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Literature Search No. 502 Toxicity and Pyrolysis of Alpha-Pinene

Date: 05 Jan 1987
Length: 144 pages
87490458-87490601
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Dunn, L.
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LIFE SCIENCES LAB 20/LAB FILES
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COMP, COMPUTER PRINTOUT
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G41
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R1-037
Named Organization
Lor, Lorillard
Date Loaded
20 Dec 2001
Document File
87490437/87490773/L-Pinene B154
Master ID
87490458/0601

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Lor, Lorillard
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MARG, MARGINALIA
PARE, PARENT
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xxv54c00

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Jiarniary~ 5, . 11487 UPDATE TO LITERATURE SEARCH NO. 502 TO7C3CITV AND~ PVROLYSIS' OF ALPHA PINENE Requested'd by Aw Cook
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LITERATURE SEARCH NO. 502 TOXICITY OF ALPHA-PINENE
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A Division of LoewS Theatres,.Inc. Research Center Library. 420 English St:.. Gieensboro; N. C. 27405 Cable Adtlress'Lorillard` NEq1'YORK OFFICE 200 E. 4ien ST. Decembea~16~, ]1983~, LITERATURE SEARCH NO. 502' Requested by L. Dunn. TOXICITY OF -ALPHA-PINENE
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UPDATE TO LITERATURE.SEARCCH NO., 502 Lorillard B'1544 compound SEARCH TERMS: ALPHA P'INENE2-PI'.NENE EaICYCLO'C3.1.1.]HEPT-2-ENE„ 2',.6„6-TRIMETHYL- 2',.6,6-TRIMETHYLEICYCLO. C5',1.,17HEPT-2:-ENE RN=80-56-8.
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Opdyke. Monographs on Fragrance Raw Materials Registry of the Toxic Effects of Chemicals Sax. Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials Tobacco Abstracts Toxicology Data Bank Ton¢1 ine Search terms used: Alpha-pinene Bicyclo [3.1.1]1 hept-2-ene, d-pinene 2,-pinene (1979) Current through June ('198'3) (19 6 8')i Vol.. 1 (Q957) through Vol. 27 #4 (1983) Current through August (1983) (Il974')1 through July (1.983) 2',6,6-triimethyl- [RriT_80-56r8]I ~pr, ~~areC f P~~f"ou,~r~ d,,?J 5-/
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CHEMICAL.RESULATIONSAND SUSDELINES CURRENT RE..SEARCH INFOFtMATIONSYST.EM/USDA, (CRI.S/USD:A) EM£ASE 19'74-PRESENT FEDEF:AL. RESEARCH IN'PROC3RESS CURRENT FOODS:.ADLISRA 1994-PRESENT FOOD SCIENCE ANDTffCHNOLOGY 1'984'rPRESENT HAZARDLINE CURRENT HAZARDOUS SUHSTANCE.S~DATABASE CURRENT IRL-LIFE SC.IENCESCOLLECTION 1984-PRESENT MEDLINE1!984-PRESENT NATIONAL TECHNICAL I'.NFORMATIONISERVICE (NTIS) 1984-PRESENT REGISTRY OF TO'XIC EFF_ECTS OF' CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES (,RTECS) SMITHSONIANISCIENCE:INFORMATION EXCHANBE kSS.IE) LAST 2 YRS. TO'_XL.INg. 1984-PRESENT
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TOXir_ITYSEAFkCHTERMS:. TOXIC?. IMMUNOTOX:IC? NEUR~OTO:XIC:? GENOTOx.IC'? EMDRYOTOXIC?' FETOTOX.IC~• OR FOETDTOXIC'. CANCER? CARCINOGEN? CARCINOMA?' NEOPLASM? TUM¢iR?' OR: TUMOUR? MUTAGEN? MUTATION?CYTOGENETIC?CYTOTODQIC TERATOGEN?TERATOLOG? CLASTOGEN? ONCOGEN? ONCOLOG? UNSCHEDULED DNA DNA DAMAG? CHROMOSOM'?ABERRATION. MICROSOME DOMINANT LETHAL. MOUSE LYMPHOMA AMES SISTERCHROMATID S:IOASSAY ACUTE SUBACUTE CHRONIC SUBCHRONI.C LETHAL DOSE LD 50 SkItilFAINTING INHALE"' INHALATION FiESFk I RAT? F'ULMONARY ff*O ISON!?' IRRITAT? HYFERSENS'.LTI:? ALLERG? ADVERSE;EFFECT? L;IOLOG.ICAL EFFECT? BIOLOGICAL ACTI'VIT? HEALTH HAZARD? REF`RODUCTIVEEFFECT?.
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F'YROt..YSSS' SEARCH TERPTS.: PYROLY? COML•sUS'i?THERMAL DEGRAD'?' THERMAL DECOMP^' LkROWNI!NG. EiURN^ CAF:AMELIZ^ HEAT - CHEMSCAL. HEAT - BIOLOGICAL PHOT!OCHEMIICALTr THERMOPYROLY? MAILLARD SOURCES SEAPiCHEDm SOURCES IN PRINT Arctander.. F'er-fume and Flavor Chemicals. Bedoukian. PerfumervandFl.avoring Syrntheti.cs. Commerce Clearni'ng.House. Food Drug Cosmet.ic Law,fieporter. Food Chemical Codex. Furiia. Handbook of Food Addi..tives.. Stofberg.. Consump~ti.on Rafliass and Food Pred!o ii.nance of Flavor-inq Materials. SOURCES SEARCHED ONLINE: EIOSIS1984-F'RESENT CANCERLIT' 1'.9Ed4-FRESENT CASONLINE 19E4-PRESENTCHEMICAL CAFtCINO6ENESIS RESEARCH I'NFOftMATION' SYSTEM'(CCFiIS) CHEMICAL EXFOSURE.
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December 16, 1983 LITERATURE SEARCH NO~. 502 This search covers: Cancer7ineCAS ONLINE! Chemical Abstracts, Chemical Regulations.& Guidelines Clayton.Fatty's Industrial Hygiene &' Toxicology Commerce Clearing'House_ Food Drug Law Reporter Chemical Sources Assoc. Flavor & Fragrance Materials EMBASE Food Science Technology Abstracts Furia., Fenaroli"s,Handbook of Flavor Ihgredients GbsseSin. ClinicaS Toxicology of C'ommerical Products - Heath. Source Book of Flavors xirk-othmer.EncyclopedLia of Chemical Technology ILife.Sciences Collection MEDLINE Merck Index National Technical Info.rmatiion Service N.C.I. Survey of Compounds Which Have B~een Tested for Carcinogenic Activity (.1963): through August (1983) (.1965)', through Vol. 99 #12'(i1983) Vol. 23 (',192'9), through Vol. 99 #12:(1983) Current through Nov. (1982) (11978), Current through October (1983!) (198 1)',(1975) through Issue 31 (1983) (1969) through:Sept. (1983) (1971) (1975) '' (1978) (19'78') through July (1983) GD (1966) through Nov. (1983) ~ (197 9'.)' O (1964): through Issue 24 (198:3) kth Q7 (1951) through (1973)
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Toxicity search terms used.:, Embryotoxic:. Fetotoxicc Foetotoxic: Genotoxic: Immunotoxic: Neurotoxic: Toxic: Cancer: Carcinogen: Carcinoma.: Neoplasm: Tumor: Tumour:. Clastogen: Mutagen: Mutation: Oncogen: Oncolog: Teratogen.r Teratol: Aberration: Abnormal: Allerg: Hypersensiti: Irritat: Poison: Adverse effect: Biological activit: Biological effect: Health hazard: Reproductive effect: e=truncation symbol Acute Ames Chromosom: aberrat:. Chronic Dominant lethal LD 50 Lethal concentration: Lethal dose: Mouse llymphoma. Salmonella mammalian microsome Sister chromatid Subacute Subchronic
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k ~ I ~ ~ t s l t t + a s t $ x . t 874904'7i t '9 W 9 R~g o_uj ''~"' tl~ .0s~ C 6 i ~ o~~~ ~~~~~ ~ ~Im~ ~ ~ ~s8.w 4 ry ~ ~ ~ ~ x P ~ I
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HAZARDLINE AN Ar_CESSION NUMBER~: 95. 861<. CN CHEMICAL NAME:: ALPH'A-P'INENE. SY SYNONYMS: 2,6,6-TR.IMETHYLBICYCLO-(--,.I.,1)-2-I-IEPTENE.. BICYCLO('3,1,.1).-HEPT-2-ENE', 2,6,6-METHYL--. UN 2368. 2-PINENE. PIICYCLO(3.1.1)HEPT-2-ENE, 2,b.,6-TRIMffTHYL-, RN CAS NUMBER.:. . 80-56.-8. RES. TOXIC NUMBER:: DT7000000. CHEMICAL FORMULA: C1OHi6. PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: LIQUID, ODOR OF TURPENTINE. MaL WT: 136.24 BOILING PT: 31T'F SOLUB'ILITY:.. - INSOLUBLE. FLASHI PT: 91 F VAPOR'PRES:. 10 MM AT 99 F MELT PT: -67 F UEL IN AIR:: LEL I N. AIR: MECINI AQR: . 491 F SPEC GRAVITY: 0.8582' VAPOR.DENSITY: 4.7 ODOR THRESHO'LD: OCTANOL/WATER CU-EFFICIENT: PERMISSABLE'E%POSURE: NONE ESTABLISHED CERCLA HAZARD,RATINGS - TOXICITY 1. - IGNITABILITY y- REACTIVITY 0 - PERSISTENCE 1'. OSHA STANDARD29CFRI910:.120c7 HAZARD COMMUNICATION REQUIRES CHEMICAL. MANUFACTURERS'.AND'.IMPORTERSTO:ASSESSTHE HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS WHICH. THEY PRODUCE OR I'MPORT, AND.ALL EMPLOYERS HAVI.NG.WORKPLACESIN'.THE MANUFAfTURING.DIV'SSI.ON., STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION CODES 20. THROUGH39., TO PROV'IDE.INFORMATION TO'THEI'.R EMPLOYEES CONCERNING HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS BYMEANS.OF HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM INCLUDING LABELS, MATERIAL SAf=ETYDATA SHEETS,. TRAINING,. ANDACCESS. TO WRITTEN! RECORDS 48FP.57~28C_i, 1:1/2.5/8T. FOLLOWINO OSHA STANDAF:DS. APPLICABLE TOSUBSTANCES LISTED.29CFR:19'10,. OTHERWISE ADVISE.. DANGEROUS EXPOSURE: NONE SPECIFIED LIG!UIID, ODOR OF TURPENTINE INCOMPATIBILITIES: 1
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0 TABLE 2 Synthetic Flavoring Materlals (Continued) Kume S/rnc/nre Flmnr Churnrlerielire Solubility in Alenhnl Use Type Praduct Sfnbilrty Phenylethylisovalerate Fruily Good Modifier,blender Heavy,fruity(peach,etc) Feir ~ (CH,t)rCHCHtCOOCHzCH~_ - - flavora Phenylethyl phenylaretete g~ ~ CHrCHcOOCCHr =f 5 8weet,honey Good Modifier Fruit,honey,orange Good Phenylethylsalicylate P 9-CHcCHr000"( J d 8weet,peach Good Modifier Apdcot,pesch,pin_ea_pple -flavore ---- Good - oH Phenylethyltiglate Floral,roee Good Topnote Frult,nutflavore Fair-good ------ C 1}-~ GHtCHsOOC(GH,)-GHCHr Phenylpropylaeetata Bittersweet,gooaeberry Good Body,toPnote, Fruit, berry flavors Good C y-CHtCHrCHrCOOCCHr / modifier Phenylpropyl ~-- ~ ' Bitter,cherry Fair Blender Bitteralmond,cherry, , Good cinnamate h-(CHr)tOOCCH=CH . P l_J - - plum a-Pinene(CreHte) ~ Pine-like,woody Good Topnote Lemon,nutmeg Fair P-Pinene(C,cH,y) ~ Pine-like,woody Good Topnote Woody F'tic-goorl Piperine /~ Pungent Fair-good Modifier Celery,sods Good ~O CH=CHCH=CHC N ~I ~- U HtC \ O Propionahlehyde CHtCHtCHO Aceteldehyde,pungent Good Topnote Fruitfiavore Good Propionicacid CHtCHpCOOH 8our Good Topnote Butter,Cruitfisvme Fair-good Propylacetete CHpCOO(CHr)rCHr Bittereweet,peare Good Topnote,body Apple,pear,berry,melon Fair-good flavors Propyl alcohol OH,CHtCHrOH Pungent Good Modifier Fruit Fair-good 69V06DGB z a a G V
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CHEMICAL CPaftCSNOGL:NES'I5 RESEARCH INFORMfaTION, SYSTEM (.C;R..IS) . .. '7' --~: T ALFHA-FINENE'.. . ._ ' ,s"! s-LIw,~L"_;: 80-~D'_: --< P}:a.,LOC'. USE ::L ASS N_r DATA TYPE Tumor "romo_ion CARCINOGENI'CITY STUDIES ND TWMOR PFONOTION STUDIES WPECIrS.a M^!: sE: `;i:3LiTE C.^ROMOTER;s Tpl-'ICl-'i'- '.AF:uET --ISSiiE.. -`;~PE •'.?F- _ESION: IMTE=:61J?1ENTP-?F:Y.:YSTEM (,ShIN) CARCI".l.O.:,E=N::=t'IBCt RDIUTE. Cr_ARC?NO0Etk: a TOPICAL DOSE3`_C~'iRCINOC`=Nd !.. T^•P F:~EF-RENCEL L .~^_~~- Cr>PJD F"T'=--D,':JEH C;:i6N'C TC'XI.CITY OF CSSENTI'OL_ OILS EeliD C_s-,TfSIN OTHE C; FF?nDL'" t.^ OF ;1nTUl'~AL •^•ftICaIN FOODCOSriE-., TOXICOL. 3:311-324, ].`:fi5: MUL4r,EN...ICCITY STUDIES ND, 15
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Regulatory Status of Direct Food Additives. 91'~7 REGULATORYf STATUS. OF DIRECT IfOODADDITIVES (cantinued)~ AlternateName. ISourvel FEMA. Na. 2(LO)-Pinene -a-Pinene see./a-Pinene 2-Pinene 2902 /-Piaene 2(10}Plnene 2903 Piperidene Hezahydtopyridine 2908 Plperine. Piperaylpiper{dine 2909 Piperftol d-Piperitone. tee pMenth-1.en8-o1 p-Menth-1cn-3,one 2910 Piperonal'i Piperonylaeetate Heliutrapine; &4methyl- enediozybenzaldehyde Hel'uotropyl acetate 2911. 2912. Piperonyl isobutyrate 2913 Pipaissewa leaves„ (CAimaphida umbeilaAa 2914 extract Polyethylene (L,).Nutf.)i, Regulation~ Clmitalions Polyethyl'ene glyeol Csrtiowax®; PEG FDA §121.1059 in.n synthetic terpene resins forchewiog-gumbaee. Prod- uct specifications apply FDA §121.11g4, Synthetic flavor/adjuvant FDA §121:1059In synthetic terpenereains fOrchewing-gumbasa Pnod- uctepecificationaapply FDA §121L1194 Synthetic flavor FDA§12111164 Synthetic flavor FDA §121C1164 FDA §121.101 Synthetic flavor GRAS, synthetic flavor and adjuvant. FDA §12111g4. FDA §121.11g4. FDA §121-101' Synthetic flavor Synthetic flavor GRAS, .. natural flavor ex- tLactive Synthetic masticatory sub- etanceih chewing gum base; molecular weight 2,000-21,0)0. Coatingon, . &esh' citrus fruit; dispersing and de- foaming. adjuvant„in wm- pliance with~FDA §121.1685. Average otoll wt, 200-9500 ~ 1. Coating, binder;, plasti- cizing agent, and/6r lubri- cant in tablets used for fnad 2: Adjuvant' and bodying agent in monnutritive sweeteners listed as GRAS &Adju.mnt to disperse vit- emins and/or mineral pre- pauations
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4 , ~. o t bH bH nx vm Seheme I-AfetabnNsm uf (-)-a. and (-1-$pinenea vi.a7lylie oddu- tiiun (A/. formntionuf epoziide fo(lowed.6yneduetian or hydration fiB). anE'rins:dkmrage of the feur-membered rins.(C):,
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-.5...1.!:~. ;~a'I% ..i`.' ,_ ... OTt-IL_R. FI^=~' ,^T~.E'dl'J]'•G~' ND. I'tA"cARDS EXPLOSIVE LIMETS AND'. ND' POTENTIAL. nEi;CT. T_ V.'ITIES =. .. tiD. it+iC[]MPATinItLITIi.'= DECOMPOSITIO."d ND POLYMER.I ZAT I Oid'. ND OTHER HAZAnDDU-: N':i? ODOftI THRESLIOLDND SE::IN, EVE A".ID'. REwF'IRATOFtYhdD'. I ;R'ITAT:On1S PFOTECTIk?E. E~,?U'2I7T?ENT & . Cd:i CLOTHIRI6 ' OTHER PREVENTIVEMEASUEtES'ND L~~ v r?ri , STA!3IL_ITYISHE_F LIFE NDS}-IjI_PMENT ME'THODSAND CONTAINERSe TANI'; CARS & GALVANIZEDDFCUMS. FEGULATIONS CHawleY,. G.G. TheCondens..ed Chemical Di.ct:~.onarry. 4±h ed. New York: Van Nostrc,.nd'. . Reinhold Ca.., 1977. p., 6873 STORASE C~~3NDITIOfdS . ?LDCLEANUP METHODS NDD'ISI'OSAi! METNODSND. f'AI'I',A'TION LIMI.T S: AND ND POTENTIAL . TOIX tl.C I_ T'vSUM^tARYND 6
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r_at~rE~,L*_T .-. ?9r>>-3~/N~7V - Af~_Pan PIPiENE .. ... _-,,, _ .,.: .._, - . _ _ .. F?l_PHA-PIraENE Dar_rment -,'.•pet. i. ~- ' - ESrr~.~i~:,r.-.+nir.•r:2. _. -,. . . . .. . :.a :. . . _-. . ?)ztn un, ai~pha-pI~~nRne :~Mre ~ pree.ented regarding ":; structure~„ cccurr Lncry~, ,_~~r. ~,.ith <.,r i a rsguLa•ory >>eazcies,c toxicity, .+r:•=r~ratann, :•=r~ratann, uses, t- r:t3t1!On ._.ns1tati^nr . MpT.atC!:~ ~.~ f.;:.y ai^t :fdwr i3m,. percutaneous 'r~ .nrjl r~.. ro,e,l iLt_ .,tli t nmr oret:iotir.g. and , ^... . _... . ., . . ~...t.i) r.•-r't, •, :jci .:.r ..51 S:: . h,:...u ?_L..., :-. ,r .~. ~~ iA
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!N',*.C^I-` RFrs:,;*it1G"::;DAT : np18 T4~{ftESHCI_D LIMIT VraL 'U!E°_ nry;ERt. UrCUPATI.ONAL PERMISSIbLE L_VC LS WATEf2.STANDARDS rTMOSS'f4ERIC S;irAN:,,:^RDS. SrU?L. STANDARDS CERGLA REPORTABLE ;UANTITIES TSCA REQUIREMENTS RCFiA REQUIREMENTS FIFRA REGU'IREMENTS FDA REQUIREMENTS FDA REQUIREMENTS ;:!"r?'. ?.I D ND ND ND ND, ND ND ND ND FDA SECTION NUMBER Y21.1ti159IN. SYNTHETIC TERPENE SES.INS' FOR CI;EWIING CUM BASE. PRODUCT SPECIFT.!CATP.ONS APPLY. EFi!ri.a, T.S. fed.7. CRC w.andhook: of Food Addli.ti.ve~i. 2nd ed. Cl.eveland: TheChemi.cal RubSer Co., 1972. FDA SECTIi]N.NUMEER 121'.1184CFcnaroii's. Handbook of~ Flavor Ingredients.. Vnlume-2- ExJited,. `ransTated, and revised by T..E., Furia and N. Bellanca.2nd ed. CleveLand: The r.hemical Rubber Cm., 1975. P., 4861 14
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OSHA STANDARD: 29CFF'19dc7-.2c? ACCESS TOEMr'LOYEEEX'.POSURE AND' MEDICAL RECORDS.. (4 OF 10) OSFIA. STANDARD <^9CFRY9S0-1T2PERSONAL PROTECTIVE E6?t!iIPMENT. (5' OF 10) OSHA!STANDARD 29CFR1910.,141 SANITATION. (6 OF 10) OSHA.STANDARD 29CFR1910.151 MEDICAL SERVICES,AND FIRST AID. (7 OF 109 OSHASTANDARD29CFR191n.133,EYE AND FACE PROTECTION. (S' OF 10) 40CFR717 RECORDS AND REPORTS OF ALLEGATIONS THAT CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES : CAUSE SIGNIF2CANT ADVERSE'REACTIONS'TO'HEALTH OR THE ENVIRONMENT REQU,IRES~MANUFACTURERS,AND CERTAIN PROCESSORS OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES AND MIXTURES TO'.KEEP RECORDS OF SIIGN~IFICANT ADVERSE REACTIONS TO_ HEALTH ORITHE.ENVIRONMENTALLEGED TO HAVE HEEN CAUSED~ PYASU6STANCE OR. MIXTURE... EPA MAY I'NSPECTANDREOUIRE REPORTINGOF SUCRRECORDS. 46FR.38178'08122'/83... - (9 OF 10) 49CFR172.101 TA6LES.QF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, THEIR DESCRIPTIONy. PROPER SHIPPING.NAME„ CLASS,. LABEL, PACY•.AGING, AND, OTHER REQUIREMENTS DESIGNATED IN HAZARDOU'BMATER.IALS TABLE ASHAZARDOUS MATERIAL FORTHE'PURPOSE.OF TRANSPORTATION. 41FR15996 04/15/76 45FR34588U5/22/80 (AMENDMENT) 45FR46420 Q7/Y0L80~(AMENDMENT)- _ 45FR6z08U09/18/SO.(AMENDMENT)45FR74649 11/11n/80(AMENDMENT)46FR1773903/Y9~lB1 (AMENDMENT) 4'6FR192'5 0v/3U/81 (AMENDMENT). (10 OF ll0)' - 49CFR172.102'.TAFLES.OF HA..ZRRDOUS,MATERSALS, THEIR',DESCRIPTION!. -.PROPERSHIPP'ING NAME,-CLASS, LABEL,PACKAGING, AND OTHER RE6fUIREMENTSDESIGNATED INIOPTIONAL HAZARDDUS MATE-RIALS:TAFSLE',WITH ALTERNATIVES.TO CORRESPONDING REQUIREMENTS IN 49CFR172-101 FOR INTERNATIONAL SHIPMENTS AS'.AUTHORIZED BY 49CFR171.1241FR15996 D4/L5/76 46FR^c9?93 06/U1'./811 (AMENDMENT)~ 46FR=.^..50) ij6/22f81 _ ( AMENDMfiNT )'. .
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REGISTRY C,F TOXIC EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL SUL<STANCES. (RTECS) SE~;ONDARY 3":UF:CE IPCAS TYPE i NAME CAS REGISTRY NUMIRF_li' CLASSIFSCATION CODE STANDARDS/REGULATIONS STATUS' SYNONYMS'.. SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS'. SYNONYMS' MO4.ECULAF:. FOhMULAMOLECULAFt WEIGHT WISWESSER.LINE NOTATION ENTRY MONTH TOXIC DATA SOURCE. TOX'•DATA KEYWORDS TOXIC DATA SOURCE. TOXDATA KEYWORDS N 3:OSf^i./DT7pG0i>00 P3CYCLO(3.,1.1)HEFT-2-ENE',2,6,6-TRIMETHYL- `d0-`i6 --S ' - FRIMARY IRRITANT DOT-IMO:FLAMMABLE or COMBUSTIBLE L.IQUID'; LAEfEL:FLAMMA2LE LIGUID'CFRGBR Code of Federal Regulations. 4'9,172.102,84 REPORTEDIN:EEA TSCA INVENTORY, 19II= ACINTENE.A alpha-PINENE 2-A' I NF_NE alpha-PINENE (:DOT)2„6y6-TRIMETHYL&TCYCLOi(T.1.1)-2-HEPT--2-ENE- UN. 2358 ('D0T) C1O-H16 136.<^6 L46. AEUT3 Al Al El 6604 FCTXAV Food'.a.md Ct;smeticsToxicology. 16,.853,78 S4'.IN;.MAN;.HUMAM'-.,"; IRRITATION; iF)rY).;TOXI~C EFFECTS;SEVEf:E SYIN;RARBIT•RODENTS,.Ififi1TATION;',540 mg/24H TOXIC'EFFECTSg:,MODERATE FCTXA`.lFood and CosmeticsTox:icology.16,853,78 .ORAL;F:'AT;RODENTS;LD.°,r,r;37a70 . mg/kg;TOXIC EFFECTS;. C3Nl'RAL NERVf.~"LL..-,:. SYSTEM; EEHAV I OriAL SYMF`fUM.^; FULMONARY SYSTEM'. INIIALATIIN;:RAT;k:ODENTG;.LCLa;:625ug/m.°_.;TOXIC~ EFFECTS;CENTRAL NE ;:SfOUS'. SYSTEMqEYE;PULMONARY SYSTEM INi,ALATION;MOUSE;RODENTS;..LCLo:.364 ug/in3;TOXIC EFFECTS;CENTRAL NF_FiVOUS.SYSTEM;EYErfULMONARY SYSTEM INHALATION; GUINEAF'IG;RODENTS:LCLo;.572ug/my TO'XIC.EFF-=CiS;.CENTRAL NERVOUS.SYSTEM;EYE E'ULMONARY SYSTEpi
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HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES DATABANI: (HSDL$). rr;s{"dF: Ni iMH:ESR'. :Jt~McLL- ^r SIJBST'-3NCE Cf`S =GIST,Y NUM3+E, ~ RELAT.ED . HSDB fiE.CL'RSS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS MOLE:CU".:-AFc: FORMU7 ,A, . W?SWESSER LINE P-:OTATI.ON RTECS NUMBER' OFiM--TADS NUMBER SHIPPING NAME/NU;1B'ER -DIIT/UN/NAfIMCO. STCC NUMBER EPA HAZAFtD•.`^.1 iS WASTE NUMBER ASSOCIATED CHEM.ICALS I-#AZAmDSSUMMAFYFIRE. POTENTIAL NFfiA' HAZARD CLA,SIFICATION FL.AMMABLE LIM'ITS rLASH POINT 7':;=} ALPHA-F'.T.NENE 3C;-571-,1. ND 2',6 ,,6--TF,' I!`9ETHvL;~I CY=CLO ('L. i..1 ) HE^T-2-ENE 2',,6 , 6-TRI METHS'L6SCYCLO- (3, 1,1)----HEPTENE 2-PINENE D,ICYCLOG3..1..1)HEPT-~1--ENE,,. ^<„6,,6-TRIMETHYL. PINENE "•!D NIOGH'JDT. 7^0n0r}r ND ND ND ND ND MODERATE. WHEN. E'XPOSED~ TGHEAT OR FLAME CSa:~, N..I.. Dangerous PropertiesorF Ird!'.s*ri.al. Mater-i.al.s. 5th ed. New. Yer6:a. V'an Nostr-a.nd Rhei.nhoid„ 1979.p. 916] ND h.D o!) %a 9'1. DEG F CC'. CNa4.ional Fire ,'='rote¢tirn rA Association. Fire Protection OLi.ide on ~ Hrza.r-Jo~~.o hfiaterials. 7th ed. B..oston, M,~s... ~ na2 FirePrciter-tion As.s.oc,iati.on, 1973. %j ?^<<M161] cz 7
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T-1E3":MAL DECOMPOSITIIaN PRODUCTS: ARE I-IAZARDGU.-".: AND/OR TOXIC. ROUTE OFENTRY: "NHAd~iATION''.. SKIN AFRSORPTIONI. IN£3ESTION. TARGET ORGANSr CENTRAL NERVOIJS! SYuTEMI. EYES. GAITRO.IhtTESTINAL. KT.'LiNEYS., LUNGS.. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. SKIiN. SYMPTOMSc EYE,. ORGAN OFSIGHff (SCO47O); IRRITATION,. EXTREME REACTION.TiO A CONDITION (ISC0G94). SKIN,, COVERING OF BODY'(!SCO174)'; IRRITATION!, EXTREME REACTIONI TOA CONDITION (SC:hUU9e1).. ABDOMINAL, RE'LATING:TO THE ABDOMEN (SCnOO1); PAIN, SUFFERING,: EITHER PHYSICAL OR MENTAL ('SCO182). NAUSEA, ' SICKNESS AT THE STOMACH (SCO415).. VOMITING, PERTAINING TO'.NAUSEA (SC6166)I. DPARRHEA, UNCONTROLLED LOOSE BOWELS (SCQ046). DIZZINESS FEELINGFAINT,: LIGHT-HEADED~, UNGTEADY(SCOrJ48). RESPIRATORY D!ISTRESSDIFFICULTYBREATHING (SC0219). COUGHING, FORCEFUL EXPIRATION _. (SCO173). DELIR:IUM'.,, STATE OF DISORIENTATION,. CONFUSION (SC0288). ATAXIA, MUSCULAR. INCOORDSNATION(SCG013). KIDNEY DAMAGE,- I'NJURY'TO' THE E'IDNEY(SC0220)- _ NERVOUSNESS, STATE OF UNREST, UNEASINESS (SC011'.8); .- D.ISTURBANCE', INTERRUPTION:OF A'.NORMAL STATE (SC0947).- DERMATI.TIS, INFLAMMATION OF SKIN (SCOn44). NEPHRITIS', INFLAMMATION OF THE K.IDNEYS'(SC0117). . . SPECIAL DIAGNOSTIC TESTS AND INDEXESIOF EXPOSURE: PULMONARY FUNCTION. IF'S'i'MPTOMSOF CENTRAL NERVOUS,SYSTEM OCCUR, 0©TAIN BLOOD GLUCOSE. AND RECTAL TEMPERATURE. PERFORM COMPLETE NEUROLOGIC EXAf•tINATIOON:ANDANY OTHER SPEC.IFI.C:NEUROLOGIC TESTS AS APPLICABLE. BASELINE LIVER~AND,REN'AL FUNCTIONS. REGULATORY STATUS. (,1 OF 10) ) - - OSHA.STANDARD29CFR191'9.12CkUHAZARD COMMUNICATION REQUIRES CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS TOASSESS THE'HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS WHICHI THEY PRODUCE OR IMPORT, AND ALL EMPLOYERSHAVING. WORY,PLACES:IN THE MANUFACTUR'INGDIVISION, STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION:CODES ^<OTHROUGH 39',. TO:PROVI!DE I'NFORMATION',TO THEIR EMPLOYEES!CONCERNING. HAZARDOUS CHEM.ICALS BYMEANS:OF HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM INCLUDING LABELS, MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS, TRAINING, AND ACCESS TOWRITTENIRECORDS4SFR5'-,3o 11/25/23 . FOLLOWING'.OSHA STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO SUBSTANCESLISTED 29CFRd91'0, OTFRER4JISE ADVSSE:. (2 OF iD) OSHA, STANDARD:29CFR.195',.94 VENTILATION OSHA STANDARD 29CFR1910.134 RESPIRATORY PROTECTION. (s. O}F 1c_3~)
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cHEM AL+STRACTS ALF'FH,Y PINENE -,_ Human reactions:to~low:roncent.rat'ions of volatile organicc compounds ql_i MoeThav:=, L..g P:ach;. ifOSk_ 'iyq, . Aarh_r_,,, 0_,•n.. 80Environ. Int., 1~--7-75, SC ?--3 (Toxicology)LT -7 CD ENVIDV .T,.^ c'' 14f_'.L .. L_A, rngAB: !1groupof' human ubj:cc"'_,.vr•s r. _+..posed .c.or 2.75 1) n. to, aa mix.t. o-f 2- e vola~tile org. corntids. known t.,~3 be indreor air pcilutants. Three totall concns:. of t}., 5.,. nr,d. 215 mq,/m- the sarrte.. 22 eompds.. werryused. TYree subjects were all healthy ano vi~l'..Lhout ast,r;ma., allergy, or chronic bron,Thi.t's 6ut. ,-Laimcd ..~~.en ar .•.:.f er frDmdry :nucr:u-, mcnb-.ne:s ire eyes nose, or upper iir w_:•7s . Dy ~-.:sing ai yuesf~innnNir-e en 2udi..Fferent air quul'i'•_ya5pe•ct=..;y a signi.fi.cant ef'fect of e;<posure was found forq,ues[ions r.-.lated'tc general air quality, odorj, ability to =.onc..,, and(or) mi.icou-, rnembrt.n_ i:rritation. Continuoras evaluati.on o4 irritation.i.m eyes, nose, _.,c!: showedsi~gnificant correlation to exp_sure. both =c Sand 25- :ng: r.r.T_... The effect wa s.zcute and showed no signs of =,d pial_i,nn. A. dfI,.it sp.-n iaerformance. test. -howed'd decreasedi scor a:_ dua-ing. =:,r^surr_:..r. 1
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BIOSL.S - ALPHAP1iNENE I (,i(:%1,'' -•17.''-'G:: ii.IOSIS'NutrTbe'r c 1~~'',s(i7.5i.`.4. ANALYSISIOF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN,THE FOREST AIR OF THE SOUTHERN'.FiLACk' FOREST WEST GERMANY LUffTTNER.F INST. CHEMI;SCHE PFLANZENPHYSIOL. •, C='FiiiENSSTF'. 41, D-74'. TUELtT_P1f_:EN. CHEMOSPi~dER.=. 15. (8'.. 1986. 9l35-992. CODENr. r;rySHA - Languaqe:~ ENGLISH - . Sub-fiIea. FjA.. (.E+iological Pbstr-acts)- The volatile or-ganicc compounds of forest air (Kalbelescheuer, Southern. Black Forest) and, for comparison, suburban air (Tubingen) were qualitaGivel.yanalyaed by gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods~. 94 Individtiual compounds were i;dentif"xed, 6 of them belong to' biogenic monoterpenes(.aLphe.-pineme,, .DELT'A...3-carene, myrcene.,..limonene,, eucalyptol, camphene)~. While thee monoterpenes were enri;.ched in forest.air,t aa similar col1'?ctionn of the pollution productswas observed in both locations. Pr•adominant substances were aromatic compounds. (tolueme,, ethylbenzeme, benzene, sylenes, ethyltoluenes, pseudbcumene and: naphthalene) which can beregard:ed as constituentsoP vehicle,e:oh.aust fumes and incineration processes. Other important substances.in forest air wereva:rious.e solvents, of which butySl acetate„ isobutyl acetat•e,. tetrachloraethylene and trichloroeth.ylene,, butanol-1, and severali ketones were prominent species. 7/7/2 0016610113 BIOSIS Number: 5=080083. ALLERGY TO' OIL. OF TURPENTINE iT11 POf:TUGAL. CACHAO F`,, . BRANDAO F M;; CARMO M,, FRAZAD Sg SILVA M CENTRO DERMATOLOG.IAMEDICO-CIRWRG'ICA,. ALAMEDA D.AFONSO HENRIQUES,. 17-8, 1'1?00'LISBAO, PORT. CONTACT'DERMATITIS 14 Languageo-. ENGLISH (4). 1986. 205-^<08. CODEN: CODED. . '. Subfillee E(A('F'ioLogi~.cal Abstracts). - . rOil o+ turpentineisstiLl a common allergen in Portugall aTthough:it does not contain .DELTA..;-car-ene, as ascertained by gas chromatography. Patlehh fests-with 6 terpenes an 22patientsreveaL,ed that.17 were allerg.i~c:to !. weresensiti4iee to. ..DELTA.T-carene, _ to .alpha.-terpineol and 2 to 1 turpentine in Port!rgal.
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J .!~ :. f 3:'r . l', VOLATILE ORBAN~I.C COMPOUNDS IN INDOOR AIR'.AN OVERVIEW~OF SOURCES CONCENTRATIONS AND HEALTREFFECTS _._"(L i r.~:~n, IF_L.... Gr"f'll"h1'Sc, ~... '.. (iI .i,AYE I }$EALT'ra, SEVENTH L IFi w.iEPA„ ..Yri'r,iNSIUM; :<TdUXVILLF~, TENt,, 0C-;,, °I:+C'-'~IS FIIEL.~=:HERS~., INC'."IIr:H. 'r3N. ?LLI-IfE:. MAfP.^. iSBNI CnD`c.f i3<r1 br3'184T3.: Bd,OS:I3 Number: 81r1t3*339: AEROSOLS FORMED FROM'THE CHEMICAL REACTION OF MONOTERPENES AND OZONE YOKOUCHI. Y;'AMBE Y DIV. CHEM. PHYSICS, NATL. INST. ENFv?IRON... STLI;iIc.S'„ YATABE,. IBARAKI 36v, JFM1. ATI`1L'SEiVI?:!:r.DRI 19 ~~P).1V_.~:. 12?i.-_.-?F•.., CCDEN.r (3:TENB Language: E3uGLISH _ Subfile: BA. (Biollogical A6stracts)Chamber ea:peri:ments'were conducted to study'the aerosol products fromthe ozonoZysisn# themaj':or atmospheric monoterpenes; .alpha..-pineme, react±on...n produced mainly 2', 2'-dimethyl-3'-acetyl cyclobutyl ethanal (pinonaSdeh'yie), the .t+eta::-pinene-O' reaction, mainly 6,6-dimetPoyl-bi¢ye4.o CT_•...1..1] heptan-d--onee and the Iimonene-O3 ;reacti.on„ sev-ar-alunidentified , products. The:see product> were sought in forest aerosols and! pimanald:ehyde ; was d'etected in the atmosphere.
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j'...i 5. ~:- ~.t-: TL!R FE.. ,'.E i r Mr.rN C0'1PnNECaT OF y ~1~-~INTn I~{;', jr TEi4h^' ~„'ar ar' ~f-.P' .~. .~_ 1 PI:~A:ir - ~~~_ T~_ :` TCLi' ~~ ' . :\ICiJT:='Y'iC.IT},. l~f:!LUES "rn"'O).'ICLTY 'YALUE'` NATIONAL TOXICOLOGY PROC :AM F:EF'O9'`,TS'.. I:A;tC SUMMA:,;,,,. AND GVnr''-UAIt I'_7N'1 1rIINI^MUM FATtiIL DOSE LEVEL POPULATICPI!= AT .'`F•EC f.AL :iS?. r4DS0F(F'TI.^.IML Di..~s~TF:TL:UTIQN''~ AND =XCR-rii'.,i7;ll ADSn'"Pj TON., ST-aT-.BUTIO'il ANiA~ E3E:Ci;ET:~OP~, ND ND ND ND ND ND' AES4RBED THFOU6HSK.IN, LLNGE., INTESTINE. rThe. Mcr-cb:. ImaSe.... 9th ed'_ Rah:,ra%,. New Jersa_yaMerck & Co., Inc., 1576. p. 9697 IN INJECTION OFMELALEUCA:.VZRIDIFLORA OiIL (CONTAINING ALPFtA--PINENE) TO: FtATS',. AB'SO'RPTIONWAS DETEFiMINEDAS' A FUNCTIONI OF TI.ME... ELABAT C, OUSTRI''N •J; STUDY OF A NATURAL MIXTUfiE:OF TERPENES; IDENTIFICATIiON OF CONSTITUENTS. ABSOfif-•TIONAN'D FATE INI,TFtE RAT AFTER INTRAMUSCULAF' I.NJECTION,! ANNPHARMi Ffi. 37:9-1ir2 377 (197q)7 METAEsOLISM/METADOI_rTES )"t I OLOG'.I CAL HiALF-L I FE MECHAN'ISM~ OFACTIOPJ I.NTEF:ACTIONS PftnDA:+I_E F:OUTES: OF I-IUMaN. L-\POSUr2E. ND ND ND ND `tD. I) -1 ~ Aar--F,prE. DA'ILYINTAf;E. ND, fD © F!IRnl+A.r<:>E EXPOSUFES. ND wL~ OD u1 M,nDYF<URP.EN° ND 13
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.r-,'notaxi.c: evalu.ration of' the o -. offg.-assi'.ng, product_y', of ..~. (*_.......:"} P"' 19t36 LA Eng AD Volatile:substances r-eleased: .fro,: pulverized particleboard weredose-dependentl.y mutagenic and tos.ic to',Sa3monella flyphimurium TA100 exposed to the.grts phase above th=',powder. 5,9 -fr-acti~onsdid not affect th_• resul-t.s^ apparenta.y thee: -r.,i!tcgrn-. dc not need metaboIic ,rt':`,!e.ti'.r,rj. 1r _;r:--2' wk sjor-avre :r, a r-:.:os=d contal ner, thee powder ._.__ ... : ...:au~ i,.._. bu;i. . _-a_..:=d' Af±er .,--wkk storag:G„ the'e r''n,_n.- HCL;i: and st.,•.:,-ne- r'i-r0-42-57 i.n, the gass ph.ase, rrea...?d., arn~a ,`e ::_onc.ns.. of ~enacnr_,C71-43--27, .alpha.-pinene~ 1imone': -~:.. f;;?3-9u _]; fr[anana:. C_ 1241-19'-61, and n-b-utanol inc;,ased. T,n^ aging: of the partir_-lebo'ar'd r.f~f'g<•s:_;_ng pr-ndu.ctsers :co;ici'.ty are disrvssed.., AN v:.A i 04', ('2,°;): : .«0772'J, . TI Fepe1'lency and toxicity of some plant oils and their terpene components to Sitotroga cerealella (©1'ivieir),(Lepidbptera, 6elechii.dae) -. AU Kr i=hnar-a;ali, S.. F. g: 6anesaling_•m; V. Y... Senana•vak:o', U. M. CS Dep" tooll., (Jni.•,. .T_:.-.ffn~,~. . LQ la;~~;na', Sri. Lanka SO Trop.Sci., ^S(4),. 249-52 : SC 5-4 (.Agrochemi'.c al Bi'aregulla.tors) DT ] CO TPOSAC. - IS 00'41--3291'PY 1985 LA Eng AE• Oils from Cymbopogen:nardue andVitex. negundo were most effective,in causing Fi;nock down'and inactivation ofS.. cerealella, a pest inn storedlr-ice. Isoiated'.ter-penes =rom plant oil!s and their combinations :aereallso. Lested'g p-cymene C99-_07_..;;; was most effective i'r, knc•ck:-doEVn potency, fol.Tovaed in decreasing order- bycampheneG79-92-57, .al.'pha.--phel.landreme [4221'--98-17, and .alpha.-p:inene-g]. Combi.ned'd p-cymene and .beta..-pinene caus_ad the greatest i',na*_t'=yatiorn. and mortality of the ineect. W ~1 ~ f0 O N
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f0. ~"~~ , SRiI , i;'_.!: HEPATICO:DEETHYLASE ACTIVITY IN:M!I:CE ON DIFFERENT TYPES: OF' BEDD.ING: .._. ."..-, 1 .,:DLf'E_t:: 03El'.F'JLt"-!.r- _. :' . -.n, ~_ :TDTCR- CC16fLODCN.•[ {1DSE?dSE C,., -., FSI_l=i c rrc,rtihD: 2E 1906. :,59_7~j. . iJDEfJ:'.. ZEVFiA:. _.. -,.~~ages ENGLISH Rubfi3i~c: ::f? (Bic•t-'oglcal Abstracts) The ef rect of thetvoe a' hleediln gg on hepatic ,-nL.'..-nphenetol-O-d:ee*hylasear-Miv*_ttii:-: outb,-ed Bom,:, NMRI mice has.beens es:-mined. Miceraisedone beech:-waod-bc=•dd~_ngd were tr-ansferredl to cages wiithsaft-wood bedding (mixture of spruce and pine chippings). Three days later the O-deethyl.ase activilty hadincrease.d to: approximat•ely1.45%, of~ that inlivers fram mice.continuously kept on beech-wood bedd'ingand it remained at this Ievel, . duringthe6Ck-dstudy period. Within 2 weeks after chang!ing the bedding: backk to- beeclnr-womd and O-deethylaseacti!vi~ty had returned-to the cont.rrol'value, .alpha..-pinene was identified in soft-wood'.bedding,..and i!ts enz•,•.me-induci.ng, ability was demonstrated. The presence of..alpfia.-piinene or other environmental inducers.i o{ micraso,ra: cytochrome P~--450 activity in laboratory animals should be avoided --ur stanaiardized' i'n experiments involving m:crosomal.and'.cytochromeP--45,U~-modia'ted metabolism... C)i-i1656Cy696 BIOSIS Number: 31r?3:?770TURPENTINE SENSITIZA:TION ROM'AGUERA Cg: ALOMAR AISALf-1ZAR~ L Ca CAMARASA .J M~GqGR:IMALT F; PASCUAL A M; MIRANDA P;: MORAN'M; GEIDC, (CALLE CASANOVA 143, BARCELONA, SPAIN'.. CONTACTDERMATITIS 14 (3).: 19'C6:.197'.. CODEN: CODED Language: ENGIiISH Subfil'e: BARRM. ('Biol'ogj:cal: Abstracts/RRM) r:r0161:074()_B:IOSIShlumber: 3Ufi5644~VARIABILITY' OF HETEROBASIDION-ANNOSUM BEHAVIOR'. TO THREE MONOTERPENES THIIBAiJLT-BALESDENT M!; DELATOUR C . LAB. PAT6{OLOG:IE FORESTIERE,I.N'.R.A...-C.N.R..F.,CHAMPENOUX, F-54280 SEICHAMPS;, FR. . SYMPOSIUM ON ROOTAND BUTT-ROTS., AND SOME OTHER ROOT DISEASES OF WOODY PLANTS HELD AT THE: 27TH MEETING OF THE SOCIETE FRANCAISE DEPHYTOPATHOLOGTE: ('FRENCHC-`4-IYTOPATHOLOGffCAL SOCI'ETY),. PARIS,, FRANCE,. NOV. 22-2:.,. 1964. EUR J FOR PATHOL. 15(5-6). 1985. TU1.-:'lj7., CODEN; E:7FPA, Language:FF:ENCHSu:bfi.le:., BAi';F'.M(Eiiological Abs±.ra.cta1~;RM)
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-~:i~[~-I _ „', F-; ., I F --,.1 .. _. -;-Inn.:: -;Af, .~9='- .., _~ =~mad~.r, :.r?c.. , Cb_ ;Si-cr i:ur Pr,;_nur •~-~`ar , '.i=~n; AN1Ti'>"r.TG. A+N'9 EMERGENCY OFiAL EXFOSUR'E I:) CHE:ST„-RAiY SH.OU0.D SE TF:E(1T"'4'j:;T OBTA:INnD-Ar:LY TO bE' COMPARED WITH A'. ?ND.....TO BE OBTAINED 24: HR'.LATER. ....IN2ND X--RaYASPIRF'~TI'ON'. PNEUMONITIS~. MA?Y L'.E SEEN. IN I SERIES ^NEUMQN2TISWAS GREATEST (1T.SX) IN'...CASES /WITH/SPONTANEniilS PNEUMONITI^ WHEN VOMITING 4-1AS. INnUCEL'.:. /HYDROCARBON`3/ tlt:ymac4l:.; B.H.. (ed''..)°aisindA:e. Microfiche Edition. Denver, Co3.~orado= Micromede;<, Lnc., in associar-i'onwi.th thE National' Cent.zr- for Pait;on Inforitrar_ion,, with upsia'_r•s, 1975-present. MF."iNT i 7 ANTIDOTE AND eEMF_G:GC"3CY_1RAL HAS P)"tL1dAE:LY ALREADY T.rEATMENT OCCURr;ED, . . IMPORTANT TO EMPTY STOMACH: . &. - .?VOID' ABSORPTION & POSSIBLY CNS DEPRESSION, MYOCARDIAL INVOLVENENTOR OTHER:TOXICi3%-1.--F';-";.. 'FREAT SEIZURES. WITH' IV DIAZEPAM (A_r;U_-Ts ijP TO 1n.M6 SLOWLY, REPEAT IFCHILD:. -M.r,l4:G SLOWLY. i1-:Y'_':'-IOCF;RONS/ GRum3sY,, r:.P~l. Ged. ) Foisinde;<. "q+~r:=-Fichr, :'-dition. Denver, Cnlcrado:Micromed.e:<„ Inr_,,.in.associat:ion with the Ne,!:i.ona.I Center for Poison Inform~ation,, with upda. ns„ 1`.175-presenrt. M6MNT 17 ANTIDOTE.AN'D EMERGENCY' ORAL D) PULMONARY'EDEMA:MflY BE SEEN AS TREATMENT CO!"tPLICATION OF F'NEL'MONITIS & "IAYE<E. TREATED 1-!ITH F:f'IIw. END EXPIRATORYF'RESSUF'E. E) - ANTIBIOTI:CS...RESERVED:FOR: SPECIFIC 'NDICAT-T.GNS& . NOT USED'. PROFIIYLACTICALLY., F)DASELI'.NE F.ENAIL & HEFATIC FUNCTION TESTS. SHOUf._D C3E OBTAINED.. iHYDF3OCAf„BONS! (Rumack, B.H, (ed.) Poisindex. N'icrof'iche Edition. Denv~=:r, Coiorado:Micr-ome,d'e:.:,. Inc.., in association with the National Center for Coi.s,nInfermation, with updates, 5 ~ 197`_-,--pr-crsent. MGMNT 1T ~ l rD
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R ' .•."-i. t i ~"i.n i r•I~•.!~ PrJ~S~.7L:'` TR .;.^' .LA:, -.r I'--`fiTIL ,".I.X.. _ ."1 .1d.1 = 0 l1 _ 7 1i:1E... IN CC:S. :. '- ,.,, . ..,.., ~T_ f-:n r- i- +.J~1NT . AIfJDIf..'~~..~~. ,I. ;:ap: r:E~Mf"v+c` rT TO ,r-RESHA.T..'R. 37Pfir;/ S.R:i:iri , 'c9. i'9. (ed. ) .^-7-o-(ich_ `:-]ition~.. DliriVer~. M7.Cr'7iiy,=+a63Xy, In1=., in a.»oCiE•.`'i.n.n I..o _.r :vith,, the Cd.A.t5:onaI -;or- PGison T.n ..)or,.n;qtion-;- Wiith upr_iatn{,, i975-preSent. HGMNT 27 ANTIDOTE AND EMERGENCY E). MONITOR PT FOR RESFY DIST:FRESSg IF COIJGH. OR. TREATMENT DIFFICULTY' IN BREATHING DEVELOPS',. EVALUATE FOfiRESf' TRACT IRRITATION, BRONCHITIS, & PC.'EUMON.IA„ C) TfiEATME!NT... TNCL mn: ,AI_ -v'-,r OSUr:E SEETII_TS ftiE.lsiflMf,-N~ S.TTO"~c,, ., IN ~~ E_., ~ . . ~i~., . WHEN APF'RC1F:=tT.ATE. EYF A) EX4'OSF_D, '`YES, .. I1=:F IGAT`dD. OP C~"r-U^ot.Y. ,..WAT~c,R.... . C. LEAST !'5 M-TN.. JF':YDROCAREiONS/ CRumac!•••;:., &'.HL (ed„) Pioisiindexc.. Mi.cra{ir_-hc_Edi't"xon.. Denver, Coioradna i3i.cromed'e:;,, Inc. „ ina'=soci•?.t.:on uri =h `.h,s "at.i,ony.1 Center "or- Poison. Inf or mat;_ an ,, w:.th ,;.pd?tes.; ;.'-.'7'5-presant. MGMNT i.7 ANTIDCTE.ANDEMEi;GENCY EYE B) AN OPHTHALMIC EXAM SHOULDHE'. TREATMENT PERFORMED IF IRRITATION.GFi PAIN PERSISTS AFTER 15 MIN OF IRRIGATIONWI:.Tf-I WATER. DERMAL A) PT EXPOSED DERMAILLY' SHOULD WASH EXPOSED AREATW.ICE WLTI':SOAP & WATER. B) G'HYS~.ICIAN'. SHOULD EX.AMINE.. EXPOSED AREA IFIRRITATIONI...,F'ERSISTS, AFTEiff, AREA, . ISWr=iSHED. LHYDROCAR6ONS./ CRumack, B..H. (ed.) Pois.index. M'icrofi,che Editi'on.. Denver,, Colorado:. Mi,cromede:;, Inc., i.n.association withthe National Center for Poison' Inf'ormati'on„ with upd'ates,. 1975-present. M6MNT 1' 7 ANTTIDOTE. ANiDEMERGENCY DERMAL. C). TREATMENT SHOULD. INCL TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS LISTED IN ORAL EXPOSURE SECTION WHEN APPROPRIATE. /HYDROCARDONS/CRuunack;, I:1.H'_ C.ed.7 Pbi<s:inde:<. M'icrofi'.che. Edition. Denver, GeIkn:-ado:: Miir_romedex, Ine.,i,n association ;yith the Uation.al. Center for Poisean. Information, •rr.ith up:dates.,, 1.97J pr esent.. t`1CfIRt l 1: ] "'IED~.ICAL S!'~.1#~Tkr'EI'LLAM~,IC6 _LLAM~,IC6_ "JD 11
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Toxicity oipesti.cides.tosome aquatic animals. VI'Si. Acute'.toxi.city to . Daphrni.a magnz' .. .....- ;:-r, - "J ~:_i('L-;4.I j, : . " 1. i-! .=Ff~-.-p.i-..• .. ~M.] A AB Japan The ac,.{_,..va::.,'._ c--'-fsctt of 16 ~ a,nsee`i _?~des, 14 15- herbicides,~, 4 rodenticides, Z1 p',lant gr~cwth~~regul'ators~, and 19~other agrochems. wa=_~t._sted on D. magma. Chlorpyr-if'os (I~.) C292i-B2-27!,, sulprofos diazinon and pyrazofos L1'4°,7-i:S-57 shnared! -trong'i to+:c. _,f.+erts on D... magna :,Ai~th'h medi.an E~r~i~~. Tri. t=cntr H9i:., i. tr adi~:"Or , . ~ .yr i p ~aqua:,=.n . C404 67t-42 -~i] th l i d!i . . „ pen .me.. a . n C~s^5954-Y3-87, c9:a1.,..pJn C75--99-n'r, rodenticides, plant gr-,o-r~p.h~ r_:.r,r-tlatcrs, and~~d otlfierr agroch e-ffec'e ==-i.n * D~. mcagna. The '~ i~:ic ,-ffec 2m,5.~ shornrsd t of th'ese~ wUale tossi. tested eigr c.c ochems~. on D. ~lr,,,na. ;_ ;~~npc.;.rable~. to t,a,..ct cri cr-n-ntion.=:1l; tc'.-~,twd D. pul!ex.. :-oP'~ `.,ec.,2 printed t.r AN CAi04(4)=-61r?d Tl Studyoftoxicag!ents formed duringg axxo synthe:si~s AU Dmitriw ,, M. T..f ICuIesh, T. A.ti Ra~ty.annikov,... E. Ge _ CS Inst. p6shch. .^.ornrnuna1.'n. Gi.g:. !_G Moscow, WSSft SO Gig. San;.t.., (S),. 51-4 SC 59--5 (Ai.r' C:oll.ut_cn and~ Industri_:I. l-!ygiene:) DT ,J CC) GISAAA IS 0016-990,0 '. - . PY 1965 LA AS E'uss Toxic compds. formed' during oxo synthesi.s aredescribed'togetherr withh their relative toxicitiasan_'concns.
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CHEMICAL EXPi]'~SURE -- AL.1-`HA' F'I!UENE Acute Poisoning with Pine Oil. - Metabolism of' . r.r?.T, l - r?r`.rLryr" u~1' _ ` _,mIR .. _ 9 1 -Are.Il . ~. .. . .ii~41 -.. n._ _ .. .. ., .~ )ll - _. ~I:]f'- I jn , Fe.::er...a m.1 _.:aLd.f /lJ-.a J des S'_in_k:L.l . Char 1 fq.~ ~.`__:.rrJr B13JT~li`•nGlr =.._. Atr r.!11'.'ces 'ta>n o 7''-78 1' .?6 `1', Df'CIIY~M1LrdT otll'.r-1.1. TISSUE MEFiSUF:EDc: Urine EXf?OSURE. ROUTE: Ingest ii on''. Ah1ALti'TICAL PtETHOD: SC/MS CASES: 2 F"A*du€,a Nm+.t ap;_' i.cab'Lr• °~El~ii.'. . ilti(1.. _,U. _ SEX~e M''.. Momcrterpenes . _ .._ J _ ~.... '1:i I ( ...:..11 l ."C' Ilile :. ~ Li ._ . Gh2 h9./l' 1Cfi. :?m :n;ik WPo.lk9.inih. nf .dc~.rn-2nV. C^MMENT: SO day mmui.ative mcrotia.ci of inetaboSite.(bornylacetate) =lpha pinen.., _rft:.r .. :ge=t:ing 4<}ri arUrD ml pine ai.',.(57i; aLpB!a. pinerne) DE^'1O6RARr -'. I;"Jf-nr-,1.1A:T'Ipha; 44yr old, k•at S; i:gy, ,tt~mpted suiciue of HE.";LTti I i nC?': '6=aiiatha, c:rytll~-r.i_:, -- -! MOudih~ :ane. T:aryn:,,. =:.1_.~h.°_d face, c:taxi a.y s2o,{.::-rcuus hr a-Ftesr- ::nge-ticmy .'n„air'ed~ ~I'•-o} I~•l-7J f71"_r ).r':P' CA kiqME(S)''.. J(~B~'=;I)' ... El irycI o t . Is-, rr.t_y !_Zlln~.i:'.~yuy- tF :-ir,E,th y 1-~ CAS REGI`;TF:V t+1Ce! 6-0-56--5. F0:]M'L.._A:e Cllr;h°7.6 CHEM.IGNL FFiC7F'EftT E-,,~ MW 27!:6. SYNLT"dYi•iS, a: pi'.a_-f'i nene2^_ ,,f,t bP . , 156 CC i.methyIhi._/cSu;:' ?' i'!-. ept-.^_ene
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Acute Fci-~nni.ng iyiit.h P:inc O'il. - Mbtatrdism of Monoterp enes ::ieFl?l c n y.,. I_ r h3'i. 'n _f?P-m2d.ny T' _..~.. .,- __RIEi?.. -._YTir,-a_. __p3: _. ^fi~I~1rE: 1 ' 7fEAhd'~, . I`,l;:~... aprcl., _ay~l e 6CMMEM1T: i and 6days~ after inyesti'~ng GU0-5:D00 ml pin_ oil wt-,i.ch ean~tained 57'Y.~ a.lph.. pinene Estimated fromm graptr,~. DEMQhFinF'4?T-~~ -i'-nFZ'.x'+.T:f:"da~.. 4°~ yr o'lid, ~ 4rot f3'5' ;'p:y ,t1(=mpted~ sui.cid's HE: d r_rytl-.ema~. = u- u .:n.r! ...-r yn;; jj -f l ~.ush:=d~ face~,. cn.~ . ;.r~ Z_c, ~r:ge:ti~on,, impaired~ ._on.-_c...out:sne-...~,. .'.rnp :n t;:'.aod~. cressuree,, .r.~:~ ~ ^PiE'_°', °`:...^r:c. CI _?i '~.Q z~~~.metrlyl-- CF1,j r,E=T>s:Y ND~a r1 :EMw -nl.. - n~'.: I'T..- n4:,~ 1_ F..- r'f'~ 1°s .,._ .... yiti T .re.._. v~,Ci.~6,-Trr~.f.?thy b 1 ,r:'.o F--c~-..,nr.
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r nn.,"'r f_I:MG Pn r'.TP.1L :+1 i 1: 1•. ,"~s am=.. a n; i~'.~:'~-: '_ . `:m1t!'lyd an i ;.!.U..,... ...../ T IIAL' ESS:-i:-7_ n_' --.- Sr-~:ME T0X"L'CI'~.T1' AS TUP)P.:NTIP:E. .i~ _c• xr):; G:.IH. , H.a,. 4'odg R..P'~. Smith,~ end hi.;.3. C.1.eaT r_r-i - C~li To:a~~icolug:•; or Ccrrierrc:al F:"'roduc{_s~.. 4th ed.. Baltimore: WiLt_it:,:mss r!nd: Wilkins, :r?7h~~. i I~~.-.:'0~1 POISONING FOTENTIAL SEE.TURFFENTINE. Afi LITTLE AS 15ML.(1/2 OZ)!',AS PROVED FATAL TO A CHILD, ErUT A FEW - .. ° CW.I.LDREN' HAVE. StJRV'VEn' 2 s. r'b'EN _OZ. MEAN'. LETHAL nOSE INA?)ULT pF~JS;~'ti-~LY LIES BETWEEN 4 R. h. OZ, /TURrENTt.rdE/ FL.'o--;:• 7!n;. H.C. Itodge, R:-F. Sdritr:, arnd N..N.. Gic.ascn. C? inical Toxicology ofC:mnm._::rcial Products. 4thad. Daltimorc: W._11i.:m, ::nd ' .dilkiine„ 1`376... 11-..1701 r'rn'_SIpNIN~-° rr' .cNTIfl_. MOST P~REG'UINT ROUTE ) OR. iPL?SiN3NG iS' BY. ACCIDENT'dL. INuESTIONI 6TUFiPENT/h1Ei . ANTIDOTE AND EMERGENCY A) ESTABLISH REP..F': CREATE (,F:TIFICIAL AIftWAY TREATMENT IF NECESSARY. CHECh. TIDAL 'rOL. (NORMAL= 10.-1,_: CC/k-.G'). F'REVF'NTION OF ABSORPTION CGFiAL INGESTION) B) IF EMESIiS IS r_NDICATED: ...INITIATED 'JNLESSPT' COMATCSE., CONVULSING, ORLOST GAG REFLEX. IF /SO/ ENDOTRACHEAL I NTUC<AT I ONI SYOULD'F'RECEDE.....L.A4'AGE. .. /HYDROCAR30NS/iRumack~.,, B:.H!. (et]..) .. °oisi.nde;.~. Micro-fiche Edition. Denver, Col.orado:.. Micromedex, Inc., irr association . ~,ithh thGNat;_r_,nal Center fiorrPoison Inforinaticn, with updates, 1'~7'5r-pres:ent. "1GMNT 17 ANTIDOTE ANDEMEf(;:^i.NCY' ORAL C) IPECAC IS: PREFERRABLE TO LAVAGE INi TREATMENT ALERT PT WW4.1' REQUIRE..~'i EMESIS. LAVAGE SHOULD BE RESE"R?v[:.(tF'JR' PT WITH COMA., CONVULSIONS, OP S AL:SENT GErGREFL-EX. D) ADMIN ACTIVATED CHAF.:COAL rADUL.Te: SS;.-1r`,rJ G., Ct+!ILD:: 3ci--,hca G) . Eif,ATFAr;:TIC. MAGNESIUM SUL FATE „7ni.LTe: ;_cCt Gy CHILD~n 25i-r. MG/1=;G0'.. /''VY,r~ "'r"`RF':ON°/ r~".Umack:., Lt.H. Ce*_i.). . F:oiisi.ndb;:. Mi..crc#?iche. Edx'.tion.. Denver, Cclcrado= MicromFde:c, Inc:., in association "i.th the Nati~onal' C;=nr_c~r -'er Poison ?r:,iorrnatipm., wit.h.updates, 1475-..p.resent.. MGMrdT1.1 '7FAL L kkTliCA!- ~,C'=!'i '. -~UICE _: - i 9
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.. .' ? i c}7..'1T~I ON _~.I:Ep"_.;L:S T'L `". f1T, '_r:,_::. „ 1^7h. ..- ! '. I ll 1 Ti1 _~=:;Ir~~ ~^~rc4t _. %~o,:; Tn,_ 54'.UMAN TOXICITY EXCERRTS. I-{I IMAN TOX,I /v',I, TY EXCEi:FFTS. TURFEN. I" IT:,Ii= rPINc.h.r:•. jer,--:y, New '_;^ae,u: SEE T+1F-.ENTIN`. '"IM'.•TOMA'TOLOGY: 1. E%UfiNING. PAIN INMOUTia'. °< THRUAT, ABDOMINAL PAIN, NAUSEA, VOMITI'NG,p<OCCASIONALLY DIARRHEA. 2. M7.LD: reES?IFE'ATOFIYT^.`4CT-iYMPTOMS ARE OFTEN EJI :., C;G, DYSFNEA '< EV"L-"N.. L R.... . 6'YSTEMI.C AB5^ Rr CTUINI ' iA' : LEAD i0. PULMONARY EDEMA n. P'NEUMON'.TI51. ;TURP'ENTINE/iGosselin„ i:'.E.,, H.:C. Hr.rrj.,s., R..P. .3m,_thn, and. M.N. Gleason. Clinical T„i~co7:.~_ny o-F C'ommercial Produc+_s.. 4th d, ~'llli._.ms. and Wilkins, ,LE TURflE!~:TINE. SYMWTO;IATOLOGY: 3. TRANSIENT.. Ek_GITE:MENT,. ATAX:IA', DELI'FIUM & FINALLYST/DPOR,WHzCHISCOM MONEST SEb1ERE: SYMPTOM. COi"M'JU'i_SInND . OCCUR uCCASIONALLY'„ USUALLY NOT UNT•'L SEVERAL HR AFTER ~ INCiESTION,. SdHENTHEY MAY INTERRUPT A:DEEF' COMA. lTURPENTINEL CGessei:in, R,E.., H..L'.. tlodge., R...P.. Smith, and' M.N. Gllecjscin. Ci.,ini•__ol To,ci..colagyo-F Commorcial F•roducts.. 4thh ed. Baltimore:; t;/.illicamsand Wilil:irls,1r376. 11-170) H'!11AN Tn'L:IiCI',TY EXCERPTS SEE TI1S(f'Ef'dTTNr". SYMn•T'.OMATOLOGY: 4. - OCCASIONALLY PAIidFUL URIIvATFON, ALPUMINURI.A„ . HEMATURIA. URINE MAY HAVE rJDOR RESEMELING.,.VIOL.E:."5.:.,. RENAL LESION IS. USUALLY TRANSIENT. 5. ODOR OF TURPENTINE ON BREATH °.IN 'v!OMI.TUS. 6. FEVER & TACHYCARDIA ARE COMi!tON.Z. DEATF; is IiSSUALLY DUE TOi RESPIRATORY FAILURE. CTUF'P£rNTINE/' LGosselin,. R..E.,, H.C. Hocg,c, R.~'. ,,.m.,-•`.h, and M.N. Gleason.. fL':7:.i.ni=al Tcxirningiy Of Commer-cia'1. ProdV_cc.t-~~. 4t.`a =d. 'Ralt.immra.: Wi'.1Pia.ms and Wi I ki n=,. iC?76. I:I-..1I7p'.7! -..7 ~' ,. 'I.., . -, .. D~_.u_ :T-U„ IZ
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rnhancement of hepatlicdr!rg h.iotransiiorm'ation 6y' a short-ter m i..nt,=rmittent •`_t_irpen~tiine expossuregrr tho rat. , e^,a 1...... .=soc::-_rgy ~ie;!=.i7i~-'~ :: . .'.ili~.il ._ Lls' f..: ~ ..: ._ _ . . . . ~ ... •. _ _ . . . . , .. i5/~_.i IIi_ •.. ~S , .t ._i . ~ . . ~ -i . . . .4.. ~.. . ..a:1 ~, ~,.. 1 _ ~ . : ~.,,._ ,.. . . i - ~. . c-. a _ week _. _i'~_: t ~ _~ _. dl'-uq31 .. ~. ~i . r. . ,~ j'*_, trr .~ - : • t'~.o n enz 'y:Tc: of ..,,.. _:.L:~ ..•._ .... _on.,;i".9~'r1•~.. T~'l_~ de~_l;itie~; 'r - Na ~" J t' ~tc_~ir~omz= - r.r+.. t._~ --~ :t!:ox!• coum.~,-in' d'eafli~r/laser and~ ":'i . C' '. ._ ... cGnt.G•nt ?'r _ya.t p11IG=. .' . . .',F":'*n. ::ncrE3cY _L ':]-L('J% : dt.r,ng thE•. 'r.r-.-t weeks of tlae ex~Neriment9 but h::d .. ,QIttd:en.c>/ to return towa.rdss controS •.•alues ~later on. fl~ simiil.ar -.nhancement_ o-F was~ also -flound 'vn l.i~~.•der micrusomaB epat<a:de h;-+qrr't:.:e an!'.. f_D:`glluc:uronosyltransf~erase, tsut. .._:;z.y:nw acti•rities tcndhu ..I:p,_ lcs. Ht_rr~iin; r.he <,tpsr~i.cr•csnt_~ Thc• , l ._.,,: km ,~.t an ` ~r n.ci r_,z:_C. . . ..,` -`r, . /. .::;. 7 . ~~ :r" t, ii..i ~ or'ot ~.~ 1 ~:.v,'' ~.sli-nmc~ .:,rn t ,, , ~_..-5t. 1,D alphtz..-p:inene ( ilt mai.i t _hc :.ne):. 19
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MEDLINE - ALF`HA f'INENE :ib: `'r'/ H'epatic O-deethyliaseacti~vity in naiceon different types of bedding. `?i1211 ;en ~,-`.. Arrde:rsen CA; sv-=ndisen ° Z '.ler i:4rhz`ie.r4:r.i aLFi1:1S-'.~r, G?_T? 22 (1-2) r&r"--75:, ):S:;ii QG44'-3h37 J..ournal. Code- Y2=-: L-.a.ngwagES:. EN6LISH, . .. 20507a5 862677C-+5 Tlerpene cyclase catalysis i!n organic solwentlmi.nimal' water mediai demonstration and optimi,zatian of' (+)-alpha-pinenecyclase activity. 4lh:eelerCJ; •'.:rotc-au s:~ ' Pn:atitrateo~fiB§.alpg.ical Chemiistry,: LJasthingtomState University, Pullman 991h4-6?4rJ • Arch &'i~_aem[:iopilr!, ''i)NITED STfaTES') ,Ju.a~1 1936, 248 '(1.7, p4'2G--3'-4;:. SSwM c7rlcp._--9.~'J+6i'.. Ju-+:rnaS' L'ode: i:SK CL?.ntrn.r_tluh'F::n?_ N;7.F:. GN _:~1?54 Lan4uagP_s.EilrLI91-'• nA par -i.x::l y n--=.rr fiedl and'. Iyophi.l.ized preparation of (:+,'.)-alpha-pinene.e cyclase from sage (5alviaofficinali..s) was shown to convert geranyl pyrophosphaae '..:o the monoterpene oiefins a.lpha-p:~nene„ carnp:hene,li'nonene, and myrcene., in hexa::,e with the a.dditi on of 0. 1 to 19'Y% water. Thisconstitutes the first report nfcatalysis: by a terpene cyclase. in"'non-aqueeus" ®cdia., The relative proportions of olefinic products, metal i.onr-equircrne:-ij_,.. pl-P .:,ptimum,, temperature :rFSponsc,and tim,ee course of the enzymatic conversion were determined. The cyclasr>e was. shown to be stabiIized wi:Lh respect totemper-ature.and time by the use of: hydrocarbonn solvent, and" in all other characteristics, to exhibit properties closely resembling tho:~e o5served in aqueous meda;.a.,
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TOXLINE:- ALPHA PINENE L. ; i!._pMAR~ A: S(.LAZ7-1R LC . C~~M"r:r =~F1 GE;.I'.MALT F PA'.~CL':~1. "+.;1 in:'.~:ANDA A MORAN M . . . TI TURPENTINE SENSITIZATION SI - P3CST5/R6/2-77-J7 SC: - CGNTL^iCTDcR,99ATITIS;, 141',). i9F,'6. 157. AL;-HILISIS COPYRTGHT': LHSOL ABS. RRM HUMAN. ["'E(~OX:IDE: AL~r~HA. PINENE DELTA-'CAFENE L LTT'1(;,+~4ENE DLIMONENE AU: - MCDUAI::EfNR ;: RAJALA GE ; PENGILLYD'TI - Measurement of total redYuced sulfur compounds in ambient air. SI - RI05IS/S6/2Sr67 SO -ENWIRON SCI TECHNOL;: ?0(5'). 1986. 517-52Cr. AS - BI.OSIB COPYf;SGHT: EIOL ACi5.... Method.sfor the determination of total reduced'sulfur (TR^o)comp.oundsin theambi,ent air based on coulometric.dt?tection ('Phili.ps Model. PW'97D4 anaIyzer)and thermal oxidation folDowedlby detection usingi pulsed fluorescence (Teco.Model 4.T_3 analyzer) have been evaLuated.Analytical response fac.tors, relativeto,H4S, were determined for both flhei.ndiividual'TRS compourrdsand compoundls such as terpene= and carbonyl sulfid e that may bea.potential sour-ceof interference. The.resuQ'.ts.for COS andd terpenesindi;cafie..that in atypicad monitoring situation normally encounteredi.concentrat.ions of these compounds are not expected to~causesi:gnific-_nt measurements bias. The results for the individuaS TRS compoundsind.icate that.whille variations.in TRS composition are not a factor in assessing measurement..biasfor the thermaloxi.dat.i~on/pul'sed fluoreseence method, they area factor forthe:Philipis coulometric method; i.e.,increasing positivemeasuremente bias may be i.ntroducedas.the TRScompositi.onS shifts towardreli t.ively less H28. PhiLips-Teco- compar-ison data collected' at a sin.glesi.te in the vicinity of _ three operating kraft pulp mills are compat.ible with these expectations. - - ,..
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Ontv('t kLt i°f'E- I AU'- Ged'eke DL AD - Res. Inst. Frasrance Materi.alsa, En9leuood C1.'vffs+: NJ. 07632 T1 - ALPHA-PINENE.: SI -ICDB/79/12693' SG - Food Cosaet ToxicolilElSuariTlt853-8571'978 LA - £NG AB - Data on alrha-rinene,are aresented resardin3 itvstructure.oceurrencer cre¢arat'>on, uses.. status with various.re9ulatory a9encies.toxiciksp irritation., sensitization. ehutotaxic'vtsr eLaboPisa. eereutaneous absorption, .har.acoYosvr, and: . cancino5enicitr.Both tu.or-ero.otine and.tw.ar-ihhihitins activities im .ice have been reported. (84 Re1s1~
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a~) C~~r.IL_ IiOE~ HATCH .ALFHA.PINENE, L17 1 MAT .AILPHA'. PIN'ENE _> DIS' SUB CAN RN IN MN SY SY' SY SY' NF' CI B0!-56-8 BieacloC3. L13heet-2-enep 2r6'r6-trimethv1- (19CI) .aP.rBa.-Pinene .alvha.-Pinene 2-Pinene 2F6.6-Trimethslb'xcscloC3.1'.1]~hept-2-ene. .a1r5a.-(4)-Pinene C10 H16 CONr TSCAi. ANS 1 2713 REFERENCES 1 CA99(12)193502x 2 CA99(12),N93501u 3 CA;99(12).~934996, . 4 5 CA;99(12)1:93496v C499(12)793495x 6 CA99(12)"93490s 7 CA99'(12).92964n 8 CA99'(11)785268k 9 CA99('11):851582 10~ CA99(:11) «85130,i 2703 MORE REFERENCES' =7
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~ -._ .. . .'.: . An cvaluzYtion of the: utility of four in vitro short tc-rrm tests forpred'.ict'ing the c.:/totorticity of individual compounds derived from tobzcco:smoVte ....D TJ_i I 0- Li'. .. . (°: % 4 ,^ ~-.2. l} `3 1 f'• 1904 LA rng'. AP Biol. activi"•;.y of 7.05 cc;mpds.: (12 grourys~ accor-dino to main functi;onality) wascompared:'by4in' vitro tests, i~.e..i* the cell growthimf Asci.tessa.rcoma BP 8 cells, the oxidative metab. of i- o'! at:_d , ,,:.l^ f: i_ -el lls "`rrnm adult hamster-s, the rnernbrane d.amage of numa.n d pi cid _mr ,onac '_un^ :L•roh:*,-.1_s,~ and +-i iar-,v activity Of e.mhryo Ch ~ ,_ i-.rel aure: !:ataulated. The P:her7ols c,n~>Ut_t _-rc_ -tr' ~ _- rsc•_ive procp~, f'ol lowed by caidehyue•s and alcs. The ._i.a_ ~~sCthi;_r~7nil~s and th~l -3:ers':. Eimong the .~en_li.'.: ri-i_-. :_U I vl _~-.^n0~_s d:rr. ~1 g}'el) 'S-ti's.c•.. To -f2nd~~ whett.@r ti1e i ,,_ilt,/ -n ,f7, tw°-.e c_,mpas.. to..icngii.nq to different groups~. might, + dLr...a'. "_I ai uL'Un:~L, .._ d~.acri.p~'ors~ ~:~+e:re ~>elected .~ The i._r' ~ a~-~.cted _„ :. . ~. ...,_. _;i?cti or i ~t~. . 7ti'- -.!r{: any :r.ml .. 1.'.i.r ~-m 3-+il1.5'F thr• me:iri 14 7=3r_ri'.Jt'oF' e.l O:_ll] tol 5cm~ Cer~,er:oi.~- -,oi' ,„u•d by :.rdmlrns and n~,F,ht`ra.lene:-;. ::+ r-:oat -nxic _'-}escr~r ;.or" -, ,p -Scltlowed b,y n-alkyl a cs~-; +,.~<e.~yd~•_.., and ..r•ca.. ?nterwys,tem s,m t<,s-i:ties and difu-. I,gh-ncad'_,m~..iow j,ndi.ra -d t:nat.. aa1 the n,. t 5v-, e m s ~ .. a E.mE• rc ..)..v2 I s% o'.jC thE r.].Pr.ds 4
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LIFE SCIiENCES COLLECTION - ALE'IiA F•INENE Inheritance of'.bet.a'.--pinene in;;ylem oleoresin of k:nobcone>c Mbnterey pine hybri.ds.. _. f..=. 19a..,ly.c. IJI..V 1.__ i.'G 1~._?:q, . v.f m 1e-, r.a~ 0n~''J: l!SA R .(.,) pp. bF;7-'6Gfi _ I~~.,ya: EI1g'..ils.h. S+.wamary LasSg_rag~'=r,lgliaiu:,ocl_unent TJp_c_+:: Journal articT_e ur'.pia t _;"Lbfiilc:s, 07Geneti~cs !-?bstrae'cs Monotarpene:, c::omposi:ti.oi; o-f' y--r., r,<pr:--,ed,: . as percentage of ,_otal: rnonotrnrpene's:, is analyzed in -%2 individ_rals fr-om i8 crosses of knobcone x Monterey pine hybrids, hybrid derivatives, and parental species. Ol,igogsnic con*_.rol' cf .beta...-p..i.nene is. demonstratedg single-geneand'. +„M-gE•nr-. ~n: ~;a+,.- m,-:de?ss aree pr. ^nt.ud_ `.-ligh: percentage of .beta:.-;j:nc?ne . 4 ._, a1 ._.-_ ~? (_.1.1.. I..i._ }IO 1..~a - . •ri: an yC.hav3•..- of .'.iph'a,.._ E•.nd' I .C-r-. . e sFl/]nd '_ ''_O lri a .:;JiRp'.:em0nt .•'1_;~p r a'_ii: ,~.'u=6'~ ~ Chromatographic, mass-spectrometric determination of toxic substances i.n the air'., ,I~!. r i. S.Rloi:el L.II.. Itr_ _- :...r.y ,i . . S' ;, od:k: i:a, F3... i'^. . ( Ir:st. Gen. and Ml:4ni.,,=i'p. 1H>Jg.., Acad. :"ed. Sci:., iloscow, USSER.) i_1q. :~`~arri'1_.. : "•l, q•'._.~1.4, 19~]+r~, L anguage. Ru~si.a.n - _- Document Type: Ju_urnal: . arti._i.e-or-iginal research zdub~ile:: 24 Tox::cology Ab:s±,.-ar_+!.LA chromatogr-apf-i..r'n. y~ ectrometr'ic method fiorr ': h ehe assay of airborne toxic substances is descritred, usingan L-f<«--2r7_-71 cho-omato-masss spectrometer .:ith, computer integration. Thectrromatographic separation is1_uzdartak:en' at room temper•-at!rr afar the first S' min, then at a rising temperature i+0:. C/min to 150 C) for a total chromatography time of 30-35'mi:n, using adsorbants sur_has.Tr?•nax or Polysorhamide. The c.hrornatographi~c 'rract.ions are: analy-.zed'd by mass spectrometry. Thi.ss method •; s applicable toai~r poltutants such asbutane, tridecane, pentene,, h e:<.ene:, benzene, naphthal_ene, mett, lcyciobutane,.A cyclopentane, cyc7.ohe;oane:, ether, b.uty.lacet_•ate,, dic,r:an, acetal:dehyve, ben>aldehyd:e, acetone,, acatophenone, meth:anol, i, npropan.ol., J..loro;orm,, carbon tatrachl.oriuc•„ aPpha-pinene and otYlze"t' Compoltnds or., ¢1_aalses. 1I 1r.5;?a ].s. 3t' abol-lt 1 18
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CHEMIICl11L F'EI:,UL_ATIONS AND GUIDELINES -- ALPHA PINF_NL. ~Commodityr~ Control:. Li~st and Related:.Matters. . nn: : °_;i7].a:ior:; C77. .. _ . . i_i.i i >_,-~ =Pr_r L` ,. S. ;?uthnrity ~' ... a rn. nny+r >tive Airtn~.r, ty. No. of' Revs.. _ w_.. c~f' '"hGmic l 31>1J;~', Ihi'Ca'iFL_ETE. 6~T~F`LAY~.~ Con;tai'~ns~ the Cammoditq' Controi. Lisd_ end oi-ee- deta.ils~w on how to a,se'e it. -zTyaes of commodi.ties~ are~e broken down into ten groups and countries for n:hich~~licenses~ are requ~ired~:are.indicat'ed. ~ (~:45FEt F359T2~, Dec~. Tnr 1980. rA.5-,') U8g. Hazardous MateriaDsTables and Hazard'ous Materials Communications F.egulat.ions. ^OT '.. IJ-f..r_a pr~i ~ CtS-dOlit:? L"Satek i'?15i (ie7„u1 ::tir~ni f'ztati...on: M9 C.F:. i.7.._ F•ub:I: ^at^: 71_;^4y= E;Tf'ec¢ive ff.a"tr.=: ;'hr:.415 ' durr:sdiction,€ LIS Doc. Ty;;e:,RI; GULr"rTiOid Stat-us: FINAL i. Gr:4 S1 L.l-R tiuthcr'-,-:Hfn• . Slo, or. h~,u-s.. .... !co,. ..fChc-mic ' _.it'r, 0; 11,C^.MPLETE ;.iTSP'LAY. Lists andl ca z i.-2ies thn-c: rIa_..-ial.s whichi the!Jrypartment. of Tra.n ,port..zt-Ig.; !..- Jcsigna'ced~~ as . _z.er ~'cus r ti c=r i S f.o~'.- purposes of transportation, :'1__scrit.c- thircqui's-ements ;^.or shippng oaper.s, package marki.ng„ labelingy aiSd 1_ranspur-t rchicl'~ pl..cardirrg' aphli..c_.ble: toth.e ~ . ~ h:: p m en fl a u `--an;par-=.tion od I.:: a:= : n,--ar~r- x*Chernical --~~rhstanras i ra a •~, ; ,a,rLn~~~n 'L . - :aI Sc r-, eir~•n_.eJin 45 . Ff" . 7~164r7. __,. _ , ~.__ (41 FR 15996,. Apr-. . ,. 96::r-1.^c US. Use of United. NIi'ti'onsShipping. Descriptions.. - DOT ~~ fiesearcharid Special Frrogr-arns Hdm.inistra.tion Citation:: 46FF29392' Publ. DaterS1r_r6r,1Efr`ective Date: 8'106U1 :1uric,diction:: US DocType..• REV 1'S?'JPl RE6. St_atus:' FINAII Source of I'nform=ctions 8•1/r16/{J1,. 46FR 29392-29436 (4;~ CFR~ 172),,uthor i ty HMT'.A ldo. ;' 0 No.. of Chemical . 1"L1;!. INCJ4'F' ETE. DISPLAY. fr!!bli,_fes a revised version o,-~ thrs(ppti'.on 'I rlaza.ruoun: Materials Tab'Ie wh~ich app:_aars in 49 CFR 77:...1n2. The cvisicn has b:•i=en necess3:.atedLy a number of ' ahang'es to the I-ot_er-13overmmer,`.ral Maritime ConsulJtive 'Irga.mizati.on Int;_rnational Marttirn.^. Dangerous ibod~ Cl.de!rpone w;-,ichthe r•;at:iona:l tab'_.ee ie based. ~ rA t0 O ~ CD' 1 OD
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NTIS - ALPINA PINENE :... _ c _: ;...;.; Heutlth Hazard F_valuation Determination Report No. 7©,:?i-15-9, Champion 13'uilding Products, Honner, Montana _. . . .. ~ _ _ . ^n : A. -.rgsr-, J.. . ;.,:_t; and. 1_ :.C.'~, C .:.!-i,:~n -:t~ , 0`.i -{_alth, Elnr{. -.^_iln cal _tssiStance _?r-. _ ~~~ur~ce Ccdes: r}52- L7?5,.r .1~ - R~saort No.;, Ni.OSN-kIE-7£d.-2i-S'9 Nov 7e. 2.4p , Languages: English NTIS Prices: PC A02'L'MF AC>S dournal Announc.eme.nt:: 6fiAI8'11G Country of Publicataon; United States Concentrations of aL..pha-pi.nene,.Fieta-pinene: and primaric acids were s:easur-ed or, February .°, to Q, 1'^72 and'pulmona:rytunr_tion. tests of wor-kers, :•rerc conda;=:tedon. February t, ..c 1c?,. 1!978 at the Champion Bui'~ldi.ng Products(Standard Industri~alCla,-icicc,tion-24-,5) in ^Dnn•er, Montana.. The Lumber and SaNrm^_.1'.1 Workers L..~` T 1 -o.cull Union -73°.r. Missoula, Montana requestedl the evaJ.uat:ionn tc~ie±.,3rnz-r-o potential expc,_.ure to plywood veneer dryeremi.s.sions. -for- 175 a.~t'e,_r' d 'ota1~ -.cid concentrations ranged. :_rpt-o. 2..;; milli.gra:ms pE:r r:..;=,_r (.-a;/cm m). F'incn.a :.:_oncentr-a:tions rangedfi-or,r ~--' • ,,,. h..... ,snv I' C.,rf nen{__, ,= i,.. - tn .4...'_;7r.y/c..:: d zy . e;:ist or e.se.. f,ubstances, Cr_,nrnnn~rn_•dL. were ,~.r respiratory irria.;,tion, dry thro.at , z~ tu no~5e, -;::nn;_,rg nrjse, cou.g-hrng:,: burning or it.ching . eyes,., chest tig.htness, c.r arhet ~,r:.,~:. PuTms,nar-y Tunctioe: tests d:iid not reveal any-ign '.S:i1cant :mPn_r•taemiist•hee worRr~r--_. ' e. a:Ahnrss conclude that: no sign.ificant healtht~aza J_.wists for w or-Fcers •?:t t.hi.s facility. Theyy recommended that door ais. on veneer dryers be cleaned and repaired to prevent. 1ea6::age; ~:,rc.u:_i ho ol?= d uoth roeeden- and offhear end3 r.i'tl'r Feeder=3 p> >.,cf:,-_,n:«d. o +_e,.:E :d e 'LL`) e shrou:c, .t•;d: . raor vc.--ntilator_eonsist oi' e.ah?!irst -,cans inss.de i_-Fe shrouded areas. Exhaust emissions shouLd not be pernnitted'- to reentertne5ame or othe^workr areas.. Pre-assignment andperiodi~c medical examinat.ions.f'or :1ror4b:.ers aIsoare recommended,, along withemployee education on the irritant e:({e:ctsd produced by veneer dryer emissions.. -.
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Genotox'.icity of ' organic chemiicals: -Arequentlyfound in the air ofmobi 1 e'. homes'. i"1a-..: Y ~. _F:. SC.i. Tn;( Il i_O logy?: 1~_ol . Li.}t . .. TO4 IFDE ... '.;i-1127 :. r . ~:98. ~ L°: Eng A3 'i he19 chem. m r _--:rG aa y :i cr..c^'.ed!. nn act!.d.dy o-P •~;ob.i 1',F. homes . ?exas were t!e_ted, for mr~'_ageri:ci'~=y using battery r,ibact2rial test strains; the1's.teraturewasse:arched'.e to obtainn addnl.. i~nforrmation concerningg the mutrag.r=nicityy and c:~rcinegenicityc,f. '_hese chems. F-Urma:dehy.de ,a~a ,.rsr=.ntt in 14;n7.ofthe' mcLi2p homes and at the h.. _ . ~_ 1'....:... :=:/ R:ndd at r:-enU4:.anL-I__ r2.93M '.. './f tis i.. ~G' il_it.xCJEnicity, sG f' .ideh)`de ga••he a pos. ..._ an..,o.•. A r-,_•;>.wri j.` +., ....,_era.ture _v_ale_' tFat' 4 of the Chef .. }o._tGd~ ~.t:.;irC?n'e [100_.4."•._..S3S. ter-ra:_1ti7,or aathvl.=na i2. _.18-K...:.~+ benzzne, L71-4C'-3],. have b'een _how.n to be anirn l: ?:nJ or hunan ..-ri.n'o~~ens~. 7hu:=~~., i'o!-maldehydel.s. :;ot.t the mnJ.yy genato:r-;li~ p,~r_senl ~tiair o-f mobile homm=:, but because it I4B5s pt" =e.n,t .rl [hn c,ir u¢ t1. riio(Iies tested at much higher cnncr,s. than _. )~: -her c,-- '-ur~-maldc.:hyJe shn~_idh u:naidered e one of{he major or_,tmnti.r.l gc ro`:cxi:- ha.:ardss presentt in: t"+e air o,' :nobile..homese hCu GA 1(]'1 (9) ; 5,777'Oy. .' M~icrosomal biphenyl hydroxylase of -fall armyworn,l1arvaeand its induction by alleTochemicals and host plants: Alii Yu, Simort J.; Ing„ Rober-t T. C°: Dep... EntomaU. 1Vema.itol.,. Univ. Florida LO: rainesvilleG FL 3!<~61''1., USF1I SO'Comp~. Siochem. Fhysiol. ,, C~: Cornp'. Pharmacol. Toxicol.., 7SC('1) , 145-52' SE. 5-4 (Ag:r-ochemi.cal Sioregula:tors)SX. :1 C'J. CL'•f-CEE FY' 1984: .. L1 Eng AE Biphenyl ydass hydr o':;yl.at_d to 4-hydroxybiphen'yl by tmiiscd--Functi.on n'dase system trr_'n mad;,uq:' mi._rosomess o;fa.ll army,iorm: (!9p.odoptera. -fr-ug.ip.yr-da) lar-.ia-', •7ptimUm conditions -For zss:a.yi.ng: S:he enzyrne.: werr, tstabi.: ;hed.. Thc: ma.,=rn--~oma.1 b.ip:henyl 4-Ihyd~oty? aee C9013?~-r3fJ-r]] increased r'Jur:ng l.ar-ual development and de:=lined in the;,repupa. Al.lt:lochems_ (inonoter-penes, indoles and ilavones:), dr-ugs'. (phenoharbit'al L5_r--06-63 and '-methylch:olanthr'emn_ r_56'-4S` 57I);: andd ho•s4it plan•tsinduce;d the: hydr-ox.ylase:. Thee enzyme was, fairly ._rti•ae:e in nther- species su:='ha:s velvetbean caterpi.l'lars,., corn earworms, tobaccomol'~.e r-ri.cii~=±=,flmr.ri.c:an co=kro-iches, and honey b:ePs.
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. R+~cT-- m Jr-) E R _ . 26i8:: alpha-PINENE'~. Dihydro-para-cymenc (old, confusing name)i. )-IPIOene:. 2.6;6':-Ttimethyl tiicyclo-(.3,/,L)-Zheptene: Commercial'. Pinenere with high a!'pha-isomer contentt isalso.sol'd'under various trade names:. Colorless.s mobile liqpid'.. Sp:Gr. 0.86. B.P.. 157° C. Practicallyinsolbble i'rn water„ soluble im alcohol (not in. diluted alcohol) and miscible. with most perfumee oils: Almost insoluble in, Propylcne: glycol and Glycerim Irt is /9amm., able,.but'. its flashpoint is.highcr thamordimary•roomtempcmture;.andy the materiall does.nots carryy explbsionn hazard... afpha-Pincne is one of the Ibwest boiling of all. Monotcrpenes„ and has therefore the most diffusive odor and poorest tenacity. It is. also onee of the purest commereiallyy available Monoterpenes, thee chief impurities being bera-Pinene and Camphene. Its odor iss w•arm-resinous„ refreshing Pine,, like;, but lower grades of thiss material.l may carry more pronouncedl 'Turpentine"-like odbr„ °Rosin"-odbr or evenn herbaceous-aro- c maticr. odor (common featuree of autoxidized a!p/ia-Pincnc). lfhe material as such isnora very important perfume shemical.. Apartt fiomm use:io-,artificial: Pinc: needle aitl or fragrance;, it willl onl~ be. a minor ingredicnt in olihcr compo artificial Lemon, 13ergamot, Nutmeg, Gemni- um, Lavandin, etc.. andlforthesepartieular purposes,, thee alpha-Pinene must bre of high olfactory purity. 1/ Cral3tr °. 136.24 Thousandt of' tons are used (mainlyih Europe) as starting material in the manufact- uree of Terpineol,., while this alcohol in the U.S.A. is maiinlyy produced..as an isolate from steamdistilled Pine (stump) ailL European Turpentine is particularly rich in alpba-Pincne (mostly/aeno-rotatory;,exeept Greek,.whiclnis dexvarotatory)j . while American: Turpentine hasaconsidemble amounrof bera-Pinene. The alpba-Pinene in American Turpentine is dexlrarotatory. The title material is also used in.flavor com- positions, partlyas ingredient in artificial Lunoa and Nutmeg oils, partly as..component of suchh type flavors. The concentration in the finished product will he.about 15.to 150 ppm. a/p/ra-Pinene:lhas.a more balkamic:taste,c while beio-Pinene, less suitable for flavors;, has a dry-woody character. G.R'.A.S. F.E-M.A. No.2902... Prod.:.: by fractfionation of Sulfate Turpen- tine orneutral Turpentine. It has also been made byisomeriaationof beaa-Pinene.. 87,127; ;: 100-820;, 1160.11170;: 163-65; 1I63-234; 163-373; 85':-98; . Arizona Chemical Co. - data sheet, samplts: Herculhs Powdcr.Co. -data.sheet, samplcsGliddcn-Durkee Co., samples && info.
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1120 6-4-84 Food Additives Trimellitfioanhydride (C/45 Reg-Nb, 582_30~a) for use.onlye as across:lunking agent',ai:a level not to:exceed 15 percent byweight of'the resin:in contucl'witbh food under all conditions of use:,except . that resins ~iotend'ed for usewith Eoods'aontaining more than~ 8 percent alcohol'' must eontactauchAood!onlyt under. . conditions of useeD: $ B: and Gd'escribed in table 2 of paragraph (d) of'~-this sectioa. - Trimel'litioanflydrid'e adduals of, . ethylene glycol andglyeero4 prepared' - by the ee a ction of 1'mofe of trimell tUe antiydtide with M-O.e~molie of ethylene glycol and OAC-0118 mole of g[yceroL foruae ody u.a moge,litifHitg agentatr level not toextxed 1101 persenE.by weipht' of the cvned'coating, provided that~the:t cured coating onlyrcontbcb.food ' . . eonla;nfng notattare Umrl b.perecne:' ~.. ~ albohoLL - :::.:, r:_ :.: .:.. ....:.. «:....:.:- ' C!) Adtunctls for epoxy rwsins:'. .. .tluminumbutylate. . . .._ ~ . Bensoir acitl. for usee as a:eomponentl:ln' epoxy resins for'coatings net', exceeding acoatinaa•eight of 4 maligtams per seuare. Inch and that are Intended for contact . underconditionsof ase D,. E, For G0 de- acribed,In table 7 of paragraph (d) of'thid section with.aleoholle.beverages:eontaiu- )ng less than 8 peroent alcohoC - Pol4amltlea ftnm mmerised veaetable, eUa and the amnte catalysts listed'In pera- amPh 4bn3avW Mbl of't1ussecUOn, aa . the - basic polymer. . . Silane coupled s)11ca. Prepared llrom the'e re- "aetionn of mlerocryatallme 0uartavith N- _beta<NHnylbenxylandno) ethyl'-Pamma- aminoPIDpyttcimettloxYailane, monahy- 'drogenchloride..fa2 use onlyin.eoatings ..Ihtended'for.repeated'.use in.contact.enth ffKKla only of the typesidentifled: . In tetra- 'geaph , (d1 of'ttnsseedon. Table 1,. untler Category 1 anQ Caleeory VIIL at tenu)era~ turcs not etcatling ifE•C (19(r F):. Sueehdeanhydtidet for use asa, component m epoxy iesina for matmgs'.not exceeding aa coattng we)artt of .(w milligrams per 1aPUe inch. and nht are. intended for eontact'ender conditfonsof ase D..E; Por G described 1n tables of.Paragraphi (d)or ttds secUon~with aleoholic beveragee con.taitdnglbss than a Percent akxthol': .. (ht) Conmarone:lmdene reshl,, as tltee basie..polyrmer.:> . .. . (x) Petrolleum. '-liydirocarbonresin (eycloPentadiene type), ast.hes basic polymer. .... _:~.._.. . : .. .... -. (xi) Terpene resin's,: aa'. 6he basic polymer., from: one. or moreaf the fol- Ibtving: : .. %:. -... .::^. .,., .. 956,895' 21 M 175'.300i Dlpcn4ne:_ . .. a-Pinene. A+Pinene. (xii) . Urtea-formaldehyde, resins and - their curing catalyst: (a) Urea-formaldehyde resins, as.s thee basic polymer:. Urea-formaldehyde. Urea,fonnaulehyde chemicaayy modified with methylL ethyL ProPYLIsoproPYL butyll or ieobutyl alcoholl Urea.formaldehyde chemically modified'wimoned or more of the amine catalysts 6stiedd m, paragraphObx38k1i/Hb) off thisaeetlon. . .. . . .. . . (b), Curing (cron-linking)) catalyst'for urea-fornta)dehyde resn)s:. Dodecyl bensenesulfonie aeid (C:et, negistryHo.27176-67-a)',. (xifU Trlazinerforrnaldehyd'e resins and their ¢ttring'catakvst;. (a): Ttiaxine-folmaldehyde ~reslns7 ~ aethe basic polytMr. . lsensoguanamine:LOrnWeehyde" ... .. Melamihe-formateehyde. - Melamine-formaloehyde chemieally modl-fied',with, one or more ot.the.lollowmgf amme catalysts:' . .. Aminee catalyata'llsaed tn paragluph, (bH31ivU11tb) of this secuhn. Dimethylamine-3:methyl-l-propatwl.. MethylPropanotatotnea. .,.._ . . .... . . TtrlethumlYmine.. ,-.+rr.,r....- r. Methmine-formaldeAydee chemically modi- fied a9th memyl ethyl PtoPYL. isopropyl.L butyl„orleobutylialcohoL - - (b) Curing (eross-llnking) catalYst fortriszfne-forntaldehyderesiis: Dotlecyl i benzenesutfonic'.atltl'(Cli. Registry Nu.2717e-67-0). (xlv)'. Modifiers. (for oilsandi alkyd's, inchud7ngpolyestersh, asthe: basic Polymer.' '. _ . -. Hutylmethacrylate.. - Cyclopentatliene. Methyll ethyl. butyl,. or octyl esteta of acryl- /c:acld:. . . Metltyl methaerylate. .. . _. . .. 6tyrene: vmyL tolnene., (xv) Vinyli resinous substance., as tt)e basic polymen& . ... . .. . . . .. . Pol4vinyl acecate. ` Polyvinyl alcohoL :.' .. . .. Pol3!ymylbutyral. -•.. . . . Polyvinyl'.chloride: Polyvmylformal.' . Pol"inylitlene chloride. Polyemyl pyrrolmone. . - 0 '.19a(;.Commerce Clearing House, Inc. C1Pird• F-soD _7Wtl'6 C^,9SM(FF7C LAW 2~PO~--~S .te ye
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Inhi~biiti~on of' monoterpene cyclases bysulf'onium analogs of presumptive~e c:arbocationi,-_ in<_ermedizztes~ of the cyclization reaction. . ,.__._. ~. . .. .i., ._.:. , Jc.Fri r 1..3g0r C1_. 7 -r : , ahi:c.._ Ci_:::r, ,,;. 4. hin~gr n ~!nt~-:,c.._.-.y, _.,,~. ., ::n~,~n . . •_,n L• , ... . ,~~c r _ . ~,. _ , [:} c(, (:J_ ii,TTi cl STATES) Q_q_i ~. r. ~_ Y9".3'by _i.~ . t'?'a-~.C::B ,:'.u urn.a1 Co.. ;1?,.,' C- :ntract . . ,:~i! ho.. SI i 1i :!5r. -angrf3ges'6 .a encyr, atic. r_y.cli:..ation o.'' ,).=rany1l pyr oF'-__-.ph-;c-c {o .s , .. ~' . _ ' . ~G ,?nl'{]n t`•:c~~,.ntt to proceed through a . -.:.eries-of ca. L ~rr:'..it rr, n -py:~'o!-o.;'ph~z ' paired int-ermediates:.. St,lfo,ii_,m.nallogsM c=f :oo .?rrt~tive _arb'rsc>ationic: _n'_,+~-mce!diat.es of thee cyclir:at !on ..Tr,u_nve. ;:4 _:r:hown i_o he irfi:ibitors of the conversionof the acyclic precursor t . '.'.:. bi'c•yclic noncterpenes. ('+)-aiaha-p:inene and (+)-bornyl pyrophosphatebv:artially purified cyclase'prep:aratiorta from .:age' (Salviaoffic;.nalis). The sac'.-Flon3umanalogm or tlhe. tert±i.aer•y a ~I y2i:=, liralyl, intermediate (;_,e, l)vinyI =_.rr.i-foniurn ,.r.rchlorate..lr i:ded rr_ :per_t.iv-. }' valut_s' of _.,WrrricroM =.+r„i ._.p „i._roM z,.ains'•- the ;c1icat:.on ' to - a:pn_i-pinene and bornyl p.yrophospLiate.e at: a substrateconcentra'_ion of ..°~ mucrnM., :,+hereas the. -,u1 -.mn i um ana.l og of' the monocycl i c, a~',. pha-rerpi rrut .. i:-,te:rmedi a.te t'i..e. d:i!methyi-C4-methyicycl.mhF --e.n-l-yl! su:rFomriarm iJodi:Jey: ezhi~bited: respact.i.ve.e hu valu.esof 3.4 micro(^ --:,ad 3.9microM against Gtre same two cycli:ations. Thrpoten::.,y' W .nh,:'oition in a1.i casesincrea:sF.d,.yithc inr_rtr_+a.5i.ng: =ubstr .•`_e.__n rd'r_aa_i.n".g that .he: z'~in+-tyy o+ t_hc-.e en;ymes- for the ..ul.foniu;n an,loy:'s w-ass increased by .._hc-'_presenc2'e of the pYr-opho-ophate estc-r. T:nor"ganic p>,•r.c•piosphateat a concentration of Sfr. ~" nricroM, wihich.a.lone.had little'influencc on the cycii.zations,, increased the effectiveness of inhibition af tnesrLlfoni!,um anai.ogs several.fold„ anrd the apparentW,i fcr inorganiic pyrophosphate wass r-ed.uced manyfold '6y the presence of either ahalog at' S' mi.croM. That tfiecombinat.ion of suifoniumanalog anid pyroph'ospl'rate.pr-ovided syn'eryli•aticc inhi.biti:on o:the' elsc:t_ropr,il:c cycLi-atx_n= in+dica:ted'd that the c`jclases: bind thee pair2dd species: mmr-eti'.ghtl,y than either partner ad•one., Specificity ctudiessuggested that inhibition by the abovesulfonium ion::pyrophosphate pai'rswas due to'both electronic and struc::ura.l resem5lance'to intermediates of the react_ion:.. 2
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6-'MBASE - i1LPIilA PINLNE. ri-^i,~ ..- -- .: Allergy to oil of turpentine in F`'nrtuga~l .:~.-,,,+ ~.ai. i'. ~Z, . ,-•i C~( „ J ~ q..rt~-.-~1 rr... _L?iLD ~-u°~T ^~ 1' T Ts .r- . .,i,qu-lnes2 ^.id of turpr~ni~ne is :ei'.i"~~ I --,nnr- _.,... erge.r„ in 3ai .,:.thou.3h it doara ati•t contain ,.'r,~ltastw~. .-r..ar ene, _. ~~.>..'.:.i.ned~ by gas chrr,.ua.t-i,i aphy. Patr_h tests w.ithi S~ tF•r-prenes i rLvealed th_~i1 17 ~ ~a~r-e~~ ablersi c . to~ alpha-pinene~and 15~, to dipen'tene; _L .saer-c all'~ergic to both_ Four patients were sensit:ive: to Del.tasub~. 3-~c.arene,~, ~. ~~ to alpha-Lerrpiirtenl and~ 2 to~ heta-p.inene... These resulte~ explain (:_Let incidencr_, crf allergy to.ci1 of tU rpentine in )?ort.uga?... ' •'?qt311_.T54 Mbdeling potential ozone impacts from naturali hydrocarbons-I. Development and testin~gof a chemicall mechanism for the NQ(x)-airphotooxid'ati,ons of isoprene andl alpha-pinene under ambient conditions Lloyd A.C'.. `+!.a.n .. F'.; _trmamn .;..!.g Rli.tta B'. 9L='.D Environ. , .. Technol.. linr_:., {=tef, a,'-::e VilPage, CA; u'.. S. A.. - ATMOS. F_NV:RC9sl.. ([Nf'LAf•dWI, 17Ji0 (1(7:1-19Cr3), .:oden: ATENO'Languagos:: :-r•.fGLIBH' 020292L4 i_tY, 0 0 5 5 1.007-78' Acute poisoning with pine oili. Metabolism of monoterpenes Kior?ppel -_C.; Tenczer J.,--Toennesmann U; y et al. Abt. To>ri.koL.,, Landesan t. L•_bensnri ttel--, Arz neamii tt~5.- Gtr-icht. Chem.,. 1:nr)o ®erl i n 21 - GERMANY, 14EST ARCH. TOX:ICOL. (.GEFsMKiNY,4)EST) , 198b, 49/1 (73I-7H) ,.. Coden: AfiTODLaan7uages: ENGLISHA.. patient attemptan:4 suicilde i.ngested 400-°5riQm1 pine oil and wasa:dmitted tno the clini.c. Si.nce more than theIethal do_,e.had been ingeste,d''d hearoperfusionswi.th act:vatedcfharcoal arrdl ambr..r.lil'..:.e anda hemodialysis. .cz:r-s= perfor,nr_+d. Thnr_omposition ~).r' •t..hn i,n>?cztad pine oi.I ajaes d'~:_terminod'y bygn._chron?.togr-aph,vlmzss 5pectr:Draretry. Four monoterpeneswe.rrE• idcnti°i.r_-ds 57'.£% alpha-pinene, 6'l.: bet±:-'I>:inene,ZS'G _a.rc:.nr=, 6%. limonene and =~it other hr;~rncarbons. The b.l.ood and ur. i.r,enorroterpene cr-.nc•3ntr ati'..on,7 . sderecantinuousl:y rnonitored.The dat-a sugq:e:,a t_hat mo.n.oter-per•~,.s are paorly ti=orbed: in thegastr-oi.ntesti.malt.rar.t. Thee re=orbed portion o-f thehydro,-arbons.e cumuiates in the :ip~.,~p.hil.i::. bodyy cornpart_menlis .a.nd'd i~; slowly. .,at,aboliz.edl and then t2xcrcaedd by "iv.c::;dn_ys.. Themairr mr-t.abolic pathwaysare hydration, hydroxylation, and .-o_:r r<Zngement.,, and' acetylation_ F-ive: rnei-.-:.bolitee~~. wer-~e i,dernti~-tied. 8"7490499 1
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-!.r_. -_:t,a,= I?A `.-i. _...-. _. T"j°J'.. T. M T .i.__ ~. .. ..y•~..'lr:Nhlrr'v. ,- '- STUDY OF TOXIC SUESTANCES FORMING,DURL.NG OXrJtiYNTHESIS cT C". -11 .,'4 IT°. A ~ .':-:i8 .:. Cu'S'.''Fi' EI-i , :: 101- r=11 •.r.. Rn:M AIR PCI '. i. r_ipd., AU -'STEfitLI:VS DF1 TI -- VOLATILE ORGANIC COMF'OUNDS'ININDOOR AIR AN. OVERVIEW,OF SOURCES CONCENTRATIONS AND'HEALTH EFFECTSI S.I~ - BIOG.IS/G6/0S411 SO -- GAMMAOES R.. B. AND. S.. V.}iAS'E (ED. ). INDOOftAIR. AND HUMAN HEALTH} SEVENTH !__IFC_ SCIENCES SYMFrSIL"•,, K^rOXV'rLL:, TENN..r USA, OCT. 2q-?~ c?p:-0. X'?T:,.$„iiP'. LE4J•R ?~_:EI r._5:^ -.".C.. CHEL..SEAr, MICNi,.r USA.. -'_S.. MaF=•cC. C_ (<,;) . 1935. -=--4t)2. AFi -;~SOSISCOP1nIGf-4:fa: . 9T17L . ALSStri.M:.. f UI'iAN r,^..•~:(`1ALDCHYDE. PESTICIDE TOLUENE :(YLENE ALF^HAFINENE CAftCIN00EN MUTAC,EN!. INDOOR AIR _ E'f!LL'JTION EYE I`:.ITAT=CN, RES°-.f;'ATOfiYIF{RP,TATION, HEADACHE AU - HAWTHORNE 9£+' S.IE`JifiS RE P:ARk'LE•'/RM -1I - Organic emissions from shale oil wastewaters and their ( impIications for air quality. SI - EtIOSIS186d00575 SD- ENVIRON'.SCI TEGHNOLq Y9'(10). 1985. 592-SS7. AE: - B'.IOSISCr7F•YRISHT:: B1OL.AFu. The emission of organi,c:cnmpoundsf'rom sMaleoil wastewaters used to cooll hot,.r-ntortnd, spent oil shale c.;,.dd for =_idispon_aIl wit-h: retorted shale was tnvestiga±ed. The: major clasGes c:-f cnmpoutnd~s emittLdd are aromat.ilc nitreg.en'-coni:v.ining. c.ompounds.,, Is:etanesr. phenols, and nit-iles, the same as those pr-e•,•i.ously reported to be emitted -fron, wastewaters exposed.',:a ai:.r at.room temperature.. A.gas'_stripping . method was modifiedto allow the determinatiom mf sevc-ra1 Henry's Iaw eonst.antsS simul'taneousl'y. MLasur-edd valu+=s: of H f~or thesesolutes.in thew=stewaters (fit)-4--1n:-,°, atm mZ me,l-1) generally agreedd with v.aIucs determinedl forsaiutes inn purewa±er-:. i.ndicating, +t-,a-_ ;.I,ewnstewater matri,x has little e7r'Fect on~ H.: Air sampl--s, co'_lEr+_-od in regions likely to. be affected by atmn=3pheri~c emissi,ns, vram the ~,fiale~ oill industry had no detectable levels of the ma.?or organi,_ species that are emitted -fr-om_ahaleoi'1 w_1st--,.t-_.rrs, i.ndic__i..mrj that these species may .u-;u: in t:. a,-r g pol li `aiit cir- masses resuolti,ng. €rorn sha.. _ r,+_:1l prodLs~fl.ion.. :],d '1)1'7=.u. 6
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Flavor and Fragirance Materials - 1981 Worldwide reference list of materials used in compounding flavors and fragrances Compiled by the Chemica.l. Sources Association, Washington, D.C. Allured Pub ~ ~1tiGKing Corporation,. R'heaton, Illinois, USA
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t`~:I", .. M'C+P11 C- -1 -_. .. Anh(~i - Y'-rr I Li:.nC:~:~,~=t Q~• ''? - Air-ConditioningiMeasurements in Siri4 Low-Energy Houses. I -- NTIL'-,.,:.1-"=•~~°7f..^_•c,• . Govt Rr•por'"=' 1~-rounc_-mor~ts i'mde `°RA°e}~ ry2, l~~La':' rr'e: ,;r .. with .nt_e, dc7 ':ow ne-rr;; cn ,,-;.mp_ion r^:e.rrx built in H.,c ~ek'aF-!° :at. Lyngby in °p.tl~-:mue:.. .970 . The repre%ented the newest' !'now~ledge on h!ut..ji.;1c Fec4,iniqus :andm t.eri.:al.s,: The houses mado it_ possible to -uamine '•:.flie indoor=atmospheric envi:r-onment., tL : bee expr>ctedl in future h'om_s. Tiie rhou•~rPs5 were umocc.upi'.ed.d for the first ye'ar., Measurements of t'heindoor' - atmospi7eric'c environment in this periodl aree desc::riLied in this report.. Al.Lthefive series..o-F me'asurements wer-econducted under normal outdloor climatic conditions. Windspeed, however, was in' all cases lower than one meter per second.... The indloor cI'..imate,wasasaverage characterized by an ai.r temperature of 24..7 +/- 3.,n d.egC and an.air'humidi;.ty of5.9 +/- 2.0 g,/kgl. Ventilation in each room was between V.79and 2.92 air changes per hour. On average '_4diff~ere.nt compoundswere identified!in the samples. A'total of 23 di-Fferent compoundss weree ident,_',fied,a.nd TfoI_!anc:• a.ndl alpha-Fi.nene were the'most frequent compounds. The conce.ntrationn decreased systematicallyduringy theyear,e and w4a.s halved after, on an average,, .7112 days. Halfllifevaried from' 6:3 to 187 days. The concentration was constant in one of the ho-.ases. The for:raldehydeconcentratians were measured during'.•.hef'i.rs.t visit in all si~xhouses and were in al.l cases lessthan 0.02 mg/m exp -' . It was concluded that theconcentra.tion of organic y~._,_s a.n_+d vapours of the solvent type.wc.s similar to thatyearlier -Found in other Danish houses. (EfiA.citation lC):c?46669): In Danish.EM--2., . Alli - HedenstiernaG;; Al'.exandersson Rg Ros:en G, tAi!mander- K; Fandma'. E TT_ -- SubJective complaints andllung function in occupational, exposure flo: the fumes arising in sawing SI - CIS/85G0:1684. SO. - Arbetarskyddsstyrel.sen, Fublikationsservilce„ 171 04 Solna, Sweden, 1984... 20p. 16.ref. AP- 46.sawmi'lll worl::ers exposed to.terpenes (mean val.ue254 mg/m:3o. ^-pi~nene + deits.-carene) and 46 non-exposed locall controlswere studied with regard:to symptoms and.puPmonary function. Dyspnoea was significantly more commcn'i~n exposed sub,:F•c.ts than in controls. Reduc-ad FEVG17, an increasedd closing voTume and a.sLope in the alveolarp;..ateau (phaseII.I) omsi.ngle-brr_*•ath nitrogen wa'shou.t.werc:een on the Monday morning after .2 days..ofii work. The d. ;roe o-r Imp.=_sirmcnt inn puimonary could not be corrE' rted`=Jth:e duration of zrvpaoym.errt.... No -fur'*'imr change in pu:lmenarv. .F_~ncti.on was found after a~ d'ay mf cn_cupjt:.ional exposure to tsi pemes. TF:_- -findings: point to slichtoL••itru,.:Live but rather s'_.a4iE ..mpai.-mk=nt o-° pul:::on:Zryfi-mn tioo- 3'.
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0-;ETA L.'.-....-.-:. ... -Gas chromatographic:evaluation of the organic componentspresent, in the atmosphere at trace levels with the aid of Carbopack Es'.for pre-concentration of the sample. ._ QST°'(•";.iii:_:'.._ - ,7 _ . . . :S:^~. •._... -4: u. Li.I.QSI ;.r-4!T•vf -r:Ts •r•S(7L :'aBSW .:nrr.i: hmen,t :-;n trA.p- F_v:cF•e.d with Carb:cF c.I~= d-cr'b::_nt is ;~ ~r~sed v= =.s!ri.tableme?ihod for the. ' •od ;r:aan'i c compm!:.n:a:s p: sent at par'tcs per 109-1012 levels in atmospthE:ric. ::a.mplAS._ The tec:hniq!re has be•en applied to the det:er mination af orgaini'.cs.,., dispersed in a suburban a.tmosphere,, dlissolved:in.rai.nwater or volatilized from thepwr+-.i,=ulate matt-eremitted from .,in indb:st.rial emission and a diesel engine exhaust. A comparison between the collection efficiency of Carbopack 8',andTenau GC. ?n the sampling.of' C6-C10 hydrocarbonsis aSso presented... Tlherr,sults obtained with both simulated and natural'at~nosphe>:'Ss indi:=atee that Carbonpack: Er is rnor-. .°ificiien+: and dor,>: nc;ct give : t-e to :=amp:ling artifacts in th~ ._=_nceof' oxidantss and ar9.dic ._lutxnts,:., whicK are shown i.n!~ead: to cause decomposition n-F i,,e Tenax GC polymeric matrix. The inertrress.of-Carbenpa.ch.llalso permits the •'etr.rmir:ation of organic compoo.nd's i..n .nthr-opogenic emissions, v:here "~^'gO amounts of ^;0^:,., w:a,t^r rn.d'strongd acids are present. ALJ' -- kAUPF•INEN' Tr ;^Ar^,TANEN TJ NU,'~M.INEN t°I!": ; MiCKEL.~`.l: JI ;, HERNBERGSG ;, . I-IAi~UL'idEN . TR ; Puk:Y•.ALA: Ei ; SAVONEN ET TI - Respiratory cancers.and chemical exposures in the wood industryr A nested case-controli. study. SI - EuOSI'S/86LY'806'° SO - FF; J. IND t?1ED; 4':S (,2).198ih.: 84-90... . AF_i- fTIDSIS COPYRIGHT: n^TQL ADS. A cohor`... of -_;Br5 men who had!worked' for at l,easL onee year in the particl.ebnard, p.lywood, sawmi:l.l„ er fbrmaldhhyde glue industries between 1m44 and 1965 wa+ followed up, until. 1901. fFrom within the cohort the57patientswith veriified "respiratory"cancer (ICD 7 codes: 160-162.1, 141, . 14~T-2) were dOfiined'as "cases:", andi171. m2n without resp.iratory .. cancer from within the cohort were matched on birth year and- used as controls. The comparison of' exposures wasr_arr-ied:out - according to work histories and j.ob exposure_mat.ric.es for eachplant.. The od'ds:ratio fore:rposure to wood dust was 1.rJ_'.. (.,1 e,posed'cases) x without provision for any latent period,, and'c7.97(:27 .=xpose:d cases) when provision -For a mi'nimum latent periodd of t?n ;~earss wass applied. The odds ratios. were 1.64) andl 1.8,5,. resp.act.i:.ve7.y, when smoking was . controlled by:.stratification. ThFr5e -es!;.Itsdi:d not differ s.ignificantay fr'om unity. The: -=var-:;,a: liecel o`F t:::.pc,;!,.re. to!•rood d!:.si~_ among the --ponrJ ._ 1?.mg/mT2 and the me: n-]nra+ rn o•r :;:oosureabout. :• a: .,.., Pr.gni.fi=antly. (one sid ra: te,t, 1% ).evr,1:Y raisedod:d'ra ~ ,.arrlir.,~ observed ;;or exposure to pest,.ci.des.s and ah*mul.. hi.o. ,p CD. p:-tzr- de couTd be, ident:.fi .t: :s. au .at:ave" because of , Fr~af-~ L,rual' trl1e exposures. The iaired odds ratios for phneoa 0 .:-or¢: ,-..:.il; oxplained by smol~:i'ng a7:1 _..:p! ;r!.re. to pesticides which. t: e observed a:ssoc:atinrsF,~~r rhenol e: posur e. Q.
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20 Atmospheric Volatile Hydrocarbon Corr:posiflion at Five:Remote Sites in Nbrthwestern North Carolina, ._ I,P,-..'1779._:C•. °" ,..-,.. . 1_,., . ~ '..)r.'.: Th-=sults 6l'i •!r•la^ i1H =or,ip,:ition. of thz ..t~~-' ;_r;the cutherc ,tSpGal _ =Fi i.LArl MoU.nta~.ns p.c ..o.'tiiw,_ t _rl. -..a!~G.C.i na. a;-= ~r2s,~iited: "imbi!ent .,r <:.{r:p1.vd .•a'o(]: l_•tli_'.ccaly'. anJ br ?.n.i._all,';i diT'r-.-en`.. t?ote Site:s 'frnm Septe*+ber 1901 to OLt»:er 198-~. T-. ad:_1i`-.orr, limited =r•mpl'ingg was : done in and just ou•7;He' '.hee town o-"r -P,a_orne,, NC.. Samples wer,- coTler-ted'in stainless steel ca.nisters and analyzed for C-2 to C'-2.2 hydrocarbons byga.s, chroma.ton,r aphy withfl.ame ionization detection. Thenonmethane total hydrocarbon concentrati.onsat the remotesi'tesramged from?.^c to 1132 ppbC.The range of i.dentif'ied par-affins9, o1'e-Ains, and aromatics concentrations was7'to 65''ppbC,: i.to..:8,,ppbC, and -4 to 20 ppbC,respactively.Isopreme and alpha-pineoe'made,,.up;;a smallportion of NMTHC,,-ranging!from.less: than ~?5 u5 to 1i:a ppbC and! less than. 0.05 to 9' ppbC,. respectively. Unkno!Mn: peak> elutingg mostly in thepc+st-.C-9 region af the chrom,, rogram~were aa sig:nifi_ant portion oi the:NMTHC, rangingg from 13 to 1C?B: ppbC. The identity and source'of the unknown compounds are no!1 wel.l understood, al:though some of them are: -pr-obably biogeric. Isoprene and alpha--pinenedi~sp.Layed'.a distinct sLasonall variatiom~~ r.zlated: . to a!nbienl. temperat-ure.;l whereas, acetylene and the sum of paraffi.ns„ olefins,, and aromatics showed no seasonal variation. Pt~-epared'.i.n coopera:tionn withAppalachian. State !Uni~v.,. Poona, NC. . AU TT_ SI so .AL+ - KAUPPINEN T - Occupational exposure to chemical agents in the plywood i:ndustry. - E+IQSISVE662'110^' - ANN'. OCCUP HYG,:, '0. (1). 1~986. 1'9-Tr7... - BIOSIS: CL1F`YRIGHT:.BIOL AEtS. Air contaminantshav.e been measured at 19 Finnish p'.lywoobd plants: since. 1965. EExposure to: formaZd'ehyde was.usualllythe heaviest in gluing departments. However, changes in glue composition and ventilation have:.had'.aconsider-abl'e eff'ect on -formaldehyde concentrations in the air during the last 10 years. The meani concentrations neargl.ue rollers and h.ot presses.haved:ecreased from 1-< ppm in 1965-197"„ to about 0'.5 ppm. or below: in t6Se 1980s. .. No suchh trcmnd'd wasn seen for the concentr-ations o-fwood dust which have• remained at about 1.--4mg m'-'3 in finishing work, e..q. sawingg a.n:_'d sand::n•j:. The concentrations of'phvnoI and pest;cidFs C.e:::cc-F:•t ehllorona.phthalemes..i in thee air h-.ve usua11y been wc_+T1 beloar the' e::posureli.mi~t values, but {:he possib:i:Iity of absorption throi_tghtheh sk:in cannot tre'e exclu:ded.. Traces of1 c-.1 diffe.remi.; polycyciie aromatic hydrocarbons was detected in areas :,vith heavyfork.lifti trafficr or near sa~-ri..ng: a.nd: sandling, sites. These data have been used: to evaluate past e;;pos!irr?.s in a finnish .•p:idemi.ologi¢al study oncancerrisks: among wood`workers. 4
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dermati,t:iscaused hy trergamot 01111 Tpp='n i E-' F'~ , C.. r. ~ .. . .d..... Il.i.:.n: .. ryEwNAN _.u= i L t.-,. ',AU:r;n ':'IEDIGJS; E-i,iGL '. 'eai .rY •. .t9, ;_arrPom--crts s-crt.s cot!.ld only be.- _ . ..t.Lr~r.. to the -• ., .~. _,' ~s r ,.l i::f:cr'Pin_?d !'%y patch t'c.5s..3 str,Gri'.ng„ ^ne_ Ls y. .r_aSee of. ,..r-c: w':-+*'~~,n~~ sease re,Rre.. ~ ;;r:=_ p:-.tient.._ job Lr'~: a perfume factory c.nd the ot`c'r i .. .:, ce le ~n~i --isi.t'i.zat.ion due' to . ~ ;... .. . ,. c:nssneti u-. In the form, r ins'.ncr= pzt'ch-L-est i-esults were positiveto ...lpha-pi.nemF'and beta-pinene, andin the lattertoci.traI an6 alpha-pinene. n.,s_ r;:ou':.vd be e;;pectad, contact ~-1'2rgy to turpent_ine oill was confirmed in .. in the' second case, in. 1 .~._. r :: . > "h U:-_is -n,: 'N~l2rac o..=:. c z.em.atnq ntl.- : o . .h r .~~~.' r`'. i., ._' Tn''ni I af;sl ,C .:-t_i.S ir?:. hn n.: r t."a:... ..._.. _~~'.(T 7.11551.~Finene cyclases I and II'. Two:enzymes from sage (Salvia officinal'xs) whic:hcata'lyz.e stereospeeific cyclizationss of geranyll pyr•ophosphate tomonoterp:ene.ol.erFinsof opposite configuration. CrotCai_t R ' Eiio_ 9 ~ C::Semm _ 'n9?.:, • ° (2) p.74C:-5, . ISSPv C4i21-42.`J~& ' „~ i.n~n ^5 ...^,:i, '. . I'::jurmaall Codea HI'U _ Co.ntr<-+ct/Cr.ant hb:.: SMI -1'54. La:nguagea.: EhlGLISH„ . Subfile; INDEX MEDICJSy A solub1eenzyme preparati.on from immature sage (Sal.vi.a o-ffi'.cin'ali.s) 1~aves has been shown, to. _:a.talyze', the cat:,i'..on-deper•dent cyclization ofg:erarzyI pyrophosphate to the isnme,;-ic rnoncter-peneolafins.m ( .+,./-)'-al.pha--p:i'nene, and ()"-,L-,eta-pinene and h..o: lesser amounts of camphene and limon'•^rnn'. 05ambl ial.,. IH. „ and'~ Cr oteau; F.(19_i) J. I3i.o'1. Chen.. 257, ,5c?42).. This preparati,:,n was fractionatedby'gel -Filltrat.ion on Sephadex G*-15C?'to affordd twoo reg',iona ofi enrymic activity termed geranyll pyrophosphate;pimene cyclase I (Y91- approximately equal to 9b,tJ4J6), whi~chcatalyzed the conversion of geranyl pyr-ophosphate to flhebi~cycli.c olefin. (.-u)-alpha-ryinene, and to sma9.I:erquanti.ties ofther-earranged'oleflin (+)-carrphene an.-J the mon,ocyclir- o3e#in ('•:) ....7i:mor=.en..e, and geranyll pyr.op:hospha.....pi.mene cycla:seZI(Mh approxi.F~ toi,; equal to 5`r,tJr)r3')',, which transformed th.^. scyclic precursor to (-7-al.;ah~-pi*~env and(--).-beta-pi'nene, as. .,reli x {!o a,~d i:- axu:-;.r_ cr1!efin my-cene. The me.rlt_.ip1 u3.-- 'irSiosynth~etic activill~es- co-p' .L.'` i.:~-;qi_'h Yinzne' cyclase I on -FOur --rrhse,qpj~nt r hr! :.omatogr z:phiic and e.~ t.r;,Nt~ra=t.i¢ steps" and the. ability ,..u r_vr}.i..'r= geranyl pyrophn irha-:tu and ..-,= rc.Iated al':yl..i'c p',rroi+h.-rsph'; F5 n..+.ryl j:r.yrrophosptaate and ].ina'; t,,:.-ophujpha.tewas lii !•;ewise coincidennt _.hr-o,-i.gtr,7trt r¢.rri4ication. Fr ar-t.i..Dn;_tlorrc):~:i!nene cyclase II byy ava, d:_+:nti'.crai sequence showed tfiat.the.aet.a.a.+_`ra- for the synthesis of the. st-r'.tochemiral',l•;rel..ated (r..}-oIefi'.ns cri--pur1.f-iod':, ;, did thee ab:ility to' i_Ati' 1 cthe thr~e, acyrlir precrrr r:rs.: The g.ener-all '.rr opefH_:ies: n;: cy'cTaseI d cyclase II weree detarmi',netd.,. and a schr,me for':cte :±,iosynthesisof the' d rnonot-rptn.e . n'sf'ina,ai_, pruprus:.~d. r-cl•?ae- 87490505
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Introduction to Flavor and Fragrance Matei-ials-1981 This is the third compilation of this series,'-2 and by far the most ambitious in terms of the amount of intornation gathered into one vofume: Ih addition to the extensive list of flavor substances, listed in the 1979 edition, this edition includes over 11000 fragrance substances. A most important addition is the suppliers of'these materials, accomplished through the efforts of'the Chemical Sources Association (CSA): (see the report beginning on page. 00), The CSA has been very active ih finding and developing sources for.tiavor and fragrance materials for several years, and this volume puts their extensive re- sources of companiesand products at.the disposal of the worldwide industry. This list of flavor substances. isbased on the computer files, of the Flavor &. Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA), which in turn is based on the FEMA GRASI lists'a' with additions from other FEMi4A and Food'~ and Drug AdYninistration lists. Additional flavor substances were added from the records of GSA which are principally natural juices;, herbs and extractswhich are legally considered foods rather than flavor materi- als and, therefore,. dc notl appear on the above lists. The fragrance materials were compiledi from the list of materials which the Research Institute of Fragrances Materials has investigated for their safety in fragrance use, plus the list of substances for which there are published EOAIFMA standards, plus. addi- tional'rnaterials which, have been suggested by several' fragrance companies and sup- pliers of fragrance. material's. An important problem wPoen dealing with, a combined list of flavor and fragrance ma- terials is the different terms that. are often used for the same materials.. This was a problem with all of the lists checkedl for this volume. While we have tried; to find: the identity of each material, it is certain that users of this volume will find many instances of, different materials under the same, name. Iti is even more certain that the same material will appear more than once under the various names by which it, is known References are given after each principle name, providing the following information on each applicable material: The first number following the principal name is that assigned the substance inione of' the ten FEMA GRAS lists: Numbers 2001r31241, GRAS 3; 3125-3249, GRAS 4; 3250- 3325, GRAS 5; 3326-3390, GRAS 6; 33911-3423, GRAS 7; 3424-3444, GRAS S; 3445- 3475, GRAS'9; 3476-3525, GRAS 10; 3526-3596, GRAS 11; and 3597-3650, GRAS.12. A separate list of'all of these FEM'AA substances and their synonyms in numerical order begins on page 179. The second number following each principal name refers to the section of the 21 CFR where the substance is listedf The thiird number refers to the number by which the substance is listed in the publi- cation "Natural Flavouring Substances, Their Sources, and Added Artificial Flavouring~ Flavor & Fragrance Materials - 1981 - Allured Publishing v
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Technol. 17(1i); 64, 11973;, FEMA GRAS Substances 7. Food Techno. 27(11), 56, 1973; FEMA GRAS Substances 8. Food TechnoL 28(9), 76, 1974;, FEMA GRAS Substances 9. Food Technol: 29(9)i 70, 1975; FEMA GRAS Substances 10. Food TechnoL 31(1), 65,, 1977; FEMA GRAS Substances. 11. Food' Technol,. 32(2), 60, 1978; FEMA GRAS Substances 12: Food Technol. 33(7)', 65', 1979 6. Council of Europe, Natural Flavouring Substances„TheirSources and Added Sub- stances, Strasbourg, 1973', p. 463' 7. Grundschober, F.; Hall, R: L.; Stofberg; J.; and Vodoz; C. A., SurveK of Woridvride Use Levels of Artificial Flavouring Substances. Flavours, 1975, pp, 223-230 8. Guide to the Safe Use of Food.Additives, FAO, CACYFAL 5-1979, p. 6' 9. Ministry of Agriculture;. Fisheries and Food; Food Additives and Contaminants Committee„ Report on. the Review of Flavousings in Food, Her Majesty's Stationary Office, London, 1976, p: 190 10. Food Chemicals Codex; National Academy Press,. 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418', 1981 11. Research linstitute for Fragrance Materials, 375' Sylvan Avenue, Englewood.Cliffs, NJ 07632; USA 12. Fragrance: Materials Associationi of the United States, 900 17th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006 13. International Fragrance Association, 8 rue Charles-Hubert, CH-1205 Geneva„ SWit- zerfand viii Flavor & Fragrance Materials - 1981 - Allured Publi'shing
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Monoterpnne cqc:lases: use of' the noncvcl'i::abl.esubstrate, analog 5,7-dihydrogeranyl pyr-ophospPoat-etnuncoupl.e the',is.omerization step of the _oupledl :.somcrizat.i',om-cycli-.:aaion rmar_{:..ion. . . . : - i ..' i ~ .: -... i %=. u'IJLi.P ~ aflt. No. : :aiii t".1, i !-._~7 xr~g,.tage=~: ErLC{ ISi-i,,. i tmic.n' =ri:.vmes -i'rom ualv:~a. :)'fici!naI .;. a ..; ' ` ~ .nc e.. .smm.~:rz~--.:a'ion. -- ;ubsequznt cyrli._a:t_.on or ga~r-anyl pyr'oCho_,ph..:tet-oe the cnonote:r.penes'~+1&lpha-pinene and . .bornyll p•jrophosptrat.e ;.yere _.::art;d:ned viith the noncyci.iaaLl:e, substrate a.nalog 6„7-dihyd;-ogrranyl pyropho=phatar in an attempt tod~i.ssect..the cr•yptic isomerization atap.from thenormall.y coupSed: reaction sequence. Th.e analog inhibited the cyclization of geranyl py rophosph:zteand,, wax;. ,,.tself c=i'a7ytica3:ly<active,. affording acycl.ic+..e:-punenle-' irs and al,_ohol.sl a p!,;_;;_u_ts. Thr= anr';;rn, 3~_ ,r.•r'od.ucts generated 'r.^m6,, ;' ii.hydrog.,r...-;,v;p.yrc „ ~ -,ph.: te qual z,. ,:.: :z.L'. . ,~.c~bl'~ed the -:~= l;01.`.`sis p r' •ooLcts: e7'. ny'op.j.,ccpj-,at_e., yet they. ._~:nst,_It~!.tec: af~+., h~ishc-: r-:r prop.~,~-ic:rr of oler' ~rs,, =,ugsc~atiny: that enzymatic Pr.,d,-sctt inrmati:cn: :JCcr;1:_. i:n a:-~ ~.r.v,_ronmert. rr_•Z=,ti'iely ;.macca ssi.ble: to. "-it._r . S'i:n .o t)iee ncw. ma;. -._l i.c a:_i mn o£ geranyl .-cpt-.ospha.te i sconsi dered ;:o ,.t ,-_i.~r. a ia pr.>l, mdr:a.i t 'om r i,.ati-,n tothr. "oaAmt! int_rmedi:ate. .... yl. t~.yr, ~.h Csph~ ._ r_F ':_scrl7 5u;gy__ttr.z~Zhre.. car 1Og ._rr-i~~r'g~ies ~ziio . n.c,rmr:: ryrnphospha _ .-on., ut.,r w.ic_.rat o~. yi:v::.ng !r•ise in '~his: .as~;• to s+';.)--B,I pyr phos:ph,7' _ :ich :s xe:onized, and ee,_..~sset~t subsequent ryLl:.aar.xu n-- a*-eprecluded', the r-csuiting cation is =;.:_her deprnt:onatedor cart.urur9 by vaater. iri :':•ja'.ent metal': iomr~quirerncnt,. pt',optimum, and. ~,ther char..c ;.L ri tthe enz:ymaticc i-ransfermation of the analog resembles thnnor.nal mor,oter-penec•;rclaser_..act.ion. .. 1489047 S5014047The essential oil of Ducrosi'~a anethifolia (:DC.) Boiss. Chemical composition andanti;microbial activity. d'anssen AM;:, Scheff'en- ,d3;&aer-heim~ Svendsen A,Aynchchi V - Department ofFharmacognosy, State University of Leiden,. The Nbtherlands.. Pharm Weekbl CSci] (NETHEF`tLANDS) 3Augi 24 1934,.. 6 (4) p157-6rI,. ISSC.I n.167-655.°r :Pournal. Code:r OZW Langr•aag.es:EN(&LISH,, Journal Announcement:: 8501 Susbfi.1e: INDEX MEDICLIF: The essential oil from herb of Dea=rosia, . ,anethifolia T3oiss.., growing Id in Iran:,, was investii3a'ted by ~SC, rLC:.and +-_C'--MS. The oil consisteds me.im_y.of al.;_.phati:,_ r_omp.ounds:.alplhs-F•inena, rtiyrcene and Iimonene wr_re main comp.onents of the hydroc_.r-bons presen.t inn tlheoi.l,: whil.a: n-decanal,, n-dodecanal,. n-decanoI, tr.ans-9--dndecenal, and' c.i+s -,!-yswnthen•,al acetate: were th,.~ major "-'>:ygen-containing eonsti.tucnts-. Thc=..e o.i11 and the mainn r.x;!gen-containing: aliphatir_ corr,pon.nts.:hoi•a-d a. remark:able antimicrobia.l :~ct.i.vi.ty against gram-'pnsiti'te bacteria, zA y.:aat, ~nd so,ned~rmatophy_es. 87490504
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8- Effeets of: d-llmonene and ad+pinene on.in vitra carbo- -hydrate dissimilation and methane formation by rumen bec- tetia.A. Crane W.O'..Net§on, and 1t...E. Drown.(~~Unir,..ut Illinois;,Ur na'. J. Doir9.Sti..9p, li317-23(19ar).-Thc effects of d-limonene and.ad'-pinene onn the sn.vitro:dissimi- lation.of'~carbohydrates,and methane formation bgrumcn ~ bacteria weree studied by enrichment culture techniques. d-Limonene 9'X 10~'M,, but not 9 X 10'tM m-d-piheny. was toxic to stabilized rumeniculturess which prodhcedd methane from acetic acid. Methane productionfrotnn formic acid -bF rumen cultures was not affected'.. by thesc terpenes. Cellulose digestion,, but notl starch and rellobiose dissimi- lationn by rumen bacteria,, was inhibitedd by higher eonene. of both terpenes:. A..II. Johns,av Chewicat aspectson turpentine: eczema.. Sven Heller' rAm NdsThyresson~, nnd Gvnnat N!idmar@ (Karo-li--Lans ns ...Stoekkolm).. Dernmtologiia 1115.. 277-80(1957xin English);; cf. C.A'.. 50,.14241i.-Afterantoxidation ofAt- earene,.a-pinene,.@-pinene, and limonene (comprising 30, 60„ 10,, and 1%e,resp,, of.Svedish turpentine) the most -highly'eczematogenic was the oxidation product. of. tlr- carena o-pinene andl } limonene required moreextensve oxidation for eczematogenic activity, and p•pinene could not be oxidized ta.an active form. Ales. obtained from syn- dietio carene hydroperoxides and the glycols of dr+carene, a•pincne, and' + limonene were inactive.. iCetones:related to limonene (carvonc, dihydrncarvone,, carvotanacetone, carvenone, and eucarvone) were.also inactive. Attempts tb obtainn ketones from: cnrene peroxides resulted iir extreme .convetsions of the eyclopmpanee ring, One synthesis yiclded'.3',4-dimethylacetophenone.which.was.not e¢enmto- genic, but wtiieh.may have invnlvv.dlan.active unstable.tro- pone as.an.intcrmediate., Vera C. Glocklim Synergistic.iusecticidal compositions from henzene:henta• dtlarideandtarpenehydiacarbons., NalroMarmr hlobro and Juan.NebreruEscobar. U.S. 2',761,eW, Sept. 4, Mixus..afC.HeCln(1) and terpene.hydrocarbons (II);of the: formula.CtrHluin the form ofliquids or adsorbed on solids . act.as rodenticides and as insecticides for suckinginsects: The terpepe-hydrocarbon.Gaction, the activating ingredient. isprepd.s by treating turpentineof d.0.&58-41.870 wrth 3-8:b HeSO, bclow' OP. Tarsand.s other materials are decanted 'from the acidified lipuid'd hydrocarbon, which is:themneutral- rzed to yield II, consisting mainlg of a.pinene andd poly- mmizcd ,r-pinene. I is addedlto.1Q togive.a satd. solh. which is.filtered free of iitsol..isomers, tayicld:u liquid (IIS') saud. mainly with.the y-isomer of I Ulussmall amts. of other - isomers.. 111(25-15U parts) is.mixrxl witlt 1(llNl'pmts talcl.o yield solid vtsectiadal prepns.for, agrieultural uu:e or fbr destruetion af' lice, ticks,..audl ac:uus infcslathms of'cattlc. Similarly, fID: is dissolved in, petroleum, IiuscLd oil, abs. EtoH,, or. pctrolaRum to: yield: prepns. autivr hr paiitts, and against human.lice; nits„andlsinulaeparasites. L. F.
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°Aero-oI',f'ormcad.from the chemicaI reaction o~ monoterpenes.and oz.one. :..ue-i_?d '_'--- .,q.::, .- i 01 at'fiC Jl~ierSC T.( i :Ji-.=° ~ .." t+ ~:~ii '!_e 3nr_I ~.]L.?lOnenE'. T~'= C . - ytL'.0:'S t v7 r.t.`i -1_.3, ~,..i . ,ol:alr_C'_~1-MVdei , the _. 1) heptan --+-ne~ and the lilnorPnc--.." .l.act.iicn, ~-evera~1. unidenti-Fied~ produc':::. protsuc'ts were: sc:L-ight in forest aerosols and pinor ::_deh.;e. w'ase r!e.te in -he at.oo !jhr~-re~. AU - GAED. Se HEi.:LPrJiIT`7TNER', Eg TUn^NErrF WVp KOr2TEfF T' IHYDRmXYMETHYL HYDROPEROXIDE AND D'SSITYDROXYMETHYL PEROXIDE FROM GAS~PHASE,OZONOLYSIS OF NATURALLY OCCURRING ALKENES 80 -' MATURE CLOND?:.r -.1fi (6C.t^81). 19.[:5.. 5='S'_.L_G.. F;T_OS,T-,. TERPENE Tr.}4T, EgSOL.A£ari.r'./"1r3~LONE r':F.EE FM.ISSIONISOPRENE WA':_B':iTFRF_;EN AI'.,R POLL!JTIOp~ii. A!'_ '- Er11NCaD5 T(-", , '1T_S', JC. : FiAlVN'a.'_i<r i~: Ii-ETG1 ' DF:; y MAT!'dEY-r_. Genotoxicity of' organic chemicals frequently found in th;e air of mobi1e homes.. S: -- E.rI,OS:IS'<'S=,.a,~:q;C:1~. r " T .~ C0 ... tiT)`q 25 LT1 ( yr OXICOL ? (1:)a AD - BIOSf` t--OP'.:f'CHTe: BIOL AL'S. 7he 1'c:;ernilcals 'naphtha:ene, tet.rach'_'.or-oethylene;, s'•`yrene, tet!radmcane„ _. n-undccanc, rn r+:;..;_hlior:o6nnz-n_=,. o.._r 1._h'_.=robemeen2~,. tal.uene„ nonanal, alpha-p.inine.,. (-F)limonene, o-xyylene, forma.ldet,yde:,, benzene, p-.x.y7.ene, m-xylene., n-bwtanul and _ampher-le)') rnost commonly det.-/ tad i;n a study af moui'-e'e homesin. T~2~x_.s (:.USA:) were tested r`or mutageni:ci'!yusirgi a wattery of bacterial test strains; 'ahr_ .~'aer.itu:re' wa . =archetl: to obtaina,!d',:tionad informa'iion n_c-:rning the muta.gs:ni:cit.y and carci:nor;,enicity of these chemica:s. )=ormaldehyde:wasfound'to be present in 100% o-Fthemobile homes and at.the h;:ghest'mean concentration ('187~ ppb)., Theremai:.ning'; erg:anie'.chemi,cz~l., wereall present at mur_h.lower mean ccacen±r-.=.tinRS. C<. 10 ppb) and at varying freqaxenci'es fY--9Ci:~k. 0-F th~ : 1^ chemicals tested: for ml.!.tagen'i.city, only. form~ rir=f,yri=c 9...._ a po~i:tivp -_spor.=_.e•.. A review. 04 T_.iteratue' rr~y.c. l~c' ':h..,i' _. Lre.-he.zica1~~~ i e=sted, €ormaD 1,h; de, - i:yren;=, and br=nzczn?, werc shown to '1r?'.. .animal. and/or T!1-s',, fc'';la'ld+-hyde ,..s ::ot the Dmlyy ge.no'_o;...'in r. sfl r, " ,.,.. r-rrbi'm 'ur•mes Lrirt prE r-rt . ir. !aF ai 7 ~'Y/grr,::a+i- J ;B:-'h t n i:L c. home i'r?' ted 6.'j'7n:cn chemi_ai_y" a I fo ilu ?ilHld rjg!Si~l r"I,r= r ld. be ,~ ~'.rl ;•f b,n na;ior- pm:tent _+: " lZa!7,j„ preaent O fi 7Ri!'s. ~ ~ ., ~'
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FENAROLI'S HANDBOOK af' FLAVOR INGREDIENTS Edited, Transl'ated,.and Revised by THOMAS. E. FURIA and NICOLO BELLANCA. CIBA-GEIGY Cnrporation. Ard'sley;, New York From theItalian, languagee works of PROF. DR. GIOVANNI FENAROLI Director, Center for Studies of Aromatic Substances F/niversityof Nfilanoy A9ilano. !taly TP 450 F35 -Publis5ed by THE CHEMICAL RUBBER. co. 18901 Cranwood Parkway, Cleveland, Obio 44128 J.z~ f ~1
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Substances" of the Council ot Europe (CoE).6 A revised Council of Europe publication appeared at the, end of 1981, but too late to include its data in, this volume. There are some substances im. the CoE list that are not, included here because there is not evi- dence that these are being used in the United States. The fourth number indicates the class of flavouring substances. The. division of flavouring, substances into three categories was proposed by'the International Organi- zation of' the Flavor Industry (dOFI)s andl has been adopted'by the FAO7WWO Food Standard Progranune; the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The official definitions for the three classes of flavouring, substances, indicated by the numbers 1, 2 or 3' read as fol lows."' Natural Flavours and Natural Flavouring Substances: For the purpose of, the Codex Alimentarius; "natural flavours" and "natural flavouring substances" are preparations and. single substances, respectively„ acceptable for human consumption, obtained ex- clusively by physical processes from vegetable, sometimesanimal raw materials either in their natural state or processed, for human consumption. Nature-Identical Flavouring Substances: For the purpose of the Codex Alimentarius, "nature-identicali flavouring substances" are substances chemically isolated from aromatic raw materiaPs or obtained synthetically; they are, chemically identical to sub- stances present in natural products intended for human consumption, either processed or not: ArtificialFlavouring Substances: For the purpose of the Codex Alimentarius, "artificial flavouring. substances" are those substances which have not yet been identified in nat- ural products intended'for human consumption~ either processed or noti The fifth number refers to one of the six appendices, numbers 1 through 6, of the "Report on Review of, Flavouring in Food," published by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheriesand Food of the United Kingdom (UK list)..Againi not all substances onithe UkK list are included here. The sixth column is used foran alphanumeric code to the Scientific Literature Review. (SLR): in which the substance is reviewed. This code refiers primarily to SLRs produced by FEMA under contract to the FDA. The titles of these SLRs together with the order number and a price code are listed below. These SLRS and their supplements are all available, either bound or on microfiche from, the National Technical Ihformation Ser- vices (NTIS)i in Springfield, Virginia. The exact price can be obtained from NTIS' by giv- ing the price code. It should be mentioned thati the SLR supplements refer often to the original and should not be used without it. In some cases the supplements.are included with the original as noted. These FEMA SLRscover groups of substances with; related chemical structures and~ therefore, presumably,, related'metabolic and toxicologic properties. For example, SLR Al covers 56 substances with similar functionality. An additional 6 compounds in. this chemical class are covered in.supplements to SLR A1.. The date the SLR was submitted to FDA is also. included on the list.. Where theSLR'reference is simpiy"PBi" this indicates that the material was reviewed in a report not prepared by FEM'A. In these cases, the order number and price code can be obtained from FDA. There are a few substances which are covered both in a FEMA: SLR and in a report not prepared by FEMA. In these cases, the only reference given is to the FEMA: publication which, in turn, gives reference to the other review. vi Flavor & Fragrance Materials - 1981 - Alllured' Pu6lishing
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EXERPTft rnEbcc4 6f7/1 8308756'7 0240180802:079C1'inical. aspect and theraey.ofa severe exosenic intoxication with eine oi1 . KLINIK UNB'THERAR'IE EINER SCHWEkEN, AKUTEN'. EXOGENEN INTGXIKATION MIT R.EINEM TEfiPENT'.INGL Tonnesmann U.4 Koaeel C..i SchiroPT.,7etal.Feaniwatiorrs'zent.., Med.Klin.Po1'ikli.n.,K'.Iio. Charl.ottenb.urs'r Freien. Univ,Berlin, 1000'Berlim 19. GERMANYr WEST INTENSTVMEDIZIN'.(SERMANY', WEST) ,P982v 19/6 (270-274), Codent ITMZB Lan3ua5es: GERMAN Suwaarv Lansua5es; ENGLISH Suicidal ineesti~on of 400-500'v,l pine oil ('turyentine) by a. 41-qear-old male led to somnolence.e andsowor after an impressive stateofer.citation. Further samptoms af the eoisonins were.tachycardia, later bradscardia,d~ro:- of blood rressure, and spontaneous hyaerventi1ation. Since ao extreme dose of kineoi:l had been.indested,hemoferfusi.on withact'ivated'charcoal and Ambe:rlit'eXADsub. 4' aswe1Lass a hemodi:alvsiss werePerformed besides continuous stomach.l'ava9e. Thecomaositi'on of the wine oi'1w.as d'etermined bas sas-chromatosraehs/massspectrometry. The : blood, lievelo:f theaain component aleha-P_inerre was monitored in orderto~controI the efficiency of the detax:ication. In urine no original comFoumdscould be detected. Tihe st'ructure; of five metabolites could be elucidat'ed.. 6/7/3 82030911 Functional asaectsof thioacetamide (.TAA')-inducedl.cirrhosis of thrliver in rats Pap .A.i' Derser Z;i: Varro V. I DePt.. Ned.r Untiv. Med.. Seh., SzeSed HUNGARY LIVER (DENMAkK) ,1981.r 1/2'.(150'.),Codeni.LI'VEO. Lan9ua5es':I ENGLISH
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FOOD DRUG COSMETIC LAW ' REPORTER Scope of' Reporfer . . . The Reporter iss devotedd primarily to the Federall Foodl, Diug„ and Cos-metic.Act and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, as administered by the Food and Drug, Administrationt, the Poison Prevention Packaging Act, as administered by the Consumer Product SafetyCommission„andlthe'.Compre-hensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act, as.adtninistered by'the Drug Enforcement Administration:. These Acts:are.reported!in full text, along svith ~ thetexts of pertinent regul'ations, proposals„ rulfings,, decisions, and other. I developments described at Q 5: AA number of'f federal "related laws," such as ~ the Viius. Serum, and Toxin. Act of 1944„ are reported in full text, with sum- mariesof selected court decisions. Similarly, state.lawsof general applicatiow to4ood,, dtrugs,., andd cosmeticsares reprod'ucedd in f'ull text, and summaries of selected rulingsandl decisions are also reported. In addition,, related state laws pertainingto specific products or areas of' the food, drug, and'~ cosmeticindustries are ildentifiedd in separate lists of"Speciali Laws" with official! eita- j tions, for those who wishh toeonsult the olficiall texts. These "Speciall Laws"' ' aree lasusgoverningstandards, packaging, and labeling of'f specific products,. ~ . All. regyitations.issued by the Food and Drug Administration under the Food, Drug'„ and Cosmetic Act, the Fair Packagingandl Labeling Act, andd the ~ Virus„ Serum., and Toxim Act of 19441are publishedd in f'uIl text, as are', regula- tions under the', Poison Prevention Packaging Act„ ass amended by the Con- sumer Product Safety Commission. The' full texts of the regulations issued by' the. Drug Enforcement Administration implementing the Comprehensive Drug AbusePteventhon andl Control. Act, aree reported.. Regulhtions' issued.d under some'e off the "related laws"in." the Federal. Lawss division arenotre- ~ ported.. Nostate regulations are reported. . ~ FederaI,and.State court decisions are reported. Primarily, these decisions. will be those casesthat interpret or apply the provisionsofl the Federal Food, Dvug,, and Cosmetic Act and the basicc food',, drug, and cosmetic laws . of'thef states.. Casess that.t arise under the various state or federall ^telated''. ; laws" are reported on a setective basis., . '; HOW TO CITE THE REPORTER Q 11 I Citationsto. Footr DRtGCosNETr¢ LAw RErosxs are accepted by courtYA andi administrative agenciess because they leadi too authoritative data, some: of which is available excllusivelyhere'. Justt combine thelet3ers."'CCH" with, -th.ename of the. Reporter and'.the.parta,qraph number. For example, the food additive regulations', maybe eited'"CCH FaoD DRVeCosuettc L..wREroeTSj 155,300. ` A particular section of the regudhtions could be referred too by thte specific paragraph of the'. Reporter .vhere' it iss reproduced. CmOMME,. ItCM+ CLEARING= 1IOUSE,tI'NC.. ..,...~. M ~ PUBLIISHER.S -f TOIPiiCAL LAW'. REPORT'S 4025 Wl. PETERSON, AVE.,. CHICAGO„ tILL11NO1S60646
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The. seventh column gives the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) number for the sub- stance. A number is assigned by CAS to each; material which appears in the, literature, and this number is becoming wideliyused asprime.identification. The eighth, column indicates if the substance appears amongi the monographs pub- lished in the Thiird Edition of the Food Chemicals Ccdex.1° The ninth column indicates if the substance has a monograph in the series published bythe Research Ihstitute for Fragrance. Materials." The tenth column indicates if'there is a standard for the material published by the Es- sential OIII Association of the U.S. (nowknown asihe.Fragrance Materials Associartion:" The eleventhi column indicates, if that, material is mentioned in the Guidelines pub- lished by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA)L These guidelines give the rec- ommendetions of IFRA for the safe use of fragrance materials, based on the latest re- search information available from, published and unpublished sources; worldwide, of adverse reactions to the use of fragrance materials: The recommendations sometimes recommend that a particular material not be used in fragrances,, but more often re,com- mends tthati a: material not be used above a given level, or that. a specially processed form of the material be used that has proven to be safe. Finally the suppliers of both flavor and fragrance. materials have been listed. The in- formation under "sources" in, this volume has been taken from CSA publications and files, as well as from information sent tb us specifically for this publication, Our aim is to provide a fuli' and complete source listing of alll these materials worldwide. AI!I the infor- mation thatt our readers may be able to contribute wiil be greatly appreciated. This publication, is intended to aid in the searchh for a, particular substance in one of the resources mentlioned above. Although, a reasonable effort was mad'ee to find all list- ings, it is probabie that some were missed. Accurate cross-referencing was difficult. This is especially true of the botanicals. Here it was assumed that where the species were the same on two or more, referenced lists, the substance was the same unless it was clrrarly differentiated by reference to a particular part of the, plant, i.e.., roots on one list and leaves on another. It is important, therefore, to emphasize that if accuracy is desired, the original list should be consulted for verification. If you find any errors in this Edition, it. would be greatly appreciated if you could let us know so correctionss can be made in the Fourth Edition, References 1!. Ford,, R. A., and Cramer, G,.. MI, Reference list ofi flavoring substances in use in the Whited States. Pert. FlBvorist 2(1)„ 1',1977 2: Ford,. R. A., Flavor Materials 1979, Allured Publishing Corporation, Wheaton,, Illinois, USA, 3. Hall, Ri L., and'.Oser, B'. L_ Recent.progressin the,consideration of'fllavoring ingre- dients under the Food Additrves Amendment. FEMA GRAS Substances 3, Food Technol. 19(2)„Parti 2„151„1965; 4lFoodTechnol. 24(5)1, 25, 1970 4. Oser„B. L., and Hall, R'. L.,,Recent progress, in the consideration, of'flavoring ingre- diients under the Food Additives Amendment. FEMA GRAS Substances 5. Food J. ~ t0 Technol. 26(5)„35, 19!72. 0 5. Oser, B. L, and Ford, R'., A.,, Recenti progress in the consideration of, fl'avoring ingre- tJt t:91 dients under the Food Additives Amendment. FEMA GRAS Substances 6: Food E+ Flavor & Fragrance Materials. - 1081 - Allured Publishing v0
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C. S A.FLAU'o2 FEMA~FDA~ GoE:Nat G8 SL II MATER~ALS Phoebe„ oil Phosphoric acid'i 2900'184.1073 2'. X Source: MNST Photocitrali See cisr5-Isopropenyl-cis-2-rnethylcyclopentan-l-carboxald'ehyde cis,lfans-Phytoll . . . . ---- . 75411-49-3- Source:. KRRY Picea spp See Spruce; oill (tsuga and picea spp•C Piconia. (IFF), .SeeIsolongifolene. ketone Pimenta See. Allspice, oil, (pimenta officinaliss lindl.) Pimenta acns kostel See Bay leaves,, westt indian, oit (pirnenta acris kostel) Pimenta leaf, oil (pimenta officinalis Iiindll 2901 18220 335. 1 X X X Source: CHUVACHX CAVE BBA CTAL CRPT MNHR. Pimenta oil See Allspice, oil (pimenta officinalis 1'ind44 Pimento berry. oill Pimpinella anisum I.: See: Anise. (pimpinella anisunr qPinacol I tl 3 ---- Source: CTC X Pinanethiol See 2,3~ Or 10-mercaptppinane cis-2-Pinanol I See 1 A.2a.5a-2.6,6-timethylbicyclo(3L 1.1)heptan~2-ol Pinanyl mercaptan, See 2,3' Or 10-mercaptopinane Pineapple juice " Pine bark. white, extract solid(pinusstrobus. I.) ---- 17251'0 342 1. 3' _ Source: MOIS MEER Pine bark,. white, oil (pinus strobusI.); ---- 172.5110 342 1 3Pine bark, white (pinus. strobus IJ ---- 172.510 342 11 3' Source: MEER CHRT Pine,, mountain, oil'i See. Pine needle., dwarf'„ oil' (pinus mugoo turra var. pumilio (haenke) zenari) Pi a nene 2902 1'72515 2113„ 2 6 A6 50 56 8 X X Source: UNCA, ARIZ DGF GLDN ,8=Pinene 2903' 172515 2114 2 6 A6 127-91-3 X X Source: ARIZ GLDN UNCA, YSHR2-Pinene See a-Pinene Pinene See.a-Pinene. • - 2(10)-Pinene! See A-Pinene Pine needle, dWarf;oil (pinus mugo turra var. pumilio (haenke) zenari) 2904 172.510 339 1 2 X X Source: P&B MNHR Pine needle, oil tabiesspp.) 2905 172.51'0, 5 1 X X X Source: P&BBBA PLRM, ARGV CRPT MNHR UNGR - 2/101-Pinen-3-ol 3587 172.515 2 A5 5947'-36-4 Source: DGF IFE 2-Pinenr4-ol' See Verbenol Pine,, scotch., oil (pinus sylvestrisl.) ' -' 2906 1'72.5.10 341. 1 3 X X, Source: P&B BRJE Pine tiar,, oil (pinusspp.). . Op 2907 '172.515 340' 1 3 D24 ~ Source: CPHL Pine, white, oil (pinus spp.) ~ ---- 172.510' 340 1 ~ Source:YSHR ARIZ GLDN UNCA ~ W Pinocarveol See 2(10)-Pinen-3-ol W n~....._. c. - 1981, - Allured Publishinq.
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Clinical Toxicology of Commercial Products ACUTE, POISONING ROBERT E. GOSSELIN, M.D., Ph.D. Irene Heinz Given PMfessor of PharmacoloRy. Dartrnoath Medical School. Hanover. NewHampsh'ire HAROLD C. HODGE, Ph.D., D.Sc. PMfessur and Chairman Emeritw of Pharmacology and ToziiroloRv: School of Medi- aineand'Dentistn•. The University af'Rochester, Rorhester; New. York; Profesror in Rt•sidenceof Phar.nacoloKrandi OralBiolop'. UnioeMiq°of Califarnia:.San Fmn. ciscn: of'Encironmental Tosicologp, and ofAharmacology and Medical Therapeutica... Unicersi tV . offalifornia. Iroina,. Cali fornia. ROGER P'. SMITH, Ph.D. PIolessarof Tozicolog,it Dartmoath.Medical Sehool.,Hanooer. New Hampshire. MARION N. GLEASOM M.Sc. fh.c.) Hbnamrv.Assaciate.Fellbm. AmericamAcademv of Pediatrics: Fwmerly ResearchA®sociate in Pharmacoloiyy. SSchool of Medicine andDentistrv.. The University of' Rochester. Rachester.. Neu, Yorh. Fourth Ldition WILLIAMS & W'ILKINS Balltimore/ London . 2A 1L11 G5 1975 . ,f '1' :a 7
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:tFineemtg h, the. :n: it dd rl"Ilt rnr.r teeded pn: plant he fieldL mf,rllh aKrimlture, duct<. nutrition, : 75 xuhlecvv, con- -rtinent data. i Volume ?uf the , thixencvclope-•uhjects awered_ ience.disciplinec. i Rre:~~~ ~ metv of ~ewlk:, .i.dS, and'. Source Book of Flavors HENRY B. HEATH, hi.B.E., B. Pharm, M.F.C., F.P.S., F.LF.S.T., ISk,fuan . BushBoalte.Allen,. . A.Division of Albright & W'lllson,. Iitdl.. ikedRnod,:dairvLondonl England aducts from the. Aume in the field e reference wvrk,. I t ia organiied iih, rription.of fuid, ndWwk of A tmZ :nrm, whieh gives THE AVI PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. GO -1 W esbport,;. Connecticut„iJ.S.A. . ~ ~ m8'I ~
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G. CR'~Es.' Ct F(./) /'/ -7 ''V V ~ Tlr~ ~fi` '5-r : (f9cf) mZ7SOSd ('F w"79oF ,c~ Cig ice -_d, : (r/F(' D) 13 q'aF rR> - Carrier activityaad combined toxic action of'.insecticidal solvents'. Seiroku~ and Yosltimichii Asuka., Baly~- Kag~aku22,. 113-1t~h-The iusecticidal actionn of line dmnn as inflhenced, bc variousorg: solvents on Murra da- +mesduuand GryRus rn7dratus(iimtgines)was investigated. JLiitdanedustandsobts..wereemnpared. Tltefhllnwiitgsol- vents gave increased activity (~arr.utged ih.dccreasing.order):: isoamyl.acetate, cyelolrexanol, tricliloroethylene; hBeCOEt', cvclohesanone, isrrDuCOAfe,, iso-UuOlf, o-cidorntoluene, m- _Itexane.,, dioxane. (;enerally, the aromatic hsdrocarbons showed the best action,.alipliatic ketonesanditalogenated hydtocarbons were medium,, while acetates and aliphatic ales. had the:leastactivitr. No correlation between b.p.. solri, and activityy wass f'uund; u decreaee in.activity with increxsing.surface tension.of aliphatic alcs..and kctoncs and aromatic hydrocarbons with female G. mrtratarwas eleariv observedl. No o[ber correlatiumhetwreu other phvs: consts. and.insecticidul activity'eoul'd be establLshedl. From C1L 1959,6268. . , Ottb C. Elmer' Bipene, esiuert.medirtmfor elettraphoresisl Anast. A.A Cluistomanos, (Univ. Tllessalonild). Ckim.. Clmonika~ 'fiTREBT, Cn-~) 26, No, 4', 73-4(1901).-Tbetrse of ginenc iss suggFsted as= inert medium for paper electrophorevs of proteins and.peptides instead of.f toluene. G. A.,nnldnutas - The eHect'oft essential oils on~ the atherosclerosis of rab-6itsfed aholesGerol''. A.B .rnk n, A. Machtr„ F. 5rarvas, andT.Titioldi(Unlv.Szcged- ,Tiung,)',. A'raneunitkLFoncfi. 1L,.307-72(1981).-Rabbf[s fed1 g:/dayof cholesterol re- oei4ed 2 nd./day of a mixt'x of tapenes.consisting.pf tiorneal, eamphene, rineole, menthol,menthone, and. a- and $4- pinmes. Tbetreated animals rems'tned'fkeem~atheru matosis of, the aorta to a considemble degnee. IC. Schoen Microblological tavsformatfion of terpenes: bydfo¢yl'a- .tionn of a-pineae. P: K., Bhettae B, R, Prema, B.~ D', Kulkarni, andi S. '. a snatl. Ghemt Lab.,. Poona, India)'..Nafare 187, 089-7f1(1980).-A 24dir: culture ofAspergiflas wiger metabolized an amt. of d, pinene (S) equal to 0.5% of its'vols in 4-8brs• T7myielfl rof I included 2ff-25%ce.nverbenol, 2'to 3%% verbenone, and 2 to3%u trau.r.snBrerol. Most. of I is brokem dowa'into small fragments, CQiand IH.O.. R. D.Strickland The effectnd'n-pineneon oxygemabsorptionand glycoly-tih.activity im the rat brain, in experimentstn vivo. 11i. M.. ~Epya~~rl~ (McdL.lnst'., Kiev). Ukraie. Burkhi.+n~. Zlutr. 31„ 0~7`~l-7(Russian summary, 757-8)(1959).-Resuits af! exptsh with rats indicated that prolonged' inhalation off pmene lig ratshad no effect on.brainn respimtion; despitee the fact that the activities of suecinic dehydrogenase and lactic acid de- hyduogenasewere considerably9owered.. This IeAd to fur- ther studies of'theselectivc inllibitory emtiotr.of' pincne au thetbiA1 gruup of'enzytnes in the brain.. The injectinniof, unitl/iol (Ns 2,6-dimcr<.q)toprupauesulfunate) consideralily'.ce:.kenedy theeffartnf liiunucout brain alvenlysist tLis was L,ken as a direct iitdio:uinu ~dYhct fhct tlmt ttufihial badla succific cffcctt on tllr fuuctimuJ st:ne .eftissue sullhyJr.a gruup• Braiit glucokinuev anJ adcnn~iitetriphusllhaL~.x. ucrc lowered ufterr esp,hurc to pinetm_ Tllinl enrymc inxe- tivntion. was reversible. l+orty-lu3 days:dtor the z:us were rcmoved from Ulhupinenc cxposuree eifamber the.wtivity, of brain hesokinusew ruttuned.tonormal. 1Y. S. Levbtc
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' 1. 1 1 E MEi r~ t.l! K 1 1 \ L iJ L 1 AN. ENCYCLOPEDIA OF CHEMICALS, DRUGS. AND BI.OLOGICALS TENTH EDITION Martha Windholz„Edieor Susan Budavari. Co-Editor Rosermary F. B1lt'•mebti. Associate Ediror Elizabeth S: Otterbein, Assistant Ediwr ~'-/98.2- Pnbtislacrd b2" MERCK & COL, I2vc. FNHWAY'. N.J.. V.S.A. . 1983
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~'HSy:, (i9`o') 13fa7,e. Effect of'e-piaeneon the'e chemoreceptor functfouof''f theperipherale nerves. L. N. Bo a~t_s'k~a~~and M. M..Epshteln. Fi2.iaL. Zhuu, Akod'. Nauk.. Ukr.. A:S.R. 5,.659~'il(Russiau summnry,.fi61-L)(1959).-Rabbit ear'wasperfused with a- pinenc, a, component of pine needlespbytoeide (turpen, tine).. It't was shown that the reflex reaction to acetylcholine becnme less pronounced as a result of perfusing, a-pincnar solm, in 1 X 10-' diln.. throughh the ean vesseJs;; no such efi fect.wasobservied with 4 5( lOr''dilm3 of the pinenc. The. Ibsti sensitivity of the chemoreceptnrs to aeetylchnline wasmstored by preliminary treatment off the ear with a soln. of cysteine as a srpplementary source of SHgroups. It is'conelhded.thatdisturbanee.of chemoreceptor function seenn during perfusioniwith, a-pinene was.due to-changes, in the, tnctabolism elicited' inn the . receptorsus a resultt of block of the SH groups. B..S, Levine The e5e<t ofvolA4Te'plant-protecfing phytacides on the sulfhydryf content; and activity of'sylfhydryl enzymes in~, peripherali nerves. M. M.E~shtein.and Yu. S. Rotenherg,' C~ 1.~60) (Med. Inst., Kiev). UkYaia.eo~m. 2kur. 31, 196-201 ~ v' detdl hy the me[hodl ogf Ehevre ont.a~nflP Frederic (cf: Ros- 1 .1... -T 3Z. _ -Itiul. C.A.4g8, 13883d). Volatile phytocides of pine needles, cJ l a-ptnene and synthetic allyl mustard oil lowered the.SH.. gmup, no...in isolated nerves of'the frog and mt. Unfthiut cmnpds.. restored thee eaiginal' no. of' the SH groups. a-•. )Pihme and pine oil altered the activity of the sulfhydryl enzymes.. (yuetiiue and ghttamie acid dehydrogcnnses) in similar nerve prepns... ... B. S. Levine enAff-.3 : ( l9st~ /oYaF t Pharmacological testing,of vilerian .. root.. F. Gstirner and E.1:leinbauer'(Univ:.Bonn, Ger.).. Pkarmazee'T3,417r2C1. (1958).-Guppius (Eekisless reticufnWS)') were pl§ced in com- pletely cluKr 10-20% aq. infusion ewts.. of' valerian root (I)..Thcysoon.showed slowing of the swimming rhythm, indif- ference to tbuchii.g, color darkening, bacl--lying position. and side-lying.g on bottom of the eontainer, phenomena. inter- preted by sume ass iudicatingg a sedative action. Rapidd recovervfollowed transfer.to fresh.nrater:. Similar.resultswerer obtninedl withh other volatilee oil drugs (ehamomile;, thyme, balm-mint) i but not with non-volatile oill materials (dog.gresc, tnrmentil root).. The volatile oil of I was.fmc.d tionated 'mto itsvarious esters,, etc.,, by disln. under high,_ vaeuumi These. were diltl. in water,..shaken, filtered„ andd added to water with guppies; the strength,of the prepn. was measured' by an.oxidimetric micromethod. Three esters of bameo] when adtled'.to.theinfusion gave similar.effects ib de- scending.orderoGactivity:~ theacetate, formate,.and isova~ lemte (approx. 5-7mg. %.of each). The butyrate,.I-Simo- nene:. and!-a-pinenewere inactive. On using the revolvingg dmm~ methad' with aboue1000white mice; theestets activee in fish provedlinactive in.the'mice.and in fact.stimulated._ them, Io.wasconcluded that fish and miceare unsuited for tes[ing of' I1 Volatile oil-ftee prepns.. of I acted on fish in the' smne.waFastlie volatile oil and its.eomponentss flence,, theree must be other components of I besides thevolatile oil' which givethesee8ects. 41 references. G: M'. Hoekibg, -; bfechaniemm of a.pioene action. M. M. ~Epsh~teln~ and M.. B'.. Shehigol (A.. A. BogooletsMed. nTt.; Riev):. Ukraln. Biakkiin. Zhur. 30, L18-25(1958)(Russiann sum• mary,.125'-7).-A study was made off theefiect'e of mpinene' on.the elec. potential of.frog 4peripheral nerve. Resultsindicatedlthat'u-pinene in the mediumof atm. a'mor in..pureO lowered the nerve potential,, probably due too the forma- finnm of a peroxide from pinene, which. may havee actedl as an/ oxidiier of. sulfhydryl.groups of enzymic proteins: A, directtik reaction.between andlcombination ofcysteine and a-pinene wasalsaobserved. Irrespective of thee mode of actionn of a, pinene onsulfhydrylgroups, a shift occurred in the metabolic processes, which gave rise to changes in the magnitude of the - potential.of theperipheral'.nerve: B. S. Levine
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A• C 'I 29 = (I9s3) 98,, 0'483) C I} 4Y':, (! 9 93) ~ . 99: fi6M8p bevolbnt¢rybioaceumul¢tia¢ of' avfeonmentd pollutants in uouamokib.g heteroge¢eoua human population. A~qMypa~'Bogudkw IC;'O'NeBi,. Hugh. J. (Bes:. lat:, , HT~. ~L~IL 806i6 USA). J. finuiron. &.. Ha#k, Part A, 1982, AL7(866-83 (Eng)~, Armninveeive,techniqueof human apiredl air revealed the occurrence of human chem. biosttvmuletion and thee cham. identit¢of environmental pollutants. The total estd. bfusoeumuLtion, invoiva at, least281 environmental pollutants or nearly 80% of the total no. of e:pized <ompde. These pollutants include producte of' humenn tec}moL and tutural effluents and arcr distributed among the heterogeneous end homogeneous etudppopulations uconstituente~of the.aep, chem: bioeceumuletiens.. The chem. biueccumuletion in the heterogeneous study population, including wntrob,, prediahetio and' dfabetin, consists of 716ubiquitoue env'uonmental pollutants or 60.5% off the total atd. biose<umu4tioe. The ahum, bioaeenmu4tionn in the individud' homogenema eudg populatima mduda 116 nonubiquimu envita¢mmtal pollutants m39b%of the total atd. bio.avmuLtum. Eimple . prae¢t the major* erpaua health hevede inn both typa of study populatiom. The other obsd..environmentdpoBbtante, lududi¢~'i helocarbn¢a, eWoroaromn., silicone and F acmpd¢,,bmpema and amqhora, iggmrea tliaa health hazards byviiGm of tbe'm'Imown'toriiatr a¢dpadbleqm rgutie .ctivity. The .decad maj,¢voletile meaLolita. which rHeraeteriss tlhe oo¢tro1,. ' pradiabetic .nd', d'mbetic .dtdY ppultHOa. require special quaat:. studia in order to ascertain Nmr endagemus origin md to proee, thei'r aaro®. withh the atate off hmlltb encountered fn.n the reap. yopuletiona . . p8i 102265f Ihe.po¢ie of mieeoaomai peptidea.in De¢draetunua terebraua and rat liver to.a-pi¢ene.andbtheninducere. SWh~, RobertA.,.Jr: Agoaio,MOiw(Ikp..Zoul,.UnieGeorgie.Ti t~ne,. GA 30602UtbA). Deu. Biuchem. 1982, 23(Cytocbrome p-l60.Biochem.,, Biophya. Environ. Implir:), 797-9 (Eug). Mierammee' I eldctrophontic peptide differences oo¢ureed between 2~2 eeoL-relatad beefle species (D. terebwns and D. front¢fis) and between ratle treated with ¢-pinene ~ig-gg'-g1 and other Jiaducra, .g.n~ bIM-06-61; B-rmphtfluR¢uana (6os1-82-2). and 3-metehy c7 ho~tanut~1'),. [g6-/9-61i A6o, D. tereArane m' asoma abowedd a 50'-foltl higher meabohe activity Wward'aa-pinsne than didieitba control or treated ¢atliver microeoma: a-pmene-4eated rat micraeemes had  Im tar metabolic activity toward n-pibene tlien the rat'~ miaaomae rom control orot8ar induced gmupe It is suggated thatl these differenaeuedue tothapraena of highlyepeafic cytochrome Pe50 (g036-81~21 in Dendroctonue whichpoaibly are induced throughRhe inganun uf terpe¢e-tnntg. fuod.. "Bg7T1399p Indoprairpollution due to' organic gaaes and .epnaof.aolvena i¢ building'matenials. Moelha Lers /imt Hyg., Univ. Aarhue,. Aarha,' DK-8o00' DenJ:" uivo . Int, I98S:.. 8(L'-6). 117-27' (6ng)+The emission of org. eolvente feamcommondf used buiiding meterialu wa measured under etd. enm. conditioa. An av. of 22 oompdei warfound in the air around each building nraterid) and'.theootal oo¢cn: of geea and vapom waO.OL-1110 mg/mi. The'. ew aritAmeticemission rate wa 9.6'6 mg/m2 h, andi 52 difTerent <ompda were identified. A meth- modell was established fnr the indoor air concns, ofpollutante origineting,from.0 building meterielt. The. model wa tested on 3 model raums covetrucAed from the materialA investigated. The..eslcd total air ew~a. opf ~g~eeo end'vapors. in 3 rooma'wa l'-23:8 mg~mt,, and the ;tl tmt d~tfer7 from thox'. 23-32 Theaecnncns end no. of rom found in,actual roums eimilsr insixeand conatruction to the modBll roams. The rlahs of.health effects dueto theeompdse identified.from the.building materials were.invesligated, and criteria for future artrt' . quality etda. are dixvead.. The poeaibihty' of' neg. health effeclas annot.be neglected', ap. not floe the moreansiuve minority of the' generel population. /
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! /• eA' 11: (1943) (n,3 V3 (r), e'n _& : (lFYa) ?la 7(3-) CfP'":. (/FYo) . 7927(z) ~ e'R.ja :' (1984) d9 9'9 (tio OFJ jL: (/9'3 Z; 193q(1~) . ~ Detoxication of terpenes by-sbeep, J..M. _Ilarve M. White and T: G.. H. Jones. Univ. Qneensfand: Pa.pers,.. Depl.. Chem. 1~ . No..23, 10 pp.(1942).-Four. terpenes„ p<ymene(I),.. a-phcllandrene (pI), piperitone (M), a-pi- nene (IY):,,wem.administeredtosheepandthemetaoofites, appearingg in the urine were studied. After acid mydrolysiss and steam distillation the products reported wcre: from (I) cumir acidp. (If)' phe{landric aeid, p-cymene, rurau-e fnsacetone. and'd possibly phe0andral;: (III):) thymd, caren- tanuceWne„ pijieritone andd probably diosphenol; (IV)) toxic productk yet to:be ihvestigated.. E. R. Newton Effects. of'some.terpenes on the skfa: H. iedel.. Kf.n.. Wochschr. 19„ 103h-6(1040).;. R'ev. Current i. Painf, Calour,: Aarnuh& Allieddnd: 15, 164(1942).-Of' 102erpenes tested (patch tests anthe skin)', only a-pinene, limonene,.phellknd[ene and.p-eyatene showed acute action (inflhmmation and ihn some cases blisteringafterg soaking the forearm fotn one hr. in the solvent), while most of the terpenesshoweda.clironic effect. G. W. Ayers The anthelhdntia action.n of someterpenes . Tuneyosi Ta ~ Japan. L dleC. Sci. I V. Piiwmacal.12, No. 2/3;, roc:. Japan. Pharmacol. Snc.. 13,. 4i0-2(194(l),.--Studies were made omsantonin, macnio. (ext: of Digeneaa sinep/ez);, naphthalone„2-naphthol„CC4, ncmatol, thymoi,.mentbol,, menthone„menthy0acetate, camphor„ borneol and piaene: All depressed the isolated.rabbit'sma]U intestine and . killed earthworms. Santonin and naphthalene were the slowesq, requiringseveralbours to kill. On swinc asearfs; santonin,. macnin and pinene.requimd more than 48hrs.,, menthyll acetate 3-24 hrs:, and lhe other drugs10 miv. to:2 hrs. tokill.. The merhanism of action.of santonin i.s; unknown. Drugs acting ann nematod6sparaly¢a the muscle. James C. Lfunch t:ompsrative activity of some carcfaogeniahydiocarboas. J. M. ~T~r and C. C. Twort. Am. J.Cancxr35,..8o-5(1939) =~salh.. of 3;4-benzopyrene (1) iv CHCIi, applied . daily'toy the skin of mice„ is about 5times as carcinogeni, asa.soln, . ofdibennnthracene(II). When dissolved in oleic acid'I, it is about twice as potent.as II., Methylchol- anthrene,, in CHCL, is'abouts twice as. potent as: I.. Cryst. picrates:of a.piaene synthctic: tar made at:8511° had; . an.aetivityaboutequivn tothat:ofH.. Thefrequencyof' hyaline dbecnetation andd of spindle<ell: epithelioma, is related to the carcinogenic activity of the agent. Cellsrend¢red irreversibly cancerous~ by I are retardedd by lanolin from.developingintoatumor. Cellsrcnderedahnormalby a few applications af'Ipassquickly into a canceroussYagewhens stimulatedi by olcic acid„an effect not producedl by liquid parafHni or lanolin... P. R..Muin Hiogeaesis oflthe terpenes.. K. ~Ganapa~thil... Current Sci. 6, 19-20(1937).-Adapting:the ww tl Iaf, fmgencral. thee widely distributed terpenns are only indicative of:the case with~which the biol'...reactions.in the planhproceed in the diieetion of their formation and not suggesting that thcyare.functioningas the.progenitors of'otherterpenes, C.. has made a study of' the relative abundance of the( IcrpcnesThisslmuld serve asa duc to understanding ihe biogenetic tendknciesin tlmplaneregarding the syn- iitesisof'the terpenes. AA census taken withh thiss idcaa furnishes thc following dota: a-pinene.occurs in.J75 oils7 cincoll in 2G0; Ihnonenein IfiO; phe8andrene in 126; borneol in 110;; camphene in 85; camphor in 70;: a-tecpineollin.165i: 6-pivene in 00 and the others alf'occuring in wsmallcr no. ofi oils(the aliphatic terpenes being omitted),. It. is suggested.that.linalodil can.satii:factorilybe.considered. tohe the preeursor of.all the above widely occurring:terpenes.. A scheme is given showingg the prob-able "general.directionof the processes"iathefonnation" of the widely distrihuted terpenes in.nature: W.. J..F'.
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SECTION 1. FIRST Atl):ANDE\LEBGr.\"Cq TREATMENT Tox dl) aalin4ur Clas. Supertosia. Extremely to141c. TASLEIt Yrobshle Um11LLF71'HAI. U~..:e tHumanl i 4 Gery.toxic 5(1-5f10 mr./kQ. 3 Moderately. toxic Uab.5 gmfkK. 2 SliKhtlytoxic 5-15 Qm./ks. I I N`racticallyy nannrxic abnve75Qm./kR. Fnr %1 kC{>Prvnn I lfdl lh. i A taste Iles than 7 dropsl'Eet.veen 7'drnps and I I teas-pwmf'ul Bet ween l tsp.. and 11 ounce Hetweemll oz. and I pint (or.1 Ih.) I tiet ween ~t pt. and 1 quart More:than I quart (2:2'.Ih./ L- I estimates mayy be useful inm prognosis (,Toness and! 6Work;. American J'ournal of Diseases of Children., ]02r. 427„ 19611). If thee toxitity'rtating iimpliesa poor or equivocal prognosis(with respect'to mortality or morbiditjr), even the asympto- matiic person should'be examined'as soon aspossible.. This iss important even if the alleged exposure occurred many hours before: Some toxic agentsproduce severe sequelae after lbng, periods of latency. A situation..like this represents a challeng- ing opportunity to the therapist. 2. Has the patient vomited? If' not, and if the poison isthoughti to have been ingested. suggestl.one'of the followingemetie.stimulig lt?one.of these:procedures.should be attemptedl if the patient is unconsciouss or semiconscious, or if the ingested poisonn is thought llo'o havee been a strong alkali, a; mineral'acid, or.lterosene..Severe heart disease and pregnancy are sometimes valid eontraindications.If successful, any'oneof~the first three: measures (a-O should imducevomitinge within, 2 to, 3 minutes. a.,Tickleorgentlystrokethebackof'the.patientPsthroat Indnce.vom'uting, -with afinger: Wi'thh a child (who may bite) use.a blunt probe like' thehandleof a teaspoon. Mechanically induced emesis is seldom extensive enough to: be ade-quate. b. Have the patientdr'ink one or more glasses of warm water containing aa teaspoonful of mustard powder. IvLix.the dry mustard with' water just beforee drimking.. c..Repeat.procedure (a) above after the stomach has been distended with t7uidl ('see3:below)',. d'..If available;.ipecae syrup: . (IUSP) ) may be adm~inistered.by mouth,. The connrentionalI emet'ic dose issaidl to be 8 mL, but a single dose.of 155 to~ 20 mP, has been given without untoward effectsto~ many young, childrenn who had ingested potentially toxic substanees.. Vomiting.g under these circumstances is not immediate, but 56% of. the patients vomit within 15 minutess atid 88% . wiNhin 30 minutes. (Robertson{. American Journal'of Diseasesof
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Anthelmintisactioa of principless of volatilee oils,. Il. .Action on pig Ascsris.Yasu.li.Nozawa. Sup¢oru Med. J.. 3, 48-53(195?.).-Chlorothymo ,cf' arvacrof, diliydrochavi-tietol, dihydroeugenol, thymol,.. geraniol, and menthol'l showed a stmngasearicid'wlg action. Guaiacol,.isoeugenol,. ?isnclmvibetol. safrolc,.isosafrole, ¢cymene„chlorocarvacrol. =eitrenellol, linalbdl, linalyll acetate,, camphor„ borneol„ a-pinene; 1'-limonene„ d-limonene, terpineul', terpinalene„ mentbone.. menthoglyrol. isopulegol, eucalyptole„ and chenm podium oil showed a, weaker action.. II. Action on.n the eartliworme muscle preparations. Ibid. 5-ti-60.-XIl of the eompds. cited ih.PartI showed a stimulating action onrthe dtnervated muscle prepn. of' earthworms. No relation wass observed„howevery between.this.stimulatingactiun andthe ascarieidal action. IH. TVricityy for mice and the ef5cacy.' against pigg ascarisand earthwonn: muscles. Ibid:..73-7.- L.Duw(mg./10.g..bodywt.).form-ucewas: d-limonene311.7,., chlorotliymol 24.6, menthone 18.7, hatiloBP 14.7,, dihydto- eugenol'. 14.5~ tenpineol.13'.6, menthoglycol 12.4, geraniol. 10.91 eucalyptole 10.7„isosafrole 10.3„mcnthol 102, safrole. 10.2', citronellup 8,8; ; carvacrol 0'..8, thymot 6.0;, dihydro-' chavibetol18A„guaiaeoS 32: Nu,definite relationn waaoa servedt between the toxicity' for miceand'e the ascaricidall action or the.stimulating action to earthnrorm muscle. IV. Chemical s[iucture and biological'potency. Ibid...78-SS.- httroduction off an alkyl radical in Utre nucleus of phenol ~ deaeased.the ascaricidal action (I) of phenolk.. I of ¢-alkyl- pbenol and m-all-ylphenol was the same, while the latter was. mure toxic to miee than.the former.. Chlorinati0n ihcreaxed P of.f thymol,, but did not iuareasethate of carvacrol. I of',- terpene ales.. (especially primary ales..)') was strongerttian that of terpene ketones. Hydrogenation of unsatd. side eliaibsiw alkylbenuoes and alkyk:yclohexaness increased' their.It Itfro.Tyuma , Possibilifiesofs thee use of ethereal loils for room.disudec-tion. 11. W. Kellne and'. N. Kober (StadY. Hyg. Iast.,,.. Numberg„ Ger.). Arvneienil[rf-ForrcB_ 5,. 224-p(1955)p cf. C.A.48,.1012f3[.-Theantihacterialactionmf 175 ethenalb oils has been tested against 0 s7,caiesof hacteria¢ -^1 of'f the most active oilswem chssified'd according to plant families and.ehemd eompn. andd it was found that oilsfro,m.the stmee families eontainn thee sM1me unr similar comprl5. The follow- iogcompds: showerl strongantihacteriallactixit}^/.cymcne;. linalo6l. gemniol, nerol, thlmoq carvarrol',.eugenol, sdml,.- BzH„ cumene aldehnde, einnamic aldehv(lo, salicv•lie nidc-_ ,)iyde, pulegone, carvone, thujone.ascarirlol,and cincoL. The: , terpenes in. genernl show emtsiderableantibacteri:d. nctivin.. K. Schoen 'phe effect of' variouss essential oils on -hay ameEas.. ~~Chien-li Huang(Natl.. Taiwan: Univ.,. Taipei, Formosa).. . o,TF rnoad:As.mt.53i8-11(195i'):.-H3yamebaswere. killCdi by'the essential oils cavacrol (1/1,000,000), eugenol (1/100,000), annamic aldehyde (1/10,000),, citronellal. 1(1/10,000),, and geraniol' (1/1010f10)'in 1% EtOH. Cin~ namie ale., eitronellol',.linalbnl, eineol, gemnyl aeetate;, and liualyl acetate inhibited movementt at L/100,000, diln. Phenyl-ethyl ale., benzyl acctate,benzyl benzoate, methyl salieylate;and'a-pinene inhibited at 1/10,000 diln... Results' indicate that activity of essential oils against hay amelxisparallels their bactericidal activity. Johm, P: Crispell hercutaneousabsotption and chemicall constitution. Hydiooarbons,, aleohols, and esters:. G..JV,aI ette and. R. Cavier (Fac- pharm.,. Paris). Artk. entern;-¢)wrmacody- vomie97;. 232--00( I954').-The speed' of penetration of the skimof rats was measured for the.satdle hldrocarbons,pri- mary ales. and their acetate esters, and the.Et esters of.thesatdl fattyacids.. The rate increases up to a chain lengthi of 6 to 8C. atoms and then.decreases. The.hydiocarbonspmetmte best, the ales. leasL The estersat ttieirr opti- mum, chain.lbngtli are absorbed about.as fast as the kydro- carbons but otherwise quite slbniy... Benzene;, ethplbni-zene„ isopropyltienzene„ xylene, and cymcne were well ab- sorbed, and soo were myrcene, alloucimene;.limonene,, phcl-landrene„ pimne,, and nopinene. Carpophyllene is, how-ever; veryslow... Meand Et'benzoates:and salicylates,and Et pkenyl6cetateateslow.. 114'. L...C. Bcrnheim -
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N~ir) ipAlhL--~-tctidJiehL- )'r1FpPn~-n'o/J' &P.W'IGF- el7 e'. 526312PB-257V18/1Nosauitlo-0arvicide. (Patend)' Stevensr. Kenneth L.t Jurd, Leonard: Denarteent of A9riculturerRashin9ton. D'.C. Cure.Saurce.CodesIl 108800', Rencrt No.f PAT-APPL-627 328. PATEHT"a 972 897 FiIed:30Oct 75 patented 3Au9 76 3r Previnusl'e fi:Led as PATrARPL-55A.053n 27 Feb 73. This Severn.ent-oened'invention availablee forU.S. D'icensinY and'a. nossiblMn tor forei9n bieensins., Corr.of, Patent available Co.aissioner of Patents, Nashinftone D.C.2023i $0.50. Ducu.vnE.Tvee7l Patent. NTISPr'oces7l Not available NTIS', Journal Announce.ent: 6RAi762A Li.onene (or aleha-rinen.) ') is cendensed .ith, sesa.ul under auu.uus acidic eonditionss too produce a.iatura of tuv novel co.ruw.Js.uhich ar. u.e6u1 as .oseuito Iarvic'sdes.,
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Cy,5-72'.: (l9ca) 9e.23 e'fi "r/ ,` 09s.z) l3/9'9 1~ Cf9 sc : 0 9(a) as3Y' ~ Effect of some essential.l oils.on dehydeagensse activity of paramecia. M. M. E shtcm and S. M. Filvavs ka. bfek- ,adial. Gf., Akod..e~rsu ' r. RSR 24., No...2, 44 7(Russian smnmary„ 47-8)(191i2). Rosemane} pine, andl valcriauic oils:were the most'.effective, wiiile mcrtle eutd ginger.oil were least cffectivn as pmtistocidal agents. Dehydiogenase (L)r activityof paramecia was (Tlmuherg metliowl~ depressed imostl byy rnsentaryand wild orange.oils and least by gingcrr uil, tvith.pine.and.oil of wintergreen.uccupyingintermediate peisitions.. Theprotisticidai and I+iepressing properlics of theessentiale oilsparalltltd one mmther: Rosemary ni( wasmost:s inhibitory for succinic dehydrogenase, followcd by wild orange oil; ginger oil Imd practically tm.eHecton it. AA stndywasalso made of! the hicyclic terpenc n-pininc„ aa basic component of pineuil. Therewas.a parallclism be-- tween intensity of' protisticidali pmpertiesand's cytoclirmne oxidase activity for mpinene. lt was coneluded thatldepres- sion of'oxidative enzyme activity played.a substantial role ' ' in dhe mechanison of protistocidal aetivity(if essential oils. B..S.Ilevinc . Mode of action,of ezcess ofvitamin A. IH'.. 1Lespera- ficity of the effect on embryonic Ghick-limb cartilage in eul- ture: andd on isolated mt-liver Iqsosomes.. Honor Bl. Fell J..T. Dingle, and M. Wehh,(Stmngeways Reuarch~ a~i.. Cambridge, Engl.),Biucheue: J. 83. fi3-9(B162);cf. CA59;.22508e. AA no:, of compds.,, including;derivsg ofl vitamitt- .1,. terprnes,.and airs., were examd..for ahilityy to reproduce the effects.ofl vitamin A on. embrynnic chic@-1imb cartilsgeirt culture and on~the release of'cathepsin from isolated lyso- somes. These included vitamin A.ale., vitamin A acid (Na salt), vitatnin A acid (free), vitamin A palmimte; vitamin. e1C acetate, vitamin A.oxidii:ed inaii, vitamin A epoxide„ hydFo- genatedd vitamin A,. anhydrovitamiu A,, isoprene, ettml: Q and d-ionone,. Q-cymene, pinene,. pHytol, dbdemnol, netanol,, gl4ceryl trioleate,glycerol, iso-BuOH. 2-metHrf-2-butanol, EtOH, toluene; aeetone„cysteine, and calciferol. In organ cultures. at a conan. of 0.01 microntole/mL.. none of the compds: examd. except vitamin A acid had a significant'effeet ontheexplants; thee6ectsof'thisderiv.weremdistinguish- ablt from those producediby vitamin-A. At a conan of (Ii1i, mietomole/ml. hydrogenated vitamimA and 0-ionone slightly reduced; . the growth ih length of the explants; but caused littfe' histol. change: APprox: r/. of the..bound proteasewas te- leased from isolated rat-Lver lysosomes by 0.7micromoleof 'vitamin A/mI. Of'thef compds. studied under the: same conditions, anly vitamin ~A acid..had an effect comparable to that of' the vitamih.; other derivs. of vitamin. A were inac- tive, and most of theterpenes.had about25% ofi.the activity of.the vitamin. At higher concns. the specificity of the vitamin was reduced~: The results ihdicated that the action of; vitamin A.was.liighlyspecific on tartilage in.culture and aBo at low conens: on trie' isolated lysosomes-. Roland F..Been;,, Jr. Thermadynamtcactivity of'some industrial' poisons.- evaluation of'the activityiu the toxicology of volatile organic compounds. V. A.. hilov. Tr. Naruhn. .Sersii Leningr. A'auckn-Jssfid. Insr'M_Wny. Trrrda i'PYoJsabuteo'.,.195g, 223-31(Rhb: 1959).-A thermodynamic treatmamt wa:made of 84 diHerent volatile org, compds.. Relationof unspecifie activity to different.functionst and, logarithmic dependen~ of:activity iv homologous series was. tested. The range biol.. activity of various narcotic compds.. were detd. J. Htadec. 'rhermodynamioc activity of'volaule organicc compounds andtheir action on mammals. V.. A. Fi1sv . Biafu:ika: 7,. 'No.. 1, 73-9(1902):. Activities.(deRne~-as A-=P/pr+.wficre p was.rapor pressure under exptl. conditionsands pn the pressureof tbe satd...vapor) of f94 volatile org. compdsg caus- inglateral decubitus inmtce after 2 hrs. exposure, as:well as -activitiesof.41 eompds: eausing the threshold effecton tlle uncondtioned-re0ex. activity in rabbits, wem caled.. I'tt is concluded that the thermodynamic activities may'scrve fora gross.classifications of the type of action. The rela- tiim between ¢he log of:activity'andithe:total no. of . CC atoms in the ihvestigated.cornpdsd may be used to predict.the biol. e8ect ofhomologs.. N- JasinezuM
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586. Fenaroli's Handbook.of Flavor Ingredients Olher names 2{¢Phcnylprop511'-tetrahydro fuan 2,Hydrocihnamyf.tetrahydrofuxanl s{3-PHenylpropyl).tettrahydrofuran. 2-Plnene 2,6,6-Trimethylbicyclo{3,1,3 )•2-heptene'. C,ofBm Empirical formula Structure CuH..G' C 0 7--Ckty, CH'-CH Pliysiial/chemicaleharacteristics'' Appearance Colorlesss to psde,.strawyellow liquid Mobile, colorless liquid )•tolceulhr.wei8ht 190]B 136:23 Meltinor.point.. -623°C )3oiGng.point'. 105-107°C.at i mm HIY 156°C at. 760 mm Hg Specifiegpavity. 0.8625 a015'C Refractive index f.5hf2 at 204C. 1.4680 at 15°C Optiel rmatibn d-, +51°8';.1-„ -5l`17', -58° Solubility Very slightly soluble'.io water; soluble in Insoluble in water; soluble in akahol,.. akohof chloroforrn, and ether;;ahnost insohrblb in propylcne glycol and glycerim Organoleptic ahsn- acteristics 8ynthesis Naturafoceurrence Sweet,t fruity odor,; hone,y-like,, sweet flavor Front #-(2,(5-phenyl fury111-propionic aoid.butylester by catalytic hydrogena- tion with,cnppcr ahromiteunder pres- sumand subsequent ringclosureg by hating the: intermediate 7-phenyG heptan-l,4-diol in thee presence of Alr0 ` Notrcported foumd.in nature Characteristioc odor of pine; turpentine- Iike; oxidimd material rosin-like odor. Fromm turpentine, by distill6tion... Forr total synthesis see reference 7: The strueture wnuld'account for the presence . of four optically activee and two optirally' inactive isonurs. Only d-, f-, and dlb-. pincne are known; howe¢er..lts pR.sencee in nature hasbeen~ reported in mom than ~. 40D essential nils: Ih the largest amountsits hasbeenreponed found in: Achilfea: miliefolium (ri-), Arremisia rridemam(d-), Italiann rosemary. (6), wildi thyme. (1-y. French, lavender (!-), coriand'er (d-, dl-). . cumin.(d-, d6). labdanum p-), ncroli (1-). lemon, . llrsea cu6'e(m. (il-)., and ylhng- ylang(d:). Reported uses? Non.alcohulic beverages 0.50~ pprn Nan-alcoholictleverages16-94ppm ~ ~ iceecream„ices, etc. Candy 2.0 ppm 0.03-2.0 ppm lce cream;' ices, ete. CBndy 64-0pm 48ppm ~ ~ . GeJatins:and puddings Chewing.gum 2.0 ppm 2.3 ppm 'I Baked goods Condiments 160 ppm 2.6-150 ppm Cr] Cd I Regulatorystatus FDA 121i1164;; FEMI4 No..2898'. FDA 121L1164; FEMA No. 2902 REFERENCES For references 1-5, smintroduction.toPart 11. 6. Thewalt and' Rudolph,.Brr. d:D.C.G:, 96:136,,1963.. 76 . Komppa, Ann. Amd. Sei: Fenn., A59:3;.1943.
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4 T 3L7/2r4'.7.9..13 EXERPTfE MEN'C>!4, 3/7/2 79176544 Conversion ofi alpha-rineneto aivha-einene',oxide bs rat liver andthetiark.beeEG.eOendroctanuoteretlrans nicrosa.al fractli.ons White R.,Aa Jr.i Franklin R.T.1 Asosin M. Schr.Forest Resuurc.. Univ.Georsia+. Athens, Ga. 30602 U.S.A. PESTIC. BIOCHEM. PHYSiOL. (U.S.A.) r1979, 1.0/3 (233~247). Cbden7PCBPB' Languagesl ENGLISH 3/7/4 78267754 Turpentine induced herersnnsiti.vitv. to Peeeer.intoil Doo.s Goossens.A..:: DegreefH.l Holvoet C... Maertens M.. eat. Der.atol.. Kathol. Univ. Leuven BELGIUM' CONTACT DERMATITIS(DENMARK): .1977,1 3/6 (3'04-308)r. Coden: CODED Languages: ENGLISH After a dentalareratiom afaraen Daborators technician was referred to our clinicc because aT swelling of his tonsuer lirsr and.Yingival .ucosa.. Patch testing'.w'ith theICDRGstandard:.test batterg.gavePositive reactlions'to coleeManw, balsa. ef: Perurp and turpentine. aeroxidee. Further eatahtesting revealed hseensensitivite to. veprereint nil. (an:ingredient af' several dental,ereparatinns), duetoe thesensitizin9 eraverfdes of 3in9red'sents: aieha pinene, lironene, and eheilandrene. These covounds~ also occur in turaentineoil'.e a substance used in the rati~ent's laboratarg.. 3/7/7 78012927 Sensi'tizing:and irritating rrorerties.ofl star anise oilRudzki E.; G.zswa 7. M. er.atol.r karsauiNed.. Sch.. WarsawPOLAND CONTACT DERMATITIS (DENMARK) ..1976n 2/6 (.305-308).Coden: CODEDLangua9es: ENGLISH' Star anise.oil im 2 and iT concentrations produced act.ivesrnsitizatiani in 52' of testt subdects:, and.-aositivenatch tests in 36and: 34%, respectivel'sr.of consecutive PatientswitM'der.atitis. A co.sari'son ofthcresults of tests with balsaws.ands other essential ails showed that star aniseeil does not give cross reactions and rseudn cross sensit'ivits.. Patients positive to thisoi.l are freouentla positi,ve to anetholeand toother constituentsof'this oiU: alpha rinenen ligonsne and s:f*ole. In~ tests with star anise oill it is nateuorthew that a. 1% . cnncentrationi iss strongls irritant, and 0.5Y:Z revealssensiti,vits in onlw one fifth of theactivels sensi:tizedd subuects. It.is eossiblee thatt thee cause of false negative ratch tests .ight be:si.'>lar in the case of some other alYergens., 3/7/9: 77001672'. Increase in~ tspe a virus particles induced in BALB/c .ouse er'sder.isduring chemical careinogenesis BiDLY M.C.a Siith G.M, . Tobacco Res.. Counc. Lab.. HarroSate UNITED KINGDOM BRIT.J.CANCER(ENGLAMD)' r1975h 32/6' (660-666)rCoden:', BJCAA, Languagest ENGLISH Electronn ei'croscocicc observatinnss of normal BALB/c .ousee epidermis revealed the Presence of isoleted.intracisternal Asarticles. Nvnerplasiar. raeil.lo.a andd carcinoma fornation induced bv toriral eveli,catidn of benzal'a)avrene (BIaJF') and 3 nethelcholanthrene (MC) is. zecn.vanied bw an incneasein the nu.ber of A: rarticLes. Toei.cal.. arelibation of a non carcinogenic ikri.t'ant alpha einenelalrhePl failed tarrovide comparable chanaes.Exawinat'aun of the nucliei indicatedd occasional electrnn dense granudesin the nucleorlas- whicM' became .ore co..um throughaut the progre5sian of c2rcinogenesis. 3/7/.L3 76060556 Effect' of aleha.pinene tneat.ent,on the.s.ooth endoelaswic reticuLu. in the rat Pae.A.: Szarvas.F.. I DeaUr Med...r Univ. Ned. Soh.r. Szeged HUNRART ACIA'. MORPHOL.ACAD:.SCI.HUNG. (HUNGARY) 197YY 22/2(187-192):.. C6denC ANSHA Languages: ENGLISH
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.2. CIH F'~: (1913) C H~4?':(1Ay3) c' ig f2 : 0w) C'q 41:. (iqf a) 981.6668t8. Hapatotoricityand pulmonarytosicityof pennynoyal oil and its conetituent'terpenn'.lin thamouee. Gordnn;, W. Perry; Forte; Anthony. J; MeMurtry, Randolph~ J:; GlTue; Nelson, SidneyD. (Dep. Mmd..Chem.,.Univ. Waeldngton, Seattle;.WA.98195USA):. ToxicoL. Appl: Pharmacof:. 1982, 65(3), 413-24 (Eng). Pennyroyall oil, an arom. mint-like oil used as a. flavoringandlfragrance.agent and as.a herbal medicine, caused aeute hepatic andd lungg damage at 400 mg/kp iipp and higher in male mice: CeLUler necrmie waa.laca[ized to iba centrilobuke regiooe, of the liver andl Aronchiolarepittielial celles ofl the lung. Capillarygasdiromatog anal. of sampleas of pennyroyal oil that were: obtained from heeltlifood emres:ehowed'thepreeence of! several monokrpane ooatituente. R-(+)-Put¢gone. [89~-82-7] was the major terpeneand camtitutedl >80%% oE tbe canetituent terpenes in the oils that were eeamd. Pulegone and 2uther.constituent krpenea, ieopukgone [2960f.79-9] and mentho/uron [494L90-e7, were:bothhepatotusic',and, puhaonnry torie.. Based on reeulte of'fiietol. ecoring of' neerueie, plesma GPT elevationa,.and hepatio.glutathione depletion, R:-(+)-pulegane is.thes krpen¢ primarilyreeponaibk:for the tissue necrosis. Furthermore,, reaulks of' toricitytests wi0leeveral mngenen of R-(+)-pulegone, including the etuntiomeric S-(-)'-putbgone [2391-90-g]',b eteonglyy impGcated' the a-ieopropyiidene ktomgrmt pp ee the structural unitt required fon elu.itingg hepetatoricity, although the configuratimud orientetion: of the Me group ran modulate tha,tiefmtoWltic reapmny/ - 99:89729+r C5emiall composition and biological activltyof'~ easenHal oile of'plantu from Northeaat Braail - genus Lippia. Beurrn. P:;, Femandet, A C.; Crevei.o„A. A.; Andrade, C..H. S.; . 1Gf-ema-, FJl A.;: Aiencaq J: W.; Meebeda M. h 4;Vieru, G: S..B.;:: Meme, F. Fatims; Rou~ueyrol, M. 2elia (Dep. !$io1., Univ. Fed'. fi.ea` re;, Brav7). Cienc: CWc. (Sao Paulo) L981„ 33(Silpl., Simp. Plant Mbd Brae., 6f:h, 1980)~, 1-1i4'(Pott). The wmpn. of Lippw: atniJofio, LL grottu, L aidcida, G thymoide, LL alba„L. aX• eidotde, . and' 1:, o//:.arfatooo essential oilas k given. Thymal [89-83-8]I was the.majorcunatituentof L. alni/ollo, < p+oryop/tylkna [87-4M5] ofl L. unstam, andl 0.methyfl8ymol (t076-36-8] of L. H.ymoidee. Moeteodktillatee'.from otC manuf; were moBuedeidaisgp inet Biom=pholario giubrata. Of'f the eompmtenta, molluecicidal activityy aa.s shown by ttiynwl, caraacrol. (499-75-2]; and timmnene [138-86J].. The codistil4tn had aom~e phyefoin L' dfecte on,n mammals in vftro, uchs as acetylcliolinesteraee btor:Itage t6e rat ukrue. - _97:.i2iS7gb F.Meebs of iubraco ema" cempoend'e on theciliary activity o6ahe embryoehfchentrachea im vitro. ~ Berttl; Curvall; Margerela; BoreB, Curt.H. (Div. e11. uzi6ol., Univ: Stockholm, S-1'06 91 Stoeltholm~Swed.). Toricob8y 1982, 22(T), {t-55(Eng). Tbe:tdliotoaaty ofSl6~. mdtmdual~. compde. repreeentative of tLageaeotts and eemivoiatile phasea of toba¢o~ smoke was inveettgetod using chicken trecheell organculturee:. Whenczemd.at5mMwntaiand,meeeuritKthe timee toaomplete ciGoeLSie, 36% ' of the eompde.. caueaedd nliostasiss withih. Mmin, whik -50% had'' no vuible effect on the:ciliary, activity dhring'a 60-min erpoemx. The majority of' the ciliotosic compds. were either elkylated phenylethera„ benronittiles, beozel'debydea, phenols;, barmenea, naphthal6nes„ andindelee, or aA-imsetd. ketones and aldeftydea or Ca-Ctoo alipha alca., eldehydeaacidaand nitrilea Most of the compds. classified es benzoicacidA, eetere„ polyarom:. hydrocarbons;amines and N-heterorycles, except indolee,, were inactive. 97: g6684b Allelopabb[c potential of terpene-aecretiing .(aromatie) plants. y~ym~T:; Aiaht,L (BioC Dep'.. Montane. StateUniv:,.Boaeman~Al'l` 59717USA)'. Proc. .ldont.,Aaad. Sci. 1982, 41,. 51-6 (Eog). Thetoticity of 8 terpenes. (cineole1470-82-611 citroncllot [106-22-9], dipent¢ne. [108-86-3], o-iimonene. [5989-27'g], menthol C14B0-04-B1,a- [80-68-8]and 8-pinene (127,91-31, and terpineol [80g0-41-7~] is demotutreted ftir cucumber(Ctmumie. mflmur)i Qtml. similar reepomeeof other plants to theeeterpen ea is aeaumed'~, On,this buie,.5g5 plantacatalq2ed by Guenther (1952)) as contg. ?i of tbeeeterpenea~~are labe[ed' ae presumptive allelopaths.. A.table ahew the tazonomic distributiun: of theeeterpenea toidentify ptant'.groupa moet liYelytbcontain plants a0elnpathic due.torerretionoetLeee:terpenea. . .
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/0. ~"A S~g f/Fss~} 41At/ pt - Antitielinfuth'¢c actioan of the eomponentsof:essentisl oils. G. ,\..'~a.l~et~tea R. Caviery andl J. Debelmas (Eac. pharn., Pans7. xnn. pharm. fran{. 11, 649-53(i953) -Tests.ix aitto were.carried out with RBahdilis macrocerm and Ascarii snum, thetota[andlthe anterior segment of the parasite being used. In viva. tests weremadt with~the oxyures of the white mouse:. Carvacrol, eugenol, isoeugenol, cianamic aldehvde; silicvlic'.aldehyde, pinene„and geraniol were activea: anti.- helmintlties.. A.. E. Meyer R.'epellents for arthropod carriers of infec0ous diseases. S: G. Gl4dkikh.. Zkur. Afikrodiol:,Epidemiol. 6nmuno8wl: 1953,~61-5. Ivlosquito repellents testedd for av. protection tiine (min. to first bite)'.were:) o-C:H.(COOM" _alone, 270; iu.25% EtOH soln., 120; 15% emulsionn in glycerol, 180; 15% emulsionn in petrolatum„ 180; n-C.Hv (COOBu)t alone, about 180; 25% . EtOH'H soln:., 90; 15% ~ emulsion in glycerol,, about 120; 15% emulsion'in' petrola- tum, about 120; a-pinene frsction from juniper ext., 48; erosine;.12; liquid petrolatum, 2;:; glycerol, 3:. Incidence lof'mosquito-Iwme.infection iu.a groupusingno repellent' wass mme than twice the incidence inn aa group usingn- C.fG(COOMe)i. Hot weather and perspiration shorten theprotection time. Daily use:foc6 9.weeks.produced.no "ill'l effects on.the skin. JulianF. Smith Skfn.sensitfvity to different.terpenes and terpene: frae-tions. Saen. HeI1Nrs m„ Nils Tllyresson, Sven. Gdsta Btohm,, and unnar~ ~dmark. (KarolinsL-z Iast_,. Stock-holm). .lt1a- Dernvdo-pVenerealll. 33, 51-111(1t1a3)(im Eng-- lislrJ:; ef: C.A..45„ R660t. Skin sensitiaatian; is attributed'.'. to:terpeneoxidation.products.rather.thamtopuretcrpcnes.. Patch tcsts werc conducted on.(1).thc terpcnes 6t'~carcnr (y SSI IL. (I); a-pincnc (11); p-pincnc. sylvcstrcne, and 1-limonene;:( (2) air nxiilationn prnducts of I and I0; (3)'.synthetic pinonic and pinic acids (1H);: (4) ~fractions from micrnnliromatogra- pbvof icrpencs:nn sili<agrl (Illohmt C.A. 45„50:>ri).. Ad- sorptognnns of an us. vol. indicated inlmmogeneity of most satnples. Patchtcstswereneg..forHlandHighlyPuriGcdil,h and, strongest far stronglyadsmbed fractions of oxidized terpenes., Ruth C. Pierle CR' 1: (l9 4T)' WO02~ Cf138 : ' (/ ?Y~') & I/Y S(a) -Detoucatian mediani®s in sheep. S. E:WWiiiatt_ (Univ. Queensland). Uxio. Qstensland'. Papers, Dept. Chem. 1,. No.. 25;, 1-10(1945).-Investigations have , been.conducted.on.the mechanisms.utilizcd by the sheepim the dhtoxi5cation.of a-phellandteue, paymene„ men- `thot, a-terpfneol, terpin.Hydmte, cineolE,, and a-pinene: The animalss werenmintained on aa diett of wheat o0 oat ctiatf andd concentrates for 2 or 3 days prim too the begin- ning. of, andduring, the expt. The sample was dild.. to, .30cc. with liquid paraffin and.the miit.. administered'.by means of a standard drenching gun, each.dosebeingpre- ceded bya drench of 5 cc. 10% CuSO. to minimize passage into therumen.. The urine was coHectedl in iYcOH and under toloene,, and wasexamds for'the presence of' the detoxified.prod'ucts:. These tests have indicated that.thesheep does not use any detoxication meehanismss peevliar too that', . animal, nnd'thatl on a normal diet finds no~diln-.culty inaupplying adequate glucuron'ucacid and glycine for conjugation purposes. Close similaritywasy observedd with, the methods used ihn the rabbit in somee instances, andla Iligh degrec of axidation,.as evidenced hyJowyield: nf' dctoxificdd products, was encountered. Itt hasbeen.s assumed thatthe.membolltes isolated are.intermediatess which have escaped.complete destruction because of the'e relative.slowness nf'the oxidative processes. JL P. C. Newd6terrent substances for protecting rnnn agamp the:attacksof'mosquitoes. D.ILBIago vesNchenskit N..6'.Bregetova and A. S: MonehadsktT'~ak'ra3y .fk¢d.. .IYa.} . S. S. S, R. 40, 135-8(I943)r,' Cnmpt. rendL arad..srl;. U: R. S. S.. 40, 1ll9-22(1943)(in Englisb).-The d.i-pihene fraction of.f juniper oil,, from Juni¢tras sema sckanica,.eitHer alone on dispezsed in.water withLysdai naphthsl)sol is'an's effectlve mosquitoo repellent. Itsap: plication. to mosquito. netting greatl¢improvesthe latter'i'effeetiveness... .., . ... _ J.W'-Perry'.
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CA" : (/I r<s) 39s k a ? GJ': (f94 V) 7u8SGt e R U : (19a sr~ Sl8 70 * C'R' bo : (I 9 ( V) I377/~-k eySB:(C4fi3~ E'fl aV_9_ :(/9L3) 7.4 79 GF> Elkctrophysiologicalmeasurements',of tNe.odor of single com-s ponents'.of aa miztureseparated in a gas chromatograph.., D~ Ottosomand E.. v. Sydow(Karolinskalnst., Stock(mhn).. LiJs• . n. 3 W), 1I1I-]fi(1904)~ Simullancous mcasuremcnt of gas chrnmatographpeaksh and the electrophysial. responses of'thef olfactory mcmbmne.of a decapitated frog to the substances in thc. gas streamgave e'_ssential agreementt on.a.test sampleof higher boiling arunu compds..of'blackcnrrunts. aswell as pure compdsf' such as n-phrene, txumldeffyde,.MC073z, and Mo.salicylate ~. It I•. Maiekel' EHectaf.painting with cyclic terpenes onthe skin of', white mice aad' on the skih, carcinoma deveioped' by benzoGdpyrene'.pafnt`ing.. A. ~B_a~rkaj 1'. Tibolilij and J. Bardos(iMed. llniv.., Szeged, Hung.)1-~claUnid /nkrn. Contra' Cuncram. 19(3-4), 78fr8- (l9(;3)(in. English).. Skin of mice was painted'd with. benzo/a(pyrene or ditienz/a,hianthracene or alternatelyy withione of these and a miztl. of' menthone, menthol, camphor, mpincne; @-pihene.., borneni, and' ciheole:. Alternatingg with the terpenc mxt. re- , duced the incidenree and lengthened the time of onset of maI lignant alteration of the skin. Richard F. Riley The occurrence of turpentine eczemaa in rosin collectors, H. Ixutisteim. 5:vmy. DermntuL, Corpus Lecliannm, Unim Carulina., Prague 1960(1), 294-7(Pub. 1962)(in'German). Two - cases.of'contact:eczema provoked by'rosin aredeseribedl.. The results of:the patchh tests were asfollows: for 30% turpentine oil,30%dipentene, or 30%Ar-carane pas. in both cases, fon 50%o rosiu or 30% a-pinene pos. in one case and for 50%eolophonydoubt- ful in both eases.. An addnl. 51~ investigated rosih collectors . showedneg.patchtests. BTJG ~ 'Chemical nature of theeczematogenic agent't in oil of turpen•. tine: IV. Primary irritant effect off terpenee., \!L, Pirila.. E' Siltanen., and Iwmna 1'irila (17niv., Helsiiiki).. DermalMngic l28(i), 10-21(ilf3134)(iis English). TI1c primap*irritart effect of' various terpenes, including a-pincne,s p-pinene,. Grcarene and.hmonene was.ihvesttigated.. With Rnkstad.'s adhesive chamben methotq slightly modified, the freshly distilled'i, unouidized tet- peness ass a rule elicited toric reautions at 70-80% concns. With.h oxidn. of theterpenesthein primary.irritant effect increased, on.n account:t of'the increase ihn their hydroperozide content, irrespec- tive of whichterpene wass eoncerned. This is in contraskto the eczematogenic effect of oil of turpentine, which is. solely orr mainly due to'.the oxidn..products (hydroperoxide) of ArMarene.. Knowledge of: thee primary irritantt effectl of terpene hydroper- oxides iss essential when.n the eczematogenic effect of oil of' tur- pentineise investigated. Thee tonic reactions's possibly elicited . by'the oxidized'iteLpenes at lowerconcns. than previously realized may otherwise be ermneuusly regarded as'allergic Cf. CA 52;, 21158h.. C.. W l. Ackerson . Mimolliological hansformatfon olterpenes. UL TransforA mations of a-pinene., Bl, R.._Piema.andi P. K. Bhattackaryya. (Natl. Chem..liab.,,Poonay Ind-u). A¢pl: Misrobinf: 10„524-8(1962);, efL CAI 55,. 50fi2g. Severallstrains of fungii were tested for their ability tometabolize a-pinenein shake cultures. AA straiu ofAsQergiUnsniger showingnmrked e0icieney in thiss respect'.was selectedfor furtherstudies. The optimal conditions- fm fermentation we.re established with.respect to substrateeoncn.e time, and temp. From the fErmentation prodhctss three major' metabolibes of o-piuene were isolated:a ketone,.CnHuO, identi. fiedl as d'-verlienane, ann ak:-,. CteHr.O, identified asd-cis- verlienalland a cryst. dio1, CiaH,r04, characterized .as'. d-trans.sobrerol.. Efiectof.essentisI oils'.and their componentson the isolated intestinee of mice.. Izumi Imaseki and Yoshilro KitabataketS (TSUmuta Lab'., Tokyo)..- a uga a Zasshi 82;. 1320-FlE1902),. The relktion between the action on. smaBl intestineande chem. structure of main components of plant', . essrntial oils used in dtugs was studied. The monoterpeuoids, such as a-pinene; limonene; and.dipentene; werefound.to exert a stronger actton on coutme: _ tioun thanithe substances Naving.alc..HO groups,.sueh.as linalool,. citronelloll, gerraniol,I and menthol wkich, . showed antispasmodie" action similar to that't ezerted bythymol, carvacrol, and eugeno)..." A contractile action was also observed with orange oillA mandarin ailll terpentine:oil, and fennel oil, but peppermhtt:oil and clove oil~ showed antispasmodic action. K. Kitsuta
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The influence of olfactory stimuli on the: activity of.secondsrl neurons inithe.burhot.(Lota:Iota): It:jell B. Dovmc (Qiaroliinka ,Inst.., Stockholm). .1cf¢Physral. Stand: -66(3), 29Q-9(1866) (Eng):. The nervous activity of singlee secvndary neuamu was recorded from thcolfactorytmet of thoburbot whil'e stirnu- lating,therolfactory epithelium with variaussalns.. ESerennin- flucncc was eliminatedd by transecting the olfactory tract About 30%a ot the stimuli producedlan increased aet"rvityrcr the neuro1u C A v r. CrQL6/ ~andl20%n caused inhibition of the spontaneous diseharge; about halPof the stimulations failed to produce any change in.n the rate of firing:. The.excitatorytypeafresponsetypioally4eganwithaa Av increased discharge, followed by nsteady discharge at a lower frc' quency, which wass mainmined' throughout thestimulatiop• lalostof theunits.which~wereinhibited.gaveoffdischarges• The activity of' the secondary neurons ad'apted.very slowly toaon- tlnuous stimulation. RCV V Skin: penetrating agents.. Friedriclt }6tygL, Beit. 1,001,949 fCl. A 61k, 3/00, 7/00„ Aug..18, 11965; Ger. AppL July.20,1961; 1'4 pp, Maiachite gceen dissolved' ip (CHAH)t does not pene- trate the epidermis, butt when' cyclohexane (I) is used as a pene- R1 A 63 _, ! l( tratmg agent, the dye can be aetected~ ib tlie.deep layers of the l- C sldn (corium) after a fewmin.. The rate of peuetratmn incseases rapidly as the prnportion of I increases. Rhodamine B(IE) isnot ~(P J', V2, absortied from HiO, EtOH, (CHi0I1)r;.propylene glycol, or gly- evol solns.,.but:the addn- of Ii to a soln.:of IFrn (CHtOH)i shows deeppenetmtion ih.30 min.. W hen 50%I is added, II is detected m tfiecorium in 3 min: and after'30 min.. it is found in the sub-. eutaneous fatty tissue. Four other examplesare cited and pene- tration data for 15 dyesand 200 hydrocarbons, alls., aldehydes, esters,.ketones,.essentialandfattyoils;,ointment:bases;:etc:,arc tabulatedi, D:. Wilson Greene j ~Tbeinfluenceof tetpenes on biochemical:.processee:ia living orgaai®s:. M., M.. E(MediInst.,Eiev). SinWick. ProdakYy sa Kmrifolis a,. Akad'. Nauk Be1o.-ussk. SSR . Tsenln Nauchn.. Isslyd, i Phoek.tn:. Inst. I<sokkim. Prom.,. Tr.~ Yses: Nauckn: TekAn. Saetakck., Garki 1963s257-66(Pub.1964)(Russ)„ The innitro.expts., showed that a- and ()-piuene ~7~ possrssantibacterial activity against gram poe. nilcroorganisms C1~ ~:'. (~/7~.65) ~d Saccknrotnyces-euiptoid'e.s. In thepaesence o(~ cysteinethe' antibacteriallactlvtty of'f a-pinene against Stapkylutoctu.r aureus~ and Afycobackrrum lkbaculosis was 02' as great... Itir further'. studies the effect of a.pihene on biochem. processes ia, organism at/' was studied. After administration of a-pinenee to ratv and rabbits the activity of: hezokiuasee in brain and. suociniod'ehydro- genase.iu brain and peripheral nerves af', raas and.the activity of phosphorylase and adenosinetriphosphatase in liver and muscles of rabbits were diminished en.vflro.andlin sivo, Simultaneously, ' the contentt of SH groups in the peripheral nerve: of ratswasre- duced.. The tissue respiration remainedd uninfluenced. The decreased phosphorylase activity was accompanied by increased liver and musccl'e glycogen. The content of.ATP in muscle.re- ained unchanged. Thirty'to 40'daysof a-pinene administra-n mtion to rats.by meaus:of awaerasal decreased the glyeoSytic ao- tirityofthe:braihto40%a. T7vs:actionwas.neducedbyNa2,3- 'dimercaptopropanolsulfbnate. The main mechanism of. action of: a-pinene may be the effect on SH groups present ib cellular . enzymes. O~ Linet C'f#'ld: [./FCS) atrsz a 9 e'9 k2: 0Acs)l O~'.2s-m. Q Effect of monoterpene vapors on the westemn pine beetle. NRichard H.~Smrth (IP.S. Dept. of Agr., Berkeley;. Calif.). J. Pton: EveamoT. 58(3), ` l0(1965)(Eng):. Vapors of dif- ferentt monoterpenes fiam Finas, ponderosa „ primary host of the westernpinen beetle, Dtndroctonur breairnmiss varied inn ttieirr ta:- ieity'tothisinsect:: bmonene> 3-carene> myrcene2p-pinene -, =n-pinene.> controll _ RCJB " Allergy caused.by larch wood.~ LubominHanslian and Karel KadlOc (Okresni. Hyg.-Epidemiuh Stanice;, Mmauc; Czech~.). PYacooniGtkar.16(8),.362-4(1064)(Czech). Theinvestigation.of a, rarem case of'urticarisf factitia (dermogmphism) byepicumnaous testsrevealLvl a strong allhrgic reaction topetro ethecexts:r of lancch oreneer and larch wood (Lariz eurnpaea) in a person working in an. atrmi having3o-70 mg. wood dust/m!' E%ptl. inhalation . of larch wood dust produced a marked declinee in the no, of leukocytes(by approx..3000/mm.s), whereby the latent period of dermographism~ dernasedlfrom the ariginal level of 6min. W3 ~ min.. Baperthromatographie anal!ysis.of the.above perr. ether I'. -exts. showedd the presence of'a-and @-pinene, 3-carene, a ses- 'quiterpene„ and 2 unidentifiedd resinous acids. L.. J. Urbauck.
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l.: HEm IGo L RtC-LtLy`rlOfJ s Afvb GUr~DE4.ln1ES 3/9/i' 212-0~ US Food Additives ' Feraitted for Direct. Addition to Food. for HWan Consueptiorr. FDAi Cita6ion: 21 CFR 172 PubD. Date: 770315. Effective Date: 770315 Jur'vsdicCion: US Doc.Trpe(:REGULATION Status: FINAL Source of Inforaationt 81/04101r 21 CFR Authoritul FFDCA No. of Revst 8 No, ofCheaicaSs: 928; INCOMPLETE'.DISPLAY. Proscribes.food additives and ingredients penaitted for direct addition tofood for human consuaptionr includin9lfood nreservativesr eoatinsse fiTasr. and rel'atedlsubstances9- seecial dietarv:andlnutritional additives, flavoring agents and related substancesi'. suesr chewingsua Dases andreDated substancesc and, other saecific usaseadditivesr rarticularim, sultipurposeaddltiWes. tbelaiis use, allowable liaitsr and labeling'. reauireaentsfor each addit'ave. Also Presents test eroceduresfordetereiningultraviulet absorbance limits for selected indredients.. U2FR 14V91LMar.156 1977.. 3L9/2'. 215-0: US Indirect FoodAdditi'ves: Adhesive Coatings:and Coeeonents. FDA 6itationa 21 CFR 175 Publ. Date:I 7 DT15 Effective DateD 770315 Jurisdict'ion:US Doc. Tv>eCREGULATION Status: FINAL Source of'Inforaatinn: 81/04/01x 21 CFR AvthuritsF FFDCA He, ofRevs: 3 No. of Cheaical's: IlOSi INCOMPLETEDISPLAY.Pres'eribesconditionsunder which substances aav be safelrused as components of adhesives and coatings used in the manufacture of food: vackaging eaterials,. fldentifiles and!stipulates Iiaitatlianson the food associated use of component substances of adhesivesr•ressure-sensitive aI and; coatingsr includinst acrvlateester eaealueer cnatinlsi'. hotraelt.strirpablefoodlcoatin9si senthetic raraffinr partial phosrhorie. acid esters of rolvester nesi.nsi polv lvinvlfluorideY resirrs: resiFmusand poLzsenic coatingsN resinouaand eolvaeric coatingsfor aolvolrfih filesi, vinel acetaae/cretonic acid coroLvaeni vinvlidene, chloride coroisaer coatings for nvlom fil.e. vinvlidene chloride covoluaer raatin9sfor polscarbonate filail wvlene-forualdehsde resins. condensed witlr. 4.r4-isopropsliid6nediwheneliepichluruhsdriir epoxs resinsiandzinc-silicon dioxide aatrix eoatinas. ATsadetails testrrocedures for detereirdngthe aaount of' extractiwes from resinousor polvaeric coatings usiugsulvents: siYulatingltspes.of foods andbeverages. (42FR 1'453.1r Mar, 15, D977. 3/9/3 632-0 U9 Tolerancesandl Exeaptionsfroa Tolerancesfor Pesticide Chemicals in or onIRaw AgricDtural Coaaudities•, EPA I Office of Pesticidesarrd Toxic Substances Cit t' ' 40 CFR rA0 Publ.Date: 7111125EFfective Date: 711125, JuI US Doc. Tvpe:REGULATIGN Status: FINAL Sourceof Inforaation: 80/07/01.. 40 CFR 180 Author'vtv: FIFRA No. ofRevs: 14,8 No. ofCileeicals7 1032; INCOMPLETE DIISPLAY. Regulations for tolerances and exeartions for residues of prsticide, chemicals in or an raw agricultural caaaodities are detii.ed and interpreted'.r, procedores for filin9 vetitions and for other legal andl administrative stepsareput forth, seeoir'r.c:lulerances for iudividual pesticide cheeicalk are vresentedr and the handl,iu5 ofresiduetest data is. direcled. IListin9s are5iven of categories andgrorwsof rau fouds andl feeds according to, rer'vshab'alitvn relative tiains'.for useof cM1eaicalr proeessing of the coaeaditxr and fate of the aheai.cals(including. introduction toother stages in the food chain). Pesticide chevicalsare rlassified into safer, deleteriausr. inertr. and either heving to tulerances or beingexeapt fFos tolerances. The re9ulatiamcallv for rrraanenL or teaparars certification of cheeicallusefulness andestiute of residuer for Judicial reviewof petitians for exeaptiorisr and for tlle aeendins'.or repealingof'srecific tolerances or exeaptiuns when reasanablegruunds action, aredeveloped.. Procedures and fee structures.for petitiuns are detailed.Several tables.of cheaical groupings are rresented.1A1 FR 4537, Jam.30i1976.
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ILlFCr SC1Eh~ES~I,I@LLJZZ.'~ i ppm' 977JY 536385' Chrooato9raehicn eass-srectroeetr.ic deterainatiun ofl toxic substauces in the air. Deitriev,H'.Ti.. r RastiannikovrE.G. i Vulkov.S'.A. iI HalsshevarAsG. I Sasa-i2hoariin,8'.M. ('1'nst.. Gen.. and'Hunicir. Hes..e Ac'ad. Hed. Sci~.. Hescoe. USSR) G's9. Sanit. 5, 4'2-44.,. 198GLanguaees)Russian - DOC TYPE7 Journal articlerori9inal research 241.Toxicoloss AbstractsA chruaataerarhic/aass snectroeeteic aethod Oor the assasy of ai'rbonne toxic substances is describedi usinsg an OKN-20391chroeato-aass srectroeeteraith coeeuter integration. The chroaategravi,ic separation is undertaken at room temperature for the first 5 ein, then at a risih9 temperature (+5 C/ein to.1G0 C)~ for a total chroaato4raehs time of 30-'a5 einc us'vn5 ad5orbantssuch',as Tenaxor Pulssurbaide. The.chroaatosrarhic fractions's areanalszed bs.aass.srectroae0rs. Tirisaethod'is arelicable to air PolLutants.such~asbutane, tr'adecarre., nrntene, hexn~e. ber¢ene, narhthalene, aethslcvclobutane, cscloventaner cveluirexane. eLher, butslacetater dioxan, acetaldehsJe, benzaldeHVde.acetune,aceturlleuoner eethanoLisavroaanoln chlorofore, earbomn tetrachlorider alvha-rinnine and other compounds of'tlrese classes. The sensitivity level is att about 1 .au.sVa3.. 9/7l2 469381, 800612704278306-773Enhancesent of heratic drug bioUransforaation bvy a short-tere interaittenb'tureentine exPesurein tiie rat. Jatvisalo,J. ) VainiorH. Tnzue.Healthr Haart.aninkaku 1'.SF-00290 Helsinki 29, Fiuland) Acta PHaraacal.. Taxiial.. 46(1)'.. 32-3ti.~ 1,980 Lan9uaees)IEnglish Summary Uanguages: English DOC TYPE: Journal aeticle-uriginalresearch 24i.Tox'acologs Atistracts. Inhalatiom exeosure of rats tu,300 era of aceu.erc'val turpentine 66 h dai,Ys. S days a veekk for 8 ek enhanced the actie'aties of dbu9 biotrans[a.eation enzsaes of liver eicrosoaes cousideratile. The activities or NADPH cstachroae c reductase and. 7-ethoxvcou.arin d4ethnlaser and eicrasoaal content of cstochrneeP-4'S0 were incressed 37-60Y duriost the first weeks uf, the..exrerieent, but had a CenJencv.to return toeurds control values later on. A'i similar enhanceeerdt of activitirs was aleo found in liver eicrosoeal eroxide hydratase and UDPSlucuronussitrarrefvrase.but theseenzsee activities tendedlto adaet'. less during the exeeri.eut.The tuneentine treatment increased Uha affiniL.v of liver sicrosoeal cs0oclrraee P'-R50.to .alvha.-rinene(the eain cuevuneut of the' tureentiare).
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THIRD EDITION ®engerolus Properties of Industrial Materoais N1IRVIN!G SAX Dihector; Radiological Sciences:Laboratary. NewYor6 State Health Deprtment. Albany, N.Y. , ASSISTED'BY`. MILTON S. DUNN / BENJAMIN FEINER/ JOSEPHIJ. FITIGERALD./. LEONARD J. GOLDWATER JOHN H:.HARUEY /' DWIGHT F:.METZLER /. BERNARD'L OSER /ALE%ANDER: RIHbt / MEREDITH THOMPSON' T 55.3 H3S3 1'.°68 ' Van Nostrand Reinhold Company New.YoTkCinainnati Toronto'Lond'on Melbourne
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r 392 SOURCE BOOK OF PLAVGRS Chemical Name Di'henYlpmpylpnryiunal. 2J9-PtenxlpnmYlLtetuhydrnfuren a fYnen B Pinene 211nFPInemO-d _pin-11. PiPeridin_ Pilxrine Pipeeileuon Piperilenuneo.ide d~Piperilone PipenenJ Piper~myllcetate Plpemna lnbatyrete P~dilimunene P7Ybrbale20 15.Iu..~rnn~eFn Rnly.nrbnle 90 Pnlanniumanl.te Rnne.immnorhae 18mline 1.2_Propanedithid 1aPmpnnrdithiol Propnnelhiol Pmp.nylAYiFmnl P--~-Yl pmcrl di.ufde Pmplunaidehyde Pmpioniurid 2-PnIM^nylPYrrnle 2.Propinnyhhiaeol. PmpYyhenune Pmp>'lanlele Propyl almMd p.RmGYleninJe PrupYl benanle ProPylhuryrete Pmi,Yl.innamete Prop91 P.a-deradtnna. PnnM'Idigdfide Promlenenlym~ ... Pne2eleneAlymlal9inete 6VS06Vf.IB P OlherNamn H..ehydmpyridiue 1-Pipergylpqrldin. y~Menthl•m~3an. lld'wtroplne. Heliotropyl eceute Pslyaeyflhylene/0nlnrhiten monol.nrue -~- ~e~xlene13U1eorblmn nratmrate Pdyo.yethylme1201nrhiten munuolesla Polemlam 2.4hr.adi.noate - 2-PYrmlidinenebonylie.Ad Prowml MsJM1vl.roiiead Etlnl2p I IF ta PI2:TRawfyd)TUiop.none 1P nnd--- - D'M1vdm.nnhul. 6.pra Td wll'dF I 2-b'hydron -- - Hydm.v npylalFfnale ORGANIC CXEMICAIR IISED IN FLAVORINGS AND FRAGRANCFS 393 alaolus Phyeim,hnnlcnFChnrnrten_~ic. IOFI Sulubilily Cmrxil FEMA Eumpe United Sulrw FDA Cl..xi~ Glerei- firminn +IJ]Ff Ibuln. IinR Mrlllne i h ~ 1•nn~t G. qna Nu. No: fieniiun I.iu 0 LV' I. htmmH ,nn 2897 410 17$.515 Art V51 6 2ffi +mu 1:1.515 Arl+ YFI -F 2902 2113 152.515 NI In S In S )56-16U 3irlCl 2903 2114 179.515 NI 1n 6 VSI E 164-169 tl 3567 152.515 In~~--t'i - -- 5 2i. 21S tmna 210 5 3593 PIfSIG N! 2908 695 112.515 NI 9 E 10f I6 29U9 192 11J.516 NI VSI S 12X-129 172.515 - NI 950J 1.9.515 NI I9i0 2052 192.515 NI In S - -~ 2011 101 192.00 NI In S SI 261 35..5-8: r'er EDA 29t2 2912 172.515 Arl+ l•SI S 133-ISJIIJmmI +IMI 2913 305 172.515 Art+ YSI 6 +lOn 112.515 Art 2915 172.515 Art S F pa 291fi 1T2.515 Art 6 S In _ JRf 2911 1]2.5t5 Arl S S EJY' 2920 1i2SIS -VI1 3 $ 29T +Inf1 2921 Arf~--S S •ILY YCJ' - 3319 1911 NI VS ~ ~S1--- §0=222 Fre' romp~xil 3.5" Art+ 152 3!. 35M Art 3G21 /213 1t2.515 NI V11 S fi7-6N -I13 -20 112.415 -Wl~. - S S S Ai-An +lfln FI'f' 3227 .026 NI 2993 90 1'.2.515 NI fi & JN-f9 -91 -J I'IY' --~4 - 3 51 _ S-4 ... . _ _ IJn-IJI S2 PCl'. 361J Ii2.51\ Art 3911 IS@w15 Art 3469 599 9t 21x IA dR 2925 197 TY'd3[3- NI S S 5 S 66-102 Jn 2929 50 I12.51h NI S S 3 97.2 _If. 29.10 K12G I)Y.FI4 Art E _ 21! -2I:1 v5 FA)A 2931 671 152.SIa FI In 5 2&1 293J 260 I]°.nln NI Vhl S 1Jl-Illl 2935 321 1:2.515 Art In S 26J-2AJ ----~15---~T ~-- - 36JA 1]2.515 Arr 322a 5.0_ 1T2,515 N( VU S IPJ 11 2940 4212 IX2l:n NI 5f M In 191.6 --- +1JN U t~ 2941 _ Ii:r~15 Ar.t S +100 F(T
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i IEC,s l SECONDARY SOURCE I& CAS;TYPE I N'A.ME CAS. REGISTRY NUMB~ER'.. CLASSIFICATION! CODE STATUS' SYN'ONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS SYNONYMS MOLECULAR FORMULA MOLECULAR WEIGHT WISWESSER LINE NOTATION. ENTRY MOM,TH TOXIC DATA SOURCE NIOSH/DT7000000 BICYCLOiG3.1.,A)HEPT-2-ENEi 2i6.6-TRIHETHYL- 80-56 8 RRIMARYIRRIITANT REPORTED.IN'EPATiSCA INVENTORYi . 198!0 ACINTENE Aa1rMa-P'INENE 2-PINENE 2,6,6-TRIMETHYLRICYCL0(3.1.1)-2-HEPT-2-ENE. Cl0-H16 136.26 L46 A EUTJ A1 Al El 8305 FCTXAV! Faod and Cosmetics Toxicolo9s.. 16985308 SKINiMAN',iHUMANS;IRRITATI01di100XiTOXICEFFECTSi'.SEV.ERE SKlNiRADBITiRODEHTS;IIRRITATI0Ni500 ni9/24H' TOXIC EFFECTS;MODERAPE FCTXAVFomd:.and Cosmetics Toxicolo9s..16 e 8'53s 7 B ORALiR!AT;RODENTS4LD50;3700 ai9/k9iTOXIO EFFECTS;CEN'TRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMiDEHAVIORAL SYMPTOMS;PULMONARY SYSTEM INHALATIONi;RAT;RODEN7Si.LCLo;625u8/d3.i.TOXIC EFFECTS!iCENTRAL MERVOUSISYS7EM:EYEpPULMONARY SYSTEM INHALATIDN;,MOWSE;RGDENTS;LcLo;.364 o8/w3`.TOXIC EFFECTS9CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM4EYEiPULMONARY SYSTEM INHALATIONiGUIINEAPIGi.ROll1ENTSiLCLo.F.5721u5C.3TOXSC'EFFECTS;CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM';EYE. PULMONARY SYSTEM' TOXDATA ISEYYORDS' TOX'IC. DATA SOURCE TOXDATA KEYVIURDS
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I i 56,502 Faod Ar3ditives - 3-Methyl-S-phenyltiutyraidehyde;: e-ISopro-pyl'pTenytacetrldehyde. .. . .. Methyl4-phenylbutymte: 4-Methyl-l-Pbenyl-S-pentanone: beneyl.iso- but'yliketone. - Methyl. 3-phenylproplonate;: methyl hydro- clDnamatl. . . . . Methyl proplonate. - . B-MeLliyl-8-p¢opyl-7-cyclobexen-l-one. Methyl eulHde. 3-Metbylthloproplonaldehyde:~methtonal..'.. 2-Methyl-~talylpropfunaldehyde,ft mtaed,.o•. S-MetLylundecanal: metbyl nonyl aoetUde- hydt %rethyl g-undecenoate.~ . Mbthyl. S-undecyno.tai', methFl decyne ~ nr- bonate. ..... . . . . . . . .. Yethyl erelerate.. . ... . 9,Metbylvalnle aeld. . . . Myrcene, 7-methyl-3-metLylene.l;6-eetldl- ene MYrlatrldeTyde; tettsdeoso.L '.. a-Neon»nttia: S:IYObutyl-6-meLliyloyclaTea- am1 NeroliNe-&7.dlmetDF49:6-octadlea-I-o1 . NYmNdu1: 9i7.11~tr1meLDn•116.IU:dodeeattl. en-3.a1 . .. . Nerylacetftb. .. . . . . Nery7.DUtyrate. ... . . ,t4eryliformate. . . Nexylileobutyrak. . ... Nerylimowlerate. . Neryl' pmplmate. . . S;6-NOnedlm-] roL ry-NmaLCWne; 4-hydeoxynonanoie: acid, 7- lactonr, .Idehyde C=18. Nenwl: pelargoWb a1deT4de. . 1,8-Nonaaadlol acetate, mlvd esten: Non.aofe acid; pNargonlb ac16. . O-NOnanone;:metbylbeptylbetone:. SFNOnsnoh-I-yk atetate; 1~DydroayS+aona- none acetste. . Nonyl acetate:. Nonyl alcohol; 1-nonanoll . Nonyl metanaete. . Nonyl lsovallerate.. .. NOoNmtone:b.e ••"._-"ry1-8'-Isopmpenyl.bli eye1614,4:01-dec-L-end-one. Oelmene; tTmw-p-cClmene; 8;7-dimethyL-1,8,. 6-petatrlene. q.0etataetone: 4-Dydrosycctanuic .acid,, y-lactone. Oetanal; caprylaldehyde: OctAnal Glmeth4t eeetal. I-Oetanol: ncctylalcohot:S-llctannl. .. 3-Octanol. 7-Octanone: metTyl luql katbne. 3-0etanane: ethyl:emyl ketene. 3-Oetanon.lwl. 1'-Oeten-B-ol:', amyt vlnyl oarbtnot. l~OCten-Srylecetate. metyl erotsa. 3-OCtyl..aeetate. ektyl butymte. Octyl fmimate. OetylDeptanoate. Octyl.feobutyrate., Octyl'isovaleate:. llCtylloctmoate. ' Octyl ~pbeayleeetebe. Octylproplonate: . q56r519'.15 21 CFR 172.515, 14e rce>> L~ uG d'.~c~t 1057 3-28-83'. u.Pentederalacthne: lb-hydroiyPentedeca-.c nole. aetd;n-lleotone; pentadecanollde;', an- gellhalactRme:, . ... S.S-Pentanedlone; aoet9lpeoplonyl'. •. S-Penranone; metL9lPropyLketbne:{-PentenolC seld. , . . . - L-Penten-SbL . - Pe'fllaldellyde;'. 4-laopropenyl-L-cyclohexene- 1-carbomldehyde; : B-mentha-l,8-dlen-7-ali. Perillyl rxtaEe; P-meafAS.1,8-d1en-7-yli acetate.. e-PTellaadteneT.a meatD6-1,641eae.. . Phenethylawtalb: - -..- ' . . .. Pheneth9laleohad; y-pTenyleth91.e1COho1. PnenechylsntDranllate. - Phenethylbeapoate.. .: - .• Phenetbyl butyrate. . . . .. . Pheuetb9ldaaamate. -.;.. . . .. Phenetbyl formate. . PhenetDylleobut9rate. - .. ' .. Phenethylfeovaleraf.e:. .. Phenetby[91methyroutyrate..-- . Phenetbyl phenylYCetate. . . PhenetTyL Froplonate:. . Phenethylslteylate. ' PTenethyLSene'Af1Mte:: phenetTyl.3;3-dlmetT. 4laerylate: Phenethyl pglate. Phemiyacetle aeld. .. .. S-PhenoxyetDyLfeobutyrete: . . PhenylacebMebydep.a-tolulh.aldehyde.. .. Phmylacet4ldeTyde Sa'-6ut9leso gl9tall eUbl. Phenylaceteldehyde dlmethyL eeetal. PhenylnceteldeTyde glyeeryL aeetAl. . Phenylaoette acid; a-tolnletEld.. 4-Phenyl-S-butanol:'; phenylethFlL methyil carbinah bPDenyl-S.butbn-S-o1:; metb7ll etyryi ear-. D1no1. 4Phenyl-8-buten-S-one. Y-PTeuyl-S-butyl axtnte; phenyletDyil metllyl'carbtfyi aaetak.. L-Phenyl-8-metTyl-S'-pnntanal: phenyletDyi meLbyl i ethyl earb11w1. . .. L-Phmyl-l-propanoG phenylethDl earbinoD... 8-PDenyl-l-propavol: hydraclnll"myl alcoDol.S-Phenylpmpbnald<Tyde:D74ratmPalde-. hyde. 3-PhenylBroplaaeldeTyde;'hydroelnnamslde-hpde. S-PDenylp[uplonaLdehyde dtmetT91 acetal: hpdratroplc aldehyde dimethyl aCGt61. e-Phenylpropfonac ec1d; DydroclLnamlc acld:. S-Phenylpropylaaetate. S-Phenylpropylibutymte. .. 8-Phenylpropyl alnuaoute: 3-Pbenylpropyl i f ormate: . e-PDenylptopyl i herauwte. S-Phenylpropylilaobutyrate. 3-PhmylpmpyliLpbutyntb. e-PDenylptopyliLOValetate... S-Phenylpropyliproploaste: 8-(B.PDenylpcopyq xQt~gDydrofYra... Ca-Plnene: 4.plnme. ~-J 29 p-Plnenep 8(la):-pmene. Pina tar o1ti. Plnecarveol; S(Le)-plnen-3:N. Hlperldlne. Piperlhe. d-Plperltone; p^menth~lron-8-ane. H1perLtenone; p-mentha-1,1(8)-aten-3-one. Piperttenone oLdl; IIS-epm'y-P-mentbi(8).-'en-8-one. Piperonyl.aeetate: helYatropylacetate:. Q 1993, . Cuunmerae: Cleariag, House, Inc.
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170 SECTION' 11: D: INGREntENTS INDEX 773, 773: Di-f-p-menthene e.g:,, Pinalene Oi•ganic.film formerused'for controllof pesticide.residuals: A. two subunit polymerrof pinene,.a major constituent of'.pine oi1..Saidm be non[uxic but no data were located. When depositedasa thin film on~a surface,. Pinolene slowly polymeriies over.weeks and months to form longer uhain polymere. See afao: Turpentiae;.,Re/lerence Congener in. Section.Iff. ' Re/: Svec 1999~ - 774 774 a-Pinene 2-Pinme. -Toxicityratingp 3.. Thee principal ingredient of turpentine, with essentially the seme toxicity s turpenNne. .. . Seeafso:'Gurpentfue, Re%rence Congener in SectionlR. . Re/.::HerculesPowde Co:,,1951. 775. 775 Terebene. Toxicity: ratiag: 3(?): Minturee of terpene hydmcarbons;., chiefly dipentene, prepared'~ from oil. of turpentiue: Used ®axtimulant expectorant, andl formerly. for dyspepsia and for chronic urinary tract inflnmmatiom Oralidose.0.12 to..0.5m1. (or by ibhalation/.. 16 excess it maypmduce albuminuria and hematuria. See.alao::Turpentihe, Reference Congener in Section.ITL y76, 776Terpenes e:g:,. Pinene Toxicity rnting: 3.1'be cyclic liydrocarbons contained in volatile ails are usually designated asurpenes (from turpentiite oilb See afro:: Turpentine;,Reference Congener in Section Idf. Re(::: Hercules Powder Co.,,1951. 777, 777 Terpineol p-Mentk-ltn-8iol'. Toxicity reting: 3. Laista as 3'ieometa (a,. Bi.Y). 71ie principalconstituents ofpine oil (atiout 75% terpin- enls): Asjudgeds by pine oil, terpineols are.itritseing to eyes and mucous membrana.P+oditce hemor- rhagic gastritis whm~ingested:.Syetemic effectainclude weakness and central nervaus depression,.with hypothenmia: and respiratory failure.. Acute renal.faflurefollowed an abortion~ induced by the vaginal' in- stillhtionof 36oz: of a mixture of water and a eommerciallpreparationr of stesmdistilled pine:oil (70%) and.neutral sorp (12-14%), but the role of'terpiaeol in the genesis.of the renal.lesion is.not knawn,See afso: Turpentine; Re%rence Congener in Section/fl. ReJ.: Hercules Powd'er Co., 1951; Gomel.and Goldman, 196g: A.del , See o ' Toxic See a 'i Ref,: ~. T 2,4-D i Toxic p>Tet See a ; Vario ' See a Pyret Pyret Thea ' pyret ; Seea jf Tiox& : ~ti i See a 778' 778' Terpin. Hytlrate- Antfl cis-Dipenteneglycol,hydrate Toxicityrating: 3. An expectorant said to:lessenabundant. sputum. Chemically relatedlm the terpenes endlterpmeole:Said tatie mora,pleasant, less.irritants and less.toxic.than turpentine(including:the If.not ' reetifieduil),butnoevidencewas:locetedto .showthatltheltthaldoseis:greatm..than.thatofturpentinew toxici See.also: Turpenthre,. Re/erence Congener in Section Ild. doses; Ref.: Oeol and Faaay 1955. Fulvi. Cbnatitumta of pyrethrum and of'dlrrfs:and theitderivatives . Antif skm. 779 779Allethrin Recar Allylcinerin. QD prod, Toxicity rating: 3. The synthetie allyl analogueoP cinerin 1, the latter being one of the active ineecticidal . -J sever.constituente.of pyrethrum. Toxic actions similar to pyrethrins. Perhaps 4 is a more accurate estimate off t~1b r [roum the toxicity rating: ~ Ref.: Sea.alm: Pyrethrum; ReferenceCangeneria Section.!!!. ~ Rej,: Hayes,.1963. ~ e:g., ] 780 78& Barthrin ~ Dea 6-Chloropiperonylehrysanthemumate; ENT-21557 - cl~'+ Toxicityating; li.,Cloeel¢related.tm.natural pyretheins and synthetic allethrin,but much less acutelyy singlr toxic in reta. patte See alao::Pyrethrum;. ReJerence. Congener in Section. Rl . killed' 781. 781. Cyclethrin LD". df-2-Cyefopentenyl-4-hydmxy-3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-l-ane:chrysanthemete subct. Perh: 'rozicityreting: 3: An.ineeoticida used inaerowl and dairy spreys.,Thacydopen[enyl analogue of
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MEJ)Ltr1E' 094083 76136083 - Increas. in tspr A viruv narticlas induced in BALItc euusv enidereis duriha ebaeical;csroi,nosenesis. Bibllv MCi. Saith SM e-r JZ'ance. rBec 1975:. 32 16h e660-6, IBSN 0007-0920 J.•urnaE Cade: AV4 Lansuasec: ENGLISH Journal Announceeent: 7607 Hubfile: INDEY.MEDILUSElectran .icroseonic observationss of nareal BALH/t•.eousa eeidernis reveaied the Presence of isolated inbraeisternaB A Particles. Nevennlasiaw aoilloea and careinoaa fareatien induced bv 6ericai'applicatium of the eareinosenic polvesclie: hedracarbans bmz(a)pvrane (RIa1P) and 3-aethslthulanihrene (MC)ieaecaepanied bv an inereaseire tlm sueber or A •artieles'.. Topical a.pliicatian of a non*carcinofenic irettndl aleha-nineno (alrha P) ' failed to nrovide co.rarabiechanae.•Eaa.inatlun or tAe.nuclei indicated occasional electron densa franulec in thenur:.leorlase which becaee ee:reeneeon fLroufhoutthe eruer.ssion of carcinaSlnes~is. Toes) Aniaall'MaleDeseriaturst. HMZOVVnmai Ce11 Nceleus--Ultrastructune(UU:L Enduelasaic Reticulue--Ultrstructure.4U114MethvichalanthreneiKiceil Micer.Inbred BALB - C; Neanlasn.Eaeerleeotal--Cbe.icalJa Induczd' (UI)i: Nvunlesnsr €arari.entlal--Mirrobielosv. (K1)/ t6ncuYenic Vldoses--IsaLliau and PueiBicatliun (IP)i Paeilloea--Cheeicalls Induced (CI08 P.nil)baa--P.thalosv (PA)a 8kin NeopLasev-Cheaf<allv Induced (CI)/ PBkirc Nvonlass--Kicm.Llela- fv (ME) P Skin NearBases--PathatmJV (PA) P SSkiir-MicenbioloYV (NI) 0802021 73222G21 Effert't of ab'nha-ninenetreateent an the s.auth .ndunlas.i'u rrtilcula..ih the nt• P~ar AP.SZaraas F ' 7~CEr Mn.ehal, AcadBci N4ns .1974s. 22 (2): v187c92r I68N 0001-6217 Journal Code: 18f Lansuases: ENGLISNBubtiler INDE%MEDECU6 Tass: Anb.alJ'Feeaie Descrietars;'Ad.irvistratiam0ra19'LEndurltsetaReticuLUa.-Rru( Effeets (HE)9'Enxvee Induction)', Blvco9en--MrOaLolis. (NE)i BoPSi Anrvaratus--Ultrastructure (tlL)i. Liver--UllrsLructan.(:UUf Liven--Drus Effects (DE))L..osoeesr-Ul.trustructum (UL)i Micrmcovvr. ETectroni tMicrasaees. L'aver--Drus.Erfeats (DE)1 Mitochandnib--ULtrasLrurture(UL/1 RatsP Ribosoaes.-Ultrastnuatura (UL)R iTereenes--Pha.eacudwueihe 4PD) 22/7/3' ----- . 1015665 69160665 ETurrentine oil poisanins imvorkers af a sMoe rolish:fartu.re c.used'.bv d-a1Ma-Nnenxl Tarnentihal-Intosikation Uei Arbeltern vihvr Bchuhtreev-F.Lrikvvrursatht durchid-Aleha-PLnen•. Nurnberser F' 2anVral A.brits.ed(6e:r.anvrNest) rOct 19479 17 (IG/ n301-9.r. I86N' HB4D-0000: Journal Code: raB Lansuases:. 6ERNAN 22/7/e 0083790 66083790 - IN.actbansin:the tenene:aeries. 2.,TIIr svstee aleiu-vineev-ecN.Lu actdl, Reaktianen ihdo Terren-Reihe. 2. Bas Bvste. alnhi-PiiwmEva6YSaore. Valkanav 64 Itunaeou M Y6ari &cTi NaIe /SUit:erlandL rAbl-Bee 1965. 40:(B) H'67-76n 19BN 0031~6865Journal Dode: POE lan9vafes:'OERMRN
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N(}TtGN!PiL-TEG}+N'/EA L O,NFbRrWna4 aRvocF 81712 826897PB81-143034 Haalth Hazard Evaluatian Determination Rerort No.78'-21-5-a9. Cha.eiou Building Pioducls. Banner.. Montana. Gunter, 8'. J.. P Anpol, A. G..i Lvbargrrr J.NaLional Inst. for Occupational Safetv.and'H.vltiu Cincinna4'ir DH., Health Hazardand'Technical Assiztar.ce Brarmh:. Corn., Sounce Codes:: 052678013' Report No.:.N~I(ISH-HE-78-21-5G9 Nov 78 24v Langua9es: En37.ish NTISPrices: PC.A02/MF A01 Journal.Announce.ent: G'nA18110~ Country of Publicatient. United St'atesConcentrationsot a1rAa-r(O.e_nv beta-pinene and'eri.aric. acids were measured ore Februarv 5',.to 9. 1976.and aulaonarrfunctinn tests of'workers were conducted on Februarr.6 to 10, 1978 at.the Chariun Buildin4,Produets fStandard Industrial Classitication-2437) i'n.8anner. Montana. Tire.Lu.ber and~Saw.ill Norkers L.P.D.W. Local Unioni 3038, Miissoular Nuntana revuested' theevaluatiom to deter.ine the potential exposure to,rTvwoodvanesr drver emissions for 4'75.affected:uorkers. Total acid concentratiuns.ransed ruto 2.5'.i14.iera.s Per cubic meter (.s/cu .)'.. Pinene concentrations ransed foo. 0.55 to 11..13YS/cu', a. No envi.ron.entall standards existt for these substances. Common medical co.elaintswereurrer resviratarrv irritationr, drrtheeatsrstuffs noser, running nuswrceushinio burning or itching ewesr chest tightnessor wheezing. Pul.onarv funetionitests.did nutt reveal ans -sisnificanBi.eair.ents a.ong the workerssThe aothers concludtthat.no'e significant health hazardd exists for workers at this facilitv.The. reco.aended' that door seal!s an veneer drversbe cleaned andresaired to Prevent leakager shroud be Placed over bet7i feeder and oLfhenr endk wilir feeders Positiuned outside the shroudr and roofl ventilators consist.of exhaust' fans inside the shrouded areas+Exhaust.e.issious should, noLbe rer.itt'ed to reenter the same or other work.areas:. Fre-assigiuenL.and •eriodic.edicaL examinations for workers also are recu..vnded., aiwn9 with e.nlover education on the irritant effects Producedbv veneer dFVer e.issioas. 8/7/6 650542 PB-28D 05016 Brean:e Characterizationn of Aerosols'.andVaror Phase Compounds in Urban At.rsrheres. . . . (FinaP reet.l Mendenhall!n 8. David L J'onesvPeber NL I Strurr Paul E. i. MarsardF 8arner L.. . Batteile Colu.bus Labs...Ohio.. ' - ' Corr. Source. Codes:'. 407080 '. - Sponsor: Ehviron.ental Sciences Research Lab.r. ResearchTriansla Park, N.C. RerorO.No.a EPA/600/3-781031. - ' Man 781 8bnNTIS Pricesl PC A05/NF AOt Journal Announce.ent:6RAI7816' "- . Contract Ne.: EPA 68-02-14'09- - Orsan'tc.. roLlutants in urban atmospheres were characterized be analyzing ParticuDate and/or varor-ehasesa.rles collected by EPA Ih St. Louis, Missouril Miami, Floridai Denver, Coloradoi Nouston. TexasP and at the " Seneral. Motors Test Track in Milford, Michigan. Th.aarticulate sa.rles -vene., extracted with solvents and'theext.ractable.atenials analvzed:bv ele.ent'at combustion analysis and 'onfrared'srect'rosco.ic'd anaivsis. To evaluate more than one solvent extraction Bechniwuen the earticulate samples were aliauotedandlanal.vzed by several extraction erocedur.sa Some of the Proble.s encountered with these erocrduresare discussed. Varor-ehese samples were collected oniCMro..sorb 102 ehroeatosrarhic traps and~ . ana1vzed using'g eualitative 9as~ chro.atoYrarhw-.ass svectro..ter analysis. IhdividuaBl sreoies t.ntativelvw identified are shown an reConstructed: Yaschnoaa'togra.s and individuai.. .ass srertra for a1'1 chromatographic neaks are included in~ theanrendi,x:. A.esTests for .utagenicitv.on model aerosol Products were al'so conducted. Products' tested werefroe toluene/NOxn 1-hent.ne/NO+, andalrha-riner.e/NOx svstes. Norreoe the aerosol Products froe these systems showed! .otagen'ic erorerties.
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Tb=.e,a, -R8srRHerS. BABEY. J. f d~t y, 7r~)Terpencs in tobacco. Zuerieh: Eidg+,Teeh:.Hochsch. ThesisNo.5Bb7. 1974.48 lp. fFr.)1 1 Four mclhodsof extmUionwereemplnytd: trapping nf the vaporsreleascd I byeobacco QI") byy means of a, closed-circuit pump and mllectYon on i aetivated.carbnn: supor trapping.by a current:of inert gas'.(nitmgen).and collectiumat O+ (lo Wcxo tempcrature 5,119); total solvent extraction followed fiydistillation oGanaqueousaolution(prepared'with 15% NaCpoftheextran ~ (techniqueusatforterpcncanalysuingrueatohaeeo);totalsuhxntes[raaiun followed by disaillation of: the extract in buffered solution(pH 4.5) withi5Pc f3aCl. The extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography. usinH 3 different columnrimpregnamdlaccording to.the.mcthod of Grob. Eighteen terpencs wne found in the ddfcrent.cured tobaccos: n-plnena. S-pmene. tl:'-curene, limonenne. linalol. santenol- ttdtene, aierplneal farnesene, sabinol. Ihngdoltne. anoph)91enc: humulene. <iirnnellol gemmol;.ekmol, cedrol. andJ-terpinenol Theirbehaviorwasstudieddurmgthewdlingandeuringof tobacco leavo (NanetY Sola 27) Different phenomena resulting Inlerpenc decrease:ware observed xfter priming. These includ d srmpR cvapnmtion of m'=carene. andl the: synthesis ardd evapamtfon nf IinulM, eitranellol, y- terpinane andterpinolene upto 16dbysaftcr hanxeting: Ceruih mrpenesmar disappeareomplctelyand do nol:exisft in the dried tobacco. It hasnot been possible to rocover the fundamental tobacco arnma by hlonding together purilicd tnhucco lerpenes. Imfaq the odon tested xhowrdfittle reeemb)ance tolhe specd)c ammav associated with dil'ferent tnbacco varicti2s:.lhusit secmr that the rcconstimtion of tobacco aromas should be searched in a d/lfercnnwav. Conp. Cent. tici. Res. Rrlau.Toh; Inform. ludl. UIWn. AM011 1975. 1210
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(Y)EbLjnq E 5/5/3 0690038 82135033 EPercutal . al•aarrliou afiuus terreoes - eutl,ul, anlvue.]i.onener isabanrvealracst.kn a7rh.-rirrc.ne - f'ru. foar. L.Lhs leublmris trvarrsf)3 Die. e.kutan..resorrtium v scnie.dener Terr•eue - KeuL%rul• Ca.rher. Lieunen• Isnburnsiacefat. alnlra-0`ineu..us B.uezuuatzem. 9cE;f, RiScllafvr Y Cheaischen Insl'iWt.Schafer AG• Dbr.rnil/BL (Sdrvxi_l.. Arznei.it'te.lforsch (GERMANT. YEST). r1982. 32'(1)'. r`.6-8r IS511 0004-4172 Journal Codel 91U Lsnsuases: GERMAN 90..er. Lan9uasec: ENGLISN Dac Tsret: Enslish ASSlract- Jhurnal Auuuunce.ent: 8206 9ubfilet'. INDEJF MEDCCU+ The cercutarwuusabsoretiouc of'.caobene.r isabarrl n lienrnnen eenthal and drha.anene as.eansL'.1Rueuh uf's faa. baLll /Piniwl uere. easured vrT--.ni.aYs usinYradiuactivells Iallelled in9reJ.i.nls. Rhareaeokina0ic .ssureaenLv slruuerl .axiaum b1ue.J leveb for a11 L4sL,di inaredients.LO ein after the unse0of ..rcubaneuus bsurrtiun. Nune uf theinsredivnts ws ereferentia114 absorbed. DLuuJ 1'.vellz, uf .11 iuur.uientv, after 10 .in ofrercutaneuus.absarrtimr ueree a d:irectlfuuckion ror' thvsice of tlre.skin area.invullxed. Tass: Aniull Cueraraldve SWJMi: 011. . Drscrirtnrs: 9ornanes--MeLaWlisn fME)1 iDrter•/e.M1zi KineticsC: MenLlml--Mrtabulis. (MEJ:i Nicel zSkln qLsorvtiwiP t9a.6,or:utive Ayentsi' iTorrenez--NafaOal.ise (NE) CAB'RCSistrv No:..:12.-12-Z .(richla:aiNi'1e98-0a-66 dHeuLLUlti~ IiG-66-3' .A1iaanene)i 39-93-5 .(ca.rhene/i BO-56-8 .lal.rlu-rinrnel 0667:37 32112547 ACYtr. rulsmllnrt e.tir eineuli - euLaLul/z nf l v rena.. KovreD K CiTe.nceer ei Tunue..enn U+ Slchi Ti ILe Ab r t-e~1 Y'Tmatluluaerv LnrJes.nstalt~ fu/ur v.u alLal.• erlii ' Arch Tuxicall tGERMANY• uEST) ,NUV 1:91r L~i~'Ill r-a-a,a•ISaNe0003-iaa6; Juurnal Endel BJ: Larabafes:'ENGLI9N Joarnxl. An„uunc.e.ent:820.Subfile: INDEx MEDICUS'A ratirnk e[t'u.rturel . wicl6a inasteJ 100 i04 .l1 rum ui.l a wdeitted ld,tire clinic„ Sin `ue tir. Lhe. leUur,JU. '-J'bee es1eJl heeuaerfusiuns aiUll ae.CivaLed.draecnal .nd. asuer1'atb a o wJ/alsve ,rere.cerfnraed, Tbe ca..usitiun or the.iuxested v, uld e JrLrr oed Lx : iaschraaatusraehs/.ass srecteo.etm. Fuur aurmtrrn.nes aereadentlfieJ7. 5]Z: a1eAa-einener 8% beta-einener 26% . . rvner 62 liaunv,rr. .ud'.3l utber MedrocarbanaThe blood erd aniua unu0errene caurl'mati.wrs aere. eantinuousls, eunitorediThe d'aCa susxrak liot'...... tereerres are roarl.. resorbed in the aaslruintestihal tract.. Tlre resur4ed. ruattmi ur thehsdracarbans euaulates in L6e l,iruchilic bode cooanleentsanq i's aluaFr aetaboli:ed and then exereted.bs the kiJUVSS.. Tbe.an aetJu saLliuavs arso hudYatdiunr hvdroarlati~ene raerrauda.vnOr anJ .ceLVlaLiw,. Fi.ve aatatiniliL'es uere identified. Ties: Case.RYeorM1:'Nueani Male Descr.i:turs: Bicucla GuarcmrGs--MktabuUise.(HE)iIBICtlCLO CPD9--M¢tabolia. (NE:)1: Electrnencerhalasparhv/l EEGL Nvaurerfuiunl Nsn FvYeentu>Ir.rhei GCNSi'Middle A9ei k0ils--Paisoninf (DD)i'zTarrenes--H.tul,ulia. /MEi CAB Resistrv. Nol,: 12]-91-3 .fLe.bunLbeneYi t38:-86-3: .L14.urreneif 80-36:-8I .falbhe-ebrwnc): on mWJ IQ, CD O ul fA 4TJ
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rnEbUxE_ a/9/2 1545390 79210390 OLC-eass.srectroaebrv of'.Teucriue rulihe oil,. Nessam NN) Muhtadi.FJi AI~NadFAA J~Phare Sci rJum.2979r68',.(6L.r800-1.ISSN 0022-35a9 Journal Code: J07. Languases: ENGLISN - Journal AhnuunceaenU 7911 ButifileF.INDED MEOICOS Theessentiial oil of Teucrius roliurr grouin4im Saudi Arabi'a. w, thoraughlv.'anvestisated fbr itsconstituents Va SLC-vasscrectrnavbrvr TLC, andlc.octronhntn.etrteeeihods. This', iMestigatli0n rsvqled, tiw rresence of 10 trreenaidal nosruunds including the hsdroca'rEansbeta-riueuvr ]daunem> alrha-rh.lllandrener and'. gaesa- and ddta-eadfnvnes and Olw alunhois Einalbaln tereine-a-ol, cednoLn cedrenolr, and guaiaL. The oil ws rich un alcohols and dewid of est'ers. Prelieinarv eharsacolesical.screruing shoued that't'he oiRtassessea ruvvrful antivnasaod.ic aetivitv Desarietors: ChrasatograMvr BacF Chmealogr.rhrr TLin Lawri i0ilsr. Oblatil.--Anelssls (AM)i tPlanbsr Medicinal--Analvatu (AN)I Br.etrus Ahallxsi...Mass. ' - .. 1!5/1 1874834 79248834 ETbaic e(facts oC essentiul, oi1.l aP Canybissativa L. aodeain canstituentf on Aanarian tDuaesia tivrjlnal (auYhorrs trans1)3 Etude de 1a.t'aaicit. deE"huil. vsven[irllr.de Cevnabie.aaL'tva L. .t de ses'erincirauN'.constituants sur la rLanaile (DUgesiatifrLua G.). Faurnier Gi Leoiceue PMD Panik.NR aaiT <ol..Eur Res eNov 1978. 1(6) vi&5-9/Juunnal' Cade:VROi llanguagee: FRENCH Sueaarv LanguaYes7 ENGLISH Doe Tvnei Enslistr.Abstract Juurnal AnnaunceaancT 7912SubfilaR INDEXNEDIE05 Reganovtior Piecesaf elanariam uar.s arv able W.absueba iusuluble substances deeosited' an the basr af tlw wssr6 inuhiNL the. are cuit'ivated. This biological testt was usvd to vtudv tlu• toxic effects of the sssenllial.oiil of Cannabis sativa'L. TLe hvdrorarbons.such as eiovne (aleiw andlbeta).carvoMvLlene and soo an verermt tuni'u. W. Bhe i•radrary earvarhvtilene nside aashigMlx toxic. It wsnat rosalble to detect anv erotectiun hv 5-bMro.vtrvelaxlne sc it uas.s tha cass' agiinstt dQAa 1-tatrahsdra-cannabinol and'~eannsbidiol. Tass: Ahiael " Desrrirtors: tCannabisi Cannabir-pnalvsYs (AN)T L.Lhal Du+e 50) LD 501 Oilc-Isolation and'. Rurification (IVI) t0its--TOaiciBv (TO)F tPlamrians--Drus Effects'. FDE)i Reguwration--DrudEfOrrts WE1'd', Sarotonin--Pbarucadsnaeics.IPD)9 tTurbelLaria--Oeus Effeets IDEY. 1/5/3. 1471125 78106125 Tunnentihr-indundhurers.nsitivitv'ta evreareint ail. Ooaes-GOassen.. At DYSrveC Hi Molvavb C)'.Naertens N. Cantaet r.rutitis. rDec 1977F 3(6) r30a-8r I55N 010'.-1573 Juurnal Code: DP7Languases:. ENGLISN. Journal Announcesenta 7806, SubttleC INDEXMEDICOS - After a dental erenat'.arr a feraerdaburaivrv Lvcliniciam a.s. referrrd too our clinic.because ofsaelling ufhistorauef lirsre andlginsival eucos.a. Patch, testing with the ICLRG stendaisi test.batt.rv levs rusitiw.er.etlonrs ta.eelorhanar balsar of Pera, and turpentine rerevides.. Funl'L.r rateb~ testing rvvraled hxnrcensitf.'atn to nerrereint oil ('an LnsreJimt of severat dental Preearations) due to the sensitizims rraranti.s af thre. insevd'uentet'.alrtltrihener liaanene, and Mellarvdrene, Tlresecosemnais.slsooceur in tur.entine oilrp a substancs used in the ratienl's.laboratorvn Tasa:'.Cace.Rerurtl NueanL Male. " Descristors: Afedi FAnLiI•Infeat'iw. Mvnlv. Lucal--Advvrsr Effectr (AE)i tOSnlal Materlal4--Adwrae Effects (AE)) DereaLitis. Cuntact-ELiulogv (ET) '. R tDeus'. Nvrersens.itivitvi iOiLS+-Adeerse EtfecLs (AE)) Oifvr Odlatlle--Adve}seEff.cDs(AEIi tPland Extracts--TOaititv (TO)')' Prnanesthetib Madieation--Adverse Effects /AE)i aSLCeatili.--Etiul'usv QET/s. Tooth Elnteactionil t7urrmtinr-AdvvrsaEfleeta fAil I
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Toxicity Raaings. A~mexplanation of'.f the toxicity ratingsis giveni ' in the following paragraphs: I U:. = Unknowm This.dccignation is givenn too substanceswhichs falll into one of the followingg categories!(a)I Notoxicity information could be foundin the Iiterature andl nonee was. known to the authors. (b) Limited.information based on animal ex- periments wass available but in the opiniotnf of the authors, this information couldd noti be ap• plied to human cxposures.fnsome.cases this ~ linformatiiunn is mentioned.so thatYhe reader may ~ know that.. some experimental workk has been done. (c)'. Published toxicirty data were feltt by Ihe authors to be of questionable validit-v,. 0 = No'Poxiciily. This designation is: given to matcrials which falll into one of the following categuries:. (a) Ma2erials.which cause no harmi under any conditions:of use.. (b)~ Materials which produce toxic. cffcclson humans only undbrthc most unusual.conditions or by overwhclining~dosage.. I - SlightToxicinya (a). Acute: Local.. Materialss which onn single exposures lasting secondsy minutes or hours cause.onlyslight.effects on. the skinn or mucous membranesregardless of the extent of the exposure: (b) Acute.Systemie. Materials which cam be absorbcd into the body byinhalation, ingestioni or throuch, the skin, and which produceonlye slight.effects following single exposures.lasting seconds, minutes;, or hours, or followingg inges, tion of a single dose:., regardless of the quantity absorbedlor theextent of exposure. (c), Chronic Locall Materialks which on con- tinuous or repeated exposuress extending over periods of days, months,, or yearss cause only slight harm to the skin or mucouss membranes. Thc extenlof exposure may be great.or small. (d) 'C,,hronirSystemie. INaterial4.whicPo cam be absorbed into~ the.bodyby inRalation, inges-tion or through the skin and which producc.only' slight:effectsfol9owing continuous or repeated. exposures extendingovcr days; months oryears. The extent of the exposure.tnay be great orsmalll. In.genenall, those substances. cltrssilied ashav- ing "slightt toxicity" produce changes. in the humaobody wF.iehi arc readily reversible. and whichh willdisappcar following termination of exposure„either with.or wiithout medicalltreat- menU 2 = ModerateToxiciay: (a). Acute Local.. Materials which on single exposure lasting seconds, minutes or hours cause moderate effects an theskin: or mucous membranes. 'fhese effects may be.tharasult of' intense exposure for a. matter of secondsor moderate.exposure for a matter ofhours-. (b)AculeSystemic. Materials.whiehcan, be absorbed intolhe body by inhalation, ingestion ~ or through. the skin.and which produce moderate effects following single exposuress lasting ser 1 onds,.minutesor hours; or fiolllowing ingestion I af a single dose. (cll Chronic Local. Materials whichion eon- tinuous or repeatedd exposures extending over periods of davs„monthsor years cause moderate harm.to.the skin or mucous membranes. (d)~ ChoonicSyslemic: Materials which can beabsnrbed into the body by inhalatiomt inges- tion or through thre skin, andd which produce moderate effects following continuouss or re- peated exposures extending over periodss of days. months or years. Those.substanaesslassified as having"inod6r- ate toxicity" may produce irreversible as well as reversible changes in, thee human body.. These changes are not.of such severity as to threaten life or produce seriouspermanent physical impairment. 3 = SevereToxiciity: (a) Acute Local.. Materials which on single exposures.lasting secondsor~ minutes cause in- juryy to skin on mucous membranes, of sufficient severity too threatem life or to cause permanent physical impairment or disfigurement.. (b) Acute Systemic. Materials.which can be absorbed.into.the body byinhalationy ingestion or through the skimand which can cause.injury of sullicient severityto threaten lifee following a single exposure lasting seconds, minutes or hours,. or following ingestion of a single dose., wi~ (c) Chronic Local.. Materials w•.hichon con- tinuous or repeated'exposuresd extending over periodsofdays,.monthsor years can causcinr jury.to skin.ormucous membranes of sulticient severoty tothreaten life or too cause permanent impairment. d~isfigurcmentt or irreversible I _ change. fX1 (d) Chionic Systemic. Materials.which can ~ be absorbed into,the bodyy by inhalation, inges- tion or throughh the skinn and whichcanh cause O dcathmr serious physical impairment following ~ continuous or repeated exposures to small ~ amountsextendingavcrperiods.ofdays.month~. N or Vears.
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. 1..]L liCbI Wlll-rvrcnY uL, rUl(ro, L-FO471,. TU1-~, HYDROCHLORIOE/ _ # SPECTRAL 8 OTHER PROPS SPECTR~AL ffiOTHER.FROP'S VAPOR.DENSDTY: 4'.7 (AI'R= 1) ALPHArPI'NEN'.E IN NORTH AMERICAN OIiLS IS DEXTROROTATORY, 8 I'.N MOST EUROPEAN OILS IT IS'. !. LEVOROTATORY .~ SPECTRAL ffiOTHER.PROPS SPECTRAL 8OTHERPROPS BOILING P'OINT: 155-156 DEGCi. DENSITY: 0..8591. @ 20DEG C/4DEGC/D-FORMi INDEX OF REFRACTION: 1.4663 @. 20DEG CLD'.i (` SPECTRAL I OTHER',PROPS SPECIFIC OPTICAL ROTATION: +51.1'a @ 20 DFG C/D /D-FORMC SPECIFIC OPTICAL ROTATION: +33.52 @ 20 DEG: ~ SPECTRAL & OTHER.PROPS C/D (ALCOHOL, 1X) !D-FORM,RYDROCHLORID,EIR BOILING POINT: 155~156' DEG. C./L-FOP.N/ DENSITY( 0.8590 @ 20 DEG C/4,DEG Ci' INDEX OF ( SPECTRAll I OTHER PROPS REFRACTION:! 1.4662'@ 20 DEG C/Di SPECIFIC OPTICAL ROTATION: -51.28 @ 20 DEG ClD SPECIFIC OPTICAL ROTATION: -33.24 @ 20 DEG (~ SPECTRAL 8. OTHER PROPS CfD (IALCOHOLe 1%) !L-FORMr HYDROCHLORID'c/ CHARACTERISTIC ODOR OF PINE; OXIDIZED MATERIAL.HASROSIN-LIKE OD!OR. Q SPECTRAL 8' OTHER.PROPS SPECTRAL 8 OTHER PROPS INDEX'OF REFRACTION: 1.4680 @ 15 DEG C STRUCTURE,WOULD ACCOUNT FOR 4 OPTICALLY ACTIVE 8 2 OPTICALLY DNACTIVE ISOMERS; ONLY' ( SPECTRAL 8 OTHER PROPS D, , L-, & DL-ALPHA-PINENE ARE KNOWN MELTING POINT: -55 DEG Ci DENSITY: 0.8582 @' 20' DEG Ct4 DEG Ci BOILING POINTX 156.2 DEG C ~ POLLUTION POTENTIAL /DL F17RM/ EPRC] HANST'PL ET ALr CARBON MONOXIDE PRODUCTION IN PHOTOOXIBATIION'. OF ORGANIC . OLLUTION POTENTIAL MOLECULES IN! THE AIR. ATMOS ENVIRONi' 14('9) 1077 (11980).CO-PRODUCTION FROM ATMOSPHERIC PHO110WXIDATION OF NON-CH4 ORGANIC MATERIAL RELEASElBY VEGETATION WAB SIMULATED BY. OXIDATION'OF ALPHA-PIMENE. [PRC3 BURNS WF ET AL, TAMPA BAY AREA. ( PHOT•OCHEMICAL OXIDANT STUDY.APPENDiIX C.. NONOTERPENEEMSSSDON RATES FROM SLASH PI'NE... REPORT; ISS EPAL'90!4/9-78/013i ORDER NO ( PB-287532, 26 (]1978), ALPHA-PINENE PRESENT. IN, THE VAPOR PHASE SURROUNDDNG THE PLANTS IN SUFFICIENT ®UANTITY' T0: MEASURE RELIABLY. ( POLLUTI10N POTENTIAL LPRC]SEI:LA RL. NON-URBAN HYDROCARBON - CONCENTRATIONS IN AMBIENT' AIR! NORTH'.OF HOUSTON.n TEXAS. PRO'C ANNUIMEET -AIR POLLUT ~ CONTROL..ABSOCi 72ND'(4)' 70 (1979):. ALPHA-PINENEr VEGETATION HYDROf.ARBON't COHCN INCR. RATHER.SHARPLY' AT SUNSET AS THE C FIRE POTENTIAL NOCTURNAL INVERS30NSET INr AS MARKED BY LOWER~EDW.INDiSPEED:. [SAX. DANGER PROPSIINDUS MATER 5TH ED 91'63 ~ FDRE HAZARDC MODERATE, WHEN EXPOSED:TO HEAT ~ . . OR F{AMEiCAN REACT WITH OXIDIZDNG MATERIALS.: wP 00 C FIRE POTENT3A1: [SAX« DANGER PROPS INDUS MATER 5TH ED 91'63 TO ~ C SHIPMENT METHODS ABSORPLDISTRIHLEXCRETE FIGHT FIRE:. FOAMr CARBON DIOX:IDE, DRY CHEMICAL... [NAWLEY'.. CONDENSED CHEM DICTNRY 9THIED 6873 CONTAINERS: TANKCARS.& GALVANIZED DRUMS. [MERCK INDEX 9TH' ED 9693 ABSORBED THROUGH N L SKIMn LUNGS, INIfESTINE. CONTINUE PRINTING? (YES/NO)'. C USER: Y
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ALPHA-PINENE C~
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PYR©L SZ $"y490578 ~s~-ais Y'uH Y~7 . _.~~ ... . . -,~,._:_._ ~.~a-a~.:..:..,a .::.._. . ~.~..-: ......_.~'~~~~_.:.~ __ __..:.. _ ......~..__..:-...-.... ... ._...._. Adft -... _, .
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• 0 0', 0 0 0 ~ I . 0 NAME OF SUBSTANCE ALPHA-PINENE TD'_E~ CAB REGISTRY NUMBER 80-56-8 MOLECULAR FORMULA C10-HD6 STATUS LAST REVISIOND!ATE MOLECULARI WEIGHT 610810COMPLETE'WI.TH PEER REV3EW. COMMENTS INCORPORATED RLGTH(16332'. 8'.10810~ 136.23 S1INONYMS SYNONYMS SY.NONYMS'. SYNONYMS SYNONYMSCLASS'. BN' MQJOR.USE MAJOR. USE MAJOR'.USE MAJOR USE MAJOR USE. MAJOR USE MAJOR USE CONSUMPTiION PATTERN POSSONING POTENTIAL 2,6,6-T'RIMETHYLBIC7CL0(3.1.1)HEPT-2-ENE 2,6,6-TRIMETHYLBICYCLO-(!3,1~,.1) 2-HEPTENE 2-PINENE BICYCLO(3.1.1i)HER'T-2-ENE, 2',6,6-TRSifETHYL. PINENE [SRIJ CHEMICAL.INTERMED,IATE EMERCK INDEX 9TH! EB 9697' MFR'. OF CAMF'HOF.', INSECTICIDES, SOLVENTS,. PLASTICIZERS,. PERFUME BASES CFENAROLIHIDBKF'LAVOR.DNGRED. 2ND ED V.OL2 4867FLAVOR INGREDIENT [HAWLEY. CONDENSED CHEM,BICTNRY 9TH ED 687] SYNTHESIS OF GERANIOLn TERPINEOL, TERPENE ESTERSe LUSE OIL ADDITIVES [HAWLEY. CONDENSED CHEM'DICT!NRY 9TH EDi687] SYN'THETIC RESINS 8 THEIR'DERIVATIVESr ODORANT, [SR'I] CHEM INT FOR SYNTHFTIC PINE OIL [SRI] CHEMI INT FOR CAMPHENE, CAMPHORv TERPIN! HYDRATE, TERPENE RESINS, B.INSECT'ICTDE, TOXAPHENE [SR'I] ND LGOSSEl1 NI. CTCP 4TH ED II-1701TOXICITY POISONIMG POTENTIAL POIS~ONINGPOTENTIAL. PQISONING POTENTIAL VAPOR',PRESSURE BOILING POINT MELTI'N&POINT DENSITYISPEC GRAVITY FLASH POiINT' SOLUBdLITY SOLUB.ILITY' f SQLUN3LITYSOLUBILITY 0 COLOR/FORM COLOR/FORM COLOR/FQRM~.. SPECTRAL Y.OTHER PROPS SPECTRAL &:OTHER PROPS CONTINUE USERI 5f RATINGS: 3. 3= MODERATELY TOXIC: PROBABLE ORAL LETHAL DOSE (HUMAN)! 0.5-5 G/KG, BETWEEN 1 OUNCE,& 1 P'INT (OR 1 LB) FOR. 70 KG PERSON' (150 LB). IGOSSELIN. CTCP 47H ED II-1707 .../IT HAS/ ESSENTIALLY THE SAME TOXICITY AS TURPENT!INE~., [GOSSELIN!. CTCP 4THED II-1707: SEE TURPENTINE. AS LITTLE AS' 15~ ML (1/2 0Z) HAS. PR'DVED': FATAL.TO A C.HILD., BUT A FEW CHILDREN'. HAVE SURVIVED1.2 3:EVEN 3 0Z'. MEAN LETHAL DOSE IN:ADULT PROBABLY LIES B'ETWEEN 4 1 6 0Z. /TURPENTINE/' [PRClNOST FREQUENT! ROUTE FOR POISONING ACCIDENTAL INGESTION!(T.URPENTINEI.. 10 ft HG @ 37'.3 DE& C 156 DEG C @ 2760.NM!HG -62,5 DEG C 0.8625 @ 15 DEG C 91 DEG F CC INSOL IN! WATER /DL SOL IN ALL.P~ROP IN /DL FORM/' I'S BY FORM/ ALCOHOLr. ETHER, CHLOROFORM SOLUBLE INGLACIA'L A'CETIC ACIDi/DL-FORM/- ALMOST INSOLUBLE.IN PROPYLENE GLYCOL I GLYCERINE OiIL /DL FORMJ LIQUID/DL-FORM/COLORLESSa MOBILE LIQUID INDEX OF REFRACTION: 1.4658 @' 20! DEG'.C/D /DL FORM/ MAX ABSORPTION (ALCOHOL): 210' NM (LBG E_ 3.64) /DL FORM/ PRINTING?(YES/NO)
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FROM: F&CT Vol. 16 Supplement Fragrance raw^materials monographss a-PlvenE Sinnmmcc 2-Pinene:2;6.Gltrimeth ,ibic%clo[I3; Ll]-2-heptene: Strucrure:. 853 Dvsrriqrion arcCPkpsicad propcrtier. ,SYtrck fndez (1976). Occarrence:Has been.reported to occur in.more than400iessential oils, being found'in the largest amounts in.Arliiflha miffefnlfum; Arterni.sio tridenratq Italiamrosemary,wild tiHymu turpentine. French lavender, coriander. cumin,labdanum, neroiiilemon, Gitseacube&a and ylang,ylang.(FenarotLs Hand- 6ook' of Ffucor fnyredients„ 1975):. Prepararinrr.c By, fractionation oflsulphaterturpentihe orneutral turpentine.(Arctander,.1969)- Usesr In public use since the 1930s. Usee in fragrances intkieUSAamounts to approximately 60001b.'vr.. Concentration ih: finall product $nap Derargenr Creams, fotions. Perfume Usual 003 0-003 001. 0-2. - 6daximum. 03I OU3'. 0051-0~ Status \ x-Rinene was given GRAS status by FEMA(1965), andl is approved by the FDAIbr food, use (21 CFR 1172-SId1. TheCouncil. of Europe(19741 included itt in the list; of artificial flavouring suh- stancesthat maybe added temporanilyy tofoodstvlfs.withouo hatard to public health. CASRegistny No. 8U-5Cr8. Biological data A'cvre roxiciry. The acute oral. LDsa ih, rats was reported as 3!7g/kg (2•3-S•1 g/kg) ) and'tPoe acute.dermal LDso imrabbits exceeded 5 g/kg (Wloreno- 1972). Work b,v. Hercules;.fnc. (1962) showed thatt the oral gDso. (ter rats was 21. g/kgfor x-pinene from steam distillation of woodandl 3'2 gtkgg for that from sulphate pulping of wood, thee signs of acutee intoxication being loral irrdtation, aentctl . nervouss systemm depression andd death from respiratory failure.. W hen. adtninistered to sheep, z-pihenc causc& grossalbuminuria and: . had a toxic action on the lit+er and kidneys (Han•ey, White & Jones, 19421... Ddialarion: The LCfso values(lethal concentrations for the'shortest periodlcausing death).for inhalatiom of saturated vapouns 1'-6100 mgHitre)i of x-pinene from steam distillation of'f wood were 625. 572 and 364mg/litre,;min in rats, guinea•pigs and mice. respectively, while for the saturated vapours (28-0mg7itre) of x-pibene Gomm sulphate pulping, the LCfyu values were 756, 896 and 420.mg;litre;min„respectiveLy (Hercules. Inc,,19621. The vapoursproduccdlocalleye,.nose.and lung irritation and affected the centrafl nervous~system. The.brain respiration of rats exposed..to.z-pinane vapour was: nott affected directly, but: brain glucnkinase and ATP levels. as well as the. activities of succinicdehydrognnase,and.lactic dehp$rogenase were lowered (Epshtein, 19591. Brain, glbco- kinaseactivity.returned to normal 40--05' days aher exposure was terminated. Iln rats kept im an atmosphere:saturated with n-pihene,. glycogpn levels nose.sharply imthe liver and les sharply,in the muscles, andl remained normall in brain t'usue, and the blbodlsugar level' remained normal (Ep.shtein,&Khiltko. 196% . flummr tv.cicitc. m-Pinenc isabsorbcd through thce skim, lungs and intestinc: andl benign skin tumours may result from, chronic eontacr with it IAArrok Index, t9761. Itt may irritate the skin and mucous membranes and cause skin eruptions, gastro-intestinal irritation, defirium,, ataxia. kid- ney damague and coma. Inhalation of a-piitene causess pa~lpitation, dizziness; nervous disturbances. chest paih-. bronchirixand.nephritis (.lfrrck.lndac, 1976). Irritation. Undiluted z-pinene applied tu thrbacks of hairless mice.andl swine was. nott irritating (Urbach &Forbes, 19T_b Applied full strengthtointacr or abraded rabbit skin for: 24hr und'cr occlusion it was.moderately irritaiing(Moreno. 1977), but tested at tW;, in petrolatum- it pcoduced no irritation afler a 48-hr closed-patch test: on twoo different panelsof human. subjects (Kligman, 1972h Simiricutiorr. In a maximiration test (Kligmaa 1966; Kligm,m.&Ep>teiir. 1975) ccarried outt on ?5 volanteers, the material. (RIFkt no: 711-721 was tested at a concuntratiim of! 10";,.in petrolatum and'd produced threesensitiaation reactions (Kligman. 19721:In vicwof thrautuxidaniun problems
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............ . ----..__.. T-b 3 ~ RESP' DISTRESSI'IFCOUGH OR DIFFICULTY IN ~ BR.EATHING DEVELOPSr EVALUATE:FOR FiES~F TRACT I!RRITATION, BRONCHITIS, S PNEUMONIA. C)~ TREATMENT...INCL RECOMMENDAT IONS.. .,IN ORAL EXPOSURE SECTION WHEN APPROPRIATE. EYflA)EXPOSED EYES...IRR1'GATED - COPI'OUSL'Y...WATER'...@ LEAST 15 MIN:.. ANTIDOTE 8' TREATMENT. /HYBROCARDONS/ CRUMACK.. POSSINDEX:MGMNTi 1] EYE.B) AN (' OFHTHALMiIC EXAM SHOULD BE.PERFORMEDIFIRR'ITAT'I'ON OR PAIN PERSISTS AFTER 15 MIN OF ~ IRR.IGATIONWITHIWATER.DERMAL AF PT EXPOSED DERMALLY'SHOULDWASH EXPOSED!AREA TWICE WITH~ ~ SOAP' 8 WATER. B9 PHYSICIAN SHOULD EXAMINE EXPOSED AREA IF IRRITATION.«.PERSISTS AFTER AREA' IS WASHED!. /HYDROCARBO!NS/ ~ ANTIDOTE 8' TREATMENT DRUMACK. POISINDEX MGMNT 1]! DERMAL C) TREAT!MENT SHOULD INCL,RECOMMENDATIONS'LISTED' IN ORAL EXPOSURE SECTION WHEN APPROPRIATE. ( U.S. METHOD OF MANUFACT /HYDROCARBONS/ [SRI] RECTIFICATION OF VARIOUS TURPENTINES+ PRINCPLY SULFATE ( MA'NUFACTURING INFO CMERCK INDEX 9TH ED 9691 PREPN. OBTAINED FROM OQL OF TURPENT!I!NE... E GIZLDEMEISTER', F HOFFMANNa DIE.A'THERISCHENOELE:BAND' IV' (4TH ( MANUFACTURING INFO ED, ACAD!EMIE-UER1LAGr BERLIN, 1956)'r. P 39.. CMER!CK. INDEX 9TH ED 9691 PREFNI ISOLATION OF D-ALPHA-FINENE FROM PORT OXF-0RDI CEDAR'WOOD ( OIL (CHAMAECYPARI'S LAWSON'IAMA PARL, PINACEAE) THURBER; ROLLv IND ENG CHEM 19,, 739 (1'927). ISOLATION'.OF L-ALPHA-PINENE FROM ~ MANDARIN PEEL OIL (CITRUS RETICULATA BLANDO, RUTACEAE)7' KUGLER., KOVATSr HELV! CHIN ACTAi 46, 1480 ('1963).. C MANUFACTURING'IiNF& IMERCK:INDEX 9TH ED 9697 PREPH:: PURIFICATION THROUGH'THE NITROSOCHLORIDE: T!HURBEFy T,HIELKEb. JiAM.CHEMSOC 53, 1030 (1931). TOTAL. t MANUFACTURINGI~NFO: SYNTHESIS'OF ALPHA 8'BETA FORMS: KOMF'PA,ANN! ACAD SC'S FENNICAE'A59r 3(1943!)i CA 41!r 425 (19.4.7)~. . EFEN'AR9LI.HDBK.FLAVOR INGRED 2ND ED V.OL24867: (. PREPFI7 FOR TOTAL SYNTHESIS...JOHHSTONEr BER DTSCH CHEMI GES22P 61'.+ (:1889'). CE: ' C M'ANUFACTURIN:GINFO AL OCCURREN DMERCK:INDEX 9TH ED 969] NATUR ....ORL OF TURPENTINE...CONTAINS 58-65X'ALONG WITH!30:C N'OFINENE (ISOMERIC BETA-PINENE) ... ( MANUFACTURING INFO MANUFACTURING INFO: CENCYC OCCUPAT HEALTH! & SAFETY 1971 239]NATURAL,OCCUR.REN'CE3 ...SOURCE OF PINENE IS FROM STEAM' DISTILLED W00'D TURF'ENTINE. CFENAROLI HDB't FLAVOF!INGRED 2ND ED VUL24RE] i NA'TURAL. OCCURRENCE: ITS PRESENCE IN NATURE,..,REPORTED IN MORE THAN 400 ESSENTIAL m OILS. IN LARGEST AMT IT HAS BEEN REPORTED ~ FOUND IN« ACHILLEA MDLLEFOiLIUM (D-), f0 L ARTEMISIA TRIDENTATA (Di-), ITALIAN.ROSEMARY O (L-)'., WILDTHYME,(L-). FRENCH LAVENDER (L-)r C/T 09 L MANUFACTURING INFO CORIANDER (D-n DL)r CUMIN (D-, DL-)... EFENAROLI HDBK FLAVOR I'NGRED 2ND ED VOL2.4R6] NATURAL OCCURRENCE: IN LARGEST AMT IT HAS (Z) BEEN REPORTED FOUND IN...LABDANUM,(L-), NERDLI.(L-)r LEMONr LITSE&CUBEBA'(D-)r 8. YLANG-YLANG (D-)i.. CONTINUE.PRDNTING9(YES/H~0) USER':
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0 MANUhALIUKLNG 1NtU LWHLIE-S6EV.ENS» PEST IN EN'JIR17'ri.VULl9E1 APFLICATIONSC ...STRODANE /AN INSECTICIDE/ IS PREPARED'.BY CHLORINATING MIXTURE OF CAMPHENE S FINENE TO CONTAIN 667 CHLORINE. MANUFACTURING INFO EFENAROLI HDBKFLAVGR INGRED' 2ND EDlV0L2 4861 APPLICATIONS: REPORTE:DUSES /INCLUDE/ 16-54 FF~M IN NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGESi64 PPM IN ICE CREA'Mb ICESb. ET!C; 48 FPM'IN CANDY; 160~PFM IN BAKED GOODS;. 2.6-150 PPM IN CONDIMENTS:.. MANUFACTUR'.ING:INFO EFURIA.. HDBK. FOOD AD0. 2ND ED 9177 REGULATORY ST'.AT.USt FEMA NUMBER 2902; FDA SECTION NUMBER 121.1059 IN SYNTHETIC TERPENE RESINS FOR CHEWING GUM BASE. PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS AF'PLY'. MANUFACTURING INFO EFENAROLI HDBK FLAVOR IN'GRED 2ND'ED V0L2 4863, A MANUFACTURING INFO REGULATORY, STATUSS FDA SECTION NUMBER 121.1'164 EFOREIGN'.COMPD METAB IN MAMMALS VOL4 242] NATURAL OCCURRENCE:, ONE OF MAJOR MONOTERPENQID CDMPONENTS OF EUCALYPTUS IS ~ ALPHA-PINENE.... MANUFACTURING INFO CPRC] NATURA'L OiCCURRENCE7 DELITALA LFr. CHEMOTAXONUMIC.STNDIES ON THE GENUS JUNIPERUS tb L. ESSENTIAL OIL EXTRACTED FROM THE BERRIES OF JUNIPERUS PHDEN'ICEA' L. I.~ TERPENE FRACTION. RIV ITA'L EPFOS3 62(6) 303 (1980). ~ THE:TERPENE FRACTION OF JIPHOENICEA OIL e . MANUFACTURING INFO ANUFACTURING, INFO CONTAINED:' 93.8% ALPHA PINENE. EPRC] APPLICATIONS: KLIMETZEK D ET ALr EFFECT AND FORMULATION OF THE POPULATION ATTRACTANT' OF LUMBER BARK'BEETLE TRYPODENDRON (= XYLBTERUS)' LINEATUM. Z ANGEW ENTOM'OLi 89(L) 57 (1980).. CATCHES OF I LINEATUM:DOUBLED WHEN'. ETHANOL AN'D. ALPHA-PINENE WAS ADDED TO THE LINEATI:N. DPRC7 NATURAL OCCURRENCE.P'ICKETT JA; ~ GR'I'FFITHS DCr CDMPOSITIDNDF APHID',ALARM PHEROMONES. J CHEM ECOL;' 6(2) 349 (1980). ANALYSIS OF SINGLE CORNICLE DROPLETS FROM e 1~b MANUFACTURING.IN'FO MEGDURA VICIAE SHOWED THE PRESENCE OF VOLATILE'COMPONENT OF'ALPHA-FINENE« CPRC] APPLICATiI.ONS: BORDEN JH ET ALr ETHANOL AND ALPHA-PINENE AS SYNERGISTS FOR THE AGGREGATION PHEROMONES OF TWO GNAT:H'OTR'ICHUS SPECIES.. CAN JFORRES 1i0(3)~ 290 (1980). U'6EOF ETHANOL S ALPHA-P'INENE AS: SYNERGISTS IH'PEST MGMNT WOULD ENHANCE MALE CATCH S,REDUCE (r POSSIBI~LITYOFUNCAPTiURED. MALE&CREATTNG MANUFACTURING INFO COMPETiLNG PHEROMONES SOURCES. EF'RC7 APPLICATIONS: HEDIN P'A'ET ALr IDENTIFICATION AND FIELD EV.ALUATION OF THE COMPOUNDS COMPRISINGTHE SEX PHEROMONE OF THE. FEMALEDOLL WEEVIL. J CHEM ECOLi 5(4) 617' D ~ (IA (1979). ALPHA-PINENE IMPROVED RESPONSE BY .G 40 MALES SO THAT POTENCYOF'MI'XT WAS COMPARABLE TO THAT OF GRANDLU'RE FOR FEMALES. O ~ ~~ MANUFACTURERS QSRII] ARIZONA,CHEM CO~. PANAMA CITY, FLA 3!2402' GC ~~ MANUFACTURERS. MANUFACTURERS ESR'I] CROSBY CHEMSr INCn PICAYiUNE.. MISS 39466. ESRI7 HERCULES INC, ORGANICS DEPT.BRUNSW'ICK.n GAi315:2'0. HATTIESBURGa MISS 39.401 ' MANUFACTURERS'. QSR.I.] REICHHOLD CHEMSr INCr. NEWPOR.T D .IV.BAYMINETTE, ALA 36507, @AKDALEc LA 71463r. (r PENSACDLA'r FLA32596 CONTINUE PRiNTING?(YES/N0) r wFCV!
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0 0 A 0 0 0 0 0 s 0 ADSORPdDISTRIB.fEXCF:ETE' ANTIDOTE STREATMENTi ANTIiDOTE &TREATMENTi ANTIDOTE I TREATMENT, ANTIDOTE & TREATMENT ANTIDOTE 8TREATMENTANTIDOTE.B.TREATMEiQT ANTIDOTE I TREATMENT [PR'.C7: LABAT Ci OUSTRIN J, STUDY OF A NATURAL MIXTURE OF TERFENES. IDENTIFICATION OF CONSTITUENTS.ABSORPTPON AND FATiE IN THE RAT AFTER INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTION. ANN PHARM FRN 37(9-d'-0)377(1.979)... IMINJECTION OF MELALEUCA'. VIRIDIFLORA OIL (CONTAINING ALPHA-FINENE)T-0. RATS, AESORPTIION WAS DETERMINED ASA FUNCTION OF T!IME.. [RUMACK.POISINDEX MGMNT 1] A)'. ESTABLISH RESP: CREATE ARTIFICIAL AIRWAY IFNECESSAP.Y. CHECK...TSDAL.VOL (1(ORMAL=10-15 CC/'KGY.FREVENSION OF ABSORPTION (ORAL DNGESTION.) B) IF EMESIS'IS INDICATED« ...INI'TI~ATED' UNLES5. PTCOMATOSEs CONVULSING, OR LOSTGAGREFLEX. IF /S0/ ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION SHOULD PRECEDE...LAVAGE.... /HYDROCARBONS/ CRUMACK.. POISINDEX MGMNT 1] ORAL C) IiPECAC IS PREFERRABLE TO LAVAGE IN ALERT PT WHO REQUIRES EMESIS: LAVAGE SHOULD BE RESERVED', FOR PT WITHCOMA, CONVULSIONS.P OR ABSENT GAG REFLEX, D) ADMIN ACTIVATED CHARCOAL.(ADULT: 60-100 Gi' CHTLD': 30-60' 6). E) ADMIN' CATHARTI4. MAGNESIUM SULFATE (ADULT: 30 G9 CHILDC 250 MG/KG). /HY,DROCARBONSA [RUMACK. POISINDEX MGMNT 1] DECONTAMINATION A) PT SHOULD REMOVE.ALL EXPOSED CLOTHING. WASH ALL CLOTHING 8.EXPOSED AREAS OF BODY TWICE'WIT!H SOAP AND'WAT!ER.ORAL EXPOSURE A'). COUGHINGS' IF PT IS ALREADY COUGHING ON ARRIVAL...ASP'IRATION HAS RROBADLY ALREADY OCCURRED. /HYDROCARBONS/ CRUMACK. POQS!INDEX MGMNT 17 ORAL EXPOSURE B) CHEST X-RAY' SHOULD'BE OBTAINED EARLY TO BE COMPARED WITHA 2ND!...TO BE OBTAINED 24 HR LATER'... ...INI 2ND X-RAY ASPIRATION PNEUMONITIS MAY BE' SEEN'..IN 1 SERIES PNEUfiONITIS. WAS GREATEST (13.5L') IN'.....CASES /WITH/ SPONTANEOUS VOMLTING...4.3:C PNEUMONITIS WHEN VOMITING WAS INDUCED. /HYDROCARBUNS/ CRUM'ACK.POISINDEX.MGMNT 1] ORAL B) IF,..,ASPIRATION HASPROBAB~LY ALREADYOCCURREDi....IM~PORTANT TO EMPTY STOMACH B..AVOID ABSORPTION 8POSSIBLY CNS DEPRESSIONt MYOCARDIAL INVOLVEMENT OR OTHER TOXIC EFFECTS., C) TREAT SEIZURES WITH IV DIAZEPAM, 4'ADULT: UP TO 10. MG. SLOWLY, REPEAT IF NECESSARY. CHILD: 0~.1-0.3.MGlY,G SLOWLY., - /'HYDROCARDNS/ CR~UMACK., POQ'SIN'D!EX. MGMN7 1] ORAL D) PULMONARY EDEMA MAY BE SEEN AS COMPLICATION OF PNEUMONITIS8 MAY BE TREATED W'ITRPOS END EXPIRATORY PRESSURE. EA ANTIBIOTICS...RESERVEDi FOR SPECIFIC INDICATIONS & NOT UiSED PROPHYLACTICpLLY'. Fl. BASELINE RENAL I HEPATIC FUNCTQON: TESTS SHOULDBE'OBTAIN.ED!. /HYDROCARBONSV ERUMACK. POISIN,DEX MGMNT 17 ORAL G) CONTiRA'INDICATION'8: EPINEPHRINE IS CONTIRAINDICATED...DiUE TO ITS POSSIBLE CARDIACEffECTS (VENIfRICULAR FDBRILLATION).. ESP COMMON FOLLOWING. PINE OTL.INGESTIONS. ANALEPTICS«..CONTR'A.INDICATED~IN CNS DEPRESSION... STEROIDS ARE CONTRAINDICATED. INHALATION 0 REMOVE PT TO.FRESH AIR,. fHYDROCARBONS/ .. .. .>.,._.:_:,,;. _: -....:,w.. ,..,... 7`D 13
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l,5/a' 1e64556 780995:56Effect of alnha'~-vinene an ti.e vz:e.l.fwmtiun .iarusoul uniJ.;vr.r,Uv. u~ Lhe rat. Fav Ai Szarvas. F ACta Med Aced. Sci Mane. rl'976... ]3.1A0: v3]9-85. ISSM'.001'-a89 Journal Codet' 0?8 Lanwases: ENGLISN Journal Announce.entl'. 7805'Subfile: INDEX MED[IJli The', .icrosa.al'fraction ur th* l~ivea vasrtudied fnr rutrim and csLachrou.. P 450 : contents as, vellias for a.inarvriur N-Je.etbvl4r. and aniline Mdra.vlase activit..and,for its butvliiocvanl.d'.e s rctru. under tbe effect of aCrha-rin.ne treat.ent.. A.oderalle ihcreasr vas' found in lLe aaount of eimraso.al arotein and c.tochrosa P a50:. a.arled iucre+se in tbs .etaboliism of botharino.vrine 6n.bst.ate af! tere:1) arA niiline(subatrateaftN.e I:l)] together with an inervas. iu the butvlisucwnid.-.bsur.tion .a.i..'of both hae.o.roteins.involvedin tl¢r.actiwi.. Thvs. albha-r'snene is.a broad-a.ectrum enzsee.inductar of the rhvnobarbital tvee. .iith carta('n .aantlttativediffe.ennes. Taes:'Ani'.al Descrirter.] tA.ine.vrinr M-De.ekhvlase--Met'abuUis. (ME)fil tAr.i'line Nvdroxsiase--Metabolis. (ME)i tAnl Mvdrocarbon Nedrux.lase.rllrtnbulis. (ME)ilCvanlldes--XetaEaliso (ME)). eCvtoehru.e P-190--Mvtabulis. (ME)6 ELZv.e InductionD 1Miermo.ear Liver--Enzv.ulow (EN11 Micruvu.es.. Liwerr-Metabolisr lME/:P.iOaidureductasn--Ifebbelbs. (ME)P PlmrvGarbi'.tal--- PMsrueadvnaalea'.tPDL1IRatsB iT.reene.--Phar.aced4na.ie. (PDI 4/5/5 144810678083126. Sensitizinf.and'irritatine .ru..rti.s.o6 star anis..oil. Rudzti E/'8ravua Z 1niacl. Der.atitis .Dea76. 2 t61'.3G5-8n I55N 01!d5-1873' Jwrnal. Gode:! DP7 tanfuafesl!EMGLISNJournal Anncunca..nt: 7805 Subfilel'. INDEkIME0ICU5 Starnanise.oill in 2 and lE cermantrations'..roduced active smsitia.tiomn in 52ot'test. subJectsr and aositive. .atch testsin 36 and 3a-., rn.rctivele.of'cons.cutive rati.nts.vithder.atitis. A cos.ar'zson.of theresults nf, tests with balza.sand'.other assantiai..ails dmveGithat staranise.oil daes not sive crass-reaaLions and seodu. c.uss-s.nisitivitv. Patients positive to this oil.are freourntlyeusikive to an.Lhule and toather constltuents of this oil: aleha-sinene. .li.uu.ne andd saTlule. Im. GsN. with siar anise ail'it.ae nutnonYln that a l: cunc.ntrati'en iss stlonelv irritant, and 0.5% r.veals sensitivity in aulv one fifth of: theactiveLe sensitized subjects. It is emssi0le tl/at the cause uft false nesati've .atch tests eight be sYe'alar ln the cas. of su.. oti.rr alierdenr., Taes:', Nu..n Descriptors: ALSera.ns: 8alha.s--Adverse.Effects (AE)1 Cos.eti.cs--AJv.rva Effects (AE)i Cross Rb.ctiansl a8eradliLise Contact--ELiuludv CET11 Falsa. Negative Neactionsi Flavarin!'. A9<ets--Advers. EffeclK. (AE)i't0ils. Valat'ile--Adverse Eff.cls (AE)) PatchiTestsL Pul:and 6/5/6 1445232 78080232 aleha-Plnene .etabolism bs Pseudo.onas .utida.. TudFaszen NJI Nellv DPJ IIi1Dic MF Eiache. !. r15'Naw 1177, 168 (2).315-8.. T88N 0406-2936 Jburnal. Code'.', 91'D LanwaleaL ENGLINN Journal Aenounce..nU 7804 Subf'11c:'.INOE1 MEDICUS Dv usinf.etabolicallv altered .utanbs a.d acrvlate, novel rutativ. inter.e0iates of ab.ha-rinene .etabolis.,bv Pavutloumas rvtida. PiN1L ...e detectad'. The. .eracharacl.rizad as 3-ismro.vlbvt-3-.mdc acidd and fieta'1-2-.eYhvl-5-isaneo.vlh..a-2r5-dlonoic'acid.. - Dsnr.iatars: Aervlates--Phanacodvnaeics (PDIi!Mutatlion)!Pseudu.wias--Dr- un Ef'fects'.(DE)IIPYeuda.onas.-Bva.ties (6E/9. tfswdv.wos--MVtabolis. (ME)J. tT.r.enes--M2tabalfisa (ME) at5/7 GQ 139173778026737' I -1 Gas chra.atosraehia-.ass.seectro.rkrkc dater.inatiun at valatil4 unrania ~ih ca.rounds in an aeban at.asehere. ~, Doff. BVt Isidurav VA) Zenhevieh IGO, J Clma.ato.r .11 Nur.1977'r 162.787-95. I55N 0021-9673Juurnali Ccde: NOF CA 'Lansuases: ENGLISH itl Journal Armouno.ent.'.7802' to '. Subfile: INDEXMEDICUS Palvsorbioide and earbachru.en nev sorb.nYS with hGSh t....r.tur... sta0ilits, havr.b.en used to cunc.ntratv teace a.uunts of at.uerturie. wllutantsc and 136 CIFC13 orsauia cu.aaunds. inul:udinY 126IndrucnU.ms. 6'6 anvsen derivatives and 3'3 chlbridesr u.re identified'l in air sa..les' collected in the streets.ofLeninrlr.d. Or.e.of the ..mr ftatareb uf the., caoosibion of the oreani:c constituents of the urban air sa..l.d is tha~ eresenceof a nu.ber at CnNBn hvdrocarbous (.ainlv olvflins)r and: also pnN2n-2'2 andCnN2n-a unsaturated hvdhocarbuns ('.ineludi'iN'.atalra-.ineni and eaa.han0. A'ca..ulson of the resullts with tbase. of carried'd wD om air fa.etes fro. Zurich. Noustou urd Paris Is o0 condd..able. Lntarast in eonnectionn viththe rossible eff.nt eA' seosraehicsU factoesam.th. ea..ositien and lif.ti.e.of orYania.eollutanlsim th..at.asaher.. Dascri.tora. tAir Pollwtants--Analesir lANlt: Cure.rtberavMv. 0.61 Olvdrocarbons--Analssis'd tAMli M.MOdsi ireetru.. A..alvsls. Massb N6latiiiz.tlbn ' •'
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MANUFACTURERS MANUFACTURERS U.S. PRODUCTION U.S.PRODUCTION U.S.. IMPORTS U.S'... IMPORTS U.S. EXPORTS U.S.. EXF'DRTS ANIMALINON-HUiMAN TOX EX ANTMAL/NON-HUMAN TOX KN . IHUMAN TOXICITY EXCERPT HUMAN TOXICITY KEYWORDS ( FHUMAN TOXICITY EXCERPT i. t LHUMAN TOXDCITY' KEYWURDS ('HUMAN TOXICITY EXCERPT C c HUMAN TOXICITY KEYWORDS U LSR.I]ISTi~MSUN LUMNER COn i3URTHWLSd PtIHULHLM CORPrDIVn ANACORTES+ WASH 93221, [SR'.I]UNIONCAMPCORPc TERPENE AND AROMtiTICS DSVr JACKSONUILLE+ FLA 32205 [SRI] (1F723 9.OX10+9 GRAMS (SALES) [SRI] (I976) 2..41XY9}9GRAMS (SALES)_ [SRI] (D972') ND ISRI]' (1975.)ND CSRI) (1i972') NDESRI] (19'75) ND CPRC71 JARVISALO J; VAIN'I0Hr ENHANCEMENT OF HEPATIC DRUG BIOTRANSFORMATION' BY SHORT-TERM INTERMITTENT TURPENTINE EXPOSURE INTHE.RAT. A'CTAPHARMACOL TOXICOLi 46.(1)I 32 (1980). TURPENTINE FREATNENT INCR THE AFFINITY OF LIVER MICROSOMAL CYTOCHROME P'450 TO ALPHA'-PINENE (THE MAIN.COMPONENT OF TURPEWTIN'E)'., CHRONICiRATSiNDe'INRALATIONiMETABOLISN AND NUTRITION7METABOLIC'DI'SEASES.ENZYME'INDUCTION' EMERCK INnEX 9THIE5 969] IRRTTATES SKIN+ MUCOUS MEMBRANES. CAUSES SKIN' ERUPTION. GIi IRRITATIiONe DELIRIUMr ATA.XiAn KIDNEY DAMAGE, COMA. INHALA:TIONICAUSES RALPITATIONb DIZZINESS+ NERVOUS'DISTURB'ANCESn CHEST PAIN+ BRONCHITPS+ NEPHRITIS. BENIGN SKIN TUNORS FROM CHRONIC CONTACT. NDiNID'iND`nNDi.DERMALiSKIiNiDERMATITISr CONTACT URTICARIA ND!iNDiNDiiNDi'INH'ALATION!iNERVOUS SYSTEM DIZZ'INESSiNERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES IMERCK INDEX 9TH ED 9693 FATAL DiOSE ABOUT 180 G' ORALLY AS TURPENTINE,IWHICH COiN7APNS.58-65X. ALPHA-PTNENEA. AOUTE"nNDiNDG.NDiDRALiNDiDEATH LGOSSELIN. CTCP 4TH' ED II-170] SL'E TURPEHTINE., SYMPTONATOLOGY7 1. BURNINOPAIN LN'MOUTiH & THROATr ABDOMINAL PASNr NAUSEAr UOMITING. & OCCASIONALLY DIARF:HEA,.2.. MILD RESPIRATO!RY TRACT SYN.PTOMS' ARE OFTEN NOTEDi ...QOUGHING+ CHOKQNGIr DYSPMEA S EVEN CYANDSI'S. ASPIRATION OR...SYS7EMIC ABSORF'T1AN'. MAY LEAD TDPULMONIARYi EDEMA &' PNEUMONI?'IS.. /TURF'ENTI~NEC NDiNDiNDiNDeORALiDIGESTIVE SYSTEMiPAIN!i.NAUSEA VAiM TT I NG'i.D IA'RRHE A NDiN'DiNDiNDi.OR.ALiMOUTH!AND TIEETH'iMOUTHiPAIN PHARYNX NIDiND'.iNDi~.ND6lORALiR!ESPIRATORY SYiSTEM"rF'ULMONARY' EDEMAiPNEUMONI:AiCOUiGH6RESF'IRATION DISORDERS DYSPNEA.',AIRW'RY. OBSTRUCTION NIDiN,D'iNDi~ND4 ORALiNDaABDOMENiFALN NDiNDi'rN~DiND!.iORALiSKIN,9CYANOSIS NDiNDiND'.iNDiASPIRAT.IONIiRESPIRATORY SYSTEM PULMONAR~Y EDEMAiPMEUMONIA;r ASPIRATION fumftw=~ ANSIENT DELIR'dUM & FINA CUMMOA GONVULSIONS OCCUR OCCA iY. USUALLY NOT
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mc ..: urpentine. in oil of oducts of'. aus2azea ftilbwing . 97, 23^_ iahuainces •mponents !ormallon rvai E E. Jrupncen ol6oresin : Siurerrid+. iProelk'ns Its on the pplement] .phert)y~ spenoid6: ovvoLitile 116rs~/6nF Is to bees. enes from kren¢ of dly aetive :dl ka+cs fi. b rs agTIS Fragrance raw materialt morwgraphs 857I MeKibticn. G.. H.- Htdin. P. A., McLaughlin. F..E_ &Davich. T. BI.(1971L Development of the.e bait principlee fbr control'l of boll weevils.. Additionn of terpenoidsand related plant' constituenm J. acon. Ent. 64. 14931. Meisncr, J. &.Sketulla..U. (1975). Phagostimulation.and phagodeterreney in.the larva of the gypsy mothr Pornhetria.Ji..par L Phrropara.drica 3(Ik19. Moore, B. P. (1964): Volatile terpeness from.Nasutitermes soldiers. J: Insect PhJ•siol: 10, 371. Ozo1s:,G.. ES.Bichevskik M:. Ya & Galvans. U..Ii (1973). Terpenes.and their complexes as primary attractantsfor bark-beetles.ofconifer trtes. In Znslic6ira Lesa. Edited'by Z. P. Spalvin Sh. p:.24. Zinatne. Riga. Pa,+ne: T. L(7974) Pheromone and host odor-stimulated potentials in: Dendocronm. Ezperienria 30, 509,. Payna: T. L. (1975k Bark beetle olfaction. Ill. Antennal olfaaary responsii+enessof Dandroctonus,fronrali3and D: brariromis,(Coltoptera-Seal(tidae).to.aggregation.pheromonesand host tree terpene.hydrocarbona J. c8nn. Ecal. 1„ 233. Pitman,,Gi. B. (1973), Douglurein aDendroaonus' pseudotsugne managemcnt.system. Enstr:.Ent: 2, 109! Pitmam, G.. BL &Vite-. Jl. P. (19701. Field, response of Devdroctonllss pseudotsugaee to, synthetic fruntalib. Ann. rm. Soc. Aur, 63. 661. Renwick, 1. A.A &Hughes. P: R.,(1975[ Oxidation of unsaturated cydic hydro®rbons~ byDendroctonus frontalis InsecfBioch'eue 5,.459. Rudinsky. 1 . A. (19734'Multiple functions of'tbe southern pinebeetk pheromone verbenone. Encir. Em: z 511'. Rudinsky. i A.. Furniss M. M_ Kline, L N. & Schmim R. F.. (1972). Attraction and.repression of Dendrruronus pseudorsuyar bytbree.sy'mhelic plieromones.in trap,ss in Oregonn andItlaho.. Can. Enr. 104, 815. Rudnev. D: F., Smelyanets,.V. P. & Voitenko. A. N. p970L. Biological efieet.of Saotcbpine uerpenoidsan insmss and mites. Vism sil.Aaspod:.,VaukJ. 13(7k 711. R}zhkova T. S. (d974):.Changr.in terpene compounds in AMes sid'rfca damaged by large black bng-hornee/. beetlhs. Pro6lrny frnioL.Piokhim. Drrr. Ra.r., Te:isr pokl. Vses..(Lsr Konf.L4',.45. Smelyanets;. V. P: &&uznetsov, N, V. f1968h Toxicity of some terpene compounds. Khinr. Se/. KJroa. 6i 754. Sumimow,. taP., Kondo:. T. &. Kamiyama„ Y. (1974f Altraetantss for the scolylidW beetle; Cryphalu€ fulvus. J, Jluecr. Phrsiol.' 20,.20711 Turchihskaya- 1.. A. (1975). Olfactory response. of bcetksof the'e genus Nylo6lur to thee smell of technical chlarophos. Khrrnorel.tepr.qcm Nosekmn rkh. 2 131. Vaseehko. G. I. &Kuznetsov, N. V:.(f9691 Toxidtyy of'.terpenoids for chalcographtleetks K6inr. Sel. Khn_. 7,913. Waseahka G. 1. Kuznetsov, N. V,. Smel\anets: V.. P: & Guznenok. N. Kh. (1970). Insecticidal properties . of some codmponentsof essential' ails. Dopor. Akud. Nnuk ukr. RSRSe. BI32, 275 Vite- JL P_.Hughes; P: R. &. Renwick,,J. A. A. (1976). Southern pine beetle: eBect ofseniil pheromone saturation on orientation. NururwisunscGafhn 63;,44. Vite,], P. &.Renwick. J. A. A. (1971). Ihhibition of' Dendrocfonus.froamlis resporlse: too fiontatin by isomers of brevicomin. ,Nntura•issrnsc6aftrn 58, 418.. . Ier1I,lVn.r1 .1
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AN9WER$~': :' :" AN TI AU cS. LO So CA91',(24).e198110f.. Parti.culate matterand.aromatic hydl-ocarbom em'assions from the controlled.cmmbustion bf alpha pinene Wa.rd„ Daraid. Edward Uhiv., Washington SeattLe,, WA, USA. 259 pp. Avaid.. Univ. Microfilms Int.., Order No. 7917658. FFam: Di'ss', Abstr. Int. B.1979, 40(2), 513 SL59~-2 (Air Pollution and Industrial Wygiene). DT D PY 1979 LA Eng ASUnavailable W pinenacomaustian particulate matter IT' Particles Aromatic hydrocarbons,bioloqical studies (emission oP,..from controIled'i.combustion of .alptra.-pinene) Te-80-56-8 (combustion of, arom., hydrocarborre.ands parti.cuiate matter from controlled) _
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f}`tEbLuNE „ =„/6 , 0a6a191. 81191191 Tervanaidrd biutransforratinu . xal. I.II: Biui:run.furrLeun uf al_rMa•elnenar betia-rinene.' ruiane .a.-cerene+ canarre.xe~~vurr and n-vs.eue "' rabbits. Iehida )e Asakawa YI Takeevlu'Ti A.alanl I J Pharr. Scii .Anr 1981. 70 (4) rJ06-1'.r IGBN 0022-3+a9 JwrnaL Code::Jm' ldnsuafns: ENGLISHI Journal Announce.enl''.:'.81D9' Subfilel INOEX'MEDICUS Thee biatrensMbraat5bn or li)-n /-1';r and. (t-)-a1rAa-rin.nasr. (-)-beta-rihenr(noriaene).n 1-)';cis-ninaner R1:-3-earaiwr 1-/rris-aaraner avrnner end n-cvaen¢ in rabbitsvas Lrvesti9ated. Tfiw major .etaNUlites vere. as fal3avs: (:-)-trans-v.rbxnal feoe (t)-r. {F)-. and 14/-):-alrba-einenesi (-)-10-rinanolt and f-Y-1-.-.u.M1haer7r8-diull froa (',)-beta-ninene:. <-7v'Leiia-tenln.ol and (-)-trans-sobrvrul from ('rl-c"is-rinanei P)-e-venih.-ar6-divn-8-ol. 3-earen-9-ul• (-1-3-carmer9-s- arbuzvlic acidr and 3:ca'rene-9.10-diaaeboxrlic acidfroe <il-3-r~ereneirarane-9r10-dicar8oxvlilc acid feua (-):-cisraaranvI and.evroene-3(10)~-9lecur Ie evrcene-lr2-91vca1] urutereeaolb. and'e-eveene-9-rarbuxvl'zr.-acid'froei f-cvaene. Thesee eetabalises includeaL'Lrliitoeidationre.oxidationie stereasalertive fee-diaeMVl.h.droxvlationiand its exldation. clleawYa ofa. . canJo9.tedidauble:bond to eeaxidvtianr and re9iaseleCWve,axidatiameaael df which are not.8bund usualla in cheaical~ r.actiansr andd due' to rhlch oarioucs nee eoaevands vere detereined•Thisbiotran+f4ru'tiue~a0 the : wnatareene hvdiocarbons gave 9we lnsect eheroaonas.inhi9h vtald•U , Tanf. pniedl) Male - Descrietorst Bi'cvda Coanaunds--Mvtabolise (ME)). BICTCLOiCPDS--Mwtatialis. ~ IME)i Blakansfdnatibni RabbitsitT.rneues--MVtabalLSe tMEI~. CAD' Re9istrr. Nu.a 123-35-3' •(lvreerrell 127-91'-3 .(terbenUwne)e'13166-]B-9. .(3*earen./E a73-55-2' .(Yinanal: 35a-59-6•(larana)9 80-56-8 .(a1Ma-einene)):99-87-t .(.-cveene): 5/S/7 . . . . ' .. . 0215933 80215933 - Metabolis.. ofalrha- and.bets-rineru. e-cveene'and 1r8-cinaole in the tiru+btail russuerTrichnsurua.vuleecule. . Baetheell. IA/ Flvnn TXi D/rvabniele R: ' Eenabiatica rJan 1980r 10 f10 ri7-23r ISBN0019-825a' J4urnal CoAe: ROU Lan9ua9es:.ENGLISN Journal AnnuaneeaentF'80t0 Bubfile: INOEID.MEDICUB' 1. Tha naturv'arl the:nun-conJusated. .etabaiitvs. of thv Eucal'srtaw aip't taneenrid coeevnenLS slnha-ribener beta-rinvircr rcvawrn nN.1LR-Cinvcle in tha. urine and teecea, of' the, brushtail1 eos.ue vas Lnrrtiaated• 2.. ' alnha-Pinenr was eetaboliad to awntauic eid and trans-svrhvnolr' beta-einenee to 9srteniic aeidr e-eveane bu'e-te.sot nW eueic.acidc and IrB-cineule to e-uresoir 9~nrdruxweinaol. and cinrul-9-uic acid.Tuss:'Aniaal: Fe.a1sH Male peserleturct tBLcwclo C4arounds--Mavbull+. IME)1' 9BICTCLO'. CPDS--Metabal,ise (MU.i. BioCnansYor.ationli i8rid9vJiCueeauuds--Netabuiis., (ME); tBRI'DGED CPOS--M.tabolise (ME)1 Eroxv Cueruu.ds--XVtabuLis. IMI)/. EPOiY CPDS--Metabolisa (ME)i' Eucal4etusi; Fvun--Aualsls (NN11 buerris.l. iManthaL--An.lo9s. ard. Derivatives (pA)i. Mvntirvl•-Matabulis. OMC1I.a0rassae.--MVtaboLise (NEH DTar.vnes--Mrtabulis.(ME)' CAS Re9istrv No.t 127-91-3 .Iterbvnt6anr)5 1190-VA'-6 dMndbql)e 470-82-6 .(cineulcli 80-36-8 •.(alehavirrcnell 99-B7-6 .(a-cvevnal 5/5/8 015020 . 80150209. Enhanceeant'of hepatic drug biutrxdvforeatiuni bv a shorRterr. inBeraittvnt.tureentina.exvasure in the rat. Jarvisalo.J1. Vainio N'. Acla Phar.acal Taxicai (Cur.Nrl. dvn 1960, 16 (1) e32-36r. ISBM' 0001-66831 Journal.Code:11DG'. tan9uaaasa ENGLISH JaurnaE Aunoancaaent: 8007' Bubfilet INDEX MEDICUS'- - An inlialation axsosure of aale rats tv. 300 r.n.., or a uu..veeial Lu.rnmftne 6hrs dallv 3.dava a vaak fdr 8 waeks enhancvd tNe artuviLiesofdrus bi~atr.nsfor.ation enz..es o0liver aicrasaavs ounsiderablv. The activittes af'NADPM rvteehraee C redVCtaye llld7-elhYxyCYewaPiil deathYlaferand eicrosa.aL eantent efevtucAraev P-dS0 v e incraased 35-60i durinY thefint weekas of the e ent• but had aetaudancv to retbrn towuds the control valu..slater onNnArsiailar enhameaent u0 activities was afso found in tirer eicrosueal.e.axide hvdratasn and UOP flucenunosvllraurferasv.. but, these enzvae' activitiie.tandedlto dOrt llvss durinsiCLe rxevrssvnL Thrturrvntine trrat.vnt Increasad'theaffinitv oflliven eicrosueal cvLurhra.e' P-030 to:alaha-einane (the eaun c erunant of' thv.CUrrvntirwf. Thv rrsent data su9festa.that.-eabbsure to,turaeid."sueisable, to aw1iM§a considrrablv the biotnansfbreotien afidru9s. Tafst Aniealt''MaOv Dascri'ntons:'Adaetatibns Bialo9ital--Drni EfTect's(BE)t BfiutranvfuryUio- n--0rue Effeet+ (pE1f Couvarhns--Mrtabulli.-. (ME)'Ji GvtocXraae P-a50--Mttabolise, (MEM Evuxida Xvdrolasvv--Mktabnlisa (NEf)'EOhrl Ethars--Metabolisa /ME)i Poirrosa.vs~.. Llver--Enzv.o4'WV /EN)(' MMDPN Cvtnchruae C Reductaase--MetabuUlae (KE),fi Oavsanases--Metabalise (NE)/ RaUs/ TerranesrytetaE0lisa (ME/dTurrantine•Mdxinistratlun arN. Dusaev (AD)1 tTur.entlnc--PXareacodxnaaics(PD)li UDP Olucunonusv.lYransfawse--N.tabalisa (ME)' CAB RtlistrvNo•(B0-S3-B .l:irvenvll. 800A•d1-2 •(Tueeenti'rae)Enzve Mo.t EC 1.1'3. .(Oiewsenuesll'EC 1.11'.13., .O-etl•uxvruusarin D-dealkrlase)i; EO I•1a.1.1.1 ./Cvtochre.e P-aS011 EC 1.6.2.V .[NApPX Cetoehru.e C Reductaself EC 2Sa.1•11 •(UDP'8lveuranusvltreusderase)i EC 3.3.2.3'. •lEnaxid. NrdraBase.)"
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ANSWER 7 AN CA78f17)'.:111553n . LI ..$y~p1_ar_s;5;4fyw~alpl+a.r*plmme~toocimeee. AU Ricey Sraham., Pollmck,.James.Franca :S United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority I U.S. US 37L4288,30Jan 1973, 9 pp. AI CB Appl. 39,423169, 6 Aug 1969 CL 260-675.5g 8iO1.j, C~07r_,. C: 094 SC 30-10 (lerpeno"vtls) DT P CC WSXXAt9 PN 1973'. h Eng IsR Unavaita6le !KW pinenepyroLyni~s +t'ci~mere h7 13877-9.1-3P' 6iro:m pyrolysis,a# ..=phv.-~i~~.+n) I1" .-80'36°B - , mr.i.m=ne .om).
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ToWNE AU - Karasev US TI - ha~ r~aTiristics of the develonent' of Calilidium violacaur on coniferous wood stores in the USSR SI - CAL091/05104SE SO -Biakarroz., Biorovrezhdeniua. Obrastaniva.. Bater.. Uses~.. Shk., 1stK 1976.131',5 LA - RUS AD - CBAC COB7RIGHT:' CHEM kDS Srna.ins coniferous boardswith3 L/.2 of 5% ea..a-HCH (D) decreased infestation by larvae of the tit'Sebeetle from 20 to 0.9'larvae/a nt board length, rhervac barking tNee boards co.aletelr rreventedtheinvasion:.(58-89-9' .sasa.-HCN). Non-barked fir wood was relativelwiresiktanU to invasiom.bs the beetie.becausee of a high content.of burnwli acetatee and DELTA:-3-oarenein the bark.. (76-49-3'Bornel acetate)(13466-78-9 .DELTA'.-3-Carene) The high contentofalvha-rinene in Pine bark offered less Protection. (B0-56'-8 .al'rha.-Pinene) Saruce.boards suffered the greatest da.aseand contained no.bornal acetate. UC50 values.of NornvB acetate, DELTIX-3-carene, al'rha-rinene, and li.onene ta4th-Sth,instar larvae of. tNe.beetle were 0.000836. 0.001107..0.001636iand 0.004020.auL/.L/.allarvae wt. (13ff-86-3'Lieonene)'. 8 AU. -Karasev US AD. - a..ashch. Drev.r Ukm.. Nauchno-Issled. Instl. Rekh. Obrab. Drev.v Kiev, USSR TI - The.roleof volatile oil cososition.for trunk rest resistance in coniferous slants. Exeeri.ents.on lumber SI - CA/087/195429T. 50 - Svar. Biol. Huns.iVBL.16. ISB Host-Plant Belat. Insect Behar. , Rerrod4r Peoc, Svn... 1976r215-19' LA - END AB. -CBAC COPT1iIBHTA CHEM ABS LC50 values ofvolat'xle-ui) co.ronents's of srruce., Pine, and'fir: alrharrinene, beta-rinener DELTA3.carener lieonene, boenvl acetate, volatile oil of fir balsa., and alaha-terrineol.were'.0.1652. 0.2630v 0'.1483r 0.5226.. 0.1129. 0.1045, and 0.0974 .uL/eL.. resr., for 1 Callid'aue violaceua 4th-5th instar larva. (80-56-8 .alrha.-Pinene)(127-91-3.beta.-Pinene)(13W66-78-9' .DEtTA'.3-Carene)(138-B6-3 Li.onene)(76-49-3 bormi acetate)('L0482-56-1'~ .aleha.-tereuneol.) The LCSO values of the fi'r volatlile oil for the.lstr3rdn 4thr and StN'instar C.vfoiaceu. Larvae. was 0.000059, 0.001986, and 0.002321 .uL/.Lr per I as larvalwt.n res.. The high toxicity of the.fin oiliforvoune'larvaer coabined uith the conen.. ofthe fir resin~ ducts in the outer bark.exrlair.sthe high resistance of'unbaaked fim.losst to.the rest, illustrated bs the fact that the bark of the spruce loss with'20 larvae/a lenath., fir logs with 2 larvae/a, and fiv logs vith'no larvae..each contained 0.05, 0'.41b% and:0.35Xvolatile oil, resr.o haying LC50'values fcr the 4thr5thinstar larvae 0.006423n 0.003554., and 0..00I908 .uL/.L.. ree1 .a.larval wt..'resP.
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pN. CP76(115)H35933y TI Pyrolysis of..alpha.- andl.betla.-pinenesin a tuba heated:tiy ani ry LLA •electricalcurrent Voi~tkevichy S. fi..qKashni:kov„ V. V..;, Zhuchkova, 0. N..; Bbgacheva, T. P.; Zelenetskii~. NL N., Vses.Nauchno.-dssbad..-Inst. Sint. Nat. Dushistyk.h Veshchestv Vorontsovo, . USSR Maslo-Zhir:' Prom., 37(1D.,. 24-5 30 /Terpenoids). .T MZPVF3E 1971 Russ FlBUnavailatll.e WW pinene pyralysis T ~80-56-8 1'27-91-3'/pyroiysis.of)' I
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Toxl.rN E e AU - Tsurmta Ti " AU. -Mawai, M TI- The artificial reproduction of Tricholoaa'.aatsutaker(S.. Ito et - leai) Sins. Vi!I. Antibiotic actlivities.of volati..lesubstancese extracted froa a'bhiro:'of'T. aatsutake. S0. - Nirron Kingakkai KaihoF VOL 20, ISS 2a. 1979.211-19 AB -CBACCOPtlRIGHT: CHEM A8S Volatile erf.substanceswereextd. with steaa distn. or Et20 froa an~activeescorrhizr.af Tricholo.a .atsutake The exts, uere fractionated bssas.chro.atafy andl contain various kinds at volatile substancesn indicatinf:that 6' fractions froa A to F were eain coeronents.. Coaranents A-D were greater in the ether ex6d. frscti.unss thanthosen im the steaa, distdl fractions and thecontente of eoaronent.Fim the steaa .. distd'& fractions was hifher than that in the ether extd'. tractions. These exts« suppressed the faowth'of Bacillus subHil'isrin viRrar alihoush.anr effect ani the.srnwth of Peni,cillflua citrium or Tricfiodersa viride was'.not naticaabltr.Alrha-P'inener beta-rinene and limonene was. ProbablsPresent' in the exts'.. (80-56-8 .alPha.-Pinene)(127-91-3 .bets.rPinene)(138~86-3',liaonene)'. Alrha-Pinene.it'~elf has a stranf antibiotic activity asainsts B.. subtilis. On the application of a e a-r'aneneto the sui.ls the no. ofsoil b.cterir were effectivels reduced. 8hem alPMa-rinene was used tofe0her with Benlater the no. aff both bacteria and fungi im the soilwere reduced also, altfioueh.the results were not alwass.canskstent depending on the soilss used.. AU - Fournier G AU AU - Lenicuue PH , - Paris MR AD - Lab., MatiereMedl.n Univ. PaeisXl. Chatenau-Malabrv TI - Toxic effectsaf the essential oil ufCannabis.sativa LL. and itss aain constituentsan Planaria (Dusesia tifrinal St - CA/0921052924T. SD - ToxicoL. Eur.. Res:.i VOL 1, IS86. 1978r385-9 LA - FRE AB - CBAC. COPYRIGHT: CHEM.ABS He.p serdessential.aiLs and their coanonents were deposited on the bottotaf 10-c.-diae'.Petri dishes as 0.IZ salns. in CHC13, and aftertheCNC13 evaen..50~eL water was added and regenerating D. tisrina were PLaced for detn. ot'48-h LD50'.values expressed in aL of the original 0.IZ so1h. of theactive insredientsin CHC13. The LD50 values were fon'thr essential oli 1.35b terrenehsdrocarbons 1.62, oxygenated substances 0.51. beta-carwaehvl'lena:2,B01 beta-carworhsllenee eroxide 1',I) 0.20, terrinene-4-ol'. 3, a1PHa-Pinene 3, beta-rimene3. and 1r8-eineal.3 aL. /87-41r5 .beta.-carwoPhwiBeneli1l'39-30~6 ".beta.-Carvorhvlllene eeoxide)/362-74'-3 TYrrinene-4'-ol1(80-56-8 .a1Pha.-Pinene)(127-9D-3 .beta.-Pinene)(47D-82-6 bB-Cineol) . Seratonim failied to alleviate the high toxicity of I. LD50'.of _ synthetic I was 0.30 aL ofl 0.11. CHCI33 saln.., indicating some differences between the:naturatand synthetic I. ~ 2 AU AD TI SI SD LA AS De e DL J' - es. Inst...Frafrance:Mat..Int.r EnflewoodiClitftr - Manosrarhs on fragrance raw.aaterialsw a1Pha-Pinene - CAd091/19876AX - Food CosaethToxicol.iVDL 16.. ISSSurrl.. 1.1978we53'-7 . - END - CBAC COPYRIGHT: CHEM ABS'A review with,84 refs.an a1Pha-Pinene (D) includinf toxicitr, inhalation.. irritat'von, sensitieationr PhatOtaxieitY, aetab..PercutaneousabsaTTtTUnr careihofen3citer cwtotoxicitv, andPhareacul. ('.80-56-8 .alrha.-Pinene), 3
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Txu'NE- 9 nB10N• AD - Switz. LI - Phar.aceuticaS.coanos.itiom containinsan antibiotic ando solvent mixture containin9.oxidized alpha- and beta-rinenes 91 - CA/o86/127280XSO - 6er.Offen. PATENTNO., 2265235'12/16176 (BuskSne S. A.)AB - CBAC COPYRIGHT: GHEM ABS Synergistic antibioticc activitr.was obsd. with co.rnsi cant9. a tetracvclinevntibiotic and a fractiem of the oxidn. rroduct of a eixt- ofl alpha-pinene and beta-rinene.Forexa.ele. 1500 9 ofam 80:20,.ixt,. of alpha- and beta-rineneuas Heated'with.1Zdibenzovl.aeroxide at 75-85.desree.for30-50~h while rressurized air was biown through the reaction .ixt.. Part of the axidn. rroduet.(10 s)was rlaced on an A1203'coluan and eluted with 200 .L II',MeOH in benzane* and then eluted as»nn with,3000..L solent which was eva.d. to give 8 - g of a yellow oil.. This oil 1501f1', vas.fractionated a4 14. .. He - to sive. 5I9 fraction 1and.15 9fraction 2. Miceinfected'uith Dirlococeus.eneu.eniae lived longer when treated with 600 or 700 ee/ks of a 1:.10 .ixt.,af tsaction 2.and tetracwc1ina-HC1 than uithtetracsciine-HC1 alone. (64-75-5 Tetracscline-hsdrachlbride) . Administration rith4raction 2'also decreased'the.ind inhibitory conen,of. the tetracscline-MCI for 4 common bacteria. The rresence..of fraction 2 did not.alter the aeute ar chronic toxicitx.of tetracvcliue-HC1' in .ice. Enhancesentt of the tetracycline activity bv fraction 2uas due to - the vehicle function and cytarer.eatiilizin9 action'ofthe terrane fraction as well as to thebacteriostatlir effect af the substance itself.. 10 AU - MacGresoeJT - AU - autun U .. ' ' AU - Butterw.RG AD - Sest.. Rai. Res. Uab.rARS.Berkeleee Calif. TI - California bav:oi3. II. Biolosical'.effectsof constituents. 91 - CA/081/1466580SO - J. Aerla. Food Che..1'UOL 22. IS5 51 1974n777-80 LA - ENG AS - CBACCOPYRIGHT: CHEM ABS The.acute.oral toxicitv of'Ca11fSbay: (U.belBularia;californica)oil,was 9reater than that of Mediterraneani(Laarusi nobilis) or Yost Indian (Pi.enta.race.osa)'a bay oll.. Thetoxinitr of Califomni,r.bax oil was due eri.arilv, but.notentirels.t to u.belliulone.(D).a co.ronent.notPresent in, Mediterraneam or West' Indian bas oLl.(24545-81-1UabeiluLone)'. 3r41di.ethoxva3lslbenzene (II)., a constituent of Californiaand. Mediterraneanibasy ails.. Produced sedation in.eiceat 1'ou doses and a reversible narcosis at higher doses., (93-15-2 - 3e4`Di.etfioxnailvlbenzene)'A reversible narcosis:uasalso obsd. im stick'feback fish exposed to.I3. II erevented the death of .ice treated with lethal convulsant doses of strychnine. (57-24-9'Strvchnine) The effects of II suggest it .avhaveso..relativeCe specific centrall nervous.or .vnneunal effects and indicate.a voten0i.a1 clin., utility of this ater'aali ar a drug.
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AN CP91(3):20726y. " in'-some aBroundYitate°sflgMatr6~X'°ts'and~electrecyciic`rearrangementY ' ef .aTpha'.-pinene .(pphoterpenes.~ai+4ha+pjfTa2*jsls IFSB Pyrolysis ofailoocimenef obtained by heating .al.pha.-pinene. AU 6rowiey.y K. J.,)I Traynor, BL. G. CS Dep."Chem.., Trinity Cpll'. - ' LD DubDin:, Ire.SO Tetrahedrony.34'.f18), 2783-9 . SC . 30-10 (Terpenoidk). ' - DT J CO TETR65B. ' IIS 0040-4020 PY 1978. Lp Eng ! --" (424.degree-~nnder--N),-gave a-complexr-mixtG-of products-derired.- - I, primarily from.1.7-and 115-H migrations, and 6-electron electrocycliaations. KW pinene.pyrolysisq alloocimene pyrolysis.rearrangement IT Terpenesand Terpenoids, reactions' (sigmatropic and electrocyclic rearrangements of) IT Rearrangement ' (electrocyclic thermal, of a43oocimene). IT Rearrangement -(sigmatropic thermal, . ofalloocimena) IT 16782-79-9. *4'0920-68-1, (Grignard methyl'stipn of) IT 18479-54-4 70469-51-I. (dehydration of)1T 514-96-5P .alpha.-Ginene) (formation of, in pyrolrysis of IT 514-94-3P 652f-10-4P' 55108-98-OP 55109-00-7P 70469-52-2P' 70469-53-3P (prepn.. af)'. IT ~60'-56-®(pyrolysis of) 52775:-52-3P
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CA69Y12f.144847v Mass spectroscopy o< pyrolysis prod.ucts,ofl polymeric materials. I. Masa spectroscopy of'wood-component pyrolysis.products Hiramatsu„ Kinji CSOsak.a Furitsu Y.ogyo Shoremkan LOOsaka,dapan SO Shitsuryo Bunsski, 14(4), 215-24 SC 43(Cel'Iulose„ Lignin, Paper, and Other Wood Protlucts>, llT 7 c0~ SH3IiAK. ' y' 19G6 A Japan H'. Unavailable :.WW pynolys8s,wood~ wood pyrol'ysi~s;, man specara wood pyroPysis Wood (pyrolysis.of Pinus..thunbergii antllSnorel negrosen:,is, mass 05 spectroscopy in) %j Filter paper ~ (pyroLySis of, mass spectros.opy in) _ ,20679-57-6 c (pyrolysis of, as Ilignin modeil cnmpd., m2=_s spectroscopy in) Ln Ti IT IT ITreacti'ons. (pyrolysisof „ masa sp.ci.roscopy in) I
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Y FROGt 4 ~ AU - FLORIN L - AU - RUTBERe,L -~• AU - CURVALL M ~ ~ AU - ENZELL CR TI - SCREENING-0F TOBACCO SMOKE..CONSTITUENTS.BOR MUTAGENICITT USING', THE'..AMES" TEST ~' SO - TDAICOLOGTi 15:2i9-232,1980'. AB - EMIClORNL ~ 5 AU -OhavAK C AU - a n( skii80 TI - New.eeneration resticides.im forest protection SO - 1ZV. VYSSh.. Uchebn. EavedLrLesn. Zh.i ISS 6.198Dr19-24 L AD - CBACCDPYRIGHT:.CHEM A85Thetitleaestlicides are ardb off wood erocessing bsnraductsrsuch as.the turrentinee residue (carene fraction oftureentine)'. (TR) reaaining aftrr e.inene sern.r, uhichh C contains 27-SY DELTA3-carene (1), 20% dirertene. 82 alrvha-ei,nene+ 22lbeta-ninener 22 beta-aarcene.p and~.73.3X caarhene. (13466-78-9 .BELTA,.3:-Carene)'(77271-84-2 dieeetene)(80-56-8 C leha.; Pinene)(127-91-3 .beta.-Pinene)(123-35-3 .beta.-MSrcene)(79-92-5 Caeahene) TR wasalsostas effective agalnst.forest insects as.was Pure I.in lab tests. The TReCfectiveness.was increased byresin addn, wnichextended its effectiveness.in the field', . Field LC50 value of'TR-resin 1.:'0.5 suseensions for 2nd-instar vellou alder sawfls was5.,60. larchsaxflu;(Pria9lrhora enichsonii)'7.0tr buff-tip aotM (Phal.::a bucephala) 3ed-instar cateneillers2.90n alder leaf heetle larvae 4.66, and acacia aphid 2.99 agLL. The treataent wos not toxic for beneficial Sulbfly larvae Predators and Ichneuson'adae rarasites. Oral LD50 of TR for aice.was6 sGks. 6' AU -RQ KLF,~L~ P AU - RAY' I TI -MUTAGENIC SCREENING OF VARIOUSHERBS. SPICES ANDFOODiADOITIVES SG - NUTR CANCER) 1(A)tl0-f5r1979 AB -EMIC/ORNL. 7 AU -Kulv ZT AU -Guseinov. DY AU -Kasusoe FY AU - Akhundov RA, TiI - Studies on the cheaicaS eoeeosition'n and'sone Phareacologieal andl toxicolo4ioal. rrorerties oftht essential oil at'Thvaus kotschsanus SO - Dokl. Akad. Nauk.Az. 55R: VOL 35. ISS 8, 1979+87-91 AS - CBAC: COPYRIGHT:'. CHEMiABS Theoe oil irom, AzerbaiVan srecies contained 52 cveeonents anons which were carvacrol. 13.747 thneal 10..0i.terainene 7.60e terninnlene.6.72'e carvuehvl3ene 6.33, terpineol 4.56, alpha-pinene 3.36. and beta-pinene 3.325. (499-75-2 Carvacrol)(.89-83-8 Thueol0(8013-00-1 ' Tereinene/(586-62-9 Terrinolenelle7-44-5carvochul3ene1(8000-41'r7 ternineol.)(80-56-8 .airha.-Pinene),(127-9f-3 .beta.-Pinenel'. Toxicol.. data on ahiteei,ce> guinea Pigsa and rabbits showed nao toxic rroeerbies (LDO'.= 1750 ueXkef. LD50 : 1892 aAVks)'. SS 18 /C?' USER;' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Q ~ ~ l ~
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AN Cli1O0(2):124'29t. TD ~hermal`?'decomposf~ti'dn:'fif'`po7yethylend'.f"gYr'yCd1~i~20M'intl1lffmti;al'aail',s -im M/aprlaqm d :chramatographg; enC:~-the;aff,Kt±;of4 ,FaqesC.pf- pKygen: Conder, J'. R.; Fruitwala, N.. A.; Shingari,'M. K'. Chem.Ehgl. Dep.,, Univ. Coll'., Swansea' Swansea.SA2BPP, UK J. Chromatogr., 269(3), 171-8 62-2'(Essential Dils andlCosmeti'es)80 JCCRAM 0021-9673'1983 Eng PolyethyYeneglycol 20MI C56592-21-37-coated'firebrickd columns, used- for gas chromatog. of essential aiIsy darkenedland had a strong odor . ofHDipc after operati~onat 170.degree. for afew hundred hours. Decompn., followed by'tiltrn_y of an aq. ext. of the column packing with R.0009111 NaOH, began atr about 160.degree... The use of an O removal column (Mn oxide) irt'the N carrier gas.line, rai,sedlthe decompn. temp.. to .apprx.200.degree., suggesting,that Ois.involved'.0 in the ox.idn. and depolymn.of the stationary phase. In the chromatog. of mixts. of geranio7.. C106-24-1.3and'nerol. C106-25-27 or - .alpha.-pinene CBO-56-®1'3 and .beta.-pinene. C127-91-31,, decompn. of the terpenoids began,at 90-140.degree.,, depending on the column support used and the.amt.of statlianaryy phase. Phase Sep PAW was the best support ior the.pinenes.and. Phase Sep G was best for geraniol and nsrol_ Phase Sep. P'was inferior farboth mi'.uts.Statiunary phase.toadings of 15~217.I vs. 5Y.decreased decompn. of both thee stationary phase and the terpenailds„ . po3yethylene glycol decompo gas chromatog; chromatog IT Chromatography, gas (of-essentiall oils, decompn. T' Thermal decomposi'.tion in) terpenedecompn gas (of' terpenoids, ingas.chromatogn or, polyethylene glycol stationary phases) Terpenes andlTerpenoitls, reactions (thermal decompn,. of, inigas chr<omatog. an polyethylene glycol stationary phases) T Oi1s' ' (essentiai~ thermal decompn. glycol stationary phasesdChromatograpAy, gas GD ' in gas chromatng. onpolysthylenc-jl (stationary phases, po)vethyleneylycol „ thermal stability of) Polymer degradation (thermal, of polyethylene glycol, as.gas-chromatogs stationary phase) . T 56592-21-' (thermal decompn.of,. asgas-ehromatlogs stationary phase) IT .HO-56-Q. 10h-24r1 106-25-2 127-91-3 (thermal decompne of, in gas chromatog. on polyethylene glycol -statiooaryphases)' ' 01 Q CA QD' Q'
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T-a,cL- i0'E PROGI. 1. AU: - HELMESCT AU; - ATRITlSON' DL AU: - SIGMAN CC'. AU. - THOMPSON.KL AU. - KELSEY. MI AUI - KRAYBILL HF AU. - MUNN JI TI - Evaluation and classification at the rotential carcinogenic'vtv af' organic air Pollutants... SO. - J ENVIRONISCI HEALTH PART A'ENVIRON SC1 EN01 17 (3). 1982. 321-390. AD - HEEP COPYRIGHT: BIOL ABS. Bataon the carcinogenicits.andAaesSal.onella test .utagenicits of 671 organic chemicals reported too be Potential air Pollutants were so.eiledlfra.;published reports. Criteria.wereestabYisBed for classifsing'theche.icalsas recognized careinegensr, suseected'carcinUgenir tumor Yro.oteTs or' cocarcinogensand. eutagens or suspected .utagens. Confirmation of' che.ica1s'.as ambient air vollutants was attempted onle.for the cheeicahrsclassified into a.categorsof rotlential carcinogeniciteothery than unknown. Pri.arwy andlsecondarw literature sourcess weresearched'fur th. reported detection of' the.che.icals asaebient air eollutants. This work resulted in the classification of'77 air aollutants.as potential hu.an';carcinogens, as demonstrated bsthe categorization of 25 air Poilotants as'.recogniQed carcino5ens. 20 as suspected carcinogensr 15 as tumor pro.oters/cocarcihugens and 50 as.utagensor suspected .utaeens. For 19 . eff the 50 air aollu0antsclassifiedlas autagens.or susrected.utasens.rd noadeauatenositive carcinogenicitsdatawerefound. Noevidenceo of .utagenicitv de0erainedbv the Ames test wasfaundlfo.r 7 of the.25 recognized.carcinogens or far'9 af' the.20 suspected carciaa9ens. 2' AU - Gordon NPAU. -Tor ~AJ'.- AU. - McMurt.ruRJ AU - Ga1.J AU. - Nelson SD. TI. - Hepatotux"rcitw and. pulaonarv texicitwof pannvrorali oil and!its constituent terpenes in thenouseS0. - Taxicol.. Appl., Phar.acnl.i VOL 65, I85. 3.. 1982.413-24 AB- CBAC. COPYRIGHT: CHEM ABS Pennsroyal.oil.l an ara.. int-like oill usedas a'.flavoring.and.fra9ranceasent and as a herbai..rdicinerl caused acute hevat:ic and lung da.ageat 400 n9Ckg i.p. and hither in .ale eice.Cellular. necrosis was.lacalize&to the aentrilabular regions ofl the liver and bronchialar eritheli.ai cells of the lung. Capillary saschro.atags anal.. of saeples of' eennaroeal oi1 that.uere obtainediroe health food stores shoxed'the presence ol' severali oonoternene constituents. R-(+)-pulesnne C89-82-77 Was.the gaJor tervene and'.conetituted )e0T off thee constituent terpenes in the.oilsthatl were:exand, Pulegoneandl2' othen canstituent.t terpenes.isorulegone E296a6-79:-93 and .enthofuran C494-90-6L, were both henatatnxic and rul.onarv toxic. Basedlon results of'histolf scaring of necrosis.rlas+aGPT elevations, andlheaatic.glutathi,ane depletians. e-(+)'-eulegmiee is the ter.enepri.arid4 resvonsitilefor the tissue necrosis:.. Further.ore, results of toxicity tests with several congeners of' R-(3J:-pulegone, including the enantieaerlc.S-(:-)-pulegone t3391'-90-0]9 strongly i.clicated the alrharisoprnevlidene ketone'e group as.the structurall unitt reouired for eliciting hepatatoxicitwv although the configurational orientation of the Me 9nouecan odulatle the heratotoxic.resvonse. 3' AU - BEALL. JR. AU. - ULSANER AGTI. - TOXICITY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS PRESENT'INOOGRS. SO - COMMIiTTEE BN PUBLIC'HEALTH OF THE NEW YORKACABEMYOF MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM GN HEALTH!ASPECTS.OF INUOORAIR',POLLUTIOR.. NEN YORK, NlY a. USAr MAY'28-29. 1981. BULL N YACADiMEB: 57 (10)..19B1 (RECD. 1982).. 978-996.. AB. - HEEP COPYRIGHT: BIOL ABS. HUMAN ANIMAL FORMALDEHYDE MUTAGEN CARCINOGEN ALLERGY EYEIRRITATIONDERMATIITIS RESPIRATORY; PATHOLOGY CONTINUE PRINTING? (YES/NO) USERII r ra 0 f t C C A C C E ~ .. (''l (. GD ~ ~ %a ' N. C t •
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AN GA99(18)e143032s. TI 6i9ebuitdatq~>iit8~+~~+etm'Afoptl , vol atiL es AU. Thornton4 , Mark ML; Matte,. Phili.p~C. CS Dep., Chem.., Univ. Washingtom. LO Seattiie), WA,.98195: USA SOi Proc.- Int:-Coof.-Resid. So1'udlFuels: Environ., Impacts SoIutiansy. -':Meetimg Date 1981, 851-72. Edited by: Cooper, John A.; Maliek, Dorothy., Dreg.. Grad;. Cent.,c Beaverton, Creg. ' SC 52-1 (ELectrachemical, Radiational, and.Thermal EnergyTechnoliogy)'- 43, 48 DT C CO 50EHA6 Py 1982 LA Eng AB -Combustion ofprevaporized„ premixed., modell wood volatile compde. in :.-a lab.']ot-stirred:combustian reactor operated at 1 atm andl15,ms . nominal resi.dencetime is.presented.The reactor was stabilized on.a veryy lean•n mixt. 06 H and air, giving combustiontemps., of -. 700-1300.degree.. The model compds. were added at'a nominal concn. . of 1'0~,000-ppmC'..:.The gaseous and condensable products in the'. combustion field'were cantinuously'sampLed, and were analyzed by temp. programed„ packed column gaschromatog. Model compds. studies were.al.pha.-pinene<C80-56-8],MeEt ketone C78-93-3], and MeCHO C75-07-03.. Pentane,was.burned as a ref. compd. W.ithi~n exptl. , scatter, all of the.compds- gave the same quant. behavior with. respect to CH4 C74-82-8], CC, andIC02.cancns., Combustiort was. -essenti'ally compUete at 51000.degree.. At <900-degree., non-CH4 unburned'orgsd occurred:, their total concn, varied with compd. type in the order! .allpha.,-pi.nene simeq. pentane >> MeEt ketone .:simeq. MeCHOL At 750.degree.,. .apprx.5R of the .alpha,.-pineneand pentane existedlas mnburned.orgs.: C2H4 and,C_HE in the.case of pentane, and . .apprx_20heavi~er compds. in the case ofl ..alpha.-pinene. combustion woodvolatiIecompdq, pinene combustion;; acetaldehyde combustion; methyl ethyl l:etane combusti'om IT Combusti:m (of waod..volatiles, rateaf). IT Wood tvolatiles, combustion rate of model.) T 75-07-0, reactians. 78-93-3, reactions 80-56-8: (combustion.,rateof)' IT 74-02-OP,, preparation 74-84-9F, preparation 74-B°.-1P„ preparation, 74-86-2P, preparation 74-8E--6P, preparation 106-97-NP, preparation1:f5-07-IP',. preparation 124-38-9P, preparation 630-08-OP, preparation 25167-67-3P (flormation of, in combustion o{wood'volat'vlesl' I
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f-NtUMAN TOXIC3TYE)QCERPT CGOSSELIN. CTCP 4TH EDiII-170'3 SEE TURPENTINE.SYMPTOMATOLOGY1. 3. TRANSIENT EXCITEMENTv ATAXIAn DELIRIUM S:FINALU.Y STUPOR, WHICHISICOMMONEST SEVERE SYMPTOM. CONVULSIONS OCCUR OCCASIONALLY, USUALLY NOT UNTIL SEVERAL HRAFTF.RIN'GESTION. WHEN THEYMAT INTERRUPT A DEEP COMA. /TURF'ENTINE/ LHUMAN TOXICITY KEYWORDS NDiND.;ND"rNDi.ORALiNERVOUS SYSTEMiATAXIA DELIRI'UMiUNCDNSCIOUSNESS9~COMAGLONVULSIONS NDOND;NDhNDiORALiPSYCHOLOGICAL PF.QCESSESANXIETY HUMAN TOXICITYEKTGERPT EGOSSELIN. CTCP 4TH ED 1I-1703 SEE TURPENTINE., SYMPTOMATOLOGY1 4, OCCASIONALLY PAINFUL URINATION, ALBUMINURIA. HEMATUR:IA.~ URINE MAY HAVEODOR~ RESEMBLING...VIOI.ETS... RENAL LESION IS USUALLYr TR'ANSLENT. 5. ODOR OF TURPENTINE ON BREATH 8 IN VOMITUG:. 6. FEVER 8. TACHYCARDIA, ARECOMMON'.. 7. DEATH IS USU.TLLYDU'E TO RESPIRATORYFAdLURE, /'TURPENTINE/ HUMAN TOXICITYKEYWOR!DS NDiND6NDiNDI;ORAL;KIiDNEYiKTDNEY DISFASF.S ND!iNDiNDi:ND!;DRAL;UROGENITAL SYSTEMiURIN'ATION OISORDERS:iPAINiH!EMATUR'IAiALBUMINURIANDSNDiNDiNDiORALiNDiFEVER6DEATH N'D;iNDiNDi:NDiORALiCARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM TACHYCARDIA NDIiND;:NDfiNDiORAL;RFSPIRATOkY SYSTEM RESPIRATORY, INSUFFICIENCY;HALITUSIS NDiNDiPNDiNDiiORALiDSGESTIVE SYSTEMiiVOMITINO LABMETiHODS EXCERPT EPRC] ZAMUREENKO VA ET ALe STUDY OF THE COMPOSITION OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL FROM PEPPERMINT USING CHROMATO-MASS SPECTROMETR'Y. IZV TIMIRYAZEV'St~ S-KHI AKAD.i 1.9: 169 (1980).ALPHA:-PINENEWAS COMFIRMEDBYCOMBINIATION GAS'CHROMATOGRAPHIC-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC METHOD. LAB METHODS KEYWORDS, NDiMASS FRAGMENTOGRAPHY LABMETHODS EXCERPT EPRCJ BURGAR.MI ET AL, CARDON-13NMR'.ANALYSIS. OF THE ESSENTIAL UILSOF DALMATIAN SAGE (SALV!IAUFFDCINALIS). FARA•VESTN(LJUBLJANA)i36(4,) 253(1''879), THE VOLATILE FRACTIONOF DALMATION SAGE 01.IL CONTAINED ALPHA-PINENE. LAB METHODS KEYWORDS N,DiNU'CLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE LARMETHODS EXCERPT EP'RC7 GLASL HiW'AGNEF(Hr GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC STUDY OFF'HARMACOPEIADRUGSlS1. PART7. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC STUDY OF COMMERCIALPINE OILS AND THEIRATTEMPTEDSTANDARDIZATIDN. DIfSCHAPOTH ZTG; 120(2) 64 (~1980).THE CONTENTS OF AL'PHA-PINENEIN FIN'E OILSWAB USED TO DETECT THE QUALITY8 POSSIDLEADULTE'.RATIDNS. LAB METHODS KEYWORDS NDiCHROMATO!GRAPHYr GAS LAB METHODS EXCERPT IPRC7TATTJEOHE ET AL. CONSTiITUFNTSI OF ESSENTIAL OIL FROM LEAVES OF LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA L. PLANThMEDi 38(JAN) 79 (1980). MAIMICON'STITUENT OF P'ETROL.FRACTIONn ALPHA-PINENE WAS INVESTIGATED BY MEANSOF LIQUID S GAS LIQUID CHROMATUGRAPHYe INFRARED, NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCEr 8 MASS SPECTROMETRY. 'LAB METHODS KEYWORDS ND!iCHROMATOGRAPHY, LIOUID ND'dCHROMATOGRAPHYr GAS NDiNUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. NDiSPECTRUM ANALYSIS,MASS ND;SPECT'ROPH'OTOMETRY,INFRARED
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IANSWER 5 ANCA87120.:205830p IT[ ~ ,qapi{,eyerpwi„s~}r;};.a,rfwst4ivw7actor. CaU..Lipeies„ Marting. Landis., bwight.A.q Hidy, George M'. CS ° Rockwell Int. Sci. Cent.. LO Thousand,Oaks, CalifS,. WSA SO..Atlv.Environ:. Sci. Technol.,. 8.(Pate Pollut. Air Water Environ., Pt. 2 ), 69-100 SC 59-2 (Air Pollution antllIndustriali Hygiene) DT J CO AESTC9 . . iPy 1977 iLA Eng AB A'laminar f'lowreacter whichmaintlainsh a residence time of .apprx.10 s.in the irradiated section was used to studyaerosol-farmi.ng reactions under controlled, steady flow of'. 1-hexene C592-41-67, cycliohexene C110-83-8], toLuene CL08-98-3J,, m-xylene G108-39-37, 1'-dodecene C112-41-4],. 1.,3-hexadiene C592-48-3], 1,,.`.-hexadiene C592-42F77,and".alpha.,-pineneC80-56-89. Except'for toluene, alll the hydrocarbons formetl condensation nuclei, adtled502 or NH3 increased condpnsation nucllei formation, and water vapor at 50t relative humidity decreased'aerosol'formati~on.. KW aenosul! formation hydrocarbon combustion; =ulfur dioxide hydrocartionn aerosol' formation; ammonia hydrocarbon aerosoll format.iong: phatochem aerosol' fuel'l combustion IT Air pollution (by aerosols,from hydrocarbon combustimn) IT Hydrocarbons, reactii.ons Icambustion of,, aerosol '"ormation in, air pollution in rel.ation.to, ) IT Aerosols(formation of, in hydrocarbon combustion) IT 7446-09-5, uses.and miscellaneous 7664-41-7,, uses and miscellaneous. (aerosol formation in hydrocarbon combustion in presence .-.f'i IT 4yO-56-8108-39~3, reactions 108-88-3, reactians :10-83-8'. .. reaetions 112-41.-4, -92t41-6,, reacttans 592-42-7 7,9'-4R13 (combustion af„ aerosobfnrmation in., air poll:utl:cn.in r_l.ationto.
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TOXL I'At(E AU -Pinkas.M' AU -Didrv N AU -Torck M AU -Be2an9er L AU -Cazin J8 AD - Lab. Matiere Ned.Phareacodvn.rFae... Phare.r Lille, Fr. T4 -Studv nn Palvphenols from so.e Grindeli,a.spacies SI - CA/089J152623F SO -Ann.Phare.Fr./ VOL 38. ISS 3-4r 1978,97-104; LA - FRE AB - CBAC. COPYRIBHT:. CHEN ABSNinePhenolie acids andflavonoi.ds uereisolated:fraa the sedicinal'plant G.souarrosa: p-hvdroxvbenzoir acidn vanillic acid , p-cauearir acid6 auercetol, luteulalr 3'-eethvlauercetolr 3-eethvlkaesrferolr 3r3`-dieethv7auercetaD, and,.3,7-dieethslKaeerferal. t99-96,7 rH9draxvbenzoicacidp(12Ir34-5 Vanillic acid')/P00-08-0 p-OOuaaric acid)(1i17-39-5 BuercatolT(491~76-3 Luteolol)(14'86-70-0 3-Methv1auercetal)(1592-70-7 3-Methvlkaearferol)'.(4382-17-6 3,3''-Di.eethslauercetnl)(3301-49-3 3,7-Dieethvlkaevferol) Most of'these,.eoaadsf vere:alsafound in G. aphanactisr G., robustar, and G. aaritiea. Soae:constituents of the essential oil oT'6. sauarrosa were identified, includins.tarrineol, alpha-pinener and beba-pi.nene. (8000-41-7 Terpineol)(80-5E-8'. .aUha.-pinene)(127-91-3 .beta..-Pinene): A palvphenaD-cante. ext. ofG6 souarmosa had antibacterial activity in vitro, antDinflaaeatorvactivitr in rats, and weak antispasmodic action. AU - MatsuoK ' AU - o AU - FuJisaki' Y - AU -Gondn H AU -Noda K- AD -Res. Lati.. Hisamitsu Phare. Co., Inc., Sasar. Japan TI - Artificial oxidation eroductsof drliieonene SI - CAP0891185975A SO -ISakuhin KenkvulVOL 9) ISS 3r.1978r518-24 LA - JPW AD - CBAC COPYRIGHT:: CHEM ABS Ten impurities im the . antirholesteresim.d-lieanene (1) erepn. rere identified by gas chroeaos. Move than 80 oxidn.. rroducts'eerefaund when the I faln. was aeratedr andlthe structures of these Praducts Yel4 also detd. These,productsr of which d-Iioanene-S,2-epoxideuas theaador coeponent.uere aare toxic to eicethan I itself. (1195-92-2'..d-lincnene-i,2-apoxi.de), AU - rlendenhaii 00 . AU - Jones PN. AU - Sfrup PE ~ AU - Mar9ard'NL AD - BaGtelle Columbus Lab., ColWabusr Ohio TI - Onsanic',characterizatinn of aerosoLs'.and!vapor phase eoepounds.in urban atacspheres. SI - CA1090f043296B . SO - U.. S. NIISr P8 Rep.i I8S PB-280050ce 1978181 np.. LA - ENS UD AD - CBAC COPYRIGHTF CHEM.ABS'. Brs'. rol..lutants in:urban atmospheres *3 ' were characterized bv analyzing rarticulate and/or vapor-phase. saeples.collected by EPA im urban areas in the US. The ~particulatee saaales wee extd. uith~solventsand.the extractable 0 'eaterials analvzed,b.w elemental combustion anal.. and DR ~ snectroscopicanal.. To evaluate:..ltorea-,4 solvent extn. +~ techniaue:r the rarrticulate.saeples were aliuuoted'and analvzed'bu (J'1 severaB.extn.rrocedures. Soee.of the problkes encountereduith~ these rroredures are dM1SCussed'. Vapar-phasee samples eere- collected an Chroaosorb 102 chreaatos. trapss and analezedlusins auall. gas chrasatos.-eass.srectroeetrv anal. Individual srecies tentat'vvelvy identdtiedare.shoun on.reconstructed'easn chrosutosrae,, and individual mass spect',ra.for aiL chrosatas. reaks are included in the.appendix. Aees.Tests for eutaseniicBtr on aodel aerasoU products.uerealsaconducted. Products tested were fros NOxsvsteesuitMtoBuenerx heHane,, and alpha-pinene., (1'0B-88F3TaLuene),(142-82~5,Hertane)lB0-56-8 .al+ha.-Pihenel - None offthe aerosol rroducts fros these systems shoued'wtalenic proper9ies. . . . . . -.•.'„. . --..c~,'.1,... .. ._. .. . ..
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'd!t,r.i7n=P-5 71<'.t FHYSICOCNEMICALIINVESTIGAIfIONS ON ArVOL.ATILE OIL RECENTLY ISOLATED FROMI SUNFLOWER FLOWERS HEL.I~ANRFiUS-A'NNWUS i ry.. FOP L i TLJJlJL. ',"::: ~ - .... .~ im 74 r"cECO. 1_98!J) . .'.?1~--176.. CODEN!: CL`JMB l
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TOXLINE - ALPHA.PINENE.-PVFtOLLYSIIS AU - f.errJA; Calvert JG TI - Chemical Transformation Mbdules.for Eulerian Acid Deposition SI1 Models. Volume 1. The,Gas-Phase Chemistry. - NTISlfiB85-27.T.7Y4 SA - Environmental Protection Agency, FCesearch Tri~.anglePark., NC. SO. Atmospheric Sciences Research Il.ab.. - Govt,ffieports Announcements & Inderw--(GRARsL), Issue 13, , 19'85. AS -TD~T: This study focuses on t..hereview andd evaluation of mechanistic and kinetic data ier the gas-phase reactions.that . lead to the production of acidic substances in the:environment. AA master mechanism is designed that.treats oxides, sulfur dioxide, ozone, hydrogen!peroxide,, ammonia, the.simple amines (methyl,, d!imethyl!, trimethyl, and ethyl ami.nes), chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, dimethyl sulfid3., the hydrocarbons (methane,., ethane, propa.ne,, butane,„ 2,.:-dimethylb:a±ane,, the CS-CB alkanes, ethylene, p.rropylene„ trans-2-butene., i.sobutene, b'enzene, toluene, m->::ylene,, isoprene, alpha-pinene),, and the variety of o;<i!dationn productss of these species including the, transient freeradilcal..s., aldehydes., k:etones„ hydroperoxides and!othermolecules.. The reaction mechanisms.and~.the:rate constants.for certain of the chemical . transformationsareidentifiedfor which major uncertainties remain and!.for which additionall e:eperimenflall and' theoretical workk is.recommended'. Rapt. for Aug 8.TV-Jul84, I
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(p ~ The pyrolpsis oE pinene. A new type of monocyclfc qpl terpenes;, the pyronmes: Georges Uupant and Raymond' d ~ 1 Dulou.Cotn¢I. rsnd. 201, 219-21(1935): Pinene, (a(n 48°, was vaporized and passed over. Cu gauze kept at 30(!-5fJQ. The products were fractionated into 24 partss falling in 44 groups. The fkaetionss of. the 3rd and 4th groups consistedlmainly of. dipentene and a1loSci-mene,, resp. The 1st and 2nd groups.of fraetionss consisted mainly.of a-and d+pyronene,.resp: ThuRamaa spectra of these fractions were detd. as welL as that of'f their. common tetrahydro deriv,,, which is1,1,2',3-tetrametbylcydohexane:. TBe fractions,of a-pyronene were.more active opticallpthaathose of p-pyronme. The authorss suggest that pinene iscleaveds either at a to fbrm pyronenes, at b.ta form di, pmtenc,, or at both places, producing alloticimene. R. Baltzlv / Boilinqpouttsothydrocarhons.. BoatsNeqxesuv. Z:qhjvik Chcm.,Abt.A,.141„ 37Prs6(~]fYl9); ef. C. A. 23, 3390.-St was shown, on.the basis of the empmad formulh. T°° const. (USf - (wliere T. - aris. b: p., M'e mol. wt., Z- the sum of'certaihf equiv. const.. = 2gA) that the b. p:. of hydracarbons caa be celcel;.closelyfmm their structural formuhas.. From the equivs. C'.. - 2:00: H= 1.00.a double bond'. - 1.00, the b,p:ofPiumeraled..tlobe428°~whiletheexptl.valheis.425l°abs. Thefnrmulawasfuuudd to.bold to within 5' for 260 out of 316 compds. Lovys W:vAe:tvBq_`
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NTIS - ALf4-IA F'INENE' - FY'FiOLYSIS'. _, . .: ... _._ .:,, .7 ;, ,:q.. ---. Hea3thHazard Evaluation Determination Report No. 76:-21-539, Champion Building Wroduct.7,. Bonner, MonM.ana ra.rc,tcr, !. nfatxonaI_ -t. f dFet7 a .d .,.anc... ,~7fi. H'.~alth -13:?arCl and Er-hfilcal rrcilachi.. COrp.. SloL.a•.c'W° ri]dE3'd Qc''67~'(ria Report Nr_:.:: Nov 78 21 p Languages Engl i :h NTIS Prices.FPC AIU2.°M= AHS J.ournal. Annoa_rncmens-c: GE'A?G1;'0. 6SGc4^ ~P.-C'~r3 '35^/b •.. Organic Characterization o-F Aerosols and Vapor Phase Compounds in UrbanAtmospheres ` '.i`i'ia:1 r='t.? Menaenhai.l„ 1. D..•xJ-, Jone_:,. rct-r W.; Strc:.p, r•z,u2 L.;. Margard, !Fla1^ner L. Batte1!1e Cu1.Lc:nhu_LabS., Chio. Cwrp, nm_.Lr e Cocr 4070Pt*. SF,on.er,. ' ndi~.rcnmen`al ci.snc_e.., -'e_F~:rit: Lab. , R_._~::arc:h T7 ~'ang.',= Prrk, ;•a.,, C. . Report No. : EPA/.'0'?/'-76Cn._I Mar 70 81p " NTIS Fri':ce=v PC Ar3Sb'MFAD';. Journal An:nouner-.ment: SF4=:I7Ui5 1 :F
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I 854 D: L...JI Oruvrs reportcdiby Pirila & Pirila.(1964):,Pirila, Pirila &.Siltanen (11966).and Piril5 & Sitranen ( 1955. 1956 &1958p, it, was decided that (he maximization procedure should' be rcpeatcd on a freshipi distilled samplrof x-pinene processcd nnder a blanket ofnitrogen and'containing added but}lated hydraxy- anisolc. as an antioxidant. The maximization test was then carricd out on 25 voluntcersusinF thie freshly processedd sample (RIFM' no. 72-75); andd the malerialL tested at aa concentration of 1.0i in petrolatum, produced no:sensitizauon.reactions (l.hFinan: 1972). In experiments wnh, oil of mrpenline andl a-pinene (Ptrrle Kilpiu, Olkkonen;. Pvtla. & Siltanen. 1969 PIri15 & Pinla. 1964:Plrila er aC 1966c. Pirilli & Shcanen, 1955, 1956 ' & 1958: Prila, Siltancn &PtridS; 1964). it: was shown that only Ihee autoxidation products of' oiV of turpentine and not the terpenes,themselves were eczematogentc. Autoxidation of a+pincne in the presencce of air and light was suBicientt to, produce the eezemalogenicagentc but its formation could be pre,cnted by addition, of inhibitors such as hydroquinoneand.pyrognBol Autozidation of A3-urenc.to the hcdro- peroxidee forms the actual eczematogen in turpentinee oil, the amountt of e¢ematogeni fonmedb-v autoxidhtionn of various brands of a-pinenebeing dependent. on theirA3-carcnecontent: the more efficiently apinane was purified.of Aacarene, the.lower, asa rule, were the.eczematngenie.effeqs of its oxidation products. a-Pinene has been reported too be allergenic (Fregerl, 1974) and- inn a concentration of 20°,5 in mineral oil, to have produeeda papulbvesicularr reaction in a 54-yr-old man (Keil'- 1947} Phomronicirr. No phototoxic eMectswerereporled for undiluted a-pincno on hairless mice and swine(!Jrbach & Forbes, 1972). Metabolism. When a-pinene (in propylene glycol) was injected in an iv. dose-of H pg/kg into wyoung,pig.andiwhuman subject, 5°/,: was ezfialed within 3hr{Rbmmel6 2nber,Dirnagl &Drexcl, 1974p Both~x-and.P-pinenc are converted in the rabbit into conjugated.gPocuronides of undetermined nalure,:andlheating~of these:glucuronideswith.dilhte acids yields the hydrocarbon„cymenc (Williams. 1959): Percuraneo+a abxorpifon. a-Pinene showed significano absorption into the skin ofrats(Walettc & Cavier, 1954I: Analysis of thebrratii of young pigs and' a humam subject duringg and. after a 36mimsoaking (wilhoutinhalaliomof bath volatiles) in. bathscontaining,a pine-needle (Pinus pmuiflo) oil indicated percutaneous absorptionaf a-pineneand otherrerpenes in amounts.capable of produc- ing.therapeutia effects.(Rommel( a af: 1974). Q"arciuogenicir;l7 a-Pinene~ has.beenreporled topromote.lumour formation om the: skin of micc lreatedlwitli the:primary carcinogen 7;12-0imethylbenz[a]anthracene (Roc &.Field, 1965) butt when mouse.skine was; painted alternaaeiy with eitherr benzo[a]pyreneor dibenz[a,h]gnthracene and a terpenemixture: consistingg in partt of't-pinene the incidence a6 skin carcinoma was.s lower and the latent penodl was longerr than in mice: treated with the carcinogens only (Benkor. Tiboldl& Bardos, 19631 .. Q'J•roroxieirli. a-Pinene inhibited thegrowth of ascites.sarcoma BP8mouse call culturess by 3% at a concentration of09 mwti, and by It)pPoI at I.I msn (Pilotti, Anckert Arrhenius & Enzell, 19756 PharmacolOgy. . Rabbits fed1 g chokslerofJday for 3 months and giveni eachh day 2 m I I of aa terpene mixture which included x-piaenee showed much: kss evidence of'atheromauosisf of thee aorta than did'd animalsreceivingcholesterols only(Benkp, Macher, Siarvas & Tiboldi. 1961). Other studies confirmed that pinene (P9 g/day) partially suppressed the accumulation of lipids~ in the liven aorta and heant, and hindered the:devefopmene oflatheroma plaques on: the.aortic intima of rabbits given Igrctiolesterol/day (Benko;,Szabo, Muller & Lesznyak; 1972k and tolallyinhibitedy thre increase inn the number and volume of mast cells in. the aortic adventifiaa and the rise in the total lipid eontent:of the.aortic wall associated with this,additionalcholesterol'l intake (Issznyak. Benko; Szabo & Mullkr, 1972:. Les:nyak & Lusztig;,1974): Reflex reactions to, acetylcholine becamee less pronounced in rabbits in, which a-pinene ina dilute solution wasperfused through~the ear vessels, but preliminary treatment of the ear withh a solutionof cysteine prevented.lhis.loss of sensitivity too acetylcholine (Bogats'ka &Epshtein„ 1959). IhwasconcludedthatH a-pinene blocked Ihioli groups in. the acetylcholine chemoreceptors. Reversible blocking~,of ihiol groups was suggested as accounting,Por tAeenzyme inhibition observed after pro- longed z-pinenee inhalation, inn rats (Epshleim 1959J. In. experiments iir rirro and in riro, 2-pinene inhibited phosphorylase and ATP' activity in muscles. (Epshtein & Khil'ko: 1960k When tested on isolated rao-liver lysosomes; a-pinenedisplayed approximately 20°0 of thee actfvity of vitamin A alcohol in releasing prolease (Pel1. Dingle &. Webb, 1962). a-Pincna did nott affect the pcntobarbironr: sleeping time of'f rals(Jori. Bianchelli'& Phestim. 1969). Nut't inn ratss in which hexobarbitone sleeping time had been prolonged' by. thioacetamide-ibduced eirrhosis, oralpretreaumentl with220mg a-pinene/kg/day for 3days prior to the hexobarbitone injectiomnormalized the.durationof sleep, due tohepatfc enzyme induction (Marosi, Pap &. Szarvas, t973)- Exposure of ratss to turpentine vapours (essentielly a-and. P-pinene)j in aconcentratiom of 3>4mgJlitre.for 6-hr periodson~three:consecutive days,. did noo decrease the toxibityof parathion orparaoxoo; but.intteasednhe toaicityof heptachlor and had no.eRecto on. hexobarbitone.sleeping time (Sperling; Ewenike & Farber, 1972)i e-Pibene induced contractions when applied lo~ohe isolatcd, . small.intestine.of the.mouse in concen- trationsrangingfrom10-5'to I0r4 g/ml (Imasekn &Kilabalakel 1962). The electriapotontiall of frog pero ll'he of p. allhc scdat &K Arcia; dai Bcnki mir. Benkr alhr Benkc mic. Bogatr nen Counc Sub fkSVin burt EpsMe in e, Epshte biuA, Epshtc Fell. I!: The Binc. Fenar." p: .7t ' Flavor. Fd' 7 Fregari Gstirnt - Harncl Unir Hercul, Toxi. Imasd intes Jorij A. 13, . 2 Kcil. H Kligma A..pn Kligma Kligma ' Dem; f.esrny: in ra 5711. Leszm; in th S,rmp Marosii time Aferck; NJ. Morcno Pilo1I4 on cc Pirila-\ imoil Piri15; \ de.nrc Piri15, \
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Sukestrate and metal speci:f'icit.y' i.'n the' enzymic synthesi.s's ofcycl:.ic :ronoterpenes.Trorn geran;rl, and ner/1l pyrophosphat.e _ s i _-_ . - .-. -...- . . T~-{'-_. c C;;:;ci_n; ASi N.-'L - I 'r C~i~tru~ -y t i - a P4 .,-'~l~C'~ c'.,fiY ^i . .-:lf~o::+pi1 i oS:C- ..J;pen: and a'Ln:i-1-a!-.pinBi!le i mum' imum - . PF) i~~-~d .--._~l The ~r:~:>; r £ ~ar ...:r '~~+~ . , r'S . <;-i'ir !phd.t a ._.pi'nc a.c __vJ_t_ _ WtainE?d ,Je;c~ l'.C .Z.ilrs. 3, .. i. m:~!/ri./~.i.; spCC`1'4Ei'jr. o-y thc, r.a:J. ~ic.stt-o.+r_.3.:~_r-ar:d _h='ab,.la~ty~to uti~lize~ n,=ry. pyrop,icspha:.e'. wa_: almost comp'e`eaiY~ los+ w-ath aging. i;itronel.ly:l py:-optlosphat~e and dimethy1Kl 1yl pyrjphr-.. ph::te were the most sffec.ti+re i.nhi.l.r.tor'- of carboc!"lays. Isr_•pentenyl t:yl*.opl-losphate„ the~ rc.onoFht.,sph<<~_ ._sters, of.. nerol and gr=r-an;.ol, . .".11 L_ inorganic . , ... '.v.ere O,.r_`Z ' .. r, .a~ :ec.,t/s .. . , ~ 'i a .r~- .-~ .- . ..... ~.nzymrr had . :rt abc vt-._ : rw!_t.~~ecierit~ -For ' sup 2'_~.sp -f . Zi:CJ: . ;ix':'h .aGcut `dZ~ :jy~ M+-.ttp ~ 2~7-_tp -r' a.nd : C,:o_s;_p ?r-up~. + r-imr.,t.. c _.~~_r,J;'.G~_ showed that the el s-,,..-l „-.ct,'on +-z* with the . . srlcul :c-d~ '_eneantr~a:tion ruf .Lh~-. GrP t+'a=iA;p ' '!p' +' u}0 2 _,)} ,_ .~. %"rc~.r.ouK: .~vld".. . ...- Wit~: nEJnePI-y,lat~ic er:,ct.nn=: , -hr rr .°=r- r__r-~~supp+s'c-td tlr v.ieanrw th.A- :_trrr~ a:ccha.ni:,m of C.crbJt _yc_a-.. L the -.na::CAG2' _f prc'i'iyitr 10
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856' D. L. 1. OeovKE ~ Pirilii' V. & Sillanen. E. (1955). On th¢chemical nature of the eczematogenir.ageni in oil of turpcmine. 1..Dhrmmologiea 110. 144.. - 18rilii;,V, &.SBtanen:.E. (19561. On thechemirul'.nature.of the eezcmatous ag<nt in oil ofturpentine: II.. Di~mmmlixrira 113, I.. Piri15. V. &~ Siltancm, E. 119581 Onn the chamicd naturre of thee ec7cmatngcnir agcnr' in oiii . of mrpenfinc. 111. Derrrmrolnyica 117. i. Pirilz, V_ Siltanen, E.. & Pirila, L.. (19641 On ttk chemical nature of the eczemaiogcnic aeenrt in oill of turpentine. IV: The primary'irritant effect of terpenes. Dermatolr.aira128,. 16. ~.ikoei. FI 1• C. &. Field.. W. E. H'. (1i9651: Chronic tosicityof essential ailis andi certain other products of ~i natural origin Fd Cnsmro..Tovicol: 3'.311.. RSmmelh H•.Zuber. A.. Dimagl, K: u. DrcxeL H:.(19741 Zur'. Resorption von Terpencn aus. Badczusetzen. M''unrh. nrcd. R'•sdm. 116. 537. Sperling. F., Ewraikc,.H. K. UL& FarbcrJ T. (1972). Changes in'LD.n.of parathion and heptachloriollowing turpentine pretreatmenl. Eruur. Re... 5,. 1'64. Urbaeh, F. & Forbes,. P. D• (1972). Report't toRIFML 26 May. - Vaktrtc Gi. & Cavicc. R, (J954), Hy'drorarhonsi.alcohols and eslas. Arrlrv int Phannucodlrt TLir: 97,. 232. Williams, Rl T. (1959). Daro.rirurion Aferharrism.e.Tbedferufioliam and'Dero.viomion of Drurrs. Ta<a Subsiorraer andOther Organic CmnpauuLs. 2nd Ed:.p 531!. Ckapmam& Hall Ltd_ London. Additi6nal .nefcreaaea lsolaredbisswa .. .. . Ouoson. 0. & von Sydon•. E. (1964). EkctropBgsiologicaf measurements or the odor oE singlc components --oVamisture separated in algas.ehromatograpk. Life Sri:3, I111. 6ficrmoiymdcnrs. . • Bhattacharyya P.. K- Prema, B R~, . Kulkarni B' D.&Pnadha S. K. (119601p Microbiological transfurmation of terpeness', hydiroxylaliomof a•pinene. Nmure, Lond: 187, 689•. ' Bondarenko, A. S: Aizenman,. B. E. Bakina, L. A:,. Kozhina, 1..5, Prikhod'ko. V. A, Mishenkova E. L. & Meshcheryakox A. A. (f9741 Antimicrobral and.antiviral activilyof essenuall oil from Psnrulca druparea . araf (rs aetirfp Ruvr. Rerur',.Akad: Nuuk.SSSR 10, Cobb, F. W-Jr., Krrstr6 M. Zsvarirl E. & Barber H.. W. Jr. p968)l Inhibitory eRecls.of volatileoleorasin -componentson Fomes.anrrosus andifour Cerarrrnsr'rsspecres. PhfloparlmlrqJ 58; 1327. , Epshtein. Mr M. (1964).i The in0uence of uerpenes on,bio<hemtcsl procasses in living organisms. In Sinrrrich. Produkn ¢ Kanro8 i Skipidara, p. 25'7.. Akzd. Nauk Belorucsk. SSR, Tsentr. NaucBn: Isskd. i Prockln. Inst. Lesokhim Prom:Tr. Vses. Nauchn:Takhn. Soveshdt. Gorki: Epshtein. M. M. & Ptlyavi ka S M. (1962), . Eifect of some.essentral oils,on dthydlogenuseacliviiv of parame- -cia Mrkrohml Zh 24(2). 44. Fedorov, N. h, Starchenko•.N. 1..& Manukov. E..Nj ,(19931 EBen oCsame okoresincomponents on.the growth of: mycelium ofahe root fungusForniropsis..annosa.' Lesored. Las. [Len: Kha.. IFsx Prom. suppkmenQ ' . _. . ' 7, 129, Gikkerftz D„ Weufien; W: u..H6ppe, H. (1974). 'Terpene undTerpenderii.'atrvom Carvon.+rnd Campherty~p'- ihrcantimikrobillleound verminoxen Eigenscha(1em Pharnracia29,.339. Joglekar. S:3., Vora, M..A. Dhere, S. Gi &. Dhavilkar. R. S. (1968k Microbial transformanions% of terpenoids: cilronellaL citral. eugenol. 6'<arrne, x-pinene. and Ibngifolene; Indian Oil Soap,JL 3Q(4), 85. Melin,. E: &. Krupa 5. (79711 Eatomycorrhizae.of pine: II. Growth inhibilionn of myeorrhizul fungi bv volatile organic constituents of Piuacsylrecuii.(Scots',pine) roots'. Phyaioloyia P1. 2S 337:, Morris„O. N..(19721 InhibimrgeRects oGfoliage.axlraps ofsome.forest Irees on commercialiBucillus rloo- inpiensfs..Can. Enr: 104. 13SZ: Oh. HL K., Sakai„ T_ Jones:, M. BJ & Longh'urst.. W. MJ (19671 EPlM of various essential oilss isolated from'Douglas firncedles upon sheep and.deeerumen mierobial.activiuy. AppL Microbial. 115;.777: SmirnoE. W. A. (1972) Effects'of volarilesubstanees released by foliagee of Ahies ba6runea: J. inrrrretir..Pnrhoi. 69, 32 U/zdennikov,.BJ Nl (19701 Biologicallactivity of.terpenes, turpentine, and essential oils. Nauc4,..Tr..T)Vmen. Sel- -Kbaz.firsri.no.7;176. . Uzdennikov,. B. N: (19721. Effect op some'e terpenes on baacda, fungi. and protozoa. Ib Fiiaueridi; .Warer. Sor'eshck., 6rh. r969. Edited by BLEI Aiaenman. p. 100• Naukova Dumka.. Kiev: fusecn'. - ` Alexandrescu. S.. Popesem.C:.&.Serban„KL (t970i. Toxicity of variouss chlorinatedherperu: franionsto bees. Anull bnP. Coc..uymn. Sen. C. Pnn'. Plam. 6: 523~. Chararas, C. (J959):. Attraclivenesss exercisd by conif4rs tolhe Scoljnidae and the role ofl lerpenes from the oleoresias. RenieParh. rig. Eac agric: Fr. 38, 113. Chararas. C(0968):.Adaptation.oflBlusraphagu.r piniperda to various Pinus'.spccies and the preferenceof lhis insact'.withrespcento essential oils. C. r.lrebd•.Sianc..Arad: Sri,.ParB Srr. D:.266,. 238: Dodson. C. H:, Dresder',. R. L, Hills. H. G., Adams. R. M..&Williams, Nl. H. (1969)•Biologiw{!v active compounds in orchid fragrances. Science; N.X'. 054.1241 :. Khalifa,.A. Rixk„ A.. Salama H. S. & EllSharaby, & F. (11973): Role of phagostimulants of cottonn leaves in the.fecding hehaviorof Spodoprera lirroralis' J. Insect Ph_rsiol: 19. 1501. Knopfl.lLA: && Pitman, G. B. (1972), Aggregationn pheromone.for manipulation of the Douglas fic beetle. J: «am Eiu.,65.,723. Kaanetsov, M;,V. Rudnev„UI F..&.Smelyanets, V. PI (d9681 Natural protectivesutistanees ofaonifers.against destruaive.inscots Dopnr. Akad. Mauk.: ukr. RSR Ser: B 30. 657.. MtK ' for Mcia Pw Mnm Ozoi> for ' Pavm ` Pa)nc !' and ij JLt' Pitma Pitma ' A'a., :. Renwi fron ~ Rudia : L5 ' Rudio 11sel, , Rudhe insn Ryzhk. . fieet ' Smel.: 754 Summ I J. ' Turchi rthio ~ Vasech 7,91 Vaseeh of so ~ Vite, J satur Vit0. J. oftir r.r.r. m r I
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Gx.pcrimental. apparatus for .,alpha.-p.inenepyroIysis- Lat srri<'iri 0 r... T ?.E An app. is describeid tor the ,i,;,_,lyr;:~.ss o+.A:phL;.--p at ates orf 5*._, 1.0 kg/h . th i.nput temp•s. o nd _r+tnu?i tc^IP.jaS. of j..400, t'. -"r-a~.. ThuS ;:+yrCl.1 sn...s m.r 1-at J`i .+-. 1r,: kg/h r input 245_.degrew, q, output _75cegree. gave dipentene 44, ailoocimene:27, and'pyronenesktetr-..methylcyciohe;<adier.es7: 28%s.ith a:. 9r3%/ degree raf conversi,nn of I. AM T?' CA 1 tJCn 12,1 . - 121 29t Thermal decompo*;itiion of polyethylene glycoli 20M and essential oils in gas-liquid chromatogra{phy'and the effect of' traces of oxygen Conderf .1. R.i., ,-°.u''t;vale.., Shinga=i, M. St:. Ch2i:n. r_Jl_n, LtE°i7.,. lin1V. 1'roli.i.. •CJwan:eCi SA2 Spp,.. UK J. Ehromatcgrr r _^••'n:9171--c.~ 62-?' C:E=ssential Oi.ls. an;dl Cbsme_i::sY. J(]Crcr,ML7021-9E73'. 19&'3 Eng Fo:yethylanee glyco:', 20"I. r,5.`.-:;9t _l-'~ -_catt~i 'i.r~-br•.ct: calumns, used for gaschromatogs efessentxal oiL5; darkened and had a strongodbr of 1HOAc after operation at 170,degree.. for a fe;y hundred hours. Decompn.,. followed by tiarm. of ..a.n aq. ex:t, jj'F Y.he: column packing with Q:.00C7~91M' NaOH„ began at about r_6i)..degree.. The!tse a,= an 00 removal column (Mn e:idei in the N carrier gas,li.ne rai.sad!r_he- decompnd temp, to..appr•:,.2tDU.deg".ree:., suggesting that 0 is~involveds in the oxi.dn. a.n'd, depollymn. of the stationary phase. In the e of mixts. o-f geran'.i.ol L1US-24"11 and nerei chromatog: C1n6„-25-2} or .alpha.-p.i:neneCr3<,r-56-?; and ..beta.-pi.nene r_127-91--.?],, decompn. the terpen:oi.ds began at-.90-3..Ci.degree.,, dependdng. 0n,.the column of support used and thcaamt. o-~ .=;rat;.ona.rry phase. phase Sn-p. PA4J was- thee tlast supp>o.r t -For thepinenes «nd. Phase Sep i0 waa tlre-st -For ge-rani~.r;I: and nercl,. Phase 5epP ~•rass i.:•¢eriorr for- both m+_:<.+. . St<.tt~~ns.ry phas.e lio_+.di.ngss r:r 155-^'.~ele~cr..ea.sed decc:,mpn. stationary phase a.ndi the: terpenaids. =-f bui_ i ihe. 1 9
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BIOSIS:- ALPHA~F'INENE -PYF(OLYS~IS EtIOSIS Numbers 6.1Jra'T::40 RATE CONSTANTS FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF THE HYDROXYL RADICAL WITH A SERIES OF MONOTERPENES AT 294 PLUS-OR-MINUS 1 kELVTNI ATf,:INSON R::; ASCHMANN S M7,' PITiT:3 .7h•; .yFi STATEWIDE AIR.POLLL'TIONRES. CENTER, UNI'J.. CALIF., RIVERSIDE, CA 92621. IhiT J i_HEM' FiINET' 16 (3). I9G6. 287--_0i=. CODENa IJCk7s' Language.. ENGLISH. L/014302640S:IOSISNumrber: 76('~3912<_r MODELING POTENTIAL OZONE IMPACTS FROMINATURAL HYDRO CARBONS 1., DEVELOPMENT AND~TESTING.OF A CHEMICAL MECHANIISM'FOR THE NI~TROGEN OXIDES AIR PHOTO OXIDATIONS OF' ISOPRENE AND ALPHA PINENE UNDER, AMBIENT COND'ITIONS LLOYD A, C; ATKINSCN:.R,:. LURM(".NN F W; NITTA Ii ENVIF.ONMENTALRES. TECriNOLr.GY„ INr-,,. 2625 TOWNSGATE RD,., WESTLAK:E. VILLAGE, CA 91361,, USA. ATMOSENVIPOtil ]..' (RECD~, 1964).. 1931-195rr~. CODEN: ATENB' Languag?; ENGLISH 0014'586266 fiIOSIS Number; 78022746B:IOSYNTHESIIS OF CH.IRAL ALPHA PINENES AND BETA PINENES IN PINUS- SPP BANTHORPE D V;EKUNDAYO O; NJAR V C 0 DEPARTMENT OFCHEMI.STRY„ UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON:,, LONDON,WCIH 0AJ', ENGLAND. PHYTOCHEMISTRY (OXF) 23 (~2). 1984. 291-294. CODEN: F'YTCALanguage: ENGLISH 001.3.125906BIOSIS. Number:7606'398 SUBSTRATE AND. METAL SPECIFICITY IN THE ENZYM:IC SYNTHESIS. OF CNCLIC MONO TERPENES FROM GERANYL PYRO PHOSPHATE AND NERYL PYRO PHOSPHATE ROJAS MC; CHAYET L; PORTILLA G; CORI 01 DEP. BIOGUI:MS,, FAC. CIENCIAS~BASICAS.FARMACEUTICAS,; UNIV. CHILE,CASSLLA 23-~.,.. SANTI1AGO 1,. CHILE. ARCH OIOCHEM DIOPHYS 222 P2). 3E39--71.96_ CODEN: ABBIA Languag:e.: ENGLISH 001C?21.41' BICSIS Number-t 7:.+07Y41-~ HOST PLANT INDUCTION OF GLUTATHIONE S TRANSFERAaE IN THE'FALL ARMYWORM SPODOPTERA-FRUGIPERDA, YU S J P-EP.. OFENTnMOL. AND NEMATOL., UNIV.. - ~' FL-RII:q A, GAINESVILLE, FLA. :261' 1 . PESTIC BIiOCHEI`?'. PHYSIOL 18 '. (1). 1562.. i:n1-106. CODEN; F'CEF'F" ENGLISH
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/ The pyrolysieof pinene. In. The pyronenes. G, Dupont'and. R.. Dulou., Aki % cnngr. rn(crn. chim. 3~ 123-9(1939)(in French)',.-Afterareview of'earlier work on thee pyrolysiss of pinenef,cf. Wallach, Ann. 227, ^Jt2 (5885); Semmler, C. A. 8, 3049;I Smith, C. A. 21,.3799; Conantan& Carlaon, C..A. 24, 94;: Tildhn,.A Chem. 9ac. 45, 411(1884); Schultz, Bcn 10~ 114(1877); and Dupont and Paquat, C. A. 32;.1239r) D. and D. on:pyrolysis of d, pinene;, fa)a48% find by means.of the Raman spectrum, 2' newhydrocarbohs, a- andd d-pyronene (fi and11), in a yield..of abaut 50% of the.pyrolysis products. I.hu 43°, n>ri 1.4605;, dss0S347,. /a1y, 17.18°. II b.,48-50°, n'h 1:4747,dss0'.8401,.(a)n4.52°'. Thecommon.strucMreof 1 and II is confirmed by spectrographic identification of their tetrahydrna compds. as 1,1,2;3-tetrarnethylcyclohexane which shows tllat,they aro.1',1,2',3-tetranrethylcyclohexa- dienes: LI.. The formulas: ol the pyronenea. IBrd. Ux- 39.-The presence of.ronjugated double bonds ih:Iand 11 is established byy theRamanspectra of the.original prod- uct and of. the hydrogenation' products otltaiited with EtGH: andi Na, andby hydrogenation with Raney Ni. For the detn, of'the position of the double bonds, the Alder dierx.synttiesis. (C.A~. 30, 8178') is used'.. I(15 g.): is treated with 15.g.. (:ICCO.Me): for 2' hrs. at 10p°. The gas evolvedd onn decompn. of' the ~ addh., product. ispassed into a sofmm of Br in. CHCIL front which BtCMerCH\teBr and'some:BrCMe.CHsBr (III) are isolated.. In.addm.to these.productsaicompd., bp 176-74`,.is obtained which, after sapon., gives 3-mGhyf-o-pblhalic ocad, m. 151-5°. This proves the strueture.I for a-pyroncne: 11e oacur- teoce of some iB indicates:the presence of some II ih 1. (1). (II) II whentreated in the ssrne way yields:III and 3,I-di- nuthylplitlialio acid,, m: 150°. Condeysarion of" II withia- naphthoquinone (IV): accordiiig.to Dicls and Alder ('C., A. 24, 847) ~ gives.a compd. (V),pr- 95-,'i°. Oxidation.of V' - Cx a C Cfl0 (VIllI) by passing air into an alk. soln. at 125-80° gives methyl4 propyleneandi 1,Zdimd)eyfanikraqauiwne(VI), m. 150°. The formation of VI is in: agreement' with~~ the formula IID'H proposed.for'S•pyroncne: Iiand IV'give:a tondeasalionn product.(VII)'°.m. 123r1". Simultaneous osidation.andn pycolysisof' VII according too themethod ofDufraissn •(C.A.. 31, 2599'), yieldk 1-mdbylaMkraquinune„ m:. 167°: , From these results the pyrolysis of a-pinene occurs aecord- ing to the following scheme. rnpturcaoa a-pyruucnc an q.pyronene at¢ Bmoneneat a aad t4 ocimene and 211066menc With acroleih II gives 50% of an aldehyde (VIIL), bn 123:°„ n'ol 1.4919, da 0.73:;; its ttmiuorbasone m..209-10°; I gives also 10% of'an aldehyde whose senticarbasonam. 204-5°.. With maleic anbydride I gives after sapon. aru acid (I$)'.,, m..195°, whife II gives an acid anhydride (X), m.,154°'. Neither I nor II reacts with BzC i CBs or with quinoae: ~, F. E. Brauns': /
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CHF_M ASSTRACTS.- WLPlifiP'C.NL"NC. -- PYROLYSIS . 47i 103 ' 1, r. a . . .. . W!'i Analysi~s o3~condens,ate~ctnd gases~.~1ormed in combustion of model wood! volatile:compounds ihr}r.rr.'_on E^"-.r4 M :.::,.i H:,,: .:: -_. ep,. „ umi Wathw:, uJA-, WC.fd~ r-.nr'Jssm.~ Thermoch»m~. Ricma_,s ~ Con er s.. , z,^a.p. -- :r,t. on-; ..7 M;eting Daae. 1992, ~. 211-2b.. L,J;',::ed.b•;~. O.;.c-renA, I:.. P..; T., t1udy:e,.. L. .... E=_ev~ier~ (N.ppl. - i,.. Lcndo3-r, UK,.'. SC S2-1(El.tctrochemi.c~~al'~, ftadiiational, and~. Thermal Energy Technol'~ogy) CO S3UH~A3 t::Y 1985 ~ . .._A Eng ._: p-_:.ur~ modi rr0c;..;.f. ',:.7, .aipha.-p:inene~ C;;O .,j.r~-a!r~-~t. . ~-O.'.. ` 1 7'}-t.yp i.cal ot tao prudr.._it.~:5 of ..uood Wv.,latila. . aciun' or py°oly.s':i..s and wood gas were uurnt ucder- cont,-:-'_.'.zd'- aer _ted ~_:arwlitien t., _, au~. stirred reactor for the.e ttitle ar:r..,. and detn.: of the ,.mt. r_,T~ unb,,.rn t~ matar al:. c'•em*.~ne qi.vesy ty 'ydic il ~_ i j nr- i anLj:rycxasurt-'d rC;. GQ2~,, a.nd„ CI-: gt1:gt1 ... `"~- ,: f''ii 1 r7 '~• h it~Gz1~, .~-ri5 'y>> i,',~ ~ E:. . dTaS^ ./_~~ra. A.I'CF:rL. t .-.•i:o r - -`.-.. l '.:Ld! t'. ,A_L" . -;:: n,-i,:• P:rC lry[IpI. `.W i ,..• :i,;:,.. tGldtnt. ,..'j.(pp.r ,L.. 1'~. b.~ c:i:n-'d.,qls{_ r-'fe tL.'t'I =nn~ d'd~ .~.-N6nrn:tnt- are a'K' 33e _, 91hr1.' !]r ..IIC.r :odei camr r,. - ,ld. , -. Ip I'~.~..~, IpI'~.~.. i 7 r~•no g*ves the mos'~ f~~,r the y-a.ak"'r 1.~9r~ ~ il:. ut,',.:7._. Results . Cli' furan ar-(°.: de,II1Lr `~d by un'o,u1't1'c materia. in the .3us: phase. F,,.riu~-al ji~.,cs t`le2 largest c-:mts. o~ condensed po1',.ar org. :ilaterial,. approaching _n%: of thee inp,_et~ C,~ and~ its tar' yield~.: - d=:rrrin~ated 0, st.;r_'znry ,.-,.-er~i,i, Sut. .C roass cl:os,-u-ee is not oLte.ined~. The tar produced by t:.PrEc camuustion o{' wood -pyrolysis~gas~.conta~ins phenols~also produced by'the combustion o, ..alpha~...--p:inene as well as aa no. of unknown h,.ighrtroi.lingi components~.. The measured phenols~.are~proh~a.bly~~fYom the lignin -frac'c.ion of~ the woodl.. A single global oxidati~:ve~pyr-o:ysis rate~.is indiicated,: whic.h' holds apprcx. r'.vr straiglht.chain.hydr-ocarbons, because o-F the - similarity ii.n burning rate for all of the.campdse e;::amd.. ie
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&-a-:: rUk k 53: 53 ; 14G 2.-q h 53 :. I g89oj ~ Pyrolysis of a-pinene. A. Boake, Roherts- & Cn.ILtd. Belg.. 037.707. Jun. I/i, 1904, AppL Sept. 23,. 191{3; 2,10 : pp- a-I'iuvuc 13(t panls heatedto ;O:i°%15mm. wam pyrol¢red by ,'„ntaetwilir a Nichrmna• wire at'. IiIMI° fur lli hrs. too yieldd a prv,lucC rYnolg. a`pinruc LN1•. dipeulc.ue ^P, ocimencr 49, xlhr nciniouc.lf.5, aud u nunvnlaeilc polymer:13 parts.. D: M. RI.. , ,'~ Correlation of latent heats and' entropies of vaporixationwith temperature. D,mald. F. fJthmer and'. David 'Ludke-' vitch,(Polytech. Inst: of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, N:4.): litd: Eng.. CBem.. 51, 701-96, 1022(1959).-The latent.heat'.of a suhstance can bedetde by the eqpaliom! _)m'!'(1.003 - 11.66. P o.tt)) /(1.(gKf - 0•O6' P,^.7'):, where 1'I and V are latent _ beats, P. and PJ'arereduced pressures, andlm and m"are consts:, for unknown sulistanceand reference substance:. Values of m.fm more.tlhan 500 substances are given. Nomo- gramsfor. the detn. of latent heat.and.entropy of'.f vaporiza- tion withi illustradvee examples for using them are given. The compds. included hydrocarbons; halogenated hydrec enrhons, alts., andd polyols; aldehydes, ketones, ethers,.. acids, esters. NeompdA., phenols, meta0oorganiccompds.,. B cornpds'., and Si compds. it. S. Monn e, /Ad'ditive funcNou of entropy of.6uiling, and'the pred'utbn of latent heat of'vaporiration' andlvapmpressurer of liquids. Leo IL Thomas: (Glarnorgan Coll.. TecfinoL, Treforest, Engl.).. J'.. Ckem. Sor. 1959', 2132-52:-An additive.func- tiuon.of' entropy', of vaporiiationn is presented by means of whichh latent heat and vapm-pressure.data of a given sub-' stance can: be evaluated from a knowledge of its b..p. only: The treatment leads also too a plausible correlation of mol:, structure and 'mternal order' inn the liquid state. F valuesare mlcd: fromlog (T/100.) = A}B l'og(TJ100)....... with benzene as referencxe substitution and B. _(T/E) (E/T)y.,..... (E/T)e,e,,,,, is taken as 272 rrl./mole de-gree,. so that F=2B/2Z2', where Z is:mol. no. = B at.. nos., . of constituent atoms. The relatiom is, tested for over 300 compds. and holds very wellL Deviations are: 1..1%.for 16' ethess; 1LL%% for I7 cyano compds.;, 0:4% for 9' nitro- alkanes; 0.6%u.for 17'esters. Largererrorsareencountered in arylketones and alknxyaromatics, e.g. -2'.9%:for beneo- phenone and -3:5%, for pheuetole. _ F. C. Nachud A f Pyrolysis of terpeaes. Masae Kitalima' unct M. Na,gu. chii. Nippon .5enbai~ Kbilia Cd&6 I"ienkvAsAo ICenkjN7 IfB- kokuNn. 95,. 53(10.56); A6sla. Resrarckcs. Tobuccn.. Salf, Camphor 1958, , Abstr. No. 02.58.-a-Pinene, rentpHnte, limonene,, etc. were pyroljzed at abmui(P and a.rate of 30 g:/hr_ by passingg them,through a quartz tube (2 cm. inn diam, . and.05'cm. in length) filled with 100 mIL ganul:rt~„ JaVanese, acid clay... The.infrared spectroscopy and chem.. analysis showedl thaa. the resulting'oils contained tofuene as themain Product (30-4070), o-, m-,, pxylkne, methylethvl- benmenes, mesisylcne, pseudocumene, 1,3•climethyl-5'.ethcl- benaene,.1,2-diinethyf-4-etl1y1t1enzene,. and isodurenc; they did not eontiini p-cymcne:. These resultssuggest that the main reaction in this pyrolysis proceels through the dchy+ drogenation of the terpenes tnptymene, which instantl¢decompy to toluene undl propylcnc: Dealkylation,, alkyla- lion, and migmtion.of alkyl groups.on aromatic rings occur sintultaneously;.produciugYhevarinus alkylhenzcnederivs. described above: K. L. C..
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C, bp: 260' Cal 5mm.. htian 3. ,Wid. It canicause.con-rymation- Thee ingestion tcrial causma marked' perspintion and' lears,. ~,. pmn in thrabdomcn, ntesuna with profusre isf sometimes quidsanedL The respiralian iaqui<k s the bronchi. There:aretremum.andlfeabld con, :splrallan and weaknesssns until brearhing ceasev. lie sweal glands rctsders. in the'.pharmacopeia. It. id accumulalions in the lh but whan,il'doesi% it is.. na o4 the lungrl caing.to decomposition oxides, gCneral lrealml for yditian atropine may be .anoM. t at 320"F,. ud: 7198 .osed lo heat..or ignition sposed.lo 4eat ar flame. ,n exposure to beat arr. n oxidizing malcrials. ,dione: ]5 kilograms (passenger). eraibkanE rmeni6k'. ehanr•+- faYrY.l rjar;y a6ar.nY shon e.po.ura .m.vmY d.alAay,am~un. 1029 nJ'INF\E Grner.l Ilnlnrmafnn i Synonym; 266.T imclhclh y lu-(7.1,1)-2-heplena. Uescript'un: Lquid:odorolturpentine. I urmula C H Con:tanw: Mull I: 1361 mp: -53'C, bp: 153'C, flash p: 91'F, d: 0.9585 an 20"/4'C rzp.., press_: I0mmut37J C-eap.d d7: I luard Anab i Toxic Haurd Raling: A vtc Rocal Irntant 2: InEe Yun2: Inhalatfmn 2. Acule Syst mic IhEcstiun - Inhalation 2; Skin AWorp-tiom2. Chrun ic.LarC Irritant 2. Chronk.Symemic- Ihgcslian 2: Inhulalion Y, Skin Absorp- lion 2. Tanicoksgy: Irritating to skin arrd mucous membrane. Can' ausc dizziness: palpitation. bmnchitisand ncphrilis. Fire Haeard:Moderale, when exposedlo heat or flame: can react wilh oxidlzing matcrials (:auMemcazresTa.Fghl Fire: Foam. carbon diunides drychemical'.or car-bon tetrachloridh(Sectiun 6):. Ventilation Canvol: Section 2. Slorage and Handling:'Section 7.' FINE 0111- General Ihformation Description: Palkyellowliquid:pcnctratingodor: Constants: Bp:.20U:220'C. flash p: II/2°F (C.C.). d: 0.86, flash p(smam disl il kd): i31PF. HaurdlAnalKZis Toxicity: A weak allergen. See also turpentine. Fire Hazard: Moderale..when exposedlto heat or flamm: can react With axidizing,malerials, SpontaneousHeating: Mbdcrem. (fountermeawres To. Fight Fire: Foam. eaFbon dioxide,. dry, chemical or carbon lelracbloritle (Section 6). Ventilation Control: Section 2. Slorageand Handling: Section 7- Shipping Regolalions: Section I l.. CoastGuardClassiflwtioo. Combustibleliqpid. PINF. IHT('HI Generalllnlormalion Constaots: Mp: 64.4'C. bp: 255"C, flashpr ?85'F (C.C.1. di 11.1. HhzardAaalvsi: Toxkity: A~.'eak allergen. Fiie Harard'.: Slight, when exposed loo hear or flame: canreacl with oxldizing materials. Spontanmus.Healing: Yes~ (CaunllrmeasYres To. Fight Fire: Water, carbon, diacide, dry chemical or carbon tetrachkridc(Srclion ti). Slurageand Handling: SectionJ. PINE RESIN:, Seurosin. pINE. TAR'. General lnfmmationDescription: Black.bonvmriscousliquid:pingadoc Canslants: Rp) 240-400'C flash p: 130°F(C.C.), d: ?I. autoign.lemP:671"Fi Hazard Ana1W5 Toxic Hazard Rating:'. Acute:Local: Irrilant I: AOergen 1. Acvte.Syslemic: U. Chronic Local: Allergen I. ChronicSysmmic U. Fire Hazard: Mad6rate:.when exposedllo.heat or Bame;, canueacs with oxidizing materials. SpantannousHcating: tles. PIPERIDINE Opumermea.ura.. T}.IhghVFiru:1-oam, carbon dioxide, dry chemlcal arcer- h,olmra hlondc(Sc'tian6l. Y- nxlllpg,cn Scct on 3. Y t'IaGonCumml. Si IiunY. SI , ge and Handhng '. Sectloe 7. I I}E IIXR 0111 ( t7~jF,a•ral Infurmarm. Sy unym...Tarml liliid.. De nplion: Dark reddisMbrovnliquid. Co stants-. Flash p: 144"F (C:C.). d: 0.96 0,99 . au 25' /25' C. Ha~rard Aeal,vse. Tu~ic Huw.d Raling: wtaLocali Irriunrl. tNIQSy>lemlc U. ' hronic.Lowl: Allergen I.. 'hronicSystcmic: U. FEic Hatard: Moderale, when exposed to heat.ar flume: can rcact rilh oxidieing matcrials.. (jrymermrawres Fight. Fire: Carbon dlbaide, dry chemicalor carbon tctruchloridc (Section 6)j ersunal Hygiene: Section 3'. loroge and Handling: Section 7.. P16T5( 'HIgAS(kneral Information Typical Composition: 30.0% k illumfnanls, 0.1% carbunmonaxide, 13.2% 'hydlogen, 45.0% methane„ 9.0'8Z nhanq 0.2% carbon dioxide,.l.6'1 nisrogen. Hazard Analysis. Toxic Hazard Rating: AculeLocal: U. Acute Systemic: Inhalation 2. ChranicLocal: U. ChronicSystemic:', Inhalation I. FireHazard: Moderate,whcnexposedlto:flame(Sectian6). Explosion Hazard: Unknown. Disnmer Hazard: Moderately dangerous:.wheo. healeQ itt cmils.toxic.(umeg, can react withroxidiziag materials. CuanmrmeawresVcntilatfunControl: Scctibn2. Storage and Handling:. Sectlon 7. . PIiHFR;IZI\E.. (ieneralInlormation Synonyms: Hexahydropyrazlne:dlithytrnediamine. Description: Colorless, rhombiccp?tafs. Formula: NHCH,CH,NHCH,CH4. Cunslanu: Mol wt: 86.14. . mp: 10!'C:, bp:. 145'C;, Oash p:'..190' F(ll d: I.I,.vap. dl: 3.0. . Hazard'Analvris. Toxic H'zaard Rating: Acute Lucal: Irritant 1. Acule Systemic: IngestionJ_ Chronic Local: U. Chronic Sysemic: Ingeslion I.. Tbxicology: Excessiveabsorptioncancaus<unicaria,pomit'- inEe dinrnhex, 6lursed vision and weakness:, Disasler Hazard: DSngcraus; whemheatnd todecampusiliun, it cmiu highly toxic lumes of oxides'of nllragcn. fuumemeawrn PersunahHygiene: Section S. SlaragcandHandlinF Settion7:. TuFigM.Fira Alcohol PIPERIDINH General'. fnlormation Synonym: Hexahy'dropyridine. Description: Clear. eolork:ssliquid; aminclike odor. Fbrmula:'. C.Hi,N. Constavtr. Moll wr. 95.2, mp: -TC,. bp: 106'C flash p:
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CMF-ASE '-- ALPHA FSNF_NE_... F•'YRL?L.YSS^ ; f":ineticsi of the gas-phase reactions of NOsub'.3 radicals with a.seriies of dial&:enes, cycloalkenes, and monoterpenes at,295 ', or - L K . ,.'_ ~ . V .. ..; .. . ,.. .. n_jcll. < r•nl l i irj ._ . ,A;i A... ~..~a ~ - . ~. ~ 02141M ,. . U: 1~_ l -'_'_= arr_h 1 ..- .. . .. ... , .. ~, - ; _ ,.. Q.~B.1T ~~r,r'nI3:, r_2r S'... ja, . i.11. E^.'JI fi+-qV.. . TE ;'^:2`l._.U-,C3, A= )., 1904, . .. '/'_ . _ . -7 a ), lod'en.:ESTNA .'angua+3e_, Eh;GI'..~ I6H ,.OW C.ons._antFi .- LV:_.r tTr' ,_ a_.]i_Ara. .:)ftf:.o NrsLrb: 3 r:3di.[a1l, an important e n.ct,i.•Je :_onstituent of rr:qhttifnee ambient a.tmosphf_res., have'e been 3etGrmi.ned forthe.first ti~~me for _, ser_F•s r: dialk:enes, cycloalkenes, and manoter-pena,-_S b.vu..,ing a. rel.ative: ~ a-te t.r.hn''que. By n. ' _ o-E aa rate c:onstant 7:.he, r-eMM ...:,n 0% NO=ub-radi.c.a_s with .a'i':e ns''ant -`.or the reaction of ; ,::. ,1_.. _*._,~: ,.x r.=,'- bu.-c,? '=. 11 -!.1 o! ~ 0:.,:'.+,: x.. tq~sup~~ -sup ~ _I"~ 7 ~a_un s:s_rp ":n 1 !~-~aUr~ ,con~. int'c ~btained _ _ 295 . _i. - ... 1 _ •.ie,r-e.. 'h., f'oLlo.aing (;_ u:ms= _7 rol or-uaF_•-.rtp =_:.!:rs'~ 1 ssup ! :,:n .:::., '.y _,-but-r:i,:eene. (.°i.34 - ce:r ;:. E,2') :a iGsp p 1sup 4; Dr -., :B .i:p -.J ).=up y cyr_ .-t...;=•nF' i'LF37+ or - -- 'i:.p ' _Q1r (7.2 . -or ~ t . .. 1'(_' sGlp (2:. . .:_ C, `__) . .r'3_u+ __p L_or -; fi 9 . or .. : { . { 0SL,.! '. Vj31 - 25 -7 .h.=:-.' . "iBne p . ..up ._`3u".3 2; o:_ t',._.Fr.1.1e:3.'^, 1-4- '..:3!" )<T. . ".3E.lp.. 1:..:_t_ D =~~tvc-:_r,'h _ '.aL"erw3y (~..~ 4 or -- 1.-/~~ . -iVSV. wLlp 1-Up 2'y ~ d-'i (r rn,:., .7~~.7 + o;r~ 1.7) ;. i.ps!_ip -sup ]=?_tp~. .C.. T'-rse: NOsub~, j.' r.adical 1 ...tQ _., ,`+,.: -A,: the natt(r .' 7•.. arro, t ta=-d h,dror.ar tons i sepr ane and th._. :nWn, t*f,>.,es,, in corrj!_inc.tion ..d th measured ambie,.-rn Nilsu; _ radical showe that nighttime reaction with theN7st!b: radical can be .n :La;por t:ant., ir nor 7,_- pi ocei=,s. fmr thcse' orgarnies. ~.._,._. .r ...,;. . _ ',.r _._. also _ --r= a~~_.:::c,n -...n' .I-_~, . 6r•o a,n i~mpei~-tant. 1_ ,~ .. .~~ •~rocesafar- 'vOsub. _: ra:dicals, a.n(T hcance for NU(;...), dur::ng nighttime liour-•_. 84011354 4 Modeling, potential ozone impacts from natural hydrocarbons - I. Development and testing of a chemical mechanism for the: M©(x)-air phatooxid'ations o+ isoprene'e and alphar-pinene under ambient conditionsi_ldyd'. A:.C.; Atk.in'son R.; Lurma.nn Nitta E+. L?nviran.F'e:>. Tec.hnnl. Ir.,_.,, trJrst'i.a'.::._ Village, CA 41.T.•~&.1. U. S.A. r^-,T!"IOS. ENVIRON. (EN.GLfiND)„m3.,... 17/10 (15:1-1`75Ct), Codent . f4T_NS Langu.ages: ENGLISH ' GO -1 rA (D O! N ~ , uT.
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3s: iacl'K 40 ,' 1'~451 ~ Pqrolyeisof. a-pinme to al166eimese. Tha.dore. R. Savich and Leo'. A. (",oldblatt (toUnited States of :America,. . as represented: by the Secy. of'Agr:). II.S.. 2,437,759„ Mar: 16; 194&., a.Pinene (I)or turpentihe ispumped inn the.hquid.phase through aa closed reactor at 40U-5410° at space velbcities: of 480-211,0W vol4./hr.. Thus, I wass pumped through the reactor at 46W and.StqRb./sq. im.. at a space.velocity af2f1(I0vols./hr: or a contaettlme of Z sec.. to give 50% albBCimene„ 36% dipentene, aa small. amt.. of polymer, andl theremaindere as unconvertedi I'. Arthur A.. Dohtiek ~ ~ Preperation.of fsoprene from terpene hyd'rocarbons. IL Staudmgcr, H., W. Klever and. J. Prodrorn. 8<r. 75H;, 2059-64(h942).-AA special app. is described fnrr thee pyrogenie.deeompm, of'tespnte hydromrbonss by passingtheminvutaooaeraPtspiralheatedwithanefee.current... Limonene at' atm, . pressure gives 27% of crude isoprene. (1); a pure samy lefroon the tetrabromide in.sacuu. (210 mm.) gives 68'.1%;; a aom. samplb yielded fi0.5%]: Allthel fullowingg deoampns& were carried out irr~ mcnu;' the: yield of' I isgiven.: dipeatenefrom terpina132.3%, fromm terpineo1l 29.8%, from the di,HCI salt'33.8 and 37.5%a,j from pinene l%; pirrene 28%;. terpinolene l.1%p; terpiuenee from pinene7%; phellhndrene 1.4%; sylvestrene 18°,{,t~ wbuinene.1.6%; myrcene39.0%. These.results show the impossibility' of transfammingg pinene into diyentene. A consideration of the sttucmres of thee various terpeoes xhows that thosewhich contain the MeC(:CH,)- side chain yield L. The Sahmidt. "double-bond"'sule (C. A'. 2G;3719),istnbeconsideredasthe"allyl!gouP"rule; the above results can be interpreted in. the light of this rule.. C. J. Wea / Productioaot' isopreue from turpentine derivativen.. B..L. Davis„L. A. Coldhlatt, and.S. Palkin (U.S. Dept.. Agr., New Orleans, La.). Trd: Eng: Chem. 38, 53-7' (1946):.-The production ofieoprene (I) from tarpeness obtained by the pyrolysis of turpentine (II)was studied., The method of depolymerization involVed the use of an, . elec. heated' glowing wire mfli immersed in the:liqufie ter- pene. Pyrolysiss was, however, that of a: vapnr-phase'e systemf, since.the coil was at 750°:The pyrolysis prod- nets were quickly removed from the high-temp. :ane andl cooled by the bollfng terpene.I was only slightly soL in, the terpenesi, so itunderwent.little subsequent pyrolysis... The app-. is illustrated and'the technique described. Gtf'f all terpenesstudied, diPentene (M) gave the:bestyields.. -(approx.. 00%); g-pinene" myrcene, I'1. a-pinene, ter- pinolene andd allobcimene gave suceessivelylbwer.y yields inn the order' given. II of' high purity was isolated from the.IIE'.pyrolyzatcs by fractional dlstn. through a short glnss Hruun.eolumn.. I!.fromi the otherpyrolyratesr could not be obtainedreadlly in such, pure form.. Thelosses ass gas not condensable by dry iee were' in inversepropmtion to the yield of'I, and ranged from less than 4 too more than 30%. The yields.of I were very little differentt whcther. Pt or Ni•Cr revistance wires were used. Higher yields of'III were obtained by the use of a.highaioilingdiluent or by'redueed pressure. L.iquid, productsother than ILfrom.thc pyrolysis ofl HI, whichh comprise approx. 35 ofthe limonene whieh, rcatts, consisted of approx:. 30~ of unsatd. acyclicrcompds. (chfefly unsatd. compds.. higher than Cj)„30%.of.uusatd. cyclic compds. (chiefly' isumcrs.of III)'„ 30% of' aromatic eompds: (chiefly xylahre„ some toWene, and little or no pcymene), and 10% of' polymer (dimer)'. The uncondenable gass eonsisted of 45 %e of CHt„30%of H„ 20% of'H:C::CHs and lcss..than 5% of olefinshieher thaniH.C:CHk. C. C. Davis..
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5a,, I(e 4`RA- A~~~., Ma'1~ 1 C~ .VI V. t I `d b Coatfag tompositsons: D€rivfs& resiniques efr terpEaiquH (Louis Desalbres, inventor). Fr. 1,023,339',. Mar- 17, 1953,. Yyrolysis oF oiDof'turpentine, pj~ or uopinene. on differ-. ent metals'at 300-80° gives.an od.(I) that contains 20-40efo: alloocimene (H)', d n 0lb'U(i-1.011M I70", and 1U-15%a myrcene;, (1I1); dn 0.801,.Iqw 106-8°; the rest't are Cyclic terpcne.hy-dhacarbons.. I.replaces advantageously theusual.diluents(IV) in paints„ varnishes,ILequers, and enamels that con-tnibutb9ittleortmWiugtoLlmformation. S2inplesofthese coatings, each contg: ei2her IV or'I in the same proportion,n showed that.the dryingtime.was.reduced tal/4 wheniliwas.- used. A comparison'n of the saine type Of' liuseedoilI paint dild.,withequal proportions of oil; of turpentine, I„and.pure H, resp., showed a drying tlme.of 30, 10;.mnd''. 4 hrst, an oxidation velocity(measUmedlbgtdle reduction of.O.pressure in nun. Hg.- per miu. for a detd. wt.. in a.closed vessel) o0 2.ir1U, 20-75, and 35-172, percentages'evapds after 1, P, 3, and 4'hrs. (from.equalwts: under identical.temp..and sur- face conditious) iof'27, 52, 70, 89; 8, 17, 2}„ 32; and 2, 3, 4,. 5%furthertspectiveeuruptss, Gxpts.with~industrialpaintsshowed an inereasedlresistance tohumiditymtd gas and a greate.r hmdnes. when I was usedL These rsults are attrib. mtedd to I itself being 51m-forming and aeting:as a, drier. - Hans Friedman.n f. '~ Fbysicsl andd thermodynamic properties of'terpeves II. The: heats: of cmnbustionn of aetm tarpene: hydrncat7rona. J Erskine Hawkins and Watren T:. Eriksen (Univ, of Florid9, Gafnesville)., J.. Am.. C6em.. 3oc. 76,. 20fV941 (I954).--Six terpene.liquidswereburned under.30 atm. O0 in an'illium.bomb plorimeter. The produets:were analyzedl Por COe and CO. The Heats of'combustion cor. tu25°(reactants andl pmductss in their standard states)'are:a-Pihene 14ti3.0'.t 025, p+pinene1485.1 f 0.34i.dipentene 1474:7 f 0:24, d-1'imonene 1'473.9a 0.27, mvreene ~1490:4 t. 0.24,., and cis-alfoBcimene 1481.2' f 0.00 kcal./mole. Bernard M...Zdfert ,,, .. f The mechanism of'the pyrolyses of:pinenes. Robert L. Burwell, Jr.,(Northwe.tcrn Lniv.,,Hvanston,.ill.). J..Am. Chem. Sos. 73,4401-2(1951); cL, C.A.. 43,. 12a9r.-AA biradical (1) provides. an explanationn of reactionsoccurring during p.vrolyses.of a- and d-piuene. The' hlpothesis.per-mits. deducing the relutive: mtes.of tbee reaetimisundergone . by such bhadieuls. I'is unusual.in that I of theoddelec- tYonsispartof.anallylicresonaneehybrid. Theenergetics„ kinetics, and products are.eonsequente to this state.. . ~ Jh ~Z' FelirSaunders ~ A `C~', 1 '~ ' The relatfon between the sativatinr, energp'forpinene pyIrp1y®sandthe C--C: bond' dt.aooiahmenergy 1n't4cf9- butaoe: Frank H. Seubold, Jr. (Uafon Oill Co., Brea.. CaW.).. Chami<tr7 & Iiidustry 1954, 131~; d. CA. 4'8;, I0c., 12A81k.-The C-L' bond dissacn. energy in cyclbb butanewas talddm as57 kcal./mole itom tlle sum of the nati-- ntfan energy for a-Piaene ]nymlysu and'd the stram.energyY of the cyolobutane ring(given.by the diftermcein.heats of formatfon of' a-piaene and limoneae)', less the strain energy of the 4-memhered a-piueae ring. /l simil4r eafca. based on 6pineae gave 64 kqal./mole: The av:. of these 2'values - agrces satistactorilywith the exptl- aetiivatloun energy for elciobutane and with the dissocn. energyekd, fromthetmal and stertic data. Itt isunnecnsery to postulAte any ecti• ntion,energy fon cyclic radiral reaotnbiuatlonli and.. a dis'- snun. meehanLtm involviug foitfal C-C bond' fibion to yield a b'vadital appears ]usiified, for cyelobutaoe,a: well u.for the piuenes.. Values of the dissooa:. energy or a C-C bond for' eyclobutane mased'd on comparison of 4,4dimethyl-l- penteneandlthe pinenes; are inaccurate because the compds. are.tm.different forthe'analogy tobe valid.' Ernestine R., Feial 87490589
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~. "I';" Fragrance raw.materials monographs 855'. ~. . frog',peripheral!nervewas lowered by.a-pinenein,air'or pure oxygen, andthe formation of a pinene .~/°rIh peroardewhich mightt have oxidized enzyme thiof groups was suggested (Epshtein &.Shchigol- 1958). When the oUaaoryepitlrelium of the burbot'. (iora, Iota)' was stimulated'd by, a 0'001 as'm solhtion using '; ~; of pinene; both exeitatoryandy inhibitoryresporrsesy from the ol[actoryy neuronesr were. detected„ in of ,~,~ although in some instances there was no response at all (f7bving;1966). f~-Pillene showed rw~ -sedativeaetion.whenadded.towaterinwhichguppies(f:ebistesreticulatus)wereswimming.(Csstirner anen- & Kleinbauer,.1958)L . lanen ~`,}. • . d not r and -rl l bv ryaev edl by `.l Aretander-. S. (1969k Prrfume and Flarar Cfiemitals.(Araaa Chendcal9) Vo11.2- no. 2619. S:.Arctander,. Mont:-mo[e . N' - elair, NJ. . efiects ~ Benk6-A'. Maeher, A.,Sxarvas,.F.u.Ts'bo1dLT.(1961) Die Wirkung'gtherischer()IeaufdieAtheroskleroseg mit Cholestain gefutterta Kaninclanu.AanrfmUref-Forsrk. 11, 367. 0'/.in ~.~., Benko, S_ Szabu, R, Mulkr, S& Icsznyak; 1..(1972GEffect. of terpenee derivatives,on eholesterol-indueed atherosclerosis in rabfiits. Ki.rerL.r7eroamd 2/, 453. . -- ' ardos;, J.. (1963); Effect of painting wiih cyclic terpenes on the skin ofr white . a„d i_.1. , . Benk6, A.. Tiboldi,. T. &, B g into )rexel, mined Iliarns, Valeue :Jter a. 'mnifio)'I rodbc- mrce ano om unc sam raranorna aevelopea nyocnno(aJpyreae painting. Acm un. mr. tano. sr: tao. Bogats'ka, L NI.& Epshtein;. M:. M. (1959) Egecnof n-pinene:c on thechemoreceptor funeion of ttie.peripheral nerves:.FJnrof. Zh 5, 659 - Council of Europe (A974) Natural Flavouring Substances, Their Sources, andlAdded Aruficiai Flavouring, Subslanccs. Partial.Agreement in the.Social' and Publio.Hksith Field. List 2- no. 2113, p- 305: Strasbourg:. Dbving K. B. The influence of olfactory'stimu6 upon the activity of secondaryy neurones in tke, burbar(LaraInrn L) Atta phpsinf. srand:,661 296:. Epshmin- M. M:.(1959). The eBect't of s-pinene oID oxygenn absorption and: glycolytic amivity in the rat brain= inexperimcnls.inn tvto. Ukr. kinkhem. Zh. 31, 751. . Epshtein, M. M. &. Khifko: 0:.. K. (1960) Effect of'2-pineneon wnbohydmte-phosphorus metabogsm,. Ukr. biakhem. ZM 32, 710. . ' Epshreim,M. M. &Shchigol, iv1..B. (1958) Mechanism of s.pinene actionL Lkr. 6ioklirm. Zh.3U;.118, 1. T. &. Webb. M. (1962). Studies on the mode of'aclionf of eacesss of vitamin. A. IV. Fe1L H. B:. Dingle , tti« , f ~ The spenfinty of:the effect on~embryonic ehlck-8mb ®rtllage in culture and on isolated rat-Gver lysosomam t when Biochnn. J. 93, 63 arrd~~-~7 „.Fenaru(fs Nondbook af Ff.aro.ingredientx (A975) Edited by Tt E Furia and' N. Bcllanca..2nd Ed.. VoL II;., en ar1~/ y8 I. p: 486:.CRC Press: Ckveland OH: o(d) Fiavoring Extract Manufacturers•. Association (1963) Survey of flavoring~ingredient usage.levais. Na 2902:. Fd Trchnal.; Ckarupuipn.19(2):,part 2, 158: '-- 74 C h J' S C 33 M k r tiama un sgaa Fregart . (19 y ,of ontacz Dennarifs p. . open d agen. 6 a~~ Gstirner, F. & Kleinbauer;.. E. (1958k Pllanmacokrgical testing;of vabrian aooe Phanna:ir IL7, 415 t Qd 11,.no. 23;- - ~ - a.aathan~t' ,~ ~Hkra Unic. ks;.Ine (19624 Hereudest terpene hydrocaobons'and solvenrs:.Summary of toxicologiGsl.invesligationsl riUdia; i Tosicaio4uul Data Buflerin T-108. 31 October.. ', aorla. 1 ImasekL 11 & Kitaba[akc Y(19621.Studies. on eRect of.essential oils and!d their components on the isolatedsgisen, i.t'. intestinesof.mice: La4u9aktr_asshi.82, 1326. . ncfeascP A, Blanchetti, A. & Prestini„P: E(1969). Effect ofasenlial oils,on drugmetabolism. Biaclinn. Pharnlac. I1 linid I Ia, GVa3:. - C»M .-f luen. m. tuvar),.lumact ucrmxmn uuq to mr. or arroncna. 1: mrev:,vann1 w~ . .eina with a 1959)i zrsiblc er pra -pinenec ped on, min A.. ~II Kllgman. A..M. (IY(i61. the taentln(2noniol.COnlaCl.al[Crgens ny, numanassay. Ill. lne maxlmRatlon test: A proeedure: for screening andd rating contact seositizers..J_ imr.N: Derm. 47,. 393. Kligman..A..M: (19721 R'eports to RIFM.. 14 March and 1'3Octo6er. . . Kligmam A. M. & Epstein,. W. (1975);..Updanng the maximization test foridontifying.contact allergens.Comacr Dermosiri.c 4,231.. Lesznyak.)Benko-.S Szabo. R' & Muller, E. (1972). EIfeUI f hrpeneson chol'esterol rndu¢datherosclerosis in rabbrtsIIII Numerical and volhme changes oflhe aortic adventitial mast cells Kiserl. Orras'md. 24, 571 Lroan}zk..1 &.LusrUg. G. (19741. Studies of:the.heparinocyter reaction connected with hypercholesterol<mia in thu.aorta ad.enutia or rabbits,and the eifeet of Icrpenc d'crivatives. In. Gefuosnand Blurplamu, 4th Srmp., 1972. . EEdited by. R. fimmrich. p. 253. Fiacher Verlag. lena, DDR. F U9736ERect of pretreatmemm with x-pinenec on the hexobarbilal sleeping Marosi Ci Pa A & Szarvas p , ,.,,. ' l~ktime of normal rats and ratsw'ith, uhioa¢tamide cirrhosis: KisdH. Orcosrud:.25, 523. ~u~,Wwc&klkJex'{]976), .An,EnepcfopediaofChemicalv.aml Drngs-9tlrEd. No, 7242. Merck & Co:. Ine..Rahway. -bitonc . _ NJ- . - zarvas,. -Morena„O. M. (19734 Reportv to RIFMI I.andl5 May. .ion of A.. Anekeri. K. Arrhenius, E..& Emell, C. (19751. Effects of tobacco and tobaccoo smakee comtituents 'athian on cclllmul(iplicatiomin rir%Tuxi2ulagg 5„49: - ~erpir- ~ ParGi:,V, Kllpru. O.. OlkkoncniA, Pirila-,4 & Sillanen-E..(f9694 On the,chemlcallnaturc:of tlie:eczcmatogens in oil.of turpentine. V. Pattern oflsonsitivity.toditfcrenn terpenes: Di•rnmtnfayira139, 183. .rysa?w) PirdS: V. u P¢i18.L (1964 Tcrpentinalk.rgie. (J6er dieekzcmatogcne. Wirkung dar 2- und 3tCarene. Bervfa rlial of ' drnnarasen 11 163. - Pitila. V, Piiilii, IL. & Siltanem,El (1966)l Sensitization taoii ofturpentinn: Acm derrn.-rener.. Srockk, 11t8. -.yG.,.
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MERCK INDEX 1976 1 Pipamperone~ 7298'~. +ol in akro- tatnrsA g6, } pinacane: ugnn. C eduetion or '.1906k Ad- 231.l94 in d ed:,, 1955) as, Irom wa. The.anhydt r, mg 41.1,^, ther„alightly e odor. hp lAia WO'. re; r<nbutyl 1011, C tim a a- (1869). -nll, p 462; L. F. tco,. 3rd cd.- Natned when 0.5:Bter 25% onehso. .an dg ',0.72506 dile m steam. It imalouhd, glk8& mp 78: bpjp . chlbrofarm. (!-wMAyLeth- 'opylamino)- Vnken. CN N11.28%dO and 472:a4 rqyl)-lM-iw- t 2-pivalyl- iion6 piva)yl -stNyOs; mol repo:Kilgme nats, Vwgs, Bright yelbw crysta8flam ethanol. mpt08.110-. tiD in rats; Lv. 50 mg/k& orally 2g0.me7kg• tsainest Tosirol ' ApP1. Phnnnncol: 14, 51.5 (1969), . Sodium Sdt- Pi/uivn, bnghtt yellow nrystal5. mp.205-21 Vl. Schwara USpau E;ggqL32,(1959 to. Morton Chens.l. Sol in water. tuG Rodendcide; insestidde. Caudam0.eduorr. blood coaeullatan. Symptans.resemble warfarin. 4nF 72ax a,Pihme. 2;ad-T.+mtthyr3.(7tuefal:nprep-2-ene; I-Nnenw ploena CpfB~t: tnol't v.ti 136.23.. C 88.1165Br H. 10.8{%. Oblainedifrom dl afiturpeotiitartiihh ewtairu. % % aap/nene.6somaiu. d-pN 58-65R: a-pineue .long: with 30 nene): E...OOdvncisten, F. Hbffnrann, Dia.lLherec6ea.Oele Ba.d IV (Akadtmie-Verlag. Berlln. 4thed.., 1956). p 39: a-Pibate in: NorthAnte.ican. oils is~ dextmmtrtarq, in,most Europun o0s.it:islevorootory. Constituent of'many voln, tile o0i, fsoln of, da-pihaict from Pan Oxford imdar wood; 00 (Clmnuncyparir. Iavmn:ona Pad.. Pbueeae): 7lturber,. R,rB,.fnd Ehg. C/tiem.19.739:(1927). lsoln d1-a-pihme fmmm mandarin peell oil.(Citeus nrkviam Blando, Ruroeeae):. Kui Ko.dts lfalv. Chtm A'cm46.1480 '.U9679. Rerfew: Palmcr.. lnd. £ng. Ch'ern 34,. 1028~ (1942); 1. L Sinronsen, 7Te Teryenes.oL II (Cambridge Uhiv. Press. 2nd'ril'., 1949)pp 105-197.. Purifiutionthrough'the nitrosoc8lorlddr Thurber. Thielke:.l: Aln. Cbenu Sac 33,1030 (1931). Totap synthesis ol a- and p-lonnc Komppa; Ann. Acad' 3ci. Pennime A59; 3(8943): CA'. 44 425 (1947); Thanas. Fallis. TennAedron Leuert 1973r, 4687. dl-Forrn, Bquidl characteristic odor of ttnptntine_ bpita 155:156`, bpy 52.S. dja 13.8592. rrg~ 1.4664- Practiully' insaliin waeer,',sd'i in do. cA/ordorm..ether.glacial acedee add: 8lydracldaidb, C}[HtrCl.mp 132': d-Fonn. bprtt LS -19C.. df 0:8591- na, 1.4663. (a]r +51.14-. . H;ydrochloride,.mp:132'. [a]o +,33.5T(dtuhol). I.Form, bp„e 155-a56-. dtm aesso: rt0 1.4662. [a]f 5L28-: Hydrochloridb mp 132-. [a]S', -33.24' (slCUboU . tae:. Manufamure of cmnphor, inseetiddes. aolvents, plas- tiaxers, perfumo . beses. aynttietic . pine al. 9ee review by. Palmer, ldc. cic. Caumus: Absabed through akib. /ungs, in. testine. 6ritatesslun., mttmus membrana+. Cames, akineruption,. 0:1.. irritadon. ddirium, ataaia; kidney damage. msna. Inhalation attses 1rsiPtation. dimttess. nervous dis,, mrbances- ahestpain;r bronch(tis', nepbritis:. Benigrc skin tumors from chronic cpntacG Fatat dae.aboutt 190 g orally. u.turpendne. - 7243. Pfae (311. Yarmor. An oil fiomPlnus: pirtuamis Milll and tatsin,other species ot:pines, Pinaceae. It Ia ob:- u/nM humpiace.so.kM pinewoodby serasn dslHlationorsolsssu extradion followed tiy, steam dtsUealion and also by destructive distilletian It eondstss ttsunfy of iaomeric tertia- ry'and seeondmy; cyehc tvpene alcohols. CAlodessm. Pde Ydlow liquid.. turpantine-like odor. d'ahout 0.9; bp 200-2201Ihsol.in, water. eoi in the usual organic solventa.. lduman TazfelOr lydtating taiekin,.mussans, manbranm. large dosrs may. cauac CNS deprasrion. lnE: Mnnuf terpnhydrste and other [erpin products; asa rolvent. dtstnfeetant't and d6odoranG in. teatilascouring; far notanon of IeRd.and rinc orea. TNERAPCaT:. PharmaeLutic'.aid (Bat'on and.perfnme). 7284. Pine Tar. Aprodbm obtained by dcxtrvctinc dis+ tillation of' w,wd oe Pia.us pnWsrris Mi11L. or ather species of pine. Pfnatena BlackisR-brown- viscous liquid:heavicrthan.watw;cmpy- reumatic odor and sharp tastc. Slightlysol in water;.snlin alc, chloroform. ether,.ac<tone, glaual acetic acid. Gxed and volatile ,vls. aad in sdns oftxustic alkalies. Principal con- 'I stituents:turpentina resin..gu.iacol, crtwsol:,methylcreosol. . phend, p8loroh. toluene. sylenc: and.other hydrourbons: tNERN'C1T: TOpiCJl.antiecrmra6C; mbcfarienLi nttmtwP C4T tvml: M'ild irritant; antisepticin chronic skin conditions, Ehpemorant. 7245.. PingoluEin. A protcolylic enzyme.obtainetl Iran 7thc juice of the fruit of 8ramdla pYnguinPltrnt ex L.,. Bnunn liatme (pineapple family):'Asenjo. SNenn.95, 48(194II)t Blach, MessinB. U.S. pat. 2,977:]87 (1961 tn. Ehicon). Aq wlbs are npabib d, digesting nnzrotic.tissua but do not. ttttaak: viable tissue. Oplimum: prmmlytic activity ii'.at pH 5.2 to 5.5 and also at pH:7a. Itoativated'.at'temps above 8R., 7246:,PinaSylElne. .f-(S-Phenylehenyl)-l,3-benrenediul; I 3-»7I.nmrtinol; 3.5-dihyd4oxystilbc.r¢ C, HtrO} mol..vt 212.24. C 79.22%.. H'. 5.70%, 0, 15.0g9a. 4Sccurs togdhet witli ilsmonentethyl etbe. in the heartwuod of pute, Pinvs ryhesMS.L., P.' mommsa. Mill„ P: rommnta,var lariJdia S. Wata.. P.. ponderosa. Dou81.. P.. halepeestr Mill. Pfnncetra' - Erdaman:. Ann..539;. 1116 (Q939):. Aulin,Erdtman, Erdtrttan. ' Bee 74, 50 (1941); SpBth, LirLhcrr. lfNd. 869; Lindstedq Acm Chem. Scand 3„755, 759,767 (1949);.Aharez-NOVm, ibld.4„4C4 (1950): Prcpn fromm pinosylvine monomeMyl etBV: 4indberg. Itiid.3, 912 (1949). Both pinosylvineand its,monumethyl ether have the eronsconhguration, Biosyn- thesis: Birch, Fortrdir. Chenr. Org. 7Nemrse.l4, 1g6.(1917). CeNSCN- Finee needles from glknial aeeticc uid., mp 135.5-156. Piamie.lly insol in watc, sol inbenrrne..acetate„ehkxo- form, glacial aoetie.ac3d. Monomethyll ether. CifHpOt crystalv: mp 122-123-. More sol in bernme tban pmosylvtne. Alsoo aoi iomethmoln glacial oelic acid. 7247:.Pipaauzine- 1-(J-(7+Chloro-/ON-Phena+hiurrin- 10-y1)Propllj.f-pfpendrnanargaamm.dq 1-(3L(1 ehlnrqar- rlnthiazin-1PSd)ymapylJjaoniyeeotarniide;' 10-[3-(4-urbam- oyUpipesidin-LyOprOpyl/-Dcblorophenothiadnr 2-ehlbm- lo-[3-(4.rbamoylpiperuhnyepropyqphenahimne; w{3- (1-earbamoylpipendino)proPyl]-2-chloropftetrolhiaane; SC 9187, 1Vametine; Naundd,.Momrdme C~ ~Hyt7N~09i'.md wt. 40197. C 62 7S°h, H' 402%. CI S.BT/a Ni 1045Ta 0 3nM S7.9g%. Prepn. aw;. et ar... u5:. pa. 2,9s7,e7o (1960 to'Seerle). CNaCn~CN~ Y~ rCONN.1 ~ v- m Crystds from Zpropanol + petrether;.mpabout 139'.. Hydroehloride, crysteln.mp~about.196-19T with fomu- tlon of.tiubblbs. TnER.tf CAnAntiemeUC. 7248:,Piqampoona 1'-(Y-(<.FZuorayllaryl)-aea•ebrt-. yll h 4. erviverid ne}e:•-tareaxa,n'de: r•-f.1~trNaoro-b<nmyr)ProPytl-LE I 6YPiperidi ef.Ir.carbo+a dr, 1-(p-. Buorophenyl)-4dd ptperidino-4-urbamoy)pipendtoo)-1-butanane. 1 {r(4-fhrorahenwyDprnpyl7~-pipenernnpiPer- idine.4-urboxemide: 4'-0uoro-4-CN-[4{N-piperidino).4- Cmrall tke traa ihder before uriag this section. Page 969'
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