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Cigarette Tow Newsletter

Date: 19650315/P
Length: 75 pages
01194636-01194669
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01194433/01194779/Celanese Corp of America 65
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Page 1: tcw81e00
MARCH 15, 1965 CIGARETTE TOW NEWSLETTER CELANESE'~ ~ FIBERS MARKETING COMPANY CHARLOTTE MARKET RESEARCH NORTH CAROLINA
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„ INDEX TO CONTENTS Pages SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 & 2 a DOMESTICCIGARETTE PROT)UCTIONANDCONSUME'TION Cigarette Sales and Output in December 1964~ Increased Over ]:963• . . 3 Cigarette Sponsors Sign for TV; Tobacco Industry's Labor Costs Rise; Tobacco Product Companies Report Earnings. . . . . . . . . . . 4 Proposed Tax Increases; Smoking Increase Noted; Michigan's Bootleg Shipments; Cigarette Prices in Miami . . . . . . . . . . . 5 DWG Merger; Smoking Tobacco Sales Increased in 1964; Cigar Sales Soar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Proposed California State Tax on Cigarettes, Tobacco; City Cigarette Taxes; Camel Top Seller. . . . . . . . . • . • • . • . • 7 Lorillard Sales and Earnings for 1964 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Filters - Today and Tomorrow . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • • . • . • 9 P. Morris' Growth; Lorillard's Cigarette-Sized Cigars. ....... 10 Analysis of Major Cigarette Company Sales, 1964 vs. 1963 ...... 11 Pat ent s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 NEW DOMESTIC BRANDS New "Latin" Cigarette; Reception of Lucky Strike Filters; Scandinavian Small Cigars Introduced in Utiited States; Pall Mall Fil ters Add Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • • • • . 13 SMOKING AND HEALTH Congressional Committee Hearings on Cigarette Package Labels and Advert is ing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Texas, Nevada, New York Consider Cigarette Tax Increases ...... 15 State Action on Anti-Smoking Bills, Cigarette Labeling; New York State Gets Cigarette Label Bill; Committee Formed to Fight Tax Increase . . . . . . . . . . • • • • • • • • • • i6 Johnson on Smoking and Health:; Funds for Leaf Research; Hospital Installs Cigarette Vending Machine. . . . . . . • • • • • • 17 FOREIGN CIGARETTE' PRODUCTION AND CO?1SUMPTION- Dutch Firms to Affiliate; Tobacco Product Consumption in Africa, Canada; Molins to Supply Equipment to Japan Monopoly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Kent Cigarette to be Made in Australia; Tobacco Consumption in Norway and France; Report on West Germany . . . . . . . • • • • • 19 La Tabacalera Begins Selling L & M in Mexico . . . . . . • . . • . • 20 Benson & Hedges to Offer Premiums with Belvedere Cigarette ..... 21 Belgium Tobacco Production; West German Cigarette Market; Comunent on Great Britain's Ban of Cigarette Advertising on T'V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 22 & 23 Excerpts from Foreign Agricultural Service Reports on Jordan, Yugoslavia, Italy, Canada; Text of Ireland's Cigarette Advertising Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • • • • • • 24 - 26 Personality: Lennart Stahl, Arenco, Sweden . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
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SUMMARlES Domestic Cigarette Production and~Consumption December, 1964, cigarette sales rose 5.8 per cent over the same month of the previous year, and cigarette output rose 12.4 per cent for the same period. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the industry's labor costs rose 4.2 per cent for the same period~. Advertising Age gives a rundown on cigarette company sponsors for the 1965-66 television season. Tobacco companies have reported increased sales and earnings of cigars, smoking and chewing tobacco, and snuff in 1964,. Authorities in Ohio and Utah disclose that tobacco spending is up on a per-capita basis. The state of Michigan can testify from first-hand experience to at least one disadvantage of a cigarette tax higher than that in neighboring,states; bootleggers. In 1964 there were four seizures and eight arrests for violations of the cigarette tax statute. U. S. Tobacco Journal reports that the tax administration must maintain "daily vigilance.w- DWG Cigar Corporation of Detroit is considering a merger with Allegheny Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company. Two independent financial experts are studying possible conditions of such a merger; the studies should be completed withinithirty days (the article is from the February 18 Wall Street J'ournal). The article entitled "Filters - Today and Tomorrow" is taken from the February 20 issue of Tabak-Journal International. It gives a concise account of the history, various materials used, and future outlook for cigarette filters. On Page ll are quarterly sales, profits, and 1965 prospects for five major United States cigarette companies. Of particular interest is the patent on a cigarette which provides a reminder to stop smok- ing the cigarette at a predetermined point, as it is believed by some scientists who have studied~the relationship between smoking and health~that the last few puffs of a cigarette contain more harmful substances than the rest of the cigarette. New Domestic Brands Dosal and Mendez Tobacco Corporation of Hialeah, Florida, has announced plans to market a new cigarette made from "black Latin Americantobacco." The new cigarette will be aimed primarily at women and Cubans - 95 per cent of the company's cigarettes are now sold to Cuban exiles in the United States. The Swedish Tobacco Company has introduced Van Baars Juniors, small Scandinavi,an~cigars, along the East Coast, with New York as the main destinatioa. The advertising campaign is aimed at a°sophisticated high-income urban readership"; it is reported that approximately 75 per cent of all annual premium cigar purchases in the United States are made in New York. The cigars will be sold in packs of 10 or tins of 20, priced' at $.60 or $1.2& respectively. The new Lucky Strike filter cigarettes are moving well in Buffalo, and it is predicted'they will be well received by the general public. ~O American Tobacco has announced the introduction of its Pall Mall Filter into new markets. ~ rA Smoking and Health ~ w ~ The Senate Co~nerce Committee's hearings onicigarette advertising and package labeling are scheduled for March 22 - 25 and March 29 - 30. The committee will examine the effects of
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the"indus-try's self-regulatory advertising through the Cigarette Advertising Code. Witnesses will'include Robert B. Meyner, administrator of the Advertising Code; Emerson Foote, chairman of the National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health; Surgeon-General Luther Terry; FTC Chairman Paul Rand Dixon, and representatives of the National Association of Broadcasters and several health and education associations. The Committee will consider two bills, one spon- sored by Washington Senator Warren Magnuson and calling for warnings on packages and disclosure of tar and nicotine content, and the other sponsored by Oregon Senator Maurine Neuberger and calling for warnings on both packages and advertisementso Texas governor John Connally's proposed tax increase of 1 cent on every pack of cigarettes is slated to meet active opposition from two state tobacco organizations, the TATD and the TMVA. Spokesmen for the groups listed these reasons for their opposition: (1) the tax increase would encourage bootleggers and decrease state revenue, (2) wholesalers' state tax would be increased from $4$ to $54, and (3) the Texas tax would be the highest in the country. Virtually the same situation exists 3,n New York, where Governor Rockefeller has proposed doubling the cigarette tax. The proposal is opposed by a special Committee Against Unjust Cigarette Taxes headed by M. L. Fleischer, managing director of the Retail Tobacco Dealers America. Already about half the price of a pack of cigarettes in New York is tax. New York is also considering a cigarette labeling bill, as are South Dakota and Washington. A Nevada legislator has introduced a bill calling for a 50 per cent reduction 5.n cigarette of wholesalers' state tax discount. On a slightly more cheerful note, the Massachusetts legisla- ture turned down four bills designed to curb smoking. President Johnson's budget for the new fiscal year Includes $4.6 million for over-all tobacco research. (Tobacco's February 12 issue ponders Johnson's silence on the recent Health Depart- ment report on cigarette smoking; the February 19 issue advances a possible answer.) Foreign Cigarette Production and Consumption The news this month consists largely of reports of affiliations and licensing agreements between tobacco companies and tobacco-equipment companies, an indication of the international character of the tobacco industry. N. V. De1i-Maatschappi and Koch Scheltema N.V., internationa.lly known Dutch tobacco companies, have announced they will become closely affiliated; the agreement provides for an exchange of shares between the companies and directors of each company will be nominated to the board of the other, although each company will continue to operate separately under Yts own board of directors. Molins Machine Company has entered into a licensing agreement with the Japan Monopoly Corpora- tion to supply cigarette-making machines and other equipment worth more than 317 million pounds; this reflects a"sweeping modernization program" under which four new factories, in which most of the new equipment will be used, will be opened. Molins' agents were Marubeni-lida Company, Ltd. The British company plans to demonstrate its machines at the liritish Exhibition in Tokyo this year. P. Lorillard has licensed Godfrey Phillips Pty. Ltd. to produce Kent filters in Australia, its mandated territories, and Antaretic areas, making its twelfth such agreement in twelve foreign countries of five continents. Production has already begun in Victoria. Liggett & Myers has announced that both regular and king-size L & M filters to be sold at com- petitive prices are now being manufactured by La Tabaca_l.ers. Mexicana in Mexico City. The ciga- rettes, now being distributed to wholesalers a,nd scheduled for retail sale the week of March 1, wi11 be introduced to the public by an advertising cacnps,ign beginning also around March 1. Norway's cigarette sales dropped 9 per cent and French consumption showed signs of leveling off in 1964. In West Germany filter cigarettes comprised 80 per cent of the market, the manufacture of Oriental cigarettes decreased from 1963, and December production increased 14+ per cent over November production. 01/qt /1„ 3 ~ Page 2
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The $outh African government reported that excise duties on tobacco products between April 1, 1963, and March 31, 1964, showed an increase of $7.42 million over the 1962-1963 period. Canada's DominionBureau~of Statistics reported a 3.9 per cent decrease in tax-paid cigarette withdrawals for January of 1965 as compared to the year before. Canada's Benson & Hedges initiated an "'i.nstant gift" campaign on behalf of its Belvedere filter cigarettes. About one out of nine packages will contain coupons which can be redeemed~for prizes ranging from auto- mobiles to electric toothbrushes. Advertising stresses that smokers buy Belvederes because they like them, however, and not because of the gifts. Commercials for this promotion were filmed~in England at Woburn Abbey, the ancestral home of the Dukes of Bedford. Belgium's production of tobacco products rose 5.1 per cent dzring the first half of 1964. Cigarettes, cigars, and cigarillos increased more than enough to offset decreases in smoking tobacco, snuff, and chewing tobacco. Excerpts from reports of the Foreign Agricultural Service provide information on various aspects of tobacco production and consumption in Jordan, Yugoslavia, Italy, and Canada; the text of Ireland's Tobacco Advertising Code, adopted in the latter part of 1964, is also included. In an attempt to recognize the contributions made to the international tobacco industry by individuals, an article from Tabak-Journal International out]lining the career and achieve- ments of Mr. Lennert Stahl, manager of the tobacco machines division of Arenco AB in Sweden, has been included. Page 2a
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DOMESTIC CIGARETTE P'RODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION /
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Cette givcSales Plose 51°i° In Derl..ember Over '6 2.2% I ncrease Is Recorded For Six Mos. 37 Jurisdictions Show Advances in December From the Year Earlier RICHMOND; VA., Frid'ay-Sales of' cigarettes in December, 1964, as meas- ured by taxes collected on these sales in the 48 states and the District of Co* lumbia where levies are imposed'; rose 5.8 per cent over thelevell of the com. parable year-earlier periodl, it was and nounced here this week by the Tobacco Tax Council. Volume in the final month of last year was pegged at 2,082,162,000 pack- ages, against' 1,968,772,000 packages in December of 1963: Of the 49 taxing jurisdictions,,the Council's data indicated', 37 showed in- creases and 1l1 refleeted' declines init'he December; 1964, period' when compared' with the same month the year before. Colorado,, it was noted; did not' im, pose a cigarette tax in December, 1i963. Cumulative figures on the volume of cigarettes taxed for the first half of the fiscal year -July through Decem- ber - were 2.2 per cent higher than those of the corresponding period a year earlier. The six-month total for the July-to- December, 1964, period was 11,976,903,- 000 -packages, as against 11.721,281i 000 packages for the same six months the year before. A total of 33 of the 49 jurisdictions; again excluding Col'orad'o„ experience& increases and 15 had declines in the volume of cigarettes taxed during the first six months of the current fiscal year as compared with~ the same peri- od a year earlier. For the month of December„ major gains were scored by North Dakota, up 24.9 per cent; Missouri, 17.3 per cent' ahead of'~ a year earlier; and Wiscon. sin, a gain of 17.0 per cent from the levellof December, 1963. Severest losses for the month were reported by South Dakota, off 18:6 per cent', Wyoming, down 10.0 per cent; an& Hawaii, 8.8 per cent below the year,-earlier level. The jurisdictions showing the strong- est gains in the July-December„ 1964, period included Utah, with an 8:9 per eentincrease;,Nebraska„an advance of 7.1 per cent; and New Mexico; up 6.0 per cent from the, corresponding peri- od the year before. The latest losses for the six-month, period were recorded in South Dakota, down 8:1 per cent; Kansas 7.2 per cent;, and Rhode Island, 6.2 per cent. The data released by the Tobacco Tax Council! are shown in t'he accom- panying, table. 3 Level U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Pages 1 & 24 jj l , ,;-4 l ~ L- U . S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19 5- Pages 1 & 24 Cigarette Output Rises 12.4 Per Cent in Dec. Taxed Removals of Cigarettes Up 8.8 Per Cent In the Final Month of 1964 Compared With Year Earlier; Cigars Reflect Strong Increases All major categories of tobacco prod- uets-cigarettes, cigars and smoking tobacco-enjoyed! advances in December of last year compared with the same period of 1963, according ,to data re- Iease& Friday by the Tobacco Mer- chants Association. The TMA data also indicated that ci- gars and smoking tobacco had strong increases in both production and taxable removals for the 12 months of 1964, while cigarettes experienced small de- clines in both areas. For the month of December, produc- tion of cigarett'es totaled 42,30b,103;941 units, an advance of 12.4 per cent from the level of 37,638,060,228' cigarettess reported for the final month of 1963. Taxable removals were 39;898,2Fi9,690: cigarettes inl December, up 8.8 per cent from the 36,683,870,454 units of the same month a year earlier. Output' of large cigars in December rose to 539,1i115;959 units, an increase of 16.6 per cent over the 462,464;454 cigars of the final 1063 month. Taxable re- movals totaled 413,913,539 units in De- ceraber, 23.5 per cent'ahead of the year- before level of 407;391,903 cigars. Production of small cigars in Decem- ber reflected a gain of' 49.4 per cent, while taxable removals showed an in- crease of 95,4 per cent in this same period. December output of smoking tobacco was 5,572,187 pounds, compared with 4,863,392 pounds in December, 1963, while taxable removals were 5,670,349 pounds in December of 1964' against 5,094,066 pounds in the corresponding period of the preceding year. For calendar 1964, production of ciga-' rettes was placed at 540;907 million un- its, off 1.8 per cent from the 550,56.8 million of 1963: Taxable removals amounted to 497,446 million cigarettes, against 509,588 million in 1963, a decline of 2.4 per cent for the periodi Output of large cigars in 1964 totaled 8.727 billion units, an increase of 31.2 per cent over the 6.652 billion cigars of the year before. Taxable removals,, at 8.105 billion units in 1964, were up 23.5 per cent over the 6.564 billion ci- gars of the previous 12'months. Stnall cigars r-gistered a 246.0 per cent increase in production for last year compared' with 1963„ the TMA data indicated; Taxable removals of small cigars for the year reflected an advance of 255.7 per cent. Production of manufactured tobacco and snuff in the 12 months of 1964 amounted to 1i80;051,000 pounds, up ~ 7.5 per cent from the 167,524,000 pounds of~ the year, before. Taxable removals, ~at' 175,730,000 pounds for 1964, were up 6.8 per cent from 19G3'§ level of' boll. 1•64',510;00'0 pounds, it was reported. The Internal Revenue Service statis- ~ tics on which the TMA report is basedN are shown, in, the accompanying table._~T--- Page 3
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~oC7ace~~e Sales Rose 5.U% In December Over '63 Level 2.2% I ncrease Is Recorded For Six Mos. 37 Jurisdictions Show Advances in December From the Year Earlier RICHMOND, VA., Frid'ay- Salesof cigarettes in December, 1964, as meas, ured by taxes collected on these sales in the 48 states and the District of Co+ lumbia where laviesare imposed, rose 5.8 per cent over the levell of the com« parable year-earlier period, it was an~ nounced here this week by the Tobacco Tax Council. Volume in the final month of last year was pegged at 2,p82,162,000 pack- ages, against 1i,968,772;000 packages in December of 19631 Of, the 49 taxing jurisdictions, the Council's data indicated~ 37 showed in- creases and 1l1 refleoted' declines init'he December, 1964, period1when compared with the same month the year before. Colorado„ it was notedi did not'im: pose a cigarette tax in December, 196.3. Cumulative figures on the,volume of cigarettes taxed for the first half of the fiscal year-July through Decem- ber - were 2.2 per cent higher than those of the corresponding period a year earlier. The six-month total for the July-to- December, 1964, period was 11,976,903,- 000 packages, as against 11,721,281,000 packages for the same six monthsthe year before. A total of 33 of the 49 jurisdictions, again excluding,Colorad'o, experienced'increases and 15 had declines in the volume of'cigarett'es taxed during the first six months of the current fiscal' year as compared wit'h, the same peri- od a year earlier. For the mont'h, of December,, major gainswere scored by North, Dakota, up 24.9 per cent; Missouri, 17.3 per cent ahead of' a year earlier; and' Wiscon- sin, a gain of 17.0 per cent from the leveli of December, 1963. Severest losses for the month were reported by. South Dakota, off 18:6 per cent'; Wyoming, down 10.0 per cent; and: Hawaii, 8.8 per cent below the [J , S. Tobacco Jol.irriall year-earlier level. The jurisdictions showing the strong- ,est gains in the July-December„ 1964, period included Utah, with an 8.9 per eentincrease;:Nebraska„an advance of 7.1 per cent; and New Mexicoi, up 6.0 per cent from the corresponding peri- od the year before. The latest losses for the six-month, period were recorded in South Dakota, down~ 8:1 per cent; Ransas7:2 percent;, and Rhode Island, 6.,2 per cent. The data released by the Tobacco Tax Councili are shown in the accom- panying, table. February 1b, 1965 - Pages 1& 24 U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 -.Pages 1 & 24 Cigarette Output Rises 12.4 Per Cent in Dec. Taxed Removals of Cigarettes Up 8.8 Per Cent In the Final Month of 1964 Compared With Year Earl'ier; Cigars Reflect Strong Increases All major categories of tobacco prod- ucts-cigarettes; cigarsand smokingg tobacco-enjoyed' advances in December of last year compared with the same period of' 1963, according to data re- Ipased Friday by the Tobacco Mer- chants Association. The TMA data also indicated that ci- garsand smoking tobacco had strong increases in both production and taxable removals for the 12 months of 1964, while cigarettes experienced small de- clines in both areas. For the month of December, produc- tion of cigarettes totaled 42,30fi,103;941 units, an advance of 12.4 per cent from the, level of 37,638,060,225 cigarettesreported for the final month of 1963. Taxable removals were 39,898,269,690 cigarettes in:D'ecember, up 8.8 per cent from the 36,683,870,454 units of the same month a year earlier. Output' of large cigars in December rose to 539,1iU5;569 units, an increase of 16.6 per cent' over the 462,464,454 cigars of the final 1063 month. Taxable re- movalg totaled 44+3,913;539 units in De- cemlier, 23.5 per, cent ahead of the year- before level of 407;391,9(A3 cigars. Production of small cigars in Decem, ber reflected a gain of 49.4 per cent~, while taxable removals showed an in• crease of 954 per cent in this same period. December output of smoking tobacco was 5,572,187 pounds, compared with 4,863,342 pounds in December, 1963; while taxable removals were 5,670,349 pounds in December of 1964' against 5,094,066 pounds in the corresponding period of the preceding year. For calendar 1964, production of ciga-' rettes was placed ati 540;90'T million un- its, off 1.8 per cent' from the 550,568 million of 1963. Taxable removals amounted to 497,446 million cigarettes, against 509,588 million in 1963,,a decline of 2.4 per cent for the period: Output of large cigars in 1964 totaled 8.727 billion units, an increase of 31.2 per cent over the 6.652 billion cigars of the year before. Taxable removals, at 8.105 billion units in 1964', were up 23.5 per cent over the 6.564 billion ci- garls of the previous 12' months. .Small cigars r-gistered a 246.0 per cent increase in production for last year compare& with 1963„ the TMA data indicated. Taxable removals of small cigars for the year reflected an advance of 255.7 per cent. Production of manufactured tobacco and snuff in the 12 months of 1964 amounted to 1,80;Q51,000 pounds, up~ ~.` 7.5 per cant from the 167,524,000 pounds ~ ~ of the year befnre. Taxable removals, at' 175,730;000 pounds for 1964, were up 6.8 per cent from 1963"s level of ~ 164,51-0;0c0 pounds, it was reported. ~ The Internal Revenue Service statis- N tics on which the TMA report is based: are shown im the accompanying table ._::~___ Page 3
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Advertisin A e March 8, 1965 Big Week tor TV Nets as Cigaret Sponsors Sign NewYoaK, Feb. 25-lit was a roU- licking week of sales for the 1965- '66 season at the television netl- works. As AIIC: was touting a"$32,000,- 000" single order from Bristol- Myers and its Clairol subsidiary. (see separnte story, Page 74), NBCC was sweeping in, sales from, a num- ber of big spenders, to the tune of "$7 25.000;000?'NBC's "Week That Was" has been, studded with a number of hand~ some buys by the cigaret compa- nies. Liggett & Myers,, through J. Walter Thompson Co.,,put its mon- eydowni for an alternate-week half-hour of' the newly scheduled, hour-long comedy, "Wackiest' Ship in the Army." Liggett & Myers also bought alternate weeks of another newly scheduled series, "Mr., Rob- erts,"a half-hour entry, in addi- tiom to an every-other-week half- hour of the long-running, "Dr. Kil- dare," which is expected~ t'o split into two segments next season, running on, Monday and Tuesday nights. • Another cigaret maker picking up major sponsorship was R. J. Reynolds, which, through William Esty Co., bought one-half of "Get Smart'4" and "Meet Mona Mc- Clusky," another half-hour situa. tion-comedy, starring Juliet Prowse, a show not included in the network's preview to agencies a few weeks ago. Post-Keyes-Gardner put some Brown & Williamson, money on NBC's "Run for YourLife;"tlakingan alter:nate-week half-hour of the drama starring Ben Gazzara. Brown & Williamson also bought participations in "I Spy" and. "Daniel Boone." American Tobacco chose the lone shows, placing, partiripations in Saturday movies and the Wednevday movie (which is ex- pc(ted to movet'o Tuesday night)~, a=: well as "Virginian"' and "Con- vm . P. Lorillard Co. placed partici- pations in the "Dean Martin Show" and "Mam from U. N. C. 1•. E." The nrcnefes for American Tobacco are Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & i li;ivlcs and BBDOt Lorillard's buy iti as through Lennen & Newell. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Pages 1 & 25 Tobacco Industry's Labor Costs Rise 4.2% in December Tobacco Workers Earn 6.3 Per Cent More In Average Work Week WASHINGTON!, D. C., Tuesday - The cost of labor for d'omest~ic manu- facturers of tobacco products, leaf' stemmers and redryers in December of 1964 advanced 4.2 per cent over the 1ev- ~el reported for the same month a year earlier, according, to data released to- day by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Tobacco industry personnel earned an, average of $1.98 per hour in, Decem- ber of'last year, topping 1-;)th the $I1.90 of~ December, 196:, and the $1.94 of November, 1964. Average weekly earnings, it was re- ported, increased to $79.60; a rise of 613 per cent over the $74.86 average& by industry workers in the comparable 1963 month. Weekly earnings in N'o- vember of last year stood at $74.11. The average work week was longer in 1964 than in 1963, the BLS statis- ties indicated, with the December work week averaging, 40.2 hours, as against. 39.4 hours in the same month a year earlier. In November of last year the work week was 38.2:hours. r , Advertising Age March Consolidated Cigar Reports Sales Rose 20°o in '64 Consolidated Cigar Corp.,, New York, reported~sales in 1964 totaled $158,472,183, up: 20r",, fiorn $',132,- 012,986~ in 1963. Net earnings were up 45'7e t'o $12,548,113' ft•om~ the 1963 total of $',8;044,009. Fourth- quarter figures set a record with sales of $41,769,772, up 17~io over $35,571,925 for that periodl in 1963, and's earnings of $5,247,787, up 40 ~ over $3;756,)36 in the 1963 period. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 16 Smoking, Chewing Tobacco Increased 13 ioin Value WASHINGTON, D!C. - Tobacco companies produced chcwingand smoking tobacco (excliiding cigar and cigarette tobacco)i valiied at $218 mil- liom during 1963-13 per cent higher in value than five years ago. The figure appears in a report of the 1963 Census of Manufactures: re- eentlyi'ssued bythe United States De- partment of Commerce's Bureau~ of the Census. The report shows that fine cut chew- ing, and smoking tobacco, in this cate- gory of tobacco; registered the greatest increase in value of production-,50i per cent-over 1958, the year of the previ- onsCensusofl ?vianufaetrues: Twist chewing tobacco, on, the other hand,, suffered a 13 per cent decline since the earlier census year. Most of the activity in this, industry took place in the SouthiAtlanticStates, the report shows. The report, "Chewing and' Sinoking Tobacco," MC63(P)-21A-3, is f'or sale by the Bureau of the Census, Wash- ington{ D.C: 20233, and U.S.. Depart- ment of Commerce Field Offices. The price is 10 cents. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 10 American Snuff Com;Dany Sales, Earnings Climb NASII\'ILLG, TFNN'. - American Snuff C:ompanyand its subsidiaries had am increase in both sales and net earn- ings to an all-time high in 1964, it w•as reported here last' week by Martin JI. Condbn, President of' the company. Net earninfis; on a consolidated basis, amoiinYto •52,950,97'7for1964, am in- crease of 16.9 0 over the $2',5L3;5-12 shown a vc•.ar earlier. Earnings per share of commoni stock rose to a record 52.01 from the 51.70 per share of 1963, Net sales f'or 1964 totaled $36;692,110, an increase of 6.5 per cent from the pre- vinusvear's sales of $34,4571,057. During the past decade the American Snuff Company has been pursuing a progriam rof dl'vcrsific•ation through the acquisition of a number of companies. Mr. Condon said the company will progr.lm cnntinuc its diversification through the acquisitiomm of additional companies:augumented by the probable introduction of some internally devel- oped new products. Page 4
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Advertising, e March 8, 1965 Big Week f or TV Nefs as Cigaret Sponsors Sign Nekv YoRK„Feb. 25-It was a rol- licking week of sales for the 1965- '66 season at the televisiom net- works. As ABC' was touting a"$32.000,- 000" single order from Bristol- Myers and its Clairol subsidiary (see separate story, Page 74), NBC'was sweeping im sales from a num- ber of big spenders, to the tune of "$125.000,000!" NBC's "Week That Was"'has been studded with a number of hand- some buys by the cigaret compa-nies. Liggett & M!vers„ through J. Walter Thompson Co.- put it's mon- e_v down for an alternate-week half-hour of the newly scheduled, hour-long, comed~y "Wackiest Ship in the Army." Liggett & Myers also bought alternate weeks of another newly scheduled series, "Mr. Rob- erts," a half-hour entry, in addi- tion~ to an every-other-week half- hour of the long-running, "Dr. Kil'~ dare," which is expected! t'o split into two segments next season, running on Monday and Tuesday nights.  Another cigareb maker picking up major sponsorship, was R. J. Reynolds, which, through William Esty Co., bought one-half of "Get Smarts" and "Meet Mona Mc- Clusky," another half,hour situa, tion-comedy, starring: Juliet Prowse, a show not included in the network's preview to agencies a few weeks ago. Post-Keyes-Gardner put some Brown & Williamson money on. NBC's "Run for Your Life;" taking an alternate-week half-hour of the drama starring Ben Gazzara. Brown & Williamson also bought participations in "I Spy" and "Daniel Boone." Americam Tobaoao chose the lnne shows, placing, participations in Saturday movies and the Wrdhesday movie (which is ex- hce•ted to move to Tuesday night), a•c w•ell as "Virginian"' and "Con- v0 V  P. Lorillard Co. placed! partici- I ~etions in the "Dean Martin Show" anri"Man, f'rom U. N'. C. Ti.. E." The;ieencies for American Tobacco are Snllivains Stauffer, Colwell & liavlrs and BBDO; Lorillard's buy %ati through Lennen & Newell. 4 U. S . TobaccolJourn:al. February 1, &y 1965 - Pages 1 & 25 Tobacco Industry's Labor Costs Rise 4.2% in December Tobacco Workers Earn 6.3 Per Cent More In Average Work Week WASHINGTON, D. C., Tuesday - The cost' of labor for domestic manu- facturers of tobacco products, leaf stemmers and:redryers in December of 1964 advanced 4.2 per cent over the 1ev ~el reported for the sattie month~ a year earlier, according to data released to- day by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Tobacco industry personnel earned an average of $1.98 per hour in Decem- ber of! last year, topping >•`.)th the, $1.90 of December, 1i96$, and the $1.94 of November, 1964. Average weekly earnings, it was re- ported„ increased to $79.60, a rise of 6:3 per cent over the $74.86 average& by industry workers in the comparable 1963 month. Weekly earnings in No- vember of'~ last year stood at $74.111. The average work week was longer in 1964 than in 1963, the BLS statis- tics indicat'ed, with the December work week averaging, 40.2 hours, as against 39.4 hours in the, same month a year earlier. In November of last year the work week was 38.2!hours. Advertising Age March 8, 1965 Consolidated Cigar Reports Sales Rose 20°a in '64 Consolidate& Cigar Corp., New York, report'ed sales in 11964 totaled $158,472,1831 up~ 20r7, from $132,- 012',986 in 1963. Net earnings were up 4517, to $12,548,113' from: the 1963 total of $8,644,009. Fourth- quarter figures set a record with sales of $41,769,772, up 17% over $35,571,925 flor that period in 1963, and earnings ofi$5,247,787, up:40 17~ over $3,756,136 in the 1963 period. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 16 Smoking, Chewing Tobacco Increased 13'/(, in Value «'ASHINGTON„ D.C. - Tobacco companies produced chewing and smoking tobacco (excluding cigar and cigarette tobacco)~ valued at $218 mil- lion during 1963-13 per cent: . higher in value than five years ago. The figure appears in a report of the 1963 Census of Manufactures: re- cently issuedl by the Unitedl States De- partment of Comrnerce'sBureatu of the Census. The report shows that fine cut chew- ing and smoking tdbacco, in this cate- goryof tobacco, registered the greatest increase in value of production-50! per eent-over 1958, the year of the previ, oiis Census of Nhmufnctrues. Twist chewing, tobacco, on the other hand, suffered a 13 per cent decline since the earlier census year. Most of the actiivity in this industry took place in the South Atlantic States, the report shows. The report, "Chewing and' Stnoking Tobacco," MC63(P), 21A-3, is f'or sale by the Bureau of the Census, NVash- ingtonl D.C: 20233, and U.S. Depart- ment of Commerce Field Offices. The price is 10 cents. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 10 American Snuff Company Sales, Earnings Climb i`iASiIV°ILLF, TFNN'. - American Snnlf Company and its subsidiaries had am increase in both sales and net earn- ings to an all-time high in 1964, it was reported here last'~ week by Martin JI. Condon, President of the company. Net c•arninfis; on a consolidotud basis, amount to •S2,950,977 for 19634, an in- c•rcase of 16.91 over the $2;523,i-32 shown a year earliur. Earning5 per share of common stock rose to a record $2.01 from the .51.70 per share of 1963. Net salesfbr~ 196-1 totalbd $36,692,110, an increase of Cb.5per ce•nt from the pre- viousvezir's sales of $34,457,,087. Diining the past'dccade:the American SinifF Company hasbecn pursuing a program of diversification through the ac•.ctuisition, of! a number of comhanies. \fr. Condon said the company will continue its divcrsilication program through the, acquisition of additional companies augumented by the probable introduction of some internally d'cvel- oped new products. Page 4'
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Advertisin , e March 6) 1965 Big Week ior TV Nets as Cigaref Sponsors Sign NFtv YoRK„Feb. 25-It was a rol- licking week of sales for the 1965- '66 season at the televisi'om net- works. As ABC was touting a"$32,000,- 000"' single order from Bristol- Myers and it's Clairol subsidiary (see sepnratestory, Pnge74)~, NBCC was sweeping in sales from a num- ber of big, spenders, to the tune of 11$125.000,000i" NBC'§ "Week Thati Was'"hasbeen studded with~ a number of hand- some buys by the cigaret compa- nies. Liggett & Myers,, through Ji. Walter ThompsonlCo., put its mon- ey down for an alternate-week half-hour of the newly scheduled, hour-long comedy "Wackiest Ship in, theArmy." Liggett& Myers also, bought alternate weeks of another newly scheduled series, "Mr. Rbb- erts;" a half-hour entry, in adtli- tion: to an every-other-week half- hour of the long-running, "Dr. Kil~- dare," which is expected' to split into two segments next season, running on Monday and Tuesday nights.  Another cigaret maker picking up major sponsorship was R. J. Reynolds, which, through William EstyCo., boughtone-hal'f of "Get Smart'4" and "Meet Mona Mc- Clusky," another half,hour situa- tion-comedy, starring Juliet Prowse, a show not included in the network's preview to agencies a few weeks ago. Post-Keyes-Gardner put some Brown & Williamson money on NBC's "Run for Your Life;" taking an alternate-week half-hour of the drama starring Ben Gazzara. Brown & Williamson also bought par,ticipations in "I Spy" and "Daniel Boone." Americam Tobacco chose the lnne shows, placing participations in Saturday movies and the Weclhesday movie (which is ex- pee•tedtomove to Tuesday night), a<; ticell as "Vifginian"' and "Con- ~~r „  N. Lorillard Co. placed! partici- I,atinns in the "Dean Martin Show" and "Mam from U. N'. C. Ii•. E." Theac;encic•s for American Tobacco are Sant Stauffer, Colwell & ltavl'rs and BBDO; Loril9ard's buy ~t as through Lennen & Newell. l / './-_/ L.7 ? i, U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1'6, 1965- Ps:ges 1 & 25 Tobacco Industry's Labor Costs Rise 4.2% in December Tobacco Workers Earn 6.3 Per Cent More In Average Work Week WASHINGTON, D. C., Tuesday - The cost'~ of labor for domestic manu- facturers of tobacco products, leaf stlemmers an&redryers in December of 1964 advanced 42 per cent over the lev, ,el reported for the sarhe month~ a year earlier, accordiogt'o data released to- day by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Tobacco industry personnel earned an average of $1.98 per hour in Decem- ber of~ last year, topping K-Ah the $1.90 of December, 1196:, and the $1.94 of November,, 1964. Average weekly earnings, it' was re- ported„ increased to $79.60, a rise of 6.3 per cent over the $74.86 average& by industry workers in the comparable 1963 month. Weekly earnings in No- vember ofl last year stood at $74.11i. The average work week was longer in 1964 than in 1963; the BLS statis- tics indicat'ed, with the December work week averaging 40.2 hours, as against'~ 39.4 hours in the, same month a year earlier. In Nbvember of last year the work week was 38.2' hours. (.' 21% Advertising e March 6, 1965 Consolidated Cigar Reports Sales Rose 20% in "64 Consolidate& Cigar Corp., New York, reported sales in 11964 totaled $158,472,1831 up 20!"c from $L132,- 012;986 in 1963 Net earnings were up 45c", to $12,548,113'. from the 1963 total of $8,644,009. Fourth- quarter figures set a record with sales of $41,769,772, up 17% over. $35,571,925~ for that period in 1963, and earnings ofi$5,247,787, up:40 '7, over $3,756,136 in the 1963 period. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 16 Smoking, Chewing Tobacco Increased 13;o ; in Value WASHINC;TON„ D,C., - Tobaccoo companies produced chewing and smoking tobacco (excluding cigar and cigarette tobacco) valued at 8218mil-lion during~ 1963-13 per cen6 higher in value than five years ago. The figure appears in a report of the 1963 Census of Manufactures re- cently issuedi bythe UnitediStates De- partment of Commerce's Bureau, of the Census. The report shows that fine cut chew- ing and smoking tobacco, in this cate- goryof tobacco„ registered the greatest increase in value of production-50 per eent-over1958, the year of the previ, ons Census of Manufactures. Twist ehewing, tobacco, on the other hand, suffered a 13 per cent declinesinc•e the earlier census year. Most of the actiivity in this industry took place in the South Atlantic States, the report shows. The report, "Chewing and Smoking Tobacco," MC63(P), 21A-3, is for sale by the Bureau of tbe Census, Wash- ington; D.C. 20233, and'LI.S., Depart- ment of Commerce Field Offices. The price is 10 cents. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 10 American Snuff Company Sales, Earnings Climb NASII\°ILLE, TFNN'. - American Snuff Company and its subsidiaries had an~ inc•rease in both, sales and net eatn- inbs to, an all-time hig{i in 1964, it was reported hcrelast'~ week by Martin JI. Condbn, President of the company. Net c•arnings, on aconsolidirtcrd basis, amonnt to $2,950,977 for 1964, an in- crease of 16.9 0 over the $2;523,5-1° shownayearearlior. Earning.spe.r share of common, stock rose to a record 82.01 from the 51.70 per share of 1963. Net salesfor 1964 totalcd $36,692,1110, an increase of 6.5 per ccnt from the pre- vi<ous, vear's salcsofl $34,457,087. C Dnnirng the pastCdccadethe American Sinifl Company has been pursuing a ~„ program of diversific•ation t}ironbh the (~ accluisitinn~ of' a number of companies. '~ Mr. Condon said the company will continue its diversification program ~ through the, acquisition of additional t.;, comp.mies auf,Tument'ed by the probable ~. introduction of some internally d'evel-„ oped new products. Page 4.
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Advertisin A e March 8, 1965 Big Week f or TV Nets as Cigaret Sponsors Sign Ne:w YofsK,,FCb. 25-It was a roll- licking week of salesf'orthe 1965- '66 season at the television netl- works. As AI3C' was touting a"g32,000,- 000" single order from Bristol- Myers and its Clairol subsidiary (see separate storU, Page 74), NBC'was sweeping in sales from, a; num- ber of big spenders, to the tune of "$125.000;000!" NBC's "Week That Was"'has been studded with a number of hand- some buys by the cigaret compa- nies. Liggett & Myers,, through J. Walter Thompson Co., put its mon- ey dowm foran alternate~weekhalf-hour of the newly scheduled, hour-long comedy "Wackiest Ship in the Army." Liggett & Myers also bought alternate weeks of another newly scheduled series, "Mr. Rob- erts;" a half-hour entry, in adtii-tiom to an every-other-week half- hour of the long-running,"Dr. Kil, dare," which is expected' t'o split into two segments next season, running orr Monday and Tuesday nights.  Another cigaret, maker picking up major sponsorship~ was R. J. Reynolds, which, through William Esty Co., bought one-half of "Get Smart4" and "Meet Mona Mc- Clusky," another half-hour situa, tion-comedy, starri~ng: Juliet Prowse, a show not included in the network's preview to agencies a few weeks ago. Post-Keyes-Gardner put some Brown & Williamson, money on NBC's "Run for Your Life;" taking an alterinate-week half-hour of the drama starring Ben Gazzara. Brown & Williamson also bought participations in "I Spy" and "Daniel Boone." American Tobacco chose the lnne shows, placing, participations in Saturday movies and the Wrdriesday movie (which is ex- t)ec!te(l to movet'o Tuesday niglit)~, a ; well as "Virginian"' and "Con- vm'  P. Lorillard Co. placed partici- pnfions in the "Dean Martin Show" anrl "Mam from U. N. C. L. E." The ae;encies for American Tobacco are Siillivan, Stauff~er, Colwell & ; Iinvles and BBDO; Lorillard's buy , as through Lennen & Newell. <,; U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1d, 19b5 - Pages 1 & 25 Tobacco Industry's Labor Costs Rise 4.2% in December Tobacco Workers Earn 6.3 Per Cent More In Average Work Week WASHINGTON, D. C., Tuesdtry - The cost of labor for dbmestic manu- facturers of tobacco products, leaf' stemmens and redryers in December of 1064 advanced 4.2 per cent over the lev- lel reported for the sartme month a year earlier, according, to data released to- day by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Tobacco industry personnel earned am average of $1.98 per hour in Decem- ber of~ last year, topping roth the $1.90 of~ December, and the $1.94 of November, t964. Average weekly earnings, it was re- ported„ increased to~$79.60; a rise of 6!3 per cent over the $74.86 averaged'& by industry workers in the comparable 1963 month. Weekly earnings in Nb- vember of last year stood at $74.11. The average work week was longer in 1964 than in 1963, the BLS statis- tics indicated, with the December work week averaging, 40.2 hours„ as against. 39.4 hours in the same month a year earlier. In November of last year the work week was 38.2' hours. Advertising Age March!8, 1965 Consolidated Cigar Reports Sales Rose 20% in '64 Consolidated Cigar Corp.,, New York, reported~ sales in li964totaled $158,472,183, up20'7,, from $',132,- 012,986~ in 1963. Net earnings were up 45% t'o $12,548,113' frnm~ the 1963 total of $,8;044,009. Fourth- quarter figures set a record with sales of $41,769,772, up17170over $35,571,9251 for that period! in 1963, and& earnings ofl $5,247,787, up 40 17~ over $3;7564136 in the 1963 period.. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 16 Smoking, Chewing Tobacco Increased 13''Jo, in Value WASHINGTON, D!C. - Tobaecocompanies produced chewing, and smoking tobacco (exclnding~ cigar and cigarette tobacco)i valued at 8218 mil- lion during 1963-13 per cent higher in value than five years ago. The figure appears in a report of the 1963 Census of Manufactures: re- centlvv i'ssued by the United States De- partment of Cbmmerce's Bureau~ of the Census:The report shows that fine cut chew- ing and smoking tcrbacco; in this cate- gory of tobacco;registered the greatest increase in value of production-S0' per cent-over 1958, the vear, of the previ- ons Census of Mnnufachres. Twist chewing tobacco, on, t'he other hand,, suffered a 13 per cent decline since the earlier census yeari. Most of the actiNity in this industry took place in the South Atlantic States, the report shows. The report, "Chewing and! Smoking Tobacco," 11iC63(P)-21A-3, is for sale by the Birreau of the Census, Wash- ingtony D.C; 20233, and U.S. Depart- ment of Commerce Field Offices. The price is 10 cents. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 10 American Snuff Company Sales, Earnings Climb ;\iASII\'1LLE, TFNN'. - American Snuff Company and its subsidiaries had am increase in both sales and net earn- ings to an all-time high in 1964, it was reported hcrelast'week by Martin JI. Condbn, President of the compam: Net carninf;s; on a consolidatvd basis, amoont to $2,950,977 for 1964, am in- crcasc of 16.91 over the $2',523,542 shown a ycar earlier. Earnings per share of common stock rose to a record 52.01 from the SL.70 per share of 1963, Net sales for 1964 totalcd $',36;692,1 L0, an incrrase of 6.5 per cent from the pre- vinusvear's sales of $34,457i,fDb7. During the past decade the American Sniiff Company has been pursuing a prowiam of diversification through the acciuitiition of a number of companies. Mr. Condon said the company will continue its diversification prot;ram thruuf;h the aceluisition, of' additional compamies augumented by the probable introduction of some internally devel- oped new product's. Page 4
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Advertisin , e March 8, 1965 Big Week f or TV Nets as Cigaref Sponsors Sign NEw YoaK„Feb. 25-It was a rol- licking week of sales for the 1905- '66 season at the televisi'om net- works. As ABC was touting a"$32,000,- 000"' single order from Bristol- Myers and its Clairol subsidiary (see separate story, Pnge74~)!, NBC' was sweeping in sales from a num- ber of big, spenders, to the tune of "$ 125,000,0001" NBC's "Week Thatl Was'"hasbeen studded with~ a number of hand- some buys b,v the cigaret compa- nies. Liggett & Myers, through Ji. Walter ThompsomCo:,,put its mon- ey down for an alternate-week half-hour of the newly scheduled, hour-long comedy "Wackiest Ship im the Army." Liggett'.& Myers also bought alternate weeks of another newly scheduled series, "Mr. Rob- erts," a half-hour entry, in addi- tion to an every-other-week half- hour of the long-running "Dr. KilL. dare,"' which is expected to split', into two segments next season, running on Mondoy and Tuesday nights. • Another cigaret maker picking up major sponsorship wasR. J. Reynolds, which„ through William Esty Co., bought one-half of "Get Smart," and "Meet Mona Mc- Clusky;" another half,hour situa- tion-comedy, starring Juliet Prowse, a- show not included in the network's preview to agencies a few weeks ago. Post-Keyes-Gardner put some Brown & Williamsom money on NBC's "Run for Your Life;" takingg an alterinate-week half-hour of the drama starring Ben Gazzara. Brown & Williamson also bought par,ticipations in "I Spy"' and "Daniet Boone." American Tobacco chose the lnnc shows, placing, participations in Saturday movies and the Wedhesday movie (which is ex- t)ectcd to move t'o Tuesday night)y as w•ell as "Virg_inian"' and "Con- vm_  1'. l.,orillard Co: placed partici- I ~ations in the "Dean Martin Show" and"Man, from U. N,. C. D.. E." Thee avencies for American Tobacco are Su lli an, Stauffler, Colwell. & llavlrs and BBDO; Lorillard's buy ' Was through l.ennen & Newell. r / I ,i-,J~,,f z„i U. S. Tobacco Journal February 16, 19b5 - Pages 1 & 25 Tobacco Industry's Labor Costs Rise 4.2% in December Tobacco Workers Earn 6.3 Per Cent More In Average Work Week WASHINGTON, D. C., Tuesday - The cost'~ of labor for domestic manu- facturers of tobacco products, leaf stlemmersandl rodryers in December of 1964 advanced 4'.2 per cent over the lev- ,el reported for the sarSie month a year earlier, according to data released to- day by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Tobacco industryy personnel earned an average of $1.98 per hour in Decem- ber of last year, topping h•Dth the $1.90 of December, 1963, and the $1.94 of I`Tovember„ 1964. Average weekly earnings, itl was re- port'ed„ increased to $79.60, a rise of 6.3 per cent over the $74.86 averaged! by industry workers in the comparable 1963 month. Weekly earnings in No- vember of'~ last year stood at $74.11. The average work week was longer in 1964 than in 11963, the BLS statis- tics indicated', with: the December work week averaging 40:2 hours, as against 39.4 hours in; the same month a year earlier. In November of last year the work week was 38.2 hours. 1 Advertising e Marchid, 1965. Consolidated Cigar Reports Sales Rose 20% in '64Consolidated Cigar Corp.,, New York, reportedisales in 1964,totaled $158,472,1831 up 20C'd from $1132,- 012;986' in 1963. Net earnings were up 4517, t'o $12,548,113' from, the 1963 total of $'8,644,009. Fourth- quarter figures set a record with sales of $41,769,772; up 17% over $35,571,925,for that period' in 1963, and earnings ofi$5,247,787, up40~ -, over $3,75fi,136 in the 1963 period. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 16 Smoking, Chewing Tobacco Increased 13;'c in Value WASHINGTON, D,C., - Tobaccoo companics produced chewing and smoking tobacco (excluding cigar and cigarette tobacco) valued at 5218 mil- lion during, 1963-13 per cetrt, higher in value than five years ago. The figure appears in a report of the 1963 Census of 'Manufactures re- centl~~- issued by the Unit'ed! StatesDe- partment of Commerce's Bureau of the Census. The report shows that fine cut chew- ing and smoking tbbacco, in this cate- gory of tobacco,, registered the, greatest increase in value of production-50 per cent-ovsr 1958, the year of theprevi- ons Census of Manufachn•es. Twist chewing t'obacco, on the other hand, suffered'a 13 per cent declinesinc•e the earlier census year. blost of the activity in this industry took place in the South Atlantic States, the report shows, The report, "Chewing and Smoking Tobacco," b1C63('P)-2~1A-3, is forsalebu the Bureau of the Census, Wash- ington, D.C. 20233; and' U.S. Depart- ment of CommenceFielti Offices. The price is 10'cents. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 10 American Snuff Company Sales, Earnings Climb NASHVILLE, TENN. - American Smiff Company and! its subsidiaries had an: inarease in~ bot1v sales and net eanY- inbs to an all-time high in 1964, it w•as reported here, last week by Martin J,. Condbn, President of" thecompanv. Net earnings, on a consolidated basis, amonnt to $2,950,977 for 1964, an~ ine crcasc of 16,91 over the $2,523,5-}'2 shown aycar earlier. Earnings per share of' eommon stock rose to a record 52.01 from the SL70 per share, of 1963:, Net sales for 1964 totaled $36;G92,I10, an increase of 6.5 per cent from the pre- vinus vear s sales of $34,457~,0Sa'. Diu-ing thepastdccadetheAmcrican Si i ff Company has been pursuing a program of diversification throubh the acqnisitionof a number of companies. Mr. Condon said the companv will continue its diversification program through the acquisitioni of additional companies augumented by the probable introduction of some internally devel- oped new products. Page 4
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 19 5- Page 14 Comn, ettee in N. M. Re jects a Proposal Boosting Tax 25% Measure Is Defeated Seeking an Increase In Cigarette Levy SANTA FE, N. M.,, Tuesday (CS)- A posposal to increase the state ciga- rette tax by 25' per cent was turned down by the H'ouse Taxation and Reve- nue Committee. Only member of the committee voting against an unfavorable report! was the measure's sponsor, Rep. Eddie IBarboa, of Ber'nalillo,, it was reported. Rep. Barboa told the taxation and revenue committee that, the boost from 8: to 10 cents a pack would triple the amount of money available for locali recreation funds. Joe Clark of Santa Fe, secretary of the New Mexico Tobacco Dealers Asso- ciation, was quick to note that, this was a false assumption. He said sales ofcigarett'es declined after tlhelast tax boost was put into effiect by the state in 1961 and have never regained their past levell In 1960-61, under the old state tax rate of 5 cents a pack, there were 100,552,0W packs of cigarettes sold in New Mexico; the tobacco industry rep- resentative said. During 1963-64', there were 92,482,000 million, packs soldl thatt were taxed by the state, and this was the highest sales level since 1960-61 in spite of thereport of theeffect'~s of cigarette smoking on health, he as- serted. \`i U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 1965 - Page 12 ~ Cigarette Prices Vary ~ Widely in Miami Area ~ ~ %IIAhtI, FLA., F''riciay(CS)-A,, Mi- ~ 'aini'ktouri'st season builds up, the city's retail ei;~aretteprices seem to fluctuate drasticaliy.. Cirarettesare selling for 40 centsa pack in~ thiscity's Columbus Ilotel,29 ccnts per pack a block away at' the Latin American Center;,and„two blbcks frnm there, W~algrcen's Drug Storesare's scllinrthem at $','2,59 a carton, a spot chcckshowel. ~,! J ~~J =~.1 .,/,~ 4 U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 12 'Smoking Increase Noted By Authorities in Ohio COLUMBUS, 0.,, Thursday (:CS)- Ohioans are smoking more and the state is enjoying it more. Cigarette tax collections here in Ohio for the week ended January 31 were up $289,000, or 29.9 per centl, over a year ago„ according to State Treasurer John D. Herbert. However, for the seven months be- ginning last July 11, the collections are lagging by $269,000, or 0.69 per eent. Mr. Herbert' pointed out that if collections continue t'o gain during the remainder of the year ending June 30, they could be about $1 million more than the previous year. The impact of U. S. Surgeon Gen- eral Luther Terry's report linking smoking with cancer on tax collections has been gradually diminishing„ Mr. Herbert said, U. S. Tobacco Journal February 16', 1965 - Page 26 Michigan Reports Efforts to Stop Bootleg Shipments Foil Attempts to Bring Bootlegged Cigarettes In From Out of State DETROIT, aiICHI, Friday (CS)- Daily vigilance is an important part of the Michigan cigarette taxadministra- tion to prevent the bootlegging of ciga- rettes from, lower or "no"taxstates. Iin 1963 there were four seizures and eight arrests for violations of theciga- rette tax statute. The first case result- ed in, the confiscation of three truckss of varying sizes and a trailer, along with 250 half!-eases of cigarettes. Three in- dividuals were fioundl guilty and sen- tenced to two yearsproliation and vary,- ingfines: The trucks and'' cigarettes were soldl& as contraband for $22,347.W and the money forwarded to the state's General Fund. ~ I'!'1' ' ~ ' I lJ U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 19 5 - Page 9 Tobacco Spending Is Up On a Per-Capita Basis SALT LA.KE' CITY, UTAH, Friday (CS)-Residents of Utahispent slightly more per capita for tobacco product!s in 1N4 than the previous year, accord- ing to figures from, the State Tax Com- mission. In 1963, 65.8 million, packs of ciga- rettes were t''axed, compared to the. 62:9 million in 1964, but the per capita was higher, because the tax was dou- bled ... from 4 to 8 cents per package. Total amount spent for every man, woman and child in Utah for cigarettes and other tobacco products was $I21.98 in 1964 compared with $2i'.73' in 1963. Estimated! sales of all tobacco' pr~od- ucts last'': year were $21, million. One individual was arresed and con- victed in, the second case, which result- e& in the seizure of 958 packs of Mexi- can cigarettes. The sentence was a six-month probations $100 in co;ts: Since the cigarettes were considered unsalable, they were dest'royed. 25 Cases Seiz~e& The third violation involved the seiz, ure of a sport coupe and 25' cases plus 16 cartons of cig'aret'tes. One individual pleaded guilty and received two years probation and $200 in costs.,The ciga, rettes and auto were sold' for $4,777.13 and the money sent to the Generall Fund except for $1,455.00, which was placed in escrow pending court action with a finance company which had' a lien on the car: The last, caseinvolvediast~ation wag- on and 1,605 cartons of cigarettes, Two individuals were arrested'! Most of the cigarettes have been sold by stipulation of t'heir attorney and the money placed in escrow pending a departmental hear- ing. The car and the balance of the cigarettes„ to beused as evidence, were placed in storage. Page 5
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 1965 - Page 14. Conan ittee in N./V1. Re jects a Proposal Boosting Tax 25% ;. Measure Is Defeated Seeking an Increase In Cigarette Levy SANTA FE,, N. M.,, Tuesday (CS)- A posposal to increase the state ciga- rette tax by 25~ per cent was turned l down by the H'ouse Taxation and Reve- nue Committee. Only member of the committee voting against an unfavorablereport was the measure's sponsor,, Rep. Eddie Barhoa,, of Bernalillo, it was reported. Rep. Barboa told the taxation and revenue committ'ee that the boost from 8' to 10 cents a pack would triple the amount of money available for locali recreation funds. Joe Clark of Santa Fe;, secretary of the New Mexico Tobacco Dealers Asso- ciation, was quick to note thatthis was a false assumption. He said sales of cigarettes declined after the last tax boost was put intoeff'ect by the state in 1961 and have never regained their past levell In 1960-61, under the old state tax rate of 5 cents a pack, there were 100,552,0001 packs ofeigarettessold in New Mexico; the tobacco industry rep- resentative:said. During 1963-64, there were 92,482,000 million, packs sold! that were taxed by the state, and this was the highest sales level since 1960-61 in spite of the report of the effects of cigarette smoking on health, he as- serted. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 19 65- Page 12 ~,. :.i ; Cigarette Prices Vary Widely in Miami Area FLA., Friday (CS) titIAMI :; bii- 7.. \ , '.uui's, tourist season builds up, the city's retail ci;~arette prices seem to fluctuate drasticaliy. Cirarettes are selling for 40 cents a pack ini this city's Columbus Hotel, 29 cent5per pack a blockaway at the Latin Vnierican Centen„and, two blocks fnum thcrc, W~algreen's DrugStloresar~c. sellinr them at $'~2.5i1 acart~on, a spot c•hcck, shoNNed. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19.5 - Page 12 'Smoking Increase Noted By Authorities in Ohio COLUMBUS, 0., Thursday (CS)- Ohioans are smoking more and the state is enjoying it more. Cigarette tax collections here in Ohio for the week ended January 31 were up $289,000, or 29.9 per cent', over a year ago„ aceording to State Treasurer John D. Herbert. However, for the seven months be- ginning last July 1, the collections are lagging by $269,000, or 0.69 per cent. Mr. Herbert' pointed out that if collect'ions continue to gain during thee remainder of the year ending June, 30, they could 'be about $,1 million more than the previous year. The impact of U. S. Surgeon Gen- eral Luther Terry's report linking smoking with cancer on tax collections has been gradually diminishing„ Mr. Herbert said, U . S . Tebacco Journal February 18', 1965 - Page 26 Michigan Reports Efforts to Stop Bootleg Shipments Foil Attempts to Bring Bootlegged Cigarettes In From Out of State DETROIT, MICHI., Friday (CS)- Daily vigilance is an important part of the Michigan cigarette taxadministra- tion to prevent the bootlegging of ciga- rettes from, lower or "no" tax states. Iin 1964 there were four seizures and eight arrests for violations of t~heciga- rette t'axstatute. The first case result- ed in, the confiFcation of three trucks of varying sizes and a trailer, along with 2~54half-cases ofcigarettes: Threein- diividuals were found! . guilty and sen- tenced'to two years probation and vary- ing fines, The trucks and' cigarettes were sold as contraband for$22,347,.W and the money forwarded to the state's (;eneral Fund. U. S. Tobacco Journal Februery 1, 195 - Page 9 Tobacco Spending Is Up On a Per-Capita Basis SALT LAKE' CITY, UTAH, Friday (CS)-Residents af Utah, spent' slightly more per capita for tobacco products in 1964 than the previous year, accord- ing to figures from, the State Tax Com- mission. In 1963, 65.8 million, packs of ciga- rettes were t'axed, compared to t'he. 62.9 million in 1964, but the per capita was higher, because the tax was dou- bled. .. from 4 to 8 cents per package. Total amount spent for every man, woman and child in Utah for cigarettes and other tobacco products was $,21.98 in 1iJfi4 compared with $21'.73' in 1963. Estimated' sales of all tobacco prod- ucts last year were $21, million. One individual was arresed and con- victed inithe second case, which result- e& in the seizure of 958 packs of Mexi- can cigarettes. The sentence was a: six-month probation; $100 in coAs: Since the cigarettes were considered unsalable, tM1reyweredestroyed. 25 Cases Seize& The third violation involved the seiz, ure of a sport coupe and 25 cases plus 16 cartons of cigaret!tes. Qneindividual pleaded guilty and received two years probation and $200 in costs. The ciga, rettes and auto were sold' for $4,777.13 and the money sent to the Generall Fund except for $1,455.00, which was placed in escrow~pending, court action w^ithafinance company which had! a lien on the car:. The last case involve&a st'~ation wag- on and 1,605 cartons of cigarettes. Two individuals were arrested; Most of the cigarett'es have been sold hy, sstipulation of their attorney and the money placed in escrow pending a departmental hear- ing. The car and the balance of the cigarettes„ t~o beused as evidence, were placed in storage. page 5
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 19 5- Page 14 Comarrttee in N./V1. Re jects a Proposal Boosting Tax 25% Measure Is Defeated j Seeking an Increase In Cigarette Levy v SANTA FE;, N. M.,, Tuesday (CS), - A posposal to increase the state ciga- rette tax by 25 per cent was turned j down by the H'ouse Taxation and Reve- nue Cbmmittee. Only member of the committee voting against an unfavorable report was the measure's sponsor, Rep. Eddie I3arboa,, of Rerna]illo, it was reported. Rep. Barboa told the taxation and revenue committee that the, boost from~ & to 10 cents apackwould' triple tlheamount of money available for local' recreation funds. Joe Clark of Santa Fe;, secretary of the New hfexico Tobacco Dealers Asso- ciation, was quick to note that this was a false assumption. He said sales of' cigarettes declined' aftert!he last tax boost was put into effect by the state in 1961 and have never regained their past leveli In 1960-61, under the old state tax rate of 5 cents a pack, there were 100,552,00W packs of cigarettes sold in New Mexico; the tobacco industry rep- resentative said. During 1963-64, there were 92,482,000 million, packs soldl thatt were taxed by the state, and this was the highest sales level since 1960-61 in spite of t!he report of the effects of cigarette smoking on health, he as- serted. U. S. Tobacco~ Journal February 1T,,1965 - Page 12 `~ Ci arette Prices Vary Y Widely in Miami Area 1r~ \ i ytIANtI, FLA., Friday (CS)-As bii- "ami's tourist season builds up, the city's retail ci;Zaretteprii•es seem to fluctuate drasti aliy.. Cigarettes are selling for 40 cents ap ack in~ this city's Cblumbus II'otel,, 29 cents per pack a hlock away at' the Latin American Center;,and„two blocks from there, Walgrcen's DrugStoresar~e. ;ellin;:them at a carton, a spot chcck showed. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19.5 - Page 12 "Smoking Increase Noted By Authorities in Ohio COLUMBUS, 0., Thursday (CS) Ohioans are smoking more and the state is enjoying it more. Cigarette tax collections here in Ohio for the week ended January 31 were up $289,000, or 29.9 per cent'y over a year ago, aceording, to State Treasurer John D. Herbert. However, for the seven months be- ginning last July 1, the collections are lagging by $269,000, or 0.60 per cent. Mr. Herbert! pointed out that if collectlions continue to gain during thee remainder of the year ending June 30, they could 'be about $,1 million more than the previous year. The impact of U. S. Surgeon Gen- er~al Luther T'erny'sreport]Inking smoking with cancer on tax collections has been gradually diminishing,, Mr. Herbert said. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1U', 1qZ5 - Page 26 Michigan Reports Efforts to Stop Bootleg Shipments Foil Attempts to Bring Bootlegged Cigarettes In From Out of State DETROIT, MICHI., Friday (CS)- Daily vigilance is an important part of the Michigan cigarette taxadministira-tion to prevent the bootlegging of ciga- rettes from, lower or "no" tax states. In 1964 there were four seizures and eight arrests for violations of the ciga- rette t'axstatute, The f:irst case result- ed ini the confiscation of three trucks of varying sizes and a trailer, along with 250 half-cases of cigarettes. Three in- dividuals were f'ound! guilty and sen- tenced to two years probation and vary- ing fines. The trucks and! cigarettes were sold as contraband for$22,347-W and the money forwarded to the state's General Fund. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 9 Tobacco Spending Is Up On a Per-Capita Basis SALT LAI{E' CITY, UTAH, Friday (CS)-Residents of Utah, spent slightly more per capita for tobacco products in 19,64 than the previous year, accord- ing to figures from, the State Tax Com- mission. In 1963, 65.8 million, packs of ciga- rettes were taxed, compared to t'he 62.9 million in 1964, but the per capita was higher, because the tax was dou- bled. .. from 4 to 8 cents per package. Total amount spent for every man, womaniand child in Utah for cigarettes and other tobacco products was $21.98 in, 1964 compared with $21.73' in 1963. Estimated! sales of all tobaccoprod- ucts last'~ year were $211 million. One individual was arresed and con- victed inithe second case, which result- e& in the seizure of 958 packs of Mexi- can cigarettes. The sentence was a six-month probation4 $100 in costs. Since the cigarettes were considered unsalable, they were destMoyed. 25 Cases Seize& The third violation involved the seiz, ure of a sport coupe and 25 cases plhs 16 cartons of cigarettes. Qne individual pleaded guilty and received two years probation and $200 in costs. The ciga, rettes and auto were sold' for $4,777.13 and the money sent to the General'iFund except for $1,455.00, which was placed in escrow pending, court action with a finance company which had~ a lien on the car. The last case involvedia station wag- on and 1,605 cartons of cigarettes; Two individuals were arrestedL Most of the cigarettes have been sold by stipulation of their attorney and the money placed in escrow pending a:d'epartmental hear- ing. The car and the balance of the cigarettes„ to l e used as evidence, were placed in storage. page 5
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 19 5- Page 14' Comn itfee in N.A Re jecfs a Proposal Boosting T ax 25% Measure Is Defeated Seeking.an Increase In Cigarette Levy SANTAFE;, N. M.,, Tuesday (CS), A posposal to increase the state ciga- rette tax by 25 per cent was turned down by the H'ouse Taxation and Reve. nue Committee. Only member of the committee voting against an unfavorablereport was the measure's sponsor„ Rep. Eddie Barboa,, of Bernalillo, it was reported. Rep. Barboa told the taxation and revenue committ'ee that the boost from: 8: to 10~ cents a pack would triple t'heamount of money available for local! recreation funds. Joe Clark of Santa Fp;, secretary of the New Mexico Tobacco Dealers Asso- ciation, was quick to note that, this was a false assumption. He said sales of cigarettes declined after the last tax boost was put into effect by the state in 196Iand have neverr~egained their past levell In 1960-61, under the old state tax rate of 5 cents a pack, there were 100,552,0001 packs of cigarettes sold in N!ewMexico; the tobacco industr~yrep- resentative said. During 1963-64, there were 92,482,000 million, packs soldl that were taxed by the state, and this was the highest sales level since 1960-61 in spite of tlhereport of the:effectis of cigarette smoking on health, he as- serted. U. S. Tobacco~ Journal February 18, 11965 - Page 12 `~ Cigarette Prices Vary ~ Widely in Miami Area v_' MIAMI, FLA., Frida.y(CS)~-A,, Mi- ~ 'anri's, tourist season builds up, the city's retail eigarette prices seem to fluctuate drasticaliy.. ~ Cirarettes are sellinh for 40 cents a pack ini thiscity's Columbus Hotel, 29 cents per pack a block away at the Latin American Center„and, two blbcks frnm there, Walt;recn's DruqStones are scllin;: them at $12.59 acart~on, a spot chcck, sho\\ed. U . S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 12 'Smoking Increase Noted By Authorities in Ohio COLUMBUS, 0., Thursday (CS)- Ohioans are smoking more and the state is enjoying it more. Cigarette tax collections here in Ohio for the week ended January 31 were up $289,000, or 29.9 per centy over a year ago, aceordinc;, to State Treasurer John D. Herbert. However, for the seven months be- ginning last July 1, the collections are lagging by $269,000, or 0.69 per cent. Mr. Herbert! pointed out that if collectlions continue to gain during thee remainder of the year ending June, 30,, they could be about $1 million more than the previous year. The impact of U. S. Surgeon Gen- eral Luther Terry's report linking smoking with cancer on tax collections has been gradually diminishing, Mr. Herbert said. U. S. Tebacco Journal February 16', 1965 - Page 26 Michigan Reports Efforts to Stop Bootleg Shipments Foil Attempts to Bring Bootlegged Cigarettes In From Out of State DETROIT, :SiICHi, Friday (CS)- Daily vigilance is am important part of the Michigan cigarette tax administ~ra- tion to prevent the bootlegging of ciga- rettes from lower or "no" tax states. Dn1964 there were four seizures and eight arrests for violations of the:ciga- rette t'axstatute. The first case result- ed im the confiscation of three trucks of varyinQ sizes and a trailer, along with 2:5Q half-cases of cigarettes. Three in- diividuals were f'oundl Ruiltyy and sen- tenced to two years probation,and vary- ing fines. The trucks and' cigarettes were sold as contraband for $22,347.W and the money forwarded to the state's General'Fund. U. S. Tobacco Journa]- February 1, 195 - Page 9 Tobacco Spending Is Up On a Per-Capita Basis SALT LA.KE' CITY, UTAH,, Friday (CS)-Residents of Utah~ spent slightly more per capita for tobacco products in 1964 than the previous year, accord- ing to figures from, the State Tax Com- mission. In 1963, 65.8 million, packs of ciga- rettes were taxed, compared to the 62.9 million in 1964, but the per capita was higher, because the tax was dou- bled. .. from 4 to 8 cents per packa.ge. Total amount spent for every' man, woman and child in Utah for cigarettes and other tobacco products was $',21.98 in 19,64 compared with $21.73' in 1963. Estimated! sales of all tobacco, prod- ucts last year were $211 million. One individual was arresed and con- victed in, the second case, which result- e& in the seizure of 958 packs of Mexi- can cigarettes. The sentence was a six-month probation; $100 in costs. Since the cigarettes were considered unsalable, they were destroyed. 25 Cases Seize& The third violation involved the seiz- ure of a sport coupe and 25 cases plus 16 cartons of cigarettes. Qr.e individual pleaded guilty and received two years probation and $200 in costs.,The ciga, rettes and auto were sold' for $4,777.13 and the money sent to the GenerallFund except for $1,a55.00, which was placed in escrow pending court action with a finance company which had'; a lien on the car. The last, case involved' a station wag- on and 1,605 cartons of cigarettes. Two individuals were arrestedl Most of the cigarett'es have been sold by stipulation of their attorney and the money placed in escrow pending a departmental hear- ing. The car and the balance of the cigarettes„ to beused as evidence, were placed in storage. page 5
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18', 19 5- Page 14 Comn ittee in N. M. Re jects a Proposal Boosting Tax 25% Measure Is Defeated Seeking an Increase In Cigarette Levy SANTA FE, N~ Mi., Tuesday(;CS)~- A posposal to increase the state ciga- rette tax by 25 per cent, was turned down by the House Taxation and Reve- nue Committee. Only member of the committee voting against an unfavorable report was the mcasure"s sponsor, Rep. Eddie Barboa, of Bernalillo„ it was reported! Rep. Barboa told the taxation and revenuecommit'tee thatl the boost from 8 to~ 10 cents a pack would triiplethe amount! of money available for local recreation funds. Joe Clark of Santa Fe, secretary of the New Mexico Tobacco Dealers Asso- ciation, was quick to note that this was a falke assumption. He said sales of cigarettes declined after thelaste tax boost was put into efifect by, the state in 11961 and have never regained their past level., In 1960-61, under the old state tax rate of 5 cents a pack, there were 190,552;(100 packs of cigarettes sold in~ New Mexicoi the tobacco industry rep- resentative said. During 1963-64, there were 92,182,000 million packs sold that were taxed by t!he state, and this was the highest sales level since 1960-61, in spiteof, the report of'; the effects of cigarette smoking on health, he as- serted. J ~ ~ a U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 12 Cigarette Prices Vary Widely in Miami Area MIAMI, FLA., Friday (CS)-A~ Mi- 'anii"stouri'st season builds up, the city's retail eigarette prices seem to fluctuate drasticaliy.. Cigarettes are selling for 40 cents a l ack ini this city's Coiumbus Ilbtcl„ 29 centsper pack ahloc•kawayat the Latin American Cent'er;,and„two blbcks from there, Wal,green's DrugSt~ores,are. selling them at $2:5:I acarton, a spot chcck showed. ., U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 12 'Smoking Increase Noted By Authorities in Ohio COLUMBUS; 0;, Thursday (CS)- Ohioans are smoking more and' the state is enjoying it more: Cigarette tax collections here in Ohio for the week endedi January 31 were u.p $289,000, or 29.9 per cent, over a year ago, according to State Treasurer John D. Herbert. However, for the seven months be- ginning last Juiy 1, the collections are lagging by $269,000, or 0:69 per cent. Mr. Herbert pointed out'~ that if oalliections continue to gain during the remainder of the year ending June 30, they could Tbe about! $1 million more tham the:previous year. The impact of U. S. Surgeon Gen« erali Luther Terry's report linking smoking with cancer on tax collections has been gradually diminishing, Mn.. Herbert said. U. S . Tobacco Journal February 1b, 1965 - Page 26 Michigan Reports - Efforts to Stop Bootleg Shipments Foil Attempts to Bring Bootlegged Cigarettes In From Out of State DETROIT, MICH',, Friday (CS);- Daily vigilance is amimportant par~t of the Michigan ciQarett'e tax administra- tion to prevent the bootlegging of ciga- rettes from lower or "no"' tax states. Dn 1964 there were four seizures and eight arrests for violations of the ciga- rette t'ax: statute. The first case result- ed in, the confiscation of three trucks of varying sizes and a trailer, along with 250 half-cases of cigarettes. Three in- dividuals were f'oundl guilty and sen- tenced to two years pr~oliationand vary- ing fines. The trucks and' cigarettes %vere soldl as contraband for $22„t47.50, and the money forwarded to the state's General Fund, U. S. Tobacco Journal Februery 10', 19 o5 Page 9 Tobacco Spending Is Up On a Per-Capita Basis SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, Friday (CS)-Residenfis of Utah spent slightly more per capita for tobacco products in 1964 than the previous year, accord- ing to figures from the State Tax Com- mission. In 1963, 65.8 million packs of ciga- rettes were taxed, comparedl to the 62.9'million in 1964, but the per capita was higher, because the tax was dou- bled ... from, 4~ to 8 cents per package. Total amount spent for every man, woman and child in Utah for cigarettes and other tobacco products was $21.98 in 1964 compared with $21.73 in 1963. Estimated sales of all t~obacco pro3- ucts last year were $21 million. One individlaal was arresed and cnn~ victed in the second case, which result- ed in the seizure of 958 packs of' Mexi- can eigarettes. The sentence was a six-month probationy $100 in, costs: Since the cigarettes were considered unsalable, they were dest'royed. 25 Cases Seized. The third violation involved the seiz- ure of a sport coupe and 25 cases plus 16 cartons of cigarettes. Qne individual pleaded guilty and received two years probation and $200 in costs. The ciga- rettes and auto were sold' for $4,77 7.13 and the money sent to the Generali Fund except for $1,455.00, which was placed in escrow pending, court action with a finance compan,v which had'. a lien on the car: The last case involvedia station wag- on and 1,605 cartons of cigarettes. Two individuals were arrestedL Most of the cigarettes have been sold by stipulation of't'heir attorney and the moneyplaoed in escrow pending a departmental hear- ing. The car and the balance of the cigarettes, to heused as evidence, were placed in stiorage. Page 5
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fih~, Wall 5treet Journal ~ ~>I~ru~ryl , 1965 ( )\ V( I, I )I'~1-(~~"~Jc)~l.:S Bt1Ck ~ ~ f.~l:.'.t l•~ ~IJ1 I~T111('1~71e~ 1 ViI I 1 1111e(rlierrv~ Pepsi TWO 1''itlnncial Experts Studying Possible Terms; Plan Calls for Concerns toOperate5eparately RV rt WA r.,. Sr:ncFr JnnntiAr. SIn%. Rrporlcr PHTT.11lT:LPHiA--Ill1S'G Cigar Corp.,, De- tnoit, Is "sturiying"' a mer~erwith Allegheny Pepsl-Cnla. Rnttling Co., Morton M. Lapitles, DtS:r chairmah, said. Mr. Lapides ia also chair. man eL the Bhltitnore-based Pepsi-Cola: Bot- tlir^Co,, D'r: T,aplrles said DWGI directrrs, after a meetihqIn Detroit Tuesrlav:, bacfiedl such a merger "In principle," under "certain, cnnd9- tihns." He ,aid two Indercndent fihanaiali ex- perl's are studying what nnnditinnra would con- stitutP an,eqnitable exchan>;e between the com- panies; "At tiiis pnlnt no t' 21me of merger or ex- ehanpr of stock have been, determihedi" '-4Ir:. I.apides, sa.id., "Rut the t'wo studies should be completed within 30 days:" Mr. Lapides said DtYG anrt Allegheny Pep5:i-Cola.; wrn(ld• if they mei~e„ continne to be nPerated! Kssepanate r-nrnranies.. "There will herert'ninaccotmtinh, n nd other administrative savings but there won't be any sales savings," he said. Last CJctnber„Mr. Lapides purchased 53,000 LDw:Gshares from EversharpCn. at $25 eachr Two mnnth>i later he sold these shares, to Al, leghenv et the same price. Allegheny then Increased it:9 holdihge,imDwC: tnR4~,65F shares, making 1t', with a lrh;,, intere.vt, MVG's larg- est single stockholder. Mr. Lapides nnd Gilbert R. R(,dmnnt, A'l- lcgheny Pepsi-Colapresident, were elected to the DWG bnard. Mr. Lapides became chair- man of DWG last month. Mr. Lapides said AllnZhenN's holding in D4VG" hasn't been, Increased ninee the original rurr.ha:se. As recently as last' month, Mr. T.apides denied reports that the two companies I?lanned to merc,o. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 25 Smoking Tobacco Sales Hit 10-Year High in'64 Smoking tohaccosales dhniny, 1964 werethe highest in ten vears according to the latest Internal Revenue Servii!e figureswitlr combined sales of domestic auld importcd t'oliacco at 81,:r08,2-14 hrnmcls. Tliis was more, tlian one mil- lion ponnds' above 1963, Jerry Nhg1cr, ewcntiv.e cliiector of the Pipe and To+ haccoCauncil, hoiiited out in New Yorkrecentlv., Sales of diomestieally prod(rcecl'smok- inc~ tobacco was r8.O71,52•3' honncls, 16 per cent ahead of 1963, while iin- portswere 68.28 per cent :rheadnf19U3' at 2,736,421 pounds. 'Che ul)- snrgC in salesdruing the year was on a month-to-tnont'h, lbasis, with l 1 of the 12 montll.s during 1964 showing in- creases above the previous year. In December sales of alomestichroductionwas: 11.3 per cent ahead of the year whileimhort'h were ]27.7percent over Decemher 191333. According to the council, the last time smoking tobaccos,iles vvere above 80 million pounds was in 10•54„ when total poundage reached 83.700,000; Total: usage had beem remaining fairly constant at 7:3;000100(4 Poundfi inthe last ten uears„ but the increase in 1964' appears to he permanent_ Most mami- facturcrs are rellortingsimilar increases of16' per cent into 11965. Pipe mamufaeturersalsoreport heavy Nales. The shorticge of quality hriar and the heavy demand f'or pipeshavekepts most factories on an allocation basis -ith sales rnnning 25, to 50Per cent ahead of hnevious yearx. Western Tobacconist February, 1965 - Page 6 Cigar Sales Soar To All Time High Demand for cigars shattered all recor~ds in November, the Cigar Manufacturers Association of Amer- ica, Inc. has reported. It was the second consecutive month in which taxable cigar removals reached' un- precedented levels. A totall of 867;800;000 tax-paid cigars were shipped in November for consumption~in the United States. This was 160,700,000 cigars, or 22.7°Jo over the 707;100;000 re- moved in Nbvemberr 1963. The to- tal also topped'~ the 860,000;000 ag- gregate of October 1964, the pre- vious rccordl The record removals in both~ October and Nbvember re- flected continued strong cigar de- mand for immediate consumption and! for Christmas gift-giving: The association' reported that' for the first eleven months of 1964 taxable fnllTs tax-exempt shipments exceeded~ 8.6 billion cigars, or 26.10/o more than in the first 11 months of 1963. Page 6
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I'h(, Wall Street J'ournal 1-11_~i;r~iary 18, 1965 l)~i~~1~rc" ~~" c) cS 1,~tcl: Wi( I I 1~11~~~ l~elrv~ Pepsi Two ]''irlrlneial Experts Studying Possible Terms; Plan Calls for Concerns to Operate Separately Rv rt R-,Ai.r, cT;iiccr Jnrnunr. R'In%. Rrrnr/er PI{Ti.A1lii'.I,FHrA-DwG C'ip~nr Corp.,, De- troit, Is "sturiydnQ"' a merzer with Allegheny PePsl-Cola Rnttling Co., Morton M. LapidEs, DtiSa'T rhairmath, saidi Mr. Lapides is alsn chair- man of~ the Bnltitnore-based Pepsi-Cola: Bot- tlirn Co, Mr. I,apldey said IllVt'.I dlrectnra„ after a meeting In Detroit Tuesday„ backedl such a merrer "in pninciplL" unrder "certain, cnndi- tihns." He said two Independent fihaneiali ex- perl'A are studying what nnnditinns world con-stitute an equitable exchange between the corrt- pnniea: "At this polnt no terms of rnerger or ex- rhange of stock have; beeni deterrnined!" '-Nfr:. T.aPides, said. "But the t'wo studies should be rnmpleteri within 3Qdays." Mr. Laplde9 said DWG and A11eKhPny PeP~i-Colh wnuld, if they . merge;, oontirme t'o be oPeratedi as separate rnmpanles: "`Phere will be cert'¢in acnountinz nnd other' administrative savings but there won't be any sales savinzs;" he said. Last Oct'ober;, Mr. Lapides purchased 53,000 D{VC, shares from Eversharp Co. at $25 each. ~ Two months later he sold these shares to Al- Ioghenv at the same price. Allegheny then Increased its holdlngsin~DWG to F41656 shares, making lt', with a 1r7~ ~ Interest, DNVG's larg- est' single stockholder. Mr. Lapides end Gilbert B. Redmnnt, AI- lcgheny Pep9i-Cola president, w•eree elected to the DWG bnard. Mr. r.apirles became chair- man nf DIS'(': last month. Mr. LApides said Allr~henv's nnlding in r)1>v=GI hasn't heen, Increased since the original purc.hase. As rerently as laGt' monthi Mr. T,apidhs denied reports that the two companies pianned to merr~e., Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 25 Smoking Tobacco Sales Hit 10-Year High in'64 Smoking toblccosales dhning , 1964 were the highest in ten years accordingt» the latest Internal Revenue Service fifiure.switheombined sales of domestic ,uid imported t'olbacco at 81,:rD8,~,144 ]loundk. This was more than one rnii- liion pounds above 1963„ Jcrry Nagler, e~xecutive director of the Pipe and To. haccoCouncil, hoiiitedout in;yiewY'rnl recently„ Sales of diome:ctieullN' proclucetl'smok- ing t~oliacco was 78.97.1,S23I hnuntls, 16 per cent ahead of 1963, wwhile iin- horts were 68.28 per ce nt ahead of. 19(i.8at 2,736;421houmels. The ulr siirgc insalesdiorinl~ the year xason a mnnth-tn-rnonth, basis, with 1 1 of the 1'2mcmtl6s dhring ]t16-1 showintr in- creases admvethe previous year. In Decemher sales of dornesticproductirn, was 11.3 her, cent ahead of the year while imhorts sti°cre 127.7 per cent over December 19633. According to the council, the last time.vmoking tobacco sales were ahove 80 million pounds %vas in 1954, when total poundage reached 83.706,Q(4(1: Totnt usage had been remaining fairly constant at 73,000,000 Poundkinthe last' ten v.ears„ hut the increase in 1964~ appears to be permanent. Most mamt- facturers are relportingsimilar increases ofl 16Per cent into 11965. Pihemarnifaahrers also report heavy sales. Tlie shortlrge of quality brinr and the heavy demand f'or pipes have kept'nmst factoaiesoni an allocation basis with sales ninning 25 to 50 her cent aheacl of hrc.vious yeans. Western Tobacconisti February, 1965 - Page 6 Cigar Sales Soar To All Time High Demand for cigars shattered all records in November, the Cigar Manufacturers Association of Amer- ica, Inc. has reported. It was the second consecutive month in which taxable cigar removals reached'' un- precedented levels. A totall of 867;8001000 tax-paid cigars were shipped in November for consumption, in the United States. This was 160,700;000 cigars, or 22.77o over the 707;100;000 re- moved in November 1963. The to- tal also, topped the 860,000;000 ag- gregate of October 1964, the pre- vious recordL The record removals in both October and Nbvember re- flected continued stron fi cigar de- mand for immediate consumption C andl for Christmas gift-giving. I•A The association reported that'~ for ~ the first eleven months of 1964 taxable plus' tax-exempt shipments 01 exceeded'. 8.6 billion cigars, or ~ 26.1 ~fo more than in the fi rst 11 ~. months of 1963. Page 6
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Ch=, 41:'itl 'Itreet Journal i~'~~~l~;ruaty~ 16, 1965 I) H-t'~" ~talis Bac (: 'I II P1-111C1ple, Al[e~(-rheliy~ Pepsi 'I'n'o I'i'tlaneinl Experts Studying Possihle Terms; Plan Calls for Concerns to Operate Separately Run R-.A r.r, RTinvc:r dnrnN Ar..Cirri/. Rrportcr PHir.,lllh:l,FHiA-DSVG Cigar Corp., De- troit, is "stnd}in~"' a merger with Allegheny Fer41-Cnla Rnttling Co., Morton M. Lapides, D1S'G chalrmah„saidi )\fir. ILapides ls alsochair- mnn, o6 the Baltimore-based Pepsi-Cola: Bot- t(lr^ Co, TTr: I,apidnssaid DwGI dir•ectors„ after a meeting tn Detroit Titesdhy„ bairkedsuch a merger "in principle" unrier "certainl . cnnd't- tinns." He said two Indenenrdent financiall ex- Pertia are studyihp~ what nonditinnv would con- stitute an equitable exchange between the com- prt,nies: "At this point no ta ms of ine,rzer or ex- change of stock have: heen, detrrmimedj^ Mr. T.apides said. "But the t'wo studies should be rnmpleted within 30daN 's." Mr. Lapides said DtivC: nndAlleghenvFep=i-Cniki would, iitheFmerge„ oontinnie to be operatedl asseparate ,nmpanles: "There will becertain accounting n nd other administrative savihgs but there won't be any sales savings," he said. Last Octbber„Air. Lapi'de:9 purchased 53,oQ(l DwG shares from EversharpCo. at $25 each: ~ Two mnnthslaterhe sold these sharesto Al- /bghenv at the same price. Allegheny then Increased its holdlhgs iniDW'r to R4',656 shares, , making , it', with a 17r,~Y Interest, DwG's, larg- est single Ftockhnlder. Mr. Lapide.s and Gilbert R- Rrdmnnt, Al- legheny Pepsi-Cola president, were, elected to the DWG bnard. Mr. Lapides became chair- man of DWG last month- Mr. Lr+pides said AlleghenN'9 hnldinZ itrt DvA'(, hasn't heeni Increased since the original rurcha5e. As recently as last month Mr. i,apidhs dpnied reports that the two companies ptanned to merze. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 25 Smoking Tobacco Sales Hit 10-Year High in'641 Smokingtobicco~ salcs ditring 1964 werethe highest' in ten years according to the latest Internal R'evantte Service figures with combinecl sales of domestic vul imported tolblcco at 81,708-1,14 ponndk, This was tnore than one mil- liionhonnds above 196.3,Jerry Nhglcr, e.ecutivedirector of the Pipe and To• hacroConncil, hointedout intiew 1'ork recentlr,.:. Sales of (l'tomestically l)rod1i¢ecllsmok- ing toliacco svsts 78,971,523' hoiinrls, 10 per cent aheacl of 1963, wlrile iin- ports svere 68.28 per cent ahead of'. 19~63at 2,736,421 hoimds. The uh• snrfie, in salcs: during the year was on a month-tn-mont'h1>asis, with 1 I of the 12mnnths dhring ]OG4 showinf; in- creases above the prievious year. In D'eeemher sales of domestic production wara11.3hen cent ahead of the year while imhort'h were 127.7 per cent over D'eceml>er 1903. According to the council, the last time smoking tobaccosale,s .vere above 80 million pounds was in 10•54„ when total poundage reached 83.700,0(D01 Total usage had beeni remaining fairily constant at 73,000;000 pounds in the last tenvears„ k4ut theincreasein 1964ahPears tobe pennanent.. Most mamt- facturcrs arcrel{or~ting similar increases of 16 ' per cent into 1963: Pipe manufacttn-ers also:report heavy sales, 'I he shortage of quality briar and tlie heavy demand for pipei kept most factories on an allocation bosis .viths;1l'es running 2:5to 30Per cent uheacl of previous years. Western Tobacconist February, 1965 - Page 6 Cigar Sales Soar To All Time High Demand for cigars shattered all records in November, the Cigar Manufacturers Association of Amer- ica, Inc. has reported. It was the second consecutive month in which taxable cigar removals reached' un- precedented levels. A totall of 867;800;000 tax-paid cigars were shipped in November for consumption in the United States. This was 160,700,000 cigars, or 22.7°Jo over the 707;100;000 re- moved in November 1963. The to- fal also toppedl the 860,000;000 ag- gregate of October 1964, the pre- viotrs record'. The record removals in. bothi October and November re- flected continued strong cigar de- mand for immediate consumption and' for Christmas gift-giving. The associationi reported that for the firsti elevenmonths, of 1964 taxable plus tax, exempt shipments exceede& 8.6 bil'lion, cigars„ or 26.17o more than in the firsti 11mont'hs of 1963, Page 6
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Western Tobacconist February, 1965 - Pages 1, 3, 22 Industry Braces For New State Tax On Cigarettes, Tobacco A cigarette tax increase of five cents a pack has been sugfiested in California by Governor Edmund G. Brown. California's present ciga~ rette tax, now several years old, is three cents a pack and the proposed increase would hike thi's to eight cents. In addition, a 15 per cent tax on all other tobacco prod'ucts is pro- posed. There has also been talk of eliminat'ing the 2 per cent discount allowed distributors nowforaffix- ing cigarette tax stamps. Although 6hesuggest~ions are not unexepected in California tobacco circles, the proposals have received a cool reception in the trade. (And this is probably the understatement of the year.) These proposals have not yet taken the form, of legislation. They arie offered as possible revenue sources. On the other side of the coin a complete elimination of per- sonal property and business invenr tory tax has been, d'iscussed in legis- lative circles. The state imposes al tax on all business inventory as of the first Tuesday in March. Just prior to this manufacturers and shippers cut down on shipments into the state„ storing, merchandise ini Nevada or Utah or other non-taxable locations. Immediately after the tax deadline, there is a rush to fill up supply channels again. Two bills which have already been introduced and which will af- fect cigarette dealers in California are these: A.B. 41 -FLOOD RELIEF: By Bellbtti of Eureka, January 5; 1965. Provides for, refund of tax on cig- arettes destroyed or made unsalable by reason of storms and floods dur- ing, December, 1964. Referred' to Committee on Rules. A.B. 595-POSSESSION OF TO- BACCO BY TEENAGERS: By Donovan of San Diego, January 27,. 1965. Prohibits possession, of t'obac- co by persons under the age of 18. Excepts persons between the ages of 16 and 18 who have secured. previous written consent of parent or guardian. (Present law makes it unlawful to sell or furnish tobaccoo products to persons under 18 years of age). Referred 't'o Committee on Rules. Meanwhile, men in the t'obacco industry had this to say about im- pending new cigarette and tobacco taxes: Jacob Keiter, long-time San Fran- cisco retailer and a director, of the Retail Tobacco Dealer's Association, stated "if the 15°Jo increase is lev- ied, we (retailers) will suffer a ma- jor blow." Mickey Ettingoff, East Bay retail- er commented, "it isn't bad enough that we have had to fight the sur- geon~ general's report, but now we are going t'o be taxed out of busi- ness." One irate retailer pointed out that smokers already pay $3.18 out of every $100 of'tax revenue collected by the state; that the present fede- ral, state and local taxes account for 5070 of the selling price of ciga- rettes. An increase would be further discrimination against the 5.5 mil- lion cigarette smokers in California. Western Tobacconist February, 1965 - Page 22 City Cigarette , Taxes Proliferate Recent adoption of a 2c per pack cigarette tax by the Pomona City Council brings to nine the number of Southern California cities impos- ing city cigarette taxes. In eight of these cities the tax is collected at the retail level and re- mitted4 by the retailer, directly to the city government. Only San Die- go imposes the tax at the wholesale level. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 1+' R. J. ReynoldsToba¢co's:.Cainell" lirarn(l is the largest selli~nh I ~.5~.~...• ci.-nrette iQr the rc~I I l~;r„ Page 7
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Western Tobacconist February, 19b5 - Pages 1, 3', 22 Industry Braces For New State Tax On Cigarettes, Tobacco A cigarette tax increase of five cents a pack has been suggested in California by Governor Edmund G. Brown. Calbfornia's present ciga- rette tax, now several years old, is three cents a pack and the proposed increase would hike this to eight cents. In addition, a 15 per cent tax on all other tobacco prod'ucts is pro- posed. There has also been talk of eliminating the 2 per cent discount allowed distributors now for affix- ing cigarette tax stamps.. Although the suggestions are not unexepected in California tobacco circles, the proposals have received a cool reception in the t~rade. (And this is probably the understatement of the year.) These proposals have not yet taken the form~ of legi'slation, They are of fered as possible revenue sources. On the other side of the coin a complete elimination of per- sonal property and business inven~ tory tax has beem discussed in legis- lative circles. The state imposes a tax on all business inventory as of the first Tuesday in March. Just prior to t'his manufacturers and shippers cut down on shipments int'o the state, storing, merchandise ini Nevada or Utah or other non-taxable locations. Immediately after the tax deadline, there is a rush to fill up supply channels again. Two bills which have al'ready been introduced and which will af- fect cigarette dealers in California are these: A.B. 41 - FLOOD RELIEF: By Bellbtti of Eureka, January 5, 1965., Provides for, refund of tax on cig- arettes destroyed or made unsalable by reason of storms and floods dur- ing, December, 1964. Referred! to Committee on Rules. A. B. 595-POSSESSION OF TO- BACCO BY TEENAGERS: By Donovan of San IDiego, January 27,. 1965. Prohibit's possessiom of t'obac- co by persons under the age of 18. Excepts persons between the ages of 16 and 18 who have secured_d previous written consent of parent or guardian. (Present law makes it unlawful to sell or furnish tobaccoo products to persons under 18 years of age). Referred . to Committee on Rules. Meanwhile, men in the t'obacco industry had this to say about im- pending new cigarette and tobacco taxes: Jacob Keiter, long-time San Fran- cisco retailer and a director of the Retail Tobacco Dealer's Association, stated "if the 15°Jo increase is lev- ied, we (retailers) will suffer a ma- jor blow." Mickey Ettingoff, East Bay retail- er commented,, "it'isn't bad enough that we have had to fight the sur- geon~ general's report, but now we are going to be taxed out of busi- ness." One irate retailer pointed out that smokers already pay $3.18 out of every $100 of tax revenue collect'ed by the state; that' the present fede- ral, state and local taxes account for 507,, of the selling price of ciga- rettes. An increase would be further discrimination against the 5.5 mil- lion cigarette smokers in California. Western Tobacconist February, 1965 - Page 22 City Cigarette , Taxes Prolif erate Recent adoption of a 2c per pack cigarette tax by the Pomona City Council brings to nine the number of Southern California cities impos- ing city cigarette taxes. In eight of these cities the tax is collected at'the retail level and re- mitted4 by the retailer, directly to the city government. Only San Die- go imposes the tax at the wholesale level. Tobacco ~ February 26, 1965 - Page 4' ~. I{. J. R~ey~noldsToliu¢cc>'s:`Catilcl7 ' hran(l is the la rrest scllii' ei;arettein the li.S~A. . . . Page 7
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Western Tobacconist February, 19b5 - Pages 1, 3, 22 Industry Braces For New State Tax On Cigarettes, Tobacco A cigarette tax increase of five cents a pack has been suggested in California by Governor Edmund G. Brown. California's present ciga~ rette tax, now several years old, is three cents a pack and the proposed increase would' hike this to eight cents. In addition, a 15 per cent tax on all othcr tobacco products is pro- posed. There has also been talk of eliminating the 2 per cent discount allowed distributors now for affix- ing cigarette tax stamps. Although t~hesuggestionsarenot unexepected in California tobacco circles, the proposals have received a cool reception in the trade. (And this is probably the understatement of the year.) These proposals have not yet taken the forrm of legislation. They are offered as possible revenue sources. On the other side of the coin a complete elimination of per- sonal property and business inven, tory tax has beem discussed in legis- lative circles. The state imposes a tax on all business inventory as of the first Tuesday in March. Just prior to this. manufacturers and shippers cut down on shipments into the state, stor~ing, merchandise in~ Nevada or Utah or other non-taxable locations. Immediately after the tax deadline, there is a rush to fill up supply channels again. Two bills which have alread'y Provides for refund of tax on cig- arettes destroyed or made unsalable by reason of storms and floods dur- ing, December, 1964. Referred' to Committee on Rules. A.B. 595-POSSESSION OF TO- BACCO BY TEENAGERS: By Donovam of San Diego, January 27,. 1965. Prohibits possessioa of tobac- co by persons under the age of 18. Excepts persons between the ages of 16 and 18 who have secured. previous written consent of parent or guardian. (Present law makes it unlawful to sell or furnish tobaccoo products to persons under 18 years of age). Referred *t'o Committee on Rules. Meanwhile, men in the tobacco industry had this to say about im- pending new cigarette and tobacco taxes: Jacob Keiter, long-time San Fran- cisco retailer and a director of the Retail Tobacco Dealer's Association, stated "if the 15°Jo increase is lev- ied, we (retailers) will suffer a ma- jor blow." Mickey Ettingoff, East Bay retail- er commented,, "it' isn't bad enough that we have had to fight the sur- geom general's report, but now we are going tb be taxed out of busi- ness." One irate retailer pointed out that smokers already pay $3.18 out of every $100 of tax revenue collect'ed by the state; that the present fede- ral, state and local taxes account for 50% of the selling price of ciga- rettes. An increase would be further discrimination against the 5-5 mil- lion cigarette smokers in California. ~ z A Western Tobacconist February, 1965 - Page 22 City Cigarette , Taxes Proliterate Recent adoption of a 2c per pack cigarette tax by the Pomona City Council brings to nine the number of Southern California cities impos- ing city cigarette taxes. In eight of these cities the tax is collected at'the retail level and re- mitteds by the retailer, directly to the city government. Only San Die- go imposes the tax at the wholesale level. been introduced and which will af- fect cigarette dealers in California are these: A.B'. 41 -FLOOD RELIEF: By O N N CG .7 Bellottiof Eureka~ January5, 1965., ~ Tobacco ~ February 26, 1965 - Page 4 ~. " R. .T. Ii'eynoldsToha¢co's`'Can~clp' brand is thelar"ast selli", ``rer.til~;n ciaarette iQr the_U.S.A. . . . Page 7
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Tobacco rl February 19, 1965 - Page114 / ~ Lorillard Sales Rise After First-Half Decline 1'. 1Lorill:ud Companv recently an- nouuced in Nww Yorki that "afRera~ sharp first half drop in 1964 cigarette sales, thedotvn-curvereversed itself and' sales started upward again;none= theless total 1964 sales declined from 1963's record levels, and' earnings along .vith~ them." Net sales for 1964, the vear-end,re- port noted, were $466,773,167 comr pared with 1963's allltime high of $516;144,61i4. Net earnings were $25;- 330,41C1; equal: to $3:77 per common share based on 6,526!704 shares out- standing, vs. 1961 earnings of $27,- 918,457eqµalto~ $4.14 per common share on 6;573,5-18' shares outstand- ing. Federal, state and forei};n income taxes were $25;567,000:.s. $32,261,- 000 in 1963. In Lorillard's domestic cigarette op- erations the last part of the year was `1 measurably better" than the first, 11tor- gan J. Cramer, Lorillard President. said in making the announcement. And in other areas Lorillard made "sub- stantial progress." most notablv: Inter- national operationsset, recordk at all Irvelfi (export tiales, r~ovaltiestrom li- U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 1965 - Pages 1 P. Lorill ard Gives Results For Last Year Year-End Report Says Cigarette Sales Moved Up in Last Six Months Morgan J. Cramer, president of P. Lorillard Co., said last week that sales of cigarettes im the final six niontlrs of 1964 began movi'ng, upward after a sharp decline experienced in the first half of the year. However, salesandl net earnings for the firm in calendar 1964 were below, the record levels re- ported for 1963.. Net sales for 1964, the year-end report noted, were $466;77:1,1fi7, com- pared with 1i163's all-time high of $;:i16,- L44,G14. Net earnings were $25,330,4110„ equal to $3;77 per common~ share, based on 6,52fi,704'Shares outstanding, against1IS63 earnings, of'. $27,91'i,-157; eqpaltb $4.14 per common shareoni 6i575,54'S sharesoutstandings censees, and ovrscas joint! ventures),; and all of the company's non-cigarette products registered °signifieant gains," and in little cigars Lorillard, "as the dominant producer, kept it's substan- tial lea& on considerably increased voli ume." "Although not sufficieut to offset the impact of the Surgeon General's Re- port on 1964 cigarette sales," he said, "the results ofl these forward steps be- gan to be felt toward year-end and'ag- gregate earnings in the last six monthss of 1964 were ahead of the same pe- riod! in 1963." Kent, he noted, "started its upward climb at mid-year, made steady gains throughout most of the second half to recover much of the ground lost im- mediately following the Surgeon Gen- eral's Report." Newport made an "encouraging turnabout and, in the last four months of the year, actually outsold the same months of' 1963." Spnng"endedl 1964 with , a net ~ain." Old Gold Filters, and York, partici- pating in the Gift Star Trading Stamp Pi'olrram~ made "eminentlysatisfac•tory, tgains" itr the test are.ls,, although over- all sales were down. Old Gold Straights continnedito de+ cliVie: "Lorillard'slittlecigars, smokingtog baccos and chewingtobaccos alll inr creased their sales. Madison and Be- tween The Acts continued as the na- tion's two top-selling little cigars; while Omega (a filter-tipped little cigar in- troduced during the vear) is already highly successful. Erik, a filted-tipped reguliir cigar introduced in July, tookk off strongly and has already captured a significant share of a growing mar- keG," he said- In the increasingly important ,vorld' market place, Lorillilyd operations ex- panded on alli fronts, Mr. Cramer stated, and "ran well ahead of the in- dustry as a whole." For the ninth con- secutive year, export sales hit new peaks; the licensee program was en- larged and licensees' production and royalty income reached new highs; an& t}tecompany's program ofl direct investment overseas was expanded with acquisition of a half interest in a leading Iiong Kong cigarette manu- facturer. Both the new Hong Kong, company and the company's other joint investment-P. Lorillard s.a.r.l. in Lux- embourg-are operating profitablv, an& are being expanded.. Advertising,Age - March dy 19 b) Reynolds Boosts Spot TV on Basis , of Its Flexibility WIavsrox SAt.sris N.C., March 2 -Facing,tip to "multiple problems" ~im the tobacco industrv last year,. , the chairman, and president of R.,J_ Reynolds Tobacco Co. told st'ock- I holders in the company's annual re- port that reduced sales, greaterpro- mrntional costs and leaf prices com- bined to affect earnings in 1964. The company last month reported salesand earnings dips of 3.5~., and 3.9`',, respectively(AA. Feb. 8). The promotional toll was laid I principallyv to Tempo, the charcoal ~ filter cigaret introduced in the first part ofL964. Salesover-all, tthe re- ~~ port said, were affected by the Sttr- geon, General's report., Reviewing its ad program, the. R. J. Reynrnldh report li'stedl tvnet- i work shows and added! that spot ' tv was substanttialtvincreased' be- cause of its flexibility. The company cited extensive use of other media, mentioning network and' local radio, I popular magazines and several na- j tional newspaper campaigns. For Hawaiian PuncK the company used nighttime network tv~ with spot tv and radio in selected', markets. A low=calorieversion„ tested in 1964,. ~is to be in national distribution soon, ~'it said. In international markets„ R'. J. k Reynolds "continued its aggressive i efforts" with increased manpower, advertising and promotion. Filter ! !, cigaretk were the fastest growing ex- ~ port in 1964, the company reported. ~ I Dymo Forms Premium Unit ~i Dv,mo Industries; Berkeley, Cal., manufacturer of indenti'fication ~and labeling systems, has formed a premium, sales division at 280 i4iad- ison, tSve., New York. George I Kling, formerly general manager of " CblumbiaRecordsIncentive Sales„ 'has been named head of the divi- sion. Page 8
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Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 14 Lorillard Sales Rise After First-Half Decline 1'. Lorill.rrd C'ompany recently un- nouncedl in, New York~ that "after a sharp, first half drop in l9f>4 cigarette sales, the dovvn-curve rever:sed itself and sales started upward again; none- theless total 1964 sales declinedl from, 1963's record levels, and earningss along with them." Net sales for 1964, the v.ear-end re- port noted, were $466,773,167 com- pared with 1963's all-time high of $516,144,614. Net earnings were ^4"25,- 330;410, equal to 53.77 per common share based on 6;526,704 shares out- standing, vs. 1963 earnings of $27,- 918,457 equal to $4114 per common share on 6,575,54f3shares outstand, ing~ Federall state and foreivfi income taxes were $25,367,000, vs;$32,261,- 000 in 1963. In Lorillard'sdomesticeigarette op- erations the lirst part of the v.ear was. "measurabl,y bett'er" than the firsf, Mor- gan Ji• Cfamer, Lorillard Presiclent., said in making the announcement. And'i in other areas Lorillard made "suh- stantial progres:s," most notablv: Inter- national operations set records at all levels(exlmrtsalcs, ro~altics frcrtn lii U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 19b5 - Pages 1 ~, P. Lorill ard ~ Gives Results \, . 47. For Last Year ,~ X Year-End Report Says l ' Cigarette Sales Moved Up in Last Six MonthsMorgan J. Cramer, president' of P'. Lorillard Co., said last w,eek, that, sales of cigarettes ini the final six months of 1964 began moving upward af'ter a sharp decline experienced in the first half of the year. However, sales and! net earnings for the firm in calendar 1964 were helow, the record levels re- ported for 1963. Net sales for 1961, the: year-endd report noted, were $466,773,167, corn- pared tivit!h,1t163:'s all-time high of $'516,- 144,614. Net earnings were $25,330,410; equal to, $3!77 per common sharehased on,(3,526,704 shares outstanding, against 19•63 earningSof $27,918,157, equal to$i,4'.14 per common share on 6',575;548 shares outstanding, censees, and ovrscas, joint venhrres); and all of' the company's non-cigarette product's registered "significant gains," and in little cigars Lorillard, "as the dominant producer, kept its substan- tial lead on considerably increased vol- nrne:'. "Although not sufficient to offset the impact of the Surgeon Generalls Re- port on 1964 cigarette sales," he said, "theresults of these forward steps be- gan to be felt toward year-end and ag, gregate earnings in the last six months of 1964 were ahead of the same pe- riod in 1963," Kent', he noted, "started its upward climb, at! mid-year, made steady gains, throughout most of the second half to, recover much of the ground' lost im- mediatehy following the Surgeoni Gen- eral's Report." Newport made an "°encouraging hrrnabout and, in the last four months oftheycar„ actually outsold the same months of 1963." Spring "ended 1964 with a net Old Gold Filters and York, part'ici' pating in the Gift Star Trading Stamp Prof*ri:rm. made"emineittly,satii,fhctory trains"' in the test areas, although over- all sales,were down. Old Gold Sh-aightscontinued to dl'- olihe. "Lorillard's little cigars, smokingto- baccos and chewing tobaccos all in- creased theirsales., Madison, and, Be+ tween The Acts: continued as the na- tion's two top«selling, little cigars, while Omega (a filter-tiPpedl little cigar in-troducedl during the year) is already hig}lly successful. Erik, a filte&tipped regular cigar introduced'. in July, took off strongly and& has already captured a significant share of a growing, mar- ket," he said. In the increasingly important .vorld market place,, Lorill'ar~d operations ex- panded on all f~ronts, Mr. Cramer stated, and "ran well ahead of the in- dustry as a whole." For the ninth con- secutive year, export sales hit new peaks; the licensee program was en- larged and licensees production and royalty income reached new highs; and the company's program of direct', investment overseas was expanded with accguisitioni of a half interest in a leading Hong Kong cigarette manu- facttrrer. Bbth the new Hong Kong company and the company's other joint investment-P. Lorillard s.a.r.l. in Lux- embourg-are operating profitably, and are being expanded. Advertising Age Mah 3, 19~75_ ' Reynolds Boosts Spot TV on Basis of Its Flexibility WINSTON SAr.sM~, N.C., March 2 -Facing up to "multiple problems"' ~ in, the tobacco industry last year, the ohai'rman, and president of' R., J. Re' vnolds Tobacco Co. told st'ock- I' holders in the company's annual re- ~port that reduced sales, greaterpro- mntinnal costs and leaf prices com- bi'ned toaf~feet earnings in 1964. The company last month reported sales:and earnings dips of 3.5M and ~ 3.9 7r, respectively (At1, Feb. 8).. The promotional tolli was laid principally to Tempo, the charcoal filtercigaret ihtrodueedin the first I part of 1964; Sales over-all, the re- I „por!t said, were affected by the Sur- Ilgeon General's report. ~~ Reviewing its ad program, the R. J. Reynolds report list'edJ'wnet- I work shows and added'~ that spot tv was substantialiv increased~ be- ' cause of it's flexibility. The company !cit'ed extensive use of other media, menthioning network and1ocal radio, popular magazines and several na- tional newspaper campaigns. For Hawaiian Punch, the company used ~ nightt'ime network tv, with spot tvv arid radio in selected markets: A ~,lbw-calorieversion„ tested in 1964, l~is to be in national distribution soon, ~ut said. In , international markets, R'. J. k Reynolds "continued, its aggressive i efforts" with increased manpower, advertisingand', promotion. Filter I cigarets were the fastest growing ex- ~ port in1964„ the company reported. ~ D P i F U ymo remium n t orms i Dv,mo Industries, Berkeley, Call, 'I ,manufacturer of indentification !andlabeling systems, has formed a premiumi sales division at 280 Mad- ison Ave:, New York. George Klflng, formerly general manager of ' ~ Columbia Records Incentive Sales„ 'has been named head of the divi- sion. Page 8
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Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Pa~e 14 `<1 ~ Lorillard Sales Rise After First-Half Decline 1'. Lorillaud C:ompann~ recentlvanr uouncedL in New York~~ that °lfter a sliarpfirst half drop in19641 cigarette sales, the dbwn-curverevcrsed itself and sales started upward again; none- theless total 11964 sales declined from 1903's record! levels, and earnings: along with them." Net sales for 1964, the year-end re- port notedl were b4G6,773,167com- pared7 with 1963's all-time high of $516,144,614. Net earnings were $25,- 330i410, equal to: 83.77 per common share based on 6';g26,704 shares out- standing,, vs. 1963 carnin,gs of $271,- 91i8;457edual to $4.14: per common share on 6,575,5415 shares outstand- ing. Federal, state andl foreign income taxes were $2.5,567,000 vs., $32,261,- 000 in 1983. In Lorillarid's domestic cigarette op- erations the last part of the year .cas "measurably better" than the first, Mor- gan J. Cramer, Lorillard Pnesident. said in making the annoiinc•ement. And in other areas Lorillard madc "suh- stantial pro>;res.s," most notably: Inter national operation.s, set recrnrds at alllevels (exportl sales, ro%alties fromli- U'. S. Tobacco Journal February 1', 1965 - Pages 1 P. Lorill ard Gives Results For Last Year Year-End Report Says Cigarette Sales Moved Up in Last Six Months Morgan J. Cramer, president of P. Lorillard Co., said last week that sal'es of cigarettes inAhe final six months of 1964 began, moving upward after a sharp decline experienced in the first halfl of the year. However, salhs and net earnings for the firm in calendar 1964 were below the record levelsre- porte.d f'or 1963.. Net sales, for 19F4, the year-end report noted, were $466;773,167, conr pared with 11)63's all-time hig~h of$;516,- 144,614. Net earnings were $25,3.30,410,, equal to $:3;77 per common shareliase:d oni6,526,7(}.1~shares outstand6ng, against1i~63 earnings of! $27,918,457, equal to $4.14 per common share on 6;575,548 ,hares outstanding. censees, and ovrscas joint venhtres); and all ofi the company's non-cigarette products registered "significant gains," and im little cigars Lorillard, "as thee dominant producer, kept its substan- tial lead on considerably increased vol- nme.>' "Although not sufficient to offset the impact of the Surgeon General's Re- port on 1964 cigarette sales," he said, "the results of these forward steps be- gan to be felt toward year-end and ag- gregate earnings imthe last six months of 11964 were ahead of the same pe- riod in 1963,"' Kent, lie noted', "started its upward climb at! mid-year, made steady gains throughout most of the secon& halE to recover much of the groun& ]bst im- mediateliy following the Surgeon Gen- eral's Report'." New•port made an "encouragiog tnrnabout and, in the last four months of the year, actually outsold the same months of 1963." Spring "ended 1964 with a~ net gain.°" Old Gold Filters and York, partiici+ 1>ating, in~ the Gift Star, Ti-ading, Stamp Proorr~oiu, made"eminently satisfactoryy qains'" in the test areas, although over- all sales were dowm. Old! Goldl Straights continued to de- ehhe. "Lorilland'slittle cigars, srnokingto- baccos and chewing tobaccos all in- creased their salcs. Madison and Be- tween T1ie Acts continued! as the na- tion's two top.selling little cigars, vvhile Omega (a filter-tiphed little cigar in- troduced during the year) is already highly successfuli Erik, a filted4ipped regular cigar introduce& in July, took off strongly andl has already captured a significant share of a growing mar- ket,"' he said.. Im the increasingly important .vorld market place, Larillard~ operations ex- panded on all fronts, Mr. Cramer stated, and "ran well ahead of the in- dustrv as a whole."' For the ninth con- secutive year, export sales hit new peaks; the licensee program was en- larged and licensees' production and royalty income reached' new highs; and the company's program of direct investment overseas was expanded with acquisitiow of a half! interest im a loading Hong Kong cigarette manu- facturer. Both the new Hong Kong company and the company's other jpint investhnent_P. Lorillard s.a.r.l. in Lux- embourg-are operat'ing, profitably, and are being expanded. Advertising Age Marcll-d, 197-55- ' Reynolds Boosts Spot TV on Basis of Its Flexibility WINSTON Sa.t.eNis N.C., March 2 -F~acing,up to "multiple problems" ~lim the tobacco industry last year„ j the chairman, and president of R. J., Reynolds Tobacco Co. told stock- I holders in the company's annual re- ~ porti that reduced sales, greater pro- motional costs and leaf prices com- bihed to af'~fect earnings in 1964. The company last month, reported sales,and earnings dips of 3-51"~ and 3.9`;',, respectively(AA, Feb. 8). The promotional toll was laid principally to Tempo, the charcoal filter cigaret introduced in the first I part of 11964, Salps over-all, the re- port said, were affected bytheSuri- geom General's report. 11 Reviewingit's ad program, the R:. J. Reynolds report list'ed tv net- ~work showsand' adtledthat spot tv was substantiallvv increased be- causeof it's flexibility. The company' cited extensive use of other media, mentioning network and local radio, popular magazines and several na- tional newspaper campaigns. For Hawaiian Punch the company used I nighttime network tv, with spot tv and radio in selected markets„ A ~ lbw-calorieversion„ tested in 1964, ~ is to be in national distribution soon, it said. In international markets, R'. J. ~' I ReYnolds "continued its aggressive ~ efforts''with increased manpower, advertising and prornotion. Filter ! cigaretk were the fastest growing ex- port in 1964, the company reported. Dymo Forms Premium Unit ~, I Dvmo Industries, Berkeley, Cal,, i manufacturer of indentification land labeling systems, has formed a ~premium, sales division at 280 Mad- ison, Ave., New York. George Kling, formerly general manager of ' Columbia Records Incentive Sales, 'has been named head of the divi- slon. Page 8
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Tabak-Journal International Febrtaary 20, 1965 - Page 20 IS ~. o~1 i r;~~1) , ~c io l C n~r r ro n cI C n~t~ The filter eigarett'e has now become the symbol of a modern cigarette industry., Its poaulartty noi longer leans heavily upon di'scriminatory systems oT: taxation, but upon a consumer prefe- rence, which is becoming world-wide. There is now little doubt~ that in the next decade the majority of cigarette manufacturers will be producing more filter than plain cigarettes. But what type of filter will be in general use7' The first filt'ers marketed in commercial quantities in the 198U's were made from creped paper and waddl'nni Later cellulose acetate filters were iittroducedl arid today this is the most~ widely used filter. In the early' days a filter, was regarded as little more than a novelty; today it is recognised as a product which can retain certain compounds of the smoke, whilst allowing the others to pass through unhindered. This concept of selective filtration is a new one„whieh promises to have a far reaching effect on the types of filters which will be incorporatedl in cigarettes in the future. Cigarette smoke is composed of particles and gaseous comr pounds, many, of which have still to be analysed. Much has been written of the tars and nicotinei, which are the major constituent's of the particulate phase of cigarette smoke. Cellulose acetate filters have a good t'ar and nicotine retention. By a careful selectioni of' the number and thickness ofl acetate fibres, the; retention of t'ar and nicotine can be varied over a wide range, though atl higher retention levels a correspondingg increase in draw resistance must be accepted. Some filters contain additives to increase the retention of phenols in the smoke. Pure cellulose filters are still extensively used where the com- bination of a low driaw resistance and high tar and nicotine retention is considered desirable:. It is, however, the selective removall of' gaseous compounds by the use of adsorbent addi- tives in filters, which is destined to revolutionise the filter of', , tomorrow. Carboni has already been added t'o filters in numerous forms and several cigarette brands are available in both America and Europe with carbon loaded filters. The vapour phase retention properties of carbon have not, yet been fully evaluated due to the very large number of compounds found ini t'obaceo smoke. It is„ however, possible to give a comparative analysis of; the various qualities ofl canbon loaded filter, provided this is restricted to~ a limited number of com- pounds, The tests upon which the table below is based assumed a length of tip of 15, mm and a draw resist'anee of 3;6' cm at~ a flow of 17,5 cc/sec. They formed the basis ofl a paper presented by Mr., J. T. Williamson,, Research Directon of Cigarette, Compo- nn_nt's Ltd., to~ the recent~Coresta Conference in Vienna. These results confirm that a filter cont'Elining bonded carbon has the highest' retention ofl formaldehyde; HCN and! Acrolein. The very, Ihrge surface area of carbon exposed to the smoke adsorbs the gaseous compounds as they pass through the filter. There is evidence that~the efficiency canibe varied'by the use of different grades andiqualities oficarbon. The Filtrona VIF filter containing bondedicarbon.was develbped by US Filter Corporation, which now'has world patents pending. This filter is in use in the;United States and has already aroused major interest. There may;, however, be blends of tobacco for which, such a high efficiency filter wouldinot be suitable. The choice must then lie between filters with carbon applied to a pure cellulose or a cellulose acetate base. The smaller surface area of' carbon exposed to the smoke with these two qualities accounts forr their much lower efficiency in the gaseous phase. The choices between the qualities must be a subjective one, dependent upon various tactors including cost„ the levell OT particulate phase retention required and the types of tobacco available. The trends outfinedlabove will have a pronounced effect on the form in which filters willlbe received by cigarette manufacturers. Until recently the majority of filters were of a uniform quality throughout their length. With the incorporation of' additives in filters, more and' more tips will consist of either two or threee components, so that the consumer is still presented'with a white component at the end of his cigarette. When assembling dual filters containing carbon toithe cigarette, a simple dust extractiom system must be installed to avoid the build-up; of surplus carbon on the machine: Where the carbon is sandwiched between two non-carbon components„such equip- ment is not' required. The use of: multiple filters provides ani opportunity for placing additives in, the filter rather than the tobacco. The Filtrona Group has developed a filter which retains menthol for periods packing, As the cigarette is smoked, so the filter releases of at least six months without significant evaporation in normal menthol at an even rate. No additional menthotl needs to be placed in the tobacco or foil., Research is continuing in this field andl it is hoped that other additives can be used in the same way. The filter of tomorrow will give a more balaneed smoke with as much emphasis on retention in the gaseous as in the parti- culate phase of cigarette smoke. This willl give added impetus to the swing, to multiple filters which are being designe& not only to adsorb compounds but' also release additives. Rention of,Compounds incigarotle smoke Particulate Phase Gaseous Phase Filler Composrlion Formal- (A;5 mm,lenglh eachcornp.onenl~ Nicotine PhonoledehydeHCN Crole.in Paper + PaperCarhon B -t- 8 C B' B Acetate + PaperCarbon B' C C B B Acelate+ Ac.etate Carbon 8' C C' B' 8 Acelato + Bonded Carbon B B D 0 D Acetaieanly, (i15'mm)'. B C A A A and! 50 A-- below 25~•~.~ B-= betweeni 25'N C-= above50'/r an d below , 75'rr; D ~ = above 75 Page 9
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Philip Morris Call News Meuceh 1, 1965 - Page 2 ®V, Pro-t•css is not automatic. It takesagt;rt:ssiveness andimabi~ I nation, llcrsist'ence and optimism, skill cmd, dedication to pro- duce a record like the one in this yea11 s Annual Report. Philip Morris pcoplc have achicved, a decado of' progress in t]lrcc major areas, Our domcstic tobacco division has grown because our manufacturing people met the challc;nges of inno- vation and quality. But, growth in a single area, while gratify- ing, is at best limited. Ten ycars ago Plhilip Morris pcoplc be- gan looking for other directions in,which to expand. The result was the beginnins of two other major areas of' growth: interna- tional expansion and product divcrsi6catinn, These two new , sections of the busincss were abl:; to grow independently, con- I tributingto the overall strength, of the corporation without com- peting with our majpr interest in domestic tobacco. Philip Morris Intcrnat'ional' bcgan as PM Overseas ten years ago. Bcfore then Philip Morris had been exporting U. S. made ~ cigarettes to forcicn countries, but the market was starting to contract. Countries.were increasingly protecting their own in- dustrics by taxing U. S. cigarettes to the point where they could not compete. It was then that we began looking for other ways to sell our bood~ in foreign markcts. I As a result, we: now have affiliates, divisions and licensees manufacturing our cigarettes around the world, in addition to continuing to export Richmond-made cibarettes to more than 1001countries. The value of this expansion can be seen in the chart bclbw (which also appears on page 24 of the Annual R'e• port.) From contributing only 4.9 pe1' cent to Operating reve- nues in 1954, PMI now contributes almost 16 per cent, more ; than three times as much. Operating Rcvcnucs 1954 t 5.to/I DOMESTIC A.g% I ~~ 0:6°,uNON-TODACCOINTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL CONSUMER: TOBACCO NON•TOR.ACCO 35,IP°,"ePRODUCTS PRODUCTS CONSUMER. I4TERNATIONAL PRODUCTBT06ACCOPRODUCTS Opcrating Revenucs 1964 ' DOMESTiC TOCACCO PROOUCT66'II-2°j. 11.0 /e INDUSTRIAL PReOUCTS. Income from our diversified business has grown from nothing to over 16 per cent of total! revenues in 1964. PPM's expansion into non-tobacco manufacturing has been concentrated in two major areas: industrial products and! consumer prodticts. In every case, companies acquired' have been compatible with our primary business. Milprint Converting, for example, supplies some packaging materials to us as well as to ot'her customers: Our consumer products can be advertised and distributed in the same:manner as cibarettes„and can therefore benefit greatly from our corporate experience in these areas. The Annual Report's story of grou-th doesn't end with what we've accomplished in the past ten years. It shows, too; the plans being mapped out for our next decade of progress. The money we've earned is being reinvested in the future of our company and the people who work for our company. Between 1962 and 1966, 'Philip Morris will have invested approximately $'901 million in modernizing and expanding our manufacturing and adkninistrative f'acilities. From fiLst page to last, the 1964 Annual Report shows a healthy growing company; a good company in which to invest, and a~ bood company ia which to work. The Wall Street Journal February 12, 1965 P. Lorillard Co.'s Volume, Earnings Fell Last Year . Indicaterl Sales in 2nd Ilalf Tr:?I i led 1963 Pace, hut Net Sh>7wed a Slizht Increase Cigaret-Sized Ci;;ai•s Gained , R•u n\\',ri.I, NrRr,R;,r•Im+nvA NrpnrAr.n " N'F1W YOAK-P. Lnrlilao•rl C;nl reported p deCline I11 IDR4 RalPa;and earmngq. The nnmra- ny zaaitl. however, that "aiter a aharp first half dreili In 19R11 rigaret aalhs, the down curve reversed Itself." Indiratcrt cerontt' 11alf calhc still trailed a year earlier, although second half prnfit't rnne a bit. t.orillard• whnqe cigaret hrands Inclitde Kent, nldf;olrl, Newport, Spring Rnd' York, reported 1964 earninRs of $25,336,410, or $3,77 a ahare, down from $27,919.457, or $4.14 a share, the year hefnre. SAIes la.at year de- clined tn $1613.773,167 from the record $5iR,144,- 614 of: lAfi3.. Mnrga:m.T. Cramer, prevident, saifi domestic clgaret operations In the latter part nt the year were "measurably helter"' than earll.r: He Isald other areaa of operatinnc showed "eub- atanttal progresv,"' nntah1y int'e.rnatinnal nper. atinns, which set' records at ait levels. The official added that sales nf the rom, plny's rtQare.t-Ctzed cl¢ars; Madisnns anri' Re- twePn. the Acts, showed "!z.ignificant gains" and helped the company continue as the dnm. tnant producer ih this field: Noting that earninga, in the last aix month» of 1954' were ahead; nf, the 1963 perind; Mr. Cramer' said that Kent rigareta made steady Rains through mnst of the recnnd half to re- cover much nf the Qrmm(U they had lost Rnd that Newport in the last' four months of 19441 outsold the year before. Hea,dded that Spring ciQarrt:q endrdtA61 ~ with a net pain while bnlh Old Gold filt'eras and York, uslng a tl-adinz-atamp programl made Qat.icfact'nry fiains In test areav, althou(4h over-all r;ale% were down. Old Cold straights continued to decline. Lorillarrl 1k the last nf~ the five larRn puh-~~ titly held ri(;aret cnmpaniPa to report 1964 re-' eults. American Tobacco Co. anrt Fhilip Mor- ris, Inc, pnFthri record sales and profits. Ltg- gett & M•y,er.a Tnbaccn Cn,'s earninge were the hiR'haqt In three years despite a drop in qales. R. ,T. P,ovnnlria, the larrest ciraret prndlm- er Ih 1he U'.S.,,repnrted.both saleq and earn- in¢9 fell in 19(14 frnm, the reanrda of 1463. The other majnr nigaret prndnnPr, Brown & WIIIiamGnn Tnharrn C'm•p., is a eubsidlnry of Brdtish,Amoriran- Tobacco Cn. n. l,rOn1T.I,AnT) . r'R. and uhflrllarlr ret,nrt for the yoar •ndr[1 rfer: ll: , 1'rF,41nF1 19F2. • T'.arnnrt nrr rom .hr. 1177 t4.14 c1.114 ,'~ot.alrc. 45F,77.1,Ifi7 S1R.144,fl14 SIF.IRR,.1R1'~'rlhrv,(nr~, Inrn. Ix,r.. Snl87T,qIR, 6Q,17g;137, SFSlR,920Inrom~. la.N r., .. 20,5F7.,Omf/J2,261.Of1fl ^R:017,0f10ti'.Ithrnme ;!5:3161,a10, 27.71Ra;a 26•Ra1,9Pn. Commnn snnrr. ss^R,7nt s 575,sIR 6,574,51R, AA(Ipr. rrrf.rred dl%irlvnd rnqnlr.mrnlR. , Page 10
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Philip Morris Call News M,3rc;h' 1, 19 5- Page 2' '' ow 4"~d vA ~ i%rV9 I I'1-o,,1•ess is not automatic. It takes agt;rf,ssivcness and imabi- nation, pcrsist'cnce and optimism, skill and, dedication to pro- duce a record like the one in this yeat s Annual Report. Philip Morris pcople have achicvcd, a decade of' progress in tltrec major arcas; Our domestic tobacco d'ivision has grown bccause our manufacturing people met the chall'engcs of inno- vation and quality. But growth in a single area, while gratify- ing, is at best! limited. Ten years ago Philip~ Morris people be- gan looking for other directions in~which to expand. The result was the beginning of t.vo~other major areas of! growth: interna- tional cxpansion and product diversification. These two new . sections of the busincss were abl;: to grow indepenelently, con- i tributing 'to the overall strength, of'the corporation without com- peting with our majpr interest in domestic tobacco, Philip Morris Intcrnat'ional' began as PM Overseas ten years' ( ago. Bcfore then Philip Morris had been exporting U. S. made cigarettes to forefcn countries, but the market was starting to eontract. Countrics.were increasingly protecting their own in- dustries by taxing U. S. cigarettes to the point where they could not compete. It was then that we began lool:ing,for other ways i to sell our bood1s in forei ;n: markets. As a result, wc: now have affiliates, divisions and licensees manufacturing our ci-~arcttes around the world, in addition to continuing to cxhort Richmond-madc cigarettes to more than 100 countries. The value of this expansion can be seen in the chart bclbw (which also appears on page 24 of the Annual R'e+ port.) From contributing only 4l9 per cent to Operating reve- nues in 1954, PPMI now contributes almost 16 per cent, more than three times as much, Operating Revenues 1954 t /:9'k. I ------'--r 0:6?0, INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL TOBACCO h'ON•TOPACCO 15,1A0~. PRODUCTS. CONSUM£RINTERNATIONAL PRODUCTSTODACCO PRODUCTS Operating Revenues 1964' DOMESTC TOCACCO PRODUCTS 6II.:'1!f 11.0% INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS Income from our diversified business has grown from nothing to over 16 per cent of total' revenues in 1964. PM's expansion into non-tobacco manufacturing has been concentrated in two major areas: industrial products and'' consumer products. In every case, companies acquired'i have been compatible with our primary business. Milprint Converting, for example, supplies some packaging' materials to, us as well as to~ ot'her, customers. Our consumer products can be advertised and distributed in the same manner as cigarett'es„ and can therefore benefit greatly from our corporate experience in these areas. The Annual Report's story of growth doesn't end with what we've accomplished in the past ten years. It shows, too; the plians bcinb mapped out for our next decade of progress. The money we've earned is being reinvested in the future of our company and the pcople who work for our company, Betweem 1962 and 1966, Philip Morris will have invested approxiinately $'901million in modernizing and expanding our manufacturinm and adininistrative f'acilitics. From fiist page to last„ the 1964 Annual Report shows a healthy growing company; a goo& company in which to invest, and a~ bood company in~ which to work. DOMESTIC NON=TDB~.ACCOCONSUMER PRODUCTS The Wall Street Journ&l- February 12, 1965 P. Lorillard Co.'s Volume, Earnings Fell Last Year . Indicatecl Sales in 2nd Half Trailed 196.3 Pace, hut Net ShrntirM a Sli>;ht Increase Cigaret-Sized Cizai•sGained , RU.n1\'.rf.1,NrRr,F•r.fnnnvA f,.c/nJf,Nrrnn/r.,. N'F1W Y!1RI<--P. T.nrllla,rrl (',ni repf+rt'ed a lje.rtineIn iDR4 ARIos,a,nri earnin¢a. The nnmpa- ny saiil. hnwever, IhR.t "after a.harp first half drnlii Im 19F4', rigaret aalhs, Ihe down curve reversPrl Itself." Indirilert eecnndl lialf cal0c still tcaited a Veax earlier, allhnugh second half prnfit rose a bit. T.nrlllard, whnse cizaret hrands includa Rent, Old, Gold, Newpnrt, Spring and' Ynrk, reported 1`Ifi4 earningv: of $2.S,a.3f1,41f1, or V,77 a shase, dnwn from $27,31R,457, or $4.14 a share, the yea r be.fnre. Calea 1a.zt year de- clinedAn $1943,773,167 from the record $51R,144,- 614 ofi 1463. , Mnrgam.T.,Cramer, president, said domestic ciaa.ret operations In the latter part nf the year were "measurably heller" " than earller: HP said other areas of operations shnwed "aub- stantiali pr'ngres:a,"' nntahiv int'ernatMnnal oper- ations, which set' recorris at all lavel.. The offirlAl addedt that salev of the rnm, prgny's rlgaret-sized ciQara; Madisnns andi Re- tweem the Acts, showed "sii;nificant gains" and helped~ the company rnnthnue as the dom. inant producer In this field. Noting that earnings, In the last six months, of 1964' were ahead'~ nf the 1963 perind; Mr. Cramer said that Kent cigaretl made steady lrainS through mnst of the second half to re- covermuah n6 the Rrnunft they had lnst Rnd~ that Newport 1m the last four months of 19441 outsold the year before. He, added that Rpring rigareta enrird' 1P54 ' with a net pain, while bnlh Old Gold filters and York, using a lrading-atamp programl made satiRfactnr,y paine In test Areas, although over-all Fales were dnwn, Old Gnld ntralqht9 continued to decline. Lorillard 1h the )hat nfl the five large puh- 11t1y held rigaret cnmpanies to report 19R4 re- sults. American TnbACrn Cn: anrl Fhilip Mor- ris, lnc, pnat'rd record cales, anrt profits. l:.tg- gett g,. Ti,yers Tnbarcn~Cn.'s earninat were the hlp'haqt Ih three years deqfrite a drop in sales. R. T. Roynnlrls, the lprrest riRaret prodlto- er Ih Ilhe U.S., repnrted. both, sales And earn- Inti;s fell in t11M frnmi the, records of 1963. The nfhpr majnr cijzaret~ prndnner, Rrnwn & Wllllam;nn Tnharrn C7nrp., is a subsidiary of $rihlsh,Arnrrirarn Tnhaccn. Co. T'. I,On11,i,AFiT. rn. a.nd .uNeldlarle repnrtlnr the yaaronrlrfl hrr, i1: , I'N..4 T9F7 r~ex r%arnP.1nPr f~nm .h.,r (:'177 i4.14 tt.!14 Nnt' alr.. 44R,77.T,IF7 519.144.614 SIR,JnR,JA1 R'oG hrlurrInrn, Ip- . SnIR?7.41n~ Rn,17oA77, 55;51A,9PnInrnme laxr., 2G-Sti7,mm0 :12.2BI.nnn °R017,nfW ,C.r 1nr~m. 2s,;i1n,4(n: 27..'11R:4;T, aS.sJ1:9pn~. O~mmn +nnrr. s,526,7n1 ss75,5U1 6,.574,StA, AAffar. prrtnn-cddlvl.lvnd reqnlr.mrnik, , Page 10
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TABLE I QUARTERLY SALES AND PROFIT CHANGES* (1964 vs. 1963) 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Full Year Sa lie s -4. 9% -0. 5 +0. 1i +1. 0 -1. 0 Net Profit -6,4% +3. 4 -0. 8 +1. 0. -0.4 *American Tobacco, Liggett & Myers, Lorillard, Philip Morris, and Reynolds The: following table shows results; for the year for the individual companies: TABLE II 1964 9'a Change 1964 Net °6 Change Per-Share Earnings Sales a from 1963 Income (a) from 1964 1964 1963 American $11,203 , 429 +0. 9 $ 73, 195 +6. 4 $2, 69 $2. 51 Liggett & Myers 502,666 -0. 9 26,236 +6. 2 6.37 5.96 Lorillard 466,733 -9. 6 25,330 -9. 3 3.77 4.14 Philip Morris 641,439 +9. 6 22,614 ' +2. 5 6.06 5.91 Reynolds (a) In thousands. 1,613,802 -3'. 5 124,005 -3. 9 3.02 3.13 It wiLl be noted that comparisons of'the individual companies varied widely. Both Am- erican and Philip Morris reported record profits for 1964, and Liggett & Myers reversed' a downward trend in earnings which dated back to 1959. The results of Lorillard' and Reynolds were relatively poor. However, Lorillard did better in the second half of 1964 than in the corresponding 1963' period. The bulk of the earnings decline reported by Reynolds occurred in the third quarter, when higher leaf tobacco costs and increased advertising expenditures inflated; expenses. 1965 PROSPECTS The quarterly trend of sales and earnings last year is encouraging and provides the backgr6und for predicting further improvement this year. First quarter 1965 results will, of course, show up very favorably against last year's de- sificati'on I)y the large cigarette companies.- umbeT oI acquisitions~were made iast y,~di; two naajrnr takeovers - Penick &Ford by R.J. Reynolds and Consolidated Foods by American Tobacco~ - have been proposed. Theleadingcigaret't'e companies wi'lli continue to rely upon tobacc() earnings for the bulk of their profits, but the diversification programs may provide a growth aspect exceeding that which is likely for tobacco earnings. News Bulletin February 23, 1965 Page 11
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. GEN-55 t7-551 To A. D. Shelley No' Pauline Baitz M0RE.F. FROM HGS-65-207 DATE March 12, 1965 Subject: Recent Patents of Interest in the Cigarette Tow Field F. H. Lassiter of New York has patented a cigarette which provides a reminder to stop smoking the cigarette at a predetermined point by the release of a pleasant but definitely noticeable odor or taste into the smoke when the burning approaches this predetermined point. (U.S. 3,169,535) Filto Pipes Inc. claims a filter pipe construction which is not prone to clogging, is easily cleaned, and is readily assemblediand disassembled. The filtering material is tobacco and!is enclosed in a metal sleeve within the stem. (U.S. 3, 170,468) Moliins Machine Co. has received two recent apparatus patents. In one, an ultrasonic vibration device is used to seal the edges of wrapping paper for the tobacco rods. (U.S. 3,171,415) The other. covers the mechanism which positions and aligns a filter mouthpiece component between two tobacco rod components. (U.S, 3, 169,627) AMF's most recent apparatus patent uses a two stage conveyor system for the shred'd'e&tobacco thus allowing the cigarette making machine to be operated at higher speeds and still maintain uniform rod density. (U.S. 3,170,467) PB: s Page 12
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N E W B R A N D 5 N E w ~. H A N'. D (s, C'-
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~ .\ \ J U. S. Tobacco Jouimal February 18, 1965 - Page 19 Miami Company To Introduce New 'Latin' Cigarette Dosal & Mendez Will Market Cigarette of Black Latin Tobacco MIAMI, FLA., Wednesday (CS)-A "new, milder cigarette made from black Latin American tobacco" will, be onAhe market within two tb three months, ac- cording to Alberto Dosal~ partner in Dosal & Mendez Tobacco Corp., Hialeah, "We are now making samples," said Mr. Dosal, "and! after trying them out we willl begin manufacture of the new cigarette which will be aimedlprimarily' at women and American smokers as well as the many Cubans who now want a milder cigarette." At the present time,, 95 per cent or more of the Competidoras cigarettes manufactured by the firm are sold to Cubans, with strong distribution and'& sale in California; Washington, New York„Tampa, Key West and Miami, alll locations where Cuban exiles have set- tled in large numbers, according to Mr. Dosah "We now hope to expand into the American market with our new ciga- rette,'," the Miami executive saidl The firm now .prodirces more than 6,000 cartons per week. Mr. Dosal said sales are now about half and! half be- tween the filter and non-filter Conrpeti+, doras, with the figures slightly in favor of the filter cigarette. Formerly, the firm sold approximately 75 per cent non-filter cigarettes as compared to only about 25 per cent filter. The filter has steadily gained in popularity an& has now surpassed the non4ilter in' sales, he declared. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 16, 19 5- Page 6 New Lucky Strike Filters Moving Well in Buffalo BUFFALO,, N. Y.,, Monday (CS)- Distribution of the new Lucky Strike Filter cigarette began in the Buffalo area the last week in January. "There has been a favorable initial acceptance of the Lucky Strike Flavor Tipj" said Howar&J. Hoffman, section sales manager ofl the American Tobacco Co. He and B. L, Troop;, district manag- er of the tobacco company, said a local advertising campaign started this week. Toba,cco GI' =14 /1, _5 3' C_ March 5, 1965 - Page 17 Predict Good Receplion For Lucky Strike Filters MIAMI, FLA., Thursday (CS)-"We have high hopes and good expectations for the new Lucky Strike Filters,"' reported Mr. St. Thomas of Wometcol Vending Co. "However," he said, "they have not yet reached the general public, so we will not have actuali reports on the new cigarette's progress for some t'ime."' Mr. St. Thomas told the UNITFD STATES TOBACCO JOURNAL that', "Camel cigarettes still hold the number one position in sales in this area, with Kent and Salem also sales leaders:" ~'/ /' (~ ~ Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 18 Pall Mall Filter-Tip Introduced in Texas The American Tobacco Company has announced introduction of'~ its new Pall Mall filter-tipped cigarettes in Dallhs, Fort Worth and Houston, Texas, effective Febniary 15, ~I!~~a Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 16 Van Baars Junior Cigars Make United States Debut Van Baars Juniors, small cigars from Scandinavia, are being launched on their first advertising venture in the United States along a status magazine media course headed for East Coast ports, with New York as the main des: tination. The ad campaign, charted by the Daniel & Charles agency of New York for the Swedish Tobacco Company, makers of Van, Baars, and "21" Chtb Selected Items, Ltd., exclusive dis- tributors for the line in the U.S., is aimed at' a sophisticated high-income urban readership who make up the bulk of the fine cigar market in this country: According to Sheldbn Tan- nens president of "21" Club Selected Items„ approximately 75 per cent of all annual premium cigar purchases in the United States are accounted for in New York alone. Van Baars Juniors will be available in packs of 10 priced at 60~ cents, or tins of 20 for $1.20: Selected' Items Ltd. willl provide these small quality cigars from, Sweden with distribution in ret'ail' outlets where: the firm is an established factor in the Class G(ci: gars selling at 20 cents and'up each)) category - night clubs, private clubs, restaurants, prestige hotels, and the better tobacco, shops and cigar stores. U. 3 . Tobacco Journal Feuruary 25, 19b5 - Page 19 Pall Malls Add Market The American Tobacco has an- nounced the introduction of its new Pall Mall Filter Tipped cigarettes in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas effective March 11. Page 13
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 19.T5 - Page 19 Miami Company To Introduce New latin' Cigarette Dosal & Mendez Will Market Cigarette of Black Latin Tobacco MIAMI, FLA., Wednesday (CS)-A "new, milder cigarette made from black Latin American tobacco" will be on~ the market within two to three months, ac- cording to Alberto Dosali partner in Dosal & Mendez Tobacco Corp., Hialeahi "We are now making samples," said Mr. Dosal, "andi after trying them out we wilU begin manufacture of the new cigarette which will be aimedlprimarily at' women and American smokers as well as the many Cubans who now want a milder cigarette." At the present time;, 95 per cent or more of the Competidoras cigarettes manufactured by the f'irrn are sold to Cubans, with strongd~i'stribution an& sale in Californiay Washington, New York„Tampa, Key West, and Miami, all~ locations where Cuban exiles have set- tled imlkrge numbers„ according to Mr. DosaL "We now hope to expand into the American market with our new ciga- rette," the Miami executive said! The firm now prodlices more than 6,000 cartons per week. Mr, Dosal said sales are now about half and! half he- tween the filter and non-filter Competi, doras, with the figures slightly in favor of the filter cigarette. Formerly, thee firm sold approximately 7'5per cent non-filter cigarettes as compared too only, about25: per cent filter. The filter has steadily gained in popularity an& has now surpassed the non=filter in sales, he declared. U. S L/ Tobacco~ Journal February 1''y 19 5- Page 6 New Lucky Strike Filters Moving Well in Buffalo BUFFALO,, N. Y., Monday (CS)- Distribution of the new Lucky Strike Filter cigarette began in the Buffalo area the last week in January. "There has been a favorable initial acceptance of t~heLucky Strike Flavor Tipj" said Howar&J. Hoffman, section sales,manager of the American Tobacco Co. He and B. L, Troop; district manag- er of the tobacco company, said a local advertising campaign started this week. Tobacco March15, 1965- Page 17 Predict Good Receplion For Lucky Strike Filters MIAMI, FLA., Thursday (CS)-"We have high hopes and good expectations for the new Lucky Strike Filters,"' reported Mr. St. Thomas of Wometco: Vending Co. "However," he said, "they have not yet reached the general public, so we willl not have actual'reports on the new cigarette's progress for some t'ime."' Mr. St. Thomas told the: UNITED STATES' TOB~ACCO, JOURNAL that, "Camel cigarettes still hold the number, one position in sales in this area, with Kent and Salem also sales lead'ers:" 4 Z) Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 18 Pall Mall Filter-Tip Introduced in Texas The .lmerican Tobacco Company has announced introduction of its new Pall Mall filter-tippe& cigarettes in Dallhs, Fort Worth andi Houston„ Texas, effective February 15, q-~ 4 5 ~ P, Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 16 Van Baars Junior Cigars Make United States Debut Van Baars Juniors, small cigars from Scandinavia, are being launched on their first advertising venture in the United States along a status magazine media course headed for East Coast ports, with New York as the main des: tination.. The ad campaign, charted by the Daniel & Charles agency of New York for the Swedish Tobacco Companv, makers ofl V:3nBaars, and °21" Club Selected Items,, Ltd., exclusive dis- tributors for the line in the U.S., is aimed at' a sophisticated high-income urban readership~ who make up the bulk of'. the fine cigar market in this country: According to Sheldon Tan- nen, president of' "21"' Club Selected Items;_approximately 75 per cent of all annual premium cigar purchases in the United States are accounted for in New York alone. Van Baars Juniors will be available in packs of 10 priced at 60' cents, or tins of' 20 for $1.20; Selected Items Ltd. wiR provide these small quality cigars fromi Sweden with distribution in retail outlets where the, firm is ann established factor in the Class G('ci- gars selling at 20 cents andl up each)) category - night clubs, private clubs, restaurants, prestige hotels, and the better tobacco shops and cigar stores. U . S . Tobacco Journal February 25, 19b5 - Page 19. Pall Malls Add Market O N 1-+ The American Tobacco has an- nounced the introduction of its new Pall Mall Filter Tipped cigarettes in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas effective March 1. Page 13
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 19 Miami Company To Introduce New latin' Cigarette Dosal & Mendez Will Market Cigarette of Black Latin Tobacco MIAMI, FLA., Wednesday (CS)-A "new, milder cigarette made from black Latin American tobacco" will be ow the market within two tb three months, ac- cording to Alberto Dosal( partner in Dosal & Mendez Tobacco Corp., Hialeahi "We are now making samples," said Mr. Dosal, "and' after trying them out we wiill begin manufacture of the new cigarette which will be aimediprimarily ~ at women and American smokers as ~ \ 3 well as the many Cubans who now want a milder cigarette." At the present time;, 95 per cent or more of the Competidoras cigarettes manufactured by the firm are sold to Cubans, with strong di'stribution andl sale in California, Washington, New York„Tampa, Key West and Miami, al11 locations where Cuban exiles have set- tled imlkrge numbers„ according to Mr. DosaL "We now hope to expand into the American market with our new ciga- rette," the Miami executive said': The firm, now prodlrces more than 5,000 Cartons per week. Mr. Dosal said sales are now about half and! half be- tween the filter and non-filter Competi. doras, with the figures slightly in favor of the filter cigarette. Formerly, thee firm sold approximately 75 per cent non-filter cigarettes as compared to only about 25 per cent filter. The filter has steadily gained in popularity an& has now surpassed the non-filter in sales, he declared. U . S . Tobacco Journal February 1dy 19 5- Page 6 New Lucky Strike Filters Moving Well in Buffalo BUFFALO,, N. Y., Monday (CS)- Distribution of the new Lucky Strike Filter cigarette began in the Buffalo area the last week in January. "There has been a favorable initial acceptance of the Lucky Strike Flavor Tip~" said Howard'. J. Hoffman, section sales manager of the American Tobacco Co. He and B. L, Troop; district manag- er of the tobacco company, said a local advertising campaign started this week. Tobacco (~:/ / =/4 /, 5 ~' <_- March~ 5, 1965-Pege 17 Predict Good Receplion For Lucky Strike Filters MIAMI, FLA., Thursday (CS)-"We have high hopes and good expectations for the new Lucky Strike Filters,"' reported Mr. St. Thomas of Wometco Vending Co. "However," he said, "they have not yet reached the general public, so we willlnot have actual'reports on the new, cigarette's progress for some t'ime."' Mr. St. Thomas told the UNITED STATES' TOBACCO JOURNAL that, "Camel cigarettes still hold the number one position in sales in this area, with Kent and Salem also sales leaders:" r•/%i Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 18' Pall Mall Filter-Tip Introduced in Texas The American Tobacco Company has announced introduction of its new ~ Pall Mall filter-tippe& cigarettes in Dallbs, Fort Worth and! Houston„ Texas, effective February 1,5; Tobacco G /1 q.1 ,, 6 3 P, February 19, 1965 - Page 16 Van Baars Junior Cigars Make United States Debut Van Baars Juniors, small cigars from Scandinavia, are being launched on their first advertising venture in the United' States along a status magazine media course headed for East Coast ports, with New York as the main des: tination. The ad campaign, charted by the Daniel & Charles agency of New York for the Swedish Tobacco Company, makers ofl Van Baars, and "21" Club Selected Items, Ltd., exclusive dis- tributors for the line in the U.S., is aimed at' a sophisticated high-income urban readership who make up the bulk of the fine cigarmalket~ in 'thi'scountry: According to Sheldbn Tan- nens president of' "21" Club Selected Items,_approximately 75 per cent of all annual premium cigar purchases in the United States are accounted for in New York alone. Van Baars Juniors will be available in packs of 10 priced at 60 cents, or tins of 20 for $1.20; Selected' Items Ltd. willl provide these small quality cigars from~ Sweden with distribution in retail outlets where the firm is an established factor in the Class G('ci: gars selling at 20 cents and! up each)) category - night clubs, private clubs, restaurants, prestige hotels, and the better tobacco shops and cigar stores. U. 3. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19b5 - Page 19 Pall Malls Add Market The American Tobacco has an- nounced the introduction of its new Pall Mall Filter Tipped cigarettes in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas effective March 11. Page 13'
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~~. U. S. Tobacco Journ®1 February 1, 1965 - Page 19 Miami Company To Introduce New latin' Cigarette Dosal & Mendez Will Market Cigarette of Black Latin Tobacco MIAMI, FLA., Wednesday (CS)-A "new, milder cigarette made from black Latin American tobacco" will be om the market within two tb three months, ac- cording to Alberto Dosal~ partner in Dosal & Mendez Tobacco C:orp., Hialeah, "We are now making samples,"' said Mr. Dosal, "and! after trying them out we willl begin manufacture of the new cigarette which will be aimed! primarily at women and American smokers as well as the many Cubans who now want a milder cigarette." At the present, time,, 95 per cent or more of the Competidoras cigarettes manufactured by the firm are sold to Cubans, withstrongdi'stribution an& sale in California, Washington, New York, Tampa, Key West and Miami, all' locations where Cuban exiles have set- tled in ltrrge numbers,, according to Mr. Dosal~ "We now hope to expand into the American market with our new ciga- rette," the Miami executive said! The firm now •prodlrces more than 6,000 cartons per week. Mr. Dosal said sales are, now about half andl half be- tween the filter and non-filter Competi, doras, with the figures slightly in favor of the filter cigarette. Formerly, the firm sold approximately 75 per cent non-filter cigarettes as compared too only about 25 per cent filter. The filter has steadily gained in popularity and has now surpassed the non,filter in' sales, he declared. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 16, 1965 - P9.ge 6 New Lucky Strike Filters Moving Well in Buffalo BUFFAIL©,, N. Y., Monday (CS)- Distribution of the new Lucky Strike Filter cigarette began in the Buffalo area the last week in January. "There has been a favorable initial acceptance of the Lucky Strike Flavor Tipj" said Howar& J. Hoffman, section sales,manager of the American Tobacco Co. He and B. L Troop; district manag- er of the tobacco company, said a local advertising campaign started this week. Tobacco March~5, 1965 - Page 17 Predict Good Receplion For Lucky Strike Filters MIAMI, FLA., Thursday (CS)-"We have high hopes and good expectations for the new Lucky Strike Filters,"' reported Mr. St. Thomas of Wometco Vending Co. "However," he said,, "they have not yet reached the general public, so we will not have actuals reports on the new cigarette's progress for some t'ime."' Mr. St. Thomas told the UNITED STATES' TdBACCO JOURNAL that, "Camel cigarettes still hold the numberr one position in sales in this area, with Kent and Salem~ also sales leaders." ) /J Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 18 Pall Mall Filter-Tip Introduced in Texas The American Tobacco Company has announced introduction ofi itsne..• Pa11 Mall filter-tipped cigarettes in Dallhs, Fort Worth and Houston,, Texas, effective February 15, Tobacco f, /i q4 '~ 5 _ 3 P, February 19, 1965 - Page 16 Van Baars Junior Cigars Make United States Debut Van Baars Juniors, small cigars from Scandinavia, are being launched on their first advertising venture in the United States along a status magazine media course headed for East Coast': ports, with New York as the main des+ tination., The ad campaign, charted by the Daniel & Charles agency of New York for the Swedish Tobacco Companv, makers ofl Van~ Baars, and "21" Club Selected Items, Ltd., exclusive dis- tributors for the line in the U.S., is aimed at a sophisticated high-income urban readership who make up the bulk of the fine cigar market in this country: According to Sheldbn Tan- nen~ president of "21" Club Selected Items, approximately 75 per cent of all annual premium cigar purchases in the United States are accounted for in New York alone. Van Baars Juniors will be available in packs of 10 priced at 60~ cents, or tins of 20 for $1.20; Selected! Items Ltd. willl provide these small qpality cigars fromi Sweden with distribution in ret'ail outlets where the firm is ann established factor in the Class G('ci: gars selling at 20 cents and'. up each) category - night clubs, private clubs, restaurants, prestige hotels, and the better tobacco, shops and cigar stores. U'. ~') . Tobacco Journal Feurus.ry 25, 19b5 - Page 19 Pall Malls Add Market The American Tobacco has an- nounced the introduction of its new Pall Mall Filter Tipped cigarettes in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas effective March 1. Page 13
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 19 Miami Company To Introduce New 'Latin' Cigarette Dosal & Mendez Will Market Cigarette of Black Latin Tobacco MIAMI, FLA., Wednesday (CS)-A "new, milder cigarette made from black Latin American tobacco" will be omthe market within two tb three months, ac- cording to Alberto Dosa14 partner in Dosal & Mendez Tobacco Corp., Hialeah, "We are now making samples,"' said Mr. Dosal, "andl after trying them out we wilU begin manufacture of the new cigarette which will be aimedlprimarily at women and American smokers as well as the many Cubans who now want a milder cigarette." At the present time;, 95 per cent or more of the Competidoras cigarettes manufactured by the f'irm are sold to Cubans, withstrongd~i'stribution and! sale in California, Washington, New York„Tampa, Key West and Miami, all! locations where Cuban exiles have set- tled imlkrrge numbers„ according to Mr. Dosal: "We now hope to expand into the American market with our new ciga- rette," the Miami executive said': The firm~ nowprodlrcesmore than 6,QQ0 caxt'ons per week. Mr. Dosal said sales are now about half and! half he- tween the filter and non-filter Conrpeti~ doras, with the figures slightly in favor of the filter cigarette. Formerly, thee firm sold approximately 7'5per cent non-filter cigarettes as compared to only about 25 per cent filter. The filter has steadily gained in popularity an& has now surpassed the nornfilter in sales, he declared. Tobacco ~. , U. S. Tobacco~ Journal February l&y 19 5- Ps,ge 6 New Lucky Strike Filters Moving Well in Buffalo BUFFALO,, N. Y., Monday (CS)- Distribution of the, new Lucky Strike Filter cigarette began in the Buffalo area the last week in January. "There has been a favorable initial acceptance of the Lucky Strike Flavor Tip~" said Howar& J. Hoffman, section sales manager of the American Tobacco Co. He and B. L Troop, district manag- er of the tobacco company, said a local advertising campaign started this week. Tobacco / /'1~-~ji, ~_3~ G- March~5, 1965 - Page 17 Predict Good Receplion For Lucky Strike Filters MIAMI, FLA., Thursday (CS)-"We have high hopes and good expectations for the new Lucky Strike Filters,"' reported Mr. St. Thomas of Wometco: Vending Co. "However," he said, "they have not yet reached the general public, so we willi not have actual'reports on the new cigarette's progress for some t'ime."' Mr. St. Thomas told the UNITED STATES' 'hdBACCO JOURNAL that, "Camel cigarettes still hold the number one position in sales in this area, with Kent and Salem also sales leaders." February 19, 1965 - Page 18 Pall Mall Filter-Tip I'ntroduced in Texas The Anierican Tobacco Company has announced introduction of: its new Pall Mall filter-tipped' cigarettes in Dailhs, Fort Worth an& Houston„ Texas, effective Febniary 15; C l, c' -1 L ; ~ -3 ' C Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 16 Van Baars Junior Cigars Make United States Debut Van Baars Juniors, small cigars from Scandinavia, are being launched on their first advertising venture in the United States along a status magazine media course headed for East Coast ports, with New York as the main des- tination.. The ad campaign, charted by the Daniel & Charles agency of New York for the Swedish Tobacco Company, makers ofl Van; Baars, and °21" Club Selected Items,, Ltd., exclusive dis- tributors for the line in the U.S., is aimed at a sophisticated high-income urban readership who make up the bulk of the fine cigar market in this country. According to Sheldon Tan- nen, president of' "21"' Club Selected Items,`approximately 75 per cent of all annual premium cigar purchases in the Unit'ed States are accounted for in New York alone. Van Baars Juniors will be availablr' in packs of 10 priced at 60~ cents, or tins of' 20 for $1.20; Selected Items Ltd. will! provide these small q,uality cigars from~ Sweden with distribution in retail outlets where, the firm is ann established factor in the Class G(;ci= gars selling at 20~ cents and! up each), category - night clubs, private clubs, restaurants, prestige hotels, and the better tobacco, shops and cigar stores. U'. 3. Tobacco Journal Feoruary 25, 19b5 - Page 19 Pall Malls Add Market The American Tobacco has an- notmced the introduction of its new Pall Mall Filter Tipped cigarettes in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas effective March 11. Page 13
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\ U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 1975 - Page 19 Miami Company To Introduce New 'latin' Cigarette Dosal & Mendez Will Market Cigarette of Black Latin Tobacco MIAMI, FLA., Wednesday ('CS)-A "new, milder cigarette made from black Latin American tobacco" will be onAhe market within two tb three months, ac- cording to Alberto Dosal~ partner in Dosal &' Mendez Tobacco Corp., Hialeah, "We are now making samples," said Mr. Dosal, "and! after trying them out we willl begin manufacture of the new cigarett'e which will be aimedlprimarily at women and American smokers as well as the many Cubans who now want a milder cigarette." At the presenttilne;, 95 per cent or more of the Competidoras cigarettes manufactured by the firm are sold to Cubans, with strong distribution and' sale in Californiay Washington, New York„Tampa, K'eyWest and Miami, all! locations where Cuban exiles have set- tled in~ lirrge numbers, according to Mr. Dosall "We now hope to expand into the American market with our new ciga- rette," the Miami executive saidl The firm now prodlices more than 6,U00 cartons per week. Mr. Dosal said sales are now about' half and! half be- tween the,filter and non-filter Competi« doras, with the figures slightly in favor of the filter cigarette. Formerly, the firm sold approximately 76per cent non-filter cigarettes as compared too only about 25 per cent filter. The filter has steadily gained in popularity and has now surpassed the non4ilteriK sales, he declared. U. S . Tobacco, Journal February 16, 19 5 - Page 6 New Lucky Strike Filters Moving Well in Buffalo BUFFALO,, N. Y., Monday (CS)- Distribution of the new Lucky Strike Filter cigarette began in the Buffalo area the last week in January. "There has been a favorable initial acceptance of the Lucky Strike Flavor Tip~" said Howar&J. Hoffman, section sales manager ofi the American Tobacco Co. He and B. L, Troop; district manag- er of the tobacco company, said a local advertising campaign started this week. Tobacco - =1~ ! , ~ 3' ~". March 5, 1965 - Page 17 Predict Good Receplion For Lucky Strike Filters MIAMI, FLA., Thursday (CS)-"We have high hopes and goo& expectations for the new Lucky Strike Filters,"' reported Mr. St. Thomas of Wometco Vending Co. "However," he said,"they have not yet reached the general public, so we will not have actuaP reports on the new cigarette's progress for some time."' Mr. St. Thomas told the UNITED STATES' TOBACCO JOLIRNAIL that~, "Camel cigarettes still hold the number one position i•n sales in this area, with Kent and Salem~ also sales leaders:" Tobacco ~'`1~! <~`~~ -) February 19, 1965 - Page 18 Pall Mall Filter-Tip Introduced in Texas The American Tobacco Company has announced introduction ofl its new Pall Mall filter-tipped cigarettes in Dallhs, Fort Worth and, Houston,, Texas, effective Febniary, 15; ~ /!q-~4 5:3 ~23 Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 16 Van Baars Junior Cigars Make United States Debut Van Baars Juniors, small cigars from Scandinavia, are being launched on their first advertising venture in the United States along a status magazine media course headed for East Coast ports, with New York as the main des- tination. The ad campaign, charted by the Daniel & Charles agency of New York for the Swedish Tobacco Companv, makers of Vam Baars, and °21"Chib Selected Items, Ltd., exclusive dis- tributors for the line in the U.S., is aimed at' a sophisticated high-income urban readership who make up the bulk of the fine cigar market in this country. According to Sheldon Tan- nen; president of' "21"' Club Selected Items,iapproximately 75 per cent of all annual premium cigar purchases in the United States are accounted for in New York alone.. Van Baars Juniors will be availablb in packs of 10 priced at fi0 cents, or tins of' 20 for $1.20; Select'ed' Items Ltd. willi provide these smallqpality cigars fromi Sweden with distribution in retail outlets where the firm is ann established factor in the Class G(;ci: gars selling at 20, cents and' up each)) category - night clubs, private clubs, restaurants, prestige hotels, and the better tobacco, shops and cigar stores. U'. 3 . Tobacco Journal Feoruary 25, 19b5 - Page 19 Pall Malls Add Market The American Tobacco has an- nounced the introduction of its new Pall Mall Filter Tipped cigarettcs in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas effective March 1i. Page 13'
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S M 4 K I N G A N D H E A L T H H . E ;
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., , ,~ Advertising Age , March 9, 19 65- Pages 1 & 99 Congress Units to Probe Efficacy of Self RegulationinCigare#Advertising Those Testifying to Include Meyner, NAB, Industry, Health Groups WASHINGTON, March 4-The re- sults of self regulation of cigaret: advertising are in for close exami- I nat'ion when the Senate commerce I committee opens six days of hear- ings late this month on legislation dealing with warnings on cigaret l packages and ads. The committee's official an- nouncement of~ the hearings, which appeared today, disclosed that one of the witnesses will be Robert B.. Meyner, administrator of the to- bacco indust'ry"s, cigaret adver- tising code. While it was not mentioned in the announcement, AnvsaTrSrrrc Ace learned today that the com- mittee also has asked the National i Assn., of Broadcasters to provide' witnesses who can~ testify on, the cigaret advertising restrictions which are applied' by the broad- casting industry.  Mr. Meyner will be making his first public appearance since his selection as t'obacco industry code administrator. Both, he and the broadcasting industry witnesses will be appearing at the request of the committee, which indicated' it wants to find out whether self reg- ulation can effectively shield young people from the appeals of cigaret advertising. The committee's decision to make its own study of self, regula- tion suggests that an effort is shaping up to anticipate the testi- mony that indust'ry witnesses will , present when they make their apri~ pearance during the final days of'f the hearing.  The industry's friends in Con- i gress have been hoping to get leg- islation nullifying a Federal Trade ICommission rule which requires warnings on packages and ads: In- dustry witnesses are expected to plead' that Congress should give self regulation a chance.. The committee has been hearing complaints from those who feell self regulation has merely resulted in a swvit'ch, to other copy themes. The committee has been told! there is more cigaret advertising than ever, and that it still appears in places where it reaches big teen I age audiences;  Moreover, the committee has ads, and~ disclosures of tar and nic- I otine content have been removed I from packages: One of the bills which the Senate committee is con- sidering, S. 559; sponsored by Sen: Warren Magnuson (D!„ Wash.), the • committee chairman, moves in the opposite diTection~ and requires that every package disclose tar an& nicotine content.  The Senate committee will con- sider two bills. Sen. Magnuson's billi requires warnings on packages and disclbsure of tar and nicotine content„while a second:bill (S. 547); by Sen. Maurine Neuberger (D., Ore.), calls for warnings on both packages and ads. On the House side,, the com- merce committee is:also preparing to have hearings on bills which call for warnings on packages, while nullifying FTC efforts to re- quire warnings in ads. The announcement disclosed that Emerson Foote, former chair- man of McCann-Erickson, now chairman of the National Intera- gency Council on Smoking & Health, is going to testfifyforcon- trol legislation (for other `news" of Mr. Foote see story on Page 3). It also revealed that several volun- tary health and education associa- tions, including the American Can- II eer Society, American Heart' Assn. '' and the National Congress of PTA have asked to be heard.  The lead-off witnesses will be U.S. Surgeon G'eneral Luther Ter- ry and! Federal Trade Commission Chairman Paul Rand' Dixon (AA„ March 1) .. Hearings are scheduled! for March 22-25, and March~ 29-30, with~ medicali and industry wit- nesses appearing on the final days. # Advertising Age March~ , 19 65- Pages 3& iEl+ Congress Probes on Cigaret Ads I Labels to Begin been following the activities of Mr. Mevner. As a result of his initial moves, references to filter effec- tiveness tiveness have been nenciled out of ~ WASHINGTON, Feb: 25-Senate and Hbuse committees were put'- ting the finishing touches this' week on preparations for hearings on cigaret labeling and advertising. The Senate tommittee has ,picked March 22 as the opening date for its hearings, with Surgeon General Luther Terry schedule& as the leadoff witness. According to~ present plans the hearings will continue for the remainder of that I week, and into the next week. No date has been announced for I the hearings by the House com- merce committee;, but they are ex- pected to take place very soon. Rep:Oren Harris (D., Ark.), the committee chairman, has stated that cigaret labels and advertising will have a high priority on his committee's schedule.. Requests for legislation originat- ed with the industry after the Fed- eral'. Trade Commission announced early last year~ that it was eonsid- ering, a requirement that warningss be placed on cigaret packages and labels. An FTC rule which, would have required warnings on pack- ages Jan. 1, and warnings in ads after July 1„ 1965, was suspended after Rep: Harris served notice that he expected to handle the problem through legislation. So far the legislation introduced in the two congressional chambers followsa diverse course: . The Senate committee has re- ceived two bills. One, by Sem War-„ ren Magnuson (D., Washs), wouldl require warnings on packages, and' the disclosure of tar and nicotine . content. He i:s silent on advertising The other, by Sen. Maurine Ne,i- berger (D., Ore.),, requires warn- Ings both on packages and in ads . On, the House side; the penrlGnt~ bills conform~ to~ proposals which were favored by industry spoke:--j men during last year's hearinft-. i These bills would require a warn - I ing on packages. But by "I empting the fieldr' they~ would ni,l lify the FTC rule requiring warn - ings in advertising.  The announcement that SurKrmn I General Terry will be the ]pflrloff witness March 22 came immedi.rr,•- ly after President Johnson rc- ' vealed that he decided to app-ont ,' Dri. Terry to a new four-year te,m. There had been reports that othen s were being,considered for the lwsl O Under the present schedule of ~ the Senate commerce committee. spokesmen for health and edlica- 11"A tional organizations will follow the CZ U.S. Surgeon General. Next be- POA hind them will be Paul Rand Dix- Qj on, the chairman of the Federal (f't Trade Commission. In the later CA stages of the hearings the commit- . tee will hear witnesses from the ~ cigareG industry and~ media repre- sentatives. # . page 14
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., Acl.vertising Age- March 8, 1965 ~ Pages 1 & 99 Congress Units to Probe Efficacy of Self Regulation in Cigaret Advertising Those Testifying to Include Meyner, NAB, Industry, Health Groups WASHINGTON, March 4-The re- sults of self regulation of cigaret' advertising are in for clbse exami- nation when the Senate commerce I committee opens six days of hear- ings late this month on legislation dealing with warnings on cigaret ads, andl disclosures of tar and nic- ~ otine content have been removed l from packages: One of the bills which the Senate committee is con- sidering, S. 559, sponsored by Sen, Warren Magnuson (D;, Wash.), tbe • committee chairman, moves in the opposite dii•ectiom and requires that every package disclose tar an& nicotine content. packages and ads. I The Senate committee will con- The committee's officiall an- sider two bills. Sen. Magnuson's nouncement of the hearings, which bi11i requires warnings on packages appeared today, disclosed that one and disclbsure of tar and nicotine of the witnesses will' be Robert B., content„while a second bill (S. 547), Meyner, administrator of the to- by Sen. Maurine Neuberger bacco industry's cigaret adver- (D., Ore.), calls for warnings on tising code: both packages and ads: While it was not mentioned in On the House side;, the com- the announcement, AnveeTISiNC merce committee is also preparing ACE learned today that~ the com- to have hearings on bills which mittee also has asked the National i call for warnings on packages, while nullifying FTC efforts to re- Assn., of Broadcasters to provide witnesses who cam testify on~ the cigaret advertising restrictions which are applied~ by the broad- casting industry.  Mr. Meyner will be making his first public appearance since his selection as tobacco industry code administrator. Both~ he and the broadcasting industry witnesses will be appearing at the request of the committee, which indicat'ed' it wants to find out whether self reg- ulation can effectively shield young people from the appeals of cigaretl advertising. The committee's decision to . _ l lf ' i regu a- make its own study oV se ry and! Federal Trade Commission tion suggests that an effort is Chairman Paul Rand Dixon (AA,, shaping up to antlicipate the testi- March 1):. mony that industry witnesses will present when they make their ap-';! Hearings are scheduled~ for pearance during the final days of the hearing.  The industry's friends in Con- I gress have been hoping, to get leg- islation nullifying a Federal Trade. Commission rule which requires warnings on packages and ads In- ex ected to are p t quire warnings im ads. The announcement disclosed that Emerson Foote, former chair- man of McCann-Erickson, noww chairman of the National Intera- gency Council on Smoking & Health, is gping to testify for con- trol legislation (for other `news" of Mr. Foote see story on Page 3). It ' also revealed that several volun- tary health and education associa- tions, including the American Can- cer Society, American Hpart' Assn. ' and the National Congress of PTA have asked to be heard.  The lead-off witnesses will be Surgeon General Luther Ter- U S March 22-25, and March, 29-30, with medicalandl industry wit- nesses appearing on the final days. ~a nesses dustry wi AdveI tisj.ri f' plead that Congress should give ~'~ self regulation a chance.. MBJI'ch~ 8y, 19 65- P8$e8 3&44 The committee has been hearing complaints from those who feelCongress Probes ~ self regulation has merelyresulted' in, a switch, to other copy themes. The committee has been told' there Cigaret Ads~ is more cigaret advertising than Qn ever, and that it still appears in places where it reaches big teen I age audiences, Labels to Begin  Moreover, the committee has been following,ttie activities of Mr. jj Mcyner. As a result of his initial " moves, references to filter effec- I tiveness,have been neneiled out of~ WASHiNGrorr, Feb: 25-Senate and House committees were put'- ting the finishing touches this week om preparations for hearings on cigaret labeling and advertising. 'I'he Senate' Commlttee has ,picked March 22 as the opening date for its hearings, with Surgeon General Luther Terry schedule& as the leadoff witness. According to, present plans the hearings will continue for the remainder of that j week, and into the next week. No date has been announced for! the hearings by the House com- merce committee,, but they are ex- pected to take place very soon. Rep, Oren Harris (D., Ark.), the committee chairman, has stated that cigaret labels and advertising will have a high priority on his committee's schedule.. Requests for legislation originat- ed with the industry after the Fed- eral'. Trade Commission announced early last year that it was consid- ering a requirement that warnings be placed on cigaret packages and labels. An FTC rule which, would have required warnings on pack- ages Jan. 1, and warnings in ads, after July 1„ 1965, was suspended after Rep: Harris served notice that he expected to handle the problem through legislation. So far the legislation introduced In the two congressional chambers follbws a diverse course: . The Senate committee has re- ceived~ two bills. One, by Sen War-,. ren Magnuson ('D.,, Wash~), wouldl require warnings on packages, and! the disclosure of tar and nicotine content. He is silent on advertiFint;. The other, by Sen. Maurine Neii- berger (D,, Ore. ) , requires warn Ings both on packages and in ads . Om the Houseside; the pendfnt, bills conform to~ proposals whic Yr were favored by industry spoker-j men during last year's hearinrt These bills would require a warn I ing on packages. But by "Pre-I empting the fieldt' they would mil j lify the FTC rule requiring warn - j ihgs in advertising.  The announcement that Surgcrm ; General': Terry will be the learlr,ff withessMarch 22 came immedisrte- ~ ly after President Johnson n•- vealed thathedr'cided to app,ont, Dr. Terry to a new four-year to-ni There had been reports that otihers were being considered for the pc,~t O Under the present schedule of ~ the Senate commerce committee; spokesmen for health and educa- tional organizations will follow the CZ U.S. Surgeon General. Next be- ~1 hind them will be Paul Rand Dix- ~ on, . the chairman of the Federal (f ~ Trade Commission. In the later (f~ stages of, the hearings the commit- tee will hear witnesses from~ the ~ cigaret industry and media repre- sentatives. #' . Page 14
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Texas Groups Plan Fight Against Hike In Cigarette Levy Governor Is Proposing A One-Cent Increase In Current State Levy DALLAS, TEX., Tuesday (CS)-Iva•n Fears, owner of Rockwood Wholesale Co, here, Is urging all wholesale to- bacco distributors as well as, cigare!te, smokers in the state of' Texas to assist him in taking action to oppose Govern- or John Connally's proposal to add a tax increase of 1 cent on each,package of cigarettes. Mr. Fears, president'of TATD, and' Marvin Lewis of Abilene, president of TMVA, held a combined& meeting of their two organizations, in Austin last month to decide on action concerning the proposal. A joint statement by the two presi- dents was issued to the Austin, papers following the meeting calling for public opposition, to Gov: Connally's proposal. They also stated that each association would take action in opposition to the governor's planned tax hike of 1 cent more per package: Frank Hogland, managing director of TATD, said the hike would open the door to bootleggers, which in turn would cause a decrease in the revenue to the state treasury that now comes from the cigarette taxes: Mr. Fears explained! that the 8 cents per package state tax on cigarettes now in effect pulls in nearly $07 million an. nually. A 12.5°fa Increa.e "The proposal would amount to a 12.5 per cent increase in taxes and no industry can, sit still for such an in- crease as that," the TATD president declared. Mr. Fears believes that every tobac- co wholesaler will be hurt if the tax increase is carried out. He explained that' the $48 now paid in state taxes, per case woul'& be raised to $54: a casee and then combined with,the federaP 1'evy woul& increase the amount to $102' per case. V. F. Lucas, president of the Texas Cigar & Candy Co.,, stated that the state tax on cigarettes in Texas will become thehighestst'at'~e tlaxin the United States if it becomes effective. Ile believes the governor might' be able to find other means of raising extra funds to increase teachers' salar- ies. The proposal would not become ef'~ fective until 1966, Mr. Lucas saidi U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19 5 - Page 3 In the meanwhile, members, of the TATD and TMVA are continuing to organize their plans against'~ the tax increase proposal. They are urging citi- zens throughout the state to write their state representatives an& congressmen expressing their opposition to the pro- posal. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 1965 - Page 5 ,,;/ ":j4 L i- & U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 9 Nevada Legislator Asks Reduced Discount Rate CARSON CITY, NEV., V4'ednesday(CS)-Assembly,mam Harley Leavitt, of Clark, has introduced a bill whereby cigarette wholesalers would have their $207,207 state tax discount cut in half.. Mr. Leavitt's plan would reduce the discount aavarded to wholesalers who attach the 7-cent stamp on cigarette packs from 4 to: 2 per cent. "Special Committee Is Formed to f ight Proposed Doubling of N. Y. Cigarette Tax Malcolm Fleischer, Managing Director of the Retail Tobacconists' Association, Chairman of Group Opposing Plan to Hike Tax From 5 to 10 Cents. A special Committee Against' Unjust' Cigarette Taxes has been formed in. New York City to fight'~ Governor Nel- son, Rockefeller's proposed doubling of New York State's cigarette tax as a "harmful, discriminatory and unfair" measure, it was announced Tuesday by Malcolm L. Fleischer, chairman of the. committee. Mr. Fleischer is managing director of the Retail Tobacco Dealers of Amer- ica. "The proposal to double the cigarette tax from~6 cents to 10',cents, would hurt those least able to afford it-the work- ing man and low income groups," he said. "It woul& amount to exploitation." Doubling the tax will not produce the extra: revenue the governor claims, Mr. Fleischer said. "In~truth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of cigarette sales as New Yorkers go outside the state to get cigarettes. There also will' be bootlegging of cigarettes from ad- joining, states where prices are lower." Further, it would be an inflationary measure that would hurt the economic well-being of New York and all its residents, he said. It is proposed at a time when the cost of' living, is conti•nu- ing, to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more tham their fair share of taxes, and now they are being singled out again for another grab at their pocketbooks,"' Mr. Fleischerr asserted, About half the price of a pack of cigarettes in, New York today is tax- 8 cents federal tax, 5 cents state tax, the official said. New York City resi- dents also pay an additional 4-cent city tax. "A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 a year in cigarette taxes," he said. "This by itself is already a staggering tax for just one prodiict. "We hope the governor and the,legis- lature in~ Albany realize that the state cigarette tax is not based on the ability to pay,"' Mr. Fleischer said. "It hits hardest at those who can ill' afford the extra dollars that another t'ax boost will' squeeze from them." He said' doubling of the state ciga- rette tax also would have "drastic ef- fects" on the 1i40;000 small business- men in New York who rely on cigarette sales for an important part of their livelihoods. "They'll sell fewer cigarettes, as cus- tomers will get cigarettes at! lower pric- es outside the state. They'll also selll fewer other it'ems, in their stores, and therefore, they'll be paying lower state income t'axes," he said. "How will! that' benefit the state ?" A cigarette tax increase will hurt thest'at'e„ not'helpit, he contendedl It willi hurt the consumer and the small business:man, not help them. Page 15
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Texas Groups Plan Fight Against Hike In Cigarette Levy Governor Is Proposing A One-Cent Increase In Current State Levy DALLAS, TEX., Tuesday (,CS)-Ivan Fears, owner of Rockwood Wholesale Co, here, is urging all wholesale to- bacco distributors as well as cigarettee smokers in the state of Texas to assist him in taking action to oppose Govern- or John Connally's proposal~ to add a tax increase of 1 cent on each, package of cigarettes: Mr. Fears, president of TATD, and Marvin Lewis of Abilene,, president of TMVA, held a combinedl meeting of their two organizations, in Austin lastt month to decide on action concerning the proposal. A joint statement by the two presi- dents was issued to the Austin papers following the meeting calling for public oppositiom to Gov. Connally's proposal. They also stated that each association would take action in opposition to the governor's planned tax hike of 1 cent more perpackage: Frank Hogland, managing director of TATD, said the hike would open the doort~o bootleggers, which in turn would cause a decrease in the revenue to the state treasury that! now comes from the cigarette taxes. Mr. Fears explained! that the 8 cents per package state tax on cigarettes now in effect pulls in nearly $97 million an. nually. A 12.5% Increase "The proposal would amount to a 12.5 per cent increase in taxes and no industry can sit still for such an in- crease as that," the TATD president declared. Mr. Fears believes that every tohac. co wholesaler will be hurt, if the tax increase is carried out. He explained that' the $48 now paid in state taxes per case woul& be raised to $51 a casee and then combined with, the federalilevy would; increase the amount to $102' per case. V. F. Lucas, president of the Texas Cigar & Candy Co.,, stated that the state tax on cigarettes in Texas will become the highest state t'ax in the United States if it becomes effective. Iie believes the governor might'. be able to find other means of raising extra f'unds to increase teachers' salar- ies. The proposal would not become ef- fective until 1966, Mr. Lucas said. U. S. Tobacco Journa.l February 25, 1965 - Page 3 In the meanwhile, members of the TATD an& TMVA are continuing to organize their plans against the taxx increase proposal. They are urging citi- zens throughout the state to write their state representati'ves and; congressmen expressing their opposition to the pro- posah U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 5 ,~%/ /`:/ 4 (r `i ~ U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 1965 - Page 9 Nevada Legislator Asks Reduced Discount Rate CARSON CITY, NEV., Wednesday (GS)-Assemblyman Harley Leavitt, of Clark, has introduced a bill whereby cigarette wholesalers would have their $207;207 state tax discount cut in half. Mr. Leavitt's plan would reduce the discount awarded to wholesalers who attach the7-cent stamp on cig¢rettepacks from 4 to 2 per cent. 'Special Committee Is Formed to Fight Proposed Doubling of N. Y. Cigarette Tax Malcolm Fleischer, Managing Director of the Retail Tobacconists' Association, Chairman of Group Opposing Plan to Hike Tax From 5 to 10 Cents A special CommitteeAgainst'Unjust'Cigarette Taxes has been formed in. New York City to fight' Governor Nel- son Rockefeller's proposed' doubling of New York State's cigarette tax as a "harmful, discriminatory and unfair" measure, it was announced Tuesday by Malcolzn L. Fleischer, chairman of the. committee. Mr. Fleischer is managing director of the Retail Tobacco Dealers of Amer- ica. "The proposal to double the cigarette tax from 5 cents to 10 cents,would hurt those least able to afford it-the work- ing man and low income groups," he said. "It would! amount to exploitation." Doubling the tax will not produce the extra revenue the governor claims, Mr. Fleischer said. "In truth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of cigarette sales as New Yorkers go outside the state to get cigarettes. There also willi be bootlegging of cigarettes from ad- joining, states where prices are lower." Further, it would be an inflationary measure,that would'hurt the economic well-being of New York and all its residents, he said. It is proposed at a time when the cost of living is continu- ing to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more than their fair share of taxes, and now they are being singled out again for another grab at their pocketbooks," Mr. Fleischer asserted. About half the price of a pack of cigarettes in, New York today is tax- 8 cents federal tax, 5 cents state tax, the official said. New York City resi- dents also pay an additional 4-cent city tax. "A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 a year in cigarette taxes," he said. "This by itself is already a staggering tax for just one prodtrct. "We hope the governor and the legis- lature im Albany realize that the state cigarette tax is not based on the ability to pay,"' Mr.. Fleischer said. "It hits hardest at thuse who can illi afford the extra dollars that another tax boost will squeeze from them." He said' doubling of the state ciga- rette tax also would have "drastic ef- fects" on the D10;000 small businese- men in New York who rely on cigarette sales for an important part of their livelihoods. "They'll sell fewer cigarettes, as cus- tomers will get cigarettes at! lower pric- es outside the state. They'll also selli fewer other items. in their stores, and' therefore, they'll be paying lower state income taxes," he said! "How willi that benefit the state?" A cigarette tax increase will hurt the state, not help it, he contended. It willi hurt the consumer and the small businessman, not help them. Page 15
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Texas Groups Plan Fight Against Hike In Cigarette Levy Governor Is Proposing A One-Cent Increase In Current State Levy DALLAS„TE.X., Tuesday (CS')--Iva•n Fears; owner of Rockwood Wholesale Co, here, Is urging all wholesale to- bacco distributors as well as cigarettee smokers in the state of: Texas to assist him in taking action to oppose Govern- or John Connally's proposal to add'a tax increase of 1 cent on each package of cigarettes. Mr. Fears, president'~ of TATD, and'Marvin Lewis of Abilene, president of TMVA, held a combined: meeting of their two organizations, in Austin last month to decide on action concerning the proposal. A joint statement by the two presi- dents: was issue& to the Austin, papers following, the meeting calling for public opposition to Gov. Connally's proposal. They also stated that each association would take action in opposition to the governor's planned tax hike of l cent more per package. Frank Hogland, managing director of TATD, said the hike would open the doortb bootleggers, which in turn would cause a decrease in the revenue to the state treasury that! now comes from the cigarette taxes. Mn Fears explained! that the 8 cents per package state tax on cigarettes now rn effect pulls in nearly $©7 million an- nually. A 12.5% Increase "The, proposal would amount to a 12.5 per cent increase in taxes and no industry can, sit still for such an in- crease as that," the TATD president declared. Mr. Fears believes that every tobac- co wholesaler will be hurt if the tax increase is carried out. He explained that' the $48 now paid in state taxes per case would' be raised to $54' a case and then combined withAhe federal'levy woul& increase the amount to $102' per case. V. F. Lucas, president off the Texas Cigar & Candy Co.,, stated that the state tax on cigarettes in Texas will become the highestst~at'~e t'ax~ in the United States if it becomes effective. lie believes the governor might be able to find other means of raising extra funds to increase teachers' salar- ies. The proposal would not become efh fective until 1966, 'Mr. Lucas said. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 3 In the: meanwhile, members of the TATD and TMVA are continuing to organize their plans against'~ the tax increase proposal. They are urging citi- zens throughout the state to write their state representatives and; congressmen expressing their~ opposition to the pro- posal. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 9 Nevada Legislator Asks Reduced Discount Rate CARSON CITY, NEV., Wednesday (rsS)-Assemblyman~ Harley Leavitt, of Clark, has introduced a bill whereby cigarette wholesalers would have their $207,207 state tax discount cut in half. Mr. Leavitt's plan would! reduce the discount awarded to wholesalers who attach the 7-cent stamp on cigarette packs from 4 to 2 per cent. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 5 'Special Committee Is Formed to Fight Proposed Doubling of N. Y. Cigarette Tax Malcolm Fleischer, Managing Director of the Retail Tobacconists' Association, Chairman of Group Opposing Plan to Hike Tax From 5 to 10 Cents. A special Committee Against! Unjust. Cigarette Taxes has been formed in. New York City to fight Governor Nel- son Rockefeller's proposed doubling of New York State's cigarette tax as a "harmful, discriminatory and unfair" measure, it was announced Tuesday by Malcolm L. Fleischer, chairmam of the, committee. Mr. Fleischer is managing director of the Retail Tobacco Dealers of Amer- ica. "The proposal to double the cigarette tax from~6 cents to 10 cents,would hurt those least able to afford it-the work- ing man and low income groups," he said. "It woul& amount to exploitation." Doubling the tax will not produce thee extra revenue the governor claims, Mr. Fleischer said. "Im truth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of cigarette sales as New Yorkers go outside the state to get cigarettes. There also willi be bootlegging of cigarettes from ad- joining, states where prices are lower." Further, it would be an inflationary measure that would hurt the economic well-being of New York and all its residents, he said. It is proposed at a time when the cost of living is continu- ing to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more than their fair share of taxes, and now they are being singled out again for another grab at their pocketbooks,"' Mr. Fleischer asserted. About, half the price of a pack of cigarettes in New York today is tax- 8 cents federal tax, 5 cents state tax, the official said. New York City resi- dents also pay an additional 4-cent city tax. "A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 a year in cigarette taxes," he said. "This by itself is already a staggering tax for just one product. "We hope the governor and the legis- lature in. Albany realize that the state cigarette tax is not based om the ability to pay,"' Mr.. Fleischer said. "It hits hardest at those who can ill' afford the extra dollars that another tax boost will'. squeeze from them." He said' doubling of the state ciga- rette tax also would have "drastic ef- fects" on the 140,000 small business- men in New York who rely on cigarette sales for an important part of their livelihoods. "They'll sell fewer cigarettes, as cus- tomers will get cigarettes at! lower pric- es outside the state. They'll also se11i fewer other it!ems. in their stores, and' therefore, they'll be paying lower state income taxes," he said: "How willi that benefit the state?" A cigarette tax increase will hurt the state,, not help it, he contendedl It ~ willi hurt the consumer and the small ~ businessman, not help theat. ~/...' Page 15
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Tcrbtv.cco February 19, 1965 - Page 18 / 5 / Form Committee to Fight N.Y. Cigarette Tax Boost Fonnation of' a committee to fight the lproposcd! douhlingof the state ciga- rette tax as a°harmfnl, discriminatory and unfair" measure was annonnced in New York recentlv: Malcolm L, Ffeischcr, chairman of the new Committee Against Unjust Cigarette Taxes, said millions of New York smokers will be asked to help dt- f'eat' Govenior Rockefeller's request for a 100-pcr cent tax boost. Fleischer also is managing, director of the Retail To- bacco Dealers of America, "The proposallto double the cigarette tax from five cents to 10 cents would hurt those least able to afford it-the working man and low income groups," he saidi "It would amoitnt' to exhloita- tiom." Doubling the tax will nnt, produce the extra revenue the Governor claims, Mr. Fleischer said. "In truth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of ciga- rette sales as New Yorkers go outside the state to get cigarettes. There alsoo will be bootlefiging of cigarettes from adjoining states where prices are 1'ower." U. S. Tobacco Journal ~ February 16, 19 5- Page 23 !` Legislation Would Require 'Warning' About Cigarettes PIERRE, S; D., Wednesday (iCS)-A hill was introduced into the State House requiring businesses selling cigarettes to post a sign with one•inch lr?tters warning smokers. The measure was authored by Rep. Walter Wiedenman of' Madison. Viola. tion would constitute a misdemeanor and upon conviction a first of'fensee wouldl carry a fine of not less than $:5 nor more than $101 it'was reported. The sign would say: "Warning; Ciga- rette smoking may cause cancer, heart disease and emphysema, lt is dfingerous to smoke."' The bill' is similar to one introduced in the 11959 legislature that woul& have required on all cigarette packages, a skull and crossbones. That -measure was killed. The sign would be required for busi- nesses whether selling cigarettes over the counter or from vending machines. Further,, it would be an inAationarv measure that would hurt the economic well-being of New York and all its resid'ent5, he said. It is proposed at a time when the cost of liiving is con- tinuing to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more than their fair share of taxes, and now thev are being singled out agaitn for another grab at their pocketbooks," Flcischer said. About half the price of a pack of cigarettes in New York today is tax- eight cents federal tax,, five cents stat'e tax, Fleischcr said', New York City residents also pay an additional four cent city t'ax. "A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 a year in cigarette taxes," he said[ "This livitselfl is alreadva st'aggering,tax for just one pr~oduct.~ "We hope the Governor and the legislature in Albany realize that! the state cigarette tax is not based om the abilitw, . to pay," Fleischer said. "It hits hardest at those who can ill afford the extra dollhrs that another tax boost .vill sq}reeze from them," He said doubling of the state ciga- rette tax also would have "drastic ef- fects" on the 140,000 small business- men in New York .vho relv on cigarette sales for an important part of their livelihoods. "They'll sell f'ewer cigarettes, as cus- tomers will get'~ cigarettes at ]bwer prices outside the state. They']ll alsoo sell fewer other items in their stores,, and therefore; they'll be paying, lower state income taxes,`' he said. "How will that benefit the state?" A cigarette tax increase will hurt the stnte, not help it, he said. It will hurt the consumer and the small busir nessman, not help them. Ui. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 19 Four Anti-Smoking Bills Rejected by Legislature BOSTON,, MASS., Thursdhy (CS)-- Four bills designed t'o curb smoking in, the Bay State were turned down by the Massachusetts legislature following a public hearing held by the joint com- mittee on public health. These bills would have: prohibited sales of cigarettes, cigars or other to- bacco to persons under 21 years of' age; required packages and cartons ofciga- rettes to he marked "Excessive use of this product contained herein may cause damage to lungs"; created a non-legis- lative committee to study the effects of smoking, on human beings; required manufacturers using reeonstitut'ingpr~o- cess to label their cigars with the words "homogenized! tobacco leaves." At the public hearing, these bills were vikorously opposed by John Griffin, chairman, of the board of Massachusetts Association of Tobacco Distributors and president of Joseph P. Manning Co., of' Boston. j L. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19b5- Page 3 Washington Legislation Seeks Cigarette Labeling OLYMPQA, WASH., Tuesday (CS). -A billi was introduced recently in the House whereby all cigarett'es sold im the state would have to carry a label on the package warning of health haz- ards.. The label would have to be conspicu- ously placed in legible types. It also would be required t'o st;atle the average tar and nicotine yields per cigarette as determined by the Cambridge filter method„or some other method approved by the National Bureau of Standards. Sponsors of the measure are Robert Perry, Seattle; William S: Day, Spo- kane; Jack Dootson, Everett; Dick Kink, Bellingham„all Democrats; and Charles E. Newschsander, Tacoma, and Richard Morphis, Spokane, Republicans. Tobacco February 26) 1965 - Page 31+ N. Y. State Gets Cigarette Label Bill ALBANY, N.Y.-A bill to require the labeling of ci;arettes with~their tar and nicotine content has been intr-od'uced C in the Assembly by Francis J. Griffin ~ (D., Riiffalb). The bill i~ the same as one introduced ~ l,«t vc•an bv Mr. Griflin whi& failed to ~ 1.. r'Chort'c(,l out of the Codes Commit- "h :\lr. (:rilfin proposes that each pack- ~ r;~ of cit'.urettes sold after Jul), 1 be 1a1 eli•cl, in a contrasting color, with the ~' ttrr ancl~ nicotine content of each ciga- rc.ttc.-'IOLES.. Page 16
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Tvbrv.cco ' February 19, 1965 - Page 18 Form Committee to Fight N.~~. Cigarette Tax Boost Formation of a committee to fight the proposed doubling of the state ciga- rette tax as a"harmf'ul, disc•riminatorv and unfair~' measure was announced in New York recentlv. Malcolm L:, Fleischer, chaii7nan of the new Committee Against Unjust Cigarette Taxes, said millions of New York smoker.s;will heasked to helpde- f'eat Governor Rockefeller's request' for a 100-per cent tax boost. Fleischer also is managing director of the Retaill To- bacco Dealers of Americac "The proposal to double the cigarette tax from five cents to 10 cents would hurt those least able to afford it-the working man and low income groups," be saidi "It .uoicld amount, to exploita~ tioni" Doubling the tax will not, produce the extra revenue the Governor claiins, Mr. Fleischer said. "In truth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of ciga- rette sales as New Yorkers go outside the state to get cigarettes. There also will be bootl'cgging of cigarettn.s from adjrDining state.s.vhcre prices aree low•er." U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1'6y 19~5 - Page 23 Legislation Would Require 'Warning' c,: About Cigarettes 1~) PIERRE, & D;, Wednesday (iCS)~-A bill was introduced into the State House requiring businesses selling cigarettes to postt a sign with one-inch letters warning smokers. The measure was authored by Rep. Walter Wiedenman, of Madison. Violar tion would constitute a misdbmeanor and upon conviction a first offense wouldl carry a fine of not, less than $:5 nor more than $10; it was reported. The sign would say: "Warning; Ciga- rette smoking may cause cancer, heart disease and emphysema, It' is dangerous to smoke."' The bill is similar to one introduced in the 11959 legislature that would'have required on a]1 cigarette packages a skull and crossbones. That -measure was killed. The sign would be required for busi- nesses whether selling cigarettes over the counter or from vending machines. Further, it would be an inflationary measure that would hurt the, economic well-being of New York and all its residnnt's, he said. It is propose& at a time when the cost of li;ving is con- tinning to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more than their fair share of taxes, and now thev are being .sin led out again for another grab at t~eir pocketbooks," Fleischer said. About half the price of a pack of! cigarettes in New York today is taac- eight', cents fedbral tax, five cents state tax, Fleischer said', New York City residents also pay an additional four• cent city tax. `A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 a year in cigarette taxes," he said. "This Nyitself is alreadv a staggering, tax for just one product. "We hope the Governor and the legislature in Albany realize that the state cigarette tax is not based on: the abilit'v to pay," Fileischer said. "It hits hardest at those .vhocan ill' afford the extra dollhrs that another tax boost will sqheeze from them." He said doubling of the state ciga- rette tax also would have "drastic ef- fects" on the 140;000 small business• men in New York whorelv on cigarette sales for an important part of their livelihoods. "They'll sell fe.ver cigarettes„ as cus- tomers will get'~ cigarettes at lower prices outside the state. They'111 alsoo sell fewer other items in their stores,, and therefore, thev'll be paying, lower state income taxes,`' he said. "How• will that benefit the state?" A cigarette tax increase will hurt the st'ate, not help it, he said. It will hurt the consumer and the small busir nessman, not help them. ~ r! 1 G , l (`, `j V .c~ U. S'. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 19 Four Anti-Smoking Bills Rejected by Legislature BOSTON,, MASS.,, Thursdhy (CS)•- Four bills designed to curb smoking in, the Bay State were turned down by the Massachusetts legislature following a public hearing held by the joint com- mittee on public health, These bills would have: prohibited sales of cigarettes, cigars or other to- bacco to persons under 21 years of age; required packages and cartons od, ciga- rettes to be marked "Ezcessive use of this product contained herein may cause damage to lungs"; created a non-legis- lat~ive committee to study the effects of smoking, on human heings; required manufacturers using reconstituting pro- cess to label their cigars with the words "homogenized! tobacco leaves." At the public hearing, these bills were vigorously opposed by John Griffin, chairman, of the board of' Massachusetts Association of Tobacco Distributors and president of Joseph P. Manning Co., of Boston. ' ~' U. S. Tebacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 3 Washington Legislation Seeks Cigarette Labeling OLYMPIA, WASH., Tuesday (CS). -A hilli was introduced recently in the House whereby all cigarettes sold in the stat'e would have to carry a label on the package warning of health haz- ards. The label woulde have to be conspicu- ously placed in legible types. It also would,be required to stat'e the average tar and nicotine yields per cigaret'te as determined by the Cambridge filter method, or some other method approved by the National Bureau of Standards. Sponsors of the measure are Robert Perry, Seattle; William S: Day, Spo- kane; Jack Dootson, Everett; Dick Kink, Bellingham,,all Democrats; and Charles E. Newschsander, Tacoma, and Richard Morphis, Spokane, Republicans. Tobacco February 26) 1965 - Page 34 N. Y. State Gets Cigarette Label Bill ALBANY, N.Y.-A bill to require the labeling of cibarettes with~ their tar and nicotine content has been intzod'uced C in the Assembl'y byF'rancis J. Griffln ~ (D., Biiflalb). The bill is the same as one introduced ~ l,c~t .-car bv Mr. Grifiin which, failed to ~ 1.11 n lxu trrl out of the Codes Commit- M \1r. C:rillin proposes that each pack- o ,~;, uf c.iganc•ttes sold after July 1 belal,eli•ci, in, a contrasting color, with the ~' tar vxli nicotine content of each ciga- rcttc.-"I'OLES.. Page 16
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Tub& cco 4 / 18 C, I -~ U, Februar Pa 19' 196 ge y 5 - , Form Committee to Fight N. Y. Cigarette Tax Boost Formation of a committee to fight the proposeddonblfngof the state ciga- rette tax as a°harmfnl' discriminatory and unfair" measure was announced in New York rceent'h': Malcolm L. Fleischer, chairman oP the new Cornmittee Against Unjust Cigarette Taxes, said millions of New York smokers willi be asked to helh d'e- feat Governor Rockefeller's request for a 100-1xr cent tax boost. Fleischer also is managing director of the Retail To- bacco Dealers of America. "Tlte proposal to double the cigarette tax from five cents to 110 cents would hurt those least able to afford it-the working man and low income groups," he said. "It would amoaint' to exPloita- tion,° Doubling the tax will rnot~ produce the extra revenue the Governor claims, Mr. Fleisclier said. °In, truth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of ciga- rette sales as New Yorkers go outside the state to get cigarett'es. There alsoo will be bootlhgging of cigarettes from adj(nining.stateswhcre prices are lbwer." ~ ~ Vl U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 19 5- Page 23 Legislation Would Require 'Warning' ~ About Cigarettes ' . .~ \ PIERRE, S! D., Wednesday (iCS)--A hill was intlrodttced into the State House requiring businesses selling, cigarettes to post a sign with , one-inch letters warning smokers. The measure was authored by Rep. Walter Wiedenmani of! Madison. Viola~ tion would constitute a misd'emeanor and upon conviction a first offensee would, carry a fine of not less than $5 nor more than $'lal it! was reported. The sign would say: "Warning; Ciga- rette smoking may cause cancer, heart disease and emphysema. It is dangerous to smoke:" The bill is similar to one introduced in the 1959 legislature that would have required on all cigarettie packages: a skull and crossbones. That measure was killed. The sign would be required for busi- nesses whether selling cigarettes over the counter or from vending machines. Further, it would be an inflErtionarv measure that would hurt the economic well-being of New York and all its residents, he said. It is proposed at a time when the cost of living is con- tinuing to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more than their f'air share of taxes, and now thev are being singled out again for another grab at their pocketbooks," Fleischer said. About'' half the price of a packof'cigarettes in New York today is tax- eight cents federal tax, five cents state tax, Fleischer said. New York City residents also pay an ad'ditional four cent city tax, "A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 a vear in cigarette taxes," he said~ "This bvitselfi is alreadva st'aggering,taxfor just one product. "We hope the Governor and the legislature ;n Albany realize thati the state cigarette tax is not based om the abilit'v t'o pay," Fleisaher said. "It hits hardest at those who can ill afford the extra dollars that another tax boost will squeeze from them." He said doubling of the state ciga-rettetEUC alsowoultl have "drastic ef- fects" on the 140;000 small business- men in New York .vho rclv on cigarette sales for an impor~tant, part oftheir, livelihoods. "They'll sell fewer cigarettes, as, cus- torners will get', cigarettes at lower prices outside the state.They'll also sell fewer other items in their stores, and therefore, they'll he paying lower state income taxes," he said. °How will' that benefit the state?" A cigarette tax increase will hurt the state, not help it, he said. It will hurt the consumer and the small bnsi- nessman, not help them. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 19 Four Anti-Smoking Bills Rejected by Legislature BOSTON,, MASS.,,'Ilhursday (CS)-- Four bills designed to curb smoking in the Bay State were turned down by the Massachusetts legislature following a public hearing held by the joint com- mittee on public health, These bills would have: prohibited sales of cigarettes, cigars or other t'o- bacco to persons under 21 years of age; required packages and cartons a~ ciga- rettes to be marked "Excessive use of this product contained herein may cause damage to lungs"; created a non,legis, lative committee to study the effects of smoking on human beings; required manufacturers using reconstituting pro- cess to label their cigars with the words "homogenized tobacco leaves." At the public hearing, these bills were vigorously opposed by John Griffin, cbairmanr of the board of Massachusetts Association of Tobacco Distributors and president of Joseph P. Manning Co.,, of Boston. U. S. Tobacco Jourmal February 25, 1965- Page 3 Washington Legislation Seeks Cigarette Labeling OLYMPIA, WASH., Tuesday (CS). -A billi was introduced recently in the House w,herebyall cigarettes soldim the state would have to carry a label on the package warning of health haz- ards.. The label would have to be conspicu- ously placed in legible types. It also would be required to state the average tar and nicotine yields per cigarette as determined by the Cambridge filter method, or some other method approved by the National Bureau of Standards. Sponsors of the measure are Robert Perry, Seattlp; William S: Day, Spo- kane; Jack Dootson, Everett; Dick Kink, Bellingham,,all Democrats; and Charles E. Newschsander, Tacoma, and Richard Morphis, Spokane, Republicans. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 31+ N. Y. State Gets Cigarette Label Bill ALBANY, N.Y.-A bill to require the lhbeling of'cig.uettes with~ their tar and nicotinccont'ent has beem introdhced ~ ~ in the Assembly by Francis J. Griffin (D., Bliffalo). ~ The bill iti the same as one introduced ~ last , car h%• Mr. Griffin which failed to ~ I- ,<<1>E)rt(•cl out of the Codes Commit- ~ Mri. (:rilfiii proposes that each pack- q tL". i,i ciR1An cttcs sold after July 1 he lld:olcd, inr a contrasting color, with the ~ tar and nicotine content of each ciga- . rcttc.=1'OLES Page 16
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Tubs.cco ' February 19, 1965 - Page 18 Form Committee to Fight N.~'. Cigarette Tax Boost Formation of a committee to fight the prolosedl doubling~ of the state ciga- rette tax as a"harmft,l, discriminatory and unfair" measure was, announced in New York reeent!Iv: Maleolm L,, Fleischer, chairman of the new Committee Against Unjust Cigarette Taxes, said millions of New York smokers will hee asked to hell) dt.;- feat Governor Rockefeller's request for a lOQ-lx,r cent taxboost, Fleisoher also is managingdirector of theR'etail To-bacco Dealers of America. "The proposall to double the cigarettee tax from five cents to 110 cents would hurt those least able to afford it-the working man and low income groups," he saidi "It would amount' to exnloita- tion." Doubling the tax will not produce the extra revenue the Governor claims, Mr. Fleiscaier said. "Imtruth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of ciga- rette sales as [ve.v Yorkers go outsidee the state to get cigarett'es. There alsoo will be bootll?gging of cigarettes from adjoining states where prices are l'ower." ~ ~ U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1y 1975 - Page 23 Legislation Would Require 'Warning' N About Cigarettes ~ .~ Qi PDERRE, & D., Wednesd'ay,QCS)-A bill was introduced into the State House requiring businesses selling cigarettes to post a sign with one=inch letters warning smokers. The measure was authored by Rep. Walter Wiedenman, of! Madison. V.iola~ tion would constitute a misd'emeanor and upon conviction a first offensee would carry a fine of' not less than $5 nor more than $1(11 it! was reported. The sign would say: "Warning; Ciga- rette smoking may cause cancer, heart disease and emphysema, It is dangerous to smoke." The bill is similar to one introducedd in the 1959 legislature that would have required on all cigarett'e packages, a skull and crossbones. That measure was killed. The sign would be required for busi- nesses whether selling cigarettes over the counter or from vending machines. Further, it would be an inflationary measure that would! hurt the economic well'-beingof NewY'orkand all' its residents, he said. It is proposed at a time when the cost of liVing is con- tinuing to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more than their fair share of taxes, and now thev are being singled out again for another grab at their pocketbooks," Fleischer said. About half the pricc of a pack of' cigarettes in New York today is tax- eight cents federal tax, five cents stat'e tax, Fleischer said. New York City residents also pay an additional fourr cent city tax. "A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 aa vear in cigarette taxes," he saidl "This l-bvitself is alreadva staggering,taxfor just one product. "Ve hope the Governor and the legislature in Albany realize that! the state cigarette tax is not based orr the abilit'vy to pay," Fieischer said. "It hits hardest at those who can ill afford the extra dollars that another tax boost will squeeze from them." He said doubling of the state ciga-rette tax also would have "drastic ef- fects" onr the, 140',000 small business- men in New York who relv on cigarette sales for an important part of their livelihoods. "They'll sell fewer cigarettes, as cus- t'omers will get~ cigarettes at lower prices outside the state:. They'll also sell fewer other items in theii• stores,, and therefore, they'll be paying lower state income taxes," he said. °How will' that benefit the state?" A cigarette tax increase.vill hurt the state, not help it, he said. It will hurt the consumer and the small busi- nessman, not help them. Ui. S. Tobacco JouiT191 February 25, 19;5- Page 19 Four Anti-Smoking Bills Rejected by Legislature BOSTON„ MASS., Thursdhy (CS)•- Four bills designed to curb smoking in the Bay State were turned down by the Massachusetts legislature following a public hearing held by the joint com- mittee on public health, These bills would have: prohibited sales of cigarettes, cigars or other t'o- bacco to persons under 21 years of age; required packages and cartons of ciga- rettes to be marked "Excessive use of this product contained herein may cause damage to lungs"; created a non,legis- lative committee to study the effects of smoking on human beings; required manufacturers using reconstituting pro- cess to label their cigars with the words "homogenized tobacco leaves." At the public hearing, these bills were vigorously opposed by John Griffin, chairmam of the board of~ Massachusetts Association of Tobacco Distributors and president of Joseph P. Manning Co.,, of Boston. C~ /~ I l ' ,S I ~~ U. S. Tobacco Jourinal February 25, 1905 - Page 3 Washington Legislation Seeks Cigarette Labeling OLYMMA, WASH., Tuesday (CS), -A billi was introduced recently in the House whereby all cigarett'es soldin, the state would have to carry a label on the package warning of health haz- ards. The label would have to be conspicu- ously placed in legible types. It alko would be required to state the average tar and nicotine yields per cigarette as determined liythe Cambridge filter method, or some other method approved by the National Bureau of Standards. Sponsors of the measure are Robert Perry, Seattle; William S: Day, Spo- kane; Jack Dootson, Everett; Dick Kink, Bellingham, all Democrats; and Charles E. Newsohsander, Tacoma, and Richard Morphis, Spokane, Republicans. Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Page 3t+ N. Y. State Gets Cigarette Label Bill ALBANY, N.Y.-A bill to require the Ihbelinfi of! cig.uettes with~ their tar and nicotine content has been, introdhced in the Assembly by Francis J. Griffin (D., I31i(Talb). The bill iti the same as one,introduced l;«t Nc•a„ hv Mr. Grifi'in which, failed to 1.0 rcl>a rtr(l nut of the Codes Commit- t4 , . V'ir~. (:ri{fin proposes that eachpack- uf cig;+nettes, sold after July 1 be ll,l)clcd, in a contrasting color, with the ttir and nicottine content of each ciga- rette.--hOL.ES. Page 16
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TvbF,cco ~ i February 19, 1965 -~~ Page~ ]18, Form Committee to Fight N. Y. Cigarette Tax Boost Formatibn: of a committee to fight the proposed doubling~ of tiie st'ate ciga- rette tax as a "harmful, discriminatory and unfair" measure was annoiancecl in New York recentlv. Malcolm L. Fleischcr, chairman of the new Committee Against Unjust Cigarette Taxes, said millions of New York smokers will be asked to help de- feat Governor Rockefeller's request for a 100-pcrr cent tax boost. Fleiseher also; is managing director of the R'etaill 'ho- bacco Dealers of AmericaL "The proposal to double the cigarette tax from five cents to 10 cents would hurt those least able to afford it-the working man and low income: groups," he said. "It .vould amoumt, to exploita~ tiom " Doubliiigthe tax will not produce the extra revenue the Governor claitns, Mr. Fleischer said. "In truth, a higher tax will lead to lower volume of ciga- rette sales as New Yorkers go outside the state to get cigarettes. There also will be bootlegging of cigarettt's from adjoining states where prices are lower." U. S. Tobacco Journal ~ February 1''8y 19 5- Page 23 Legislation Would ~11 .~ .\, Require 'IWarning' About Cigarettes ' PIIF,RRE, S, D., Wednesday (CS)-A. bill was introduced into the State House requiring businesses selling cikarett'es to post a sign with one-inch letters warning smokers. The measure was authored by Rep. Walter Wiedenman of Madison. Viola« tioni would! constitute a misdemeanor and upon conviction a first offense would carry a fine of not less than $5 nor more t~han $10; it was reported. The sign would say: "Warning: Ciga- rette, smoking may cause cancer, heart disease and emphysema. It is dangerous to 9moke."' The hilll is si'mi9arto~ oneintroduced' in the 1ih5Dlegislaturethat wouldl have reqµired on all cigarette packages a skull and crossbones. That measure was killt:d. The sifiniwould be required for husi- nesses whether selling cigarettes overt'he counter or from, vending machines. Further, it would be~ an inflationaryy measure that would hurt the economic well-being of' New York and all its resident's, he said, It isproposeds at', a time when the cost of living is con-tinuing to rise. "Cigarette smokers already pay more than their fair share of taxes, and now they are being singled out again for another grab at their pocketbooks," Fleischer said. About half the price of a pack of cigarettes in New York today is tax- eight cents federal tax, five cents state tax, Fleischer saidl New York City residents also pay an additional four cent city t'ax.. °A person who smokes a pack a day in New York already pays over $47 a' year in cigarette taxes,." he said. "This bvitself' is alreadva staggering tax for just one product. "We hope the Governor~ and the legislature in Albany realize that'~ the state cigarette tax is not based on: the ability to pay," FFleischer said. "It hits hardest at those who can ill afford the extral dollars that ,mothertax boost' will squeeze from them." He said doubling of the state ciga rette tax alfio would have "dtasticef- fects" on the 140,000 small business- mem in New York who rely on cigarette sales for an important part of their livelihoods. "They'll selll fewer cigarettes, as eus-tomers will get cigarettes at lbwer prices outside the state. They'll also sell fewer othcr items in their stores;, and therefore, thev'll be paving lower state income t'oxes,"'he said. "How will that benefit the state?'" ' A cigarette tax increase will hurt the state, not; help it; he said. It will hurt the consumer and the small bttsi~ nessman, not help them. U1. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 19 Four Anti-Smoking Bills Rejected by Legislature BOSTON„ MASS., Thursdtry (CS)•- F:our bills designed to curb smoking in the Bay State were turned down by the Massachusetts legislature following a public hearing held by the joint com- mittee on public health. These bills would have: prohibited sales~ of cigarettes, cigars or other to- bacco to persons under 21 years of age; required packages and cartons af ciga- rettes to he marked "ESccessive use of this product contained herein may cause damage to lungs"; created a non-legis- lative committee to study the effects of smoking on human beings; required manufacturers using reconstituting pro- cess to label their cigars with the words "homogenizedl tobacco leaves." At,the public hearing, these bills were vigorously opposed by John Griffin, chairman,of; the board of Massachusett's Association of Tobacco Distributors and president of Joseph P. Manning Co., ofl Boston. U1. S'. Tobacco Journa+l February' 25, 19 ' 5- Page 3' Washington Legislation Seeks Cigarette Labeling OLYMPRA, WASH., Tuesday (CS). -A billi was introduced recently in the House whereby all cigarettes sold in the state would have to carry a label on t'he package warning of' health haz- ards. The label woul&have to be conspicu- ously placed in legible types. It also would be required t'o state the average tar and nicotine yields per cigarette as determined by the Cambridge filter method„or some other method approved by the National Bureau of Standards. Sponsors of the measure are Robert Perry, Seattle; William S. Day, Spo- kane; Jack Dootson, Everett; Dick Kink, Bellingham„all Democrats; and Charles E. Newschsander, Tacoma, and Richard' Morphis, Spokane, Republicans. Tobacco February 26) 1965 - Page 34 N. Y. State Gets Cigarette Label Bi11' ALBANY, ri.Y,-A bill to require the labeling of eigarettes with~ their tar and nicotine content has been introduced in the Assembly by Francis J. Griffin (D., BiilTalb). 'hhe bill is the same as one introdUced last vc•ar, h% Mr. Grifiinwhich, failcd' to 1- rcho)rtk•<l out of the Codes Commit- trn C ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ mr. (:rilfi o proposes that each pack- , ( c•i+.urcttes sold after July 1 be l,~hrll d, in a contrasting color, with the ~ tar and nicotine content of each ciga- -, rc•ttc.=TOLES Page 16
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Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 4 LB]mum..I _05 Wall Street is wondering why President Johnson didn't make any com• ments about the U.S. Health Department's new report on cigarettee smoking. Mutual funds would like to take on large blocks of these stocks but fear that LBJ will one day "drop the other shoe." He did make an I-agree comment on the first health report a year ago. But cigarette makers are doing, nicely in their diversified lines.. Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 1+ Silence is golden . . . A trnstworthy Washington informant said the reason President Johnson didn't make any comment on the recent cigarette health report is because the industry accounts for$3'.4hillion annually in federal, state and local taxes and these goaernments cannot afford! to lose any part of the revenues. ~. 1 Z, U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19b5 - Page 21 Score One for Our Side ... CLEVELAND, 0., Monday (CS)- Officials at Grace Hospital he.ne, con- cltrded recently that'visitors who want to smoke will find a way. They removed a ciRaret'te vending machine a year ago following research report's owthe apparent health hazards of smoking. As a result, visitors began borrow- ing cigarettes or drove to the nearest store to buy them. The vending ma- chine was put back in the hospital this week. Johnson Budget Includes Furlds for Leaf Research WASHINGTON, D.C.-Included in the new Johnson budget for the fiscal year starting next July li is a total of $4.6 million for over-all tobacco re- searchs Agriculture Department officials said. Included is money for research pertaining into tobacco and health. The budget for the current fiscal year ending next June 30 contains $1,$75,000 for tobacco-health study,. $1.5 million of the total for the Uni- versity of Kentucky and $375,0W for the tobacco experiment st'ation at Ox- ford, N'.G: The new budget contains $1.5 million for research at Louisville, and $950;000 for health-relkted and other research,on flue-cured and Mary- landl type tobaccos,,to be spent chiefly at Oxford and $235,000 for similar re- search at Philadelphia or elsewhere on tobacco uth6lization. About $150,000, woul& be spent on health•related re- search at the Agricultural Lahoratoriess in Beltsville, Md. Officials said the re- mainder of the money has not been, specifically allocated. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 26 Total budgeted funds for~ over-allto: bacco research in the year ending next June 30 is $4,025,000: In the year ended last June 30 the amount was $2,150,000. Expenditures recommended by the President are subject to action by Congress. If funds for tobacco research are approved in President Johnson's budget for 1i965-66, the Tobacco Experiment Station in Oxfor& is scheduled to re- ceive $950,000 to carry on its work. The amount is the most ever to be made available for the station. In the tobacco category, more than $4,000,000 is sought for over-all' re- search, including studies in cultivation and the smoking-health problem~ Thee allottnent for the Oxford station is moree than double that for the current fiscal period. Director J. M. Carr said that plans for the proposed expansion have been in process for some time, and will be pushed under the new and enlarged program. More adequate physicali fa- cilities and personnel to carry out the project will be_ provide& under the new appropriation. Extension studies have been, under way the past year, and will now be enlarged. In the current year, $375,000 is being spent for new facilities at Oxf ord'.-HAD, Page 17
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Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 4 LBJ mum ... Wall Street is wondering, why President Johnson didn't make any com- ments about the U.S. Healtlv Department's new report on cigarette smoking. Mutual funds would like to take on large blocks of these stocks but fear that LBJ will one day "drop the other shoe." He dirl make an I-agree comment on the first health report a year ago. But cigarette makers are doing nicely in their diversified lines. Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page i+ Silence is golden . . . A trustworthy Washington informant said the reason President Johnson didn't make any comment on the recent cigarette health report is because theindust'ry accounts for$3'.4billion annnallyin fedpral, state and local taxes and these governments cannot afford to lose any part of the revenues. u . S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 21 Score One for Our Side ... CLEVELAND, 0., Monday (CS)- Officials at Grace Hospital he.re, con- clhded recently that' visitors who want to smoke will find a way. They removed a cigarette vending machine a year ago followinQ research reports on the apparent health:hazards of smoking. As a result, visitors began borrow- ing cigarettes or drove to the nearest store to buy them. The vending ma- chine was put back in the hospital this week. Johnson Budget Includes Funds for Leaf Research WASHINGTON, D.C.-Included in the new Johnson budget for the fiscal year starting next July li is a total' of $4.6 million for over-all tobacco re- searchs Agriculture Department officials said. Included is money for research pertaining into tobacco and health. The budget for the current fiscal year ending next June 30 contains $1,875,000 for tobacco-health studv,. $1.5 million of the total for the Uni- versity of Kentucky and $375,000, for the tobacco experiment station at Ox- ford, NIC. The new budget contains $1.5 million for research at'! Louisville, and $950i000 for health-related and other research on flue-cured and Marr- landl type tobaccos,,to he spent chiefl',v at Oxford and $235,000 for similar re- search at Philadelphia or elsewhere on tobacco utilization. About $150,0W woul& be spent on health,related re- search at the Agricultural Laboratoriess in Beltsville, Md. Oflicials said the re- mainder of the money hasnot~beem specifically allocated. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 26 Total budgeted funds f'or over-all to- bacco research in the year ending next Jiune 30 is $4,025,000: In the year ended last June 30 the amount was $2,150;000, Expenditures recommended by the President are subject to action by Congress. If funds for tobacco research are approved in President Johnson's budget for 1i965-66, the Tobacco Experiment Stationi in Oxford~ is scheduled to re- ceive $950;000 to carry on its work. The amount is the most ever to be made available for the station. In the tobacco category, more than $'4,000;000 is sought for over-alli re- search, including studies in cultivation and the smoking-health problem: The allotment for the Oxford station is moree than double that for the current fiscal period. Director J., M. Carr said that plans for the proposed expansion have been in process for some time, and' will be p:ished under the new and enlarged program. More adequate physicali fa- cilities and personnel to carrwout the project will be prowided under the new appropriation. Extension studies have beem under way the past year, and will now be enlarged. In the current year, $375,000 is being spent for new facilities at Oxford.-HAD: Page 17
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Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 4 LBJ mum . . . Wall Street is wondering, why President Johnson didn't make any com- ments about the U.S. Healt4 Department's new report on cigarettee smoking. Mutual funds would like to take on large blocks of thesee stocks but fear that LBJ will one day "drop the other shoe." He did make an I-agree comment on the first health report a year ago. But cigaret'~temakersa~re doing nicely in their diversified lines. Tobacco Februa.ry 19, 1965 - Page l+ Silence is golden . . . A trustworthy Washington informant said the reason President .Johnson didn't make any comment on the recent cigarette health report is because theindust!ry accounts for53.4billion annually in federal, state and local taxes and these governments cannot afford to lose any part of the revenues. U. S. Tobacco~Journe.l. February 25, 1965 - Page 21 Score One for Our Side ... CLEVELAND, 0., Monday (C8)- Officials at Grace H'ospital here con- clirded recently that'~ visitors who want to smoke will find a way. They removed a cigarette vending machine a year ago following research report's onAhe apparent health hazards of smoking. As a result, visitors began borrow- ing cigarettes or drove to the nearest store to buy them. The vending ma- chine was put back in the hospital this week. Johnson Budget Includes Funds for Leaf Research WASHINGTON, D.C.-Included in the new Johnson budget for the fiscal year starting next July 11 is a total of $4.6 million for over-all tobacco re- searchs Agriculture Department off c*ials said. Included is money for research pertaining into tobacco and health. The budget for the current fiscal year ending next June 30 contains $1,875,000 for tobacco-health study,. $1.5 million of the total for the Uni- versity of Kentucky and $375,0001 for the tobacco experiment station at Ox- ford, N'.C. 'hhenewbudget contains $1.5 million for research at Louisville, and $950i000 for health-related and other research on flue-cured and Marv- landl type tobaccos;,to be spent chieflvv at Oxford and $235,000 for similar re- search at Philadelphia or elsewhere on tobacco utilization. About $150,000, woul& be spent on health~related re- search at the Agricultural Laboratoriess in Beltsville, Md. Officials said the re- mainder of the money has not beeni specifically allocated. Toba.cco February 12, 1965 - Page 26 Total budgeted funds for over-all to- bacco research in the year ending next June 30 is $4,025,000! In the year ended last June 30 the amount was $2,150,000. Expenditures recommended by the President are subject to action by Congress. If funds for tobacco research are approved in President Johnson's budget for 1i965-66, the Tobacco Experiment Station in Oxfor& is scheduled to re- ceive $950;000 to carry on its work. The amount is the most ever to be made available for the station. In the tobacco category, more than $4,000;000 is sought for over-all! re- search, including studies in cultivation and the smoking-health problem, Thee allottnent for the Oxford station is more than double that f'or~ the current fiscal period. Direct'or: J. M. Carr said that plans for the proposed expansion have been in process for some time, an& will be pashed under the new and enlarged program. More adequate physicali fa- cilities and personnel to carrv out the project will be, provide& under the new appropriation. Extension studies have been, under way the past year, and will now be enlarged. In the current year, $375,000 is being spent, for new facilities at Oxford.-HAD, Page 17
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Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 1+ LBJ mum ... Wall Street is wondering, why President Johnson didn't make any com- ments about the U.S. Health Department's new report on cigarette smoking. Mutual funds would like to take on large blocks of thesee stocks but fear that LBJ will one day "drop the other shoe." He did make an I-agree comment on the first health report a year ago. But cigarette makers are doing, nicely in their diversified lines.. Tobacco February 19, 1965 - Page 1+ Silence is golden . . . A trustwortlty Washington informant said the reason President Johnson didn't make any comment on the recent cigarette health report is because the industry accounts for$3'.4billion annually in federal, state and local taxes and these governments cannot affor& to lose any part of the revenues. I U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Page 21 Score One for Our Side ... CLEVELAND, 0., Monday (CS)- Officials at Grace Hospital hc.re con- chided recently that! visitors who want to smoke will find a way. They removed a cigaret:te vending machine a year ago following research, report's on the apparent health hazards of smoking. As a result, visitors began borrow- ing cigarettes or drove to the nearest store to buy them. The vending ma- chine was put back in the hospital this week. Johnson Budget Includes Funds for Leaf Research WASHINGTON, D.C.-Included in the new Jbhnson budget for the fiscal year starting next July li is a total' of $4.6 million for over-all tobacco re- searchs Agriculture Department off cials said. Included is money for research pertaining into tobacco and health. The budget for the current fiscal year ending next June 30 contains $1,875,000 for tobacco-health study,, $1.5 million of the total for the Uni- versity of Kentucky and $375,000, for the tobacco experiment station at Ox- ford, N.C. The new budget contains $1.5 million for research at'! Louisville, and $950;000 for health-related and other research on flue-cnired and Marv- landl type tobaccos,,to be spent chiefly at Oxford and $235,000 for sirniltir re- search at Philadelphia or elsewhere on tobacco utilization. About $150,000 would' be spent on health~related re- search at the Agricultural L,aboratoriess in Beltsville, Md. Officials said the re- mainder of the money has not beem specifically allocated. Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Page 26 Total budgeted funds f'or, over-all to- bacco research in the year ending next' Jiune 30 is $4,025,000: In the year ended last June 30 the amount was $2,150;000. Expenditures recommended by the President are subject to action by Congress. If funds for tobacco research are approved in President Johnson's budget for 1i965-66, the Tobacco Experiment Station in Oxfor& is scheduled to re- ceive $950;000 to carry on its work. The amount is the most ever to be made available for the station. In the tobacco category, more than $4,000,000 is sought for over-alli re- search, including studies in cultivation and the smoking-health problem, Thee allotment for the Oxford station is more than double that f'or, the current fiscal period. Director J. M. Carr said that plans for the proposed expansion have been in process for some time, an& will be pushed under the new and enlarged program. More adequate physical fa- cilities and personnel to carrwout the project will be, provided under the new appropriation. Extension studies have been under way the past year, and will now be enlarged. In the current year, $375,000 is being spent for new facilities at Oxford.-HAD: page 17
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FOREIGN CIGARETTE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION (
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el U . S . Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 8 2 Dutch Tobacco Firms to Become Closely Affiliated N. V'. Deli - Maatschappij and Koch Scheltema N. V., both Dutch companies well known in the international tobaeco - mark•et, will become closely affiliated, according to a joint announcement of the boards of management. The agreement between the two con- cerns includes a provision for an ex- change of shares whereby Deli - Maat- achappij will acquire the shares of Koch Scheltema N. V. against com- pany - owned Delil-Maatschappij share- certificates. - Koch Scheltema N. V. of Rotterdam, a private company, was formed last year by the merging of Koch & Co.'s Tabakshandel N. V.,, of Rotterdam, and Scheltema's Import Compagnie N. V., of Amsterdam. Del'i-Maatachappijl and Koch Schel- tema N. V, will continue to operate as i, at present, but in close co-operation, each under its own board of manage- ment. ' In order to promote this co-opera- tion, two directors of Deli-Maatachap- plj, Baron A. van Styrum and J. E. van Hoogstraten, willibe nominated for appointment to the board of directors of Koch Scheltema N. V., and two di- rectors of Koch Scheltema N. V., J." Burgerhout and B. ter Haar, will be.. nominated for appointment to the board, , of directors of N. V. Deli-Maatschappij.j; A. T. Laverge, who will retain hisl' office as a member of the managingi board of Koch Scheltema, will be nom-~ inated for appointment to the board; „ of management of N. V. Deli - Maat- schappij. ~' Tobacco 0/19466D C Marc)a 5, 1965 - Page 22 Canadian Withdrawals Show January '65 Drop OTTAWA, ONT. - Tax-paid with- drawals of Canadian cigarettes in Janu- ary showed a 3.9 per cent decrease compared with January, 1964,, the .. Dominion Bureau of Statistics said. The bureau said the number of cigarettes for which excise stamps were purchased' by manufacturers moving stocks out of warehouses totalled 3,- 223,488,905 last month. This com- pared with 3,345,572,000 in Decem- ber, $;3,611,918,000 in November and 3,727,865,895 in October.-TOLES. Tobacco 6//94&~ o,,Febr-ary 19, 1965 - Page 20 Tobacco Products Use . Reported for So. Africa JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRI- CA - More than 50, million pounds of ; tobacco was used in South Africa in 1963-in cigarettes, pipes, cigars and vdgarillos. Another three million pounds provided for snuff and chewing tobacco needs. Nearly 27' million pounds of tobacco, 25 millionpo unds of it locally produced, were used to produce 10,887 million cigarettes in South Africa last year. The government collected $83.18 million excise duty on tobacco products between April 1, 1963, and March 31, 1964. This was $7.42 million more than In 1982-83.-VIT. ,. Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 10 011q4(,&0 3. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 26 Cigarette Output Down In Congo in 3 Months WASHINGTON, D. C., Saturday- Cigarette output irr the Congo (Leo- poldville) during January-March, 1964, at 647 million pieces, was 14.2 per cent below the 754 million pieces, produced in the same period last year.' The decline is attributed to the in- crease of slightly more than 70 per cent in retail prices following the de- `' valuation of the Congolese franc on November 9, 1963. Retail prices of popular 'brands during June, 1964 averaged about 34 francs per package of 20, oompared' with about 19 to 20, francs for the same month last year. Cigarette output in the Congo dur- ing calendar 1964 is not likely to• equa•1 lest year's level of 3,573 million pieces, but is expected to exceed 1962's 2,523-million outturn. Molins.Machine Company To Supply Japan Monopoly LONDON, ENGLAND-Molins Ma= chine Company has entered into a li- censing agreement and is to supply Mark 8 cigarette making machines and ancilliary equipment worth more than R,3'h million to the Japan Monopoly Corporation. This is one of the largest orders ever placed in the tobacco in- dustry. Some 200 cigarette-making machines will be produced for export in the com- pany's Deptford and Saunderton fac- tories, the remainder being made under license by the Monopoly to Molins specifications. Under a sweeping modernization pro- gram the Japan Monopoly Corporationn plan to open four new factories in which the majority of the Molins equip- ment will be installed: Some machines will be used to re-equip existing factories. The Mark 8 machines are the most modem of their kind in the world with a production speed' of 2,000 cigarettes per minute. A high degree of automa- tion will be achieved by the use of special filter tip assembly attachments and automatic tray filling devices. Desmond Molins, chairman and man- aging director, who has visited Japan in connection with the order, said: "Naturally, we are very pleased with this hard-won contribution towards Britain's export drive." Molins agents throughout the nego- tiations were Marubeni-Iida Co., Ltd. The company intends to consolidate the trading cooperation recognized in this order by taking space at the British Exhibition in Tokyo this year. Within an area of some 2,000 square feet Molins' machines will produce Japan Monopoly Corporation, cigarettes and gack them in the unique 'Hinge Lid" ox. In connection with the announce- ment, Molins Machine Company ex- ecutivedescribed the Mark _8 as the smallest, lightest, fastest machine of its kind in the world, producing up to 2,000 cigarettes per minute. Using an entirely new principle the Mark 8 ensures that every particle of tobacco is under complete control dur- . ing the entire sequence of' manufacture.. This means cigarettes with vastly su- perior characteristics; they are fnmer„ ~ more evenly filled and have denser ends. ~ Electronic controls built into the 1J machine, maintain cigarette weights C~ and densities to standards of accuracv ,~ never before attained. The Mark 8 rep- ~ resents the most significant advance in O cigarette making technique since the invention of the first completely auto- ~ matic machine in 1881. Page 18
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el! U . S . Tobacco Journal February 1, 19 5- Page 8 2 Dutch Tobacco Firms to Become Closely Affiliated N. V. Deli - Maatschappij and Koch 8cheltema N. V.,, both Dutch companies well known In the international tobacco market, will become closely affiliated, according to a joint announcement of the boards of management. The agreement between the two con- cerns includes a provision for an ex- change of shares whereby Deli - Maat- achappij will acquire the shares of Koch Scheltema N. V. against com- pany - owned Deli - Maatschappi j share- certificates. • Koch Scheltema N. V. of Rotterdam, a private company, was formed last year by the merging of Koah & Co.'s Tabakshandel N. V.,, of Rotterdam, and SCheltema's Import Compagnie N. V.,; of Amsterdam. Deli - Maatschappij and Koch Schel- tema N. V., will oontinue to operate as i at present, but in close co-operation, each under its own board of manage- ment. In order to promote this co-opera- tion, two directors of Deli-Maatschap- pij, Baron A. van Styrum and J. E. van Hoogstrat'en, will be nominated for appointment to the board of directors of Koch Schelt'ema N. V., and t'wo di- rectors of Koch Scheltema N. V., J.! Burgerhout and B. ter Haar, will be, nominated for appointment to the board I of directors of N. V. Deli-Maatschappij., A., T. Laverge, who will retain hisl office as a member of the managing~ board of Koch Scheltema, will be nom-! inated for appointment to the board' of management of N. V. Deli - Maat- schappij. I Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 22 Canadian Withdrawals OJ194&60 G Show January '65 Drop OTTAWA, ONT. - Tax-paid with- drawals of Canadian cigarettes in Janu- ary showed a 3.9' per cent decrease compared with January,. 1964, the. Dominion Bureau of Statistics said. The bureau said the number of cigarettes for which excise stamps were purchased by manufacturers movingg stocks out of warehouses totalled 3,- 223,488,905 223,488,905 last month. This com- pared with 3,345,572,000 in Decem- ber, $3,811,918,000 in November and 3,727,885,895 in October.-TOLES. Tobacco 0119.4&4,o,4 Febr- ry 19, 1965 - Page 20 Tobacco Products Use . Reported for So. Africa JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRI- CA - More than 50 million pounds of ; tobacco was used in South Africa in , L 1983-in cigarettes, pipes, cigars and .,clgarillos. Another three million pounds provided for snuff' and chewing tobaccoo needs. Nearly 27 million pounds of tobacco, 25 million pounds of it locally produced, were used to produce 10,887 million cigarettes in South Africa last year. The government collected $83.16 million excise duty on tobacco products ,between April 1, 1963, and March 3'1, 1964. This was $7.42 million more than in 1982-83.-VIT. , Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 10 0//q 4G& o U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 26 Cigarette Output Down In Congo in 3 Months WASHINGTON„ D. C., Saturday- Cigarette output in the Congo (Leo- poldville) during January-March, 1964, 'at 647 million pieces, was 14.2 per cent below the 754 million pieces, produced in the same period last year.' The decline is attributed to the in- crease of slightly more than 70 per cent in retail prices following the de- valuation of~ the Congolese franc on November 9, 1963. Retail, prices of popular 'brands during June, 1964 averaged about 34 francs per package of 20, compared with about 19 to 20 francs for the same month last year. Cigarette output in the Congo dur- ing calendar 19,64 is not likely to• equal laat year's level of 3,573 million pieces, but' is expected to exceed 1962's 2,523-million outturn, Molins.Machine Company To Supply Japan Monopoly LONDON, ENGLAND-Molins Ma- chine Company has entered into a li- censing agreement and is to supply Mark 8 cigarette making machines and ancilliary equipment worth more than 93'fe million to the Japan Monopoly Corporation. This is one of the largest orders ever placed in the tobacco in- dustry: Some 200 cigarette-making machines will be produced for export in the com- pany's Deptford and Saunderton fac- tories, the remainder being made under license by the Monopoly to Molins specifications. Under a sweeping modernization pro- gram the Japan Monopoly Corporation plan to open four new factories in which the majority of the Molins equip- ment will be installed. Some machines will be used to re-equip existing factories. The Mark 8 machines are the most modem of their kind in the world with a production speed of 2,000 cigarettes per minute. A high degree of automa- tion will be achieved by the use of special filter tip assembly attachments and automatic tray filling devices. Desmond Molins, chairman and man- aging director, who has visited Japan in connection with the order, said: "Naturally, we are very pleased with this hard-won contribution towards Britain's export drive." Molins agents throughout the nego- tiations were Marubeni-lida Co., Ltd. The company intends to consolidate the trading cooperation recognized in this order by taking space at the British Exhibition in Tokyo this year. Within an area of' some 2,000 square feet Molins' machines will produce Japan Monopoly Corporation cigarettes and'' pack them in the unique 'Hinge Lid' box. In connection with the announce- ment, Molins Machine Company ex- ecutive described the Mark 8' as the smallest, lightest, fastest machine of its kind in the world, producing up to 2,000 cigarettes per minute. Using, an entirely new principle the Mark 8 ensures that every particle of tobacco is under complete control dur- ing the entire sequence of manufacture. This means cigarettes with vastly su- perior chara(geristics; they are firmer, (Z more evenly filled and have denser ends. b,.i Electronic controls built into the ~ machine, maintain cigarette weights and' densities to standards of accuracy o, , never before attained. The Mark 8 rep- all resents the most significant advance in ~ cigarette making technique since the invention of the first completely auto- ~ matic machine in 1881. Page 18
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+1 , U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 19 5- pe,ge 8 2 Dutch Tobacco Firms to Become Closely Affiliated N. V. Dell - Maatschappij and' Koch Scheltema N. V., both Dutch companies well known in the international tobacco market, will become closely affiliated, according to a joint announcement' of the boards of management. The agreement between the two con- cerns includes a provision for an ex- change of shares whereby Dell - Maat- achappij will acquire the shares of Koch Scheltema N. V. against com- pany - owned Deli - Maatschappi j share- certificates. - Koch Scheltema N. V. of Rotterdam,, a private company, was formed last year by the merging of Koch & Co.'s Tabakahandel N. V., of Rotterdam, and Scheltema's Import' Compagnie N. V., : of Amsterdam. Deli'- Maatachappij and Koch Schel, I'tema N. V. will continue to operate as i at present, but in close co-operation, : each under its own board of manage- ment. ' ment. In order to promote this co-opera- tion, two directors of D'eli-Maatschap- pij, Baron A. van Styrum and J. E. van Hoogstraten, will be nominated for appointment to the board of directors of Koch Scheltema N. V., and two di- rectors of Koch Scheltema N. V., J.! Burgerhout and B. ter Haar, will be, nominated for appointinent to the board'~I of directors of N. V. Deli-Maatschappij.1A. T. Laverge, who will retain hisl office as a member of the managingj board of Koch Scheltema, will be nom- inated for appointment to the board, of management of N. V. Deli - Maat- schappi j: I Tobacco March 5.- 1965 - Page 22 Canadian Withdrawals O/19466O C Show January 'B5 Drop OTTAWA, ONT. - Tax-paid with- drawals of Canadian cigarettes, in Janu- ary showed a 3.9 per cent decrease compared with January, 1984, the. Dominion Bureau of Statistics said. The bureau said the number of cigarettes for which excise stamps were purchased by manufacturers moving stocks out of warehouses totalled 3; 223,488,905 last month. This com- E:red with 3,345,572,000 in Decem- be r,r, $3,611,916,000 in November and 3,727,865,895 in October.-TOLES. Tobacco bll94l~~ o ~ February 19, 1965 - Page 20 Tobacco Products Use . Reported for So. Africa JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFIlI- CA - More than 50 million pounds of , tobacco was used in South Africa in 3963'-in cigarettes, pipes, cigars and dgarillos. Another three million pounds provided for snuff and chewing tobacco needs. Nearly 27 million pounds of tobacco, 25 million p, ounds of it locally produced, were used to produce 10,887 million cigarettes in South Africa last year. The government collected $83.16 million excise duty on tobacco products „between April 1, 1963, and March 31, 1964. This was $7.42 million more than in 1982-83. -V IT. , Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 10 0//94"00 /3 U. S. Tobacco Journal . Februaryr 1b, 1965 - Page 26 Cignrette Output Down In Congo in 3 Months WASHINGTON, D. C., Saturday- Cigarette output irr the Congo (Leo- poldville) during January-March, 1964, at 647 million pieces, was 14.2 per cent below the 754 million pieces, produced in the same period last year.,'The decline is attributed to the in- crease of slightly more than 70 per cent in retail prices following the de-`• valuation of the Congolese franc on November 9, 1963. RetaiP prices of popular "brands during June, 1964 average& about 34 francs per package of 20, compared with about 19 to 20 francs for the same month last year. Cigarette output in the Congo dur- ing calendar 1'g64 is not likely t.o• equal last year's level of 3,573 million pieces,, but is expected to exceed 1962's 2,523-million outturn. Molins .Machine Company To Supply Japan Monopoly LONDON, ENGLAND-Molins Ma- chine Company has entered into a li- censing agreement and is to supply Mark 8' cigarette making machines and ancilliary equipment worth more than 1r 3'h million to the Japan Monopoly Corporation. This is one of the largest orders ever placed in the tobacco in- d Some 200 cigarette-making machines will be produced for export in the. com- pany's Deptford and Saunderton fac- tories,, the remainder being made under Iicense by the Monopoly to Molins specifications. Under a sweeping modernization pro- gram the Japan Monopoly Corporation plan to open four new factories in which the majority of the Molins equip- ment will be installed. Some machines will be used to re-equip, existing factories. The Mark 8 machines are the most modem of their kind in the world with a production speed of 2,000 cigarettes per minute. A high degree of automa- tion will be achieved by the use of special filter tip assembly attachments and automatic tray filling devices. Desmond Molins, chairman and man- aging director, who has visited Japan in connection with the order, said: "Naturally, we are very pleased with this hard-won contribution towards Britain's export drive." Molins agents throughout the nego- tiations were Marubeni-Iida Co., Ltd. The company intends to consolidate the trading cooperation recognized in this order by taking space at the British Exhibition in Tokyo this year. Within an area of some 2,000 square feet Molins' machines will produce Japan Monopoly Corporation cigarettes and pack them in the unique 'Hinge Lid' box. In connection with the announce- ment, Molins Machine Company ex- ecutive described the Mark .8 as the smallest, lightest, fastest machine of its kind in the world, producing up to 2,000 cigarettes per minute. Using an entirely new principle the Mark 8 ensures that every particle of tobacco, is under complete control dur- ing the entire sequence of manufacture.. This means cigarettes with vastly su- perior charaeteristics;, they are firmer, more evenly filled and have denser ends. Electronic controls built into the machine, maintain cigarette weights and densities to standards of accnracy , never before attained. The Mark 8 rep- resents the most significant advance in cigarette making technique since the "o invention of the first completely auto- ZI matic machine in 188.1. Page 18
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.1 U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 1965 - Page 8 2 Dutch Tobacco Firms to Become Closely Affiliated ~ N'. V. Deli - Maatschappij and Koch ~ Scheltema N. V., both Dutch companies M well known in the internationalitobacco' 1„ market, will become closely affiliated, according to a joint announcement of the boards of management. ~ The agreement between the two con- ~ cerna includes a provision for an ex- change of shares whereby Deli - Maat- schappij will acquire the shares of Koch Scheltema N'. V. against com- pany - owned Deli - Maatschappi j share- certificates. • Koch Scheltema N. V. of Rotterdam, a private company, was formed last year by the merging of Koch & Co.'s Tabakshandel N. V., of' Rotterdam, and Scheltema's Import Compagnie N. V., ; of Amsterdam. ' Deli - Maatechappij and Ko: h Schel- ! tema N. V. will continue to operate as i at present, but in close co-operation, each under its own board of manage- ment. ' In order to promote this co-opera- tion, two directors of Deli-Maatschap- p1j, Baron A. van Styrum and J. E. van Hoogatraten, will be nominated for appointment to the board of directors of Koch Scheltema N. V., and two di- rectors of Koch Scheltema N. V., J." Burgerhout and B. ter Haar, will be.. nominated for appointment to the board f, of directors of N. V. Deli-Maatschappij.1A. T. Laverge, who will retain hisl office as a member of the managing` board of Koch Scheltema, will be nom-! inated for appointment to the board, of management of N. V. Deli - Maat-: schappij. I Tobacco D//94&ba C March 5, 1965 - Page 22 Canadian Withdrawals Show January '65 Drop OTTAWA, ONT: - Tax-paid with- drawals of Canadian cigarettes in Janu- ary showed a 3.9 per cent decrease compared with January, 1964, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics said. The bureau said the number of cigarettes for which excise stamps were purchased by manufacturers moving stocks out of warehouses totalled 3,- 223,488,905 last month. This com- pared with 3,345,572,000 in Decem- ber„ $3,611,916,000 in November and 3,727,885,895 in October.-TOLES. Tobacco o1194(p4. o 4 Febr erY 19, 1965 - Page 20: Tobacco Products Use Reported for So. Africa JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRI- CA - More than 50 million pounds of ; tobacco was used in South Africa in ,1963-in cigarettes, pipes, cigars and .,efgarillos. Another three million pounds provided for snuff and chewing tobacco needs, Nearly 27 million pounds of tobacco, 25 million pounds of it locally produced, were used to produce 10,887 million cigarettes in South Africa last year. The government collected $83.16 million excise duty on tobacco products ibetween April 1„ 1983, and March 3'1, 1964. This was $7.42 million more than in 1962-63.-VIT. ,I p/Iq466o .l3 U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 26 Cigarette Output Down In Congo in 3 Months WASHINGTON, D. C., Saturday- Cigarette output itr the Congo (Leo- poldville) during January-March, 1964, at 647 million pieces, was 14.2 per cent below, the 764 million pieces. produced in the same period last year.' The decline is attributed to the in- crease of slightly mnre than 70 per cent in retail prices following the de-'' valuat'ton of the Congolese franc on November 9, 1963. Retail prices of popular 'brands during June, 1964 averaged about 34 francs per package of 20, compared' with about 19 to 20 francs for the same month last year. Cigarette output in the Congo dur- ing calendar 1964 is not likely to• equal ldet year's level of 3,573 million pieces, but' is expected to exceed 1962's 2,523-million outturn, Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 10 Molins .Machine Company To Supply Japan Monopoly LONDON, ENGLAND-Molins Ma= chine Company has entered into a li- censing agreement and is to supply Mark 8 cigarette making machines and ancilliary equipment worth more than dr 3'fz million to the Japan Monopoly Corporation. This is one of the largest orders ever placed in the tobacco in- dustry. Some 200 cigarette-making machines will be produced for export in the com- pany's Deptford and Saunderton fac- tories, the remainder being made under license by the IVlonopoly to Molins specifications. Under a sweeping modernization pro- gram the Japan Monopoly Corporation plan to open four new factories in which the majority of the Molins equip- ment will' be installed. Some machines will be used to re-equip existing factories. The Mark 8 machines are the most modern of their kind in the world with a production speed of 2,000 cigarettes per minute. A high degree of automa- tion will be achieved by the use of special filter tip assembly attachments and automatic tray filling devices. Desmond Molins, chairman and man- aging director, who has visited Japan in connection with the order, said: "Naturally, we are very pleased with this hard-won contribution towards Britain's export drive." Molins agents throughout the nego- tiations were Marubeni-lida Co., Ltd. The company intends to consolidate the trading cooperation recognized in this order by taking space at the British Exhibition in Tokyo this year. Within an area of some 2,000 square feet Molins' machines will' produce Japan Monopoly Corporation cigarettes and pack them in the unique 'Hinge Lid` box. In connection with the announce- ment, Molins Machine Company ex- ecutive described the Mark 8 as the smallest, lightest, fastest machine of its kind in the world, producing up to 2,000 cigarettes per minute. Using an entirely new principle the Mark 8 ensures that every particle of tobacco is under complete. control dur- . ing the entire sequence of manufacture. This means cigarettes with vastly su- perior charaGteristics; they are firmer, ~ more evenly filled and have denser ends. J.i Electronic controls built into the N machine, maintain cigarette weights CD and densities to standards of accuracy, ,~ never before attained. The Mark 8 rep- Q+ resents the most significant advance in O cigarette making technique since the invention of the first completely auto- b matic machine in 1881. Page 18
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+1! U . S . Tobacco Journal February 18, 1965 - Page 8 2 Dutch Tobacco f irms to Become Closely Affiliated N. V. Dell - MaatschappiJ and Koch Scheltema N. V., both Dutch companies well known In the international tobacco market, will become closely affiliated, according to a joint announcement o2 the boards of management. The agreement between the two con- cerns includes a provision for an ex- change of shares whereby Deli - Maat- echappij will acquire the shares of Koch Scheltema N. V. against aom- pany - owned Deli'- Maatachappi j share- certificates. • Koch. Scheltema N. V. of Rotterdam,, a private company, was formed last year by the merging of Koch & Co.'s Tabakahandel N. V., of Rotterdam, and Scheltema's Import Compagnie N. V., : of Amsterdam. Deli - Maatschappij and Koch Schel- tema N. V. will continue to operate as i at present, but in close co-operation, each under its own board of manage- ment. ' In order to promote this co-opera- tion, two directors of Deli-Maatschap- pij, Baron A. van Styrum and J. E. van Hoogatraten, will be nominated for appointment to the board of directors of Koch Scheltema N. V., and twa' di- rectors of Koch Scheltema N. V.,, J.' Burgerhout and B. ter Haar, will be nominated for appointment to the board I of directors of N. V. Deli-Maatschappij.1 A. T. Laverge, who will retain hisl office as a member of the managingj board of Koch Scheltema, will be nom-d inated for appointment'to the board; of management of N. V. Deli'- Maat=: schappij. I Tobacco O/1941060 G March 5~ 1965 - Page 22 Canadian Withdrawals Show January '65 Drop OTTAWA, ONT. - Tax-paid with- drawals of Canadian cigarettes in Janu- ary showed a 3.9 per cent decrease compared with January, 1964, the . Dominion Bureau of Statistics said. The bureau said the number of cigarettes f'or which excise stamps were purchased by manufacturers moving stocks out of warehouses totalled 3; 223,488,905 last month. This com- pared with 3,345,572,000 in Decem- ber, $3,811,918,000 in November and 3y727,865,895 in October.-TOLES. Tobacco bll94lP~ro q Febr~ua y 19, 1965 - Page 20 Tobacco Products Use . Reported for So. Africa JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRI- CA - More than 50 million pounds of ; tobacco was used in South Africa in ,1983-in cigarettes, pipes, cigars and .d'garillos Another three million pounds provided for snuff and chewing tobacco needs. Nearly 27 million pounds of tobacco, 25 miilionpo und's of it locally produced, were used to produce 10,887 million cigarettes in South Africa last ' year. The government collected $,83'.18 million excise duty on tobacco products i between April 1, 1983y and March 31, 1964. This was $7.42 million more than In 1982-83.-VIT. , Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 10 p//q4~,&0 l3 U. S. Tobacco Journal .February 1 , 1965 = Pege 26 Cigarette Output Down In Congo in 3 Months WASHINGTON, Ds C., Saturday- Cigarette output irr the Congo (Leo- poldville) during January-March, 1964, : at 647 million pieces,, was 14.2 per cent below the 764 million pieces. produced in the same period last year.' The decline is attributed to the in- crease of slightly mure than~ 70 per cent in retail prices following the de- valuation valuation of the Congolese franc on November 9, 1963. Retail prices of popular -brands during June, 1964 averaged about 34 francs per package of 20, compared with about 19 to 20 francs for the same month last year. Cigarette output in the Congo dur- ing calendar 1964 is not likely to- equal laet year's level of 3,573 million pieces, but is expected to exceed 1962's 2,523-million outturn. Molins .Machine Company To Supply Japan Monopoly LONDON, ENGLAND-Molins Ma- chine Company has entered into a li- censing agreement and is to supply Mark 8 cigarette making machines and ancilliary equipment worth more than R,3% million to the Japan Monopoly Corporation. This is one of the largest orders ever placed in the tobacco in- dustry. Some 200 cigarette-making machines willi be produced for export in the com- pany's Deptford and Saunderton fac- tories, the remainder being made under license by the Monopoly to Molins specifications. Under a sweeping modernization pro- grarn the Japan Monopoly Corporation plan to open four new factories in which the majority of the Molins equip- ment will be installed. Some machines will be used to re-equip existing factories. The Mark 8 machines are the most modem of their kind in the world with a production speed of 2,000 cigarettes per minute. A high degree of automa- tion will be achieved by the use of special filter tip assembly attachments and automatic tray filling devices. Desmond Molins,, chairman and man, aging director, who has visited Japan in connection with the order, said: "Naturally, we are very pleased with this hard-won contribution towards Britain's export drive." Molins agents throughout the nego- tiations were Marubeni-Iida Co., Ltd. The company intends to consolidate the trading cooperation recognized in this order by taking space at the British Exhibition in Tokyo this year. Within an area of some 2,000 square feet Molins" machines will produce Japan Monopoly Corporation cigarettes and r ck them in the unique 'Hinge Lid' x. I!n connection with the announce- ment, Molins Machine Company ex- ecutive described the Mark 8 as the smallest, lightest, fastest machine of its kind in the world, producing up to 2,000' cigarettes per minute. Using an entirely new principle the Mark 8' ensures that every particle of tobacco is under complete control dur- . ing the entire sequence of manufacture. This means cigarettes with vastly su- perior charaqteristics; they are firmer, ~ more evenly filled' and have denser ends. ~.i Electronic controls built into the 1~ machine, maintain cigarette weights C~ and densities to standards of accuracy, ~_ never before attained. The Mark 8 rep- resents the most significant advance in cigarette making technique since the invention of the first completely auto- matic machine in 1881. .~ ~ Page 18
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Pages 1 & 25 Tobacco March 5, 196'5' - Page 18 Norway Smoke Salee Off 9% OSLO, NORWAY - Cigarette sales in Norway dropped nine per cent last year, from 1,403 to 1,280 million, re- ports the Joint Tobacco Industry Office. Tobacco consumption rose from 3,458 tons in 1983 to 3,541 last year, up two per cent. Cigar sales increased from 41 to 59 milfion. D//q4(~ 6 / king-size Kent in Godfrey Phillips ciga- rette-making plant at Victoria, on spe- cially purchased filter equipment. The cigarettes, to be sold' at popular com- petitive prices, are manufactured under Lorillard supervision. "The Australian cigarette market, which has virtually doavbled its sales over the last decade, is particularly good for Kent," Mr. Cramer noted, "and we expect to capture a sizable share of it because: Kent has done well 'down under' as a premium - priced imported cigarette; Australians are. even more filter-conscious than Americans (filters account for some 60 per cent of U. S. sales compared with Australia's more than 80 per cent); and' latest figures indicate a growing Australian prefer- ence for American blend fiGters. "The Australian - made Kents willi be vigorously promoted,"' Mr. Cramer said, and "heavy advertising schedules are already booked. As in the United States, television is the major cigarette advertising medium 'down under,' but radio, newspapers and magazines (in- cluding 'Newsweek's' Pacific edition) will carry their share of Kent advertis- Ing specially tailored t'o the Australian scene. Campaigns will be heavily based. on jingles which are very popular in Australia, and will also feature special- ly prepared on-screen commercials for showing in movie theaters, which are an important advertising medium in Australia." Godfrey Phillips International Pty. Limited; a subsidiary of Godfrey Phil- lips Limited of London, was established in Australia 35 year ago, and produces six major cigarette brands, tncluding Viscount, the> No. 2 filter in the coun- try. The licensing agreement with God- frey Phillips is Lorillard's third in the Far Pacific area: Lorillard brands are also currently manufactured In the Philippines and in Hong Kong. Other licensing agreements are now in force in Europe, Africa, and Latin America. In addition to licensing agreements,. Lorillard's international operations ln- clude direct export to more than 100 countries and joint ventures in Europe and the Far East. God~frey Phillips Plant Where Kents Are Manufactured in Australia Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 14 O//9¢(a ~/ ~ In 1964, 80 per cent of West German cigarettes were filter-tipped (77.89 in 1963). * * * The manufacture of Oriental cigarettes in West Ger- many has decreased from 3.34 per cent in 1963 to 2.5 per cent in 1964. *** West Germany's cigarette production in December, 1964, shows an intereeting trend: 8.563 billion cigarettes were manufactured. 81 per cent were filter-tipped; 2.3 per cent were of Oriental type. Increase, compared with the pr'eced'ing month: 144 per cent. Xent Brand To Be Made In Australia P. Lori[lard Licenses Australian Producer To Market Cigarette P. Lorillard Co. has expanded its in- ternational operetions to Australia, it was announced recently by Morgan J. Cramer, president' of the company. According to Mr. Cramer, Lorillard has signed a licensing agreement with Godfrey Phillips Pty. Limited of Vic- toria for the manufacture and sale of Kent filter cigarettes in Australia, its mandated territories and Antarctic are- as, "where filter cigarettes already command more than 80 per cent of the total market, and are still gaining," The action- marks the 12th such ar- rangement for Lorillard and extends the company's licensing operations to 1•2 foreign countries of five continents. Production is already under way of o//9-Q ~ 6 l A Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 27 French Smoke Consumption Leveled off in 1964 PARIS, FRANCE-Cigarette smoking- in France in 1964 showed signs of leveling off, partly as a result of re- ports linking tobacco and cancer, the Government reported recently. Page 19
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., U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 19r5 - Pages 1 & 25 Kent Brand To Be Made In Australia P. Lorillard Licenses Australian Producer To Market Cigarette ,P., Lorillard Co. has expanded its in- ternational operetions to Australia, it was announced recently by Morgan J. Cramer, president of the company. According to Mr. Cramer, Lorillard has signed a licensing agreement with Godfrey Phillips Pty. Limited of Vic- toria for the manufacture and sale of Kent filter cigarettes in Australia, its mandated territories and Antarctic are- as, "where filter cigarettes already command more than 80 per cent of the total market, and are still gaining." The action- marks the 12th such ar- rangement for Lorillard and extends the company's licensing operations to 1,2 foreign countries of five continents. Production is already under way of Tobacco o/lcl-4 ~ G f A March 5, 1965 - Page 18 Norway Smoke Sclcles Off 9% OSLO, NORWAY - Cigarette sales in Norway dropped nine per cent last year, from 1,403 to 1,280 million, re- ports the Joint Ti obacxo Industry Office, Tobacce consumption rose from 3,458 tons in 1963 to 3,541 last year, up two per cent. Cigar sales increased from 41 to 59 million. 0//94(~ 6 / king-size Kent in Godfrey Phillips ciga- rette-making plant at Victoria, on spe- cially purchased filter equipment. The cigarettes, to be sold at popular com- petitive prices, are manufactured under Lorillard supervision. "The Australian cigarette market, which has virtually doubled its saless over the last decade, Is particularly good for Kent," Mr. Cramer noted, "and we expect to capture a siza•ble share of it because: Kent has done well 'down under' as a premium - priced imported cigarette; Australians are even more filter-conscious than Americans (filters account for some 60 per cent of U. S. sales compared with Australia's more than 80 per cent); and latest figures indicate a growing Australian prefer- ence for American blend filters. "The Australian - made Kents will' be vigorously promoted,"' Mr. Cramer said, and "heavy advertising schedules are already booked. As in the United States, television is the major cigarette advertising medium 'down under,' but radio, newspapers and magazines (in- cluding 'Newsweek's' Pacific edition) will carry their share of Kent adwertie- ing specially tailored t'o the Australian scene. Campaigns will be heavily based.. on jingles which are very popular in Australia, and will also feature special- ly prepared on-screen commercials for showing in movie theaters, which are an important advertising medium in Australia." Godfrey Phillips International Pty. Limited, a subsidiary of Godfrey Phil- lips Limited of London, was established in Australia 35 year ago, and produces six major cigarette brands, including Viscount, the No. 2 filter in the coun- try. The licensing agreement with God- frey Phillips is Lorillard's third In the Far Pacific area: Lorillard brands are also currently manufactured In the Philippines and In Hong Kong. Other licensing agreements are now in force In Europe, Africa, and Latin America. In addition to licensing agreements,, Lorillard's international operations in- clude direct export to more than 100 countries and joint ventures in Europe and the Far East. Godfrey Phillips Plant Where Kents Are Manufactured in Australia Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 14 0// 9¢ w~/ 8 In 1964, 80 per cent of West German cigarettes were filter-tipped (77.89 in 1963Y. * * * The manufacture of Oriental cigarettes in West Ger- many has decreased from 3.34 per cent in 1963 to 2.5 per cent in 1964. * * ~ West Germany's cigarette production in December, 1964, shows an interesting trend: 8.563 billion cigarettes were manufactured. 81 per cent were filter-tipped; 2.3 per cent were of Oriental type. Increase, compared with the pt'eced'ing month: 144 per cent. Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 27 French Smoke Consumption Leveled Off in 1964 PARIS, FRANCE-Cigarette smoking in France in 1984 showed signs of leveling off, partly as a result of re- ports linking tobacco and cancer, the Government reported recently. Page 19
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., U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Pages 1 & 25 iCent Brand To Be Made In Australia P. Lorillard Licenses Australian Producer To Market Cigarette P.Lorillard Co. has expanded its in- ternational operations to Australia,, It was announced recently by Morgan J.. Cramer, president' of the company. According to Mr. Cramer, •Lorillard has signed a licensing agreement with Godfrey Phillips Pty. Limited of Vic- toria for the manufacture and sale of Kent filter cigarettes in Australia, its mandated territories and Antarctic are- as, "where filter cigarettes already command more than 80 per cent of the total market, and are still gaining." The action•nntarks the 12th such ar- rangement for Lorillard and extends the company's licensing operations to 12 foreign countries of five continents. Production is already under way of Tobacco O/l9-Q ~ 6 t A Mar`, 1965 - Page 18 Norway Smoke Scxles Off 9% OSLO, NORWAY - Cigarette sales in Norway dropped nine per cent last year,, from 1,403 to 1,280 million, re- ports the Joint Tobacco Industry O®ce.. Tobacce consumption rose from 3,458 tons in 1963 to 3,541 last year, up two per cent. Cigar sales increased from 41 to 59 million. king-size Kent in Godfrey Phillips ciga- rette-rnaking plant at Victoria, on spe- cially purchased filter equipment. The cigarettes, to be sold at popular com- petitive prices, are manufactured under Lorillard supervision. "The Australian cigarette market, which has virtually doubled its saless over the last decade, is particularly good for Kent," Mr. Cramer noted, "and we expect to capture a sizable share of it because: Kent has done well''down under' as a premium-pricedd imported' cigarette; Australians are even more filter-conscious than Americans (filters account for some 60 per cent of U. S. sales compared wwith Australia's more than S& per cent); and latest figures indicate a growing Australian prefer- ence for American blend filters. "The Australian - made Kents will be vigorously promoted,"' Mr. Cramer said, and "heavy advertising schedules are already booked. As in the United States, television is the major cigarette advertising medium 'down under,' but radio, newspapers and magazines (in- cluding 'Newsweek's' Pacific edition) will carry their share of Kent adTertie- fng specially tailored to the Australian scene. Campaigns will be heavily based. on jingles which are very popular in Australia, and will also feature special- ly prepared on-screen commercials for showing in movie theaters, which are an iin~portant advertising medium in Australia." Godfrey Phillips International Pty. Limited, a subsidiary of Godfrey Phil- lips Limited of London, was established in Australia 35 year ago, and produces six major cigarette brands, including Viscount, the• No. 2 filter in the coun- try. The licensing agreement with God- frey Phillips is Lorillard's third i'n the Far Pacific area: Lorillard brands are also currently manufactured In the Philippines and In Hong Kong. Other licensing agreements are now in force In Europe, Africa, and Latin America. In addition to licensing agreements, Lorillard's international operations in- clude direct export to more than 100 countries and joint ventures in Europe and the Far East. God'frey Pfiillipa Plant Where Kents Are Manufactured in Australia Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 14 0//94(v It1 1964, 80, per cent of West German cigarettes were filter-tipped (77.89 in 1963).. , * * * The manufacture of Oriental cigarettes in West Ger- many has decreased from 3.34 per cent in 1963' to 2.5 per cent in 1964. * * * West Germany's cigarette production in December, 1964, shows an intereeting trend: 8.563 billion cigarettes were manufactured. 81 per cent were filter-tipped; 2.3 per cent were of Oriental type. Increase, compared with the pi'eced'ing month: 144 per cent. Tobacco March 5, 196) - Page 27 French Smoke Consaxnption Leveled Off in 1964 PARIS, FRANCE-Cigarette smoking• in France in 1984 showed signs of leveling off, partly as a result of re- ports linking tobacco and cancer, the Covernment reported recently. Page 19
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 25, 1965 - Pages 1 & 25 'Kent Brand To Be Made In Australia P. Lorillard Licenses Australian Producer To Market Cigarette T. Lorillard Co. has expanded its in- ternational operations to Australia,, it was announced recently by Morgan J. Cramer, president' of the company. According to Mr. Cramer, 1-orillard has signed a licensing agreement with Godfrey Phillips Pty. Limited of Vic- toria for the manufacture and sale of Kent filter cigarettes in Australia, its mandated territories and Antarctic are- as, "where filter cigarettes already command more than 80 per cent of the total markat, and are still gaining." The act'iorr marks the 12th such ar- rangement for Lorillard and extends the company's licensing operations to 12' foreign countries of five continents. Production is already under way of Tobacco D//g-# ~ 6 f 1+ March 1965 - Page 18 Norway Smoke Sales Off 9% OSLO, NORWAY - Cigarette sales in Norway dropped nine per cent last year, from 1,403 to 1,280 million, re- ports the Joint Tobacco Industry Office. TobaccA consumption rose frotn 3,458 tons in 1963 to 3,541 last year, up two per cent. Cigar sales increased from 41 to 59 million. 0// ,?4 ~, 6 / king-size Kent in Godfrey Phillips ciga- rette-rnaking plant at Victoria, on spe- cially purchased filter equipment. The cigarettes, to be sold at popular com- petitive prices, are manufactured under Lorillard supervision. "The Australian cigarette market, which has virtually doubled its sales over the last decade, Is particularly good for Kent," Mr. Cramer noted, "and we expect to capture a sizable share of it because: Kent has done weil 'down under' as a premium - priced imported cigarette; Australians are. even more filter-conscious than Americans (filters account for some 60 per cent of U. S. sales compared with Australia's more than S0 per cent); and'' latest figures indicate a growing Australian prefer- ence for American blend filters. "The Australian - made Kents willi be vigorously promoted,"' Mr. Cramer said, and "heavy advertising schedules are already booked. As in the United States, television is the major cigarette advertising medium 'down under,' but radio, newspapers and magazines (in- eluding 'Newsweek's' Pacific edition) will carry their share of Kent advertie- Ing specially tailored to the Australian scene. Campaigns will be heavily based on jingles which are very popular in Australia, and will also feature special- ly prepared on-screen commercials for showing in movie theaters, which are an important advertising medium in Australia." Godfrey Phillips International Pty. Limited; a subsidiary of Godfrey Phil- lips Limited of London, was established In Australia 35 year ago, and produces six major cigarette brands, Including Viscount, the No. 2 filter in the coun- try. The licensing agreement with God- frey Phillips is Lorillard's third in the Far Pacific area: Lorillard brands are also currently manufactured in the Philippines and in Hong Kong. Other licensing agreements are now in force in Europe, Africa, and Latin America. In addition to licensing agreements, Lorillard's international operations In- clude direct export to more than 100 countries and joint ventures in Europe and the Far East. God'frey Phillips Plant Where Kents Are Manufactured in Australia Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 14 Ofl946, 6/ 3 In 1964, 80 per cent of West German cigarettes were filter-tipped (77.89 in 1963). * * * The mttnufaeture of Oriental cigarettes in West Ger- many has decreased from 3.34 per cent in 1963 to 2.5 per cent in 1964. * * * West GermanY's ciqcaette production in December,. 1964, shows an interesting trend: 8.563 billion cigarettes were manufactured. 81 per cent were filter-tipped; 2.3 per cent were of Oriental type. Increase, compared with the pi'eceding month: 144 per cent. Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 27 French Smoke Consumption Leveled Off in 1964 PARIS, FRANCE-Cigarette smoking' in France in 1964 showed signs of leveling off, partly as a result of re- ports linking tobacco and cancer, the Government reported recently. Page 19
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Tobacco February 26, 1965 - Pages 12 & 34 Governot Viaits Plant . . . La Tabacalera Begins Selling L &M's in Mexico MEXICO C1TY; D.F.-Milton E. Harrington, President of Liggett and. Myers Tobacco Company recently an- nounced today that L&M filter cigarettes are now being manufactured and dis- tributed here by La Tabacalcra Mexi- cana, and will be available to the Mexi- can consumer at the end of' February. Mr. Harrington, accompanied by other Liggett and Myers officials, was the guest of Sr. Jose Maria Basagoitii general director of La Tabacalera Mexi- cana, at the Alameda Hotel in Mexico City for several days of activities mark- ing the introduction of the Mexican• made L&Ivl. Mr. Harrington's itinerary in Mexico included a luncheon for approximately one hundred members of the Mexican press, a reception for several hundred Mexican tobacco distributors, and visitss to two La Tabacalera factories in Mex- ico City, one a new factory now under construction, and a third f'actory in Toluca, where the officials of La Taba- calera and Liggett and Myers were ac-. companied on their tour by Sr. Juan Feranadez Albarran, the governor of the state of Mexico. Liggett and' Myers personnel accom- panying Mr. Harrington in Mexico were Sam White, vice president, marketing; Ralph, Moore, treasurer; H. C. Robin- son, Jr., advertising manager; and Dan Provost, director of public relations. Heretofore, the L&M brand has been available in Mexico only as an imported cigarette at higher prices. Under the new arrangement between the two com- panies, both regular and king size L&M cigarettes are being manufactured' by La Tabacalera and will be offered to the Mexican consumer at popular, com- t~etitive prices, which are substantially lower than the import prices. Mr. Harrington expressed his grati- tude to Sr. Basagoiti and other officials of La Tabacalera for their hospitality and stntedt "The association between Liggett and Myers and La Tabacalera Mexicana during the past year has been a most rewarding one for me and my associates. We are delighted to see our dream of a Mexican-made, L&M ciga- rette become a reality, thanks to the vision and hard work of Sr. Basagoiti and his staff at La Tabacalera. "We look forward to a warm and friendly, and a good' long-term rela- tionship with La Tabacalera. We will provide our support where and when it is needed, and we are confident that La Tabacalera, by successfully intrtr ducing and building the new Mexican- made L&M, will be contributing to the growth of the Mexican economy and' .vill be providing even greater smoking enjoyment to the Mexican consumer. "Insofar as our joint venture pro- vides development capital, creates new jobs and increases the demand for raw materials,, it will contribute to the im- portant objective of accelerating the economic progress in Mexico. "Speaking to you now as important citizens in a great country. I would like to commend you for the excellent job you are doing. Your economic growth rate is now greater than ours in the United States, and more important, your achievements in all areas of busi- ness, government and cultural activities have been outstanding." In his remarks, Sr. Basagoiti' said: "We have set up rigid production stand- ards and quality control for the manu- facture of L&M at Tabacalera Mexicana in order to guarantee the Mexican smoker the same popular taste and flavor that has made L&M a favorite the world over. "This combination of high quality and moderate price gives the Mexican consumer a choice he has not had be- fore. Aware of the need for this com- bination for some time, we started negotiations with Liggett and' Myers more than a year ago. "We are proud to be associated with Liggett and Myers, one of the largest cigarette manufacturers in the United States, and in the world, and we are indebted to them for their efforts and full support in making our new associa- tion successful. This included many months of negotiations between our officials and theirs, and many months of' preparatory work by the manufac- turing and' marketing personnel of both companies, including Walter Corrigan, marketing director for Liggett and Myers in Mexico; William H. Rogers, manufacturing supervisor and technical coordinator for Liggett and Myers in Mexico and many members of our Tabacalera staff; including Sr. Mariano Rivera, assistant general director, and Sr. Angel O'Dogherty, assistant director: "Liggett and Myers is reco~ized as one of the outstanding leaders in the field of technical research and manu- facturing methods in the United States. In addition to L&M, they manufacture Chesterfield and Lark cigarettes, and many other cigarette and smoking to- bacco brands for distribution in the United States and 134 other countries. We are making every effort togu arantee our customers the same high quality as the famous American-made L&M cigarette." L&M's are now being distributed to wholesalers, and major advertising in newspapers, television, radio and out- door billboards will begin the week of March 1st, when the new brand will be on sale in most retail stores. Founded in 1899, Tabacalera today is one of the largest cigarette manufac- turers in Mexico, with factories iri Mexico. City, and Toluca, and a neww plant now under construction in Mexico City. Tabacalera presently makes nu- merous domestic cigarette brands in- cluding Delicados and Faros, which are among the most popular in Mexico. Page 20
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e~ ° ~ Tobacco February 12, 1965 - Pages 14 & 24 Coupons in Canada ... Belvedere Cigarettes Off er "Instant Gifts" TORONTO, ONT. - Benson and Hedges (Can:~da), Ltd., a subsidiary' of Philip \torris, Inc., announced here last week a novel "tnstant Gi£t" eampaign on behalf of its Belvedere filter ciga- To coincide with the "ihstant Gift" pro- motion and advertising campaign, Ben- son• and Hedges (Canada) Utd. has - launched Belvedere king size cigarettes in a fiip top 20 and a siide and shell 25. rette brand, now also available in king- , size and in flip-top packs of 20 and slide-and-shell boxes of 25. The new consumer-oriented program for Belvedere accentkiates the premium merchandising trend which has de- veloped in the Canadian cigarette market during the past year. The com- pany also offers premiums on its Mark Ten brand, (produced by its 90 per cent owned affiliate, Canadian Tabacofina, Ltd.), and a competitor, the Imperial Tobacco Company of' Canada, features coupons on its Embassy cigarettes. According to Antonio, Toledo, vice president and director of marketing of Benson and Hedges (Canada) Ltd., the smoker appeal of the coupons will be their readv redemption. The coupons will be inserted at random in Belvedere packages and each will be redeemable immediately f'or, a specific gift, ranging from automobiles to appliances. Mr. Toledo said': "In June of 1964 we started' laying the groundwork for this large-scale pro- gram. It was at that time decided' that the Canadian smoker would find' this.• approach very much to his liking. "This new Instant Gift program is handled so that some Belvedere ciga- rette smokers -we figure about' one out of nine-will find coupons in their pack- age of cigarettes which will entitle them to prizes ranging from Ford Mustangs to Transistor Toothbrushes: The prize which the smoker will receive is noted on the coupon inserted in the package of cigarettes. ' A grtiat deal of security has evohved around! the planning for this since last June," Mr. Toledo noted. "All of our advertising and creative meetings were held in New York City to avoid any possibility of other cigarette manufac- turers finding out about our plans. All cf ~I-e television commercials were filined in London, England. This was done ]ast October and it too allowed us to keep the program quite con- fidential."' There was even a great deal of secrecy surrounding the printing of the coupons. Benson and Hedges arranged to have the company which prints the money, British-American Banknotes Company in Ottawa, print the coupons for the "Instant Gift" program. The same type of security that surrounds the printing of our money was present for the printing of these Belvedere "Instant Gift" coupons. The main theme of' the advertising is that while Belvedere now has "In- stant Gifts," most Belvedere smokers smoke them because they like them. Some of the many prizes included in the program and available to Belvedere smokers are mink coats, desk barom, eters, complete Frigidaire kitchens, world atlases, complete RCA Entertain- ment Centt•es, Kodak Zoom Cameras, G.E. Portable televisions, Sony tran- sistor radios, 15 foot house trailers and even a 5-year supply of Personna Stainless blades plus many more inter- esting and useful prizes. The Belvedere "Instant Gift" ciga- rette commercials were filmed a few miles outside of London, England, in historic Woburn Abbey, the home of the Dukes of Bedford for nearly 300 years. Mr. Toledo stressed the fact that these commercials were filmed in Wo- burn Abbey for many reasons. "First of all," he said, "we wanted a place far enough away from Canada so that we could maintain complete security. After a lengthy search, we found that Woburn Abbey not only fit- ted our needs as far as distance was concerned, but also offered us the type of decor and background we wanted in these commercials. The main theme of our selling message is that while we offer Instant Gifts, most people smoke Belvedere cigare.ttes because they like them." In arranging for the filming of thee commercials, Benson and Hedges (Canada), Ltd. insured the two rooms that were used to film in, for $2% million, This was in case of any aa cidental damage to the room or furn- ishings during the filming. Some of the television commercials were filmed in the State Salon which is the principal Drawing Room of the State Rooms of Woburn Abbey. While this room not only has a special splen- dor about it it also cdntains many priceless paintings. Immediately to the left of the central! door leading into the room is Cherubs Scatterina Flowers by Bartholome Murilfo (1618-1682) andd over the door is Last Supper by Giam- battista Salvi, sometimes called Sasso- ferrato (1605-1685). The great gi.ltwood ~and metal gilt chandelier was bought from W. Hollingworth and Company in 1758 for £ 86: It is the first known to have been hung in Woburn Abbey. The staircase that was used for one of the commercials was designed by Henry Holland in 1787. At the foot of the staircase are pictures of the houses owned by the Russells from their early beginnings in Dorset and Devon; also homes in London, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire. Next are portratits of the 1st Earl, Lord High Admiral, and of the 2nd Earl'y side by side with his family. The direct family line follows in chronological order up the stairs and along the Dukes' Corri- dor. The director for the commercials was Laurence Borne who has worked on, such films as "View from the Bridge" and'~ "Two for the See-Saw." He has also worked on the television thriller series, The Avengers.
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February l, 1965 - Page 22 Output of Tobacco Products Is Higher Belgium Production Up 5.1 Per Cent During the First Half of Year Past BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, Monday- Output of tobacco products in Belgium during the first half of 1964, at 29.4 million pounds, was up 5.1 per cent from the 28.0 million pounds produced during the same perio& last' year. I'roduction of cigarettes, cigars, and cigarillos continued to rise and more than offset declines in smoking mix- tures, snuff, and chewing tobacco. Cigarette Output Up Cigarette output rose to 6.9 billion pieces from the 6.4 billion produced iri January-June, 1964. Cigars were up 13 per cent to 150 million pieces from 132 million. Output of cigarillos rose to 492 million pieces from 387 million, but that of smoking mixtures, chewing tobacco, and snuff was down 3.6, 22.2, and 2.3 per cent, respective- ly. Leaf uaings by manufacturers total- ed 33.4 million pounds-up 5.6 per cent from the 31.6 million used in January-June, 1963. Domestic leaf re- presented 7.7 per cent of total usings, compared with 6.6 per cent last year. 4l/94 (/ (0~ Leaf used in the production of cigar- ettes accounted for 55.5 per cent of total usings, while that used in prod- uction of cigars and cigarili'os ac- counted for 17.0 per cent, compared with 14.9 per cent' during January- June, 1963. Cigarette salesduring the first six months of 1964 totaled 6.6 billion pieces--up 7.6 per cent from the 6.1 billion sold during the same period last year. Sales of cigars were up 3 per cent, cigarillos, 29 per cent, and combined sales of other tobacco products, 0.4, per cent. U. S. Tobacco Journal February ld, 1965 - Page 22 West German Cigarette Volume Reflects a Gain BONN, WEST GERMANY, Tuesday -Cigarette sales in West Germany, in- cluding West Berlin, continued to rise through the first half of 1964. Total sales amounted to 42.8 billion pieces -up 5.5 per cent from the 40.6 bil- lion sold during January-June, 1963. Filter-tipped cigarettes represented 79.6 per cent of total sales. Cigarette output during the first bix months of 1964 totaled 44.5 billion pieces, compared with 42.0 billion dur- ing the same period last year. Output in the Federal Republic was up 4.1 per cent, andd in West Berlin 10.3 per cent. For West Germany as a whole, cigarette output was up 6.0 per cent. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 18, 19 5- Page 4 „in T his Corner" WITH THE EDITOR TO THE average American, grounded as he is in the tradition of free enter- prise, news that the British govern- ment plans to ban all cigarette adver• tising on television comes as  shock. In this country we accept the fact that the government has • a right to take action to ban advertising under cer- tain circumstances - a. g., advertising that misrepresents. . . . ON THE other - hand, the federal government has never attempted to forbid all advertising of an entire in• dustry. Even its regulations concern- ing cigarette advertising and packag- ing have come under attack, with many experts challenging the constitutional authority of the Federal Trade Com- mission or Food and Drug Administra- tion to impose such sanctions. . . . IN ANNOUNCING tbe, governmant's intention to halt cigarette TV adver- tising, the Britisb Minister of Health complained that the lung cancer rate was continuing to climb, even though the government has been conducting an anti-amoking campaign for several years. He also indicated that the Labor party was considering measures against cigarette advertising in print media. L02VIDOiN, of course, is well known for its "killer smoga," but apparently authorities in Britain are suffering from the same limitations affecting many in this country. They have be- come so fanatic in their outrage against smoking that they have for- gotten what should be the real direc- tion of their efforts - finding the causes and the cure for lung cancer and related diseases. Page 22
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February l,, 1965 - Page 22' Output of Tobacco Products Is Higher Belgium Production Up 5.1 Per Cent During the First Half of Year Past BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, Monday - Output of tobacco products in 'Belgium during the first half of 1964, at' 29.4 million pounds, was up 5.1 per cent from the 28.0 million pounds produced during the same period last year. Production of cigarettes, cigars, and cigarillos continued to rise and' more than offset declines in smoking mix- tures, snuff, and chewing tobacco. Cigarette Output Up Cigarette output rose to 8.9 billion pieces from the 6.4 billion produced iri' January-June, 1964. Cigars were up 13 per cent to 150 million pieces from 132 million. Output of cigarillos rose to 492 million pieces from 387 million, but that of smoking mixtures, chewing tobacco, and snuff' was down 3.6, 22.2, and 2.3 per cent, respective- ly. Leaf usings by manufacturers total- ed 33.4 million pounds-up 5.6 per cent from the 31.6 million used in January-June, 1963. Domestic leaf re- presented 7.7 per cent of total usings,i compared with 6.6 per cent last year. 011m &(O~ Leaf used in the production of cigar- ettes accounted for 55.5, per cent of total usings, while that used in prod- uction of cigars and cigarillos ac- counted for 17.0 per cent, compared with 14.9 per cent during January- June, 1963. Cigarette sales during the first six months of 1964 total~ed 6.6 billion pieces--up 7.6 per cent from the 6,L billion sold during the same period last year. Sales of cigars were up 8 per cent, cigarilloe, 29 per dent, and combined sales of other tobacco products, 0.4, per cent. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 22 West German Cigarette Volume Reflects a Gain BONN, WEST GERMANY, Tuesday -Cigarette sales in West Germany, in- cluding cluding West Berlin, continued to rise ~ through the first half of 1964. Total sales amounted to 42.8 billion pieces ~ -up 5.5 per cent from the 40.6 bil- \ lion sold during January-June, 1963. Filter-tipped cigarettes represented. ~• 79.6 per cent of total sales. ~, Cigarette output during the first x bix months of 1964 totaled 44.5 billion \~ pieces, compared with 42.0 billion dur- 4;Z~ ing the same period last year. Output in the Federal Republic was up 4.1 per cent, and in West Berlin 10.3 per cent. For West Germany as a whole, cigarette output was up 6.0 per cent. U. S. Tobacco Journel February 18, 19 5- Page 4 „1 n This Corner" WITH THE EDITOR TO THE average American, gronnded as he is in the tradition of free enter- priae, news that the British govern- ment plans to ban all cigarette adver- tisi'ng on television comes as a shoch. In this country we accept the fact that the government has' a right to take action 'to ban advertising under eer- tain circumstances - e. g., advertising that misrepresents. s t . ON THE other . hand, the federal government has never attempted to forbid all advertising of an entire in- dust'ry. Even its regulations concern- ing cigarette advertising and packag- ing have come under attack, with many experts challenging the constitutional authority of the Federal Trade Com- mission or Foodd and Drug Administra- tion to impose such sanctions. R • # IN ANNOUNCING the. government's intention to halt cigarette TV adver- tisi'ng, the British, Minister of Health complained that the lung cancer rat. was continuing to climb, even thoughh the government has been oonducting an anti-smoking campaign for several years. He also indicated that the Labor party was considering measures against cigarette advertising in print media. . . , LONDOiN, of course, is well known for its "killer smogs," but apparently authorities in Britain are suffering from the same limitations affecting• many in this country. They have be- come so fanatic in their outrage against smoking that they have for- gotten what should be the real direc- tion of their efforts - finding the causes and the cure for lung cancer and related di®eaaes. Page 22
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U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1, 1965 - Page 22 Output ol Tobacco Products Is Higher Belgium Production Up 5.1 Per Cent During the First Half of Year Past BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, Monday - Out'put of tobacco products in Belgium during the first half of 1964, at 29.4 million pounds, was up 5.1 per cent from the 28.0 million pounds produced' during the same period last year. Production of cigarettes, cigars, and eigarillos continued to rise and'more than offset declines in smoking mix- tures, snuff, and chewing tobacco. Cigarette Output Up Cigarette output rose to 6.9 billion pieces from the 6.4 b4llion produced iri January-June, 1964. Cigars were up 13 per cent to 150 million pieces from 132 million. Output of cigarillos rose to 492 million pieces from 387 million, but that of smoking mixtures, chewing tobacco, and snuff was down 3.6, 22.2, and 2.3 per cent, respective- ly. Leaf usings by manufacturers total- ed 33.4 million pounds-up 6.6 per cent from the 31.6 million used in January-June, 1963. Domestic leaf re- presented 7.7 per cent of total usings,,compared with 6.6 per cent last year. O//99 G(,ol Leaf used in the production of cigar- ettes accounted for 66.6 per cent of total usings, while that used' in prod- uction of cigars and cigarillos ac- counted for 17.0 per cent, compared with 14.9 per cent during January- June, 1963. Cigarette sales during the first six months of 1964 totaled 6.6 bill.ion pieces-up 7.6 per cent from the 6.1 billion sold during the same periodd last year. Sales of cigars were up 3 per cent, cigarillos, 29 per cent, and combined sales of other tobacco products, 0.4. per cent. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1', 1965 - Page 22 West German Cigarette Volume Reflects a Gain BONN, WEST GORMANY, Tuesday -Cigarette sales in West Germany, in- cluding cluding West Berlin, continued to rise ~ through the first half of 1964. Total sales amounted to 42.8 billion pieces ~ -up 6.6 per cent from the 40.6 btl- ~ ~ lion sold during January-June, 1963. V~1 Filter-tipped cigarettes, represented, 79.6 per cent of total sales. 1~, Cigarette output during the first ~ six months of 1964 totaled 44.5 billion ~ pieces, compared with 42.0 bidiion dur- Q ing the same period last year. Output in the Federnl' Republic was up 4.1 per cent, and' in West Berlin 10.3 per cent. For West Germany as a whole, cigarette output was up 6.0 per cent. U. S. Tobacco Journal February 1&, 19 5- Page 4 "in This Corner" WITH THE EDITOR TO THE average American, grounded as he is in the tradition of free enter- prise, news that the British govern- ment plans to ban all cigarette ad.er- tising on televisi'on comes as a shock. In this country we accept the fact that the government has' a right to take action to ban advertising under cer- tain circumstances - a. g., advertising that misrepresents. ., . . ON T'SE other. hand, the federal' government has never attempted to forbid all advertising of an entire i''n- dustry.Even its regulations concern- ing cigarette advertising and packag- ing have come under attack, with many experts challenging the constitutional authority of the Federal Trade Com- mission or Food and Drug Administra- tion to impose such sanctions. . . . IN ANNOUNCING the. government'e intention to halt cigarette TV adver- tising, the British. Minister of Heaith complained that tha lung cancer rate was continuing to climb, even though the government has been conducting an anti-smoking campaign for several years. He also indicated that the Labor party was considering measures against cigarette advertising in print media. . . . LONDON, of course, is well known for its "killer smogs," but apparently authorities in Britain are suffering from the same limitations affecting- many in this country. They have be- come so fanatic in their outrage against smoking that they have for- gotten what should be the real direc- tion of their efforts - finding the causes and the cure for lung cancer and related diseases.
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EDITOR'S Forum Tobacco March 5, 1965 - Page 7 Continued Con#ideace The unprecedented of&cial ban in the United Kingdom against the use of television by the cigarette industry has provoked alarm among fair- minded people everywhere. The arbitrary action imposes a new burden on cigarette manufacturers in the United Kingdom who for the past three years have been forced to promote their products in the face of an active government campaign to discourage smoking. That the B'ritish manufacturers have been successful despite this obstacle is indicated in the rising trend of cigarette consumption in the United Kingdom and perhaps explains to some extent the latest government attempt at suppression of smoking. . But the resourceful British can be counted upon to surmount this new barrier. Reflective of the renowned British pluck in the midst of adversity, we think, are the following comments by R. W. S. Plumley, deputy chairman and managing director of Carreras, Ltd., a major cigarette manufacturer. Mr. Plumley, in discussing the status of cigarette advertising, declared in part: "We believe that the restriction of advertising either by 1aw or b,y the exertion of pressures directed against the pr+xiucts of one industry, introduces an unfair and' potentially dangerous principl'ee o f discrimination in the relations between government and industry in Britain. "There are a number of products linown to be harmful if taken in excess. The evidence against cigarettes is accepted' to be almost entirely statistical. Despite all research, no positive biological link between cigarette smoking and respiratory disease has yet been proven. "lneonsistencies in the statistical' evidence itself exist. For example, the much higher rate of cigarette consumption in many parts of the world than Britain with considerably less incidence of respiratory diseases. The incidence of chronic bronchitis in the United Kingdom is phenomenally high (the mortality rate is 25 times greater than the U:S.A. where they smoke approximately 40 per cent more cigarettes per capita) and it is almost certainly li.nked' to air pollution . . . "As a result of; the government's action the industry has returned to the position which existed before commercial television was intro- duced. The restriction of this form nf promotion obviously applies equally to all manu f acturers. `7n the United Kingdom as well as overseas the (R'othmans- Carreras) Group has initiated' many forms of sales promotion tech- niques and possesses brands(rf the modern type which can be expected to maintain their impetus. "We are an old-established business but with a reputation for being somewhat dynamic, headed by a young and able management tcam and well positioned' to continue our leadership in ideas and new products. "The company liveliest in ideas and organization is likely to nvin the best advantage in the new situation. We look forward to the future with continued con fidence." Page 23.
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Foreign Agriculturel Service Unclassified FROM: ~ AmIBASSY,SEIRUT TO , DEPARTMENT OF IIGRICUI.TURE, WASHINGTON s ~ REF susJECTi JORDAN: • TOBACCO •Jordan's production of manufactured cigarettes and tanbac over the •last three years were as foll.ows: 1961 1962 IU IC s• KRS_ K. ~s. Cigarottes 956,03&' 1,©20,061a 1,445,)=. Tombac li6,155 499065 k3,351 About four fifths of the cigarettes manttfactured in Jordan ara con- sumed local3,yand one fifth is exported to ad3acent Arab countries, .pri- mar3]yr Saoudi Arabia. rROM: • BL,I,CrtiAL1F. TO .• DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTt!'RE, WASHINGTON CODE: 21-Ah YUGOSLAVIA. : Studg of Production and bcport Potential,oY Tobacco,.. .r Yugoslav cigarettes are made in plants•locatod at: Nisp Vranje, and 13 other places in Yugosiavi,ao "Theiv are 4 main grades of •cigarvttes - for.nu].as of cortain grades arre standardized but may have different names in different areas, OTho cigarette having the most Yugoslav Virginia tobacco is,the filter cigaretto produced in Croatia and Slovenia, "The ci,r~,aretto containing the highest percentage of semi-oriental loaf is nDravaa and the naxt highest is "2ota"o
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FROWS: • RO,XE TO i DEPARTMENT OF AGRIW1.TURE, WASHINGTON P E~ ~ 21A2, CII3P D YTAY.Y a Tobaooo, Fall 1964 Population: 1962/63 ~ 51,197,295 1963/61 1 ~ 51, 817, 403 ©/f q_4 ~lo7 Fiscal Year 19 3 4 Fiscal Year 1902/3 • • Per capita Por capita I t e m Quantity Value Consumption Quantity Value Consur~rotion (Kilograms) (1,000 lire) Kilograms (Kilograms) (1,000 lire) (Kilograms) Cigarettes: '- a) Italian 55,079,199 556,356,922 1,063 54,716,436 529,011,053 1.069 b) Foreign bobacco, wfgd in Italy 1,312,641 22,451,361 . 0.025 461,402 T,573,71F6 "0.009 c) Foreign 2,206,897 4Z,360,920 0.042 _1,976,263 36•937,22z o_.039 Total 58,598,737 620,169,203 1,130 57,154,10i 573,522,024 1.117 pAGE ~ OF 79 FROM aVJa, C a n~1Q~, Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada, Ltd•, reportedly is planning to double the " production capacity of its Toronto plant by making a 100,000 square foot additior to existing facilities. Rothmans will lease the C$1 million buil ding from the builders for five years. When completed in early 1965, the addition will raise Rothmans' nationwide production capacity to more th4n-13 billion cigarets per: year, about one-third of-the anticipated Canadian cigaret market in 1964. Page 25.
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f FROM: . ROME TO s OEPAR7MENT OF AGRIQlLTURE, WASHINGTON a.E~ r 21A2, CRRP D YTALY: Tobacco, Fall 196a1 Populations 1962163 a 51,197,295 : 1•963 f 64 - 51,617.403 01/ 9_4 ~ (a 7 Fiscal Year 19 4 Fiscal Year 1 02 Per capita P©r capita_ I t e m Quantity Value Consuntion Quantity Value Consusintion (Kilog sam ) (1,000 lire) Kilograms (Kilograms) (1,000 lire) (Kilogramsy Cigarettes: a) Italian 55,079,199 556,356,922 1,063 54,716,43'6 529,011,053 1.069 ; b) Foreign tobacco, 312 1 6t}1 361 22 ~51 025 : 0 461 402 146 T473 009 "0 mFgd in Italy c) Foreign , , 2,206,897 , , 920 41,360, . 0.042 , 1 76,263 , 36•937,225 . k.039 Total 58,598,737 ~ 206 ~~,169,2U3 1.130 _ 57,154,101 573, 522, 024 . 1,117 PAGE 7 OF _ 79 FROM ME~aWJO ~ CanJGda. Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada, Ltd., reportedly is planning to double the production capacity of its Toronto plant by making a 100,000 square foot additior to existing facilities. Rothmans will lease the C$1 million buil ding from the builders for five years. When completed in early 1965, the addition will raise Roth.•nans' nationwide production capacity to more th4n,l3 billion cigarets per: year, about one-third of•the anticipated Canadian cigaret market in 1964. Page 25
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Tabak-Journal International February 20, 1965 - Pages 33 & 31+ PERSoEMALoTv eopfe busy in and for the tobacco industry are internationally Pminded. The tobacco makers sell their products to far beyond the borders of their own country. To the tobacco machines manufacturers, all the world is the market, and this is exactly why they are in a position to offer the tobacco industry the services they actually do. ARENCO AB, in Stockholm, Sweden, exports more than 95"/e of its tobacco machines to all parts of the world. For this reason, for his earlier merits as a delegate to international meetings (on telecommunications) and for his high technical education at the Royal Institute of Technology, in Stockholm,, Mr. Lennart StAhI was chosen manager of Arenco's tobacco machines divi- sion. He then succeeded the retiring Mr. Ruben Dahlstrttm, for many years well known and highly appreciated by the tobacco industry. Mr. StAhl took over an enviable position,, in so far as Arenco did already enjoy an' excellent reputation in the tobacco in- dustry. The company gained' its first distinction for its cigarette packing machine, the first automatic one of its kind. Still greater successes were achieved later with the cigar machines. In that field Arenco holds a dominating position, especially in Europe. The tobacco machines, division is but one of several Arenco product divisions, being the biggest of, them. Broadly speaking, it is managed independently,, having its own groups for sales, product development and experimental work, design, delivery ' control and' service. The chemical laboratories of the company are mainly engaged on research work and tests for Mr. StAhl's division, and the tobacco machines stand for the major part of the production of the four Swedish works belonging to the company. Sales abroad are handled by the Company's world- wide organisation, including companies of its own and agents. Closely related to the tobacco machines division is the well- known firm Usines Decoufle S.A., in Paris, in which Arenco owns a substantial interest. Its revolutionary operational principle is today being used' in the majority of the cigarette making machi- nes made and sold' all over the world. Furthermore, Arenco is part owner of ARENCO-PMB N.V., in Eindhoven„ Holland, a manufacturer of various machines for the tobacco industry. Mr. S#ithl takes a great interest in the activities of all the com- panies mentioned and is a member of the Board of several of them. His role in all this is, of course, that of the manager and initiator. Thus it is only natural for this story largely to account for events concerning the tobacco machines. Most of these events refer to product development, which in, cludes all the several' types, of machinery; tobacco preparing machines, cigar machines, band tobacco machines and cigarette packers. When he took over the responsibility for the technical develop- ment, the machine mad'e Bolknak cigar was already a fact. However, it was overrolled in a direction opposite to normal, and many customers wanted machines for normal overrolling and giving Bolknak cigars closed at both ends. The first machine to meet this requirement was shown in operation at the works in Stockholm early in 1962: Also shown on this occasion was a machine for producing cigars of sizes up to 225 mm, to be divi- ded into two for double output. Machines for making numerous other cigar shapes, formerly considered' impossible to make meehanically have continually been in demand. Great efforts have been made to satisfy these demands, and today, practically any cigar shape can be machine-made, including a number of very peculiar types. Meantime, the technical staff of the tobacco machines divisionm had grown quite considerably, and new machines appeared' at an increasing rate. One of these is an over-rolling, machine of an entirely new design with an output of approximately 15 000 straight cigars, or „Stumpen", per hour. After extensive theoretical investigations and experiments Arenco has recently introduced some tobacco preparing machines of a radically new design, of which may be mentioned a high-capacity threshing and' separating machine for cigarette tobacco and a drying machine for threshed cigar filler. A new branch of substantial interest is the band tobacco machine. It took several years from the first laboratory trials till the first meters of band tobacco were produced at the cigar factory, in Schwaz/Tirol of the Austrian Tobacco Monopoly, but today, many such plants are in operation or under installation both in Europe and America. Mr, StAhl claims Arenco's band tobacco machine to be the missing link"' of the tobacco factory - where not yet installed. It was designed to make part of the production equipment, reclaiming the waste tobacco formed during the handling of the tobacco. This enables the factory to make its own band tobacco with its special characteristics. However, the machine is also used in factories specializing in band tobacco. It is made in different sizes to suit various requi'rements and in somewhat different~ designs for cigar wrapper and binder and for cigarette filler tobacco. Finally, a faster cigarette packing machine can be expected before long, which will maintain the long established reputation of the Arenco packers for reliability and' high packet quality. Arenco's success with its machines dependa,, according to Mr. StAhl, partly on the fact that the Company has specialized In a choice of machines the design and manufacture of which could: be managed to advantage. An increase of the product range to comprise all the equipment required for a tobacco factory has not been planned. In order nevertheless to be in a position for quoting on projects comprising complete equipment up to complete factories„ Mr. StAhl's efforts have been directed towards collaborating with other tobacco machine makers which, in turn, specialized in units not included in Arenco's range of, machines. As a result, a company,, ITM ,International Tobacco Machinery Co. Ltd.,, in Bern, Switzerland, has very recently been founded' by Arenco together with Usines Decoufle, mentioned above, and Wilh. Quester Maschinenfabrik, Cologne, West Germany. Furthermore, Arenco and Eduard Gerlach GmbH, in Liibbecke, West Germany, have agreed upon a cooperation in the marketing of band tobacco making processes. Similar arrangements with other firms are pending. Mr. StAhI is convinced that collaboration between machine makers will result in great advantages to both customers and themselves. technically as well as economically. In fact, he even thinks collaboration between competitors possible, particularly in the building of complete factories for optimal results. Another reason for Arenco's success may be Mr. St&h7's belief in the ability of his designers. More than once he has asked for improvements which they have deemed impossible. That finally,, as a rule, they prove capable of coping with the impossible" certainly is much due to the fact that their chief, who is only 40 years of age„ has succeeded' in creating a harmonic atmos- phere around himself: Mr. StAhl only a few years ago become a member of the inter- national society of tobacco people, but he has been active in and is in the midst~ pf a development in which the mechani- zation of the tobacco industry is about to be finished and automatization, has started. This is a very interesting and very important epochi which demands foresight and power of initiative from all those who take part in it. Page 27
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U;•rCLASSIFIID c1.AS51FICATICN ' FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE F?0V 9 h,~"~ FROm: I DUBLIN November 5, 1964 DATE TO .s DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, WASNI!NGTON 52 .- NO REF s Code 21V' k/' eMECK oNes SUOJEOTz IREhA1IDe NEW TOBACCO ADVERTISING CODE AIm. 'C r The Irish cigarette manufacturers announced last night that they had ~ formulated a comprehensive "Code of Standards" to govern cigarette advertising through all media. The new code was welcomed by the Minister for $ealth, who had participated in the drafting of the document. The manufacturers have agreed to submit all current advertising and new advertising before it appears to an administrator,who will determine whether it complies with the terms of the code. : The code'has the following nine separate sectionss "(a) Persons featured in advertising should be over 21 years of age. ~' (b) Advertisements should not present young people in romantic. situations in a*manner.that obviously ties the enjoyment of smoking to the pleasure of these situations. For example, advertisements should not suggest that a young couple are alone. (o) Advertisements should not feature smoking by conventional heroes of the young, for example, this section would exclude featuring celebrated sportsmen. (d) Advertisements should not convey the impression that to be grown-up one should smoke cigarettes. .(e) (f ) (g) ~'t) Advertisements should not give the impression that smoking is smart and sophisticated. For example, glamorous situations should be avoided particularly where they feature people of social distinction. Advertisements should Aot over emphasize the pleasure of smoking, that is to say, they should not emphasize inhalation or exhalation of smoke, nor should they exaggerate enjoyment of smoking either by facial expression or copy. No advertising should be placed in school, college or university media nor in comics or comic supplements directed to youth. Advcrtisements should not imply that it is less harmful to smoke one brand than another, unless there is authoritative scientific evidence to support the claim. scientific evidence to support the claim.'' .. . , Now types of filter-should not be described in such a way as to suggest that there is any advantage in terms of health, unless there is authoritative C. S. Stephanides Agriculturil.Attache --• Page 26

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