are g iven f or i.reat ment wi th ssodi i_im bi phenyl , degradati on by 1 i qui d ammon i a-a 1 k.al i metal gas chromatoyraphic products p• rrnm the pesticides. ?-reatments, ~=o1r_rmn temperatures for electron capture analysis ;?f analytical grade pesticides, and volatile burning >>-!' formulation o-F and analytical grade 000G3108 NI nSH--QC,{?{71 {a84 Simultaneous Gas Chromatographic Determination of 2,4-D and Dicamba in Human Blood and Urine Rivers, J. Es. ,W. L. Yauger, Jr., and H. W. t;lemmer Journal of Chromatography, Vol. 50, pages 334-337, 6 references 1970 Development of a method for simultaneous deter-mination of the herbicides ?,4-dichloropheno:ay-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 2-methoxy-3,b-dichloro-benzoic acid (dicamba) combining extraction of toxicants from blood serum or urine, methylation of concentration extract and gas chromatography of the methylated extract. Data are givern for 2,4-D and dicamba levels as a function oY type of sample, date and hour of sampling, and for recovery of 2,4-D and dicamba added to human blood and urine.
Page 103: soc40e00
,4.i#.?iii3ii&w33i1iww1 i~L:.:`~!i:!L•~. ~ . ... . ... .... . . 't . . . ~. POLLUTION ABSTRACTS - 70-87/MAR t > 71-0^b7F 71 -..2TP--(-)O 117 Dicamba uptake, translocation, metabolism and selectivity. VA fN1 D SN, S 7 F".1M, W. H, Univ. oF runlph, DE•pt. of Botany, Ontario, Can. Weed '3cience, 19!1?: 1'•=--117, Jan. 1971 P'Ub1::Yr- 1971 Language sa C'NOLISt-f _ 8 2S t
Page 104: soc40e00
i##z~333t3#iis.?iil~ TOXLINE 1965--E37/AF'R ( f?U - `7 OSTEF: T: TI - PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOLDGICAL EFFECTS OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN POULTRY SI -- EF'IDEI'•1/0c759s?8 SO -- RESIDUE ~~tE`-='. 1974, 5510 69-121 AD - EIS: E pide,^.;iolcg,~ Infar mation System AU - VALEh1C "A R TI •- MUTAGENESIS SCREENING OF PESTICIDES USING DROSOPHILA. SI - ANEUFL/77/c?00~,~36 SO - EPA F"tEl='ORT 6~-3•-01-2474, 1977 AD - ANE UPLnIDY FILE/EMIC/ORNL AU - WATERS MD : caMMON VF ; MITCHELL AD ; J0,['ENSON TA ; VALENCIA R TI - A PHASED APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS FOR MUTAGENESIS AND PRESUMPTIVE CARCINOGENESIS, IN: IN VITRO TOXICITY TESTING OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: CURRENT AND FUTURE POSSIBILITIES. PART B: DEVELOPMENT OF RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES SI - EI`1IC/83/053426 SO -- NATO CONF SE(; ( SER) I; `,Ec: 417-441 , 198? AD - EMIC/OR"dL AU - MOHAMMAD K: a MA T TI - TRADE,.~3CANTIA-MICRONUCLEUS (TRAD-MCN) AND TRADESCANTIA-STAMEN HAIR MUTATION (TRAD-SHM) TESTS ON MUTAGENICITY OF COMMON PESTICIDES SI - EMI,/8'/0 i-i63 -- () SO - ENV I RON MUl-AGENES I c; 5: 37c?-:£71 , 198L AD - EMIC/ORNL AU - MORIYA M; OHTA T ; WATANABE K ; MIYAZAWA T ; KATO K ; SHIRASU Y TI - FURTHER MUTAGENICITY STUDIES ON PESTICIDES IN BACTERIAL REVERSION ASSAY SYSTEMS SI - EMIC/8T/cJ05821 SO - MUTAT RES; 116:185-?16,1983 AB - EMIC/ORNL SEE: CA 98-156179 AU - WATERS MD ; GENTILE JM ; F'LEWA MJ TI - AN EVALUATION OF THE GENOTOXIC PROPERTIES OF PESTICIDES INVOLVED IN COMMERCIAL CORN PRODUCTION SI -- EMIC/82/005350 SO -• ENVIRON MUTAGENESIS; 4:=4f,1932 AEs - EMIC/Ot"NL
Page 105: soc40e00
< AU -- !-':URI h?PdY I A? ;!"'I L I!wS1;AYA MA ; GER MAN I V ~L' VC''w`~A TS TI •- IMPLEMENTATION OF A PROGRAM OF CYTOGENETIC STUDY OF PESTICIDES: PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF CYTOGENETI-~ ACTIVITY AND POTENTIAL °~ MUTA6F_NIC HAZARD OF 24 PESTICIDES so C•r•TOL GENE- 1 ./3 (1) : 5f-'_.53, 1 982 ; (T ;A!ySL.ATED FROM -TSITOL GENET f e_ c.? ); 4`?--49, 1'?`3:? ) Afi __ EMIC/0:NL C;EE: CA 96-1 5E 990 AU - SF•iIRAt+U Y; MCRIYA M; TEZUK'A H; TERAMOTO r~ OH'!-A T ; INOUE T TI - MUTAGENICITY SCREENING STUDIES ON--FESTICIDES SI -- EM:[C/C;2/;=~c'33~F39}3 SO - EN4VI l:Oirl h1! I'i"AGEi~r aAF:C ]: NOG F~ROC .T.. NT CONF, •'rtI) ( 1 981 )!i ''•J 1•-•?:?5, 1982 AB - EMIC/ORNL SEE: CA 98-12426 AU -.• WATERS MC. ~' NESNOW S; SIi'1MON VF ; MITCHF_LL AD ; JORGENSON TA VALENC : A R TI - PESTICIDES: MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC POTENTIAL SI - EMIC/f.'.•1/c_ic_i;'536 SO - ACS SYMF' SER; 1b0:89-11', 1981 AD - EMIC/ORNL SEE: CA 95-74672 AU -• E I SENL E I S SJ ; L YNCH DL ; HAMPEL AE TI - AMES MUTAGEN ASSAY TESTED AGAINST HERBICIDES AND HERBICIDE COMBINATIONS ~ SI -- EMIC/81/001604 SO -- SO I L SC I; 131: 44-47 , 1981 AB Eh'iIC/Of;N! SEE: CA 94--978Ei5 } AU - Eisenbeis SJ ; Lynch DL ; Hampel AE TI - The Ames mutagen assay tested against herbicides and herbicide combinations. SI - PESTAB/81/146^ •SO - Soi 1 Sci. 1•31 (1 ): 44--47 1931 (14 References) AB - PESTAB. A group of 2.0 herbicides and 36 herbicide combinations were tested for mutagenic activity using the Ames - Salmonella/mammalian microsomes assay. The herbicides tested included atrazine, chloramben, dicamba, cyanazine, dinitramine, naptalam, chlor-pr-opham, alachlor, linuron, bifenox, paraquat, dinoseb, simazine, penoxalin, pr-opachlor, metribuzin, oryzalin, butylate, trifulural in, and vernolate. Tester strains used were TA 1535, 1537, 1538, 98 and 100, wi th and wi thout S-9. No increases over b<ac'.;gr-ound -f:.ndings was noted -for any of the herbicides or combinations tested, both at full strength or as dilute solutions.
Page 106: soc40e00
~:~a~i3ta~titib7#itas?i~itif~i~#tli~iNY38i3~'ffiiiiYih'i3813i3t5:;hi~lir~;i~aif71vi3iiat;l313i+~?Sit ii11A93til f =i=~•`::i '= I:''i~101~1 ~;' _ : t1I ~-~'~^~.~LL i=?D . G'E ~01 ! ~"i , : ~:'~~L.E'`,!(~ I i'1 R TI - OVERVIEW OF SHORT-TERM TESTS FOR THE'MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC POTENTIAL OF PESTICIDES py 5I - EMIC:'C.0 !0,1LS:~o :=;0 J ENV T. it0l\l SL` I HEALT}..I,, F''AFT B; 15= 567-- 906, 19F30 AEi - EMIC/GRNL AU - S I MMON VF ; POOLE DC a F; I CC I O ES ; F:OS I NSON DE c, M I TCFiELL AD p WATERS MD TI - IN VITRO MUTAGENICITY AND GENOTOXICITY ASSAYS OF 39 PESTICIDES SI - EMIC/79/011329 SO - ENVIRON MUTAGENESIS4 1:142.-143,1979 AEj - EMIC/ORNL AU - SIMMON VF ; POOLE D^ ; MITCHELL AD ; ROBINSON DE TI - IN VITRO MICROBIOLOGICAL MUTAGENICITY AND UNSCHEDULED DNA SYNTHESIS STUDIES OF EIGHTEEN F'ESTICIDES. FINAL REPORT-PHASE 2 SI - EMIC/79/010072 SO -• REPORT; EPA-600/'_-79--i)41 (F'E~St}-1'~66) 177 F'F', 1979 AB - EMIC/ORNL SEE: CA 93-1Ca86U0 AU - VALENCIA F+ TI - MUTAGENESIS SCREENING OF PESTICIDES USING DROSOPHILA SI - EMIC/77/Ca05727 ~ SO - REPORT; (EPA 6;:33-01--: 474) : 7Cr PP, 1977 ~, AB -- EMIC/ORNL AU -- POOLE DC y S I MMON VF ; NEWELL GW TI - IN VITRO MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF FOURTEEN PESTICIDES SI - EMIC/77/003447 SO - TOXICOL APPL PHARMACOL; 41:196,1977 AE3 - EM I C/OFtNL SEE: Ei I 78- 34866
Page 107: soc40e00
....... , ~•.., ..,.,•.•..,,..,.,.a,.wr,~~:; C t us.,tt.~sa_4tftz3i3N1taiiliAiN}7isi;tifiiL+Si?~iftiliiiiiiki~l~iltf3iisili13i3diii`~2~3`•Z ~}~tt~ifi$S3N',~ 1t~•7". 21 t~ A 1-,} --- iti1 iSli1-ian VF TI - In vitro microbiological mutagenicity and unscheduled DNA synthesis studies of eighteen pesticides. -U/-'~~C~ A Sr F'E,.~-~'TAB/^u-U/-'~~C ~ S. Lr ... US r•!T1S PE; Rep. PD-•1T3,^26s 177 pp. 1980 (29 f"efer-ences) PESTAL+. Eighteen pesticides being reviewed a.s o, part of the EPA B F Substitute Chemical F'r-pgram were tested -far- mutagenic activity by the f o.l lowi ng i n v:i tro procedures a reverse mutat ion i n Sal monel 1 a typhim!_rrium strains TA 1535, TA 1537, TA 1538, TA 98 and TA 100 and in Escherichia coli WP2 t:vr-A; induction of mitotic reccmbination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia.e D3; relative toxicity assays in DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of E. coli (strains W:'11s1 and p:4•70, respectively) and of Bacillus subtilis (strains H17 and M45 respectively); and unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDSI in human fibroblasts (WI-38 ce 1 l s), h4i ne of the 18 pest i c i des- were inutagen i c i n one.or more of the assays. One compound, demeton, was mutagenic in all of them. Tr ichlorfon was mutagenic in all the assays except those for relative toxicity. Acephate was mutagenic in the Salmonella typhimurium in TA 100, Sacchar-omyces cerevlsiae D3, and UDS assays. Dicamba, 2,4--D acid, 2,4--DB acid, and propanil were positive only in the assay for relative toxicity. Disulfoton was positive only in the UDS assay, and then only in the absence_of the metabolic activation system. Crotoxyphos was positive only in the S. cerevisiae D3 assay. (Author abstract by permission) Trofimova MG Chronic effect of the herbicide Banvel-D on Daphnia magna Straus. FESTA_i/80/34SG . Dyua.l.Mcsk:. Ov~t. 04 (?) : 70-77 1.979 (19 References) PESTAB. Chronic toxicity of the herbicide Banvel-D (dicamba; dimethylamine salt of 2-metho::y-',6-dichlorobenzoic acid) was studied in Daphnia magna. Crustacea were kept in water containing 67, 45, 23, 11.5, 5.7 and 2.8 mg/1 for 2.5 mo (4 generations). Marked decrease of survival rate was recorded in variants with Banvel-D at 67 mg11. Banvel-D at 67 mg/1 also reduced fertility of Daphnia. Abnormal development was recorded in Daahnia exposed to Banvel--D at 11.5-45 mg/1 (generation III and IV). Banvel=D at 23 and 45 trg/1 resulted in deterioration of the physiological state, disturbances of embryagenesis and a decreased life span. tW la
Page 108: soc40e00
3%,.:i1 :..:' 's;~i;i3:s. ~P3i?i:.st3isi1338 ;iil:lii#}331's3i1333~~fli131~1:3~~}1~1~ " ( AU '-' Young JF !-:ci lE?' f J J TI - Simultaneous human pharmacokinetics of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid and 2--methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoi;c acid. t- :e T -' i'`CS T AL.i/ 79! 1301 SD •-- Fed. P:-oc_. Fed. Am, Soc. Exp. r.iol. 7S0, at. -). 679 1979 t;B "'_ 1-'F-STA'3. A si mu' taneo-_is pharma_aE::1 r:etz c=tud;! of two chemicals has been conducted on a clinically stabili::ced human who had intentionally ingested a herbicide mi:{tUrE? of 2,4--dichiorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba). Blood and urine samples obtained during the acute phase of intoxication were modifiec3 for the pharmacof<:inetic analysis by a digital-analog hybrid computer. The best fitting model that utilized all the data was obtained with a two-compartment model for dicamba and a one-compartment model for 2,4-D with an additional interactive urinary excretion pathway. The volumes of distribution, ,r-ate constants, and half-life values were obtained by a statistical best Yit of the data by the hybrid computer. The hybrid computer si mu'_ at i on al l owed predi ct i on of t i ssue l evel s not measured as well as b l ood and ur i ne 1 evel s that would have occurred i f the i nteract i on between the chemi cal s had not F~r: i sted . Such informat:ion can be useful in the clinical management of future into::ications from herbicide mixtures, bearing in mind the interaction between the two chemicals during their elimination. (Author- abstract by per-mi ssi on ) ' SI - SO -• AB - Young JF ; Haley TJ F'harmacokinetic study of a patient intoxicated with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2-metho;ay-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid IF'A/79/02799 Clin. To>cicol.; VOL 11 ISS Dec 1977, F'489-500, (REF 9) IPA COPY[;IShIT: ASHF"f Blood and urine analyses were used to study the pharmacokinetics of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (I) and 3,6-dichloro-2-metho:<ybenzoic acid (Dicamba; II) in a woman who had ingested 100 ml of the mixture. Samples of blood and urine were taken during the acute phase W i nto.; i cati on. These data ware then analyzed with an analogdigital hybrid computer using a 2 compartment model for II and a one compartment model for I, with an additional interactive urinary excretion pathway. The effective biological half-life values for I and II were predicted to be 59 hr and 15 hr, respectively. Utilizing the extra urinary excretion route, the elimination rate for I increased.to about a 17 hr half-life and II slowed to a 20 hr half-•life.. This study demonstrated that it is possible to estimate blood levels and urinary excretion of 2 toxic chemicals simultaneously and accurately predict their biologic half-lives without preventing a successfu:s- recovery of the clinically stabilized patient. QD Cn
Page 109: soc40e00
A {-J ._ I.-":LSi:z '-!.ti 1"i.dr-j':in ;/ ":-- . `rd :_:Z in~an S C TI - Survey of pesticide residues and their metabolites in urine from the general population. A SI - P ES TA ly;' 7S i .;~.•0 ^C r;^ - In.: 1='c?ntachl::)rc'ph'rynal, 'ao; E.,.. 1t., :'d. .rir'w York: Plenum 6-'ress) , -!•i "4~ •~•~_?'1: 'C) 1977 ~ ~ AB --- PESTAE',: The ongoing rooper-a:ive study an pesticide residues in humans under the program entitled, National Human Monitoring Program for Pesticides, is reviewed. This program determines an a national scale the incidence and leve]. of exposure to pesticides e.;pari^ncec: by the general population -For the purpose of i den•F i f yi n33 trends i n these factors -•when they occur. Appro:: =matel•rJ 28,000 persons are being selected in 64 communities throughout the four br oad census regions of the conterminoLL s United States. It is estimated that 22,000 people representing a national probability sample will be examined between Feb,ruary r97>.':, and •June 1979. The multi-residue approach used to analyze the uri.ne srimples detects the chemicals arising from the following pesticides: carbaryl, naphthalene, pr-opaxur; carbofuran, r:rc,lathion, pentachlorophenol, lindane he:cach, orubencege, methyl parathion, ethyl parathion, 2,4-D, .^,4,5-T, silvex, chloropyrifas, dicamba, and organophosphorus i nsect i c. i des. Based on the anal ysi s of 416-41 E samp l es col l ected from the general population, the maximum values o•f various pesticide-related phenosic residues round in human urine ranged f r-om tr4 ce amounts to 193.0 ppb. Based on the anal ysi s a•f 7,c.r2-?:7 0 samp l es the mc_::=m im! rm val ue of resi dues of var i o!As carbamate pesticide metabolites in human urine ranged rrom 70 to 230 ppb. Based on the ana.l ysi s of ::60-T7 :=r sampl es the ma,: i mum val ues of var i ou :s :-esl d{ ie,a Qf nal athl on metabol x tes i n hn lman urI ne ranged -~c_: a ~o 0 r~ ?yas_ad c,n o from . `~~ - ^•:> : p.,~b, _' the analysis of 4•iC~ u =amp ~eS 11uman Uri : le t:I~•> ma.r ;, m;-tm val ue 3-f d' al kyl phosphate resi dues r a.ngec] T rom tr ace .=,moLAnts to 900 ppb r. AU - Young JF ; i•dril:=y TJ TI - Pharmacokinetic study of a patient intoxicated with 2,4-dichloro phenoxyacetic acid and 2-methoxy- 3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid. SI - PESTAD/78/1?1n SO - C1 in. Toxicol. 11 (5) : 489-5Qir 1977 (t References) AB - PESTAB. The pharmacok:inetics of 2,4-D (2,4-dichloro phenaxyacetic acid) and Dicamba (2-methoxy- ',6-dichlorobenzoic acid) were studi ed i n a human who had i ntenti onal l y i ngested these materials. Routes of metabolism or` 2,4-D and Dicamba are known, but the ef•fects of tr eatment (with 1-- norepinephrine, digoxin, and diphenyl hydantoin) on personal body chemistry are unknown..A hybrid of an analog computer interfaced to a digital computer was used in n t he anal ysi s, Bl ood and uri ne data were modi f i ed f or the pharmacokinetic analysis. Dicamba was the preferred chemical for CZ) elimination studies. The computer examination o•F the data showed ~ ~ that the uri nc• curve t•,as best f i tted to c one compartment model,. whi 1 e bl ood arial ysi s r-equi r-ed a two compartment model. The ... ~ estimation o-F chemical half-lives and blood and urine levels were, ~ accurately predicted when compared to actual levels. 7
Page 110: soc40e00
a7ti,7l;!?ii.t},tE ;3i~iiiit343iz.iE3{33ii}73liNi}ii2N}ii~zl`s33i~333~~i$1i3~.39iiN~}13~{~h 31>}?333~3l~l~~i riF f~~~7tiij (lU - Ponl e DC ; Ci i~mo~~ ':~F ~ rdewel 1 GM TI - In vitro mutagenic activity of fourteen pesticides. SI _ PESTAB/77/2490 SO - Taxicol, Appl. F'harmacol. 41 : i) e i.96"$].977 AD -- FESTAS. As part of t.he EF'A's ,ubstitute pestici.de program, mutagenic st_idies are being conducted on many pesticides. In the current study, 14. pesticides were evaluated for their mutagenic protential in five microbial assay systems. The 14 pesticides tested were: Aspon, Acephage, Carbnfuran, Chloropyrifos, Crotoxphyos, Dia._inon, Dicamba, Demeton, Disulfoton, Fensulfothion, Fanofos, Trichlorophon, Siduron, and Metho:aychlor. THe microbial assay systems used were the histidine reverse mutation system in five strains af Salmonella typhimurium (TA 1535, TA1537, TA15TS, TSS, and TA1CrCr), the trypotphan mutation system in Escherichia coli WF'^, the mitotic recombination assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae D3, and relative toxicity assays in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. A mammalian metabolic activation system using tha liver of rats that had been treated with Aroclor 1:?54 was used in all assays except the E. coli and B. subtilis relative toxicity assays. Demeton increased the mutation frequency in S. typhimurium TA 1535 and TA100 and in E. coli WP2 and increased mitotic recornbination in S. cerevisiae D3. Trichlorphos and acephate increased the mutation frequency in S. typhimurium TA100 and E. coli WP2 and the mitotic recombination frequency in S. cerevisiae D3. Crotoxyphos increased the mitotic recombi nati on f requency i n S. cerevi si ae D3. None of the other- pesticides was mutagenic. The relative toxicity assays have not yet been completed. (Author abstract by permission)
Page 111: soc40e00
C AU - SHIRASU Y TI - SIGNIFICANCE OF MUTAGENICITY TESTING ON PESTICIDES SI -- EMIC/70/01G09S -.'.Ag. SO - ENV I RON QUAL SAF; 4: ?226-22•T 1, 1975 AD - f=MIC/0RNL SEE• CA s34--!74u41 AU - YODER J; WATSON M; BENSON WW TI - LYMPHOCYTE CHROMOSOME ANALYSIS OF AGRICULTURAL WORKERS DURING EXTENSIVE OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES SI - EMIC/73/o1:'331 SO -- MUTAT RES; 21: _ =5-340, 1973 AD - EMIC/ORNL AU - FICSOR G; NII LO PICCOLO GM TI - SURVEY OF PESTICIDES FOR MUTAGENICITY BY THE BACTERIAL-PLATE ASSAY METHOD SI - EMIC/72/0096-33 SO - EMS NEWSL; 6:6-8,197z AD - EMIC/ORNL AU - ANDERSEN KJ ; LE I GHTY EG ; TAN,AHASH I MT TI - EVALUATION OF HERBICIDES FOR POSSIBLE MUTAGENIC PROPERTIES SI - EMIC/72/009597 SO - J AGRIC FOOD CHEM; 24u649-656,1972 AD -- EMIC/ORNL AU - ARNOLD WE ; NALEWAJA JD TI - EFFECT OF DICAMBA ON RNA AND PROTEIN SI - EMIC/71/007809 SO - WEED SCI; 19::101-305, 1971 AP - EMIC/ORNL SEE: GA 4-23t37 AU - GRANT WF TI - PESTICIDES AND HEREDITY SI - EMIC/74/006075 SO - MACDONALD J; 31 :211--214, 1970 AB - EMIC/ORNL - WUU KD ; GRANT WF - CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS INDUCED IN SOMATIC CELLS OF VICIA FABA BY PESTICIDES QD SI - EMIC/67/002404 ~ ~ SO - NUCLEUS(CALCUTTA); 10:37-46,1967 AB - EMIC/ORNL O AU TI 4
Page 112: soc40e00
i?L! l;;UU K'D ~, GRANT WF TI •- CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS INDUCED BY PESTICIDES IN MEIOTIC CELLS OF BARLEY SI - F_MIC/67./002397 "x SO -- CYTOLOGIA; _y:'1•-4131967 (-1B -- EMIL'/OF:NL ;r•:; ,.; i AU - DUNACHIE ,7F ; FLETCHER WW TI - TOXICITY OF CERTAIN HERBICIDES TO HENS' EGGS ASSESSED BY THE EGG-INJECTION TECHNIQUE SI - ETIC/70/006521 SO -- ANN APPL DIOL; 66:515-524, 1970 AD - ETIC/ORNL SEE: CA 74-98665 TWENTY-FIVE HERBICIDES HAVE BEEN TESTED FOR THEIR TOXICITY-TO HEN EMBRYOS AT VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS,USING AN EGG-INJECTION TECHNIL-7_UE.PARAQUAT, WAS THE MO ST TOX I C, G I V I NG A COMPLETE F::I LL AT A CONCENTRAT I ON I N THE EGG OF 0.3 PF'M s TWO OTHER COMPOUNDS RELATED TO I T WERE ALMOST COMPLETELY LETHAL AT 10 F'PM.OF THE OTHER COMPOUNDS,SEVENTEEN HAD LITTLE OI" NO EFFECT AT 50 PPM AND OF THESE,EIGHT HAD NONE AT 100 PPM.EXCEPT FOR FEATHER BLANCHING,CAUSED BY SOME OF THE SUBSTITUTED PHENOXY-ACIDS,NO TERATOGENIC EFFECTS WERE FOUND. AU - DUNACHIE JF ; FLETCHER WW TI - EFFECT OF SOME HERBICIDES ON THE HATCHING RATE OF HEN'S EGGS SI - ETIC/67/004121 SO - NATURE(LONDON); 215:1406-1407,1967 AD - ETIC/ORNL SEE: CA 67-1u7549 corresponding doses determined in chronically poisoned`rats: established between the highest ineffective doses, especially the threshold doses as determined in NEr-2 cultures,.and,:the',;r were most susceptible, and NE2-2 cultures were least sensitive to the arganochlarine compounds. A fairly good correlation was` AU -- Grigor'eva LV ; Korchak GI ; Kudzina GD TI - Determination of the toxic effect of organochlorine compounds by the cell culture method. SI - PESTAB/74/1957 SO - Gig.. Sanit.39(4): 93-95; 1974(FEF:4) -AB - FESTAEa The to;aic effects of ^,3,6-trichlarobenzoic acid (2,3,6-TBA), dicamba, trichlorotoluene, pentanate, hexanate, chloramp, and acrafol on cell cultures of human embryonic - fibroblasts, monkey kidney, NEr-2, KV, and A--i were studied for the determination of the threshold and of the highest , ineffective doses. The results obtained were compared with those from chronic poisoning tests in albino rats. The cell degeneration always appeared on the first day and was aggravated during the subsequent 2 to 3 days. The generative changes (coherency loss of the cytoplasm, granulation of the protoplasm, rounding of the cells, reduced cell size and light reflex).were unspecific and independent o•F the nature of the compounds. Primary cell cultures of human embryonic and monkey kidney cells A,
Page 113: soc40e00
ha{ t'~t `• E'! e[.~. M c [ , , t .~ ..... .. . .... .i:.. . AU - ET taL. ; F;. Si','i_R DE. TI - Fate af banvel T, ioxynil, tordon, and trifluorilin in the dairy cow. SI ••- I-iAYES/&5/i=42.1 -1 SO - J. Dairy Sci.; 4S(1^)s1711-17f.•`aa1965~ AL - HAYES AU -- EDSON EF ; SANDERSON DM TI - Toxicity of the herbicides, 2-methoxy-3,5,6-trichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba) and 2-methoxy-3,5,6-trichlorobenzoic acid (tricamba). SI -HAYES/65/sj3145 SO - Fd Cosmet. To:, i col .; _ ~^99-_'i r4; S 965 ` AD - HAYES S TI - Distribution and excretion of dicamba by rats as determined by radiotracer technique. SI• - HAYES/67/U999:' SO -- J. Agr-i c. Food Chem. ; 15 (5) : B:7-4Cr; 1967 AU - ENGEL D ; TYE R nonfatty solid samples, soil, non•fatty •fluids, and fatty--fluitl nature: Subsampling and extraction techniques are given'for 4,;, preparation prior to analysis is specific for the sample's cleanup and gas chromatographic analysis. However, sample AU - Malina MA TI - Dicamba. SI - PESTAB/75/2896 SO - IN: Analytical method for pesticides and plant growth regulators. Vol. VII, Thin-layer and liquid chromatography and analyses of pesticides of international importance. J. Sherma and G. Zweig, Eds., Academic Press, New York, 1973, p. 545-567. (4 references) AD - PESTAB. Dicamba, ::.,6--dichloro-o-anisic acid, is used for postemergenc=_=weed control in zield corn, wheat, oats, barley, sorghum, pasture/rangeland, perennial grass grown for seed, turfgrass, ind!istr ial brush control, and other non-crop land uses. Dicamba is relatively mobile in soil and nonpersistent. It is readily absorbed through both roots and leaves and translocated in the xylem and phloem by most plants. Dissipation of residues can occur by exudation through the roots into the surrounding soil, by tissue metabolism within the plant, and by 1 oss f rom l ea-f surf aces. Bi camba i s marketed i n the f orm of - a 4-lb/gal aqueous solution of the dimethylamine salt, 5% granules, 4-lb/gal oil soluble concentrates, and various mixed f ormulations with other herbicides. For formulation anlaysis the active '' ingredient is determined by measuring the IR absorbance•at 9.89 mum (1012/cm). Residues of 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid and its conversion product, 5-hydroxy-dicamba, in various samples are . determined by electron-capture GC by comparing the chromatogr.ams, with calibration curves made with methyl 2-metho:;y-1,6-dichlorobenzoate and methyl 2,5-dimethoxy =-.3,6-:- dichlorobenzo.ate as standards. The procedure for determining dicamba and 5-hydroxy dicamba residues in all samples of nonfatty solid and body fluid nature utilized a buffered partition column' m
Page 114: soc40e00
A U -- F'r i g ge E TI •° Environmental toxicological aspects of the use of insecticides and herbicides. A review. ~ SI - r'ESTAi:i/75/1661 ~ CO -- Deut. Tier-aer-ztl. Wochenschr. F~0(?1 ): 511-J1•1; i`?7=. (C5 references) AB -- PESTAB. General envi ronmental and to>: i col ogi cal aspects of herbicides are described. Most herbicides are considerably less toxic to the warm-blooded organism then insecticides, and almost all herbicides ar-e subject to micrabial degradation in the soil within a few weeks, while some other substances are persistent for 1 to 2 years. f-lerbicides, except for fatty acid-derived preparations, are rapidly broken down in plants. Theref ore, and because herbicides are usually applied long before harvesting, their residues in plants are usually very low. Residues of defoliants and desiccants,~ applied shortly before harvesting, are an e:<ception, however. Herbicides usually have low chronic toxicity. The no-effect levels were determined to be 500 ppm `for dicamba, 5,000 ppm -For barban, and 300 ppm for pyrazon, while the residue levels of these pesticides in plants as harvested are usual l y bel ow 0.1 ppm. The ma.; i mum al l owab 1 e concentra'~ i on of dalapon is 26 ppm. Aminotriazole, DNOC, and diquat may cause residue problems. Zero tolerance is required for aminotriazole in plants. • AU - Raake W TI - Effect of (4-chloro-o-taloxy)acetic acid (MCPA) on cattle and rats. SI - PESTAB/74/G034 SO - Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Fharmakol.?74: Suppl. R86; 1972 AB - PESTAB A herd of 14 hei,`•ers, some of them pregnant, were poi soned wi th Banvel (34% M CF'A; means of poi soni ng not described). The heifers (2-5 years old) developed a number of symptoms, which were generally resistant to therapy. Symptoms included salivation, anore>:ia, ataxia, muscular weakness, paralysis of hindquarters, bloody-mucous nasal effusion, pulmonary edema, bradycardia, gastrointestinal atony, hematuria, moaning, and progressive apathy. The recovery period was - prolonged with the heifers generally unable to stand for 18 days. MCF'A was detectabl e i n the ur=i ne of the hei f ers f or at least eight days after ingestion. ->Thin-layer chromatographic (methanol/benzene 5:95, bromophenoi blue) and spectrophotometric (absorption maximum, 278 nm) detection of MCPA in the acidified ether fraction of the urine extract was not impaired by frozen storage of the urine. After oral administration of MCPA to rats, a shift of the MCPA spectrum the left (absorption maximum at 272 nm) was observed and was attributed to a MCPA metabol i te. t
Page 115: soc40e00
C t AL.; -- Mo f{ e+_ t_ JO M•, r tonH; TI ° Effects of herbicides on honey bees. S I -- HAR!?Ei/7 .?:/<=--•2'^ x SO -- F'roc:, !=JEst. .of_-o tl!eed Sci . ; ^C: 15 197. ~ {R EF: uy" r')L~ - HAF'AF' '?i lve;<, 2,4-p, :',4,5-.-T, 2,4-DB, dicamba, .•'~,35,6-TBA, chlo: ~iraben, oic±oram, E:F'TC„ and dalapon tti+ere relatively-c nonto:aic to newly ~~rnergad work:er honey bees when fed in 60% sucrose at concentrations r-anging from 1ir to 1000 ppm. Bromoxynil and endothall were to.,i.c at 1000 ppm, and paraquat, MAA, MSMA, DSMA, he.~a°fl!_trate, and cacodylic acid iwer'e extremely toxic at 100 and 1000 ppm. MSMA, cacodylic• acid, and paraquat were highly toxic when sprayed on smal l cages contai ning adul tworl;:er honey bees. Diesel ail or DMSO present in the vehicle carrier increased the toxicity. When applied in a water carrier, 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, silvex, picloram, endothall, and a mis<ture of 2,4,5-T and picloram were not to::ic. Brood production was not adver.sely affected when colonies were fed 60% sucrose containing picloram, 2,3,6-TBA, or dicamba at 1c-rc-ii: ppm. At 1000 ppm, however, chloramben and dalapon caused a reduction in brood development, and 2, 4--D 2, 4, 5--T, si l vex , 2, 4--DB and EPTC mark.edl y reduced or eliminated brood production. At 1<0 ppm the phenoxy herbicides did not affect brood production, and the removal of the herbicides resulted in normal brood production. Although some toxicity was observed in these experiments, it is more likely that herbicides will injure colonies by depriving them of their food since they usually kill flowers rapidly rather than through direct effects of poisons. 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T were not found in honey sacs of bees or in colonies sprayed by airplanes with these herbicides,== acF,bone break.age, causing light-microscopically detectablee chromosome breaks, woUld not be detected in bactari,,a. The assay-, AU •- Ficsor G; Nii Lo Piccolo GM TI - Survey of pesticides for mutagenicity by the bacterial-plate assay method. SI - HAPAB/73/02211 SO - Newslett. Environ. Mutagen Soc.; 6: 6-8; 1972 ;(FEF:12) AB - HARAB 0+ 14 pesticide products tested by the bacterial plate assay for ability to revert two E. coli lac- amber mutants to the lar-tose-fermenting phenotype and a cys-and two leu-auxotrophs to prototrophy, Tomato Vegetable Dust and Home Orchard Spray gave a positive mutagenic response in the lac-- and cys- strains. Captan, an ingredient common to both products, was subsequently found to be mutagenic when tested with the cys- strain. No evidence of mutagenicity was found for a variety of commercial products containing organochlorines, organophosphates, herbicides, and for mulation ingredients, Banvel D, atrazine, simazine, Alanap-3 (naptalam), Botran (DCNA), Lorox (Linuron), Cytrol, and Hyvar X (Bromacil) were inactive in the plate assay„()D using his auxotrophs, but captan 5<aW and Tomato Vegetable Dust ~. induced mutati.ons--in his G 46 and TA 1530 which revert by base Qj substitution like the other strains affected by captan. Several:_O things can explain the failure of pesticides, which induced ~ mutations in barley, to induce reversions in bacteria. DNA- N
Page 116: soc40e00
:ra~ ~3aiasiii~i#&ss~iii~iiiiiiu+itiftisisfi3i3~t:ffffii3fsix133f3f'sFs;#f#4i!#l3fllli3i3iif#313~~#ii%#l~ i~3~3~~1~ii~~iil~t is I._hus uIr' li t.t1 =va].ue in 2tse' f g '.out when c:ombined with more sor3histicated tests can lead to early idryntificati on of a rl-lutag,~i!n; c c;-impod tnd at 1 ower coct. qS. AU - Hutto 5 Kennedy MV ; Shuman Jr F L y Sto.;anovic BJ TI -- Mild thermal degradation of pesticides. SI - HAPAB/73/00801 SO - J. Envi ron. G?ual.; 1(4) :357-401; 1972 ;(fiEF: 1 1) AD - F-IAPAE< In pesticide disposal studies partial degradation of 12 selected analytical grade pesticides was produced by heating the chemical , at temperatures between 100 and 400C. Each pesticide was modified physically and chemically at a temperature at least 300-450C below its complete combustion temperature. At these relatively low temperatures eight of the original nine s.olids (zineb4 picloram, dieldrin, atrazine, bromacil, carbaryl, DNBP, and 2,4-D) remained solid while dicamba was converted to a liquid. The three liquids (DBCP, vernolate, and malathion) were all converted to solids. Eight of the original 12 compounds-also yielded gray to brown to black residues upon heating. Infrared spectroscopic analyses indicated that the extent of degradation of the heated pesticides ranged -from formation of a single degradation product to production of a mixture of compounds. Most pesticides, however, were degraded through loss of one or two substituents of the molecule by processes such as dehalogenation and decarboxylation. (Author abstract by permission)== s
Page 117: soc40e00
• • AU1 - Ri ver s JB ~, `.+auger WL Jr ; 1;1 ernmer HW TI - Simultaneous gas chromatographic determination of 2,4-D and dicamba in human blood and urine. A; SI -• HAF'AB/ 70/0'2?22 SO -•• J. Chrc,m.ytog, 50(^) o3_4--7, 197iy; (;EFu 6) A B - r-lAFAL A procedure -'or the si rrnul t zneous determi nc_?tion of 2, 4-D and dicamba in human bi.odd and urine is described which applies the method A. Levenue nt al. developed for pentachlorophenol inn blood ( this journal, 38 (4): 467-•72; 1968; for- an abstract see 69-0;51 ). A Mi croti k MT 220 gas chromatograph was used, equipped with a 3-H electron-capture detector and a borosilicate glass column packed with a mixutre of 4% SE-30 and 6'/. L?F-1 on Chromosorb W ( AW-DMCS ), high- performance grade, 80 to 100 mesh. The temperatures. were: inlet--2 0Ct, detectar--2r?8 and column-•19C>; the nitrogen flow rate was 85 ml/min. The Kontes 25-m1 evaporative concentrator tube and column were empl.oyed. Standard solutions of the two pesticides as their mehtyl esters were prepared as detailed. The solvents and reagents used" were: benezenE•, fiex.ane, esooctane, 0.1 hN sulfiric acid ( benzeen extracted ), 2,4-- dichloraphenoxyacetic acid, - 2-methosy-',6-dichlorobenzoic acid and fU- methyl-N'-nitrosoguanidine. One ml of human blood serum or 5 ml of urine were extracted with 20 ml 0.1 N sulfuric acid and 12 ml bnezene in a stoppered Erlenmeyer flask, mixed for 20 min at 5<0 degrees on a heated stirplate. After cooling, the contents were transferred to centrifuge tube for phase separation ( 15 min ). The benezene ( top ; layer was transferred to the evaportaive concentrator tube and the aqueous phase was reextracted three times with 5-ml portions of benzene, each time being shaken vigourausly -For i min. with phase separation by dentrifugza.tion. The benzene {._:•:tr-acts were combined in the tube, a boiling chip added, the evaporative concentrator column attached and the combined extract conecntrated t6 2:ml in a water bath. For methylation 0.2 ml diazomethane was removed by bubbling dry nitrogen through the mixture gently until the yellow color disappeared. The volume was adjusted to 10.0 ml with isooctane. Diluted as necessary, the methylated:extract ( 2 to 8 mcl ) was, injected into the gas chr-omatagraph.::An amount of the standards which gave similar pealc height response was injected after each. extract injection. The results are tabulated for 2,4-D and- dicamba levels in 25 poisoning case°samples and for urine and blood serum recoveries of the ~added presticdes. The limits'of ditectibility were 0.03 ppm for dicamba and 0.05 ppm for 2,4- D in 1 ml of blood serum. The respective limits for 5 ml of urine were 0.01 and 0.02 ppm. The eicamba:-and 1,4--D mehtyl esters gave retention times of 1.2 and 1.9 min.~ respectively. No interferences were seen, though care must be used not to exceed the amount of diaZomethane indicatnd;;because of impurities in the reagent. An e:<periences analyst"can perform about 16 analyses a day. ANA! YSIS 7c7/1'?/0cs, 602 197r7; ::'.
Page 118: soc40e00
C AU -- P<11 m~~.~r J C ;::.~uel r~ mIF ;;D TI -- The toxicity of some organic herbicides to cattle, sheep and chickens. ~T - H AF'AB /7c;) /C1:.22 12 CD - U.S. Dept. Agr. F'r-c.dv F:es. y fcept. No. 106: 1--,2E., 1969; (REF:21) AEi - HAPAB The r-•_,sL(1 ys -Qf S,+,-,..+di es of 5_hc `o;; i c i ty of 29 or-garii c herbicides to ~_at~~l>s, sheep and chicknns have been presented. These included ch.'•-or-opherto:<y cornpo-unds ( 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, silvex and MCF'A ), amide compounds ( diphenamid, CDAA and TCBC ), phenyl urea compounds ( iilonur on, linurony fenuron and diuron ), thiocarbamate compounds ( diallate and triallate ), triazine compounds (atrazine, simazine, prometone, propazine, etc. ). and benz oi c aci d compounds ( di camba and 2, 3, b•°TEsA ). Mi scel 1 aneous compounds investigated included bramacil, isacil, pholychlor-obicyclopentadiene isomers, propanil, dichlobenil, picloram and dalapon. A total of 126 yearling cattle, 1,90 1- to 2-year- old sheep. and 700 6-week-old chickens were studied. Repeated doses of the herbicides were administered in gelation capsules or as water-- diluted solutions by drench or in pipettes. The usual period of study was 10 days or until toxicilogic effects appeared. However, in a number of instances, longer and shorter term studies were made. The signs of posioning by most of the herbicides included anorexia and reduced weight gains._ In many instances, idgestion in the rumen seemed to have been imparied. Macroscopic lesions were somewhat variable and nonspecific. The liver and the kidneys were most frequently involved. An arbitrary yield of forage and rate of comsumption were selected to evaluate the hazard for cattle, sheep and chickens likely to exist under most severe conditions af use. The most common rates of application of many of theser herbicides for-.mulai:ions are not a hazard to cattle, sheep or chic'Kens. Th e ma.< i mum rat_a_ c,..t app l i cat i on of some approach or s! Erpass a hazardou_ leve7. in one or more of the tests species. ( A!!thor- abstrac_t mod i f i ed ) To•r, i col ogy and Rharmacol ogy 70/cjQ/()q, 360 1969
Page 119: soc40e00
7 ~~ ~ . ~:...~~~.. ( S • „ , .., ,.. . _ - , .._ ..._ : : : : ~-- i__ .-' , i .<.. -r Metabolism of Banvel-D herbicide in a dairy cow. J„ t>_._.r _~ F .~_ ~~i~ _?-s 19695 r ... , -- -...,. .„ 52(3), i : .r• :E_ r . . _' ? j,.,A,c.,•,,_ - . . _ . . , ~• ~-!::'ii_a~!_,._.~~..r: =;sL:' j' cow °7 w,' _' c-i _ i . d by _~I-i~l:-,,{.er 5 ppm of ~ , ( ;~~?tJe1 -D :__~- r„i: . _. •_~ '.:. ~-: _,,.~.......::. ::...d:i=:h_- n zo,i__ - -~ir_ ) `'o;• ~;'. : 7r-~_b~_'_s-? _ ._._ r :; r'_,.•y.. _ _:ta .~ ~e>.~ cn _. "7 kg dalLiv lead .-._.t:oli.. Tht_ herbicide '.'e:!.'- :i:n j:=i.(r"__ .'-ecry-it?.lll._ed for-m in :..bso?.+_:t_:: ethyl alc::c::hol Mi;.ecJ S.i'_t: i.hr: Mening graln. Milk specime`7<.. <( t„1'L.:3l :Fii):ed milk ;.•.;sar _ t_.ke_n G1:7r71ng and F=..venlnC'j. 1 day ILIC:.4;or:_ the =,;per iinent, during tho G,:per.iiiient and -ror 6 days thereafter. =tal daily t_?ril'.ie and mantlY..e _;mp1e= were likewise =oI 1 r?C"ted: A1. : sp'.?_='i miens were i mmF'f'i cit ely I roi' en 'f or subsequent _.na1y:;:i= by =.'._ec~ron a,'•fi.ni'_y gas chromato'.,rap;-?y •for any £aanvel-D .'-r-s.1 duk:=s ( 'i;eth`y'1 dtia?j i•ier~"'-. Lci r= e 2.c1 d ). i1o /- _-'c.l dues L.d:'=r^ det:=cteci in either the mi l I<: Or the feces; di_;ring the first 4 days c-F the -feedi ng ',_rial, only trace 1( not q!tanti.ta.tively measurable? ) were found of i'•cinvel..-D in the feces. The ur lne accounted for 73": c3°,' the 'e.;::_r2'•_;.c•n o-f the intact herbicide. From dF.y 2 thi-ough day '-, the urinary conl_r?nt°atiLns were _.11i 4,13! 4.3, 4.2, 4.1 aind 0.1 pHJrn:, .-'espe-ctL .-?ly. I-f it 'a•r'= posslbl` to correct for diluti:cr; vr-ror-•s, =rir ary e..creticn might actually represent total elimination of Banv?'.- s'J, A prior similar experiment with ..5 i pp:Ti of L'an••tei--T i':'-,•nathouy._.', 5, 6- trichlorobenzoic acid) gave analogous re=_t'• :-_ with 84.9% of the ingested compound e:.creted in the !crinl:-2- •! 0-1;'ICO_0'3Y ACJD .='HARMACOLCGY b1?/c77/c-ac-1, 22"= 1969 9 r'

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size: