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Lorillard

Cigarette Tow Newsletter

Date: 15 Aug 1964
Length: 79 pages
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01193935/01194431/Celenese Corp of American 1964
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C t G A R E Ti T E ' , T O W N'E VVS L ETTER August 15,1964 C E L A N E S E ~~. ; ~ -" F I B E R S C O M P A N Y Charlotte North Carolina DOMESTIC CIGARETTE PRODUCTION
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DOMESTIC CIGARETTE PRODUCTION AND CONS IVIPTION.
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A DOMESTIC CIG ~'~ARETTYPR(7DUCTION AND'CONSUMPTION The most meaningful analysis of'the current status of'the United!States ciga, rette manufacturing industry might be achieved by quoting the headlines of some of the articles contained in this section of the newsletter. From the July 161issue of the United States Tobacco Journal -"'Distribution Sales Up 1% in 5~ Months," from the July 30 issue of the same magazine -'"Cigarette Tax Income Rose Sharply in June." From The Wall Street Journall „ August 5 - "Cigaret-Tax Receipts and Volume Rose in June From Tobacco, Juily 24 - "Lower Federal Tax Take Reflects Health Scare" and "Cigarette Shipments Off ; . Cigar Output Swings Up." From Tobacco, July 3-'"Cigarette Use Declined 6.5* in, First Half "64" and July 17,' - "U. S'. Cigarette Consumption Shows Almost Steady Gain."' From The Wall Street Journal, July 15 - "Cigaret Tax Receipts Rose in a Majority of States Last Month from Year Earlier." Market Research will not attempt an explanation of'how cigarette use can decline 6.5%while cigarette consumption shows almost steady gain, nor why the health scare is reflected by lower federal tax take while cigarette tax receipts rose in a majority of states. Several of'the cigarette companies have issued financial statements for the first half'of'1q64. Lorillard reports that net income and sales are off'for this period. Both American Tobacco and R. J. Reynolds report increasedd earn- ings, although ReynoTd's" sales are off'. Includied in this issue is an article from United States Tobacco~Journal con- cerning cigarette advertising expenditures in major media last year as listed in Advertising Age. Six tobacco firms are included!in the list of the 500 largest industrial corporations in this country published in the July issue of Fortune magazine. These companies are; R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, American Tobacco Company, Philip Morris,, Inc.,, P. Lorillard,, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, and Consolidated~Cigar Corporation. Carl J. Carlson, president of'the Cigar Manufacturers Association, predicted' annual cigar sales of 15 billion in ten years in an address bef`.ore the Southern Wholesale Tobacco and Candy Association in Atlanta. Snuff sales at Goike's Kashub Snuff Company in Detroit during the first six months of' 1964 were up approximately 8' per cent over the similar period last year. Chairman of the Board and Chief'Executive Officer of'Liggatt & Myers Tobacco Company Zach Toms d!ied in July at the aga of' 63,. Mr. Toms had a distinguished career as tobacco executive and in numerous industry,, civic and charitable organizations. He is succeeded by Milton E. Harrington.. Both Tobacco and the United States Tobacco~Journal carried articles concerning a recent study made by C-E-I-R, Inc., Washington„ D. C. economic research and computer sciences company., The study revveais the impact of the tobacco industry on~thecountry"s economy.
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rv istributor Sales Up 1% in 5 Months. Bureau of the Census Report Puts Volume for January-May Pedlod' at $1.86'3 Billlion, Compared With $1.847 Billion in, Same 1Vlonths Last Year U. S'. Tobaeco Journal WASHi:N(3TON, D. C:, Thursd'ay- Sales of' totiacco distributors durd'ng the , July 16, 1964 - es 1 de 24 filrst five months of 1964 rose to a ta- Cigare#te Tax Income Rose Sharply, ia June National Tobaicco Tax Association Report Shows That Majority of States Had Gains in J'une, Marking First Such Occurrence Since January CHICAGO, ILL., Friday - The Na- Legislation, hiki'ng per-paekage tax- tional Tobacco Tax Association report- es, on the other hand, was blamedl inn ed here this week, that preliminary, in- some degree for the sizable d'eclines re- complete data on state codl',ectilons of ported in some states for the month of cigarette taxes in June indicated that June:. Connecticut, for example, report- cigarette sales were showing a, strong, ed revenue off almost one-third. The recovery from the sllump follbwing ils- ' deeline is felt ' to be due to, very heavyy suance of the Surgeon General's report sales of stamps in June, 1963; in an+- oni smoking and health, in, January.' ti'cipation, of' an, increase ini the price The monthly sales of cigarette tax: of stamps the following, month: stamps increased in June in a major- The NTTA officiall cautioned thatl i',t, ityy of' states,, the NTTA reported, the .might be severall months before the ad- firgt tinie that this has happened since vance in the number of' states report- January. ing increases over a year, earlier was Higher June, 1964, sales compared proved to be a definite trend., with volume ini the si'xth month last Among the more populous statea re- year were noted in 29 of the 41 states porting increases in June were: New for which reports were available, In •I'ork, 10.7 per cent; Pennsylvania, 6.9 contlrast, with only two states showing per cent; Ohio,, 8.8' per cent'; Texas, gains in May and eight in April. 7.7 per cent; New Jersey,, 24!b per cent; A, spokesman for the association, and Illiinoiis,,6:7 per cent., ~ however, pointed out that the statis- tics for 1964 and 1963 were not neces- ~{~ . sarily comparable without adjustment j~ because of increases in the cigarette tax rates in about a third of the states In the period from May through July ~., of last year. This was blamed for ac- centuating losses in a number of states ~ for the May, 1964, period, while hav- ~ i'r+g a reverse effect, on June figures., Q The official asserted that retailers in the states contemplating increases last year stocked, abnormally high in, May of 1963 to reduce their, tax expendii tures the following month,, when the higher rate was due to go into effect'4 This, resulted in the unusually sharp decline in stamp sales during June of last year. Tax rate changes, according, to the NTTA spokesman; apparently were a factor in increases for 12' states lastl month~, including Mississippi, where a 25.7 per.cent gain from 1963 was part- 1yattiribut'able to advance stamp buy- ing: ahead of a tax increase, on July 1„ , 1964. UU. S. Tobacco Journal JUY 30', 19 - Fages ]1 & 8 Tobacco July ' 2~, 11964 - Page 22 ri.orilllaird Net, Sales Offin First Haff, The P. Lorill'ard Company,, inPdewYork last week, reportedi a net income of $6,558,63'5; or 97 ' cents a share, for' the second qparter. ' This was down 3.5 ' per cent from i $6,706,228, or $1.01 a share, for the June quarter llast year and reflected the 7.5 per cent drop in net sales to $120; 753,771 from $130;635;212: . Net income for the half year' amounted to $9,219,793, or $11.34 aa share, compared with, $12,127,438, or $1.79 a share, for, the 8rst' half'of 19&'1.1 Net sales were $221,342,299 and ' $251,3856250, respectively. tal of' $1,863,000,000, topping by 1 per cent the =1,847,000,000 of the compa- rabin period a year ago, according to ~ a report ibsued here today by the Bu- reau reau of the Census.. Based on a representative samplling, ~ of domestic wholesalers, volume 1n May of thla e r w f d t $389 000 y a aa repor e a , ,-- ~ ~. \ 0 000, a,level, which ia 3'per cent under the $4014000,000 of the fifth month of 1963 but! 1r per cent ahead of the a3'87,- 000,000 reported in April of' this year. Foll;owing, is a regfonal,breakdown of tobacco distributor sales for the month . of' May, 1964, compared' with the same month a year earlier and April„ 1964, and volume In the fi,rst fivw months of'f this year compared' with January-May, 1963: New England Staties- Off'7percent from •May, 1963; up 8 per cent from, the previous month; 5 per cent higher for the five-month, period. Middle Atlantic States - N'o ichange from, May last year; 2' per cent ahead of the preceding month; 3 per cent hig}her for the five months. East North . Central - Down 11i per cent from the May, l'963„f'igure; 2',per cent higher than sales In April, 1964';; off 3' per cent for the January - May months. West North Central - No compari- son available for May of 1964 against May, 1963; 6 per cent higher than the April level'; 9 per cent' ahead of the first five months. South Atl'antic Statea - No, compar- ibon with May, 1963; down 3 per cent from Aprill;, off 2' per centSor the five months. East South, Central.6:tates - No comparison with, May of last year; no change from Aprill'a level;, no compari- son for the January-l4tay periodL West South Central States - Down 7' per cent from, May last year; 7 per cent under the preced'ing mnth;, 1 per cent' of'fl for the five months. Mount'ain States - hlo comparison, with May ofI last year;, no change from April, 1964; off 9 per cent for t6e five months. Pacific States - An increase of 122 per cent over the May, 1'963, levell; off' 3' per cenE fromithe month before;, and 9 per cent higher for the first five months of this year.
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Distributor Sales Up 1% iln 5 Months Bureau of the Census Report Puts Volume for January-May Period at $1.863 Billiot'sj Compared Withi $1.847 Billion in Same Months Last Year UI. S. Tobacco Journal July 16, 1964 - Pages 1 & 24 Cigarette Tax Income Rose Sharply in June `~ however, pointed out that the, statis- tics for 1964 and 1963 were not neces- sarily . sarily comparable without adjustment ~ because of' increases in the cigarette. ~ tax rates in about a thirdlof'the states, in the period from May through, Jully 4:,~_ of last' year.. This was blamed for ac- ~ \ ~ Natiianall Tobacco, Tax Association Report Shows That Majority of States Had Gains iniJWne,, M'arking, First Such Occurrence Since January CHICAGO, ILL., Friday - The Na- Legislation hiking per-package tax.-, ' tionall Tobacco, Tax Association report es, on the other, handt was blamed in edI here this week that, preliminary, in some,degree for the sizable declines re- complcte, data on state collections of po;rtedl in some states for the month of cigarette taxes in June indicated that June. Connecticut„ for example, report- cigarette sales were, showing, a strong, ed revenue off' almost one-third. The recovery from the slump following i!s- decliine i's fel't' to be due to very heavy suance of the Surgeon General's report sales of stamps in June, 1963, in an- on smoking and health in January.,' ttcipation of an, iincrease in the price The monthly sales of cigarette, tax of' stamps the following month.. at'amps increased in June in a major- The NTTA official cautioned' that it ity of states, the NTTA reported, the might be severai,months before the ad- first time that this has happened' since vance in the number of states report- January. ing increases over a, year earlier was Higher June, 1964', sales compared proved to be a definite trend. with volume in the sixth month last' • Among, the more populous states re- year were notedl in 29 of' the 41 states porting increases in June were: New for which reports were available, in York,, 10.7 per centl; PennsyNvanila, 6.9 contrast with, only two states showing per cent;, Oihioy 8.8 per cent; Texas, gains in May and eight in AprilL 7.7' per cent; New Jersey, 24.6 per cent; A spokesman for the association, and Illinois, 5.7 per cent. centuating losses in a number of states for the May, 1964, periodi while hav- ing, a reverse effect on June figures. • The official asserted that retailers in the states contemplating, increases last year stocked abnormally high, in May of' 1963 to reduce their tax expendi- tures the following month, when the higher rate was due to go into effect. This resulted in the unusually sharp decline in, stamp sales during June of last year. Tax rate changes, according to, the. NTTA spokesman, apparently were a factor in increases for 12'states lastt month, including Mississippi, where a, 25.7 per_cent gain from 1963 was part'- ly attributable to advance st'amp buy- ing ahead of! a tax increase on July 1„ 1964. U. S. Tobacco Journal July 30, 196- Pagee 1 & 8 Tobacco Ju1y 8~, ]:964 - Page 22 Lorillard AT®t, BaTes. Off l in First Half The P. Lorillard Company, in New York last week, reported a net income of $6,556,635, or 97 cents a share, for © the second quarter. This was down 3.5' per cent from $6,706,228, or $1.01 a share, for the N .~ June quarter l'ast'year and reflected'the 7.5 per cent drop in net' sales to $120~; 753,771 from $130,635,212. • ~l 41b Netl income for the half' year amounted tol $9,219,793, or $1.34 a share, compared with $112,127,44'38, or, ~ ~ $1.79 a share, for the &st ha1P of 1983.~ Net sales were $221,342,299' and $251,385,250;, respectively. WASH'1NGTl D.C.,, Thursday- Salles of tobacco distributors during the first five months of 1964 rose to a to- tal' of $1,863,000,000, topping by 1 per cent the #1,$47,000,000I of the compa- rable period' a year ag% accord[ing, to a report ibsued, here today by thel Bu- reau reau of the Census. Basedl on a representative sampling ~ of' domestic wholesalers;, volume in May oflthis year was reported at =389;000,, C\) 000, a level whi'chl i's 3 per cent under ~ the E401,000,00a of the fifth month of 1963 but 1 per cent ahead of the 8387; ~ 00i1,000' reported in Aprill of this year.. \ Following, ie a regionall breakd'own oC. ~ tobacco distributor sales for the month. ~ of' May, 1964,, compared with, the samee month a year earlier and' Aprill,, 1964, . andl volume in, the first five montha, of' this year compared with January-May,, 1963': New England States - Off' 7' per cent from •May, 1963', up 8 per cent, from the previous month; 6 per cent higher for the fiive-month period. Middle Atlantic States - No changee from May last year; 2 per aent ahead- of the preceding month;, 3 per cent higher for the five months. East North.Central - Down, 111, per cent from the May, 1963, figpre;, 2 per cent higher, than sales in April, 1964; off 3 per cent for the January- May months. West North Central - No compari- son,avail'able for May of 1964 against May, 1963; 6 per cent higher than the April level; 91 per cent ahead ofl the first five months. South, Atlantic States - No compar- i'soni with May, 1963; down 3 per cent from A'pril; off 2' per cent for the five months. East South Central.States - No compariison with May of last' year; no change from April's level; no compari, son for the January-May period., West South, Central States - Down 7' per cent from, May last year;; 7' per cent under the, preced'ing, month;, 1 per centl off' for the five months. Mountain States - No comparison with, May of last year;, no change from April;, 1'964I; off 9' per cent' for the fi ve months. Pacific States - Ani increase of' 12 per cent over the May, 1963, level; off' 3 per cent from, the month before;, and 9 per cent higher f'or the first five months of' this year:.
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Laistributor Sales Up 115 in 5 Months Bureau of the Census R+sport Puts Volume for Janu!ary-May Period at $1'.863' Billlion, Comparedi V6tiifh $1'.847 Billion i'n Same M~onths uast, Xear UI. S. Tobacco Journaa July 16, 1964 Pages 1 • Cl~garett e Tax Income Rose Sharply in June I•lational' Toliacco Tax Association Report Shows That M'ajoriitN of' States Had Gains in June; _Marlki'ng First Suchi O~tcurrence~ Since Jan_u~arlrCHTCAGO, ILL., Friday - The Nk- Legislation hiking, per-package t'ax- ' tional Tobacco Tax Association report- es, on the other hand, was blamed' in edl here this week that, preliminary, in~ some degree for the sizable declines re- complete datla on state collections of' ported, in some states for the month of cigarette taxes in June indicated that June. Connecticut, for example, report- cigarette sales were showing a strong, ed revenue off' almost one-third.. The recovery f'rom, the, slump following is- ' decline is felt to be due to very heavyy euance of' the Surgeon Ceneral'sxeport seles of' st'amps im June; 1963,, in an• ' on smoking and' health in January. ' ticipation of' an increase in the price The monthly sales of cigarette tax of stamps the following month~ stamps increased in June in a major- The NTTA officiall cautioned that' i't' lty of states, the NTTA reported,, the.might be several, months before the ad- first time that this has happened'since vance in the number of states report- January. ing inc,reases over a year earlier was Higher June, 1964; sales compared proved to be a definite trend. with volume ini the sixth montlh last. Among the more populous states re- year were noted in 29 of the 41 states porting increases in, June were: New ,forx which reports were available, in York, 10L7 per cent; Pennsylvania, 6.9 contlrastl with only two states showing per cent; Ohio, 8.8' per cent'; Texas, gains in May and eight in April. 7.7 per cent; New Jersey, 24!b per cent; A spokesman for the association, and Illinois, 5:7 per cent. ~ however, painted out that the statis- tics for 1964, and 1963' were not neces- .T` , sarily comparable without adjustment ~ because of increases in, the cigarette ~ tax rates in about a third of' the states in the period' from, May through July ~. of last year. This was blamed for ac- centuating losses in a number ofl states ~' for the May, 1'964I„ period, while hav- ~' img a reverse effect on June fiigures. 4 The official asserted that retailers in the states contemplating increases lastt year stocked', abnormally high in May of 1963' to reduce their tax expendi- tures the following month, when, the higher rate was due to go into effect. This resulted in the unusually sharp decline in stamp sales during June of last year. Tax rate changes, according to the NTTA apokesman,, apparently were a factor in increases for, 12 states last month, including Mississippi, where a 25.7 per.cent gain from! 1963' was part- ly attributabl;e to ad'vance stamp buy- ing ahead' of a tax increase on July 1'i, 1964. U. S. Tobacco Journal July 30, 1964 Pages 1 & 8 Tobacco Juy 2W, 1964 - Page 22 Lorillard Net, Sales Off in, First F'Ia11' The P. Lorillard Company, in New York last week, reported a net income of $6,556,635, or 97 cents a share,, for the second! quarter. ' This was down 365' per cent from $8,706;228, or $1.01 a share; for the June quarter l'astyear and reflected'the. 7.5 per cent drop in net sales to $120;r 7534771 from, $1130,835;212. - N'et income for the half year amountedl to $9,219,793, or $1.34 a share, compared with $12,127,4380, or. $1.79' a share, for the first half of 1983./ Net sales were $221,34'2,299' and $251,385,250, respectively. WASHINGTON, D. C., Thursday- Sallee of'tobacco distributors during the & 21+1 first five months of' 1964 rose to a to- tal of $1,863,000,000, topping by 1 per cent the a1i,847,000,000' of' the compa- ,, rable period! a year ago, according to a report iesuedl here today by the Bu- ~ reau of the Census. Based on a representative sampling ~ of domestic, wholesalers, volume in, May V~ of this year was reported at $389,000,- ~i 000, a levell which, is 3 per cent under ~ the ;401,000,000' of the fifth month of 1963 but 1 per cent aheadl of the $387,- ~` 000,000 reported iini April of this year. ! Following, is a regional breakdown of ~ tobacco distributor sales for the month ~ of May, 1964, compared with the same month a year earlier and! Aprill, 1964, and'vol'ume in, the fiirst five months of this year compared with January-May, 1963: New England States - Off 7' per cent from, May, 1963; up 8 per centt fromi the previous month; 6 per cent' higher for the five-month period.. Middle Atlantic States - No change from May last year;, 2 per cent ahead• of the preceding month;, 3 per cent higher for the five months. East North Central - Downi 11 per cent from the May, 1963, ffigure; 2' per cent higher than sales in April, 1964!;, off' 3 per cent for the January-May months:, West North, Central - No, compari- son, available for May of 1964 against May, 1963; 6' per cent higher than the April level; 9' per cent, ahead' of the first fiive months. South Atlantic States - No compar- ison with May, 1963; down 3 per cent from April; off'. 2' per, centlor the fivee months. East South Central.States - N'o comparison with May of last year; no change from April's level; no compari+ son for the January-May period., West South Contral' States - Down 7 per cent from May last year; 7 per cent under the preceding, month,; 1 per cent off for the five months. Mountain States - No comparison wit}i May of last year; no change from Aprily 1964; Ioff 9 per cent' for the five months. Pacific States - An increase of 12' per cent over the May, 1963, llevel; off' 3' per cent from the month before; and' 9' per cent higher, for the first five months of this year.
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"/~d,.Cost Cited r On Cigarettes' 'adverrtlisingi Age" Datal List Expenditures in Specific Major Media Cigarette advertising, expenditures in, major media last year, listed in "cost per carton,°' were puUlishedl this week, by "Advertising Age" magazine., The publication's figures, were br.sed on sales of 24 cigarette brands, and !covered advertising spendi'ngin leading media, not including network and' spot radio, outdoor, direct mail, point-of- sale; premium, sampl'inq, and collaterall programs. Listed according to brand' expenditures per carton, for 1963 and 1962, were : Pall Malll (American Tobacco Co )- 4.1 cents in 1963' and 3:9' cents in 1962. Winston, (R. J. Reynold's Tobacco Co.)-5:9 cents in 1963 and' 4.4 eents, In 19.62. Camel' (R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co,). -2.7 cents in 1963 and 2:8 cents in. 1962. Salem (R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.) -7.9' cents ini 1963' and 6.9 cents in 1962.' Lucky Strike (American Tobacco Co.). -3.3' cents in 1'963' andl 2.6 cents in 1962. Kent (P. Lorillard Co:)-9:2' cents in 1963' and 6.8 cents in, 1962'., 1Wlarlboro (Philip Morris Inc:) -7:4' cents in 1963' andl 6.7 cents in 1962:, . l,&M (Liggett' & Myers, Tobacco Co.) -11.2' cents in 1963 and 10;4' cents in 1962. Chesterfield ( Liggett & 1Wlyers Tobac- co Co~)-8.8. cents in 1963' and 7.6lcents In 1i962. Viceroy (Brawn & Vi'illiamsoni Tobac- co Corp.),-9.3' cents in 1963 and' 7.5 cents in 1962., Flerbert Tareyton (American Tobac-, co Co.) -11.8' cents i'n, 1'963 and' 8:11 cents in 1962:. Kool (Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp.)-7.0 cents in 1963 and 5.6 cents In 1962. Raleigh (Brown & Williamson Tobac- co Corp.) - 6:6' cents in 1963' and 3.4 . cents in 11962. Parliament (Philip Morris Inc:)-5:8 cents in 1963 and 13'.4' cents in 1062. Newport (P. Lorillard Co.) - 19.7 cents in 1963 and 14.3 eents ia, 1962. Philip Morris (Philip Morris Inc.)'- 4'.2 cents in1 1963 and 6A ' eents in, 1962'., Old Gold (P. Lorillard' Co. )- 12.8 cents in 1963 and' 8.3 cents in 1962. Belair (Brown & Williamson Tobac- co Corp.)'-14.4' cents in 1963 and' 12.3 cents in 1962. Alpine (Philip Morris Inc.) -8:6 •nts in 1963' and' 9:5' cents in 1962. t.ark (Il.iggett & Myers Tobacco Co.)' 84.4 cents in 19631 Paxton (Phil'ip Morris Inc.): - 26,9 cents in 1963. Montclair (American Tobacco Co.)- $104.65 in 196~'i'.. York (!P. Lorillard Co.)-26 cents in 1963 and 93'cents in 1962. Benson & Hedges (Philip Morris Inc.)-8 cents im 1963 and 1'2'.1 cents in 1962. "Advertising Age" pointed out, inn connection with these figures, that ex- treme vrariations in the cost per carton figures might be the result of shifts into unmeasured' media rather than the .consequence of' reductions in expendi- tures. 0 /1/ 9~_ 0 // 13 U. S!. Tobaccoi Journal July 23, 19' - Pages ' 1 S 0 iX Tobacco Firrns on List Of Top, 500' July Issue of, "Fortune" Ranks the 5'010, Largest Industrial Operations Six of the nation's lead'ing manu- factharers of tobacco products ranked' among the 600 lhrgestl industrial cor- porations,in this country; according to a report appearing in the J'ully ibsue of' "Fortune"' magazine. R.,J: Reynolds Tobacco Co. held' first ;^luce among the six industry compa, nies andl was 56th in the listing, of', the 600 largest firms as ranked by sales:. In 1962,, R., J. Reynolds placed 54th on the tot'al' listing. 'Sales ofl the firm were put at' $961',- 683,000;, although, the publication point- ed out that this figure does not include the excilse taxes collected' by tobacco companies and so does not necessarily agree with the sales total! reported' by Reynolds. American,Tobacco Co.,,which, in 1962' helH' 75th place on the "Fortune" 1'ist- ing of'the top 500, slippedl two notch- es to 77th position last year. This albo put itl in second place among the to- bacco companies: American Tobacco's sales for this past' year were, put at $678,049',00d0. Philip Morris Inc.,, the third-ranking tobacco company on the "Fortune" 1'ist,, last year dropped one place, moving into 144th position f'rom, 143rd a year , earlier. Salles of'tlhe, manufacturer for 1963' were put at', $387,961,000. P. Lorillard', Co. went from 174th po- sition in 1962 to 184th place last year in the total listing, putting it in fourth position, among the nation's leading to- bacco operat'ions.. Sales of' Lorillard were, reported at $,300;849;000 for cal'.~ endar 1963. In f'ifth position among the tobacco companies was Liggett & Myers Tobac- co Co., according to the "Fortune" Di- . & 25 U. S. Tobacco Journal J yr 16, 96- s1 & 25 rectory. Sales of' IdcM; which moved, Into 194thi place, from its ranking, of 183rd the year previous, were put' at $289;637y000. Consolidated Cigar Corp., was the only cigar manufacturer to appear on, the listing of' the top 600 industriat operations. Consolidated, which mo!ved' into 411thi position last year from, its 416th ranking the year, bef'ore, was the only tobacco company to advance on, the list llaet' year. Sales of' the organ- iization, were put, at $115,619,000 for 1963, Other st'atistics publ'ished' in, the an- nual nual "Fortune"' Directory revealed, the basically healthy st'atUs of the domea- tic tobacco industry. In a listing of changes in sales, for example, tobacco ahowed' a: median increase of 6:2' perr cent last' year, while the median profit' %vell advanced 2.7, per centl dluring that periodL In the area of return on invested capital'„ the tobacco Industry had a median return of 13.1 per cent in 1963, , This was the same median return, re- portedi a year earlier and put the to- bacco industry once again in third po- sition in this category among the 21 industries listed in the Directory. Tobacco also held' third' position in return on sales„ where the 1963 medi= an was put at 8.9 per cent, again show- ing no, change from the median return of the year before. In, reporting industry rankings based' on assets per empl;oye, "Fortune"' dis- closedl that tobacco was iin, secondl place -below only petroleum refining-with a median of $51,383' per emplbye. Tobacco also made a strong showing in a ranking determi,ned' by sales per eiroploye; with the industry median of'. $41,182' placing it second only to pe-- troleum refining.. Aecordiing, to the magazine, study,-the tobacco ind'ustry' had median ealles' per dollar, of' invested capitall of $1.48 last year. --t`
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."Ad~ Cost Cited T , On Cigarettes1 "Advrertisiing Age" Data List Expenditures in, Specific Major Mediie, Cigarette advertising, expenditures in major media lasti year, listed in "cost per carton," were publi'shed this week by "Advertising, Age" magazine. The, publication's figures were: br.sed on, sales of' 24 cigarette brands, andl icovered' advertising spending in leadingg media not including network and spot :radio; outdoor, direct mail„ point-of. sale, premiium, sampling and collateral prograrns.! Liistedl according to brand expenditures per carton, for 1963 and 1962, were:. Pail' Mall (American Tobacco Co.)i- 4.1 cents in 1963 and 3.9 cents in 1962. Winston (R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CoJ-5.9: cents iin, 1963 and 4.4'1 centsin 19.82. Camel (R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.) -2.7' cents in 11963 andl 2.8' cents in 1962. Salem (R., J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.), -7.9 cents in 1963 and 6.9 cents in 1962 Lucky Strike (American Tobacco Co.) -3,3 cents in 1963 and 2.6 cents in. 1962. Kent (P. Lorillard Co.)I-9:2' cents in 1963 and 6!8 cents in 1962. Marlboro (Philip Morr3s Inc.)i - 7.4 cents in 1963 and 6.7 cents in 1962. . LBiM! (Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.)'. -11.2 cents in 1963' and 10.4 cents in 1962. 'Chesterfi;eld (Liggett da Myers Tobac- co Co.)-8'.8.,cents in 1963'and 7.6 cents in 1962.. Viceroy (Brown & Williamson Tobac- co Corp.) -9.3' cents in 1963', andi 7.5 cents in 1962, Herbert Tareyton (American Tobac- co Co:),-1I1.8 cents in 1963 andl 8.1 cents in 1962. Kool (Brown, & Williamson Tobacco. Corp:)-7.0 cents In 1963 and 5.6: cents& in 1962., Raleigh (Brown &' Williamson Tobac- co Corp.),-6.6 cents in 1963' andl3.4 cents in 1962. PParliament (Philip Morris Inc.),-5.8 cents in 1963 and 13A cents in 1962'. Newport (P. Loriillardl Co.) - 19.7' cents in 1963 and 14.3 cents in: 1962. Philip Morris (Philip Morris Inc:)- 4.2' cents in 11963 ' and 6:8 cents iin, 1962. Oldl Gold (P. Lorillard Co.) - 12.8 cents in 1963 and! 8.3 cents in 1962'. Be~lair(;Brown 8tW'ill:iamson Tobac- co Corp.)-1'4.4' cents in 1963 andi 12.3 cents in 1962. Alpine (Philiip Morris Inc.) -6.5 •nts in 1963 and 9L6 cents,ini 1962. i'.ark, (Liggett &, Myers Tobacco Co.) K4.4 cents in 1963, Psxton (Philip Morris Inc.), - 2669 cents in 1963. Montclair (American Tobacco Co~)- $104'.65'in 1963., York (P. Lorillardl Co:)-2f, cents in 1'963' and 93 cents in 1962. Benson & Hedges (Philip Morris Inc:)+-8'cents inA963'and 112:1'cents in 1962'., "Advertising Age"' pointed out,, in connection, with these figures, that' ex- treme variations In the cost per carton figures might be the resui't' of shifts Into unmeasured media rather than, the .consequence of reductions in expendi- 'tures. 0 /1 /9~_ o// ,5J. U. S. Tbbe~.cco Journal July 23, 196- ag~s 1 & 2S iX TobaCCo Firms on List Of 'iTop 500' J'ul~ Issue of 'Fortune' Ranks the 500 Largest hrndustri'ali Operat'ioris Six of the nationts leading manu., facturers of tobacco products ranked among, the 500 largest industrial cor- porations ini thi's country, according to a report appearing in the July issue of "Fortune" magazine.. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co, held first O'uee, among the six industry compa- nies and' was 66th, in the listing of the 600 largest firms as ranked by sal!es. In 11962, R. Jl Reynolds placed 54'th on the total listing. ,Sales of the firm were put at $961,- 683,000, although the pubii'cationi point, ed outl that this figure does notl include the exctse tax,es, eollected by tobacco companies and aa does not necessarily agree with the sales total' reportedi by Reynolds. American, Tobacco Co., which in, 1962', hel'd' 76th place on the "Fortune"' liat- ing, of the top 500;, slippedi two notch- es to 77th position last' year. Thia allso put it in second place among the to- bacco companies. American Tobacco's sales for this past year were put at'. $678',04I9;000: Philip Morris Inc., the third-ranking tobacco company on the "Fortune" list, l;ast, year dropped one place,, moving into 144th position from 1!43rd a year . earlier., Sales of the manufacturer for 1963' were put at $387,961,000. P. Lorillard Co: went f'romi 174th, po- sition in 1962 I to, 184th place last year in, the total listing,, putting it in fourthi position among the nation's leading to- bacco operations. Sales of Lorill,ardl were reported at $300,849,000 for cal- endar 1963; In fifth, position among the tobacco, companies was 1LigSett', & Myers Tobac- co Co., according, to the "Fortune" Di- U. S. Tobacco, Journal . J' ly ' y 1964 - ee 1 & 25 rectory. Sales of IAM', which moved into 194th place from, its ranking of' 1i83rd the year previous, were put at $289,637,000: Consolidlatedl Cigar Cbrp. was thee only cigar manufacturer to appear, on the listing of the top 600, industrial operations. Consolidated, which moved into 411th position last year from its 416th, ranking, the year before, was thee only tobacco company to advance on the list last year. Sales of the organ- ization were put, at $115,619,000 for 1963. Other statistics published In the an- nual, "Fortune" Directory revealed' the basically healthy status of' the domes- tic tobacco industry: In a listing of'f changes in sales,, for example, tobaccoo showed a median increase of 6.2' per cent lhst year, while the median profit level' advanced 2.7 per cent during, that periodl In, the area of' return on investedl capital,, the tobacco ilnduatry had' a median retiurn of' 13.1 per cent in 1963; This was the same medilan return re- ported! a year earlier and put the to- bacco industry once again, in third po- sition in this category among, the 21 industries listed iin the Directory. Tobacco also held third position In return on sales, where the 1963' medt- an was put at 8.9 per cent, again show- ing no change from the median return of'the year before, In reporting industry rankings based on assets per employe,, "Fortune" dis- elosed thatl tobacco was in, second' place -below only petroleum refining-with a median of $61,383' per employe. Tobacco also made a strong showing, in a ranking d'eterminedl by sales per employe,, with the industry medi'an of' $41,182' placing it second only to pe-. troleum refining. According to the magazine st'udy„the tobaeeo industry had median sales per dollar of' invested capitallof $1!.4'8' last year. "'t"
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rI ,. ' The Ne>wr York Times Ju1y 23, 1964 Tobacca ' And R. J. Reynolds. Increase Earnings ~' R'y fi bAIRI:' 31. ItE('IiEttT' The adverse effects on the., ,ci,y;arctte business of the Sur-• geon, Cenerall's report on smok'- ' hrg and health wer.e' not re- flcct'edI In the earnings reports lasued yestcrday by the No. 1L and No~ 2 tobacco producers - the R. J. Reynolds, Tobacco, Company and the American i Tobacco Company. I Both companies showed Irr- ' creaFes in profits faf'the sec- ond quarter and first half of t~his y~ear over the levels of the 1963 periods. The Liggett & Myers Tobac- !co Company also reported' gains ~in profits for the periods in 11s statement issued twai days ~ ago. P. Lorillard & Co. was the exception, showing a, drop ini earning$:for the qparter and six months ended on June 30. Philip Morris;, Inc,, has notl yet dssued its figures. Ae);irolds SetK Recnrd, R. J. Revnolds, which malces Camels and other aigarettes,l not only improved its earnings,i but also set records for the second quarter andl first half', despite sales declines. „ Net earnings for the' three, months to June 30;, as reported by A. H',. Gallbwa•y, president, amounted to $32,207,000, or 78 cents a share, up slightly from $32,125,000, or 77 rents a share, in the 1963 periad: Net sales felll to $412',830,000, from $430;- 667,000. For the six months, the na- tion's biggest tobacco producer eleared $59',91i1,000, or $'1.45' a share: This compared with $59,- 831~000, or $i144, a share; the year before:. Net • sales atl Rcynolds for the half-year were' $767,842,- 000, against $810,671,000- Tax Reductions ffielped. A drop lni taxes contributed subst'antially' to the earnings Pains. The second+quarter tax bill was $33,710,000; compared ' with $36,842,000 in the 1963' Lperiod. For the six months. Itaxes took $''62,1i95;000, against I$68,240;000 a year earlier. Reynolds also makes Win• gton, Salem and Tempo ciga- rettes, as well, as Prince Albert, Carter' Hall, and, other brands of' smoking andl chewing to- baccos. I* also produces alumi: num foil and packaging ma-, terials ini addition to producing Hawaiian Punch and other fruiti ,beverages through, Its Pacific Hawaiian Products Company. These nontohacco operations .have undoubtedly helpedlto bof ster the company's business, especiall:v' since the Govern- ment's report on smoking. Oth- er tobacco companies that have diversified also appear ta have benefited in this way. . .~ ~! Ec'c~:cC~r~' G~~'G~ C~'~~rd"~~ufio n 0'f ' ti~ ~~ lobacCO I'ridusi"',ry ;Io' Lichpgall Noted by Survey StudyFilnds That NI'ore Than 1I4,0!00 Jobs Result From Industry's Presence; State Revenues Reported To Total Approximately $72' J!Vlilliloru Per Year -Personal, consumption expenditures of'tobacco ~ i ndlustry employ,es and! farm- era in Michigan totaled $32 million in 1902, the study reveals.. The 236 wholesale tobacco firms in hlichigan, empl'oy, 1y799 persons, have sales of $,1'97.4 million, a payroll of $7.1 million. Michigan retailers of' to- bacco products had 19'62 sales of $346.6 million, of' which, $302:7' million was de- rived from cigarette sales, the' st!udyy reports~. Not counting a considerable number come of'' $42.3 million. AuguBt 6, 1964 - 8ge' ]l]L CMRA1wiD' RAPIDS, 11'tICfC., Thursday (CS)-Marc'than 1'4,00Aj',obs, personal and •business incomes of $48 mil'lion,, and, state t.nxes totaling $72' mil'lionw result fromi Miehiganta tiobacco indus- try, according to an independent econ, omic study made public today. C-E-T R',: Inc., of Washington„ D. C.,t nn' economic research and computer sciences organization, developed, the "Economic Impact Study of' the To- bacco Industry" which has been, eub- mitted' to a U. S. House Committee. The study shows thatl sale of tobacco products in Michigan generates $1700 milliom in federal' and state taxes across all sectors of' the industry: The tobacco industry is responsible for 14',854' full and part.titne jobs in Michigan. The total tobacco employe andl business income, before taxes, is $4'8:7 million. Those in the state's tim- bacco industry have an after-tsx, 4n- The Wall Street Journal AugllBti' 5, 196C~i;gwl-ct~ ax R''e~~ceipt,5~. ~kiid V'ol'urrcc I'osc ip, , J`~2ute . 0 / 19 ~~A , SflIl,f R.f.norRbr of~THS WAr.L..STntik:T'.)oURNA[: N'EW1'ORK-The volume of' cigarets taxedi by 48 states and the District,of'ColumbiA rose 7.9% in, June, according to the Tobacco Tax Council. The organization said June volume was 2,- 056,841,000 packages, up from, 1,899,223,000 in June 1963. Dollar,tax receipts of'these taxing units lncreased 14% from a year earlier to $116.710,474. Of' the 48 jurisdictions, excluding, Col'orada~ which, didn't have a tobacco tax, in June 1963; 32 showed an increase in volume of' cigarets taxed and!1'6 had'',deereases: ~ Cumulative figures and taxable cigaret vol+ ~ ume for the 12-month period of July 1963 through, June 1964, however, wer!e down 1.3% from the prior year. Again excluding, Coll orad'o, 18 of' the 48 jurisdictions had l increases . and 30 experienced deercaties In volume of'' ciga:rci.s' la,xcd in, the 12-mnnl.h pr^in41 of' casual l sales out9ets, there are 381107 retail' outlets for tobacco prod'ucts Inn the state. d{,eta'ill employment attributa- ble to tobacco sales Is 12',389 persons, with an annual •payrol'll totaling, $28.3 million. Misnufacture-of tobacco products inn the state is conducted by firms with a total emplbyment of' 688: Their prod- uets gross $1d:3 million yearly, from which the manufacturers generate a payrol'I' of' $8 mil'1ion; The study is based on the year 1962, the most' recent period for whi'ch the requitedl data was available. Some of', the estimates are "reasonable a+pproxi- mations, C-E-I-R' cautions. They were derived from the best available source d''ata„ using generaAy accepted' teeh, niques. Tobacco Ju- 4„ 1964 - Page 13, Lower Fedbral' Tax Take Reflects HeaIlth Scare WASHINGTON, Z3.C:-Fed'eral rev- enue from, tobaceo taxes declined in the &st calendar quarter tlliif year to $433,726,000 from $4'88,469,000'a year earlh'er„ Internal R'evenue Service' re» ported reCentl}!'. Collections for the 8sca1! year to dattr amounted to a1,5110;383,000, compared with $1,,527,881,000, In the previour 0scal year for the same months. By categories, collections Eor the first guarter, calendar 196''„ compared with~ the same period lbst year werer Cigars; $13,OI9;000 against a9,813~- 000; dgarettes„ $415,662,000; against $474,310,000; and other, ;5,045,000, against $4,347,000. As the fiscal year compari'sons' re- 9'ected the saaae trend, higher collbc- tions fnom, cigars, $+l0,04'2;'004 against $36,423,000, and lower retulns' from, cigarette taxes, $1,455,708,000 against $1,4'77,799,000, and $14,933i000 fromi . other" tolbacco, products, compared', with $13,659,000, It was a fair indica•* tilDn that' the &Care generated lby' the Surgeon Cener0s recent report eD smoking was being reflected' ln these' figures.--SAND. U. S. Tobacco Journal
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1. ,, ' The~ L`iew, York Time's, July 23, 1964 Tobacco And R. J. Re' ynolds ~ Increase Earnii~gs I I R't'C LAIRE Nf. Iltl!:CKEitT' 1, The adi'crse effects on the, cii;arette business of the Sure- gean Grncral's report on smok- ing and health were not re- flcctedl In the earnings'report's Issued yesterd'ayby theriio. 1 and No: 2 tobacco producers - I the R. J: Iteynolds Tobacco Comrany and the American Tbhar•co Company. Both companies showedl In- I creases in profits for the sec-i nnd quarter andi first half of this year over the levels ofl the 1'963' periods. The Liggett & Myers Tobac- co Company also reported gains iin profits for the periods in Its, statement issued t'wo days i agp: P. Lorillardl & Co. was the exception, showing a drop In earnings for the quarter and six months endCd' on June 30. Philip Morris;, Inc:,, has not' yet issued its figures. Reynnlds SPtr Record R. J. Revnolds„ which makes Camels and other eigarettes,l not only improved its earnings, but also set records for the second' quarter and first halfi despite sales declines. . Net earnings for the three months to June 30;,as reported' by A. H. Galloway, president, amoimtedl to ;32,20T;000; or 78 cents a share, up slightly from, $32,125;000, or 77 cents a share, in t.he 1963' period., Net sales fell to $412,830,000 from $430,- 667,000. For the six months, the na- tlon's biggest tobacco producer eleaT•ed $:59;911,000, or $1.4'5 a share. This compared' with }59; 631,000, or $1.44, a share, the year before. Net • sales at' Reynolds for the half-year were $767,842,- 000, against $810,6711000. • Tax R'eductionR Helped A d'rop In taxes contributed substantSally' to the earnings -ains. The second-quarter tax billi was $33,710,000, comparedl • with $36.84'2,000 in the 1'963i Iperind. For the six, months,l Itaxes took $62,195,000, against, i$68,240,000 a year earlier.. Reynolds also makes Win-, ston4 Salem andl Tempe ciga- rettes„ as well as Prince Albert,I Carter Hall, and' other brandsi of, smoking and chewing to-. baccos. I+t also produces alumi- num, foil andl packaging ma. terials in addition to producing, Hawaiian Punch and other fruit ,beverages through its Pacific Hawaiian Products Company'. 0 These nontobacco operations have undoubtedly helped to boL ster the company's business, especially since the Govern- ment's report on smol4ing. Oth- er tobacco companies that have diversified also appear to have ;benefited in this way. ~. Emr:14cf-Lik CG,,,,'U14,6.s~~UN0n of the Tabocco trid~'Usi%r~y ~ -l'o~ Lich~ahgan ~N~wte~d by Survey~~ Study Finds That More Than 14,000 Jobs Resuilt From Industry's Presence; State' Revenues R'ePorted To TotaP APiproxirmatellX $72 Millli''on Per Year come of' $42.3 million. -Personal consumptioni expenditures of'tobacco i'ndustry'employes and farm, ers in Michigan totaled $32 million in 1962, the study reveals.. The 236 wholesale tobacco firms in Slichigan, employ 1,'799' persons, have sales of $19'7:4 million, a payrolli of $i7.1 million:, Michigan retailers of' to- bacco products hadl 1f162' sales of $345.6 million, of', which $302.7' million was de- rived from cigarette sales, the etudy reports. IV'at counting a considerable number of' casual salesoutlets, ,there are 38;107 . retail', outlets for tobacco products in the state. -Itetail employment attributa. blle to tobacco sales is 12!,.38A persons, with an annual! •payrolll totaling, $28,3' million, Manufacturef of tobacco products In the stat'e is conducted by firms with aa total employment of' 666: Their prod- ucts gross $12.3 million yearl'y, from which the manufacturers generate a payroll of $3' mil1ion, The study' ia based! on the year 1'962, the most recent period for whi'ch the required data was available. Some of' the estimates are "reasonable approxi- mations, C-E-1-'It cautions. They werew derived from the best available source d'ata, using generally acceptedl tech- niquea. bacco industry have an after-tax in, U. g• °l'bbecco JournB.ll C\ $48 7 million Those in, the etate's' to- N>It,ANI) RAPIDS, 11SIClII., Thursday (rSS-Moro than 1'4;IQ00' Jobs, personal and business incomes of' $48 million,, and state tnxcs total3ng, $72! mil1ion, result from, 111ichi'gan's tobacco indus- try, according to an independent econ- omic study, made public today. C-E-I-R', Inc., of Washington,, D. C., nn economic research and computer sciences organization, developed the "Economi,c Impact Study of' the To- baeco Industry" which has been sub- mitted' to a Ll. S. House Committee. The study shows that sale of' tobacco product's in Michiga•n, generates $170 million irrfedcral and state taxes across all sectors of the industry. The tobacco industry is responsible for 14,8941 ful'l' and part-time jobs i'm Michigan. The total tobacco employe and business income, before taxes, ib The Wall Street Journal A,ugust 5, 1964 C.'i-ga)xt-"faa: Ir'ecrvipts Au~u~~lumca5e~ "It ~~ ho~'w 0 IA' 9 . Rfnf,l'FrPorfer ofTx$.Wwrta, &rner:a•IJOUaNAr, NEW YORK-The volume of cigarets taxed by 48 states andi the Districtl of Columbia rose 7!.9~'/e in June, according to the Tobacco Tax Council. The organization said June volume was 2;- 056;841',000 packages, up from 1,899',223;000 in. June 1963., Dollar tax receipts of these taxing units Increased 14'% from a year earlier, to' $116;710;474,. Ofl the 48 jurisdictfons; excluding Colorado, which didn't have a tobacco tax in June 1963, 32 showed an increase iw volume of cigarets taxedland 16 had decreases. ~ Cumulative figures andi taxable cigaret vol- ume ume for the 12-month period of July 1963' through June 1964, however;, were down 1.3% . from, the prior year. Again exchiding' Col- „ .. orado, 18' of the 48' jurisdictions liad' increases , and 30 experienced decrcaties in vnhame nf " ciga.rcis ta,xed' in ilie 127ninni.hi po!•iofl. Augl18t 6, 1964 - Page ]i]i T(dbacco' July 24, 1964 - Page 13. Lower'Federal Tax'1'ak@ Reflects Healltb' Scare WASB11INGTC?NI, D:C. Federal' rev enue from tobacco taxes declined in the first calendar quarter this year to $4'33,728;000 from $488,4'69,000i a year earlier4 Internal Revenue Service re- ported recentl~: Collections Bor the fiaaal year to date amounted to $1,5!10,383,009; oompared with $1,527,881,000 i'n the previous fiscal year for the same montlis. 11y categories;, eollections for the &at T arter, calendar 1964, ecompared with e same period last year vvere: CiPrs, $]3,019,000 against $9,~813,- 000; cigarettes, $4'15;882,000, a ainst $474,310,00Q; andl other„ $6,0!4'~,p00, against $4.347,000. As the fiscal year comparisons re- flected the same trendl higher calleo- tians from dgan, a40,04'2,000 against $38s423,000, and! lower returns from eiglrette taxes, $11,4'55,708,p00 against $1,477,799,000, andl $14,63!3;000 from, other" t!obacco, prod4lcts, compared with, $134659,000, it was a fair Indica-' tion that the scu+e' genierated, by the Surgeon Ceneral'i recent report on smaki'ng was, trieing', reflected Ibt these 8gure,s.--SA11T1D'.
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` The New York Times July 23, 196 Arrleriean To8accol. And R. J'., Reynolds Increase Eailrmings I Bt' c".1:Arr. Jf. RF.C'1cBit'IP The adverse effects on the: ,cigarette business of the Snr-- gnon GMieral's report on smok- ing and hcalth were not re- flected In the earnings reports Issued yesterday by the No. I and No. 2' tobacco: producers - the R• J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and the American Tobarco Company. Both companies showedl in- lcreases ini profits fore the seo- iond qliarter and' first half of this l•,ear over the levels of' the 1963 periodfi; The Liggett & Myers Tobac- !co Compan,y, also reported,gains in profits for the periods in itis statement issued two days l ago. P. Lorillard & Coi was the exception, showing a drop in,earnings for the quarter and six months ended' on June 30. Philip Morris, Inc., has not, yet lssued its figures;, Re~•,nolds Sets Rlecord' R: J. Revnold:s, which makes ' Camels and' other cigarettes,i, not only improved its earning8,i' but alKo set records for the'i second' quarter and first half, ' despite sales declines. .,. Net earnings for the three ,months to June 30, as reported y A. H., Galloway;, president, mounted' to $32;207;000; or 78 ents a share, up slightly from 32',125,000; or 77 cents a share;, n the 1963 period., Net sales Fell to $412,830;000 from $:430,- 667,000: For the six, months, the na-I tion s biggest tobacco producer eleaa•ed $59,911,000; or $1.45 a ahare. This compared,with i59,- 631,000; or, ;$1.44 a share, the year before. Net sales at Reynolds for the half-year were ER67,842,- 000; against $810,671,000: • Tac, Reductions lielped' A dt•op: In taxes contributed' substantially' to the earnings. The second-quarter taxx gains. billl was $3.3,710,000,, compared. ' with a36i842;000 in the 1063 Iperiod. For the six, months. Itaxes took, a!62;1'95;000i, againstl ja68;240;000, a year earlier. I Reynolds also: makes, Win- ston, Ssl'em and! Tempo, ciga-~rettes, as well' as Prince Albert, Carter Hall, andl other brands of' smoking and' chewing to-, baccos. It' alfio produces alumt-, num foil and packaging, ma- terials in addition to producing Hawaiian Punch and other fruit ,beverages through its Pacific Hawaiian Products Company. . These nontohacco operations .have undoubtedly helped to bol- ster the company's business, especially since the Govern- menti s report on smoking. Oth- er tobacco companies that have diver:eified' also appear to have I benefited In this, way- - ~,.~Y/IYi+/ -~ .1 ~. of /.W ~//y,t~y,l !y//j~®NW7V ~/~~,;~1v/~Q,/~~ C~V"~~4JYY.~~~i~I V~~  o I . lridusa-17 -11'o L~ichiig= Nted by Survey Study Finds That MUore Tlhian 14,000 Jbbs Result From Industry's Presence; State Revenues Reported To Totall Approxiimaltely $72 Million Per Year come of $42.3 million. -Personat consumptlion expenditures of'tobaceo industry employes and farmr ers in Michigan totaled' $32 mill'ion in 1962, the study reveals. The 236' wholesale tobacco firms In Michigan emplolr 1;799' persons, have sales of $1197.4 million, a payroll of $7,1 million. Michigan retailers of' to- bacco products had' 1962' sales of $345.6 million, of'' which $302.7 mil'lion was de- rived', from cigarette sales, the study' reports.. Not counting a considerable number of casual sales outlets, there are 38,107 retaill outiets for tobacco products i'n the state. Retail employment attributa- bls to tobacco eales ia 12,189 persons; with an annuall •payroll totaling $28,3' milllion,. iW[anufacture-of tobacco products in the state 1a conducted by firms with a total' employment of' 1166. Their prod'- ucte gross $1Q:3 million yearly, from which the manufacturera' generate a pqyroll, of $a million, The study is based l on the year 1962! the moet recent periodd for which the required dYta was available. Some of the estimates are "reasonable approxi- mations; C-E-1-'R' cautions. They were derived from the tiest available source data+ using generally, acceptedl tech- niques: bacco industry have an af'ter-t®x ist- U. G• TobacOQ' Journal Q$48 7 million '10'hose in the state's to« GRA1VPl RaA'IPIDS, bt'ICHi, Thursday (CS:)!--Jtorc than 13I,000' jpbs, personal, and •business incomes of $48 million, and state taxes totaling $72'' million result from Hfichigan's tobacco Indus- try, according to an Independent econ- omic study made public today. C-D•l-lli ; Inc., of Washington, D'. C nn economic research and eomputerr scienees organization,, developed the "Economic Impact Study of the To- bacco Induatry"' which has been au'b- miltted' to a, U. 9; House Committee. The study shows that sale of tobacco products In rilichiga•n, generates $170' million in federal and' state taxes across all sectors of the industry. The tobacco industry is responsible for 14,854 f'ulll and part-time jobs in, Michifian, The total tobacco employe and business income, before taxes, is The Wall Street Journal Augtlst 51, 1964 G "igcc rct-'1''ax l~ e ceipCs A~An'~urrce Ro,se hill haze 0'/ / 9 ~U , S1oq Hnporksr ofTks~WaLc, SrrneHTJauaaAll . NDW YORK-The volume of' ci'garets taxed by 48 states and the District of Columbia: rose ;',7:9rya in June, according to the Tobacco Tax Council. The organization said June volume was 2,- 056,841L000 packages„ up from 1,899,223,000' in June 1963. .Dollar, tax receipts of these taxing units lncreased' 1+1~'a from a year earlier to "Z1116,710,474 . Of the 48 jurisdictions, excluding Colorado; which didn't have a tobacco tax in June 1963; 32' showed an increase in volume of' cigarets taxed and 16'had decreases. ~ Cumulative figures anlf taxable, cigaret voll Ilume for the 12-month period ofl July 1963 l through, June 1964, however, were down 1.3% from the prior year. Again excluding, Col- , orado, 18 of the 48 jurisdictions hadlincrea:gesl and 30 experienced dccreanes in volume of cigarcts taxed in, ihe 12-mont.h perind: . August 6, 1964 - ..etge ]2 Tobacco July 24, 1964 - Page 13, Lower Federal Tax Take Reflects Health Scare WASHINGTON, D.Cl'-)l'ederal rev- enue from tobaoco taxes declined in the 8rst calendar qu'arter this year to a43'3,726;000, from $488,469,000 a year earlier, Internall Revenue Servilce: re- ported recently. _ Collections for the fiscal year to date amounted'tb $1,510,3'83',000,, compared with $1,527,881,000 in the previous fiscal year for the same months. Bry categories, collections for the 8rait q~arter, calendar 1A6,4, compared adthi the same period last year, were:' Cigars, $13,019,000 against a9,813,- 000; cigaret'tes„ $415,I962,'000„ against $4'14,310;000!; and mther,, a5,('J49,000, against s4,347,000i As the fiscal year eomparisans re- flected the sarne t>vend, hig, er collee- tions Brrxn cigars, $d0,04?;QOQ against. $36,423'4000, and! lower returns Crom cigarette taxes, 51,455,7!08,000, against $1,477,799,000„ and $14;833y000 from. other" tobacco products, eompared! with $13;B59,000, i#' was a fair indica--' tion that the scarn generated' by tlhe' SUrgCon Gert.CLalrf recent report QD smoking was being reflected' In these' SgLirei.--J$A'ND.
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14 ` The New York Times Ju1y 23, 1964 Tobacco ' And R. J. Reynolds. Increase Earnings ~'R'y '( P,ARFi aTC lliFf'IIEIRT' The adverse effects on the., ci};arctte business of' the Snr-- geon, General';,: report' on smok-' hrg and health were not re- ~'Icet'ed In the carnings rcports /ssued yesterday by the No. L nd Na, 2 tobacco producers - ~lie R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and' the American , obar•co Company. Bothi companies, showed in- 1 lcreases in profits for' the sseo- nd quarter and first half of ~his }-ear over the levels of the 1963 periods. The Liggett & 1Wlyers Tobac- co Company also reported' gains ,in, profits for the periods in its statement issued' twa days I ago. P. Lorillard & Co. was Ithe exception, showing ai drop In, earnings for the quarter, and (six months ended an June 30: Philip hlorris;, Inc., has not', yet't issued its figures. Reynolds Sets Recnrd', 11. J. Revnold's; which makes, CameLc and other eigarette.s,l not anly iniproved' its earnings,i but also set records for the' second quarter and' firstl half, despite sales declines,, , Net earnings for the three months to Jirne 30, as reported by A. HI. Gallowa,y;, president, amounted ta $32,207;000, or 78 cents a share, up slightly from $32,125,000, or 77 rents a share;, in the 1963 period. Net sales fell to $412,830,000, from $430,- 667~000. For the six months, the na-l tion's biggest tobacco producer eleared $59,911,000; or $1'.45' a chare. This compared with $59; C~~~~r'6"Sa~D'taod~ 0'f t' ~e To' ~'~~~ Iridusio~ 10 LicCapgan Notedly ,Survey. Studjf Finds That M'ore Than 14,000 Jobs Result From Irtdustry"s Presence; State Revenues Reported To Totall Approximately $72M'illilon Per Year -Personall consumption expenditures of tobacco i industry employes andlfsrm- ers in Michigan totaled $32' million in 1962, the study reveals. The 236 wholesale tobacco firms' ini Michigan employ 1';799 persons, have sales of' $197.41 mill'ion,, a payroll of' $7.1 million. Michigan, retailers of to-, bacco products had 1962 salea of'$34Fi6b million, of which $342:7 million was' de- rived from cigarette sales, the study reports. Not counting a considerable number a c c y come of $42.3 million. August 6, 1964 - a8~' 11 GRAND' RAPIDS, ,S,, B11CIC., Thursday (CS)-'siore than 14,000 Jobs, personal' and •business, incomes of $48 million, and state taxes totaling $72' mitlion result from, bfiehiRanls tobacco indus- try, according to an,independent econ, omie study made public todsy. C-E-I'-R, Inc., of' VNashi'ngton„ D. C.,. an economic research and computer sciences organization, developed' the "Economic I'mpact: Study of the To- bacco Industry" whi'ch has been sub- mitted to a U. -8. House Committee. The study shows that, sale of tobacco products in 1Wiiehigan generates $110 million in, federal and state taxes across all sectors of' the industry,, The tobacco industry ils responsible for, 14,854 full and' part-ti'me jobs in Michigan. The t'otal' tobacco employe and business income, before', taxes,, is $48.7 million. Those in the, state's to- o industr have an after-tax in- b \. I631,000, or $1.44 a share, the \. pear before. Q Net • sales ati Reynolds' for TIl'e W!a]:1'. Street Journal . the half-year were $767,84'2,'- 000; against $810,671,000:, • August 5, 1964 Iperiod. For the six months. Itaxes took: $62;1'95.000', against ~$68,240;000 a year earlier. Reynolds also makes Wln• ston, Salem and, Tempo ciga- rettes, as well as Prince Albert', Carter' Hall, andl other brands of! smoking andi chewing to- baccos, I* alfio produces alumi, num foil and packaging: ma-, teriais in addition to producing Hawaiian Punch:and other fruit ,beverages through its Pacific Hawaiian Products Company. These nontobacco operations have undoubtedly helped to bo1- st'er the company's business, especially since the Govern- ment's report on smoking. Oth- er tobacco companies that have diver:eified' also appear to have ;benefited In this way. Tac Reduct ionn 1Hielped: A drop In taxes contributed' substlantially' to the earnings gains. The second~quarter tax. bill was $33.710,000; compared with $36;842,000, in the 1963 R'eccipts k~kiV~r~U 1'o5c i'I'.1~~Glle . 8!n¢Faporf er aJ',THa wwr.c S'rner;T JouRrrAu , N'EW' 1'ORK-The valume of cigarets taxed' by 48' states and the District of Columbia rose 7:9r/a In June, according to the Tobacco Tax Council. The organization said June volume was 2,- 056,841,000 packages„ up from 1,899,223,000 in June 1983: Dollar, tax receipts of these taxing, units lncreased! 14g~'a from, a year earlier to' `$116,710',474. Of' the 48 jurisdictions, excluding Colorado; which didn't have a tobacco tax in June 1963; ; 32' showed an increase ih, volume of cigarets taxed and'16',had' decreases. ~ Cumulative figures andl taxable cigaret voll Uume for the 12-month period of, July 1963 through, June 1964, however, were down 1.3% from the prior year. Again excluding, Co1- , iorado, 18 of the 48 jurisdictions hadl increases ,land 30 experienced dhcreahes In volume, nf' ciga.rcis ta,xeil' iru iha C2'-runnl.h periori. oll' casuall sales out9ets, there are 38,107 retail outlete for tobacco produeta In the state. dhet'aill employmentl attributa- ble to tobacco sales is 1l',38D persons, with an annual •payrolll totaling, $28.3 million. Manuf'acture,of tobacco products in the atate is eonductedl by firms with, a total em-ploymenb of' 698: Their prod- ucts gross $1a:3 million, yearly, from which the manufacturers generate a payroll of $3 mlllion: The' study i based' on the year 1962, the most, recent period far which the required' data was available. Some of' the estimates are "reasonable al mations, C-E-I-R cautions. They were derived from, the best available source data, using, g®neralily' accepted tech, niques. Tnba¢co' ,Ju , 1964 - Page 13 Lower Federal Tax Take Reflects Health Scare WrA'SHIN'GTON, D.C.-1Federal rev- enue from, tiobaooo taxes declined in the first calendar quarter this year t4, a433',726,000' from $488,469,000 a year earlier, Internal' Revenue Servic:e, re- ported recently. Collections for the fiscal ~ear to date amoun3ed't~a $1~,510,383',000, aotnpared' with $1,527,881,00a In the previous fiscal year for the same months. Rr categories, collections for the first S arter, calendar 1904, compared reithi e same period last year wrere:' Cigars, $13,019,000 against a9,813,- 000; dgarettes,, =4'15,86?',000; a ainst $474,310,000!; and otlter„ i5,04~000„ agai'nsf $4,3'47,000: As the 8scal' year comparisons Ira• i3eeted the same trend, higher collbe- tHons from cigars, $40,042,000 against $36;4234000, and lower returns from, cigarette taxes, $,1,455,7i18,000, against $1,477,799,000, and $I4',833y000 from, other" tobac¢o products, compared' with $13,859!,000, it was a fair ill tion that the scare generated by the' $llil Cen_Cralrf recent report on smokinr was beint reflected In tbese 6gures.--SAND~. . 1J'. S. T©bacco Journal
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TTobacc.a July 24,, 1964 - Page 9 Cilgaret3e' Shipments Off; Cigar Output Swings Up W:ASdI!1NQ:TO1+d-Shipmcntsof cign- rettcs droplped sharply in, May after a rebotindl in Ahril, the Iinti^rnal Revenue Service reports. Cigaretteshijiments in n'Raytotal'edl 411.7 billion, a 13 per cent drop fromm the 48:2 bil'lioni sent out' fromi factories in, May 1963. "The 6:5 billioni reduction Z. is equlvaltnt to 327' million packa~es: ~ A gain of two tQ three rer, cent rom ~ the previous year is consideredl normal'. Q However„ sometimes monthly factory Rl,ntres reflect inventory changes at the ~` wholesale level, rather than immediate .~ retail' sales; The number of' cigars shiPped from ~ the factnries' continued to climb for the ~' fifth consecutive month, ris!ing 13 per Q cent from, May 1963. The gain was 86.4 million to 730:7 million. Of the first five months of 1964, April' is the only one in which factory sales edlralhd' or exceededl the com- parable 19631month* April sales were 43I.7 bil9ion~' up from 42.3 billion in the' 1'963' month: td . S. Tobacco Journal August 6, 1964 - Page ' 11 Snw~l r=rr~~ C~'~~~~s 8 /@ s?Ies l~creas~ For First Naaff /q~o~ 7 ~ N'I1At0 , MICH., Monday (CS)- Snuff sales at Goike's Kashub: Snuff Co. during the first six months of 1964 were up approximately 8!per cent over the similar period last year, Stu- art Goike, sales. manager of the 70 year old Detroit manuf'actiuring, firml reported here recently. He attributed the increase to several factors. "We made more personal calls on jobbers andl spent substantially more money on Tromotionali activity during this period," said Mr. Goike. "We also introduced, a new one-pound carton' that gained' popularity immediately. "There was no increase in cost to the consumer as the changeover from a glass jar to a lighter-weight, heat- sealed "poly" baq reduced freight:costs by about onc-half:" He also announced thatl Goike's snuff was now soldi at the Detroit=Wiindsor Tunnel under the provisions for cus, toms-bondedl warehouses., "We hope to have a similar outlet at the Ambas: t{ador Bridge in the near future," he added., Tobacco July 3, 1964 Cigarette Use D!eclined 6',g%a in First Half '64 WASNIIVGTnN, D.C; - Americans cut dnwn on their smoking by abont. 16 bil1ion,cigare•ttes after a Government report l0rmcrd smoking a health hazard,, the Agricatlt,me Department saidl in its "Tohacco, Situati~~n" on Pl4orn quat•terly. day.. The dc cline in the first six months of 1964 wwas 6.5 per, cent fromi a, year earl'ier: The depattment,said more ciiga+- rettesare being smoked in the United! States than in the period just after the report'was relieased, IastJanuary11', but probably not as' many as before. (;igars, 'tilles and roll-your-own ci a~ rettes are 1>ecoming moro-poptd'ar. Sn~ess of regular and small' cigars' are tap about 1'2 per centit said., "Cigarette consumption in the United States during July-December 19011 rani 6.5 billion aliead ofl the vear-earliier period," the report said. "During', Janu- ary-Junell9'$4', a drop of about 16 bil- lion from the year-earlier periodl more than wiped out thislead." While domestic consumption drop. ped~, cigarette ex ~orts were up by t.vo pc~r cent chtring t~e' year ending today. United States exports during the period were nearly 23.8 billion cigarettes with a value of' $1110 mill'ion., Tebacco July 17, 1964 - Page 14 p/ / G;/- p/-/ /7 z9' ULS, Cigarette Consumption Shows Almost Steady Gain RALEIGH, N. C.-Smokers In the United States in 1i963' consumed' nearly 524' billion cigarettes-three per cent more than in 1962 and more than inn any previous year, according to the United States Department of' Agricu1- htre, as reported by the Fllue-Cured' Tobacco Stabilization Corporation. Cigarette consumption, llas' gained' steadily for many years except for' the moderate dip in 1953 and 1954, when the possible relationship of cigarettes and ]heal'th began receiving attenhion, Cigarette consumption In 1993, declined 211' per cent from, the 1!962' peak. From 1950 to 1952' there hadl been a partieu'- lhrly sharp, rise, probably' abetted by' Korean war tensions. In 1954 consump• tion cnnttnued downwardl to 71:1 per ment below the 1952 high. But the upwardtkend, resumecl, after 1954, with, cigarette consumption, increasing about 3'!1 per cent annually. Cigarette consumption per capita ( I8 years and over), at 4,345, cigarettes (about 2'1i7 packs of 20) rose two per cent in 1963 above the level of 1962 and 1961, when it was virttlally un- changed.-HAD: The Wall Street Journal July 15, 1964 Cr,ba~ret ''c~cx ~~eceit~..~s Rose in a I~V,,~aaari~~ Of State.s Last Month Fiom Year Earlier ~~ - 11 11 Ry.a WtioL RTinr;mT.loJTarrA% StaffRe,.porter CHICAGO-Cigaret sales, are recovering sharply from t'he: January health, scare; ac- cording to a preliminary, incomplete report on state tax collhrtinns in June. For the first', tinie, since Issuance of' the IliSurge.oa General's report in January, monthly „gnles of cigaret tax stamps increased'In June in a majt>rity of states„ the National Tobacco Tax Association, repnrtcd'. Sales increases from a year earlier were repnrted in 29 of' the 4'a states for which re- pcmta were available, up from two states In \Tay and eight in April. An official cautioned that statist9cs are throNvn out of line sor'newhat by cigaret taxx increases in about a, third, of the cigareG tax states from May through July 1963. This had accentuated year-to-year declines In a num- ber of states dnrdng, May 1964 and' was a factor' in inereascs of several states in June 1964. Inn these states; retailers stocked, cigarets abnor- mally high in May 1963 in advance of tax in- creases taking effect hr June lastl year. This resulted in an abnormal drop in atamp sales In June 1963. The association said that, all' told, tax rate changes were apparently a: factor In increases for 12'states last month, including Mtssiasippi, where a 2&7ryjo gain from a year earlier was partly attributable: to advance stamp buying ahead of'a July 1, 1964 tax'increase., On the other hand, there were, aeveral ih- stances among, the dozen states reporting June. declines where sizable, dtops were attributable:i lo year-earlier tax, rate legislation. For ex;1 ample, in Connecticut, where collectiions i were down almost' a third, ih, June, the year.earlfer tax revenue reflected a sizable advance sale of stamps preparatory to a July 1, 1963, increase. The associiation, offfciall also said it' might', be several months before it couldi be verified that the spurt in the number of states report• ing increases over a year ago was a definite trendl He recalled that signs of recoveryi' shown in Mareh weren't borne out In April IV and' Miay: Among, populous states' reporting ihcreases in June were New York, 10'.7~'n; Pennsylvanfa, . 6:9~/,;; Ohio, 8.87e; Texas, 7.7%; New Jersey,^ 124:5%~, and Illinois, 5.7%.
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1w11 44 ' TTabacc.o July 24,,1964 - Page 9 Cigarette Shipments Off; Cigar Output Swings Up WASI I l'NCTO'Nr-Shihments of ciga, rettcs clroppecL sii.arply in Mhy after a rebonnd in April. the Internal IRcvenue Service reports. Cigarette shipments in' May totaled 41.7 billinn a~ 13 per cent drop from, the 48.2 billion sent out from factories in May 1983'. The 6:5 billion reduction' ~ is equivalent to 327' mil'lion, packages. \ A gain of two tq three per cent from -It, the prcvions year is considered, normal'. Q However, sometimes monthly factory Agures reflect inventory changes at the yJ whol'esalk l'evel'„ rather than immediate ~ retail sales. Th 11 r f' 1r shi ed from c ci s e ` ~. pp num o g8 the factories continuedl to climlb for the fsfthconspcuti:vemonth,, risin~gB per cent from hfav 1963. , The gain was 88'.4 million to; 730.7 milliom Of' the first five months of' 1964, April, is the only one in which factory sales equaled or exceeded the' com- parabl'e 1963 ' montht April sales were 417 billion, tip' from 42:3 billion in the 1963 month. U. S. Tobacco Journal August 6, 196- Page 11 5nuil i'ir~~~~.~~~ ~J'oi Gs 8 fo s~Ti~~~ Increase For 913,,a First Nalf O197~ ID' TRO ; MICH., Monday (C:S)- Snuff sales at, Goike'§ Kashub Snuff Co. during the first six months of 1964 , were', up approximately 8 per' cent over the similar period last year, Stu- art Goike, sal'es, manager of the 74 ' year old Detroit manufacturing, firm, reported' here recently. He', attributedl the increase to several f'actors.,'"W'e made more personal calls on jobbers and spent substantially more' money on promotional, activity during this pcriod~" said' Mr. Goike., "We also introduced a new one-pound cartonf that gained' popularity immediately. "There was no increase in cost to the consumer as the changeover from a glass jar to a' lighter-weight, heat: sealed "poly" bag,reduced freight costs by about one-half." He also announced.that Goike's snuff was now sold at the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, under the provisions for' cus- toms-bonded warehouses. "We' hope to have a similar outlet at the Ambas- sador Bridge in the near future," he added. Tobacco. ~ I ~ ~j ~ July 3, 1961u ~ / ~i Cigarette Use Declined 6.5%o in First Hali''64 WASfiIIN(:TON; D.C. - Americans cut down on their smokiiig, by abont 18billion cil;nreItes aftera, Government report tormc•d smoking a' hcalth hazardl, the' Agrienltire Department said in its cluarturily `.Toh,rccn Situatiorn" cmi PNon- dav: The' decliite in the first six months of 1964 was 8'.5~ lxr cent from a year, earlier. The d'epartment saidlmore cigg-' rettes are being smoked in the United States than in the period just' after the report w as' release.d last January 11, but probably not as man~.~ as before. (:ig irs, l~ipes and roll-your-own ci'ga~ rcttes are lrecoming more popular. Sales of regular and'small cigans are tip'abnnt, 12 per cent it said. "Cig;uctte consumption in the United. Sthtes dnring Jtih,-Decemher 1983' ran 8!5' billion ahcacl of the vear-earlier period," the report said. "Dirring Jtmu- ary,-jlrne 1964, a dl•opof about 1i8bil,-lion from the vear-earlier period more than wiped, oui this leadl" While domestic consumption diop- ped, cigarette ex ports were np by two per eent' duning t~e year ending today. United States exports during the period were' nearhy 23.8 billion cigarettes with a value of $110'million. Tobacco July 17, 1964 - Page 14 0 119Z ,,4 pZl U.S. Cigarette Consumption Slhowrs Ahnost Steady Gain RALEIGH, N: C.-Smokers in tlte. United States in 1983 consumed nearly 524 billion cigarettes-three' per cent more than, in 1962' nnd! more than in any previous year, according to the. U'nited, States Department of ~YgricuS. ture, as reported by the F'lue-Ciared. Tobacco Stabilization Corporation. Cigarette consumption has gttinedl steadily for many years except' for the moderate dip in 1953' and 1954, when the' possible relationship of cigarettes and health began receiving attention4 Cigarette consumption in 1963 declined 2!i' per cent from th& 1962 peak. From 1950 to' 1952 there had' been, a particu- larly sharp rise, probably abetted by 1Corean war tensions. In' 1954 consump.' tion continued downward to 7% per ment below the 1952' high. But' the up.vard' trend resumecj' after 1954, with. dgarette consumption inereasing; about 3li per cent annuall'y.. Cigarette consumptionper capita ('18' yeara' and over)' at 4,345 cigarettes' (about 217 packs of 20) rose two, per cent in 1963'above the level of 1982' and 1961, when It'' was virtually un- changed.-HAD'. The; Wall Street Journal. July 15, 196k ~,~i b~i~-eit ~'~tc~:~ ~~ecei~a~s Rose in a Majority Of States Last Month From Year Earlier 4~1 ~ R.J/'M1.WALL STRF.F.T'JOIIRNAL RCRf/]RPllorlerCHIICAG©-Cigaret', sales are recovering sharply from the' January health: scare, ac- enrding to a, preliminary, incomplete'repor.t' on, 9tate tax collections in Jnme.. For the first tinae' since Issuance of the I Surgeon General's report in, January, monthly „sate:s of cip-aret tax,stamps increasedlin June in a, mRjority ef, states, the', Nat'ional, Tobacco Tax Association reported. Sales increases frnm a, year earlier were repnrted' in 29 of' the 4't sl'ates, for which re- pnrts' were available, upfromtwostate:s in \7ay and eight in April: An official cautioned, that statistics are thrown out of' line somewhat by cigaret taxx increases in about a third'' of the cigaretl tax, states fi•om, May throngh July' 1963. , Thi's'' had. accentuated year-to-year declines in a num- ber of'states during May 1964 and was a factor I in increascs nf several states In June 1964. rIn ; these states, retailers stocked' clkarets' abnor- mally hi„h, In May 1963 in, advance of tax In- creases taking effect l.m June last year. This resulted in a.n abnormal' drop In stamp sales In June 1963., The association said that„ all told, tax rate changes were apparentty a factor in increases for 12 states last month, Including Mississippi;, where a 25.7% gain from a year earlier was partly attributable to advance stamp buying aheadi of a, July 1~, 1964 tax increaae. On the other hand, there were several in- stances amng, the dozen states reportting June' ddclines' where sizable drops were attributable i to year-earli;er tax', rate legislation. For ex, I ample, in Connecticut, where collecttons were: down almost a third in, June, the year-earlier tax revenue reflected a sizable advance eale of stamps preparatory to a July 1,, 1968',, increase. The association officiall also said it mightl he several months before it' couidi be verified that th.e spurt in the number of states report- ing, increases over a year agp was a definite trendl He recalled, that miqns of' recovery, ~ws Ishown in March weren't borne out in Aprili V and! May. Among; populous states reporting increases in June were New York, 10.7%; &tnnsylvania,,. 6.9%; Ohfo;, 8.8%; Texas, 7,7%; New Jersey,;, 2415;9, and I11lnoia;, d:7^fo.
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I'J 4- ,Tobacc.o Jal24, a 1961+ - Page 9 Cigarette Shipments Off; Cigar Output Swings Up WASI1lNCTO'M-Shipments ofl ciga~ rettes dropped sharply in ivihy after a~ rebound in Ahril, the Intcrnol' Revenue Service rcports.. Cigarette shipments in, May totaled 41.7 billion, a 13 per cent drop from the 48,2 billion sent out from fhctories in May 1963. The 6.5 billion reduction X is equivalent' to 327 million packages. I \ A gain of two tQ three per cent, from --I\ the previous ) ear is considered normall. ~ Ho.vever;, sometimes monthly factory figures reflect inventory changes at the :1* wholesale level, rather than immediate ~ retnill sales: The number of cigars shipped from ~ the factories continued to climb for the ~ fifth consecutive month, rising 13 perr t~ cent from, hfav 1963. The glin was 86.4 million to 730:7 million. Of the first five months of 1964, April' is the only one in which factory sales edtialcd' or exceededl the com- parable 1961 montbt April, sales were 43'.7' billion;' up from 423 billion inn the 1963' month. U. S. Tobacco Journal August 6, 1964 - Page 11 SnuAi ~-ffin- 0oies 8% Sakes Increase Far than F arst Nalf 0~/9~9©~ 7C D TRO , A4dCH'., &Iondity (CS)- Snuff sales at Goike's Kashub Snuff' Co, during the first, six months of' 1964 were up approximately 8 per cent over the similar period last y,ear, Stu, art Goike, sales _ manager of the 743 year old Detroit manufacturing firm, reported here recently. He at'trihuted' the increase, to several factors., "We made more personal calls on jobbers and spent substantially moree money on Trotnotional activity during this periodl," said, Mr. Goike. "We also introduced a, new one-pound carton that gained popularity immediately. "There was no Increase in cost to the consumer as the cfiangFover from, a glass jar to a lighter-weight, heat~ sealedl "poly" •bag reduced freight cos•ts by about one-half." He also announced.that Goike's snuff'f was now sold at the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel under the prowisions for cun- toms-hondled, warehouses. "We hope to have a similar outlet at the Ambas- sador Bridge in tho near fut'ure;''he added. Tobacco July 3, 1964 Cigarette Use Declined &o 9 Z~ 6, ~, /7 A 6.51% in FirstHcrll''64WASIIIIhi(:'!1O!N, D:Q,': - Amcrncanscut down onthcir smoking by abont'. 16 billion cigarettes after a: Government report termed smoking a licalth~hazardj the Agriculh,re Department said in its qlmrtcrly •"Toltacco Situation" om Al~~tonT d';1v: The dlcline in the first six months of 1964 w as 6.5 per, cent from a yearr earlier. The department saiellmore ciga- rettes are being smoked in the United Statcs than in the period just' after the report was released last January 11, but probably nnt as many as before. Tobacco C;igars, ~ipes and'roll'-yonr-owrr ci~+aZ rettcs air ~recoming more popular. Sa1es of' regular and small cigars are up abont, 12 per cent it said. "Cigarette consumption in thc United' States chu•ing; Jtilv-December 1983' ran. 8:5 billion ahead of the vear-carlier period," the report said. "During J@trtu- ary-June 1964, aa dl•op of about 1'e bill- liom from the vear-earlier period more than wiped ouC this leadl" While domestic consumption clrop- ped, cigarette exports were tip by two r r cer~t during the year ending today. nited States exports during the period were nearly 23.8 billiow cigarettes with a value of 81I0' milllion. July 17, 1961+ - t'age 14 O// C/ ~ ,f> ~,V 1^,Cq U!.S. Cigarette Consumption Shows Almost Steady Gain RALEIGH, N. C.-Smokers in, the United States in 1963' consumed nearly' 524, billion ciigarettes-Chree per cent more than in 1962 and more than in any previous year,, aecord'in~ to the United States Department of' AgSfcul- ture, as reported by the Flue-Cured ToTmcco Stabilization Corporation. Cigarette consumption has gained steadily for many yenrs except for the moderate dip in, 1953 and 1954, when the possible relationship of' cigarettes and ltealth began, receiving attention. Cigarette consumption In 19631 d'eclimed' 2;ii per cent from, the 1962' peak. From 1950 to 1952 there hadl been a partieu- lhrly sharp, rise, probably abetted by Korean war tensions. In 1954 consump• tion continued downward to 71:1 per ment below the 1952 hig)i; But the upward trend! resumed i after 1954, vwith, cigarette consumption increasing about 3!1 per cent nnnually:. Cigarette consumption per cnpita (18 years and over), at 4,345 cigarettes (about 217 packs of 20 ' rose twape r cent in 1963 above the~ levell of 1962 and 1961, when, It was virtual1y un- changed:-HAD.. The Wall Street Journal July 15, 1964 ~,'e;baret I 'ax Receipts Rose in a Majority Of States Last Month From Year Earlier r.. AaJ aWAt.L STa9FT.io1-aHAr. Staj9',ReporterC1dICAGd-Cigaret sales are recovering, sharply from the January health: scare, ac- cording to a preliminary, incomplete report on state tax collections in, Jtme.. For the first time since issuance of the I Surgeon General's report in January, monthly sales of ci~aret tax stamps inereased in, June in a majority of states, the National Tobacco Tax Association repnrtad! Sales increases f'rnm a, year earlier were repnrtcdl ini 29 : of the 4R states for which re. 1?nrts wcre a.vaila.blb, tip from two states ]n \Lay and eight in April. An, official cautioned that statistics are lhrown out of' line somewhat by cigaret tax increases in about a third of the dgaret tax states fionr May through July 1963. Thls had accentuated ycar-to-year declines in a num- ber of statcs during May 1964 andiwas a factor 1'iniincreascs of several states in June 19641 In these states, retailers stocked' cigarets abnor- mally hi; lr ini M',ay 1963 in advance of tax in- creases taking effect' in June last year. This resulted in an abnormal, drop in, stamp sales in Jime, 1963. The associl;tion, said that, all told, tax rate, changes were apparently a factor in increases for 12 states last; month~ including, Mississippi, where a 25.7% gain from a year earlier was partly attributable to advance etamp buying ,ahead' of a July 1', 1964 tax lncrease. ' On the other hand, there were several 1n- Istances among the dozen states reporting June. declines where sizable drops were attributable i Ito year-earlier tax rate legislation.. For ex-1 ample;, in, Connecticut, where collections were down almost a third in June, the year-earlier tax, revenue reflected a sizable advance sals ofl stamps preparatory to a July 1, 1963, increase: The association of[iciall also said it might he several months before it could be verified' that the spurt in the, number of states report- ing increases over a year, aago was a deftnlt'e1 -3 ' trend. He recalled that signs, of' recovery, ~.+s shown in li•Tarch weren't borne out in, Apri1 r/ and May. Among populous states reporting i'ncreases in June we,re New York, 1q~7%; Pennsylvania,. 6.9%; Ohio, 9J87o; Texas, 7.7^/e;' New J'ersey,~ 24.5%, andi Illinois, b,7^fp.
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TTobacco July 24, 1964- Page 9 Cigarette Shipments Ott; Cigar Output Swings Up WASiIINCTON~-Shipmcnts oF' ciga, rettes dropped sharply in Plihy after a, rabound' in April, the Iitternal' Revenue Service reports. Cigarette shipments in Mtry totaled 41.7 biflionl a 13' pcr cent drop' from the 48.2 billion sent out' from factories In May 1963'. The 6.5 billion reduct'ion, N i's ecJuivalent' to 327 million packages: I N A gain of two to, three per cent, from --I, the provious } ear is considered normall 0 However, sometimes monthly factory figures reflect inventory changes at the ~` wholesale level, rather than immediate reta&I sales. The number of' cigars shipped from the factories continued to climb for the fiEth consecutive month{ rising, 13' per cent from ]4tav 1963. The: gain was 88:4' million to 730.7' million. Of'' the first five months of 1984;, April is the only one in which factory sales equaled, or exceeded the com• parabl'e 1963 montfh April' sales were 43.7 billion+ up from 42.3 billion inn the 1963 month. U. S. Tobacco Journal August 6.,, 1964 - Page 11 . Jnwf FlirLn' 20Y es 8% S ~~les tncrerise For ip.ha First Nalf' / 9' ~ TNRO ,0A^tICH~ ~., lYT~onday (CS)- Snuff sales at Gaike's Kashub Snuff Co. during the first six months of 1964 uwere up approximately 8 per cent over the similar period last: year, Stu- art Goike, sales _ manager, of' the 7431 year old Detroit manufacturing, firm, reported here recently.. He attributed the increase to severall factors. "We made more personal calls on jobbers and spent substantially more money on promotional activity during this pcriodl" said Mr. Goike., "We also introduced, a new one-pound cartonf that gained' popularity immediately. "There was no increase in cost to tlhe consumer as the changeover from, aglass jar to a lighter-weight, heat- sealed!°poly" bag reduced!freight costs by about one-half:" He also announced that Goike's snuff was naw sold! at the Detroit=Wiindsor Tunnel under the provisions for cus, toms-bondedl warehouses., "We hope to have a similar outlet at the Ambas, earlor B'ridga in the near future," he added. Tobacco July 3, 1964 Cigarette Use Declined & 1/9 `~6`fZ /~' 6.5% in First Half '64 WA,SHIIN(:'llO!N„ IU:Q'.: - Americans cut down on their smoking by abont' 16 hiflion cigurettPs aftet• a C;overnment't report termcd smoking a liealthihazardl the Agriculhn•c Dcpariment, said in its qftartiuly •...1'ohacco Situation" on IWl'on- daN: The dlclince ini theflt•stsix monthsof 1964 wns ti:5 per cent from a year earlier. The department saicl'more ciga- rettes are being smoked in the Uinited States than in the period just after the report was released last January 11, but prnhably ntjt' as many as before. Tobacca C;ig.trs„ 1tipes and'rnll'-yonr-own ciga" rettes are Irecoming more popular. Sales of regular and' small cigars are ttp abnnt, 12 per cent it said. "Cigarette consumption in the United States chu•ing, Jiile•-December 1963' ran 6:5billimn abead' of the vear-carlie,r period;" the report said. "During J1inu~- ary-June 1964, a, drop of about 16 bil- lion from the year-earlier period moree than wiped out this lead." While domestic consumption clrop- ped, cigarette ex ~orts' were up by two. pCr cent during the year ending today.. United States exports during the period" were nearly 218 billion cigarettes with a,vnlhie of $110 million. ,CT July ].7, 1964 - Page 14 0 / / C/ [f D L-1 ~7 U.S. Cigarette Consumption Shows Almost Steady Ga~i'a~ RALEIGH, N. C.-Smokers in the United States in 1963: consumed! nearly 524 billion eignrettes+-three per cent more thaw in 1962 and'' more than, inn any previous year, accord6ng, to the Unitedl States Department of Agricul- ture, as reported by the 1"lue-Cured. Tobacco Stabilization Corporation: Cigarette consumption has gaine& steadily for many years except for the mod'erate dip in 1953' nndl 1954, when the possible relationship of cigarettes and health began receiving attention.. Cigarette consumption i'n 1963 declined 2!i per cent from the 1962 peak. From 1950, to 1952 there had been a particu- larly sharp riae, probably abetted' by Korean war tensions. In 1954' consump- tton continued downward to' 7% per mentl below' the 1952' higb. But the upward trend resumed after 1954, with, eigarette consumption increasing, about 39'a per cent annualhy. Cigarette consumption per capita (,1i8' years and over) at 4,345 cigarettes (about 217 ~acks mf' 20'Ji rose two per cent in 19Fi;1 above t'he llevel' of 1982' and 1961„ when It was virtually un= changed.-HAD. The Wall Street Journ®ul July 15, 19' ~,"i;bar-et 'Tax Receipts RQse' in a Majority Of States Last Month From Year Earlier i Ay aWNCL STaRnT JbuaxA r. Stnff Reporter CHICAGO -Cigaret sales are recovering ~sharply from the! Jranuary, health, scare„ ac- cnrding to a; preliminary, incomplete report on state tax collections in June. For the firstl time since i'sstrance of the i i Simgcon General's report ih, January, monthly I „Galrs of cip-aret tax stamps increasedlin Junel in ai meji~rity of states, the rilat'ional, Tobacco'. Tax Association reported'. Sales increases from a, year earlier were reported in 29 of' the 4t sln•tesi for which re- hrnds were available, up from two states in NTay and eightl In April. An official cautioned that statistics aree thrown out of~ line somewhat by cigaret tax increasrs in afinut a, third of the cigaret tax states from May through July 1963. This had accentuated year-to-year declines ih a num- ber of states during May 1964 and was a factor in increases of' several states In June 1964. Inn these states; retailers stocked cigarets abnnr- mally high in May 7983' in advance of tax in- ereases taking, effect ih June last' year. This resulted in an, abnormal drop in stamp sales in June 1963. The association said' that, all tol'd, tax rate changes were apparently a factor In ihcreases for 12 states last month, including Miississippi„ where a 25.7~/n gaih, from a year earlier was partly attributable to advance etamp, buying ahead of' a July 1, 1984 tax Increase. On the other hand, there were several in- stances among, the dozen states reporting June declines where sizable drops were attributadte i to year-earll;er tax rate legislation. For ex-1 ample, in Connecticut, wherei collections were down almost a third ih June, the year-earSl.er tax revenue reflected a sizable advance sale of atamps preparatory to a July 1, 1983; increase. The association official also said it might be several months before it could' be verified that, the spurt in the number of', states report- ing increases over a year ago was a definite trendl He recalled that signs of recovery, shown in March weren't borne out in, April and' May: Among,populous states reporting Increases in June were New York, 10'.7ryn; Pennsylvania,. 8:9%; Ohio, 8,8%; Texas, 7.7%; New Jersey, , 123,5-,',, and Illinois, 5.7%.
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Ty oba~.'t..a July 2T, 1964 - Page 9'. Cigarette Shipments Oiff: Cigar Output Swings Up WASI I!l,\' C:TON=Sltipments, of ciga- rcttes dropped sharpHy in May aHter a rebound in Ahril, the internal Revenue Service rcports. Cigarette sliihments' in May totaled! 411.7 billion, a, 13 ' per cent drop from the 48.2' billion sent out fromi factories in May 1963. The 6.5 billion rednctiionn j~ ib eclliivalent to 327 million packages. \ A gain ofl two tq, three per cent! from -'I\ the previous year is considered normal. ~ Hb.vever, scnnetimes monthly factory fi~,nires reflect inventory changes at the ~` wholesale level4 rather than immediate .~ retail, sales. • e Th mhcr of' ci ~rs shi d from e nu ~ pp g the factories continued to~climb for the fifth consecutive month{, rising, 13' per cent from Mttv 1963, The gain was 86:41 million to 730.7' mill'ion., ©f" the first five months of 1964;, April is the onlly one' in which factory sales equaled or exeeede& the com- parable 1963 montli April sales were 43.7 billion+' up from 42.3 billion inn the' 1963 month, tJ . S. Tobacco Journal August 6, 1964 Page 11 . S 6~ ~'u~.f r, ~"P~'Gn ' 0~0 5~°fo For fi''a~a"r'irst NGa~lf c~lq4r~~ 7~' D TRO, , A'1'ICH., Monday (CS)- Snuff sales at Goike's Kashub Snuf'f' Co., during the first six months of' 1964 were up approximately 8 per, cent over the similar period last year, St'u, art Goike; sales . manager of the 76 year old Detroit manufacturing firm, reported, here recently. He attributedlthe increase to several factors., "We made more personal calls on jobbers and spent substantially more money on Tromotional activity during this period,"' saidi Mr. Goike. "We also introduced a, new one-pound carton that gained popularity immediately. "There was no increase in cost to the consumer as the changeover from, a glass jar to a, I',ifihter-weight, heat" sealed, "poly" -bag reduced, freight coats by about one-half." Hie also announced that Goike'§ snuff, was now saldl at the Detlroit-Winds'or Tunnel under the provisions for cus- toms-bonded, ware:houses.: "We hope to have a similar outlet at the Ambas- sador Bridge in the near fut'ure; " he added. Tobacco ~ July 3, 1964 ~ /J y' Z~ 6~ /7 /~f'` Cigarette Use Declined f'igrrs,')ilnes :md roll-your-own ciga<~ 6.5% in First Half '64 rcttos ale ()ecomin~ more poptilhr. Sa'('es of regul.-: and sma 1 eigars nre up about WASIIf,INrTOI:I„ 17!f:. - Americans cut down ow thcir smoking by abont 16 billion cigarettes,after a Government report termcd smoking a health hazard,, theAgi•iicultiire D'epartmentsniil in', itsquarti~rly `.Tbb:tcco Situatibn"' on Mon- da~~. The dcelline in the first six months 1121 per cent it said. "Cigarette consumption in the United! States chiring July-December 1963 ran 6:5 billinn, ahead of the year-earlier period," the report said. "During Janu- ary-June 1964, a drop of about 16 bil- lion from the vear-earlier period more than wiped out, this lead." of 1964 was 6;5' per cent from a, year While domestic consumption drop- earlier. The dcpairtment said more ciga- ped, cigarette ex ~mrts were up by two rettes are being smoked in the United pe r cent dhring tlie year ending tod'ay. States than in the period just after the' hlnited States exports during the periodl report was releascd' last January 1i1, were neariy 23.8 billion cigarettes with but probably not as many as before:, a value of $110 million. Tobacco July 17, 19641 - Page 14 a// 9 ef 0 L/- U.S. Cigarette Consumption Shows Almost Steady Gain RALEIGH, N. C.-Smokers in the United States' in 11903 consumed nearly 524 billion cigarettes'-ahree per centt more than in 1962 and more' than, inn any previous year,, accord!ing' to the United States Department of Agri'etih ture, as reported by the Flue-Curedi Tobacco Stabilization Corporatiion.. Cigarette consumption has' gained' steadily for many years except for' thee moderate dip in 1953 and 1li when the possible relationship of cigarettes and health began receiving attentionc The Wall Street Journal July 15,, 1964 consumption in 1963 d'eclined 2!i per cent from the 1982 peak. ff rom 1950, to 1952 there had been a parti lhrly sharp rise, probably abet'ted' by ICorean war tensions. In 1954' consump- tion, continued downward to' 7!: per ment below the 1952 high. But the upward ttrend resumed after 1954, with, cigarette cortsumptfon Inareasing about 3'Ys' per cent annually. Cigarette consumption per capita ( li8 years and over) at 4',345, cigarettes (about 217 packs of 20)', rose two per cent in 1963 above the level of' 11~f32 and 1961, when it was virtiunlly un- changedi-IlkD: 'a,bc~~~-~~ '.~'Fr.x Receipts Rose in aNlraaarity Of Stat,es LastM©nth FramYeaar Earlier 11; i A9u a WAt.L STRRRT.io11RNAr. FCaff Reporder CI-'IICAGO-Cigaret sales are recovering sharply from the January heaith, scare, ac- cnrding to a preliminary, incomplete report,on state tax collections in, Jime.. For the first time since issuance of the I Surgeon General's repnrtl in: January, monthly salhs of cigaret tax stamps increased in, June in a majority of states, the National Tobacco Tax Association repnrtcdl Sales incrcases f'rnnr a, year earlier were reportedl in, 29 of' the 41 states for which re. pnrts were a.vaila-ble, up from two states In \iay and eight In April. An official cautioned that statistics are thrown out of' line somewhat by cigaret tax increases in aaioutl a third of Ihe clgaret tax states fionr May through July 1963. Thls had R:ccentuated year-to-year declines in a num- ber of states dtiring May 1964 and'was a factor 1'ini increases of several states In June 19641 In these states, retailers stocked' cigarets abnor- mally high in, 1GTa,y 1Dd;l in, advance of tax 1n- crcascs taking effect in June:last year. This resulted in an abnormR.l, drop in stamp sales in June, 1963. The association eatd: that;, all told, tax rate changes were apparentNy a factor In increases for 12 states last montha including, Mississippi, where a 25.7% gain from, a year earlier was partly att'rtbutable to advance etamp buying, ahead' of' a July 1',, 1964 tax Increase. On the other hand, there, were several in- stances among,the dozen states reporting June. declines where sizable drops were attributable i to year-earlier tax rate legislatlnn. For ex-,i Rmple, in Connecticut, where eollections were 'down almost, a thitd im June, the year-earlier tax, revenue reflected a sizable advance sale ofl stamps preparatory to a July 1, 1963, increase. The association ofticial' also said' it might he several months before it could be verified that the, spurt in the number of stQtes' report- ing, increases over a year' ago was a definit'el trend. He recalled that aigns of' recovery, shown in March weren't borne out in April V and, May. Among popnlous states reporting, increases in June were New York,, 1q.7qd; Pennsylvania,. 6.9%,< Ohio, 818!qn; Texas, 7.7%;' New Jersey,! 24.5 ;'6', andl Illinois, b67r/,o.
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Predict Annual Ci9ar Sales Of' 15 Billion in Ten Years lm, Speech B'e#ore Recent Southern Conventilon, Carll J. Carlls~on,, iP'residlent~~ of the CMA, Em~phasi'mes~ Irmpact' of IP'HS' Reportl on, thie Tobacco Industry AMliAN71A. GA., Friday-By 1'97d4 cigar sales in the United States shouldl totall some,1I5 billion units, about double •tod'ay's figures;, Carl J. Carlson, presi- dent of the Cigar Manufa<•tu:rers A'sso., ciation, said ini an address before the recent convention, here of' the Southern Wholesale Tobacco & Candy Associa- tion. In, his speech,, Mr. Carlson, who is president of Garcia y Vega, Inc., notedl Rhe impact of the Surgeon General's report' on the entire t'obacco industry and pointed out' how the situation can he exploited by the distributors. Following is the text of Mr. Carlson's address at the convention: Cigars have been the subject of a great deal of' publicity in recent months, and' all' indications are that 1964 willl be, a banner year for the indus^t'ry. It is reasonable to assume that as cigar sales increase the various state taxing, authorities may well look vponi cigars; as, they have in the past, as a possible source of'revenue or additional revenue. When thi'soccursI wantl you, tioknowthat we at CMA are prepared to supply you, with, materiall which will be help- ful' to you in the presentation of valid and logical arguments in opposition to state cigar taxes. I have already indicated that cigars have been the subject of a great deall of publicity in recent months andl I might paraphrase by saying, tha,t, "SSomething funny happened to our in- dustry on its way through January." I don't think there is a soul in this: room who is unaware of the document known, as the Surgeon General's Re- -port. I would be less than honest if I did not frankly admit that the report was and is responsi:ble for the breath- less rocketing, of cigar sales. The latest sales figures that we have available are those for April, and Ii am happay to tell you that the withdrawals of cigars for the month of' April' 1D64 were 2L3.68 per cent above Arpril of 1963. For the first four months of this year cigar sales were 31.5' per cent ahead of -the same periodl in 1963. ,This percentage incre•ase resolved, into units means that we have sold or removed for sale 2;878,837;090' cigars in the first four months of 1964, which is G88;765;Q0O more cigars than were re- moved' in the first four months of 1961 MayTop1192p Accordintt to availhble statistics; the , cigar industry reached its highest peak,' in 1920, when consumers supposedly purchased 8:5 billion cigars. The, move- ment of cigars thus far this year, pro- jectied through the end of' the year, spells out a consumption of' close ta fl' billion cigars for the year 1964. Myy own estimate is that the year 1064 will, wind' up with a gain i of' somewhere be: tween 16 per cent and 18 per centy which would mean total withdrawalb of somewhere between 8,3' and 8.6 bil- lion. Despite khe f'act' that I', never 1et optimism run away with me and II am basically a oonservative Individual, I still shara (Cigar Institute of tll,meriea Fresident), Gene Raymond's view that itl is not unrealistic to look toward the year 1974', 10 years hence, as one in which, we willl see a consumption of' 15 billion cigars, annually-double today's figures: Never in the history of the cigar in- dustry have,so many non cigar smokers been sampled, and at their own exe pense, as has •been the case in the first qparter of this year. We estimate thatt literally millions of people purchaaed, and sm.okedlcigars for the first time in, their lives. Included: in this group are a vast number of' women„ thus the ent'iree economic picture for the cigar industry has been dynamically broadened.. I do not believe that the Surgeon. General's Report would have had' the iirrpact on cigar sales that it has were it not for the fact that the cigar indus- try had long: before cleaned up 'its house;, developed new appealing prod'& ucts such as the slender cigarillo types, the fashionably trim panetelas andl ct- gars with most attraotive plastic tips. Moreover the cigar industry made a night and day change in the over-a11l packaging and merchandising, aspect of' the business. For the past 10' years the industry has engaged in a,program of'total re- search which embraces the agronomy level which has produced' for us milder,, tastier cigars . . . at the production lev- el it has enabled the industry to deliv- er to -the consumer what is stilli one of the few great' bargains of today ... atl the marketing level it has directly aff'ected' you. Supporting, all of' this is a rna,(es•ticc barrage of advertising. Whereas only 10 years ago the industry's over-all adbertising dollar totalled approximate-. ly $8 million; ini 1964 ccigar advertisers will, put $36 million behind their brands. Every conceivable media has been sum* monedi to ~the front', lines. Our major ci- gar companies are high up on the list of' natlional'televisioni users: Their space in newspapers and magazines is most Impressive and!, of course, radio has• U'. S . Tobacco Journal July y 16, 196- Peges' 13' &a 15 come in for Its full' share of' thi's bo- nanza. I do not think that anybody will; question the fact that to a large degree public opinion has been rettabllitated, The cigar, the cigar smoker, and the cigar Industry have a d'eairabl'e and exciting image in the public eye. This change in' attitude and image vqilC be_ sustained in part because the mation's opinion makers in f'unneling, their mil, lions of words and' pictures have a4aanp, doned the old cliehes and have adopted a constructive attitude. This can only mean, succeeding generations will be- come cigar, conscious more than everr and accordingly will respond to the itttnulus generate& by all, ass' these thi'ngs that I have jwst' polnted out.. Since i I hold all' that I have spoken ta be krue there must be a meaningg economically for each of us. You anust keep informed and must shift tnost q,uickly away from any otbol'ete thihik - . ing and adopt all new information to the conduct of your, busines&! In this: case itl is cigars. Your salesmen and' your admilniatrative people as well should be constantly apprised of the great forces that are,working for them... There is no longer room, for doubt or hesitation, there i's only room for ac- tion, more action and more action. I't is up to you to generate and' Ihn- part to the people in your organisation, the ret;ailers weMom you, supply, and the consumers in,your, marketing area with whom you have cont'act', an enthusiasm for cigars which are today more of a favorable conversation piece than they have been in the memory span of' most of us. You can be an, eff'ectl*e force ln Inspiring the retailer to ntercharidlae more effectively through Inviting dib- plays andl modern stores fixiuures.. You can stress to all concerned' the need for proper humidificatiba so that this •periahable product will always reach the smoker in goodl condition. You can yourselves be well informed' so that the interested! cigar amoker,„ either new or old, can, look to you as an authority, when he wants to knorov.. something about cigars, as many d'o. To obtain the maximum advantagewof'f the potential that is being made avail~ able to you, you will have to be a partt of' the •new era that is before us.
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d~Tobaccca JuTy i7~, 1964 ~ - Pa'ge~~ ]•1~. Zach Toams~ Suecum,bs; Liggett & Myers Head RICHMOND, VA. - Zacli Toms,, Chnirman of the Boardiand Chief lEx- ecutive Officer of' Liggett & M'yers Tobacco Company, died suddenly Inst week here. He was ©3 years old. Mr. Toms;, who also resided in New' York City, was born, in , Durham,N. : C., and educated in the Durham public schools„ the Webb School at Belt Buckle, Tenn., and graduatedl with a B'.A. Degree from the University of Virginia liii 1921. He served as an officer (~ In the United States Army during. ~ World War 1. Following graduation Q from college, Ihe continued his studtes' ~ at' the WI'oarton School' of'' Finance at i the University of Pennsylvania. ~ Mr. Toms began his career w1th, ~ Liggett and Myers in 1922 In the eom+ ~p~rnys Richmond factory where he l'atier: became factory superintendent and ~ assistant factory manager. It was during this period (1928-1936) that his father, Clinton W. Toms, served as the second president of the Company. In 1943, Mlr. Toms was transferred to the New York headquarters as' assist- ant, to the vice president' in charge of' the manufacturing and Leaf' d'epart- menrts: He was elected a director in 1945; secretary of the Company, ttwo years later, a, vice president in 1951, executive vice president In 1959; and president in 1901. Since that date he served as chair- man of the executive committee, andl in Apri1, 1983+ he became chief executive of8cer. Under hia leadership, Liggett andi Myers' progress was marked by conti'nudng, improvement; and growth. Active in numerous industry, civic andI charitable organiisations, Mr. Toms was recently honoredl with the brother- hood award from the Nationall Confer- ence of Christians and' Jews at a spe- ciall testimoniall dinnerinNew: York, City: He was cited for "meritorious achievement, and disting~iishedl service in the field of human relhtions."' He was currently serving as a mem- ber of the Tobacco Dnstitute's executive committee and! board, of directors: He was chairman of the National Sponsors Committee to build a six million dollar National Center for the Deaf in Queens, New York. One of the most compre- hensible institutions of its kind, it will' include a new Lexington School for the Deaf, a research institute, a profes• sional preparation institute affilbatedd with Columbia University's' Teachers College, a hearing andi speech center and a guidance and adjustment center. Zaeh Tbms Mlr. Toms was a sponsor trustee o!' the Cradunte School of Business Ad- ministration at the University of Vir-, ginia, and' previously a thustee of the Madison Avenue Presbyterian, Church In New York. He was a member of the University Club and the Union, Club In New York, and the Commonwealth Club and' The Country Club of Virginia irr Richmond.. M'r. Toms Is survived by his' wife, Frances Coleman Toms;, a daughter, Mrs. Herbert E. Fitageraldy Jr., of Richmondl; and three sons, Zach Toms„ Jr., of Richmond; Peter Coleman, Toms, a Lieut. (J. G.) in, the United' StatesNavy; and Newby Toms, an urider• graduate at Princeton University; and, a sistier, Mrs. E. Ml Cameron of Durham, N. C. Tobacco July 17, 1964 - Page 1 Milton tiarrington Named Liqgett & Myers Chdef The boardl of directors of Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company Thursday in. New York electedl President Milton E. ~ Hanrington chief executive ofBcery suc- ceed'ing the lhte Zach Torns,, chai'rman ~~ of the board. Ralph P. ' Moore„ treasurer, was ~ electedl a director to fill the vacancyy caused' by Mr. Toms' deatfti, With Lig- ~ gett & Myers since 1939„ Mr. Moore 0-, was named assistant treasurer in 1956 '~ and treasurer last yenr. ~ Mr. Harr•ingt'on was elected' presi- Q dent on April 1 and executive vice president in March, 1963. He joined the fi'rm Arr 1934 andl became vice presi- dent, leaf, in 14)%_He has been a dt- rector since 1955. Tobacco! July ~41,1 1964 -Parge91 Liggett & Myers Repor#b Ecrrninga alnd, Sales Up Milton E. Ililarringtona president of Liggett andl Myers 'fobaceo Company, reported Tuesday in New York, for the second' quarter of' 1904, net sales of' ~ $128,027,000, and net earnings of 51.70, penshareof' common stock, both, wr~ ~ from 1963 second quarterr, sales and `~ earnings of' $128;720',000 anall ~l-D6 per share. 0For the first six months ofl 1994, sales ~ totaled 4238,748,0001 and earnings amounted' to, $2.83 per share as cotn- ~`pared witha240,109'„000and earnings \ of $2'.77 per, share for the first siit `` months of 19831 ~ Mr. Harrington stntedi "fhe sale of' Lark cigarettes eontinues to, gain, I-he also stated that Devon, the new ciga- rette with the Keith Filter,, was meet- Ing, with excellent consumer reception in teat market areas." N N . S . Tobacco Journal J ly 23',, 1964 - es 1 & 2'S d?tUftr' Issued By Lorill crrd ~ llAanufactu!rer Reports Totals for Six Months And'' S'econd' Quaslrter Consolidated net salea of'PL Lorillard Co. in the six montha ending June 30 totaled y22'1,342,299I and I yieldedl net IIn- come of' ;9;2i11i;79(i; the • company re- ported l Monday. Earnings availa'ble per share of common stock, amounted' to E1.341 for the six-month, •periodl I'n the first half o1' 1963 ll:orillard'r net sales tot'aledl $251,386,250 and net Income was y12,1'27„438, ivith earni'ngs available per common share amounting to $1.79. In the three months ending June 30 1.orJllard had' net sales of =120,763,771, andl net income of PA68,636. Earnings available per common share were put' at iYT cents on 8,676,848 ahares of comr mon stock outstanding, ipA Net sales in the second quarter otl (Z last year totaled I;11d0,8a5,2i12, and! net o6A income was $6~79@;?,2g, with, ;1.0t fni (Z earnings available per common share. ~ Lorilihrd reported that ika federal',. ~' state andd foreign income taxes in the. (") second quarter of 1964 totaled $7,ti®7;- 300; in comparison rovi'th a total, of $7,883,300 for the corresponding perio4• of llastl year.
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A Tobacco J`'u3y 7, 1964 - Page 11 Zaeh T4 ms Suec'umbs; Liggett & Myers Head RICHMOND, uA., - Zach Toms,. Chairman of the Board andl Chief E'x+ ecutive Officer of Lig ett & Myers Tobacco Company, die~ suddenly last week here. Iie was (i3 years old. Mr. Toms, who also resided in New York City, was born in Durham„ N., C., and' educated in, the D'urham, public schools, the Webb, School at 13elt' Rlrcklle, Tenn., andl graduatedi with a H A'. Degree from the University of' Virginia in 1921. He served as an otf'icer: t~ -in the United States Army during World War L Following graduation ~ from colleee. Re continuedi his studies `j at th Wh t S h l' f Fin t e y o ar on c oo ance a ~y the University of Pennsylvania. ~ Mr. Toms bcgan his career with ~ Liggett and' Myers in 1922 in, the com- ,~ p~ny s Richmond factory where he later became, factory superintendent and ~ assistant factory manager. It was during this period (192&-1938), that his father, Clinton W. Toms, served as the second' president of the Company. lln 1'943', Mr., Toms was transferred' to the New York headquarters as assist- ant to the vice president in charge of the manufacturing and Leaf depart- ments. H'e was elected a director In 1945; secretary of the Company two years later, a vice president in 1951,, executive vice president in 1959;, and president', in 1901. . Since that date he servedi as chair- man of the executive committee, andl in Apri1, 1983, he became chief executive oil'tcer: Under his leadership, Liggett andi Myers' progress was marked by continuing, improvement and growth. Active in numerous industiry, civic andl charitable organizations, IWIr. Toms was recently y honoredi with the brother~ hoodl award from the National Conferr, ence of Christians and' Jews at a spe. cial testimonial dinner in New York City., He was cited' for "meritorious achievement and distin guislied service in the field of human relations:" He was currently serving as a mem~ her of the Tobacco Institute s executive committee and board of directors. He was chairman of" the National' Sponsors. Committee to, build , a six million dollar National Center for the Deaf' in Queens, New York. Cyne of the most compre- hensible institutions of its kindl it will include a new Lexington Schooll for the Deaf, a, research institute, a profes- sional preparation institute affiliated with, Columbia University's Teachers. College, a hearing, andl speech center and a guidance and adfustment~ center. Tiacb i Toms Mr. Toms iwas a sponsor trustee of' the Graduate Schooll of Business Ad- ministratioro at the University of' Vir- ~inia, and previously a trustee of the fh[iadison Avenue Presbyterian Church i'n New York; He was a member of' the University Club, and the Union Club in New York, and the Commonwealth Club and The Country Club, of'Virginia i'niR'ichmondl Mr. Toms is survived' by his wife, Frances Coleman Toms; a d'aughter, Mrs. Herbert E, Fitzgerald, Jr., of' Richmond; and three sons, Zach Toms, Jr., of Richmond; Peter Col'eman Toms, a Lieut. (J. C. ) in i the i United States hlevy; and Newby Toms, an urider• graduate at Pri'nceton University; and, a sister, Mrs. E. Ml Cameron of Durham, N. CL Tobacco Ju. y 17, 1961t• - PaEe 1 MlTton Hurrington Named Liggett & Myers Chiet' The board of directors of' Liggett', and Myers Tobsiceo Compan y Thursday in New York, elected President Milton E.~ ~ Harrington chief' executive officer, sue- ceeding the late Zach Toms, chain-nani ~ of the board. Ralph Pl 'Moore„ treastrer, was, G electedl a director to fill' the vacancy caused by Mr. Toms' death. Wiith Lig- ~ gett & Myers since 1939; Mr. dbioore (~ was named assistant treasurer, in 1958 . `,-and treasurer last year, ~ Mr. Harring4on was elected presi- s~dent' on April 1 andl executive vice president in March, 11903'. He )oined' the firmi in 1934' and I became vice presi= dent, leaf, in 1'9G01_He has been a di- rector sinee 19;~.3'. . Tobacco July 24, ]:964 - Page 9 Liggett &AilNers Reports Earninga' and Sales Up Milltoni E. Harrington, president of Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company, reported Tuesday i'n, New York, for the second ~parter of 1'9i34, net sales of ~ a128,0L7,0 00'and net earnings of $1.70' per sliare of common, stock,, both up C~ from 1963 secondl quarter sales and ~. earning$ of $1286,72~,00 0,000 and $1.55 per share, 0 For'the $rst siz months of U984„sales ~ totaled 111238,748,p00 end earningt ~~ amountedl to $2:83 per share as eotn- pared with $24'0;109;000i and' earnings\ of $2~:7T per share for the first six ~` months of' 1963!. Q Irt'r. Hnrrington stated. "fhe sale of Lark cigsrettes continues to gain. He also stated' that Devon4 the new ciga~ rette with the 1Ceith, Filter, was meet-, Ing with excellent consumer reception in test market areas." UI. S. Tobacco Journal .~uly 231,, .96. - Pages 1 & 25 Data 1ssued' By ~~ Lorill Qrd~ ~~ Manufacturer Reports Totals for Six IhAionthis And'~ S'econd' Quarter Consolidated net sales of'p'. l.orillard Co. in the six months ending June 30 totaled $221,342,299 andl yiklded' net tn- come of' $91;2f1t/,78Mi,, the • company re- partedl Monday. Ehrninga available per, share of common stock amounted to $1.34 for the six-month period. In the first half of 1963 Lorillard's net sales totaled' $2b1',38b,250, andl net income was $12,1'27,4I38, with earnings available per common share amounting to $1.79. In the three months ending June 30 Lorillard had net sales of' $120,753;771 and net', income of' $8;fib8,s366 Earnings available per common share were put O at iY7icents on 8,576,848' sharea of com- ky man stock outstand'ing:, M,.a, Net sales in, the second quarter of (D • lastl year t:otaled 41itj0,8'ftb,011, and net! Zh)ncome was K788,228, with $1.01 in ~i earninga available per common share. Lorillardl reported that iita fed'erali ~ state and foreign incanM1e taxes In the second quarter of' 11984 totaled $7,0®7,- 300, in, comparison with a totall of $7,8883,300 for the corresponding periwd l' of Ihst year.
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.~ Tobacco July 17, 1964 - Page ih Zach Toms Succumbs; Liggett & Myers Head RICHMOND, VA. - Zach Toms, Chnirman of' the Board and Chief Ex- ecrrtive Dfficer of' Llggett & Myers Tobacco Company, died siuldenly lnst week here. He was 63 years old.. Mr. Toms;, who also resided' in New York City, was born in Durham, N. C.,, and educated in the Durham public schools;, the Webb School at Belt Buckle, Tenn., and graduated' with a. B.A. Degree From the University of Virginia in 1921. 'He served as an oll"icei 1~~_in the Uhited States Army during; ~ World W'ar, 1. Following graduation ~ from college, lie continued his studies ~y at the Wharton Schooli of Financeat~ the University of PennsylvaniaL ~ Mr. Toms bcgpni his career with ~ Liggett and' Myers in 1922 ini the com, ,~ ~anys Richmond factory where he later lbeeame factory superintendent andl ~ assistant factory manager. It was diming this period' (1928-1939), that his'father„ Clinton W. Toms, served as the second' president of'the Company. In 1943, Mr. Toms was transferred to the New York headquarters as assist- ant to the vice president in charge of the m:7nufacturingand'Ii.eaf depart- ments. He was elected a, director in, 1945, secretary of the Company two years later„ a vice president in 1951, executive vice president in 1959, and president in 1901. Since that date he served, as chair- man of the executive committee, and in April~ 1963, he became chief executive olficer. Under his leadership, Lig' gett and Myers' progress was markedi by continuing improvement and growtlu Acti ve in numerous industry, ci:vio and charitable organizations, Mh. Toms was recently honored with the brother= hood award' fromi the National Confer- ence of Christians and Jews at a spe- cial testimonial dinner in, New York City. He was citedl for "meritorious achievement and distinguished service in the field of human relations;" He was currently serving as a mem~- her of the Tobacco Institute's executive committee and board of directors. He was chairman of' the National Sponsors Committee to, build a six million, dollar National' Center for the Deaf' in Queens, New York. One of' the most compre- lnensibl'e institutions of its kind; it' will include a new Lexington Schooll for the Deaf, a research institarte, a profes- sional preparation institut'e' affiliated with Columbia University's Teachers College, a hearing, and speech center and a guidance and adjustment center. Zaak lloms Mr. Toms was & sponsor trustee of the Cradunte School' of Business Ad- mini'stration, at the University of' Vir- a, and'~ previously a trustee of the Mdison Avenue Presbyterian Churchin~ New York. He was a member of'the Uni+versity! CI'ub andl the Union Club in NewYork,, and' theCommon.veal'thClub and The Country Club of' Virginia In Richmond.. Mr. Toms is survived' by his wife,. Frances Coleman, Toms; a daughtery Mrs. Herbert E. Fitzgerald, Jr., of R'ichmond; and three sons, 2ach, Toms, Jr., of R'~ichmondi Peter Coleman Toms, a Lieut. (]. G.) in the United States Nav'y~i and Newby Toms;, an under• graduate at' Princeton i University; and• a sister, Mrs. E. M. Cameron of Durham,, N. C. Tobacco July 17, 196k- Page 11 Milton Harrimgt'onhidrned Li'qgett &' Myers Chief '. The boanl,of' directors,of Liggett and Myers Tobnccro, Company Thursday in New York el'ectFrl Piresitlent Milton E:. ~ Hlarrington i chief executive officer, sue- ceeding the late Zach Toms, chainman, r~ of the board. Ralph P'. 'Moore„ treasurer, was l ~ elected' a director to fill' the vacancy, caused by Mr. 'Iroms' death. With Lig- ~ gett & Myers since 1939, Mr. 5+tooree tT was named assistant treasurer in 1958 \ andl trensnrer last year. '~ Mr. Harrington was elected presi= Q dent on April 1 and executive vice president in Mlarch4 1963, He joined the firm in 1934 and became vice presb-dent, leaf, in 1960.-He has been a di'-, rector since 1955. Tobacco! .7tul.y 2r, 1964 - Page 9 Ltggett & Myers Reports Earnings and Sales Up Milton E. Harringiron, president of' Liggett and' Myers '1'oliacco Company, reportedl Tuesday in New York, for the second quarter of 1984; net sales of '4~ 1111128',Q27',000 and'net earningsof' $1.70 r share of common stock, both up ~ m 1903: second' qrcrarter, sales and! ~ earnings of a1128,720;000 anrl $1.55 per share. ~' For the flrst six months ofl 1964, saler ~ totaled $238,7484000 andearninp amounted to $2:83' per share as eont- pared with A2~f0;109',000 and earning~ \ af $2,77 ' per share for the first aix. `` months of 1963. ~ Mr. Hanrington statedk 'The sale of Lark cigarettes continues to gain. He alao stated that Devon, the new eige- rette with the Keith Fllter,, was meet- ing, with~ excellent consumer reception in test market areaa."' U'. 3. Tobacco Jourrsal J y 23, 1964 - Pages 1~ 25 Data I ssued By L01`iftr!'QI'd~ . Manufacturer Reports Totals for Siz Months And Second Quarter Consolidated net sales of P. Lorillard! Co:, in, the six, months endimg June 30 totaled $221,342,299 and yielded net in, come of $9,2Q0,79fi', the • campany re- ported M'onday. Earnin.gs, availible per share of common stock amountedl to a1'.34 for the six-month •period.. In the first half of 1961 Lorillard'r net saies totaled ;261',386,260 and net Income was ;12;I27,438', ivith, earningss available per eommon share amounting to $4.79. In the three months ending June anl Lorillardl had net sales of $120,753,771 and net' income of' $6Ab6,636.. Earnings available per common share were put Q at 071 cents on 8,67fi,84'S' sharea of com- ~ man stock outstandistg:. ~ Net sales in the second quarter of, C4last year totaled ;180,GWa1'2, and net' oba income was K799,228;, with $1.01 in 0 t!arnings available per common share. ~' Lorillard l reported' that ita federal, ~ state andl foreign income taxes in the (~ second quarter of 1964 totaled is7,007;- 300, in comparibonwith a total of'. Z7;883,300! for the corresponding period • of' last year.
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•STobacco Ju3y 17, 1964 - Page 11 Zaeh Toms Succumbs; ~ Liggett & Myers Head RICHMOND, VA. - Zach, 'Poms;. Chairman of' the Board and Chief Ex- ecutive Officer of' Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, died suddenlly lastt weck here. He was 63 years ol'd.. Mr. Toms, who also residedl in New York City, was born in Durham, N. C.,, and educated in the Durham public achools;, the Welib School at Belt Buckle, Tenn., and graduated with a B'.A. Degree from, the University of Virginia in 1921. He served as an oillcer 1~_in, the Umited St~atesArmy during; \ World War, 1: Following, graduation ~ fromi college, lie contirnned his studies at the Wharton School of Finance at. ~ the University of Pennsylvania. ~ M'n Toms began his career wtth. ~ Liggett and Myers in 1922 in, the corn- ~ ~any's Richmond factory where lie later 1~ecame factory superintendent and ~ assistant factory manager. It was during this period (1926-1'93'8) that his fathery. Clinton W. Toms, served as the second president of the Company. In 1943; Mr. Toms was transferred to the New York headquarters as assist- ant to the vice president In charge of the manufacturing and Leaf depart« ments. He was elected a director in 194'5', secretary of the Company two years later, a vice president in 1951, executive vice president in 1959, and president in19i31.Since that date he served, as chair- man of the executive aommittee,, and' in April, 19834 he became chief executive officer. Under his leadership, Li gett and' Myers' progress was marked by continuing, improvement and' growth. Active in numerous industry, civio andl charitablb organizations, Mr.. Toms was recentlyhonored' with the brother- hoodl award from the National Confer- ence of' Christians and! Jews at a spe+ cial testimonial dinner in New York City. He was cited for "meritorious achievement and distin uishedl service in the fieldlof human relations." He was currently serving, as a, mem- her of the Tobacco Institute's executive committee and board of directors. He was chairman of' theNational, Sponsors Committee to buildi a six million dollar. N'ationaliCenter for the Deaf'in Queens, New York. One of' the most' compre- hensible institutions of its kind, it will include a new Lexington School for the D'eaf' a research institute, a profes- sional preparati'on institute affiliated with Columbia University 's Teachers College;, a hearing, and speech center and a guidance and adjustment center. Zaah loms M'r. Toms was a, sponsor trustee of the Cradtinte Schooll of Business Ad. ministration at the U'ni'versity, of Vir- ginia, and' previbusly a trustee of the M'adison Avenue Presbyterian Church in New York. He was a member of the University Club and the Union Club In New York; and the Commonwealth Club and The Country Club of' Virginia in Richmond. Mr. Toms is survived by his wife, Frances Coleman Toms; a daughter;, Mrs. Herbert E. Fitagerald; Jr., of RichmondE and three sons, Zach Toms,. Jr., ofl Richmond; Peter Coleman Toms, a Lieut. (]. c.)' In the United states. Navy1 and Newby Toms, an under- graduate at Princeton University; and,' a sister, Mrs. E. MI. Cameron of Durham,. N~ C.. Tobacco July 17, 1964 - PiaEe 1 Milt= Ft'arri'nqton Named Liqqiett~ & Myrers Chief The board of directors of Liiggmtt andl Myers Tobacco Company Thursday in New York elected' President Milton E. ~ Harrington chief' executive officer, suc+ ceeding the late Zach Toms, chairman ~ of the board. ~ eleFctedhl aPlirectorrto filll the~vaca cy ~' caused by Mr. Toms' death. Withi Lig- 1, gettl~ & Myerssincei 1!939', Mr.Moore. E~ was named assistant treasurer i'n, 1958'. '~. and treasurer Ihst year: ~ Mr. Harrington was elected presil- a d'ent on Aprill 1 and executive vicee president in Mhrchi 1981H'e )oinedl the firm in 1934 and became vice presi'r d'ent, leaf, in 1'960._He has been a dl'r rector, since 1955. Tobacco, July 24,, 1964 - Page 9 Ligqett b Myers Reports Earnings , and Sales Up Milton E. Rilarrinon;, president of Liggett andl Myers Tobacco Company;, reported', Tuesday In New York,, for the second' quarter of 19t34, net sales of ~ $i18,027',000 and net earnings of' $1.70 per share of common stock, both u I~N fro[~ m 11983 second' qrttarter, sales and' ~ earnings of $1128,720;0001 and $1.55 \ per share. ~ For the lirst six months ofl 1904, sales ~ totaled $238,748,000 and' earnings ~~ amounted to $2:83 per share as eotn- pared with $240;109y000 and earningt $2.77' per share for the first six. ` months of' 19t33. 13, Mr. Harrington stated: "Me sale of Lark cigarettes continues ta gain. He also stated that Devon, the new ei'ga- rette with, the Keith Filtee,, was meet- ing, with excellent consumer reception In test market' areaa." U « 3 . Tobacco Journal J ly 23, . - es 1 & 25 Data I ssued By Lorill ard' ~ Manufacturer Reports Totals for Six Month:. And Second Quarter Consolidat.ed' net sales of P. Lorill'ard Co. in the six months ending June 30 totaled' $221,342;299 and yielded net in- eome of $9,211f1;7Bfi„ the • company re- ported Mond'ay: Earnings avaiiiabi'e per share of' common stock amounted to $1.34 for the six-month period. In the first half of 1983 Lorill'ard'r net sales totaled $2514385;250 an4 net income was $12,127,438, , with earnings available per common share amounting to $1.79. In the three months ending, June 30 t:orillardl had net sales of' $120;753y771 and net income of: $8A58,535:. Earnings available per opmmon, share were put O, at (YJ cents on 8;6?6,848 shares of'com- ~A mon stock outstanding, k.i Net sales in the second' quarter of (Z -last ypar totaled 4i0U,8'6fi,212, and net * 'b income was %798,228', with $L01 in Q', eaarnirngs available per common share. ~' Lorillard reportedl that its federal, ~ state and foreign income taxes i'n, thr, secondl quarter of 1964 totaled $7,007,+ 300„ in comparison with, a total of' $7,88,4,300 f'or the corresponding period ' of last year.
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Tobacco. "July-10, 1964- Pages 9 & 11 ~ ' ' obacco Study in Depth Reveals I~npact on E~conomy ARLIN(:TON; VA. - C'onsumer gpending, of over $7.7 billion for to- bacco prodiictsproviclhs$2.9billlon in personal and' business incomes, em- ployment for more than one million penple,, and almost $4: billion in fed- eral and state taxes, according to an independent economic study revealed recently. The exhaustive analysis ofl the eco- nomic impact of the tobacco industry was conducted by C-E-I-R, Inc., Wash- ington, I). C;, economic research and compruer sciences company. The study is one,of'the first of its kind of' a major American industry. Containing, more than 10',000 figures that show the impact of the tobacco industry on the national economy as well as each of the 50 states, the study was developedl with the aidi of power- ful', computers and the use of' advanced scientific techniques that heretofore have been used primarily on govern- ment-sponsored projects., The study, accompanied by a state- ment by Dr. Arthur E. Burns, a noted economist and a, C-E-1-R consultant, was filed with the House Committeee on Ihterstate and Foreign Commerce, whichI currently is conducting hearings on the indlrstry: Lester Tepper, C-E'-II-R's chief econ- omist who directed the study, said his company was engaged by the P. Loril- ]hrd Co. to conduct an "objective, in- dependent examination toset, forth~ the basic economic facts of the indus- tryThe study, which examines all' phases oftheindustryf'rom, the~farmtoi the consumer as well as its inter- rel'ationships with other industries;, was basedl on 1982 data, the last year for tvhich eomplete information was avail- able. In his statement to Congress,, Dr. Burns, who is a, professor of economics at George Washington University,, said. "the tobacco Industry . . has an im pact on the economy far beyondl itss own bounds. It affects not only its owni empl'oyees, immediate suppliers andl customers„ but also many other parts of the economy by its demands which radiate out ini every direction." Virtually every significant component of the national economy is connected with the tobacco industry in one way or another. The C-E-I-R study traces these relati.anships by a complete in- ter-indiistry analysis which aggregates and' measures tfie tobacco industry's direct and indirect reqpirements from, ' each of' 190 other sectors of! the econ- omy. Excluding the personal consumption, ,of the inrl'ustry's employees, the in- dustry generates, for example, $65 millioni in sales for auto industry prod', ucts, $59 million for petroleum prod~ ucts; $49 million for electric power;. $171 million, for chemical's,, cellophane and filter materials; $260 million for F aper and paperboardl;, $1'31 million, or raill and! truck, transport'ation, andl $68 millioni for products of'' iron"andl steell mills and foundries. The number of'jobs created in direct and indirect supplier i'ndlustries is estimated at, 1'85,000. This does not in- chide employment within the tobacco industry itself nor government em~1oy- ment generated by the industry s$4 billion tax bill. The ] 17-page C.E'-I-R report pro- duced these, other, 1982highlightsa The industry provides work, for 1'.3 million people, or approximately 2.1 per cent ofl totall private employment.. Americans spend $8.8 billion anr nually for cigarettes, and $7'.7 billion for all tobacco products. Of every dollar spent on tobacco products„ 43 cents (or $3.3 billion)) is collected, for excise and sales taxes,, 38 cents (2.9 billion ) goes for wages,, salaries„ farm and business, income; and 1!9 cents ($1.5' billion) is used' b~, the industty to make direct pur- ses, from other parts of the econ- omv:, When income and other taxes col- lected from~ the industry are added to excise and sales taxes paid by the consnmer,, over one half' ($4 billion) of the money spent on tobacca ends up as governmentall revenue. In proportionAo its sal'es volume, the ind;nstry contributes four times the na- tional average in exeise and sales taxes. State tobacco excises exceed five per cent of'the total,state tax revenues in over 30 states. I'ndustryemployeesand farmers spend $1.6 billion on personal con- sumption (e.g., housing, food; clothing, recreation)'. Consumer spending on tobacco products is nearly half the total spentfor new cars and more than the totall spent for either personal, care; auto repair and parking; private education and publications; furniture; telephone and, telegraph; shoes and footwear; drugs and sundries; or for radio and TV sets, records and musical instru- ments. The nation has 4'18;p000 farms in 286 states that provide work for 883,000 persons in producing a tobacco crop with a cash value of $1.3' billion. To- bacco acc,ounts for 3.8 per cent of' all! farm cash receipts. Some 70,000 peoplle- engagedl in tm• bacco manufacturing in 29' states earn wages and', salaries of' $324 million, Another 45,000 engaged' in leaf hanr dling and proeessingearn$215 million. There are 908i5001 wholesale and re- taill outlets fhr tobacco products, not inelud'ing, casual, retail outlets. An esti- mated' 3116;000 people,, whose incomes total $790 millloni derive employment from the distribution of'' tobacco prod- ucts: In his statement to the congressional committee, Dr.. Burns pointed out that • industry production, both, farming and manufacturing; is "highly concentratedl in, a half dozen states which dependl heavily on tobacco as a source of i'ne come and, employment." North and South Carolina, Ken- tucky, Virginia, Georgia and Tennes- see account f'or, over 90, per cent of'i the farms, acreage, cash receipts and farm employment. Some 30'.4 per cenY of' all farm cash receipts in the six states is derived from tobacco. "Those states," said Dr. burns,, "would' undoubtedly feel a, major imr pact from any significant shift in the consumption of tobacco products." 6-A Tobacco ~ JuLy 15, 1964 Y3ilton Vice President OfI Filtrann Internatloncd Q C The appointment of Ernest Hillton{ sales manager, as vice president of Filtrona International Corporation was announced at the com~any's New York headquarters last weelk. h'iltrona International is a member: of the Filtrona Group, whichi includes United States Filter Corporation and Cigarette Components, Ltdl, of Lott- don4 world suppliers of cigarette filters.
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Tobacco "'Ju1,y '10, 1964 - Pages 9 & 11 ,. I Tobacco Study in Depth Reveals Impact on Economy ARIl.IN(;TO'N, VA, - Consumerr spending: of over $7.7 billion for to- bacco products provides $2.9 billion in personal and business incomes,, em- ployment for more than one millionn people, and almost $4 billion' in fed- eral and state taxes, according to an independent ec.cmomic study revealedl recently. The exhaustive analysis of' the eco- nomic impact of the tobacco indtrstry was conducted by C-E-L-R, Inc., Wash- ington, I2: C., economic research and! eomputer sciences company. The study is one of'tlie first of its kind'of a major American industry. Containing more than 10,000 figures that show the impact of the tobacco industry on the national economy as well as each of the 50 ,states„ the stud{y was developed with the aid of power- ful,computers and the use of'advanced' scientific techniques that' heretofore have been used primarily' on, govern- ment-sponsored projects. The study, accompanied by a state- ment by Dr. Arthur E. Birrns„ a noted' economist and a C-E-I-R consultant, was filed with the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, which currently iscondlrcting hearingss on the industry. Lester Tepper, C-E-I-R's' chief econ- omist who directed the study, said his company was engagedl by the P Loril' lard Co. to, condUct an "objective, in- dependPnt' examination to set forthh the basic economic facts of'the indus- try.. The studly, which examines, alll phases of' the industry from the farm, to the consumer as well as its inter- relationships with other industries, was based on 1962' data, the last year for which complete information was availL able. In his statement to Congress, Dr. Burns, who is a' professor of economics saidl e Washin g ton Universit , y g Geor a t , "the tobacco industry ..., has an im- pact on the economy far beyond its own bounds. It affects not only its own employees, immediate suppliers and customers, but also many other' parts of the economy by its demands which radiate out in every direction." Virtually every significant componentt of, the national economy is connected with the tobacco ind'ustry in one way or another. The C-E-I-R study' traces these relationships by a complete in, ter-industry analysis which aggregates and measures the tobacco industry's direct and indirect reqpirements from, each of 190 other sectors of the econ- omy. , Excl'udiing ttie personal consumption ~f the irodristry"s employees, the inr dustry generates, for example, $65 million in sales for auto indiist'ry, prodl rtcts, $59 million for petroleum prod - uctc; $49 million for electric power; $173 million for chemicals,, cellophane and filter materials; $260' million forr paperand'paperboard; $113'1 millionn for rail and truck transportation; and $68 million for products of fron ' and. steel, mills and foundries. The number of jpbs created In direct' and indirect suppl'ier' industries' is estimated at 185',000; This' does not in- chide employment within the tobacco industry itselfl nor government employ- ment generated by the inchistry s$4 billion tax billl. The 117-page C-E:hR report pro, diiced, these other' 1962 highligHts:, The industry provides work for 1.3 million people, or approximately 2.1 per cent of total private employment. Americans spend $6'.8' billion an- nually for cigarettes,, and $7.7 billionn for all tobacco products. Of every dollar spent', on tobacco products, 43' cents (or $3!3 billion)) is collectcd! for excise and' sal'es taxes, 38 cents (2.9 billion), goes for wages, salaries, farm and' business income;; and! 19: cents ($11.5'billion)isused by the industry to make direct pur- chases from, other parts of the econ, omy. When income and other taxes col; lectedl from the industry are added too excise and sales taxes paid by the consumer, over one half'($4 billion) of' the money spent on tobacco ends up as governmental' revenue. In proportion to its sales vol4rme, the industry contributes four times' the na. tional average in excise and' sales taxes. State tobacco excises exceed' five per cent of the total state tax revenues in states that provide work for 883;0000 persons in producing a tobacco, crop with a cash value of $1.3' bill'ion. To- bacco accounts for 3.6 per cent of all farm cash receipts. Some 70,000 people-- engaged I in, to- bacco, manufacttrring, in 29' states earn wages and salaries of, $324 million. Another 45,000 engaged'in leaf Han+ dlin and processing earn $215 million.. T~ere are 908,500 wholesale and re: taill outlets for tobacco products, not including casual' retail outl'eta: An esti- mated 3'16,000 people, whose incomes total $790, million, derive employment' from the distribution of tobacco prod- ucts. In his' statement to the congressionali committee, Dr. Bunmspointed out' that industry production, both farming and' manufacturing, is "highly concentrated in a half dozen states which depend heavily on tobacco as a source of in- eome and employment." North andi South Carolina, Ken- tucky, Virginia, Georgia andl Tennes- see account for aver 90 per, cent of the farms, acreage; cash, receipts and'd farm i employment. Some 30.4 per cent, ~of' all farm cash receipts in the sixx states is derived' from tobacco. "Those states," said Dr. Biurns, "would undoubtedly feel a major lm- pact from any significant shift in the consumpt3on, of' tobacco products." over 30, states. I'ndustry' employees and farmers spend $1.6 billion on personali con- [I~ N Tbbac'co, sumption (e.g., housing, food, clothing, Ju1y 10, 1964 ~ recreation). Consumer, spending on tobacco ~iilton 1llice President Of~ Ftltrona International The appointment of Ernest Hilton, sales manager, as vice president of Filtrona International Corporation was announced at the company''s New York headquarters last week. Filtrona International is a member of the Filtrona Group, which, incl{rdes United States Filter Corporation and' Cigarette Components, Ltdl, of Lort- don4 world suppliers of cigarette filters. CA, Q. products' is nearly half the totall spent; for new cars and more than the total', spent for, either personal care;, auto repair and', parking; private ediicationn and publications; furniture; telephone and telegraph; shoes and footwear; drugs and sundries; or for radio and TV sets, records and' musical' instru- ments. The nation has 416;0001 farms in 266 ~
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oTbes, `,June .~5, 1964 - Pages 17-18 '"YES, BUT WILL IT LAS To?'- T'hc'eigar busi!ness is booming, but some cigar makers are stil'l fearful of the fa, ture. They see possible trouble ahead. "Suee sUsIrrESS is good-but' that's! only because people are scared. The questionl is: Willi' they stay scared?" A cigar maker was!talking. Biis sales were up; his profits were up; he wass looking forward! to his best year since. 1920~, which, incidentally, was the,beste year in the history of the cigar industry: He couldn't help feelingg elated. And yet, at, the same ttm!e,, he cou!Idn't help worrying: His elation, was easy to understand. Until the Surgeon General's reportt linking cigarette smoking to lung can- cer came out tast January, the cigar fndustry was a dying one. And no matter how much they spent oni adl- vertising,, the cigar makers couldn't aeemi todiamucho toreviveit.. Those Womeni' The trouble was that' since 1920',, when cigar sales hit a highi of 8;5 billion, cigar smoking, had, become increasingNy unfashionablle World War I' veterans preferred, thee more handy-to-ca.rry cigarette. Andl the American, wom!an, frustrated cigam- maker adivertising by persuading,hus- bands and boy friends to give up cii- gars in favor of cigarettes on th!e grounds that cigars, were "smellly."' Whether or not the American wom- an really was to blame, the fact re- mains that after 1920 the number of' regular cigar smokers went into, a st'eady decline. By 1955, there were only 2'.8 millioni left. And' they liter- ally were a dying breed';, 75'% of them were over 45. True, there were about 7.8 million Americans who smokedl cigars occay sionallly but they didn't help the in.- dustry much. For, although the regur ller cigar smokers constituted only 27% of all cigar smokers, they consume 86% of' the industry's outputl Then the industry began to adver- tise heavily but couldn't offset past losses: Although the male populla.- tion of' the U.S, aged 21 and over rose fa^om, 311.6 million in 1920 to 53:6 million in, 1963; the consumption of cigars actually felf by 13, billioni to 7~2 billh' on. Theconsumptione per capita by males 21 'and over t'umbled from 269 to 134. The Big Five. As sal'es of' cigars de- clinedl, one cigar maker after another eventually decided to, merge. The in- dustry became concentrated in fewer and fewer hands. By 1963,, just' five companies were responsible for 73q'd' of manufacturers' sales of' $437 mil- lion: Consolidated Cigar, $132 million!;, Generall Cigar, $69, million; Bayuk Cigar, $53 million; Ameriean, Tobac- co's cigar division, about $50 miulon,; and' DWG Cigar, $19 million. . mf' these, only Consolidated Cigar could have been called a growth com- pany. The others all had! a hiqtorr of' erratic sales and earnings. The year 1963 was the fitrst year of 1m- provement over 19601 inn the cigar in, dustry. The sales of' 7:2 billion were up 221,000' from, the year before;, bu!tl this increase had been achieved only by intensive advertising; Then the Surgeon General's report appeared;' and says Eugene Raymond, president of' the Cigar Inetitute, "Something funny happenedl , . . fn, spite of our advertising, some 10 mil- lion new cigar smokers got started."' I Happy Days, While cigarette - sales i dropped sharply, sales of cigars rose by 40% Ini the first quarter of' 1M. They are certain to approach, If' not quite reach, 1920's 8.51 billion. The cigar makers are enJoying .ne of the. most unexpected booms in the history of American ind'usttry (see ta,ble,, p. 1'8). "We're getting', a double shi!ft," says Samuel Jl. Silberman, cha~irman o( Consolidatedl Cigar., Veople,who used~ to smoke, both cigars andl cigarettes are now smoking, more cigars Also, we've got some new cigar smokers, i'nclu!ding thousands of women:"' Typicall of the new cigar smoker: Sperry Rand' executive, Charlles H. Nicholson Jr., a cigarette smoker since he was 17. Last May he switched to cigars. Why? "Sia•nple,"' says he. "I . didh.'t want to die of'cancer."' What are some cigar makers wor- ried' about? Why can't' they just rellax and l en j,oy the boom7. For one thing, they're af'raid! thatt further research may indleate that cigars are a hazard to health, too. The Surgeon General's report advo- cated smoking cigars In, moderation for those who couldn't give up smok- ing altogether, bu't a cigar maker'sayr. "Look, I don't ttrust d'oct!ars: 8ooner' or later they always find reasons why " what youu like is! bad for youw"' Doleful History. More import'ant, experience wou!ld! appear to indii- cate that, sooner or later, the lmpact't of the Surgeon General's report may wear off. In 1953, IDrc Ernest L. Wynl- der itnducedl skin cancer in mice by pailnting, them with tars from, ciga- rette smoke. There was a, audden,, sharp drop in i cigarette sales, a minor rise in cigar, sal!es: It was only a, flurry. Soon, cigarette aales werei back to normal and cigar sales were, below where they had been. Simillarly, in 1962, the British Royai College of' Physicians' report on, ciga- rettes and! lung cancer sent cigarette sales plummeting andIcigar salles soar- ing, but not for long, Today, sales of' cigarettes in Britain, despite official propaganda against them ever since, again are reaching toward new kfghs! -and cigar sales are dowm.
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At I C LJIGHTING UP Thanks to the' Surgeon Genera'!ts report, the once-stale cigar indlust~,r isenjoy;ing a boom. "'Thisindustry isshocked,"' says Consolid'atedl Cilgar Chairman Samuel J. Silberman. "Nobody can honestly say we expected any thing like this. Still, after all these years, it's about titme!" 1sr~ttnpw sMne le~Fn rlril" srNter' % p(pM~'elin1M' % It'NR NI{M/I eirarCnepauy req 1914 tesrues 19 sL tN4 tftHppi tlN. Ba lt Ci 0 2 ' yu gar s : 8 x0:33 25S11'.8 :14!2 20~ 27' Consolidated Clgar 0:19 , 0.36 89. DNYG Cigar 0.20' 0.28 40I General Cigar 0.27 0',52' 93. 'Exclodes producte purch.sed ter resele. The cigar makers are divided on ho!w to prevent this from happen- i'ng again. 11JIost' are using, the soft sel'~It emphasizing how' pleasant' and' enjoyable cigar smoking, can really' be, plsying down the health angle. This is the strategy being followed by Consolidated Cigar, and so far it has worked. Consol'idlat'ed's soft- sell TV' advertising has boosted sales of' its Dut'ch, Masters, El~ Producto and Muriel. Says Silberman: "We'll just keep doing what's mad'e us a success." Lfinerican, Tobacco's cigar d'lvision, has no alternative except to mute the health angle, since 95% of' the com.- pany's revenues' come f'rom, cigarett'e& Although, the division's sales are up'p more than, 4'0%'a so far 1Yn 1964, Yice R. J. ReyrnoLds''s' Sales Off; Earnings Hit New Iftly WINSTON-SALEM, N: C. - R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wednes- day reported record earnings for the second quarter' andl first six months of this year but sales declined for both Periods compared with a year ago. Although cigarette unit' sales for the quarter were below the comparable pe- riod' last year, they contimied' to show improvement over the first three months oE this year, according to A, H. Gallo- way, president. Net' earnings for the three months ended June 30',, as reported by IvGn Galloway, were $32,207;000, or 78 cents a share on 40,971,533 shares of common stock. This compares with $32,12'5;000; or 77 cents a share, earned in the corresponding period a year ago. Net sales totaled $412,830,000, com- pared with 5430',867,000, in, the secondl quarter last yezr.. For the first six months of' 1964, net eamiings amounted to $59'.9111,000, or $1.45 per share, comparedl with $59,- 631',000; or $1.44 per share,,a year ago. 1rJKt' sales for the half year were $767,84'2',000 against $810;871„00t1. tpS i 23s/. 29l tl' 35:0 19 63 % 38 4.4 ' 4.9 1i1 303yQ 27'tys 13.8' 211.7"' 58 72% 40, l President Alfred F. Bowden says: "Our big baby Is cigarettes, so we're not making, any' cigar pitch on the cigarette acare." Edgar M. Cullman'of GeneralI Cigar, however, says: "I' think the other compani'es' are wrong, and we should push the health, angle, but I'im, not running the other companies." He believes the experience of'1953 and the Hritish experience will' not be repeated I if the Industry "plays up the security of smoking,cigars."' He adds: "lrhe Surgeon General's report' sai'd that you should smoke cigars in mod- eration If you can't give up' smoking. We will ~ continue to remind the public of what the report says." Cullman's ads puah, the health theme hard: "You don't have to hohale to Tobacco ,7u172 , 1'964 - Page 91 ' enjoy a eigar."' "There.'s peaee of'inind ln evey puff:" His Tiparlilos are`sell- i'ng so fast they must be ratloned, and General's gainsare leading, the ind'us- tryr with first-quarter sales of' prod- uet's manufecturedl by the companr' up, S8%'o. Ironi'cally, Cullman's brother, Joseph Cullrnan III, ls now head' of Philip Morris. Thus a slightly ri'dicu- lous situation exists, where one brother Is telling stockholders that cigarettes have lost a share ot their market only temporarily, while an« other brother is predicting that~ciigars are about to make huge IhroaaJii i'ntoo the tobacco I'ndustry. `: . Wives and 6hlldren. Cigar njlkkers admi't that some of' the new cigar pnokers have already given upy gone back to, cigarettes. Ssys'Consolidatedls. 8illberman, "Some of' them tried to . smoke cigars like cigarettes and be- c,ame pretty sick fetilbws. New and different products are needed to cap• ture the average ci'garette smoker. Take the decrease in ci'garettes, com, pare it with, the increase ih cigars and'' you'll see we haven't done very weli yet. I think we have a1 great future."' Adds' General's Cullenan, "In' the* f'u- ture, parents' will realize their• chil- dren will, smoke and willl advise tlhem, to start with cigamAnd now women who used to call cigars vilb are onn our side. If a woman really loves her husband or boy friend, she'lll be after him to, smoke cigars."' Qnly' time will tell' if''the cigar mak- ers' bright hopes will go up i'n smoke, as they have In the past: ts
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m entby a cigar." "There's peace of mind iii every puff"' His Tiparilllas are sell- ing, so fast they must be rationed, and General's gains are leading the indus- try with first-quarter sales of' prod- ucts manufacturedlby the company up 58%. Iron3cally, Cul'lrnan's brother, Joseph, Cullman III, is now head of Philip 1Miorrisi Thus a slightly ridicu- laus situation exJSts, where one brother Is telling stockholders that cilgarettes have lost al share oll theilr market only temporarily, while an- other brother is predieting that cigars are about to make huge inroadir into the tobacco industry. : • 1Mhres and Cthitd'ran. Cigar niikers admit that sornw of the new ci'garr smokers have already given up, gone back to cigarettes: Says Consolidated's 3ilberman+ "Some of' them tried to smoke ci'g*rs like cigarettes and be- came prettyk sick fellows. New and different products are needed to cap- ture the average cigarette smoker. Take the decrease tn cigarettes, com- pare it with, the increase In cigars and you'll 1 see we haven't done very well yet I.think we have a great future." Adds General's Culiman„ "In the fu- tt7re, parents will realize their, chil- dren will smoke and will advise themm to, start with cigars. And' now women who used' to calll cigars vile are on our side. If' s woman really loves iher husbandl or boy friend'i she'll be after hitn, to smoke cigars." Only time willl talli If the cigar mak- ers" bright hopes will go up in smoke, as they have in, the past:  LI'G'IHTING' UP Thanks to the Surgeon~ Ceneral"s report, the once+stale cigar industry Is enjoyiing, a boom. "This industry is shocked,""' says Consolidated Cigar Chairman Samuell J. S'ilberman. "Nobody cani honestly say we expected any- thing like this. Still, after all these years, it's about tilmell" lar~4IAf~ P~rr sNara ,/ril GeMrlrr CIllarC.mPrnr 1913 19441 ®ayuk Cigar $0.28 $0:35'. Consolidated srte~ ~r r7~~lfl ~:S" x t+.a ftM. 1111114 rMf 27 23% lanrnr, 1l01ifN lemgp 25% $11.8: $14.2 20% Cigar 0.19 0!36 89' UWl& Cigar 0:20 0!28 40 General Clgsr, 0:27' 0.52 93' 'rrcludes products purchrsed for resele: The, cigar makers are dtivixied'i on, how to prevent this from, happen- ing, again. Most are using the softt sell: emphasi'zing, how plleasant and enjoyable cigar, smoking can reaCly be, playing, down the healthh angle. This is the strategy being, followed by Consolidated Cigar, and' so far it' has worked. Consolidated's soft- selli TV advertising. has boosted! sales of its Dutch Masters, El Ptoducto andl Muriell Says Silberman: "We'll just keep doing what's i made us a success." American Tobacco's cigar dilrision hasino alternative except to mute the heallth angle, since 95'% of' the com- pany's revenues come from cigarettes. Although the division's sales are upp more than 40% so far in 1964, Viice. Reynolds~'sS!a,les' Off; Earnings Hit New Kig]h WINSTON-SALEM, N1 C. - R, J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Wednes- day reported' record earnings for the second quarter and first six months of' this year but sales declined for both periods compared with a year ago. Althou& ci~garetteunit sales for the quarter were below the rnmparable pe- riod' last year, they continued to show improvement over the first three months of this year, according to A. H. Cal'lb- way,, president. Net earnings for the three months ended June 30, as reportedi by 111r. CaIloway; were $32,207,000, or 78 cents a share orc, 40,971,533 shares of' common stiock., This compares with $32',125;000, or, 77 cents a share;,earned in the corresponding periodl a year ago. Net sal'es totaledl $412.830,000, com- pared with $430;667,000' in the second quarter last year. For the first six months of' 1964, net eaniing; amounted to $59,911,000, or $1.45 per share, compared' with $59;- 631,000, or $1.44 per share, a year agm Net sales for the half' year were $767,84'2',000 against' $810,871,000. 29.5 35,0 19 83rA 36 4.41 ' 4.9 11 3Q1 27t/a 1i3.8 21.7' 58 72 % ' 40 J Presildent Alfred 11'. Bowden says: "Our bfg, baby ir cigarettes, so we're not making any cigar pitch, on, the cigarette scare."' Edgar M. Culltnan of General Cigar,, however, says: "I1 think the other companies are wrong and we should push, the health angle, but I'm not running the other companies." He believes the experlence of 1953 and' the B'ritlish, experience will not be repeated if'the industry "pliays up the security of smoking cigars." He adds: "The Surgeon, General's report said that you should I smoke cigars in mod- eration if'you can't give up smoking, We will continue to remind I the public of what the report says." Cullman's ads push the health theme hard: "You don t have to inhale to T'obacco, July 2 „ 1961t - Pege 9
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,U'. S. '.Fobacco~ Journal August 6, 1964 - pages 1 & 2'4-2'5 ~~vU?!~,~ 0 in) 111']:ICG'C; O !_a r, ry f°1 -'3 7J (1, G' C, -)~ci~ ' ' t r '' ' l i ~~ U ll L f~ '! y,:Li ! YO:an, .1 ., L~ o.d s,soo' 1 ~- x•090 G Y m GC.JYET170, „1u... .r ..,... 1 r, $001 T.ral,..d1 cscncrc: );169..111ire clpu.<1ei 1961 ~.~X000: ~7 c+~4 • 0.000 '1.s00 /Ailliemsa1'L..rOs C{pmo Sblipp.Jtar c...cur.peswin/h.U.S: 1.600 soo )7/ r'.s00 p•o00 11500 soo 4e >. 0 •~ \ C, 0~ E' ~ O. W..r.~ 'hf 0- Mr w. tf~ 0- I. n., W, 04. ic l.. Or'~ 0....EC, r 13,. 0- 154, r.. 304 ~. O- 701. 11...... C'~I..n..nJ ~Nl.ra.l P.I,.~...r Cl,.r Cigar Sales Data Cited by CMA 7s' Pt(apose ~°/ollc3~y~~' 7 Present Tax Stru!cihure Called Regressive and' Inequitable by Weiner WIASIiI'I+iGTOI4', D. C., Friday-A spokesman for the' cigar industry saidd today that the:present "archaic brack- et sy,stemi of taxing cigars ... results in tax rates which are regressive; in- equitable, arbitrary and illogical."' Testifying before the House Ways a:nd Means Committee, Dr. Clarence M. Weiner,, econamist for the Cigar Manu-facturers Association of Ameriea;, at- tacked the current tax structure a•nd proposed' as a substitute a manuflc- ture:rs' excise tax levied atl a ratc of not more than 8 per cent of the' manu- facturers'' net selling' price. "Such a tax would' eliminate alll of' the serious inequities an& regressive characteristics of' the present systemm of' cigar taxation," Dr. Weiner'asserted. "It would' also be easier to administer. It would be fair to consumers as well, as manufacturers, because it would be a tax directly proportional to the sell- ing price of cizars;" he added. Also, testifying for the cigar manu- facturers was, Leon Singer, a member of the New York City law firm of Blumbcrl;, Singer, Ross' & Gordon, counsel to the CMA. Following arc excerpts of Dr. Wein- er's statement to the committee: Of'the, many articles subject to Fed- eral excise taxes, eigars' are the only comnodity .vhose' tax is levied by means of a, bracket systlem:. All' other articles are taxed, either at a specific rate (so much per pound, per gallon, or other unit), or as a percentage off the sclling, price, either retail or whole- sale: Cigars, however, are taxed on the, hnsis of' sevlen ascending brackets. Though, the tax, is paid by the manu- facturer, the tax, rate on each of the seven brackets is based on the "ordlin- ary retail price" of a sing);e cigar in its "principal market." This method creates certain administrative prob- 1'ems which, the Internal Revenue Serv, ice has not been able' to solve. ., . . Of eveni great consequence, however„ the 1'Iracket, method of taxing cigars re- sults in a whole series of' rate-structitre defects wliichiare built into' the system. In calendar year 1963, tthe nearly 7.2' billion cil:ars removedl for consum'ption in, the United States resulted in tax collections of' $52.0 million. In thc' late 19401s and in' the 1'950's„ when 5.5 billian to almost 7'.0 billion cigars were removed llor year, cigar tax, collections ranged from $42 million to $50: million, per year. Thc.,e: are not large' sums in com- parison to the 13.6 billions of dollars of cxcise' taxes eollect'ed, on other com- mnd•Ities. However, as a, percentage of the net valuc of all eigars soldl by m.-inufacturers (g'',3F34 million in' 1963; excluding excise taxes) the cigar in- dustry's tax hill of $52' million repre- senls an average't'ax rate of'13,6 per 749; cent. This is more than nne-thirdl higher than the 10 per:cent rate applicable to most manufa:cturers" excise taxes,, and' nenrly three times the 5 per cent rate on manufacturers' sales of electric ap- plianres, gas and oil appliances, andd other commodit'ies.. This 13.6 per cent average cigar tax rate, moreover, is hased on the "tem- pol ary" tax increase that became ef- fective' November 1, 1942. The wart'ime, brackets and rates„ which we are' still paying, more' thani quadrupled the' pre- war cigar tax collections. S~~yst'~em, Is~ R~eQpessivr Another major objection to the pres- ent cigar' tax is that it is highly re-, gressive: The highest rates are l'evied' on the mediurnrpriced andi lower-priced'd cigars, andi the lowest rates are levied on the highestl-priced cigars. The Gwo lart;est.selling ciRar, classes are the lower-priced Class C cigars, re- tailing at from 5' cents to' 6s cenCs each, with, removals in 1963: ' totalling nearlX 2,855 million cigars, and the medium, priced Class E' cigars (retailing at over'. 8' cents to 16 cents each), totalling 2,574 million. The 6-cent and 6-cent eigars of Class, C comprised nearly 40 .per cent of the approximately 7.2' bil- lion cigars removed last year, and the Class E cigars accounted for nearly 36 per cent of' the total.. Together, classes C and E' aeeounted' for better thani 75 per cent of all cigars removed for consumption. The higher-.pricedi ci~ gars of classes F and G',(over 1'•6'cenis each) accounted'for only 6lper cent. Almost half of' the cigar industry's $52:0' million of excise taxes was paid by the med'ium«priced Class E cigars, $25,7' million., Nearly 22' per cent of the total revenue was paid, •by the 6-cent and' 6-cent cigars of, Class C. If we' define "low-priced cigars"' as all, those retailing at S cents or less (revenue classes A, B, C,, and D com- bined), and, higher-priced cigars as those selling for more, than 16' cents each (classes F and G)6thenilow-priced O cigars paid 36.5; per cent of' the total cigar tax; medium-priced, cigars paid 14.0 per cent of'the total' cigar tax. Superficially these figures do not ap- CZ pear to indicate that the cigar tax is s;lb regressive: the higher-priced cigars 0 paid 141 per cent of the totall tax al~- U1i . though, they were only 6 per cent of'the f.%) cigars removed, while' the low-priced cigars paid 36.5 per cen',t' of the tax although they comprised 68:1 per cent of all cigar removals.
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' Tlulnt cipprrmo rarer, lo., cellectlorn;.pnerenn roren mo qlrclnt ol'talet„byrenenwi clb1,, amd e.rbnorld', r..enu...d(e<n af e:m.onulec:turerd .lc;u ta,.~ol 8% of eibpnwls. 6e.ed oo celendoryeor1963 ro.uble dpr,r,remeva6r Cl.u and pre,.nt ia,+ebl. dgo',r Ertin.eled I tpoll .aln c irdinp -L 1a. ra+e+ reTe~oh. te! c:olllctiom (tnel. ta.et __tu! i'~ Po:. ~ ~ talei !.<L to__lnl. a (l): N) (5) (6) (7): (e) ,r M : clpmr. . , Q0p . A . $2.50. 2N,8A0,000. t 67 SS5E .t393 f: 331 11.1% I 11.18% 1 3.00 375.806,000 0 1',127 14,922. 10,32',I N,393' 7L6 IIlO Csao 2.651,817,000 il,pl9 15r;147 109,1i9, 97,700' 7.11 n.7 a. 7.d0 912:7'16..000 6:369 69.353 49,3" . 43'.a1a 9:2 14. 9 ' E, 10:00 2;573,812!,000 25i73p X93I,323 202',212 176,4173 9.61 14.6 15.00 249,197,000 : M38 431,310 7N,l53 I 26r1'1!I a6: 14.3,' G20:00 178 pB1' 000. 3' 562 61 9p5 34 472 3019111 - I 6.N - 11. y.'. _~ rdT'Al, 7:I69,266,0100'.. II SS7;033 $62T.,6!q t433',969. 3383i4U 5.3% : 1& 6% ~"•w•. Er.,26 sH7.37 t60:er $l3:55 EI.3%: qJ6% plrM'cigon . _ . Ta! Tei! Of rCtMa .:o/: EUect'ofoin 8% ,.mn.ro.crurerN e.oill. tu! Tbo conrcN~. p.r M'cipgrs. llai . ne/'b M Acrwl ro,~ coll.cronr, 1963 ' 1'52;005.000: 17,76, 0.13%: 13. 6% ' Ea:...rlnw.o/ 8% of benufactwwr' w1l1 , 32:295,000: 6_Sd A~(%~. a0DL~. 1u.rldunion'on1967»I..S7N,N0:000.(37:N%). ta,76: In, point of' fact„ however, this mis- lreading impression is created, because every revenue class','bracket encom- passes a range: of retail cigar prices,, and the brackets hide the:t'ax-rate in- equities within, each bracket. To un- eover, these inequities and the' truly regressive and' arbitrary effects of' the tax-bracket system, it is necessary to examine the tax rate on each cigar' withiln' the brackets, and the entire ra:nge, of cigar tax rates from the low- est to the highest. The: brackets result in tax rates thatt are arbitrary: The rates on all cigars priced at up to 20 cents each jump up and down, like the lines on a seismo- graphic recording of an earthquake. Among the highest, rates are', those on the 2i1/-cent and 3-cent cigars (1G.& per c':ent)',, anril 17, per cent on the 10. cent cig;lr. Amonfi' the lower rates are the 1'0.4' pcr cent rate on the' 6-cent cigar, and 11.2' per cent on, the' 15-cent cigar- with alll sorts of erratic variations in between these rates of' clas'ses: A through F. Cigar'tax rates are',regressive. The very highest-priced cigars, those of: revenue Class G,,pay'taxes c:onsider- abTy lower than average. The tax rate on all Class C cigars is $2'0' per thous- and. On the 26-cent cigar this amounts to 13.5' per cent of the manufacturers' price. The tax rate drops sharply, andd steadily, as the retail, price goes up. The rate is 8 per cent on the 40-cent eigar;,6.6 per centl on the 50-cent'cigar,. 3.2' per cent on' the $11.00 cigar„ and even lower rates om cigars priced' at over $1.00 each. ytat'ee Are Inequitablle Although the cigar industry''s $,"o2 ' million of' excise taxes amounts to an average of' 13.6 per cent of manufac-' turers" net sales, there are'substantiali variations in the tax' rates paid'' by' some brackets as compared to others. It is apparent that the tax rates be- tween the brackets are inequitable. The, lowest tax rates are those of revenuei Cl':as&B, (12.0 per centl),, Class C('11.:7', per cent)i and G(11.6 per cent). The highest rate is that of the lowest-priced revenue Class A, for cigars retaili'ng'at up to 2!Sb cents each (101for, 25 cents),, with, an average tax rate of 18.8' per cent for, the clasa' as a whole. It also is apparent that cigar tax rates' within each firacket: are' regres+ eiive. F'or'example, in revenue Class E,, with an average tax rate of' 114.6 per cent for the elase' as a whole, the 10- cent cigar pays, a tax of 17' per' cent of' the manufacturers' net price, the 2/25 cent cigar' pays a 13: per cent tax, and, the 16-cent'cigar pays 11 per cent. This regression' is' typical o'f' every bracketl, and! the wider the' range of each bracket, the greater'the regres, sive nature of the',tax. This mu'st' neces- sarily be sol no matter what kindl of bracket system is devised, since the tax rate in dollars per thousandl cigars i''s the same for all cigars In the' retstill price range' of the bracket. There Ih' no logical relationship be- tween the selling prices of' cigars and the tax rates borne by those cigars. The tax rat'e'on the'6'-cent cigar, $4 per' thousand; represents a rate of''12'.8 per' cent'' of the manufacturers' net price. The 10-cent cigar' pays a mueh, higher rate„ 17'.0 per cent-but what l'agic' is there to a lower tax of 11.2 per'eent' on, the 1 Q'.centci!gar, whi'chila even i lower than the rate an the 6'-cent cigar? W'hy, should the 30-cent andd the 1&-centeigar'pay exactly the same percentage rates ('11.2' per cent of the manufacturers' net price) while the 4'0-cent cigar pays a low 8.1 per cent' and' the 20-eent cigar pays the higher 12.7'per cent rate? The heart' of'the matteris'that there is no' logical relationship between the selling prices of' cigars and the tax ratr.' lr.vir'd un t,hem, irxf•rl/t thfTt the rates'cu,c m•f;r.c.siwe, and t!hereforie they are reput;n:Tnt to the priiocijples' of eqvit:rblc taxation. The inequities d'etailed above stetnn from the f'act' that the cigar tax is' bns'ed' on, a, bracket sy'.stlem: There is no lonf;er any reason, however, why C1tngress ~hould require, the cigar i:n- dustry to be taxedlhy means of brackr cts: \Vhcn' the use of'' stamps was re- quired as' evidence of tax payment - as was the case', until July 1956 ' - brackets were also necessary' for pur. poscs of tax administration:. Stamps are no Ihngcr required-in fact, their use is now expreswly' foriii;dden: Why, then, should the cigar industry be sad- dled with an archaic system of t'ax' brmckcts; when the reasons'f'ar their use have', long, since passed?' We therefore urge this Committee to recommend that'dn place of''t'he:pres- ent system, of cigar taxes based on brackets, that all' large cigars be taxed at 8 per cent' of the manuf'acturers" net selling prices. Such a tax: would have the following advantages: 11-The tax will: be pr:oportilonal„ therefore not regressive. 2-The tax will be uniform, there-', fore fair to ai'l concernedl 3-The tax, will not be' based on brackets, therefore it wi'Il, be less difficult to administer. Re EormWitheu t' Reduct'ion T Granted that a' uniform tax based animanufacturers' selling prices is'pre-„ f'erabie to a bracket:system, the ques- d tion might be asked'why the:rate should be',reducedito 8' per cent„i'nstead of' sinlply substituting the present average rate of' 13.6' per' cent In other words, why not accomplish tax reform with- out tax reduction? I am sure that moat members of'this Committee are familiar with the factt that'' in the field' of taxation ilt: is almost: invariably the case that a' tax reform measure must be aecompaniedl by aa tax, reduction' iif' new inequities are ta' be avoide& The ci;gar, indust'ry' i's noo exception to this rule. I think I' ami correctl i!n' my' beliefl that it is nat the intention of this Com, mittee to; increase some, cigar excise tnx ruta.r iYl uu•dtn• to t't(uaIizn the rates now in existence. Similarly, it is' probadily not the iln- tention of thiR Committee to give tax' reductions toi some cigar manufactur- ers,, and to deny them to: others, in order to' equalize all', rates. IIf't'here is' to be', tnx ref'orm, it ia' the position of' our Association that it is essential that any reductions incidental to such re- form be granted to all cigar, mnnu- fact'urers; and that they not be deniedd to any. Any rate higher than' 8 per cent: Q of the manu'f'act'urers" net se1'limg, price' 10A would result in very little tax reductiott, ilA for cigar manufacturers whose majlor W ' 'brands'sell& for G cents each. Moreover, to avoid any' increase ih cigar taxes, ~ we also recommend that there be pro- ~ vision for maintenance of the present maximum of $20 per thousand cigars. This maxi'mum' would af!'sct' only cigars retailing, at more than 4'0, cents each, whose sales are negligible, and these would, receive neither a tax inerease nor a tax decrease.
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GEN-3.9 47-911 rQ A D. Shelley RR~~oa~ Pauline ~ B'a~Lta REP. -64-719' ~~ No~. HGS . REp. NO.. oAns Aug. 12, 11964 Siibject: Recent Patents of Interest in the CiRarette Tow FieIld Philip li'orris' new tobacco product contains from 0.5' to 5% of' al - poly:isoprenoid!alchoS, e.g., solanesol, farnesol'or geranylgeraniol. These alcholis uponipyrolysis increase the flavor and arome of'the smoke„ giving it flowery, lemon-like and!sandalwood-like characteristics.. In addition they mask undesirable odors whichlare created upon pyrolysis of the tobacco. (U.S. 3,139,888): Brown'~& Billiamson incorporates a menthyl keto ester in the tobacco to provide a distinctive:taste, flavor and aroma while eliminating, harshness. 4U.6. 3,1i3'6,3'19) A disposable plastic holder by Aquafilter Corp., is said'to provide effective filtering actionifor 20'or more cigarettes.. The holder is designed i'n such a way that the filter body is recessedifrom the cigarette end of the holder andd ailiquid trap is providedi adjacent to the other end of the filter material. The filter material may bee the same as that described in U.S. 2'„911,983, also tolAquafiLter, whichh claims a mixture of moisture absorbent and non-absorbent fibers wet with a Iiquid'which aid in the treatment of the smoke. (U.S. 3',,L37',303). American Machine & Foundry: Co. has patented alcontinuo us process to obtain greater uniformity of the cigarette rod by controlling the size of the tobacco shreds whichiare fed to the rod forming mechAnism., 4U'.S. 3,138y163)! The Imperial Tobacco Company cliaims a method' of' applying finely divided dry treatment material to moistened tobaccolduring,pirocessing., The treatment material is primarily scrapl,,wastelorblending,tobac~co, buty may also be such things as flavoring material. (U.S. 3,136,321) A rotary conveyor drum for aligning, and wrapping mouthpiece or filter attachments to cigarette rods is descri'bed', in a recent U.S. patent to Hauni-Werke Korber & Co, of Germany. (U.S. 3,537,302) Molins Machine has been:issued twoadd'itional~ p~atentsionlapparatusfor manufacturing,fi'lter cigarettes:. C?ne covers the conveyor system, for feeding,the mouthpiece components:to a continuous wrapper andd the other covers the aligning, abutting and conveying mechanisms during the wrapping, operation. (U.S. 3„143,202' and' 3,136,320) 3!? - ~~ ~ ?El ~ Pauline Baltz
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NEW DOMESTIC CIGARETTE BRANDS
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NEW DOMESTIC CIGARETTE BRANDS No new cigarette brands have come to our attention in the domestic market in: recent weeks. However,, subsidiaries of'two domestic cigarette companies have begun marketing charcoal filter brands. C. A. Tabacalera Nacional (',Catana),, Venezuelan subsidiaryof'PhilipMorris,is~now producing,a charcoal filter cigarette called Astor and patterned after the Philip.Morris Multifilt!sr.. This brand has had wide consumer acceptance. (An article concerning this new cigarette can be found in the "Foreign Cigarette Production and Consumption" sec- tion ofthisiissue.)i Brown & Wi;lliamson"s Uenezuelansubsi'diary C. A. Cigarrera: Bigott is alsolmaking,a charcoal filter cigarette called Windsor. Philip Morris "will use large print ads in 152'newspapers covering,95 markets as part of'a move to supplement the already extensive Multifilter cigarette network televisioniand magazine advertising schedule, it was announced last week by Ross R. Millhiser, vice president and director of marketing,." The print campaign will emphasize the use of the coconut-shell charcoal,used inn the Multifilter. A new cigarette holder called Ban-Tar,. produced'by the Exitar Corporation of Fairfax, Missouri, has been introduced in the Kansas City area., The main feature of'the holder is the disposable tar~trap, which can be used for up to two packs of cigarettes. The price is $2'.50 for a pack consisting of a holder with a,tar tip trap and four additional tar traps. A box of'eight tar traps can be purchased for 59, cents. Sales results are described as very encouraging,. The article entitled "How Lark Took Flight," published in the March, 1964,, issue of World Tobacco, i&summarized by the magazine~in these words: "S ientiists" technical papers were the springboard for a campaign that may have made a new United States filter brand proof against the health critics. An actionlreport largely drawn fromia study by our correspondent,, Fel 'ix F. Fluss.," Readers should'.find the details.of'th3s campaign1of'interest in view of the continuing smoking-and-health controversy.,
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U;. S. Tobacco Journal August 6, 1964! - Page' 6 ~ i~l;~~ec~zdcr~ G'v~~~~`d~ v~i~~r~ C~c~n~~'~ Large Print Ads W'ill Appear iln 1152! Newspapers To Suppilement Advertising on Televilsion, andd in Magazines for the PhilllipMldrrils Cilgarette Philip \gorris Inc. will' use large print adv in 1.52' newspapers covering. 05 markets as part of a move to supple- ment the already extensive Multifilter eiFnrctte network, television and maga- zine advertising schedule,, It was an- •nounced last week by Ross R. Mil']hiser,, vice presidt•nt and' director of' market- Ing. The print campaign, Mr. 14Tillhisar said, stressa~;t the nature and' impor- tance of the rare coconut-she111 charcoal, which the cigarette employs exclu- si'vciy. The, consumer magazine ads and' net- m'iscowr cocotnlt sliell charcoal! I'hilijr 1'lorris has di~,cnrcrcd that rarce coconut-shci) charcnal' brim,v yiiu hrnicst. Inhacc(i tatitc dhrough a' chrrcmil'filt'cr. •: PHILIP MORRIS Irsc, will use these large ads im 1S2 newspapers coveri'ngg some 95 markets to .upplament pro, motion on, televiision and in magazines of'' its i61',uitiAllter cigarette. Ad stresses use of coconut=ahelll', charcoal inthe brand'• work TV commercials, as well, will highlight the attributes of'coconut-shell charcoal and its exclusive usage in the production of Multifilter. The efficiency of coconut-shelll char- coal' for filtering action andl for full' tobacco taste, said' Mr. Millhiser, is the result of a combination of' factors fnund only in this type of' charcoal.. When made from coconut'-shelL, char- coal Is highly porous with properties never fully duplicated in any other kind' of'charcoal.. Citing the development of' Philip Morris Multifilter, Mr. Millhiser ex-, plalned that research teams atthe 'Phitip Morria: Research and D!evelop• ment Center foundl that the purifjri'nR properties of activated! charcoall could'. best be uti1ized when, imbedded' in a network, of pure filter fibers through- out aniextra long inner filter. Thia; he said, "exposes not just some or most of the smoke,, but all' of' the smoke to the charcoal granules."' The newspaper ad is headlined: "Dis- cover Coconut-Sheli, CharcoaP."' On the top right of the ad, an illustration d'e- picts charcoal granules spilling from a freshly split' coconut shelh Copy just to the left of it reads: "Philip Morris has discovered that rare coconut~shel'l' charcoal brings you honest tobacco taste through, a charcoall filter." At the bottom llef't of the ad, justt over the illust'ration of Multifilter's soft plastic Sport Pack, the message continues: "Multifilter uses coconut- shell charcoal', exclusively," and in bold' lettering, to the,right of the Sport, Pack, the copy ends with: "N'ewil 'Philip : Mor- ris Multifilter, the name you can trust for flavor." The advertising agency is Leo Burnett. The consumer magazine schedule in- cl'udes four-color, back-cover ads in 'TV' Guide," "Time,"' and "Sports Il- luctrat:ed,"' as well as full-page black- and-white ads in "Life" andl "Ebony." The Multifilter summer schedule off network TV' advertising on CBS - TV consists of "Route 66;" "Alfred Hiteh- cock;" "East Side-West Side„"' "High Adventure," "Rawhide," "Luci -llesi Show," "CBS News with Walter Cron- k,ite;" and the "Baseballl Game of the Week." U'. S. Tobacco Journal August 6,, 19154 - . e '16 Cigarette Holder Scores autista!niding. Success in Missourl. Vol Iluime Has Doubled In Last Three Weeks, Company Official Says KANSAS dITY, MO., Fi-Id'ay' (i'.S) -A new kindl of' cigarette holder has beenimaking an appearance in the Kan- sas City area and the, salles results are described as very encouraging. After a little less than two months on the '~rnarket, volume has doubled in the \~11'ast three weeks, company officials ~O say. ~ The new product is called Ban-Tar, ~ produced by Exitar Corp., of Failrf'ax, 1MIo., The company describes It as a ~ cigarette holder that condenses and ~. traps the tars and nicotine frorrt, the ~ cigarette in a disposable tar trap: The main feature the company piays up Is `~ that the tar trap, does not have to, be cleanedl When It le filled with the tars ~ it is merely thrown away and' a taew one inserted. The company says a tar trap i's good for up to two packages of cigarettes. Frank Vance, chairman oi the board of Exitar, said, "Results have beem very good with a doubling of sales noted in the last three weeks: There Ilt, a far greater acceptabililty to the use of cigarette holders now, The cigar •peo. ple using tips and the report on amok- ing has caused amokers to accept them.'• Kansas City was picked ae the point for initial' market test but pl'ans are made for national sale., Price Is >N2.60' for a pack, which consista of a, holder, with a tar tip trap and four additional - tar traps. A box of' eight tar traps ' can be purchase4 for, 59 cents. Ui. S. Tobacco Jo!urnaT; August 6, 19~ - Page V6 Half and Hlalf Big Seller LOUISVILLE, K'Y'., Wednseday (CS)i -John B~ R'ose, reports that: I-I'alf' and. Iflalf' cigarettes are i•n very strong de- mand. Sitlea are also, strong on Glad- stone, a five-cent cigar, and R. G. IDunni Elbertos. Z)o
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„ U,, S. ~ TAbacco Journal August 6, 196- Page 6 ~ ~'r 0" c~Y" A, ~~js 57 ~ u, Lip,ar!! e m e n RJUMRTrer Pc~~.C,-f3 Large Print Ads Vld'illl Appear in 152 Newspapers To Supplement Advert'ising on, TelleWi'siion and i'n Magazines for the Philip IWorris irilgaret'te. Philip \Ima•is Inc. will use: large print ads in 152 newspapers covering !/5 mark,et's ns part of' a move to supple- mcnt the alr.cady' extensive Multifilter cifinrcttc network t'elevision and' magtt- r.ine advectising schedule, It was an, nou'nccdt last week by Ross R. Millhiser, vice president and director of rnarket- 1ng. The print camvniRn~ Mr. Millhiser said, sta•esses the nature and impor- tance of' the rare coconut:shell charcoal' which the cigarette employs exclti- siveiy. The, consumer magazine ads and net- ~ Discover coconltt-shcll charcoal! I'hilipr 1'lnrris has diacoicr'ed thut rare ' = coconut-shell charcoal brin,_,s ybu honest i InHaccn lartc (hrout;h ~ a charcoal'filt'cr ,~ ~ New! C''hilip' l~ilorres 11~>tu~lti!'iilt'cr ~~ the nawc ),ou can trust for llaror PHIIIIIP' MORRIS Inc: will use these large ads in, 152' newapapers covering .ome95. market. to~ supplement: pro- motion on televisipn and in magazinea of its Multifilter cigarette. Ad' stteasea use of coconut-rhall charcoal in the brand'., work TV commercials, as wellJ, willl highlight the,attributes of coconu't-shell' chnrconl' and, its exclusive usage in the production ofl Multifilten The efficiency of coconut-shell char- coal for filtering action and for ful1, tulicuco taste, said Mr. Millhiser, is the result' of a combination of factors found only ini this type of' charcoalL Wban made from coconut-shell, char= coaJ is, hi'ghlyporouswith i propertles, never fully duplicated in'any'other kind of' charcoal. Citing the development of Philip Morris Multifilt'er,, Mr. Mill'hiser, ex- plained that research teams at the 'Phdlip Morris Research md Develop. ment Center found that the puriflyi'ngg properties of' activated' charcoal' could' best be utilized when imbedded in a network of' pure filter fibers through, out, am extra long Inner filter., This, he eaid; "exposee not Just some or moat' of the smoke;, but all of the smoke to the charcoall granules."' The newspaper ad' is headlined: "Dis- cover Coconut-Shel1 Charcoal'."' On the top right of the ad; an, illustration d'e- picts, charcoal' granules spilling, from' a freshly splitl coconut sheilL Copy just ta the left of' it read's: '~Philip Morris, has discovered that rare, eoconut:shell' charcoal brings you honest tobaccoo taste through a charcoal filter." At the bottom lef't of the ad,, justt over the illuat'ration of Mul'tif'ilter's soft, plastic Sport Pack, the message continues: "Multifilter uses coconut- shell charcoall exclusively," and' in bold' lettering, to the right of' the Sport Pack, the copy ends with: "I4ewl"Philip Mor- ris Multifilter, the name' youi can trust for' flavor." The advertising agency is Leo Burnett. The consumer, magazine schedule in- eludas four-color, back-cover ads in "TV' Guide,"' "Time,"' and "Sports Il'- luetrated," as nveLll as full-page black- and-white ads in "Life" and "'Ebony." The Multifilter summer schedule of network TV advert'iaing, on CBS-TV consists of "Route 6t3,""''Alfred Hitch- cock," "East Side-West Sid'e,"' "High Adventure;" "Rawhide," "Luci-ll'esi Show,""'CBcul )`t'ewswit':h, Walter Cron«, kite,"' and the "Baseball Game of the VKeek.."' U. S. Tobacco Journal August 6, 1964 - Re *16 Cigarette Holder . Scores Outs~~ar~ ~ '.~ng Success in M'issvuri" Volume Has DwubIleal! In, Last Three Weeks, ComPanyOfficiall Says KANSAS' OITY, 14t0:, b'rid'ay' (CS) -A new, kind of cigarette holder has been' making an appearance in the Kan« sas City area and the sales results are described as very encouraging, After a 1',it'tle less than two months on the '*,Irnarket', volume has doubled in the \~ last three weeks,, company offi'cial's ~0 say. ~ The new product Ils called Ban-Tar, ~ producedl by Exitar Corp., of F.ilrf'ax„ Mo. The company describes It as a ~ cigarette holder that condenses and ~ traps the tare and nicotine from the ~ cigarette in a disposable tar trap: The main feature the company plays up Is ~ that the tar trap d'oes not have to be ~" cleanedL Wthen it (s, filled with, the tarr Q It is' merely thrown , away and' a new one inserted. The company' says' a tar trap Is good' for up t'o two packages of cigarettes. Frank Vance, chairman of the board, of Exitar, said~ "Resu'lts have been very' good with a doubling of sales noted in the last three weeks, There te a far greatier' acceptability to the use of' cigarette holders now. The cigar peo. ple using, tips and' the, report on smok- ing has rauae& amokers to accept them." Kansas City was ~pltked' as the point for initial market testl -but plans are made for naiionali sale. Price Is $2.50 for a pack„ which'consists,of'a hold'er, with a tar tip trap and four add'it9onall tar traps. A box, of eight tar traps can, be purchaced for 50 cents. U. S , TobaccoiJourrlal August a 196- Page16 Half and Half Big', Seller LOUISVILLE, KY., Wednseday (CS) -Jbhn B. Rose reports that Half and Half cigarettes are tn very strong de-, mand. Sales are also strong, on GladL stone, a five-cent cigar„and' Rl G. Dunn Elbertos..
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rr U,. S., Tobacco Journal 6 August 6, 1964 Page =~ CJ~~ ~;`Y©lQ jP)~.: G'a Large Print Ads Will Appear i'n 1'52' Newspapers To Supplelnenit Advertising on Television and! Iln, Nl'a~~gaziine~~s~~ for~ thi& Phili~p, MQ~rri's~ C[gPrettle~ Philip \Inrri.s Inc. willl use large, print' :Ids in 1152 newspapers covering 9.1) markets as par.t of a move to supple- ment the already exte.nsive Multifilter cigarette network, television and maga- zine advertising schedule„ It was an- •nnunced last week by Ross R. Milihiser, vice presidtnt and director of' market'- ing. The print campaign, Mr. MYllhiser said; stresses the, nature and impor- tancc of the, rare coconut-shelll charcoal which tlhe cigarette employs exclu- aivciy, The consumer magazine ads andl net- m'isct~vcr cocotntr slieil charcoal! 1'hiiip.Morris has di"cnrcrcd that rare. cnconut-shcil ch ucoall brim,;y ,rou hrnicst i iahacco latite through ~ >t charcnal'filfcr f N6%1 I''hi9ilP Morris. A~ilaltifilter the name you can trust for flavor PHILIP M'ORRIS Inc. will use these large ads in 152 newspapers covering some 95 markets to supplement pro-, motion on television and' in magazines of' its 63'ultiAl',ter, cigarette. Ad stresses use of' coconut-shelll charcoal' iin the brand, work TV commercials, as well,, willl highlight the attributes of coconut-shelll chnrcoul and' its' exclusive usage inn the production of' M',ultifilter. The efficiency of cooonut-shell char- coal for filtering action and for full' tobacco taste„ said Mr. Millhiser, is the result of, a combination of factors found only in this type of charcoal.. When made from coconut-shell, char- coal', is, highly porous with properties never fully duplicated' in any other kdndl of'charcoal. Citing the, development of' Philip 1Wlorris Multifilter, Mr. Millhiser ex-, piained that research teams at the 'Philip Morria Research and Develop- ment Center found that the purifying properties of actixated' charcoall could best be utilized ~wheni imbedded im a network of pure filter fi;bers, through- out an,extra long Inner filter. Thia,, he said, "exposes not jiust some or most of the smoke;, but al'I' of the smoke to the charcoal, granules."' The newspaper ad is headlined: "Dis- cover Coconut-Shell Charcoaft"' On the top right of the ad„ an illustration d'e- picts charcoal granules spilling, f'rom, a freshly split coconut shell. Copy just to the left of it reads: "Philip Morris, has discovered that rare coconut4hell'[ charcoal brings you honest tobaccoo taste through, a charcoal filter." At the bottom left of the ad, justt over the illust'rat'don of' Muitif'ilter"s soft pl'astie Sport Pack, the message continues: "Multifilter uses coconut- shell charcoal exclusively," and in bold lettering, to the right of the Sport Pack,, the copy ends with: "iV'ewi Philip Mor-, ris Multifilter, the name you can trust for flavor." The advertising, agency is Leo Burnett. The consumer magazine schedule iin- eludes four-color, back-cover ads in "TV Guide,"' "Time,"' and' "Sports Ii- lurtrated,°' as well as f'ull"page bllsck- and-white ads In "Life" and' "Ebony." The Multifilter summer schedule of network TV advertising, on CBS'-TV consists ofl "Route 66;"' "Alf'red, Hitch- cock„'• "East: Side-West Side;," "Hligh, A'dve•n ture," "'R'a w h i Id e,"' "Lu:ci - llesi' Show," "CBS' News with Walter Ci•on- kite,"' and' the "'B'aseball Game, of' the Week." U . S . Tobacco Journal August „ 1904 - . e '16 Cig'arette Holder r~g. ~r~g Scores Outsta!nd~ Succ~ess, in M'issouri' Volume Has QouN>'led In Last Three, Weeks, Company Official Says KANSAS (SITY', aklO'., Friday (CS) -A new kind of cigarette holder has beenimaking, an appearance iln theiiGan- sas City area and •the sales results'are described as very encouraging. After a little less than two months on, the arket, volume has doubledl in the \ last three weeks, company officials W say. I The new product i's called Ban-'ll'ar, N) proditced by Exitar Corp., of Fsi'rfax,, Mo. The company describes It as a ~ cigarette holder that condenses and 11, traps the tars and nicotine from, the ~ cigarette in a disposable tar trap: The main feature the company plays up Is that the tar trap, d'oes not have to be ~' cleaned. When it ib filled with the tars ~ it is merely thrownaway and a new one inserted. The company says a tar trap ls good for up to two packages of cigarettes. Frank Vance, chairman of' the board of Exitar, said„ "Results have been very good with a doubling of sales noted in the last three weeks. There to a far greater acceptability to the use of cigarette holders i now, The cigar peo. ple using, tips and the report on amok- ing has caused smokers to accept them.'•' . Kansas City was picked as the poi•nb for initial market testbut plans are made for national, sale. Price is =4'.6Q0 for a pack, which consists of'aholder, with a tar tip trap and' four ad'ditional tar traps. A, box of eight tar traps can be purchaeed for 59 cents. iJ . S . Tbbac'co Journal August 6, lV4 - Page V 6 IHallf and Half 131419 Selller . LOUISVIILLE, K'Y.,, VNednseday (CS) -,Pohn,B: Rose' reports that Half andl Half cigarettes are in very strong de- mand. Sales are also strong on Glad'. stone, a five-cent cigar, and' R. G. Dunn Elbertos.
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World Tobacco NZOchy, 197iV_- ~ow tooPz flight Scienti's"'tecltaGical papers were the springboardfor a campaign that may have made a new United Sca,tesfilter brand'proof against the health critics. A!n action report largely dras'unfront a stud'yr by our correspQndent, FELIX K FL USS. S CIEIqTISTS have in the past~ two decades had an increasingly important rolC in, the cigarette manu- facturing industry but generally as back-room boys. Perhaps in no previous instance of new' brand1 launching, have they figured' so prominently' as i'n the promotion of. Lark filter cigarettes, now on the market in the LJ'nited. States. The feature of this brand, from Liggett & 1M'',yers Tobacco Co.,, is a triple faltery the outers being ordinary cellulose acetate Ritera and the inner compartment con- taining, activated charcoal granules. The filtration principle is like that usedI in war-time charcoal-granule gas masks, The filter hit the headlines, first in, scientific circles and later before wider audiences, with chapter and! verse of the research and scientific principle behind it; and by preceding the Surgeon-General's January report on srnoking, and health, the brand gained for itself an advantage which~ according to reportsy, obliged the manufacturers to put, their work force on to a six-day production week of nine hours a day. The company also managed' what must be nearly the ultimate in publicity coups: a member of the Surgeon-Generalis committee said, before the report csme outy that he had switched! to Lark, calling the cigarette a'dei4nite advance", this was hardly less valuable tuo promotion than sequences i'n the report iltself whirtt mentioned carbon granule cigarette filters in, terms that have been identifi:ed with the Keith filter. The scientific publ'icity, story began in the middle of last year when, the New Lngland' „jrourttal' of Medu¢eitee published' a, paper by two Cambridge, R+[ass.,, scientists, indicating that the charcoal granule filter featured in, a new cigarette'could adsorb, most of the cigarette smoke gases which in animal experiments have been shown tioo depress the ciliary activity of the throat6 Thecili'a are hairs which remove foreign matter from the respiratory system; the presumed result of inhibiting their activity is self- evident. Medical World News took up the report. Although filter and cigarette were not identified by the scientists in, their paper„ the medical journal! reported' that according to Liggett & Myers, who sponsored the research j the filter, used by the researchers was the prototype of the Keith filter on the new Lark. The make-up of the ICeith filter: con- ventional cellulose ace- tate plugs sandwich the charcoal granules of'the. Lark king-size cigarette. Liggett & Myers pub- licised this chart„ based' on one in the New England Journal of Medicine, showing the degree to which ciJiary, activit•y was depressedd by: smoke from various kirtds of'cigarettes. WORLD TOBACCO (a ~secCNO'.cxroaVae~)~. ~ FAter With AcaMled . Qwt0ai OrMlldn y Comwrtfenal Ritw ~ NwFA1!!' b I 11 .•. r l= r. •. ,1 ., 9! .1 1 , 1 ' 6 ~. PrHr at aw nk N YMn.aY r~~rc" w~w..' _ . . .----- SZ
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Dr. Williaru J3atet Jr. (lt('t) anufl Dr.. Charles H. Keith; co-inventors of the Keith filter,workirrg in Laggett fo"' A+fyers'slabora-tories wit/a gas chrontographis equipment used to detect irritating gaaes in tobacco smoke. The study was condltcted' by Dr. Charles J. Kensler, head of the Life Sciences Division, of Arthur D; LittIe,, Inc. (one of the world's largest independent research organisa- tions)' and S. P. Battista, pharmacologist in the Division; it' was the latest phase of an extensive biological research programrne started in 1954 and carried1on under the joint supervision of'Dr. Kensler and Dr. Frederick R. Darkis, Liggett & Myer's Vice-Presidtnt and Director of Rizsearchr Reprints of this paper had wide circulation. Many leading newspapers, for instance the Wall Street journal of December 3, ng63, and the New York Herald Tribune of January to, commented extensively,, emphasising the protective effects of charcoal granuies.. Thecharco,al granules imtheKeith, filter~,named~ aftev one of its inventors, Dr. C. H. Keithi of'the Lig$ett & Myer's research centre, are specially treated by a, new process1 toincreasetheiirpower to 1 adsorbvarious Iniitatinggases that are present in cigarette smoke in small quanti- ties. The presence of these gases in cigarette smoke has been recognized for some time. They have been referred to, in, medical! reports as 'volatile irritants': The granules are reported' to selectiveNy decrease the amount of'these gases. Months earlier,, even beftire starting, the advertising andi public relations campaign for the new Lark cigarette, the makers' management had realised the importance of the results obtained during the many years of research, Wide publicity for the newly-discovered effects of specially' impregnated granulated charcoai' filters laid the cornerstone atlUn of a, tremendous marketing success which has not been, affected' by the Surgeon-Generat''a report: In order to accomplish thisgoal, a soberly-presented inforrnation bulletin prepared! by Liggett & Myers' research laboratory concerned with activated charcoal, had been prepared and distributed widely to the press, magazines and other information media. Shortly afterwards, the company d'istriNntted to alt news media a report by Dr. Keithideli'roered to a national meeting, of'the American Chemical Sodery, Dr. Keith's conclusions, which gained wide publicity, were included in a paper entitled 'Vapor Phase Analysiis of Tobacco Smoke' presentedl at the Society's tobacco sytn• posium. Dr. Keith claimed that~ the new fit'ter allowed the incorporation of considerable quantities ofl active sdsor- bents which have been1oundlto bedigtiitcd'y more effective in removing gases than other types of adsorbent-bearing filters. D!epend'ing, on the materi'al' used, removals of up to 6o per cent or more were effected, he claimed, by, the granular charcoai adsorbent. This capadty, was related to the extensive surface area in the extretnely porous structuree of the charcoal. In, a composite filter of this type, the surface area of the porous charcoal segment was foundl to be approximately S,ooa times greater than that of the cellulose acetate segments ... Among the materials which, were experimentally found to be strongly adsorbed by the charcoal filter were most of' of the putf' establish'eT Tta-t components of the gas phase a?r1'n's'ponsibl's for inhibition of ciliary transport activity. A'ssaysof' lrnowm, component'sof the gas phase showed' the following compounds to possess such activity: hydrogem cyanide, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and atnmonia, al.i though no, one of these occurs at levels high enoubh to, produce the effect noted for smoke. Activated carbons dilffer~ markedly ~ iln theilr~ adsorption, characteristics. Carbon filters previously emplbyed in cigarettes do not' have the specific. '. 1 power to serub, the gas! phase., It has been, repo~r~ted~ that' a~ fi1'~ter~ containing special carbon~ granules removes gaseous constituents which depress cilila ~' activity (28)'. From the Surgeon-General's report: the KeitA filter was noted, ij(' not exactly tsd'orsed, , W!oRLD, TOBACCO 39
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-F the oxygenated materials and the acidic and basic gases such as acrolcin;, formal'd'chycte, hydrngew cyanide' and ammonia. Thcsc matcrials' contributed heavily to the i'rritating effects of cigarette smoke, he indicated, referring to' the researches of Kenslcr and' Battista.. The company next proccededl to, the task of developing the' proper charcoal granules and a new tobacco blend to go with the new' filter. At about the same time it also got ready to, move the new cigarette from the laboratory to the production line-a, move which among other, things calledi for the development of complicated machinery too feedl the exact measured portion, of charcoal granules into the space bctween the two outer filters. With the Lark cigarette in production and, marketing and advertising plans in the final stages of preparationy, the company's efforts were focused on' testing Lark's acceptance in strategiic market areas and arranging for test introduetion. It was priced at the same level as other popular filter lines.. Key tests took place in, Columbus, O'hio, and the'tri-city area of Albany', Schenectady and Troy, N.Y. In'these tests, Lark salesmen moved into the area in force to call on' l'ocal distributors and retailers, and distribution was supported with heavy newspaper advertising, and TV' commercials, plus a wide selection of'point-of-sal'e mate- rials. Consumer reaction was enthusiastic, and Lark was then launched into all of the Eastern seaboard. IIntroduction into the West Coast, Los Angeles and San Francisco, followed four months later. At the end of September, Mr. Zach Toms, President of Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, announced that' the new cigarette,, having received excellent consumer acceptance in test' markets during six months, wouldl be marketed nationally. The two, impressivre, disinterested "pl'ugs" followed. On the eve of'the publ'ication of the' S'urgeon-Creneral's report, Dr. Louis F. Fieser, professor of organic chemistry at Harvard and an authority on tobacco-smoke chemistry, told the New York Herald Tribttne' that he had recently switched 'to cigarettes containing, an activate charcoal filter, intended to screen out substances in cigarette amoke that' depress the action ofl cilia in the respiratory system". H'e' specifical'ly named the brandl as Lark. When the Surgeon-General'sreport came out next day, it was found'to devote half a page'ta the effects of tobacco smoke on ciliary' activity. While reporting scientific findings without comment, the report did say "Activate& carbons differ markedly in their adsorbtion characteris'tics. Carbon filters previously employed in' cigarettes do not have the specific power to scrub the gas phase: It has been reportedd that a filter containing special carbon granules removes gaseous constituents which' depress ciliary activity"'. Dr. Fieser later confirmedl that the brand in, question was Lark. A feature of the scientific side of the promotion has' been the restrained, profess'ional, manner in which it was conductedi (The company is not to be blamed for the iiazzy' headlines their news obtainedl in some popular papers; but even the most startling, banners were followed by news couched in solid scientific terms.) The permanent' 'outdoor dress" of the brand continues the restrained theme,, with a' reverse design on the' cigarette pack that is about as far as any' manufacturer has ever gone towards Z d technicall reading on the package itself. Scienti'fically'„ ughi*, the wording is not specciftc. CHARCoh :~...^.r.= ik ;, U IRRITATIN3 f3A6E4 IN cIGARarTa 6AAOid AAe NOW R6pUeiD TIIROl1GN' 9dENCa~ .. Appt1CATIDN:e+FAefM41iD. CNARCQAL 6RANUF4 ` IN'TNflNaW' ~. 3-p1IsCE ~ f eKiAR6TT& , FILTER' t`. ~ ACTI NATED chlareoals .rhieh ecientiets call' the 'fnagic purifier~?" Is uaedini atomiec submarines leavina New Gon• d'on, Conn., to scrub" air, eclean of impuritieeiand'return It to the e,rew for breathing. As a result, submarines can stay underwater for extremely, lons periods. A Fleet ACTIVATED CNARCOALiN AIR PURIFICAITKSN SXSTEM9 MAIdEi IT P05SIBUa FOM1' ATOMIC SUBMARINa/' To STAM i1NO6R, WATER FOR: @%TEIWED. pEw<bvo. . w . ~:~L~5f~ f'unctional inRredient, of' the soldier's pas mask to screen ' poisanouc gases fromhis~air supply, inW+r puriMcation of I municipal' water suppiies etc. I'n the K.itA eiearetta i Ilter„ ebarcoal1~ranules an net anlr aetiv~sled but speciYllT f'ortiaea hr-war~__xientifk . Draeesx Many newspapers and' magazines in the United States made editorial use of' the charcoal filter story sphut the company made it available in tlrit' popular form, The stron l''y. r' c i e n t>u' f,$i ' c promoti'~onal theme spilled over on'to'the back of the Lark pack. ~11h11~'.u'~]i:t ~ll i(i 1to GM VINOliL'.D TOBAOCO 61
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FOREIGN CIGARETTE~. PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION.
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FOREIGN CIGARETTE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMP'TION Rothmans of Pall Mall CanaftLimited announced recently that any decline!in the Canadian cigarette industry is not reflected in its preliminary year-end report. President John H. Devlin stated that the slump inithe first quarter of' 1964~,, caused by the United States Surgeon General's report and a reduction in trade inventories was "temporary"' and that sales reflected record gains overlast year. It is believed that these gains are due to Rothmans" strength in the filter and king size~market. This company has also introduced a new brand!, Craven Mentho:l:,,whichlis expected to supply initially more than 20 per cent of a menthol market estimated at 190 million cigarettes a month. Canada's, Dominion Bureau of Statistics released statistics~showingan 8:percent drop in cigarette smoking,for the first three months of this year. The drop cost the government an estimated $3,100,000:in revenue. Canadian Hea]ith. Minister Judy LaMarshireports that an advisory committee on smoking is now studying the question of cigarette 1abel.ing. A survey on the living standards of'East and West Germany showed that while a West German "has tolwork 2'3 minutes to earn enough money to:buy 50 grams of' fine cut tobacca., his East German contemporary,, living,und'er Communist rule,, must work one hour and,20' minutes" to buy the same amount of tobacco:. Included in this section is an article:giving,the results of a study on Cuban tobacco consumption just finished in Miami by officials of the TobaccolGrosvers' and Dealers' Association in Exile. The study covers the period from.1941 - 1958' and shows that tobacco consumption during these!years "made an extraordinary increase." Lewis Gruber,, honorary chairman of P. Lorillard Company, declared after a recentt tour of Europe that "'American filter-tip!cigarettes are cont3nuing,to grow inn popularity"' in Enropean countries. "A three-member tobacco delegation from the Chinese Nationali'st island of Formosa (Taiwan) toured burley-producing areas in Kentucky and Tennessee during, a visit to United States leaf areas recently. They represented the Formosa manufacturing monopol'y."' Of'special interest is an article entitled "International Perspective oniSmDking, and Health."' This article was taken from the 1Wiarch,, 1964, issue of World! Tobacco, which has only recently come to the attention of' Market Research. O Thoughithis article is less recent than the majority of those contained in the IPA newsletter, readers shou]:d find the information contained!in it of interest. ~ ~ Philip Morris International's European office has been moved to Lausanne, O Switzerland; this office was formerly located in Paris, France. ~ C. A. Tabacalera.Nacional (Catana), a subsidiary of' Philip:Morris, has introduced Venezuela's first charcoal-filter ciigarette,, Astor, which met with "high smoker acceptance." Ramon Quesada, Director of Marketing for Catana, pointed out that the new d'ouble filter brand "'is patterned~ after that of Philip:Morris Multifilter."
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, Tobacco .Jltly 17, 1964 - Page 19 Advance Report Shows Rothmans Sales Gains TORONTO, ONT. - Recent reports of a decline in the Canadian cigarette industry are not reflected in the pre- liminary year-end report of Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada Limited. President Iohn H. Devlin said recently that his Company had not only recovered from the industry-wide slow-down In Feb- ruary and early March, but had made record gains over last year. Mr. Devlin said, "The slump in the )Nfirst quarter of this year, caused by the U.S. Surgeon General's report and a ~ reduction in trade inventories, was very temporary as .far as Rothmans ~ was concerned. Sales began to return _~J, to normal in mid-March and have oon- ~)N tinued to climb since that time. We re- \ ~ Q ported a substantial increase for the E d a few weeks ago. Total sales for break all previous records and lish it as the highest month ever since the company started operations In Canada in 1957." The Rothmans president declared that, "on the basis of our performance in the first half of 1964, and particular- 1 in June, the financial year just closed uly 1, 1963-June 30, 1964) wIll set 1-time records for both sales and profits." Mr. Devlin declined to quote spe- dfie figures but indicated that the company s annual report, due in late September, would reflect his present statements. Tobacco July 24, 1961+ - Page 19 East German Must Work Harder for His Tobacco BONN, W. GERMANY-A survey on the standard of living of East Ger- mans versus West Germans shows that ~ West Germans are enjoying a better- and and free-life. The survey showed, for example, that ~ while a West German smoker has to Q work 23 minutes to eam enough money ~ to buy 50 grams of fine cut tobacco, his ~ East German contemporary, living un- ~ der Communist rule, must work one ® hour and 20 minutes before he has enough money to buy the tobacco. The 50 grams of tobacco costs 1.25 marks in West Germany; 3 marks in East Gennany.-SENATOR. Tobacco Ju y 2, 1964 - Page 19 Rothmans of Canada taunches Menthol Cigarette TORONTO, CAN.-In spite of some gloomy industry predictions, Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada Limited has set new sales records for March and April, compared to the same months in 1963. j. H. Devlln, president of Rothman s, stated that sales for both March and April were up more than five per cent over the same months last year. Despite the decline in total industry sales in February, Rothmans has al- ready equalled its total sales for the first four months of 1963, and Mr. Devlin forecasts that sales and profits for the first six months of this year will exceed those of January to June, 1963. It is believed that Rothmans fast bounce from the indushy drop in Feb- ruary was due to the company i strength in the filter and king size markets. Rothmans now controls over 50 per cent of the king size market, and 30 per cent of the total filter ciga- rette market. Approximately 65 per cent of the total Canadian cigarette. market is now made up of filter prod- ucts, and Rothmans estimates that due to the acceleration in the market of filter smoking, filter products will In the near future represent 80 per cent of the total market. Mr. Devlin also announced that Rothmans has launched a new brand of cigarettes, Craven Menthol, designed to attract the booming menthol market estimated at 190 million cigarettes a month. He said Rothmans confidently expects to supp1y initialiy more than 20 per cent of this market, basin his statement on test markets throughout Canada, which produced "immediate and very favourable acceptance by menthol smokers for Craven Menthol." The Rothmans president said, "The ris- ing demand for menthol cigarettes in Canada has created a challenge in the market place. This challenge, the sales trend for 1964 and the loyal consvmer' support of each new Rothmans product give the green light for our entry into a new market." Craven Menthol, the $rst Virginia kingsize menthol dgarette available to Canadians, went on sale recent . It oins the vigorous Rothrnans fami y wit~ a well-known, almost traditional name, Craven, and retains the visual Image of Its sister product, Craven "A." The new package design inoorporates the brand name in the familiar reverse type in a gold-edged oval of color, M a• oool turquoise. A new ftip-top 80's pack and the standard 25's sleeve p.de aging brings the new brand Into lftos with Rothmans paokaging policy. Menthol flavoring was discovered ac- cidentally some sixty years ago. An' ambassador in England put a few men- thol crystals in his cigarette case and found •a new, remarkably cool smoke. The new Craven Menthol derives its flavor from a tiny drop of menthol ap- plied to the inner surface of the pro- tective foil, permitting the essence• to permeate the filter while preserving the fragrance of the Virginia leaf. An aggrvssive advertising and proo- motiona[ canipaign In print and radio, and extensive sampling, supporb the launching of the new brand.
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, Tobacco ,Jw1y 17, 1964 - Page 19 Advance Report Shows Rothmans sal'es Gains TORONTO, ONT. - Recent reports of~ a decline, in theCiinad6an cigarette Industry are not reflected in the pre- 1)'minary year-end re~iort of Rothmans of'Pa11~14~tall Canada I:imited.Presid'entPhn H. Devlin saidl recently that his company had not only recovered from, the industry-wide slbw-down In Feb. tuary and early March, but had mad'e, record gains over last year. M'n iDevlfirr said, "The slump in the ),,, flrat q0.iarter of this year, caused by the U:S. Surgeon Ceneral7s report and a \3teductlon in trade inventories, was very temporary as .far as Rothmans ~ was concemed. Sales began to return to normal in mid-March, and have con- tinued Wnued to climb since that time. We re- portedi a substantial increase for the \ ~. Q E d a few weeks ago. Total sales for, break all previous records and'd lish it as the highest month ever, since the company started operations In Canada in 1957." The Rothmans president declared that, "on the basis of' our performance In the first half of,1984, and particular- I in June, the financial year just closed S~uly1, 1963-June: 30, 19f~') will set. -time records for both, sales and profits." Mr. Devlin, declined to quote spe- „ Tobacco .Tuly24, 196k - Page 19 cifia figures but ind'icated that the compan y's annual report, due in late •September, would reflect his present statements. Earst C errnian Mtst Work Harder for' His Tobacco BONN", W.GERMANl°-Asurvey on, the standard' of living of East Ger- mans mans versus West Germans shows that ~+1 West Cermans are enjoying a better- and and free-life. The survey showed, for example, that ~ while a West German smoker has t!o. Q work 2'3' minutes to, earn enou gh money ~, to buy 50 grams of fine cut tobacco, his 0.„ East German contemporary, Iiving, un- ~ der Communist rule, must' work one ~ hour and 20 minutes before he has enough, money to buy the tobacco.. The 50 grams of tobacco costs 1.25 marks in West Germany, 0' marks In East Cermany.-SENATOR. Tobacco July '24, 1964 - Page 19 Rothman.s of Canada Launches Menthol Cigar.ette TORONTO, CA:Ni-In spite of' some gloomy indiuatry predictions, Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada Limited has set new salles records for March and April, compnred to the same months in, 1963, ]: I+I. Devlin, president of' Rothman s, stated that sales for both M'arch andl April! wereup more than five per cent over the same months litst year. Despite the decline in totall industry sales in February, Rothmans has al'* ready eqwalled its total' sales for the first four months of 19(33, and Mr. Devlin forecasts that salles and profits for the first six months of this year will exceed those of J;anua ,rytoJkure,, 1983. It is believed that' Rothmans fast'' bounce from the industry drop in Feb- ruary was due to the company's strength in the filter and king, size markets. Rothmans now controls over g0 per cent of' the king size market, and 30 per cent of'the totall filter ciga-rette market. Approximately 65 per cent' of the total Canadian, cigarette. market is now made up of fil'ter prodl- ucts, and' Rothmans estimates that duee to the acceleration in the market of filter smoking, filter prodlucts will' Ini the near futtrre represent 80 per cent of the total market. Mr. Devlin also announced that Rothmans has launched a new brand of cigarettes, Craven Menthol, designed to attract the booming mentholl markett estimated at 190 million cigarettes a month. He said Rothmans confidently expects to supp l'~ initially more than 20 per cent of this market, basin his statement on test markets throuAout Canada, which, produced "immedliate and very favourable acceptance b..y' menthol smokers for Craveni Menthol'. The Rothmans president said, "The ris- ing demand for menthol cigarettes in, Canada has created a challenge in the market place. This challenge, the sales trend for 19&1' and, the loyal consumer' support of" each new Rothmans product give the green light for' our entry into a new market"' Craven Menthol, the $cst Virginia kingsiae menthol cigarette available tla Canadians, went on salle recent1y.. It joins the vigorous Rothmans family with a well.-knovWn,, almost traditional'i name,, Craveny and retains the visuall Image of Its sister product, Craven "A." The nesr package desi incorporate. ' the brand name im the amillar reverle type in a goUedged' oval of' eolorw in a, eool turqWoiae. A new fliptop Wso pack and the stanelard 25'a slesve pqk~- aging, brings the new brand into line with Rodurums 1adisi8in61?aX• Menthol flavoring~was diseovered' ac- ddcntally some staty years ago. An amba.c.aador in E gland put a few men-' thol' crystala in his dga~rette case and' found •a new„ recnarkalbly cool smoke. 'll'he n®.v Craven Menthol derives its 9avor fzcom1 a tiny drop, of menthol apr plied to the inner surface of the pro' tective foil, permitting the essenoe• too perrneate the filter while preserving the fragrance of the Wirginia leafl An ag~ ve i advertising and pro- motlocsali caznpaign im prtna and r.dia, and. extensive sampling, sugport~ the launching of' t~lie new brand.
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M Tobacco .JU-1y 11', 1964 - Page 19 Advance Report Shows Rothmans Sales Gains TORONTO, ONT. - Recent reports of a decline in the Canadian cigarette Industry are not, reflected in the pre- 1iminary year-end' report of" Rothmans of Pa11 Mialll Canada Limiitedi Ptesident John Hl Devlin said recently that his aompany had not only recovered from the Industry-wide slow-down In Feb- ruary and' early March, but had made record gains over last ear.. Mr. Devlin said, "The slump in, the ),,first quarter of'this year, eaused! by the 1J.S. Surgeon Generai s report and a reduction in trade inventories, was very temporary as far as Rothmans ~' was concernedl. Sales begani to return ~ to normal in, mid-March and have con, ~ tinued to, climb since that time. We re- ~ ported a substantial increase for the eriod a few weeks ago. ''otal'sales for `~ ~une break all previous records and Q establishi it as the highest month ever since the company started operations ln Canad'a i'n i 1957."' The Rothmans president declaredl that, "on the basis of our performance. In the first half of 1964, and parttcul'ar- 1y In June, the financial year just closed~ (1uly 1, 1963-June 30, 1964) willl set a(1-time records for both sales andl prof ts:."' Mr. Devlin declined to quote spe- , cific figures but indicated that the eompany 's annual' report, due ini late •September, wouldl reflect his present' statements, Tobacco Ju]iyr ~4, 1964 - Page 19 East German Muist' Work Harder for His Tobacco BONN, W. GERM~ANY-A survey on the standard of living of East Ger- mans mans versus West Germans shows that West Germans are enjoying a better- ~~ and fhee-life. The survey showed~ for example, that ~ while a West German smoker has to Q, work 23 minutes to earn enough money ~ to buy 50 grams of fine cut tobacco` his ~, East German contemporary, living un- ~ der Communist rule, must work one ~ hour, and 20, minutes before he has enougb money to, buy the tobacco~ Trhe 50i grams of tobacco costs 1.25 marks in West Germany; 3 marks In East Cermany. SE1tiA'I'OR:. Tobacco du yr , 1964 - Page 19, Roth mans of Canadct Launches, Menthol Cigarette TORONTO, CAN.-In spite of somee gl'oomy industry predictions, Rothmans of Pall Mall Canada Limited has set new sales records for March and Aprilj compared to, the same months in 1~863: J. H. Devlin, president of! Rothman."s; stated that sales for both Mar•ch, and April were up more than, five per cent over the same months last year. Despite the decline in total Indus, + sales in February, Rothmans has al- read'y equalled its total sales for the first four months of 19(i,3y and Mr. Devlin forecasts that sales andi proflts f'or the Rrst six months of this year will exceed thoseloN January to June, 1983.. It is believed that Rothmans fast bounce from the industry drop In Feb- ruary was due to the company's, atrcngth, in the filter and king size markets. Rothmans now controls over 80, per cent of' the king size market,, and 30 per cent of the total filter ciga-~ rette market. Approximately 85 per cent of the total Canadian cigarette. market is now made up of fliter prod- ucts, and Rothmans estimates that' due to the accelleration in the market of filter smoking,, filter products wilt in the near future represent 80 per cent of' the total' market. Mr. Devlin also announced that Rothmans has 1'aunched a new brand! of' cigarettes, Craven i Menthol, d'esigned to attract the booming menthol market est3mated' at 190 mtWon, cigarettes a month. He said Rothmans confidently expects to supp1y initially miore than 20, per cent of market, basin his statement on test markets throuilout Canada, which produced "immediatia and very favourabls aeceptance, by menthol smokers for Craven Menthol." The Rothmans pre;ident said; "The ri's- ing, demand for menthol cigarettes in Canada has createdi a challenge in the market place, This challenge, the sales trend for 1964 and the loyal consumer' support of each new Rothmans produett give the green light for our entry into, a new, market." Craven Menthol, the first Virqinia kingsize menthot' cigarette available to Canadians, went on sale recently. Dt jo~ins the vigorous R~otlunans family witk a well-laivswni alhtost traditional name, Ctraven,, and retains the visual image of Its sister product, Craven "A." The new package design inoorlaorntes ' the brand name in the familiar reverse type in a gold-edged oval of color, tit, a• oooll turquoise. A new 9i'ptop !(1's pack and the atandatd 9,S's sleeve pak- aging, bringp t•he ttew brand into 166ts with llotlhrn.ne pad6ging polloy. MMenthol fiavoring was discovered ac- cidentally some slicty years ago. An ambassador in, England put a few men ' thol crystals in his dga~~rette case and Found •a new, remarkably cool' smoke. The new Craven Menthol derives its flavor from a tiny drop of menthol ap- plied, to, the inner surface of the pro- tective foil~, permitting, the essence. to penneate the filter whtlb ng' the fragrance of the Virginia leaf. An aggressive advertising , and pro- motional campaign, in print and radib,, and extensive sampling, supports the launehing, of the new brand.
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Tobacco J,'y 2' t,.1964 - Page 24 For mosa Tobacco Delegation © Tours U. S. Burley Areas ~ Bj, Jack Lewyn Cri~ B1irluy ~ Tobacco l Grovvers'~ Co~ogerative A''ssn:~ ~' . A three-member tobacco delegation from the Chiirese Nationalist island of Formosa (Taiwan), tourcd' burl'cy-proy ducing areas in Kentucky and Ten- nessee during', a visit to United' States leaf areas recently. They represented the Formosa manufacturing monopoly., In Kent;ucky,, the membera of the delegation were guests ofl the Burley Tobacco Gro.uers Cooperative Associa- tion, the Burley and' Dark Leaf' To• bacco Export Association andi the B'ur- ley' Leaf' Tobacco Dealers Association, The group included: J. C. Yung, senior program, and supply speciai'ist of Formosa's Council fon International Economic Cooperation and Develop- ment; M. H. Chang, senior specialist of the Taichung Leaf Tobacco, Factory of' the Taiwan, Tobacco and Wine Bureau, and S. C. 1~'tmg,, senior special- ist of the Taiwan Tobacco Research Institute of' the Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Monopoly Bureau. John M. Berry, president of'the Bur- ley Growers Association, told' the dele- gation that he hoped! Formosai would, continue and' expandi its interest ini United States burley tobacco for use. Ini American-type blended eigarettesi which have become increasingly popu- lar there. In 1962, a new U'.S.-type bl'ended d cigarette with American burley aP- peared' on the market in Taipei, For- mosa s capital, and it was reported to be an I'mmediate success„ with others scheduled' to follow. The cigarette, "Jade Mountain," was blended for the government tobacco monopoly by R': C. Travis, vice presi- dent in charge of export promotion for the Burley Tobacco Growers Coopera- tive Association, who has spent con- siderable siderable time in the Far East. Mr. ' Travis is a blending expert in cigarette ', production, andl travels the world to give technical assistance to foreign manufacturers in the use of American burley in their' products. The delegation of Formosan tobaceo men was the first such, group to visit the United States: They were acconn- anled' on the burley-area tour by ~rank B, Snodgmss, vice president andi managing dircctor of the Burley and Dark Leaf Tobacco Export Association, While in the area,, the group also vi'si'ted' burl'ey leaf' dealers amd toured a cigarette manufacturing, . plant in Louisville. Tobacco Jy - 2~,, 196k - Petge 13', Cuban Cigar Imports To England Show Rise MIAMI, FLA.-A notable increase in the imports ofl Cuban cigars in Engl'andl during the first three months of' 19044 in comparisorr.vith samope riod of'thei previous year has been olhserved',. During the first three months of' 1963 these imports amounted to 5,019, pounrls ~ comharetl witlt 28;731 pounds in sarne periodl of the year 19'04. Manufactured' tobacco imports in England during the first three months of 1964 jumped to 51,028,625 pounds compared witli 35,593,391 pounds in same period' of' 11983, from alFordgins: ~ The largest increases were observed' in ~ manufactured tobacco imports from--Z Canada, jiumping, from 9;252,703 A Pounds in the first' three months of (Z5 1903 against 19,725';798 pounds i in G'~ same peiiodl of I984', imports from the ~' United States of America, jumPing',fromi ~ 20,795;91'8 pounds in the Arst three months of 1963 against 25,468,135 aunds in same ~eriod of 1984;, and romi the hletherl'a~nds; jnm'~ping fiom405',,068' pounds, ini the f'rst three months of 1903' eompared withi 841,617 pounds in the snme period of 1984. On the other hand', manufactured tobacco exports from Engl'and' to alll countries in the first three months of 19013 showed a decrease from 7,234,839 pounds in the first three months of 1903 to, 8,34t3.0401 in the same period of 1964.-JORGE. Tobacco July 3a 1964 - Page 33 Swiss Exportta Increase WASHIhbGTON, D C. - Swiss ex- ports of' cigarettes in, 1983 totaled 9.3 million pounds-up 45 per cent from the 0:8 million shipped out' in 1962. Italy, as usual, was by fryr the largest foreign outlet, taking about' 90 per cent' of' the totall.-SENATOR. Tobacco o'/rq1o6Sri-q July 2~T,,, 1961#'. Cigarette Use Drops' 8% in First Quartiep OTTAWA, ON'I'.-Cigarette smoking in Canada dropped eight per cent in the first three months of' this year, ac- cording, toi the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The drop cost the govern- ment an e:timated $3,100,000 in revenue. The bureau a quarterly records on the consumption of tobacco shows ci~a- rette consumption, dropped'~ fromi 9,94 ,- 829,000' to 9;152,344;000 between January andI March4 compared with the same period last year. The statistics are based on the sales of excise revenue stamupsstoms and excise o(Rctale said April revenue from all! tobacco forms was up slightly over the same month last year4 but no breakdown of the figures was available. Cigar smoking jµmped 29.1 per cent during, the same period, from 88;032,.- 000 to 111,1!10',000. Cut tobacco, i'n« aluding smoking and chewing varieties fell 14.7 per cent and plug tobacco, dropped 9'.2 per cent -TOLES. Tobacco Julyr' 17, 1964 - Page 18! Canada R'tudies Question Of Cigarette Labelinq, OTTAWi1, ONT.-1leallth Minister Judy LaMarsh said a special eommitl= tee is deciding whether Canada should follow the United States leadland, order cigarette companies to Iiut "smoke at' your own, rislF"' warnings on packages and advertising, P. B. Rynard ('PC=Sitncoe East) askedl the health minister if she was aware that the American governmcnt will re- quire such a warning, e(fective in 1905: Miss LaMarshi saidthe, gQvernment's: ad'visory committee on smoking Ii atudying whether the Canadian gov= ernment' should do thi's-and also whether it has"the authority to force companies to put this kind of notice on their packaging andl advertising.- TOLES. allq~o~5 ~
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Tobacco J4,y 2a;.1'964i - Page 24 I \IzToum U. S. Furle ,~ Areas ~ ~ B7r larek Lewpn Os, Burlby Tobacco Growers Cooperative Assn. ~ A threeymember tobacco deliegatiom ~ ftotn tlie Chimese Nationalist island of Formosa (Taiwan)i tourcd, burlcy-pror dwcing, areas iii Kentucky, and Ten- nessee during, a visit to United States leaf areas recently They represcnted' the Formosa manufacturing mono ly. In Kentucky, the members, of~the delegation were guests ofl the Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative Associa- tion, the Burley and' Dark Leaf' To+ bacco Export Association andi the Bur- ley Leaf Tobacco Dealers Association, The group includedl: J. C. Yung, senior program and supply special'ist' of Formosa's Council for International Economic Cooperation and Develop- ment; M. H. Chang, senior specialist of the Taichung Leaf Tobacco Factory of' the Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Bureau, and S. C. Yung, senior speeial- !st of the Taiwan Tobacca Research lnstitute of'' the Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Monopoly Bureau. John M. Berry, president of the Biar- ley Growers Association, told the dele- gation that he hoped Formosa would continue and expand it's interest in United States burley tobacco for use in American-type blended cigarettes , which have become increasingly popu- 1'ar there. In 1982, a new U.S.-ty"e blended cigarette with American burley ap.~ peared on the market in Taipei, For- mosa's capital, and it was reported, to be an Immediate suecess, with others scheduled to follow. The cigarette;, "Jade Mountain," was blended' for the government tobacco monopoly by R. CJ Travis, vice presir dent in charge of export promotion for theBurl'eyTobacco GrowensCoopera= tive Association, who has spent con- s~iil'erabl'etime ini the Far East.Mr., Travis is a blending expert in cigarette production, and travel~s the world to give technical assistance to foreign manufacturers in the use of American II burley in their prod'ucts., ' The dele ation of Formosan tobaccoo men was the first such group to visit the United States. They were aecom- panied on the i burley-nrea, tour by Frank B, Snodgrass, vice prrsidhnt andl managing director of the Burley and! Dark Leaf Tobacco Export Associntion, 1'Khil'e in the area, the group also vi'sited' burley leaf' dealers and toured a cigarette manufacturing, - plant in Louisville. Tobacco July N,, 1964! - Psge 11 Cuban Cigar Irmporr#sTo England Show Rise MIAMI, FLA.-A notable increase in tltie iinports of Cubani cigars in Engl'nndI during the first three months of 1984 in comparison with same period of the previous year, has been ohserved. During the first three months of 1963 these imports amounted to 5;019, pouncls compnred withi28,731 pounds in same period' of the year 1964. 'Mhnufhcttared tobacco fmports in England' during the first three months of 1904 jumped to 51',028,825 pounds compared with 35,593,391 pounds i'n same period of 1963, from alVorigins. ~ The largest increases were observed in'` manufactured tobacco imports from-Z Canada, jumping from 9,252,703 A poundi in the first three months of d 1983' against 19,725,7961 pounds Irn C)- same geriod of 1964, imports from the ~ United States of America, jumping from 106, 20,795,918 pounds in, the first three months of 1983 against 25,468,135 ~ounds in same periodi of 1964; and' ftom the Netherlands, jpm[ping, from. 405;088 pounds in the first three months ofl 1963 compared with 841,617 pounds in the same period of 1964. On the other hand, manufactured tobacco exports from Englandl to all countries in the Rrst three months of' 1903 showed a decrease from 1 7;234,8399 pounds in the first three months of 1963 tto 8,3•i8,040 ini the same period of 1984'.-JO'RGE. Tobacco. Julyr 3,, 1964 - Page 331 Swiss EXports Increctse. VifASHIINGTOIN~, D'.C. - S.viss ex- ports of cigarettes in, 1983' totaled 9.3 million pounds-up 45 per cent from the 8.8' million, shipped out in 1982: Dtaly; as usual, was by far the largest foreign outlet, taking about 90 perr cent of the totall.-SENATOR. Formosa Tobaeco Delegation Q i/ q'~o ~5 1 le 'T Tbbacco July 2T+„ 1964 Cigarette Use Drops 8% in First Qucn'ter OTTAWA, ONT:-Cigarette smoking in Canada dropped eight per cent ln, the first three months of' this year, ac- cording to the Dotninion Bureau of' Statistics. The drop cost the govern- ment an estimated' $3{100,000 In revenue. The bureau~ a quarterly recordY on the consumption of' tobacco shows ci a-, rette consumption dropped from~ 9',94~,- „ 829,000' to 9;1'52,344,000 between January and l March4 compared' with the same period last year. The statistics are based on the sales of excise revenue atampstoma and eaccise officials aaid' April revenue from all' tobacco fornts was up slig~ tly over the same month last year;, b~.ut no breakdown of the figures was available. Cigar smoking, jumped! 291 per cent during', the same period, from 88,032, - 000 to 111,110,000. Cut tobacco, in- cluding smoking and chewing varieties fell 14.7' per cent and' plugtobacco droppedi 9'.2' per cent-TOLES. Tobacco Ja1jI ~'„ 1964 - Page 18 Canada Studies, Question aIl Cigarette Labeling OT1'A'WA, ONT.-Health Minister jludy LaMarsh said a special' commit- tee is deciding whether Canada shouldl follow the United States lleadl and! order cigarette companies to put "smoke at your own risk"' warnings on packages' and advertising. P. B. Rynard (PC-Simcoe East) asked the health minister if, she was' aware that the American government willl re+ qpire such a1 warning, effective in 19056 . Miss Il:aMarslt said the government!s adirisory committee on smoking i1' stud'ying whether the Canadian gov- ernment should do this-and also whether it has' tlae authority to force companies to put this kind of notice on their packaging and' advertising.- TOLES. 0 H .Gr ~ CA CI 0 l1 tq.~"o~5' ~j
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Tobacco Ju~:y 2Tia..1964 - Page 21+ Formosa Tobacco Delegation o Tours U. S. Burley Areas ~ B'r Jack Lewyn Qv Bltrloy Tobacco Growers Cooperative Assrt. ~ A three•member tobacco delegation ~ from the Chiucsei Nationalist island of Formosa (Taiwan)i tourcdi burlcy-pro- ducing areas I'n IEentucky, and Ten- nessee d'uring, a visit to United! States leaf areas recently. They represented the Formosa manufacturin~; mono ly. In Kentucky, the members of~the delegation were guests of'' the Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative Associa- tion, the Burley andl Dark Leaf To, bacco Export Association and, the B'ur- ley' Leaf Tobacco I7ealers Associationi The group included: J. C. Yung, senior program and supply specialist of Formosa's Council for International Economic Cooperation and Develop- ment; M. H. Chang, senior specialistt of the Taichung Il.eaETobaceo~ Factory of the Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Bureau„ and' S. C. Yung, senior specialL fst of the Taiwan Tobaceo Research, Institute of the Taiwan T.obacca and Wine Monopoly Bureau. John M. Berry, president of'the Bur- ley Growers Association,* told' the dele- gation that he hopedl Formosa would continue andl expand its interest ini United States burley tobacco for use. In American-type blended cigarettesh whieh have become increasingly popu- lar there. In 1'982', a new U',S.-type~ bl'ended. cigarette with American Hurley ap- peared' on, the market in Taipei, For- mosa's capitaI, and it was reported to I be an immediate success, withi others I scheduled' to follow. The cigarette, "Jsde Mountain," was bl'ended for the government tobacco, monopoly by R'. C. Travis, vice presi- dent in charge off export promotion for the Burley Tobacco Growers Coopera- tive Association, who has spent con, siderable time in the Far East. Mr. Travis is a blending expert in cigarette i production, and! travels the world to ', give technicall assistance to foreign ' manufacturers in the use of American , burley in their' products. The delegation of Formosan tobacco men was the first such, group to visit the United' States. They were accom- pnniedl on the burley-area tour by Frank B, Snodgrass, vice presidtrnD andl managing director of the Burley and Dark Leaf Tobacco Expart Associntion, Vlrhile In the area„ t}ie group also, visited' burley leaf dealers and toured a cigarette manufact'uring, . plant In Louisville. Tobacco Ju.y 21Ta, 1964- Ps ge 13',. Cuban Cigar Imports To, England Show Rise 11IIAhf I FLA.-A notable increase in the imports of Cuban cigars in, England' d'uring the first three months of' 1904 irn comparison with samepe riod of'thef previotas year has been observed. During the first three months of 1963, these imports amounted to 5,019. pounds comhared! with 26,731 pounds in same period' of the year 1964. Manufactured~ tobacco imports in, England during the first three months of 1964 jjumped to 51,028,625 pounds compared .vitli, 35,5934391 pounds insame periodl of' 11983, from all,origins: ~? The largest increases were observed i'n`- manufhcttnred tobacco tinports from--Z Ch.nada, jRimping, from 9y252,70fi' A potinds irr the first three months of d. 1963 against 19,725!79t3 pounds, in G-~ same periodl of 1964, imports from the ~ United States of'America, jumping,from, ~ 20,795,918 pounds in the fi'rst three months of 1963 against 25,4'88,135, paunds In same period of 19t34'; and from, the Netherlands, jumping from 405',0G8' pounds in, the first three months of 19d3'compared with, 84'1,817' pounds in the same period' of' 19t34. On the other hand'y manufactured tobacco exports from, Engl'and' to all' countries in the first three months of 1903 sshowed a decrease from 7,234,839 otmds in the first' three months of T' 963 to, 8,346;040 in the same period of 1994:-JaFIGE. Tobacco July 3, 1964 - Page 33 Swiss Exports Increase WASHINGTON, D!C'. - Swiss ex- ports of' cigarettes ini 11983 totaled 9.3' million pounds-tary, 4'S per cent from the 8:6 million shipped out' in 1962. Italy, as usual, was by far the largest foreign outlet, taking about' 90 per cent' of' the totall.-SENATORI Tobacco o irq `>ra . Ju- ljr' 24„ 15164 Cigarette Use Dropa 8% in First Quatt.r OTTAWA, ONT.-Cigarette smoking in Canada dropped eight per cent inn the first three months ofl thts year, ac- cording ta the Dominion Bureau of' Statistics. The drop cost the govern- ment an estimated $3{100,000 In revenue. The bureau's quarterly reeordson the consumption of tobacW sbows ciga- rette consumptioni dropped fromi 9,949,- @29,000 to 9;1i52,34'4,000 between January and I Marchy compared I with the same period last year. The statistics are based on the sales of excisesevenue stamupsstoma and' kcise officials said April revenue from all tobacco forms was up sltghtly, over the same month ' last year, but no breakdown of the figures was available. Cigar smoking f pmped 29.1 per cent . during the same period, from 88;032,. 000 to 111',1110,000. C>,t tobacco, in« cluding~ smoking and chewing varieties fell 14.7 per cent and! plug tobacco dropped 9.2 per cent: TOLES, Tobacco July 17, 1964 - Page 18' Canadcc~S'tudies Question Of Cigarette Labelinq OTTAWA, ONT.-Health Minister Judy LaMarsh said! a special commit- tee is deciding whether CanAde should follow the United States lead I and iorder ci'garette cotn~sanies to put "smoke at' your own risk"' warnings on packages and advertising, P. B. 1Rynard (PC-Simcoe East) askedl the health minister if' she was aware that the American government will re- quire such a warning, effective in 1965. Miss LaMarshhi said the government's ' ad'visory committee on smoking ii studying, whether the Canadian gov= ernment should do this-and albo whether it has"the authority to force com~anies to put this kind of notice on tlieir packaging andl advertising.- TOLES. CI al`lq~o~5 b
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Tobacco Jt?'~y 24t,,, .1964 - Page 24 Formosa T'obacco Delegation Q Toaurs U. S. Burley Areas ii~ HV, Jack Lewyn ~N Burley Tobacco i Growers CoopererHV® Assm.. A three-member tobacco delegation ~ from the Chinese Nationalist island of Formosa (Taiwan) tourcd burlcy-pro- ducing areas in Kentucky and' "len- nessee during a visit to United States 1'eaf' areas recently. They representedl the, Formosa manufacturing mono ly: In, Kentucky, the members of~the delegation were guests of' the' Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative Associa- tion, the Burley and Dark Leaf" To• bacco Export Association andl the Bur- ley Leafl Tobacco Dealers Association. The group ineluded: J. C. 1'ung,, senior program and supply specialist' of Formosa's Council for International Economia' Cooperation and Develop- ment; M. H. Chang, senior specialist of' the Taichung Leaf Tobacco Factory of' the Taiiwan Toblcco and Wine Bureau, and S. C. Y'mng,, senior special- lst of' the Taiwan Tobacco Research Institute of! the Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Monopoly Bureau. 'ohn M. Berry, president of the Bur- ley Growers Association, told the dele- gation that, he hoped Formosa wouldl contl'nue and expand its interest in. United States burley tobacco for use In American-type blended cigarettes which, have become increasingly popu- lar there. In 1962, a new U.S.-type blended' eigarette with American burl'ey apd peared on the market in Taipei, For- mosa's capital, and it was reported to, be an Immediate success, with others scheduled to follow. The cigarette, "Jade Mountain,"' was blended' for the government tobacco monopoly by R. C. Travis, vice prestr dent in charge of export promotion for the Burley Tobacco Growers Coopera- tive Association; who has spent con- siderable time in the Far East. M'r.. Travis is a blending expert in cigarette production, and travels the world to, give technical assistance to foreign manufacturers in the use of' American burloy in their products. Tlie del'egadon of Formosan tobacco men was the first' such group to visit the United States: They were accomr pnnfed on the burley-nrea tour by Frank B'. Snodgrass, vlcc presidcnt and managing director of the Burley and Dark Leaf Tobacco Export Association. Whils in the! area, thegroupi alsa visited burley leaf dealers nnd! toured L cigarette manufacturing . plant in uisvrille. Tobacco July X, 1964! - Page 13, Cuban Cigccr Imports To EMgiand Show Rise MIAMI, FLA6-A notnbleincreasein, the imprnts of'Cubani cigars in Englindl during the first t'hree' months of 1984 in comparison .vith same perBod of the previous year has been ohserved'. During the first three months of 1983, these imports amountedl to 5,019, pounds compared withi 28,731 pound's in same period' of the year 1984.. Itfttnufacttared tobacco fmports in England! during the first three months of 1964 jumped to 51,028,825' pounds compared with 35,593,391 pounds i'n same period of 19831 from all,origins, ~ The largest increases were observed in'~- manufacttrred tobacco, imports from--Z Canad~a, jumping from 9,252,703 A T ounds in the first' three months of d 983 agninst 19,725,796 pounds ini C- same period of' 1'984, imports from the ~~ United States of America, jumping from ~, 20,795,918 pounds in the fi'rst three monthsof'~ 11983 ag;ri'nst 2514'88,135F ' oumd's in same period of 1964; andi om the Netherlands, jumping; from 405,©80 pounds in the first threee months of 1963 compared''witli 8411,617 pounds In the same period of 1984'. On the other hand, manufactured' tobacco exports from England to all countries in the first three months of 1963 showed a decrease from 7,234,839 pounds in the first three months of' 1963 to 6,346,040 In the same periodl of' 1984.-JORGE. Tobacco .Iu].y 3, 1.964 - Page 33 Swiss Exports Inorease. WASHINGTON, D.C. - Swiss ex- ports of cigarettes in 1983' totaledl 93 million pounds-up 45 per eent fromi the 8.8 million shipped out ini 1982: 1taly, as usual, was by far the largsst foreign outlet, takint,*, about 90, per cent of' the total.-SENATOR. 0 1' 191 -40 60 5 b Tobacco 0 / rq1o(0 SA~l su- 1jr ~Tia ]i96k Cigarette Use Drops 8%min First Quarter OTTAWA, ONT.-Ctgarette smoking in Canada droppedi eight per cent in the first three months of this year, ac» cording to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The drop cost the gc>vrern- ment an estimated ls3;1004W0 itt, revenue. The bureaui quarterly records onn the consumption of tobacco shows ci rette consumptiani d'roppedl from 9;94 829;000! to 9;152,344,000 betweeni January and I March, compared with the same period last year. The statistics are based on the sales of'excise revenue st Cps.oms i and excise officials said' April revenue from, alt' tobacco forma was up sl'ig' htly over the same month last year, but no breakdown of the figqres was available. Cigar smoking, jumped! 29:1 per cent during,the same period, from, 88,032,, 000 to 111,11%000: Cut' tobacco,, in.- chixiing smoking' and chewing varieties fell 14.7 per cent and plug tobaccoo dropped1 9'.2' per cent-TOLES~ Tobacco July 17 „ 1964 - Ps,(te 1:8 Canada Studiiss Q;aestioa aI Cigarette Labelinq OTTA'Vtli4u, ©'N1I'.-Healthi Minister. jludy LaMarsh said a special commit- tee is declding, whether Can9da should follow, the United! States lead and order cigarette companies to put "smoke at your own risk" warnings on pnckages andi advertising. P. B. R}'nard (PC-Simcoe East) aslCedd the health minister if she was aware that the American governmient willl re, quire such a waining, effective i'n 1985. Miss LaMarsh said the government's advisory committee on smoking If' studying whether the Canadian gov- ernment should do this+-and~ also, whether it has' the authority to force companies to put this kind of' notice on their paekagi'ng, and adverti'sing.- TOLES. O t~+ CT~ 0
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Tobacco J, y 21,.1964 - Page 21+ F'ormosa Tobacco Delegation © Toum U. S. Burley Areas ~ By 1a¢k bewyn 0~ Burlby Tobacco Growers Cooperative Assn. ~ DA three+member tobacco delegatiow from the Chinese Natioualist island of. 1Formosa~ (Taiwan)i toured, burley-pro- dwcing, areas in ICentucky, and Ten- nessee d'uring, a visit to, Unitedl States leaf areas recently. They represented the Formosa manufacturing mono ly. In Kentucky, the members, of~the delegation were guests ofl the Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative Associa, tion, the Burley and' Dark Leaf' To+ baeco Export Association andi the B'ur- ley' Leaf' Tobacco Dealers Association, The group included: J. C. Yung, senior programi and supply speciai'ist' of Formosa's Council for lnternational Economic Cooperation and Develop- ment; M. H. Chang, senior specialist of the Taichung Leaf Tobacco Factory of' the Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Bureau, and S. C. Yung, senior special'. ist of the Taiwan Tobacco Research lnstitute of' the Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Monopoly B'ureau. John M. Berry, president of'the Bur- ley Growers Association, ti' on, told the dele- gation that he hoped Formosa wouldl continue and expand' Its interest in United States burley tobacco for use In Americani-type blended' cigarettes which, have become increasingly popu- lar tBere. I ln, 1962, a new U,S.-type blended cigarette with American, burley ap-, peared on the market in, Taipei, For- mosa's capital'y and it was reported to, be an immediate suecess,, with otlners scheduled to follow. The cigarette, "Jade Mountain," was blended' for the government tobacco monopoly by R. Cl Travis, vice presi- dent in charge of export promotion for , the Burley Tobacco Growers Coopera- tive tive Association, who has spent con- sid'eralil'e time in the Far East. Mr. Travis is a blending expert in cigarette duction, and travelis the world to~ Pe technical assistance to foreign manufacturers in, the use of American burley in their prod'ucts.. The delegation of Formosan tobacco , men was the first such group ta visit ', the United States. They were accom- panied on the burley-nrea tour by Frank B. Snodgrass, vice president nndl mannging director of' the Burley and Dark Leaf Tobacco Export Associationi While in the area, the group al.so, visitedl burley leaf' dealers and toured L a cigarette manufacturing - plant In Louisville. Tobacco July 2, 1964- Page 13, Cuban Cigar Imports To, Engl'and Show Rise IbQARiI, FLA.-A notable increase in the imports of' Cuban cigars in Engl'andl during the fhrst three months of' 1904 in comparison with same period of the previous year has been olrserved'. During the first three months of 1963 these imports amounted to 5,019. pinnndin ~couiparccl with,28,731 pounda~ In same periodl of the year 1964. XIauufacttnred tobacco imports in. Engl:mcU during the first three months of 1964 jumped to 51,028,625 pounds compared with35,.593,391 poundsi'ni same period of 1963s from all,origins. '! The largest increases were observed in'~ manufactured tohacco itnports from-Z Caniadla, jumping from 9,252,7f?3 A pounds in, the first' three months of iZ3 1~~963 against 19;725,796, pounds In t~ sanne period of 1'9841„ innports from the ~ United States of America, jumringfrom ~ 20,795,918 po»nds in the first three months ofl 1963 against 25,468,135 F ound's in sa~ne period of 1964; andl rom the Netherland's, jpmping from. 405,066 pounds in the ;$rst' three months of 1963 compared with 84'1,617 pounds in the same period of 1984. On the other hand, manufactured' tobacco exports from Englandl to all countries in the first three months of 1963'showecl a decrease from 7,234,83'99 pounds in the first three months of. 1963 to 6,348,040 in i the same period' of 1'984'.-JORGE. T,obacco. Ju3 1964 - Page 33'. Swiss Exports Increase. WA'SHINGTON4, D.C. - S.viss ex- ports of cigarettes in 1983' totaled 9'.3 million pounds-up 45 per cent from the &8' million shipped out in 1962'. Italy; as usual, was by far the largest foreign outlet, taking about 90 per cent of the totall-SENATOR. Tbbacco, 0 ~rq '-1o July 24, , 1964 Cigarette Use Drops 8% !n Fllrst Qucn'trrr O'TTAWA, ON'1':--Cigarette smoking in Canada, dropped eight per cent in, the first three months of' this year, ac- cording to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics: The drop cost the govern- ment an estimated1 >{3;100,000 In revenue. The bureau's quarterl'y recorde i on the consumption of tobeccol shows ci a- rette c.nsumption dropped fromi 9,94~,- 629,000 to 9,152',344;000 between January andl March, compared I with the same period last year. The statistics are based on the sales of excise revenue stamps. and' e%cise officials said April revenue frocn al.l' tobacco forms was up slightly over the same month ' last year4 but no breakdown of the flgures waa available. Cigar smoking, jumpedl Z9',1 per cent dtzring, the same period, from 86,032,- 000 to 111,1!10's000. Cut tobacco;, in- cluding smoking and chewing varieties fel'1''i 1'4.7 per cent andl plutobacco dropped 9.2 per cent -TOL~S. Tobacco July3'T'n 1'964 - page 18, Canada Studies Question Of Cigarette Labeling OTTA'WA, ONT.-Health Minister Jludy LaMarsh said a special commit- tee is deciding' whether CanAd'a, shouldl follow, the United States lead and! order cigarette companies to Iiut "smoke at your own risk" warninga on packages and' advertlsing P'. B. Rymard' (FC-Simcoe East) asked the health~ mdnister if she was aware that the American governmcnt will re- alpdre such a warning, effective in 19686 Miss LaMarsh said the government's advisory committee on smoking i#' stud'ying whether the Canadian gov- ernment should do, this-and also whether it has' the authority to force companiea to put this kind of notice on their packaging and adverti'sing.- TO'LES. 011f / 1--ld,0110S b
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L1.' &.~ To'bacco~~ Jou>*n~a1 '1.>gttst „ 9 - Page 8 U. S. Fll'i'or ~d -l'. R8ll Gainhsg 6n, Eump'a ' Gruber a-1'P. LQd~lurdCm. C=inds ®a Your Corrtpany~"s~~ Ho~~noralry Clh~aiirnaan~ G'u!es~t~ of: ' O~re~o~k~~ GoWernnient and National Tobacco Board!,, Talll+cs Wiith Officials, Tradesmen in Other Countries . + , r._...: J , AT A RECEPTION givea by the, National Tobacco Board ofl Greece for Lewis ~ ptiruber„ honorary chairman of, P. Laril''lard Co., during, his recent viYit to Greeee ~t` as a guest of tbe Rogal' Greek' government and' ttMe: tobacco board, left to right ,~ aret Mr. Gruber; George Mel'ay, Greek Minister of Commerce; Mrs. Gmuberl and Thalia! Andreades, director general of the 1Wational Tobacco B'oard. Q ' American filter-tip cigarettes are _:~_continuinA, to grow in, popularity in ~iF.u:rope,, Lewis Gruber, honorary chair- tnan of P. Lorillard Co., declared laat _,~.veek after his return,from a tour of'. ~ pevcn western E'uropean capitals andl Pvisit to Greece as the guest', of the Itoynl Hellenic government and bhe 1!lntional Tobacco Board of Greece. Mr. Gruber, during his trip; con'Fer- ried with tobacco industry executives' pnd' officials of the French,,Itallian and Fwedish tobacco: monopolies. While he was in Greece he met tobacco trades- men andl goverment officials; was giv- . en a specially arranged tour of the Greek islands and historic mainland points, and was honored at severall receptions by various government and industry groups. He has been interested for many years in Greece and, in the Greek to- bacco industry, andl in 1958 receivEd' from the late King Paul ot' the Hel- lenea the Royal Order of'the Phoenix for his contributions, to the dievelop- ment and expansion of' Greek.Amer- ican trade. While he was In Luxembourg Mr:, Gruber inspected the new P. Loriliard' a a. r. 1',. plant, which produces Loril- lard's Kent and Newport cigzrettess for the European Common Market countries. He also visited the offices of P. Lorillard International S. in Zug,, Switzerland, andl reviewed the company's expanding, export and li- censing operations in western Europe. Mr. Gruber assertedl that Loril1 ard's Kentl Is one of the leading American cigarette brands in western EUrope„ and added that in the Benelux coun- tries in particular it is the lleadinq American filter. He was accompanied' on his trip by Mirs: Gruber. Tobacco Ju]W„ 1964 - Page 21 View Export 1V'' arket As Ontario's Salvation DELHI, (TNilr.-Ontario's eirette' tobacco farming industry will only survive if' exports are increasedl and relations among producers, buyers and governments arc improved, the annual mceting of the Ontario Flue:cured To- bacco Growers Marketing Bioard' was told, hcre: Some 600 farmers attending the meeting ofl the board, which is sole marketing agent for the province's 4',500' tobacco growers, were' told by former' chairman' George Demeyere that exports are a must inJ marketing, to- bacco' surpluses. "Because our salvati'on lies in the field of increased' exports, I hope dur- in~* this next year that ways and means will be discovered that will result in a progressive expansion of Canada's to- tiacco export trade," he said. New board chairman~ Stanley Smith, Tobaaco, Ju~ y 2~,, 1964 - Page 2]~ Study Reports 0ubam, Tobacco Consumption MIAMI, FLA.-The consumption of tiobacco, in Cuba during the period 1941-1958 made an exttaordinnry in+ crease, according, to a study of the tobacco, industry just finished' ' In IuCiartd .by Manuel Loaano Pino and' Antonio Dil Dominguez, presi'dent and secretary, Respectivel'y, of' the Tobacco Growens" and' Dealers' Associttion in Exills, They say that the consumption of cigarettes in Duba ~umped from 322 million packagea In~ 1941 to more than 600 million packages in 1957 and 1958, besides a lrrge inereage of irn of' N~7Yight cigarettes from the Wnit States. Prom, 33 million packages of dgaretes ~ 1941,, irnports btereased to more ~ than 10, million in, 194'6 and ovar !0 •tnilllon In the yftn 1957 and 1958:. 4) Domestic i oonmsnptlon, of M~.r~ in~- ~, i~reased'' fran 945 mil4iott writg In 1941 ~ to more than 300' mi'lHbn trniti' in 1946 and maintained'' that pace up to 103'f8: ~ Pi.ctahdett ndettn cunsnmpttaa, edlned tl~ Ih period h 195.3-8. ~ x 0 Cuban leaf tobalcoexporb Alsctuated between 30i.7 million ltbru !es 1948 and 58 mtillion libras 1 1m' 1958, Cigar exports were lovw udtil 1951„ when they recovered I again but without rend'ering the ame total, except for 1957.. A tiotall area of 83,935.91 hectareai were devoted totobacco cropping fin Cuba in 1946, according to, ihe na- tional census of that year. Thd~' }'-fi0 e per cent' of the total area,was fertil'iaed,, but only~ 11 per t~ent was Irrigated. '11~e bulk o>E toba~cco prodmction was . oon. . centratedi In Las i4'illas and Pinar del Rio Provinces, toget}ier renderi'ng 88 per cent' of the tobacco crop ef' the 1 i'sland. Havana Province rendered three per cent; Matanzas Ptovinoe, 0:1' per cent;, Camaguey Province, 5,4 per cent and ©!riente Province, 3.4 per oent. -"]aItG,E": eallk;d for n ncw cra of "good. faith' at' the bargnining tahl'es" between Intycri and' growers' representatives. Although growers earlier this year forced closure' of the tobacco, auctions because they were dissatisfied with prices offered! by buyers„ the meeti'ng, was told that the 1903 crop, returns were the second! highest on' record. Boardl secretary Charles N. Heathh said growers received' an average 41840' an acre compared with the 1960, record of $885 an acre. Delhi lies i'n the heart of'the tobaccoo growing' area, some 20 miles south of Brantford'.-TOL.ES'. 10*1
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I:U. 'S . Tobacco Journal u.gust 65 '96. - Paje 8' U. S. HAlCr lb`d't~.,MCIJS sy8el Gainkflng' 6n Eumpal . Gruber 0i I . Loi ~illai"d C0~. F~~E~'S~.~E~'S~ c!a Tour r ~ Comipany''s Honorary Chairman, Guesti of Greelk. Government and'I National Tobacco Board, Talks W~iit:h! aflfiiciialls, Tradesnnen~ in Ci!tlher~ Countri~e~~s~~ !~I , \ i ., L L AT A RECEPTION given, by the National Tobacco Board of' Greece for Lewirf ~~~p~/Gruber, honorary chairman of P. Lorilllard Co:,, during his recent' .isit to Greece V` aa a guest of the Royal Greek government and the tobacco board, left to right ,,a aret Mr. Gruberj,George M'ela., Greek Minister of Commereey, Mr.: Grubert and 'f'halic Ahdread.s„ director genarall of' the National Tobacco Board'. Q American filter=tip~ cigarettles~ arei I from, the late King Paul of the Hel- ~contflnuinQ to grow, in popularity in lenea the Royal Order of the Phoenix 1~ Burope, Lewis Gruber, honorary chair- for his cont'ribut'ionss to the develop- rnan of P: Lorillardl Co., declared la,nt, ment andl expansion, of' Greek-Amer- --,week after his return from a tour of' ican trade. ~ peven western European capitals and While he was In Luxembourg Mr. 4p visit to Greece as the guest of the Gtuber inspectled' the new P. Loriliard It~myal Hellenic government and the s. a. r. 1., plant, which produces Loril~ Kationall Tobacco Bbard of Greece. lard's Kent and Newport cigarettes Mr. Gruber, during his trip, confer- for the European Common Market red with tobacco industry executives countries. He also visited the offices pnd officials of the French, Italian and', of' P'. Lorillard International S. A., in 6wedish, tobacco monopolies. While he Zug, Switzerland, and reviewed the was in Greece he met tobacco trades- company's expanding export andl Ii+ men and goverment of'ficials,, was giv- censing operations in western Eurone., en a specially arrangedl tour of the Mr. Gruber asserted that Loriliard"s Gheek islands and historic mainland Kent is one of the leading American points, and was honored at several cigarette brands in western Europe, receptions by various government and and addedl that in the B'enelux, coun- industry groups. tries in particular it is the leading He has been, interested for many American filter. years in Greece and iln the, Greek to- He was accompanied on his trip, by bacco industry, and in 1958 received Mrs., Gruber.. Tobacco in-y--N, 19611• - Page 21 View Export Market As On,tario's' Salvation DELHI, ONT.-Ontario's cigarette tobacca farming industry will only survive if exports are increase' andn relations among producers, buyers andi govcrnments arc improved, the annual mceting of the Ont:irio Flue-cured To- bacco Growers Marketing Board was told here. Same, 000, farmers attending the: mecting of thc board4 which, is sol'e marketing agent for the province's'. 4,500 tobacco growers, were told by former chairman George Demeyerc that exports are a must in., marketing, to- bacco surpluses. "Because our salvationi lies in the field of increased exports, I hope dur- ing this next year that ways and means will be discovered that will result in a progressive expansion of' CanadJi''s to- aceo export trade," he said. New board chairman, Stanley Smith+ Toba.cco July ljr 24, 1964 - Page 21 StUdN Reports CubaM Tobacco Col;nst>drrnptloli' MIAMI, FLA.-The consumption of tobacco in Cuba d'uring; the period ry tn- _ 1941-1958 mnde an extraordins. crease,, aceordi~ng, toa st'ud~!' of~ thetobacco industry just finished In Mhtnd by Manuel IL.oxano Pino and Antonio Gi11 Dominguex„presid'ent and secretary, respectively, of the Tobacco Growers' andl Dealers' Association Ini Exile. They say' that the consumption, of tigprettesin , Cuba /ompedfronu 322 million packages ln 1941 to more than , 800 millionipackages'in 19571 and! 1958, bbesides a large Inerease of itn of '~-1light cigarettes from the Unit States: From 3.3 1milllbn packages of cigarettea ``4~ 1941, bnportz ilncreasect to rnore .~ than 10' tnillion In 1948 and, over !00 •tailllon ila the rears 1951 ' and 1958. ~ Dornestib oon.nmm= p,tion of dgar~ ihr ~, exeased'~ from >a45' m31ll~ t+nsfts in 1941 ~ to more than 300 million ttnfts ih 1948'. ,~ and' maintained' that pace up to 1958, ~ Picadura consumptioe dbc'>irted dur- Q ing the perl'od'y p.rtiarlariX in, the pertod~ 1983-1958: 0 Cuban leaf'tobaoooexporb lluctuatbd bet,+veen 30.7' millMn fibna th 1Na and 58 million libras In 1958. Cigar exports were low until 1991, wlien, they recovered' agaltt but wltFtout ,renderi'ng tlte same totali, exoept for 1957: A totall area of' 65,935,6 ltectareas were devoted to tobacco cropping 10 , Cuba frr 1948jaccord'ing to the na-, tional census of' that year. Thirty-A.ro. per cent of the total area;was fertilir,ed, but only ' 11 per cent was irrigated. The bulk of tobaoco production was . aon- centrated in Las ittllas and Pittar del Rio Provinces, together renderimg 88 per cent of the tobaceo crop of tbe Island'. Havana Province rendered three per cent;, Matanzas, Province, 01 pet' cent, Camaguey Ptovi'n.ce, 5.4' per cent andl Oriente Province; 3.4 per oenL -"]QRCE"- callled for a ncw era of "goodl fnith, at the bargnining tables" between lMyeri and rowers" rcprescntntives, Although growers earlier this yearr forced closure of the tobacco, auctions because they were dissatis8ed witlh prices offered' by buyers„ the meeting was told that the 19(13 crop, returns were the second! highest om record. Boardl secretary Charles N. Heathh said growers received! an average $840' an acre compared with the 1960, record of $885 an acre. Delhi lies In the heart of'the tohaccoo growing' area, some 20, miles south of Brantford.-T4)Il.ES. . r3r
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U.'S!. Tobacco Journal u7guat y 964 - Page 8 U. S. ~=i~~~r ~d~~~IcJs sieII CGic~sr~~~ i~~ IU~~c; ~~ Gruber of P. i'_ariH'a~rd Co. Fjndson~ Your, Company's Honorary Chairman, Guest of Greek Oovernrnent and tN'ationiall Tobacco Board, TallNts With Officiais,, Trcclesrmeni iri Other Countries 1 ~ ji ,, . ~ .1 / ~ ( j. AT A RECE'PTIO'['J' ggiven by the National Tobacco Board of Greece for Lewis ~ p~Gruber, honorary chairman of', P. Lorillard Co., durina, hiis recent visit to Greece ~Xas a guest of' the ftoyai' Greek ao.ernment, and' the tobacco boardi lef't to right ~ area Mm Gruberr George Me1'ee, Gkeek Minister of Commerce; Mlrs. Gruben and Thalic AMdreada„ director general of the Nlatilonal Tobacoo B'oardl Q' American filter-tip cigarettes are __j;,contlnuihR; to grow In popularity in ~lEurope, Lewis Gruber, honorary chair- man of P. Lorillard Co.,, declared last ""~week, after his return from a tour of'f even western European, capitals andl V ~ visit, to Greece as the guestl of, the, Itnynl Hellenic government and bhe. f!lational Tobacco Board of Greece. M,r: Gruber, during his trip, confer- red with, tobacco industry executives, pnd officials of the French, Italian and Swedish tobacco monopolies. Wbile, he was in Greece he met tobacco tradles- men and' goverment officialk; was giv- en a specially arranged tour of the Greek isiands and, historic mainland points, and was honored at severall receptions by various government snd industry groups. He has been interested for many years in Greece and in the Greek to- bacco industry, and' in 1958 receiwedi f'rom the late King Paul oi' the Hel- lenes the Royal Order of'the Phoenix for his contributions, to the diavelop- ment and expansion of' Greek-Amer- ican trade. While he was in Luxembourg Mr. Gruber inspected the new P. Lorillardi s. a. r. 1. plant, which produces Loril- lard's Kent and Newport cigarettess for the European Common Market countries. He also visited the offices of P. Lorillard International S. A, in Zug,, Switzerlandl, and~ reviewed the company's expanding; export and 1fi censing operations in western Europe. Mr. Gruber assertedl that Lorillard's Kentl Is one, of the leading Americann cigarette brands in western EUrope„ and added that in the Benelux coun- tries In particular it is the leading American filter. He was accompanied' on his trip by Mrs: Gruber. Tobacco JuN,, 1961+ - Page 2'1 View Export Market As Ontario's Salvation DELHI, C)iNT.-Ontario'.s cigarette tobacco famninh* industry will only survive if' exports are increased' and relations among producers, buyers and govarnmcnts arc improved~, the annuall meeting of the Ontario Flue-cured To- bacco Growers Marketing Boardl was told here:. Some 600' farmers attending the meeting of tlie board, which is sole markcting, agent, for the province's 4,5001 tobacco growers, were told by former chairman, George Demeyerc that exports are a must in, marketing, to- bacco surpluses. "Because our salvation lies in the field of increasedl exports, I ho e dur~ ing this next year that ways anmeans will be discovered that will result in a grogfessive expansion, of Canada's to- acco export trade," he said. Nbw board chairman, Stanl'ey' Smith, Tobacco July y 2~i~- , 1964 - Page 21 Study Reports 0uba~t ' Tobacco Gonsumptibsl MIAMI, FLA.-Tfte consumption of tobacao, in, Cuba during t}te period 194b-39S8 made an extraordinatry in- crease, according to a study of tlte tobacco industry Jost finished in Mlamf by Manuel Lozano, Pino and Antonio Git Dominguez, president and secretary, ae~pectively, of the Tobacco Gromvers and Dealeri ' Association In Exilk3. They say that the consumption of' eigarettes in Cubs fum,ped, from 322 miiNon ~acltages f~t 1941 to more than . @0Q miillion paekages in 1957 and 1958, besildes a large Inerease of im of'. ~light cigarettes from the L1'nit States. 1~'rom 3.31 million i packages ofcig~uette.. `~ 1941, fnrttport. ituxeased to etore ~ tltan, 10, mlllion in, 1949 and war !0. •Imilllon in the yean 1967 and' 1O50: ldomesti'a I consnm of ol tn- ~, areased' from ~a, ton ~t~ untts ~i941 ~ to more than 300' mtllibn tanitit I in 1946 and! maintatned' that pace up to 1958. ~ Picadura consumpttan d'ecUned dur- ~ ing the period, ~oarttcul'iX ir,+ ehe period 19~3-1958. I Cuban leaf, tobaCODexporb flt10tnlted , between 30.7 milliion /ibras inn 194g and 58 million Iibra, In 1958. Cigar exports w!ere low until 1954 when they reoovered' again, but without ,rettdering the same total; e:oept for 1957. A totall area of 83;935.A hectareas were devoted totobacco cropping In Cuba in 1946, according to, the na- tional census of that year. Thirty 9ve per cent of the totall area;was fertilized, but only~ 11 per cent was irrigated. The bulk oB tobacco produotion was aon- centrated'~ in, Las Villas and Pinar del Rio Provinces„ together renderi'rtg 68 per cent' of the tobacco crop of the island. Havana Province rendered three per cent; Matanzas Province, 0:1' ipetr cent; Camaguey ProvinI per cent and Oriente ProNtnce, 3.4 per oent; -~JaRGE-: calllcd for a new ccn of "good'1 fnith at' the bargaining tables" hctween buyeri and growers' rcpresontatives, Although growers earlier this year forced closure of the tobacco auctions because they were dissatisfied with, prices offered by buyers, the meeting was told that tlie 19(33 crop returns were the second highest on, record. 13oard secretary Charles N. Heath said growers received an average $840 an acre compared with the 1960 record d of $885, an acre. Delhi lies in the heart of'the tobacco gcowing, area, some 20 miles south of Brantford'.-TDLES.. r~f
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Tolfacco, 3u~1y. 1';, 1964 - Page 8 tensions. These people are loaded with tension,, rarelycontented~ goaded, inciitedl with, ambitioni,, and this rnentall situation is the cause of exces- sive smokiing,as welll as of'stomach ailments. For these people, smoking relieves the tensions,, evenn if only temporary. Doctor Jlores d'eellared:' "1't is the dose which makes the poison.'"Ironically, he added: "Together withi the interdiction of' smok. img mosti doctors prescribe remedies to, remove tension another way. These tranqpilfzers serve after alll the same aim than smoking:'"' By Guernard D!. de Billick Tobacco prices i'n countries with tobacco, monopolies are based on the cost of living, wages and sal'i-aries and of agricultural working stock. As a, consequence of the increasing cost of living in. France, for instance, tobacco prices in this couin- try have riRen, contiinuously, Here are the prices per~one ki1'ogram~ in French francs for the folllow- i!ng years: 1955; 3i;i0; 1'95fi,, 377;, 1957, 410; 195%, 442; 1959, 474; 11900, 4'89:, Tlie following prices are given in new French flrancs: 1961',,508; 1962', 524; 1963, 539. The situation is similar in lft'aly.. The price for 1963' is thus about 50' per cent higher than that of'1195.5: Th®, demand for pipe tobaccos in the higher price classes, caused by the publication of the United States health reporti influenced sales of Arnold Bioninger Tabakfabrik GmbH & Co., of D~uisl burg, West Germany ini the first quarter o{' 1964. Compared with the first quarter ofl 1963' pipe tobacco turnovers in the: price class, of 2: DM and more for 50, grams increased~ liy~ a~~hout, 200~~ pier cent. tUllso~~ the~ salle& in the~ lower andl naN~y~ cut price ranges show a trend of increase. The management of the firm realizes that not alli of those pipe smokers who went over to this way~ of~ smoking in connection~ wi~th~ the~~ United States~ healith~ report wi~lll remain f!aithflull toi piipe~ tobacco~ but they believe~ that pi'pe~ smiokinF~ wi~ll~ progress. * tk ti1n Professor Doctor Arthur Jores fromi the Hamburg Uni- versity, West Gernrany, expressed his opinion, on the connection between such, d,i4eases me cancer iln thelungs,, circulatoryrlisturbtinces~ andl gaetr~ie ulcers, on the onehiandl andtobaccoPmo'kinR, on the otlier handl, lie does not deny certain con. rrections between these two facte but lre denies a causaJl connection. Tohiis mind bothfactis gpseparatclly hack to the same source, to psychic k * ,k $ssides the usual soft pack, Brimkmann of' B'remen, West Germany, now presentb its "Marlboro" cigarettes in a more rigid flip-top box. The price is the same: 1.751 1)!11'1' for 20 cigarettes. As the flipi-top boxes are ia accordance with interna- tiionall mieanurements,, thecigaretteacon~tainedare 5 millimeters shorter than those in soft packs. This means an indirect inerease of price., * * * In order to faeilitate eeonomical' manufacturing of' cigars on machines, AMF Tobacco Machinery Company (AMMAFOCO) of! Zurich, Switzerj land, has developed a new wt'apper infeed d'e• vice, type "Allround" AF 2.100, which can easily be combined with almost alll known cigar machioes. The miicroflake wrapper is gradually pulled $rorn a, horizontallyy fixed roll over a ten- sion rolll toi a suctiion head which: positiions' the wrapper on the wrapper matrix of the cigar machine. Another suction, device removes' the stampiing, waste. The surroundings of' the wrap- per matrix, are thus always clean.. To prevent drying up of' the foil4 the device is equipped with a hood of plexiglass. Itt can also be equipped with a special moi6teniing, device. * * * O1'ntll now, C: F. Voqelsanq, of Btremen, West Ger many,, dealt only with Scottiish tobacco mixtures with a, clear and male taste tendency. Two new mixtures ofi this' company now provided' smoi ers, who prefer a sweet, miild and aromatic mix-, ture. The are niamed "GreaU Western" ' andl cost 40 and', 60' DMs, respectively. * * * The discussion on the Terry' Report has quickly died down, in Germany. Contrary to the Netherlands andl Sweden, where cigarette sales decreased by more than 20 per cent and', •about 10 per, cent,, respectively, cigarette salles increased in the first' quarter of 19641 to 20:21, billion cigarettes (1963; same periodl:, 18:99' bi7lioni cigarettes). This imeans an increase by 6,4 per cent., Pipe tobacco ; consumption, it is true, increased also relatively remarkably, and cigar andicigarilllo consumption increased i'rut cigarettes stilll dominate. Thee trenril to fi1ter cigarettes ilncreasedl too. 1'6:1 bil- lion pieces were solol~ that is, teni per cent more: 79.6 per cent olf ciigairettes -arefilter-tiippedl (1963: 77:1 per cent).
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obacco. July 24a< 1964 - Page 8 By Guernard D, de Billick After a long period' of inactivity in the West Gerznann cigar iindustry, 1964 began with ai four month period of increasing sales. Two reasons are given: t•he consequences of' the Terry report and intensified advertising. In t.hi's period cigar sales increased to 947 tniilliionpieces,of °`head"ci'gars, stumpen and eigariilos.Thatmeans6.9' per cent more than in the same period of 1963. *, * * . The Gerrnan F'ederal Health Paper has published a report of the Federal Health Authorities on "smoking and healthi damage:"' It says that in 1962 every citizen older than fourteen years smoked 1,900, cigarettes, e.g. more than five cigarettes per day: It, confirms what',was said in the American;, Canadian and Brit,'iehreports con-cerning the fact that cigarette smokers between 35 and 70 years have a considerably higher death rate than non-smokers. For, every 1001 deaths of non•smokers there are 168 deaths of' smokers, says the Gertnan report; that means that the death rate of smokers is two-thirdb higher than that of non.smokers. Of these h3gIv. er death-rates 55 per cent are result of' heart diseases and circullatory diseases. Sixteen per cent are result,of' pul}iionary cancer. The report names eleven diseaees, among them malignant tumors in five different organs, the frequency as cause of death of which is more than 50, per eenR~ higher forsmokersthaa for non-smokers;• * * * In spite of'the results of the Terry R'epoi't, smokers in. West Germany did not cut down their tobaceoo consamptiom The Wickert ltistitute of Tubin- gen questioned smokers, Niinety-tM1Vo, per eenR, said t'hat they now smoke as many cigarettes as during the lqst 12' months. Five per cent said that they smoke lces and three per cent snirl tliat they srnoke more tliatti before. The smokcrs were. aleo asked whether they believe they coulol' {tivee up smokinpSizty-two per eenit aailtll "yei+,"..32' per cenit saiid' "no."' hllnety-eight per cent of qucs• tiloned persons said that they had heard of' the i'esiilts of the American investigations. Sixty- threei per cent sai'd! that they believein t'here- sul'ta. * * * In 1883jthe year ofl its 150th annivcrrairy, Martin Brinkmiann AG of Bremenh West Germany, be, came a member of the circle of sales hilllionaiires: 1053 million, Deutsche 1Wlarks. The firm is now thellargewt smokiln~gtobacco maniifactiirci' on the European continent and tfie ilhilydl l'argest' cigarette manufacturer of' West lrermany ('be- hind' Iieemstma and BIAT)'. Whiile smoking to-i bacco, consuinptiio.remained unchanged i'nW'eatGermany in generall, Brinkmann was ablle to In- crease its sales by 7.7' per cent andl its share of the market to about 60 per cent. But according to the reporti ofl Briinkmann the earniings ini this part of the business is still exceedingly uneati's• factory. B'rinkmann''s cigarette sales ilncreased' by 14.7' per cent while total cigarette consurnp- tion only increased by fouir, per cent to 85.4 bill- lilon, piecee, Brinkmann's portion cli'Rribed' from 12.2 to, 13.7 per cent. Of' other cigarettes which iri 1963 were smoked by the Germans, more than hallf were manufactured by the BrinkYnann group6 Cigarette exports and license manufac+ tnre in foreign countriies, was, with 1,386 billion pieces, double that of 1962 (611 billion pieces)i. Some 26.2 per cent of German cigarette exports are now Blrinkmann product& They employ 4.- 8'26 workers. * * * The mnai'n tobaccocultivationdistricts~of'B'ul'garlla arei'n the Btillgarian-1Macedonian regiony near Plov, div and Hacova and in the D jebel territory. Fol, lowing were total crops of the last yeat'st 1959t 95 million kilograms; 19601: 60 (bllue molld'JI); 1961: 55 (blue moldl) ; 1962': 105; 1963': 100 million kilograms. Eighty per cent of' the Btall- garian crops have to be delivered to the C(}ME• CO1r1 cotinuries, The remaining 20 per cent go to West' European countries and, In low rates, to Nbrth, Africa. Bulgarian tobaccos are esteemed for their i'el'atively low levell of' nicotine. Tliit may have been one of' the cauees for the recent cultivation of a nicotine-free Bulgarian tobacco. * ,1r * French Imports of' raw tobaccos increased f'rom, 78.4 milllion poundis in 1962 to 104.61 million pounds in 1963. Argentina was country of origin Nor . Next cume B'ulgariia, Brazil, Madagascar, the Phidippinee, Colombia and the United Statea.. The portion from Al'geria,, Turkey, Greece and' Yugoslavia, which had been, important in 1961 and the portion from Greece„ which had been important in 1962, ddecreased consideaablx. ^
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World Tobacco M&r&„ 19 - Pa,ges 19,-20. Internofiional perspectitie on C~(a I AC9~ i EAdYH WORLD TaB'ACCO, correspomdeiits review reactions in five continents &o, the bT. S. Surgeon-Getreral''s indict>`ttent W ORLD-WID'Ereactions to, the United, States Surgeon-General's January report linking cigar- ette smoking with, lung cancer have ranged from scepticism to approval; Over a considerable part of the world-in much of Asia and Africa, for example-the question is simply not a, live issue. Tobacco consumption per head is so small that the prnportion of smokers whose habit could bring, them into the brackets that attracted the Surgeon-General's attention is insignificant. Again, tobacco is frequently taken in the. East in, forms (for instance, in water pipes) which were not discussed in, the Washington survey. One reaction reported frAm several countries has been, a threat of restriction on tobacco advertising, but so, far none of these threats has matured. Another reaction, always to be expected after health-and-smoking reports have received international' publicity, has been a further rise in, sales of filter cigarettes. Manufacturers in general appear to be taking, the report't after-effects calmly,, believing that, as on previous occasions, the balance of sanity willl eventually be restored. The notes assembled! here summarise reports from, World Tobacco's correspondents in five continents~. The effect in the UNITED STATES has been lessened by energetic counter-attacks by the tobacco industry, claiming that further research will be necessary to sub- stantiate the medical claims. Senators ofl the Southern States have rallied and' to a great extent mitigated the report's influence. Based on the experiences in Great Britain, it is assumed ' that sales will rise after a fall I reported variously at about to per cent~ Stocks of'the leading tobacco companies rose on the first marketing day after the report was released. Small cigars with filter tips appear to be one of the industry's answers to the controversy, TWo manufacturers introducedlnew products. Bayuk Cigars advertised!Filterelai a brand with a'cool flow' filter, and Stephano Bros, brought out, Kingston, a cigarette-size menthol flavoured, filter-tip cigar. Each features a charcoal, mentholated filter. Six leaders of the iindustry-AmericaniTobacco„ Brown &Williamson,, Il.iggett& M'yers,P'. Lorillard), Philip Morris and R. J. Reynolds are to donate $'ro million over five years to the American Medical Association to, underwrite aa project to stud!y the relationship of smoking, and d!isease. So far„ the Federal Trade Commission's proposed regulations on advertising have not matured. The aim is to force all'manufacturers to label'brands with a caution about health hazard's. These regulations, based on past court decisions that failure to disclose relevant facts in advertise- ments violates the law against misleading advertising,, cannot in any case be implemented until public hearings have been, held. A decision may be further delayed if taken to the courts. Itt, the UNITED KINGDOM the report had negligible effects on sales, according to reports from the multiples. The only slight repercussion, was an insignificant inquiry for more small cigars; Sales of tipped cigarettes continued to rise, though official manufacturers' figures for the weeks since the report was issued are not yet available. Statistics for the year to last December show a rise fromi 28,6oo million, in IQ6a to 37,000 millipn in n963. The sale of plain branda in the same period fell from 81,300 million to 77,qoo million: A highlight of the mild controversy stiffed by the report was an admission by the then Mini'ster, of Health;, Mr. Enddt Powell, in a TV debate with Mr. Ronald Plumley, managing director of f:arreras, that a suggested ban on, cigarette advertising or an increase in taxation would be inetifective in reditcing smoking. Reactions of GERMAN smokers variled, Country-wide reports revealed an, increasing sale of pipes and pipe tobaccos with the higher-priced mixtures more in favour. This wo . speciallly evident at the Spring Fair at Prankfurt' am Main, where pipe sales showed a striking increase. Much publicity was given to the report of a West German scientific team und'er Professor Poche wHiich haa been investigating, smoking hazards for five years. Their reportt blamed air pollution, with, emphasis on car exhaust fumes, as a main contributory cause of llung, cancer. 'The tiny quantities of cancer-prodtsring elements in, tobac¢o, are: insigmificant" the report concluded. In GREECE and TURKEY' retail sales had twt beert affected up to the mid!dlle ofl February, and no ractiott war _ foreseen, by the authorities. Smokers in these countries are convinced that Oriental tobaccos contaim leaa nicotine attd tar than, other types and do not constitute sucli a riek-if risk there is-as the stronger types. The report is studied mainly from the point of view of its possible effects on, the export of Ieaf. That ia also the-case in other leaf-growing countries, suchlas those of SOUTH- CENTRAL AFRICA. The optimists believe, hiowever„that any fall Iin leaf buyingg by the more sophisticated countries could! be offset by increased demand from the under-developed ones, where smoking tends to rise with improved standards of living. Consumption in CANADA has undoubtedly been affected, though to, what extent no available statistics aa far indicate. The distributive trade reports a marked rise ia, cigar, pipe and tobaeeo sales. Pipe repairing is also on the upswing, an indication that many smokers are returning to the pilpe. The press in AUSZ"RALIA played',up interviews wi'r.hh medical l men who, smoke and' aver that they do not' intiend' WORLD TOBACCO i9
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to give up the habit. Some were photographed with eigarettes in, their lipts. It it probable that there willl be an 'cduc. •tionP campaigp, to dissuade young people from atartr ing to smoke. Advcrtising themcs-'L:ightit-you'1II like It',,'The best cigarette of'them all', 'The cigarette that's kind to, your throat', 'Not too strong-not too light' and the like haven't been changed. The report had very slight effect on smoking, habits In NE1t(t ZLAdAND. A ibw tobacaonirta reported a rntall falling-ofEof sales for a week or two, but these soon returned to normal. Others reported no change.. This lack of alarm was probably helped by a newspaper article which followed ctoselly on the report. It was onithee findings of' Sir Ernest Marsden, F:h.S+, the eminent scientist„which showed thatNew Zrealandleaf hasthelbwest radio-activity of'any grown, Advertisement themes have not been changed. There ia no advertising on radio or TV,,by agreement. The teag growing industry has so far had little comment to make but seems confident of future demand. In DENMARII;~: the Government's answer to the report will te a nationrwide campaign to reduce cigarette smoking,. In FRANCE, a Monopoly spokesman says that S.E.L'I'.A. may, have to, make changes in, its cigarette advertising. The NETHERLANDS Nationall Health, Secretary announced a publicity campaign plan to warn the public of' smoking dangers. An apparently uncontrived wave of television and publication features on smoking and! healthi around the time of the American report in the Netherlands hadl a cumulative effect: cigarette sales are reported& to have tumbled 35 per cent. or even more in iniitiallreacti'on, The fall surprised observers, who remember that the market had taken other news on the same subrcct stioitalnX: Sinoking, in, schools has now been prphibited! in Madras State in, INDIA. Madras is the first state tio respond to a suggestion along, these lines from, the Government of India. The current season's crop was piantcd before the Surgeon-General'a report was produccd6 $ir (iiotn being smaller, for fear of what might be In the report, the acreage is about 25 per eent, larger than last year, Monopoly, oRiciala in MOROCCO were unable to assess the immediate local effect of the SurgeonrGeneralPs report because what would be the reaction period eoincided' with, the month,l'ong, fast of Ramadan,, when, Moslems may not smoke between dawn and dusk. The fast always cuts consumption. Perhaps the lsst word should be left to, the dbughtiest unbeliever of all. In WESTERN GERMANY, the secretary generall of the International Association for Scientific Tobacco Researeh,, Drw I-I. Aschenbrenner, suggests that before reports on tmoking, and health are taken seriously; those making the reports should have psychiatric certification that they are not suffering from pyrophobia (fear of llre), Twenth-8ve years" researches by his organisation, says Dr. Aachertbrenner, have proved that tobacco antagonisnt ottiea apriitga !I<om a morbid (and often unconacious), pyrophobir--a phenomenon whose many manifestations inalude suppressed fear of the 'big fire' or atom bomb.
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The' Phili. ~ Morris Call IrTews'. su ly 13'~ 1964 Page I r r"% U/vuWL v.',.j vK.l:ucJ Ca,~~ L cJ1J Ili~ rSeJt.F.~lll'', C:A1tr1C;.1S, Vcn;•.zue1ai-III'igl' smoker aecclptlnce marked t!lu" introduction of Astor, first Venezuelan cigatrettc to use a filter with activated clctractal granules. 1'ihinon Qucrnd'a, Dit,cchor of Mar- keling for C:A. 7 ulrncalcra Nnclonal~ a vub.iiliary oi' Philip fidiarriic, pl~ii,tucll nut that the new <Inuii:e The Philip Morris Ca,ll News ,TuTy ]u3,, 1964 - Page 3' PAI-Pau is 1°vlowcs To S`vicaerlar<Ld Iorri's Interna I' PARIS - Philip N tional's T:;uropc:,n offiac, forrncrlv l • blsccl in Paris, i r;.ncc, has liecn moved to Lausannc, Switzcrlimcl, it was annnunc:cd by European C;an- eral Ntanager Albert Bcllnt. The new acldre>z for Niiilip.h•for-1 ris Int~rn,t+c,n,l l.i,~ l,e is: l'liilitn \forr's S' A., 5Aar,u i ua Tivuii, I Lai.s.utnu, Swit.c:;:1n:L t I filter brand is patterned after t'hat' , ol' Philip ritornit NJirltifiltcrl Since 10©U; innrortinb, cigarettes has been prohibitied by Vonezuela,. iPhilip Morris Inc.,, in combination ' wilh Vinezuelan investors, built'the country's most advanced cigarette frrctory in, Ii'iaracay. C.A. Tabaca- lcra 1\acional' (also known as Ca- tana) is now the number one firm in cigarette sales iii Venezuela. Progressive Technology Accorclinb to Mr. Qiicsada„ Ca- tryn:r endeavors to stay in the fore- I flront of the industry through the , : Introduction of twYchnolbsical acl- ', Iv.nices in its prcxluctz„ as soon as f they arc available. "The introduc- tion, of Astor was made possible tliroush the clone coolieration of' Philip Morris' technological, and. 1production personnel," Mr. Quecadaa stated. "We are using alwhite filter macle in our Marac;ry, plant with the activateci, gi•nnidc, 61ter imhortcd f'rom Richmond." Intensive market surveys were mncle by Catnna: prior to the aleci- sion to Introcluce Astor. The pref- crences of the Venezuelan smoker were careflul1y examiuerl., 'I'he ad - vertising campaign i incorporatetl the resulta of lhe surveys„ anrL has been favorably received by the public. Around the Clock, Mhnufsctc,ring, personncl' in Nfarn~ cay worked round the clocl: to pro- vide suflieient' supplies of Astor for its introduction. The 1'aigh, levcl', c.f rcordLrs since then has continued to keep production of the new brand h,i~mming: .One packaSi'ng problem wa:s l sol'vcd' with, speed and re.cotuceful, ness. The company printing the ~ packages for the brand burned to) the grounc) on the Saturday prior t,, its introduction. Ncti • printing fit- I cilities were located' within a few I hours by Catana's Pirchasinf; MEUi+ ager, Hans Kolbe and production of, new packs sturted! immediiitely.. By Tuesday nooni the new paclcs were ciclivcn•d to the factory in NInracay. , L
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The Pfiili Morris Call Newe' Ju fy 13„ 1964 - Page 3' ~.,•r1r. 64~~~~~~r. 6 L ~_,. , ~DC. .~ ~~a; . r~1c r i-,1~ }~ C:'1ltr1G:.1`i, Veuwzuela-I'Iiblt stmol:er acceptance n7tia•kcd' LhC. . iiitnothtctibn of Astor, first Venezuelan cibarettc to usc a filter' with activutr;cl clj:u•cwall giranules, Itnnnon i<)ucsnd'a„ 1Director of ' Iv-far- , koling for C;'.,h, Tabacalcra PhJaciou:rll,' a, srll>.iidliary of PlnilipMorris, pointed nut that' the new, r"uuLlo The BhiLig Morris Call Netirs July 13, 1964 - Page 3 P AI--Paris AlLoves ~ - Dhili~ K1'arris Intcrn~< PA31S ,1 Philip ~ tional's L'nropl.in oificc, fanncrlv. ~, bawcd, in Yariti, I?r.;nc <•, has hcen ~, moved' to Lausanne, 5s~'itzcrlnncf, it. ~ was annnunec~dl by European Cen- `+t!` er0.bl..~1'tana~'Gr Albcrt~. Bi:~llirt: To ~.J`~4r'~ l.I~. e~t rlc`~fliii l Q+ The new azldrl v. for Philip 1\lor ~ 1 rts Ita°ern.titln il I:l u• ix is: Yhilip I ~ .Ic.rrir S :\•, 5 .%v•i.t,c cte Tlvuli `, filltcr brandl is ,pattcrncd', after that I lof Philip ilwforris SJuItiGlt'cr. Sincc 110(30, Importing cigarettes has been prohibited by VcnEzucl'a. 1Phifip )*1orris Inc:,, in combinartion with Venezuclan investors, built the country's most advanced 4lbarcttc factory irc htaracay: C:A. Tnbaca- lera Nacional (ali;o known as Cii~ ' tana), is now the number one Arm' I in cigarette sales in Venezuela., Phogressivc Technology Accord)ng, to N1'r. Quesada, Ga- tanat endeavors to stay' in the fore- front of' the inditstry through the ,iittrod'uction of, technologicall adL vances in its products, as soon, as ' ~ they are nvaifuhle. "The introd'uc- tion of Astor was made possible through the close cooperation of I'loilip Morris' technological and ~ prod4iction loersonnel," R9'r: Quesnd'a stated. "We arc using a.vhite filter made in our Maracay plant with thc activats>dl firamilc filter importcdd from Richmond."' IIntcnsive market surveys were made by Catana prior to the deci- sinn to introduce Astor. The pref - ercnces of the Venezuelan smoker were careflrlly examined. The a& vertising campnFgn incorporateAi the resulks of the surveys, and has been favorably rcccivecl by'the public. Around the Clock >41'klnufacturing' crsonnel' in \-fara« cay workeJ' round the clock to pra- vid'e suffrcient, supplies of Astor for its introdilction. The hibh levcl! l,f rcorders since then has continued to kCej) production of the new, bbrand liumming. One pa,ckag,i'ng, probl'cm was solvcdi with speed and raroureeful- af,n:r,, Hans Kolbe and production of new, packs starterl immedGatel~: By Tucsd:ry noon, the new pack.e we•rc dlrliverod' to thc factorty in %d:tracay. c e. 0 hours by Catana's Pcuxhasint;~ lttvr- i ncss. The company' printing the ! packages for the brnnd burncd' to l the ground on the Saturday prior l G, its introduction. Nc•-.v printing fa- •ilitt were loe~ited' within •i few e I
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S INIOKINGAND HEALTH
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:, SMOKINGAND HEALTH Both tobacco men and legislators still protest the Federal Trade Comm.ission's ruling on the labeling,of cigarette packages.. North Carolina Governor Sanford, pledges that "North Carolina will intervene in the courts if the FTC'requires cigarettes be~labeled as healthihazards." Tobacco's Editor's Forum labels the ruling, "illegal and illogicaal."' The July 10 issue of Tobac o,, however,, reports that the tobacco industry may be ready to:mod!ify its stand on labeling; "the new position is:said to be to accept mild package-labeling legislation that would also try to prohibit local governments fromigetting,into the labeling or smoking control field." The Council for Tobacco Research - U.S'..A;. has awarded 37 additional research grants to support studies into lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and res- piratory ailments. The grants total $81.7,165. The United States Public Health Service has glvenicontracts for research into, the effect of cigarette smoke on living tissues for an aggregate amount of more than $300,000. The United States Department of Agriculture has arranged a.four-year contractt with the Research Triangle Institute at Durham, North Carolina, under whiche the latter wi'll conduct intensive research on neutral resins of tobacco which, may be important to the flavor of cigarette smoke. The Awerican Medical Association Education and Research Found'ati.on has approved' seven new tobacco research grants tol total approximately $1+40,000~ . Dr. William W. Bates, J!r., has been named director of research and a member of' the board of directors of Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company. Dr., W. G. Woltz has been appointed chairman of the editorial board of Tobacco: Science,, which is sponsored by the Tobacco Science Council. Dr. Woltz succeeds. Dr. J. A. Weybrew, wholis presently chairman of the Tobacco Science Council.
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Tobac+co Men, Legislators C' . Protest F'T. Cigc~rette Ediot. HENDERSON, N.C. - Tobaccogot. another jolt last week, with the Federal' Trade Commission order that after next january, 1 all' cigarette packages be labeled as a health menace and that tobacco advcrtising be regulatedi as to. claims made to_smokers: Industry plans to go into court, re- ceived' strong, supportl from Congress, wlierg representatives ftrom toliacco growing states Joined, in denouncing the' FTC order. Rep. Roy Taylor (I3-NC) led North Citrolina representatives in offering legislation that woulrl', delay for three years the Commission's an- nounced intention to put a danger label on cigarette packages.. Iiep; Horace ICornegay (D-N'C)6 of .Greenaboro„ said he was amazed that FTC, as an agency of' the government, would promulgate such a rule when !t knew the matter was under considera- Von on Capitol' Hill, He commented that "the agency must be resttrained by Congress and not proceed further with such trade regulation rules unless and until Congress authorizes them to i do so." Governor Sanfordi declared "the most iinportant concern of the farmer of' flue-cured! tobacco is the price the crop. ib going,to bring on the auction marketb, tliis year, He added, in his telegram to Secretary Freeman,_that "we need t6__&o everything possible to bol'sterr this year'si price before the selling sea- son starts. The price we get this t+earr determines the state of our pocket- books this year, as well' as the future of the support program."' The Covernor proposed that, if such a meeting as be suggested were helld,, congressional delegations, representa- tives from the Leaf Tobacco Exporters" Associationj representatives from the domestic buying companies and', farmm leaders be- invited to attend. With this combined thinking and with coopera.- tiive effort, "we can do much to restqr+e confidence In the future of tobtfccoi farming, and! much to bolster the prices paid for the crop this year."' B'. C. Mangum, president of the North Carolina Farm Bureau, termedl the Trade Commission's order "a be- trayal of' the economic interests of 17 million, Americans." He added that the timing of' the order, in connection with, hearings in the House of' Representa-, tives on ten bills proposing cigarette labeling "is an affront to Congress and'. the whole process of law in this nation." He deplored the "internecine quarrell between the FTC andl the I}e- partment of Hiealth~ Education and Welfare over who shouldl regulate the labeling of' cigarettes,"' andl said„ "The FTC, in its high}hand'ed ord'er4 ap-, parentl'y is trying to establish itself as the ruler of' the tobacco industry andl the smokin¢ Publiic." Tobacm u, y 3; 1964 - Pages 9 & 33 oJl9,~ a7~ Tinning of the order, the farm leader declared', is doubly unfortnnate, since it comes om top oB' an accumulation of attacks on i the tobacco industry, in a period of' overwhelming surplus of' to- bncco." Chairman Paul Rand Dixon of FT!C' told the House Interstate andl Foreign Commerce Committee he hopes the industry will comply voluntarilly, and added: "They can take this rule ta the nearest court andi ask for a review," which, he said be was "satisGfied this will hapnen'."' orth Carolina Senator B. Everett ~ordan said he hadl been in touch with~ lead'ers and representatives of growers , warehousemen and manufacturers anc~' these groups have al'ready agreed to take the matter to, the courts immedi ately: Bowman Cray., chairman of the board of'R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Com- pany, told the House committee that every one, including the government, ts operating in an area where there is, a lack of' knowledge, and l where a great deal more research Is essential "before definitive answers can be made." He said "we do not believe that any gov- ernmental action is necessary at the present time with, respect to cigare te advertising or labeling, ' He thought noo sueh action as that by the FTC, an ad- ministrative agency, should be taken,, andl !f it were, "it shouldi be taken by Congress and no one else." Mr. C'ray saidl industry attorneys have advised that the FTC does nott have the authority to issue "this trade regulation rule." ~Yyked if the FTC rul- ing would apply only to cigarettes, Mr. Cray said it could have a widespread ,itnpact and' possibly endanger the na- ti'ons free enterprise system:. Tobacco Ju_1Y 3, 1961+-Pagu 4 Rep. L. H. Fountain (Ily-NC)' pre- ' dicted that ' "neither the-courta northli' Congress will!permit the Fed'eraliTrade Commi'ssion, ruling to standl."' He alao, • said' that "it is about time that the Congress take a new look at the au-I thority we have heretofore granted all regulatory, agencies." He doubted ff: any Federal agency "has the corn- petency, or, in, my, tbni'nion, the legal authority to require i tobacco companies to label their products with a positive assertion that may or may not be true: -surxoorted I by wholly • inadequate re- search and statistieall evtd'ence.": Mr. 1Foamtain said' he was convinced that the Surgeon General's report "i's based lamely on statistics of a hi'¢hlv questionable nat'ta+e, and It isti fi11et1 - wtth alll kinds oE' inconai'stencie.. and : contradictions." '1here were reporti that Chairmani; bixon's pronouncement last week wav . disclosed prematurely without con-g sulting other coattniteibn members„ andl a reported "power" !lglit between the' Department of 1i'ealth, Education andl, Welfare and the 1o.'I'G' which I)ixon r heads. ` Rep~ James Itwvhil4l (R-NC), saW Dixon iir "a per.oni8catlon of a Fed'eral; - bureai who is a, alutton for power, and ia readiilag out for more areas to Qon•`_~ " RUeV~1 bl'Ican Hep. Charlsx R. Jones of, North Carolina commented on the FTC1 ruling that "during, my twelve years tn,, Congress I have never before seen anv-; thing like this. Thiu ir an, arrogant dih-; Itlayc of administrative power that' cotn-' pletelv ignores the l'egisl'ative process." -HAD: ! I trarn"E wrin . . . It's a tough break for the cigarette industry whether it does or doeen't, fight the Federal Trade Commission order to print health hhacard warw ings on each pack. If ' there is no legal battlle, etnokers are warned withil each pack and' it could hurt sales, If there is a legal 6ght, it' will' takei about four years to get through the II.S. Supreme Court and each atep' of the way will be widely publicized, which could' hmrt' sales volwme. That's why, it is said„ thie I.I.S. Public Health Serviee and F'°fC dlon'tt care what the cigarette industry decides to dlo4 .--~'>
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Tobac~o Men, Legislators Tobacco - '; 1964 Pages 9 & 33' Protest FTC Cigatette Edict ° 1'1'9q ° 7~ - HENDERSON, P!i.C. -'T'obacco got Timing of the arder, the farmi lead'er another )olt last week, with~the Federal declaredi is dbttbl'yr unfbrtunate; since Trade Commission order that after next "it comes on top of an accumtrlation of ~anuary I alll cigarette lmckages be attacks on the tobacco industry, in, a hbeled' as a health menace andl that period of overwhelming surplus ofi to- tobacco advertising be regulated as to: bacco." claims made to smokers. Chairman Paul R.1ndl Dixon of FTC'. Industry plans to go into court re- toldi the House Interstate and Foretgn ceilved strong support from, Con~tess; Commerce Committee he hopes tlte wherq representatives from tobacco ind'ustry will comply voluntarily,, and' growing states Joined' in denouncing tlte added'. "They can take this rule to the I"'TC' order. Rep: Roy Taylor (D-NC)' nearest' court and ask for a review," led North, Carolina representatives ih which he said'he was "satisfied this will offering legislationi that would delay happeni" for three years the Commission's an- North Carolina Senator B, Everett nounced' intention to put a danger label'' ordan said he had been in tiouch with on cigarette packages. ~eaders and representatives of gtowers Rep. Horace Kornegay (D-NC), of warehousemen and! manufacturers ana •Creensboro, said he was amazed that these groups have already agreed to FTC, as an agency of the government, ta1Fe the matter to the ¢ourts imrnedii- would' promulgate such a rule when ately. It knew the matter was under considera- Bowman Cray,, chairman of' the tlon on Capitol Hill. He commented' board of B. J: Reynolds Tobacco Come that "the agency must be restrained pany, toldi the House committee that by Congress and not proceed' further every one, inclluding, the government, with such trade regul'ationi rules unless is operating, in an area where there is and until Congress authorizes them to ailack of knowledge, and wMere a great do so," deal more research ir essentiall "before Governor Sanford declared "the most definitive answers can be made." He important concern of the farmer of said "we do not believe that' any gov- 9ue-cured tobacco, is the price the crop ernmental action is necessary at the ls going to bring on the auction markets present time with respect to cigare te this year,"' He added; in his telegram advertising,or labeling," He thought no to, Secretary Freeman,_that "we need such action as that by the FTC, an ad= t0--do everyrhing possible to bolster ministrative agency, should be taken, this year's price before the sell'ing, sear and if''i it were, "it should be taken by ion starts. The price we get' this year Congress and no one else."' determines the state of' our pocket- Mr. Cray said i'nd'ustry attorneys books this year, as welll as the future have advisedi that the FTC does not' of the support programi" have the authority to issue "this trade The Governor proposed that if such regulation tvle."'Asked if the FTC rul~ .a meeting as he suggested were held, img would applly only to cigarettes, M'r.. congressional delegations, representa- Cray said it' could have a widespreadl tives from the Leaf Tobacco Exporters' Antpact and possibly endanger the na•, Associ'ation, representatives from the tion's free enterprise system. domestic buying companies and farm leadersi be invited to attendl With this combined thinking and! with coopera- tive effort, "we can do much to restqrt confidence in, the future of tobdeco farming, and much to bolster the prices paid for the crop this year." H, C. Mangum, president of the North Carolina Fartn, Bureau, termedd the Trade Commission's order "a be- trayal of the economic interests of 17' million AmeriQans."' He ad'dedl that the timing,of the order, in connection withh hearings ini the House of Representa- tives on ten bills proposing cigarettee labeling "is an affront to Congress and I the whole process of law in this natiion." He deplored the "internecinee quarrel between the FTC' and the De- partment of' Health, Education and WJelfare over who should regulate the i labeling of cigarettes," and said'4 "The FTC, in its higH-hand'ed' order,, ap~ parentlk is trying to establish itself as the ruler of the tobacco industry and the smoking twblic:" Rep. L. H. Fountain (D-NC) pre- dicted that "neither the courts nor thii Congress will permit the Federal Trade Commission ruling to standl"' Ne aliso' , said that "it ir about time that the Congress take a new look at the au-, I thority we liave heretofore granted all tegulatory agencies." He doubted if any Federal agency "has the com-, petency, or,, in my bninion4 the llegall authorii')r to, reduire tobacco companies to l'abel their products with a positive assertion that may or may not be true. -sunr>orted by wholly - inadequate re-, search and statistical evidence."• Mr. Fountain said he was convinced that the Surgeon General's report "[s based lar¢ely, an statistics of' a histhlv questionable nature, and it is flllerl , withi all kind'r of, ineortsistencies . and : contradictiona:" 'I bere were report>f that Chairman ; 1 Dixon's prorrourteenrent 1Mst week was . disclosed prematurely without con-g sttlting other commission members, and a reported 'power" f1ot between t'he: Deqartment of Healthi Education and, Welfare and the FI]"D which, Dixon< beadit. Rep., jamea 1lroyhill (ii-NC)' satrl: Dixon !u "a personification of a Federal; . bureaucrat wlio ta a ptluttoa, for power, and is reaahing, out for ritore areas to control»` Republican liep: C1tatl. R. Jones of ~ North Carolina commented on the FTC! ; ruling that "during my twelve yearr tn, • Congress P' have never before seen ar+v-; thing like this. Thia is an arroqant d'is-j play of' administrative power that comr; p1'etellv Ignores the legislative proeess " AD:' HAD: ~ - H Tobacco. July 3, 1964 - Page 4 CQn't anin ... Iit''s a tough, break for the cigarette industry whether it does or doeett'ti, fi'glht the Federal Trade Commission order to print health hazard warn-, ings on each piack. If there is no legal' battle, smokers are watrned withh eachi pack and it coulld hurt salee. If there is a legal' 6ight, i't will take ! about four years to, get through, the UIS. Supreme Court and' each etep' of the way willll be widely publlciaed; which could hurt sales volume. That's wlty, it is said, the U.S. Pwblic Health Service and F"I'C don't care what the cigarette industry d'eei'dcs to do. •~
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Last-~ ~'.~itch; Fiy'h; l~J Fremm adserverW7re RenortsNnrth Carolina will intervene in the courts if the Fed- ersl Trade Commission requires cigarettes be labeled as healthi hazards, t:,nv: Terry Sanford' promised Wednesday.. The FTC issnedl an order in Washington Wednesday ret)piring that all cigarette lahels and advertising warn Americans that smoking "may cause death from can(Tr and other diseases."' The Tobacco Institute, representing all major tobacco firms;, would say nothing, officiall,y. However, the iinrlits• t'ry; whose positinni has been made clear in recent. mnrrths, ,isprepared to go all the way to the Supreme: crnu-t to evade the order. In issaing, fhe order, the FTC ran counter th the views of oth- er federal agencies. The decree, announced in dra- matic tones by Commission Chairman Paul Ranrt Dixonl will go iittn cffect in tf!(ii--on .Jtan. 1' for lahels, on Jirly 1 for adver-" ~Ifising. ~ D'iran annnmrced tile d'e- ~.cisnn and issnedi an aecam- ,f^s panyine 153-page sfatement, of ~ findings as he lcstified' before i1he flouse-fnierstat'e.andFor., , i elkn, (bnnnerrr Committee I ~ that is c•nnsiilcrine, a host of Q' btlN on eigar'ctie smnkinq. I The announccmrnt caught the committee by sm prise. Only a dhy <`arlren Siu•Gron General Lu- ther 1;, 'i'erry; te4tifying fhr the Departinrnr of' Hc.itth, Educa-j tinn and Wotfare 1F3[:Wt: said' the, Food and' Druc Arfministration,i abranchi of I1f-.iW~ should haver the anthoriit'y , ta rcgirlate cigar ette ]abels. '1'erry said the FZ'C' should regulate adtertising of cigarettes, but that new ]hgisla- tion would have to he passed to do this. The FTC, hn«cver, is an indc- pendhnt rcgulatoril~ agency and, unlike the welfare agency, not direclli,v under the control of the White House. Sanfordl said North, Carolina "woulri', intervene through for- mal com t intervention or other-I wise" if the F'TC' carries through~ with its decision., I Sanford, chief', executive off the nation's largest lobacco- groWiiig state, said, "We have had' a, thorough hriefprepared for several months dealing with the question of' cigarette lbheling." He added: "You, can be surei N onth Carnlina will play an es.~ sentiat role in the question of! labeling ci arctfcs."' Sanford said;, "Within the nextl -weekf erpect' to set up some,l conferences in Washiiigton to dis-; oussour uoint,of view;,and to h•y'to influence aiiy official position which might he formulated." The Charlotte Observer U. S. Tobacco Journal July 1 6,, 1:y6N R©/'~ ~ 1~eSeaiA t~ ', '~ ~eek Basic Inf ormativn On Tobacco Resin's UISDiA`s 4-Year Pact Provides for Studies On ILeaf Substances WAiSII'INt,TON, D. C',, Tuesday- The U•nited States Department' of Ag- riculture announced yesterday that it had arranged a four-year contract:with, the Research Triangle Institute, at Durham; N. C., under which the latter will conduct intensive research on, neu- tral resins~ oftobacco. The federal agency explainedl thatl these resins represent one of'the frac- tihns of' flue-cured tobacco which scien- t.i5ts have notl been ahle, t.'o characterize as yet; and that they may he important to the flavor of cigarette smoke: Scient.ists of USDA's A'gricultural' Resenrrh Service have isolated and identified other components of tohacco, and' have attempted to relate this in- formation to the various chararteris- ties of cigarette and ciQar smoke. These analyses;, however, have left unidenti- fiedl a num,her of substances called neutrall resins. A large-scale study, uainQ, a variety of' sophisticated techniquea which pro- vi'de, more effective methods of analy, sea, will be done by scientists of the Research Triangle Institute: It is hoped' that the resinous substances can he separated into pure compounds or mix- tures of closely related components that', ca~n'beidentiflied, andcharaeterizedl more precisely. This research will he an importarrt~ srrpplement to work, being continued atl USDA's eastern utilization laboratory near Philatielphia oni the com-ponent'R of leaf' t:obaceo and smoke. The work is being directed by Dr. riTonroe: E. Wall of' the Institute. The technical representat.i ve for USDA is Dr. Russell L. St'edman; of'.the eastern, util'izatinn research laboratory. 'j!obfacco, July 24, 1964 - Page 26 Tobacco Industry Grouip Awards Research Grants Thirty-seven additional researchh grants totaling $817.165 have beenn awarded to support studies into lung cancer, eardiovascuilar' diseases andd respiratory ailments, according to arrn announcement issued in New York re- cently by Timothy V. Hartnetty chair- man of The Council for Tobacco Re- search-U.S.A. New studies selected for support under the tobacco industry's 10-year- old research program, include investiga- tions into various types of' chronic bronchitlis; the effects of'smoke on cili- ary activity in animals; the personality traits of' smokers andl non-smokers, the effects of nicotine on neurogenic lung mechanisms, and! the blood supply' of 4/ / 9,~' 0 7.~_S malignancies„ as well as other researchh projects i The Scientific Advisory Board, whichh directs the council's grants-in-aid pro. gram„ has since 1954 approved! the awarding of 525 gTants-22G initiall grants and 305 renewalsrto inde- pendent scientists in some 100 medi- call schools, laboratories and hospitalss throughout the country:. M'r. Hartnett' said that a total of $6',741,9t34' has been award'ed! for grants-in•aid of research into tobacco use and human health d'uring the past decade. Dr. Clarence Cook Little, scientific director of the council, stated that the Council grantees have published 355 research papers in scientific journal's since the ineeption of the grants-in-aid program. Tobacco Ju]:yr 2T+,, 1964 - Page 2'1+' Cigarette Smoke Research Contracts Announced by LT.S, WfYSHIINCTDN; D. C.-Tlsree con- tracts for all aggregate of' more than $300',Q00 were announced by the United States Public Health Service last .veek for, research intn the effect of cit;arette smoke ow liwing',tissues: The studies are in areas of research where members of the fiurgeon•(;cneral's, Ad- visory Committee on smoking and health said they felt, more information was' need'ed., \ Ii One contract;, for $107,535 was a.Warded' to the New York University Medicali Center to try to isolate and identify components in tobacco which might cause cancer. Investigationi into changes in the trachea of animals' ex- posed to cig;irette smoke will be done by F<tod'i and Drug Research Labora- tories in New York Citx' under a grantl of $103;575: The third contract„ for B 10'4,44f3, was' given, to Hazleton Labo- ratories, Falls Church, Va., to hel'p evaluate various factors in causes of' lung cancer.-HAD.
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LctstD M '8:lrh Fi:'~; ~~~; ~ ~ From ip6sevver Wlre ReFortv North Carolina will intervene in the courts if'tihe Fe& eral1 Trade Chmmis•sion requires cigarettes be labeled as heallh hazards, Gov. Terty' Sanford promised Wedhesd'ay: The FTC issited an order in Washington Wednesday requiring that all cigarette lahelk and advertising warn. Americans Ihat smoking, "may cause death frotrt cancer and' other diseases."' The Totiacco Ihstitlute; representing all major tobacco firms, would say nothing officially. However, the ind'!ts- try„ whose position has' been made clear in recent, mr ittiis, is preparedta goal'11 the way to: the Supreme cn,irti to, evade the order. Ini issuing the order, the FTC' ran counter to the views of oth- er federal agencies. The deeree;, annnrmcedl ini d'ra- matic tones by Commission i hairm7n Paut Rand Dixon. will ~ ointo effect in 19r:~~-on Jan. 1~ or lahels, on July 1' for adver- tisinp. tising. ~' Dixan annnonced the de- ~~ cikani and ifisued an, accom.J`4 panyinc, 151-page statement of ~ finriings as he lrstified tiefore OI the ltonsr-fntrrstate and For•, , elRn fbmnrenre Committee I that f5, ronsiiicrinc a finst ofi ~ bills nn rigar•.rtte smnkine. The announeem(,nt' cau,-hfi the commitiee by surtn-ise. Only a day ' earlier Sm-2nnn General Lu- thcr L. '1'erriy.; trstifying for the Department of Health, Educad tion and Welfare MF)tiS') said the nod and Drug Arhninis#ration,l, ~ branch of 111H:SV. should have' he anthm ity lo rrgulate cigar- letle labels. Tcrry said the FTC ~houldl rc~gnlatc adl•ertising of~ci'garettes, but that new legisla- I tion would have to he passedlto' O'o this. I The r' CC; hmwever, is an inde- I pendent rcgtdotnry' agency andl, unlike the welfare appncy, not ', cctly under the control of the I White House. Sanford said' North Carolina , 1`would intervene through for- hoat court intervention or other-II iwise" if' the FTC carries through, with itk decision. i Sanford', chief eaccutive of' the nation's largest tohacco- groning state, said, "We have had a thorough brief' preparedl for several months dealing with the question of' cigarette l'abelinfi." l He added: "You can be sure North Carolina will play an es.! sential role in the clueslioni ofl laheling cr_nrcttes." Sanford siidl "Within the next; weck I expect to set up some, confi•ronces in lvashint;tonito chs-i c.uss our point of vicw„andlto try' to influence any official position which might be fnrmulatcdl" The Charlotte: Observer U. S. Tobacco Journal July 1 6, 1<}Ei v ©'/ -?# ' ~ Researci to ~eek Basic Infvrmation On Tobacco Resins USDA's 4-Year Pact Provides for' Si11udi+ss. On 4eaf Substlances WASIIiN(.Tt)N, D. C., Tuesday- The United ~3t'at'es Department ofl Ag- riculture announced' yesterday that' it hadi an•angedl a four-year contract with the Research Triangle Institute, at Durham, N. C., under which the latter will conduct intensive research, on neu- tral resins of'tobacco. The federal agency explained that these resins represent one of the frac- tions of' flue-cured tohaeeo which scien- tists have not been able to characterize as yet, and thatl they may be im+portant to the flavor ofl rigarette smoke. Scient.ists of' USDA's ARricultural Research Service have isola,ted' and identifiedi other components of tobacco, and haveattemptede to: relateth~is in« formation to the various characteris- tics of cigarette and cigar smoke. These analyses; however, have left unidenti- fied a number of' subst'anrea called neutral resins. A large-scale study, using a variety of sophisticatedl techniques which pro- vide more effective methods of analy- ses, will be done, by scientists of' the Research Triangle institute., It is hoped thatl the resinous substances can he separated into pure eompoundls or mix- tures of' closely related components that can 'be idkntified' and characterized more precisely. This research will fie an importank svpplementl to work being continued at USDA's, eastern utilization laboratory near Philaflelphia on the components of leaf tobacco andl rpmnke: The work is being directed by Dr. Monroe E. Wall' of the Institute. The, technical representative for USDA is. Dr. hussell', L. Stedman4 of: the eastern utilization research laboratory. Tobacco July 2T+, 1964 - Page 26. Tobacco Industry Group AiwtzrdsResear& Grtznts' Thirty-scven additional research grants totaling $,817,165' have been awardedl to support studies into lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory ailments, according to an announcement issued in New York re- eently by Timothy V. Hartnett,, chai'r- man of The Councili for Tobacco Re- scarch-U.S.A. New studies' selected for support under the tobacco industry's 10~year- ol'd research program include investiga- tions into various types of chronic bronchitis, the effects of smoke on cili- ary activity in animals, the personality traits of smokers and non-smokers, the effects of nicotine on neurogenic lun mechanisms, and the bloodl supply o~' a~/l 9 '/'&7,.J~r S malignancies, as well as other research, projects, The Scientific Advisory B'oard', whieh. directs the council's grants.in-aid pro- g,ram, has since 11954 approved the awarding of' 525 grants-220 initial l grants and 305 renewals-to inde- pendent scientists in some 100 medi- cal schools, laboratories and, laospitals throughout the country. Mr. Hartnett said that a totall of' $6,741,964 has been awarded for grants-in-aid of' research, into tobaccoo use and human health during the past decade. Dr: Clarence Cook Little, scientific director of' the counci]; stated that the Councill grantees have published' 355 research papers in scientific journals since the inception of the grants-in•aid program. TobaccoJu1yr 2T+, 1961+ - Page 24 Cigarette Smoke Research Contracts A=ounrred by U.S. WAS1IiNGTON,, D. C.-Thrce con. tracts for an aggregate of more than $300,000 were announced by the United States Public Health Sern+ice last week for research into the effect', of cij;arette snnoke on liiving',tissiics: The studics are in areas of rese:n•cl'n, where memhers of the tiurgcon-Cencra11s Ad- visory Committee on smoking and health said they felt more information was needed. One contract, for $107,535: was a.varded' to the New York University Medical Center to try to isolate andi identify components in tobacco which might cause cancer. Investigation into chan ges in the trachea of' animals ex- Posed to cigarette smoke will be done by' Food, and Drug Research L.abora- tories in New York City under a grant' of' $103;575. The third contract, for $104',44'6; was given to Hazleton Labo- ratories, Falls Church, Va1 , to hellp evaluate various factors in causes of lung cancer.-HA'D'.
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~edi.,)rs d:.~ Va . r~~~t-D. ~tc~~, F.~;~~~ ~'i~; f~.1 Foam nDs~erver Wlre Reparls. fVortihi Carolina will intervene in the courts i'f the Fed!- eral' Trade Co!nmis,sion requires cigarettes be labeled a9 health hazards, Gnv. Terty Sanford promised Wednesday. The FTC issued ani order in Washington Wednesdhy requiring thai all cigarette labels and adlvert'ising warn Americans lhat smoking "may cause death from cancer and'other diseases." The Tobacco Institute, representing all major tobacco firms, would say nothing officially. However, the indtis- try, whose position has beeni made clear in recent' mr,i;ths, is prepared to go all the way to the Supreme cnurt to evade the order. In issning, the order, the FTC rani counter to the views of oth- er federal agencies. The decree, announced in dra- matic tones byCommission Chairman Paul Rand Dixon; will go into effect in lgcs-on .Jan. 1', for lahelc. on .liily l for adver-" t'ising. fj Dixon annniuured the d'e- ` ~ ci~on and iiasnedi ani aecom- ~P1 panyine 1;B.pagP clatemcnt of ~N finriines as he tevfified before ~ the 1lnusr-lnlrr~fafn and Fnr., ~ eign f'ommerce Committee that !s considering a hnst of bills on eigarrile smnkine. The announcem(,nt' caught the committec by sinprise,: Only a rlay earlier Snr.l_'nnn General Lu- ther L. '1'erry,, lr.,tifvins; for the' Deparlmrnl nf' }{halthi Y tiuca-I ion and Welfare i F16;1V) said the ond and Diuq A(lminitihration,l a branch of' IIFiW: should have' the aufhority /n rctlulate cigar- ~tte, labcls: '1'crr.y said' the FTC I J hould retiultltc adverdising of' igarettes, but that new legisla- ion wonld have ln be passed, to dm this. Thc FTC. however, is an inde- pendent regulatory agency and,, unlike the welfare agcncy; not directly under the control of' the WhiteJlooise.. Sanforrl' said North, Carolina "would', intervene thrnugh for- mal court intervention or other- wisel' if'the FTC carries throuShl with its deciaion.. Sanford, chief eaccntive of' the nationls largest tobacco- grosving' state, said, "tA'e have had a thnrough hrief' prepared for several months deating, with the question of eiigarcttee labeling." ~ He added: "You can be sure!! hlorth Carolina will play an es>^ ential rnle in the question of~ ~abeliiifi ci~arettcs."' Sanford said, "Within the nexti -weekI expect to set up some! conferences in Washington to dis-i cuss our point of'vitw, and to try' to iiifluence any offir:iall position which might he formulatccl."' The Charlotte observer Gl . S. Tobctcco Journal July 16, l.yh t. ~'~~, Resea~rco to Seek Basic Informatioa On, Tobaeco Resins USDA's 4-Year Pact Provides for Sfiiud~ies On, Cea$ Substances WASIIIII+II(.'PC)N, D., C., Tuesday- Tlhe United iStates Department of Ag- riculture announced yesterday that it, had arranged a four-year contract with the Research Triangle Institute, at Durham, N.C, under whichthelatterh will conduct intensive research oni neu- tral, resins of tobacco. The federal agency explainedl that these resins represent one of' the fracs tions of flue-cured tobacco which scien- tists have notl heen able, tkr characterize as yet, and that they may he important to the flavor ofl cigarette smoke. Scient:ists' of' U:SDA''s At:ricult'ural Research .Service have isolated and identified, other compnnents of'tnbaceo, and have attemptedl to relal.e this in- formatiinn to the various chararteris- tics of cigarette and rigar smoke. These analyses, however, have left' unid'entii fied a, number of' substances called neutral resins. A large-scale study, using a variety of' sophisticatedl techniryues which pro- vide .more effective methods of analy- aea, will be done by scientists of the Research Trianglk Institute. It is hopedl that the resinous sohst.ances, can he separatedl i!nta1pure rnmpounds, or mix- tures of'ciosel'y related, components that ca•n 'be identified and characterized more precisely. This researrh will' he an importaimt supplement to, work being continued at USIDA's eastern util;ization Iaboratory near Phi1a41elphia on the componentit of leaf' tobacco and Fmnke. The work is being directed by Dr. Monroe E. Wall of the Institute. The technical representative for USDA is Dr htrssell L. St'edma.nt of the east'erm utilizatinn research laboratory. Tobacco July 24, 1964 - Page 26 Tobacco Industty Group Awaa& Resecn'& Grtxnts' Thirty-seven additional' research grants totaling $817,165 have been awarded to support studies into lung cancer,, cardiovascular diseases andl respiratory ailments, according to an, announcement issued in New York, re- cr.ntly by Timothy V'. Hartnett, chair- man of The Council for Tobacco Re- scarch-UlS!AC New studies selected for support under the tobacco industry's 10-year- ol'dI research program, include investiga- tions into various types of' chronic bronchitis, the effects of smoke on eilir ary activity in, animals, the personality traits of'smokers and non+smokers, the effects of nicotine on neurogenie lung mechanisms, andl the blood suppl{y of // %~~~s",N malignancies,, as welll as other research projects. The Scientific Advisory B'oard', which directs the council's grants.inraid pro- gramy has since 1954 approved the awarding of 525' grants-220 initial grants and 305' renewals-to indis- penelent scientists in some 100 medi- cal schoola„ laboratories and hospitals throughout the country. Mr. Hartnett said that a total of $6,741,964 has beeni awarded for' grants-in-aid of research into, tobacco use and human healtlhi during the past decade. Dr. Clarence Cook Little, sciientif'ic director of the couneil, stated' that the Council grantees have published. 355 research papers in scientifhcc journals since tlie inception of the grants,in-aid program. Tobacco. July 24, 1964 - Page 24 Cigarette Srnoke Research Contracts Ansiounced by U.S. WASHil'VrTO'N, D:C:-Thrce com- tracts for au aggregate of more thair $300,000 were amrouncedi by the, United States Pirblic Health Servicee lnst week for research, into the effect, of cigarette smoke on living tissues. The studies are in areas of' research where members of' the 'iurgcon-Ccneral's Ad- visory Committee on smoking, and healtlr saidi they felt more i,nformation, was nccded. N . CJ r~1 ~. ~ C) clne contract, for $107,535 was awarded to the New York University Medical Center to try to isolate and identify components in tobacco which might cause cancer. Investigartion into changes in the tracheal of animals ex-, mosecl to cigarette smoke will be done lby Food and Drug Research Llbore- tories in New York City under a grantl of $103,575. The thirdl contracti for $104,446, was given to Hazleton Laba-, ratories,, Falls Churchi Wa., to help, evalunte various factors in causes of lung cancer: HIAD;
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Sanford Pledges a r ~~ s,.'I ~+N~ '7~ !J'q.l~ lli.•N~!'~~!/ ~[+ li!•;/~,~/ L7 From O6serven wlfe, . ReportS Nnrfh Catnlin:+ will intervene in the courts 'tf! the Fed- eral Trade Cnmmissi'r+ni requires cigarettes be I'abeled as health hazards, (7nv. Terry Sanford promised Wednesday. The FTC issnedl an order ini Washington, Wednesday requiring titat' all cigarette lahefs and advertising warm Americans liia;t smoking, "may cause death from cancer and other diseases:" The Tobacco Institute, representing all major tbbaccn firms, would say nothing officially. However, the iirdits+ try, whose position has been made clear in rece.nt: mnrrtt7s, ispreparedl t:o~ go all the way to the 5upremecn,rrt to ' evad e the order. In issuing the order, t'he! FTC rancmmfertn the vievvs of~ oth+~ nr federal' agencies, The decree, announced in dra+ matic t'ones by ChmmissionChairmnn Raiill Rand Dixon, willi go, intoi effeell in 19G5-on.J'an.1, ) fhr~ lahelk 4 ~ on Jnly~~ II for~ ad'ver-' .~ , ~ tising. ~ IDixnn annnnnced the de, ~,cicon and issned' an accorn- .Jr panyine l.;x-pagP statement of' `~ findings as he, lrslified' be,fore, t'he flimrse-fn(crstate and For• , ~ d elqn ('onrmercc Committee I that is rnnsirierine a hnst or I b(lla on cicarettr~ smoking. ~ The annonnccmr`nt cau„htthe commit(ee by cili prise. Only a day carlrer Srnrt:oon General Lu- ther L. 'Lerry, (r.:sti(ping, for theI nepartmrnl of ffraith, h;duca-j tinn and Wclfarc iHE\v) said the, Foodi and Driie Achninistration,I ai branch of' I''7P;N. shouldi have' the anthnrity In rrgulhfe cigar- ette labcls. Terry said the FTC shouldregrdatb advcrtising of'~ cit;arettes, but fhal new legisla- tion would have to, he passed too dh this. The P"rC., hmvcver, is an inde: pendent regulatory agency and„ unlike the welfare agency;, not directly under the control of' the {Fhite Ilonse. Sanford saidl North Carolina "wouirl intervene through for- mal' cow t intervention or other- wise" wise" if the FTC, carries throushl with its decisioni Sanford, chief' execntive of'f the nation's largest tohaceo, groxvinfi state,, said, "M1Ye have had' a thrrough, brief, prepared. for severall months dealing with the: question of cigarette lahetinx.•" ~ He addedt "You can be sure! North ('arolina will play an es• sentiall role in the question of! labeling ci,arettcs."' Sanford said, "Within the next! week I expect to set up some~~ ronfcrences in Washington to (hs-i cuss c,ur pnint of view, and to tLy to influence any officiall position which might he formulated." The Charlotte observer U . S . Tobacco Journtall. Ju11y1 6, l964©/ / '17#' Resea~rcW to ~eek. Basic Information 0n, Tobacco Resins WSDi/4`s 4-Year Pact Provides for Studiles On Leaf' Substances Scient:ii;ta ofl USIbA''s A(rricultlurall Riesenrch: .Service have isolated and' irlentified other compnne:nts of't'ohacco;, and have attempted to relate thiia in- formation to the varinus cha,racteris- tics of'cigarette,and cigar smoke. These analyses; however, have, lefti unidenti- fiedl a number of substancew called neutral', resins.. A large-scale study, using a variety of sophisticated techniquea which, pro« vide more effective, methnds of analy-, ses, willl be done by scientists of' the Research Triangle Institute. Ilti is:hopedl that the resinous substances can be WASiTIN(.T()N, D. C., Tuesday- separated into pure rompounds or mix- The United States Department of Ag,- Lures of closely related components thatt riculture announcedl yesterday that it ea•n. 'be identified' and characterizedl had arranged a four-,yeari contract with more precisely, the Research Triangle Institute„ at This research will he an iTnportant Durham, N. C., under which the latter supplement t:o work heing, continued att will conduct intensive research on neu- USDA's eastern utilization lahoratoryy tral resins of' tobacco. near Rhilaf3elphia on the components The federal agency explained that of leaf: tohacco andi smnke. these resins represent one of'tlhe frac- The work is being, directed by Dr. tinns of flue-cured tobacco which scien- Monroe E. Wall of the Institute. The tists have not been able t.ocharacterize technical representative for USDA is as yet'~ and that they may he important Dr. Ru.qsell', L. Rtedrnan, of the eastern to the flavor of cigarette smoke. utilization research labnratory, , TobE1c!C o: July 2Ti,, 1964 - Pagt' 26 Tobacco Industry Group Awards Research Grants T'hirty-seven additional research grants totaling, $817,165 have been awarded to support stirdies into lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory ailments, according to an announcement issued' in New York re- cently by Tiimothy V. Hartnett, chair- mail of' The Councill for Tobacco Re- scarch-U:S.A.. New studies selected for support mider the tobacco industry's 10-year- old research program include investiga- tions into various types of chronic bronchitis, the effects of, smoke on ci1i- ary activity in animals, the personality traits of smokers and non-smokers, the effects of niicotine on neurogenic lung mechani.sms, and the blood supply of . oll 9,~' 0 7Sr9 malignaneies, as well' as other research~ proqects,, The Scientific Advisory Board, which directs the council's grants.inraid pro- grami has since 1954 aprroved the awarding of' 525 grants-220 initial grants and' 305' renewals-to inde- pendent scientists i'm some 100 medi- cal schools, laboratories and' hospitals throughout the country. IWIr: Hartnett said that a total of $6,741,964 has been awarded for grants-in-aid of research, into tobacco use and human health during the pastt decade. Dr. Clarence Cook Little, scientific director of the council'i stated that the: Council grantees have pnblished! 355' research papers in scientific journals since the inception of' the grants-in,aiid, program. Tobacco July 24„ 1964 - Pege 24 Cigaretle Smoke Research Contracts Ann(aunced by U.S'. WASHI'NC;Tn'N, D. C.-Thrce con- tracts for an aggregate of more than. $300,000 were announccd' by the United States Public Health Service hst', week for research into the effect of' cigarette smoke on living tissues. The studies are in areas of' research where members of' the Eurgeon-General's Ad- visory Committee on, smoking, and' health said'i they felt more informatictn, was:nced'ed. One contract, for $107,535' was awarded to the New York Utoi versity Medical Center to try to isolate and identify components in tobacco which, might cause cancer. Investigation into changes in the trachea of animals ex- Posed to cigarette smoke will be done by Food and Drug 1Researeh, Libora- tories in New York City under a gttant of $103,575, The thirdl contract, for aD04,446, was given to Hazleton Labo- ratories, Falls Churchi Va., to help evaluate various factors in causes of lung, cancer.-HAD:
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U. S. lobacco Journal -~ugtls l.a, 1964, - Pages 12 & 18' 10 ire"V`\J7 cLl ~oac~~~l D-) (M ~0- Z t. (0Neacl LO ~ ~~ ~'i~~l~. ~..i t~VU ve'~~s1 '~1esei o-cu U Succeeds Dr. Frederick R. Diarlkis, Rfetiirilrtg, as Director of' Research for Firm; Satmfilelld,, Mold And Rogers Also, Moved to hJ+sw! Research Posts Dr. Frederick It. Darkis has retired in 1056 and was electedi a vice pre:+i'- as vice pre.iiicnt and dircet3r of re- eaarch f.w I,i:¢gett & Myers TnUacco Co. lIo will l,e <urcordlyd,liy Dr. William I_A''., Ila:4r. J'r:. who h:r, l,r.en mimed_' director of: research, and a member of the hnard'of directors, it was a,nnouncedl last week by Milton E., Harrington, pre.cirlent of the company. ---- -- Aflter hisretirement Dr:: Da:rkis will serve as a, consultant to the, re- aearchi department of L&: Ml. It was also announced that Dr., Max M. Samfield has been app,)intcd senior assiEtant director of' research+ Dr. James Dt D'lold' has been advanced too assistant director of research and James D: Rogers has beeni named spe- •ciall aFsistant to the director of re- search.. Dr. Bates, co-inventor of the Keith Filter on Lark cigarettes;, has served as associate director of research since 1958; He began his career as a reseaixh ~Q~chemist, with Liggettl & Myers in 1950. "`and was named assistantl to the direc- Ntor of research in 1956, A native of: [~ Orangebur;g, S. C., Dr. Bates atltended VFchools in Camdenl S. C:, and graduated' ~,from, The Citadel with a Er:S: in chem- ~&stry: lIe served in the Chemical War< fare Service with the U. S. Army and _"""`~ini the UL iS, Army Air Force during WNarld War III, achieving the rank of -13 major and receiving the Purple Heart, the Air Medal with Cluster, and the Distinguished Flying Cross., Dr. Bates entered graduate school at Duke University in 1946' and received Fis P1r.D: as s physccai~cliemist in 1'95~1. H~e is a member of Sigma Xi,, Si.Vma P11 Sigma, the American Association for the Advancement of' Science; the American Chemicail Sbciet'y andl the I!fortlh~ Carolina Academy of Science. He is a member of' the Sf. Luke'a , Episcopall Church, the Rotary Club and, the Willbhaven Country Club, all in Durham, N. C. Dr. Darkis had a distinguished cveer at Liggett & Myers, which began in 1928 when he joined the company.,Since that time he has been prima,rily re- sponsible:flor developing research facili~ ties; research staff and a research pr.o• gram, recognized as one of, the finr.wt in the industry. In 1933 Dr. Darkis wentl to Duke University' as toharao research associate in the chemistry rlr- partment.. He returned to Liggett .'l•'. Myers in 19447 as director of' research, was elected to the board of dirertors dent in, 1000. A native of Frederick. Md., Dr. Darkis receivedl his B.S:,, MLS. and Ph.D. at the University of Kfary- land. I'lbnored in Trade, Jburnall In 1959 the "Tobacco Science" til journal published a, citation in hom~r of Dr. Darkis; °/vho+ t'hroul;h, hiia rr- searches and close cooperatiow w•ith gvvernmentalj academic andl inrlirstriirl research groups, has contributed grv'ar' ly, to our knowledge ofl toLacrr,; uJn• has encouraged the publication of Ih- results of' these studies' for the ho•m•!ir of the grower, the, scientist, :rnd :t• manufacturer; and who+ through wise coun,el„ has, influenced many to followw careers related to agricultural, scienc- es." In 1962, Dr. Darki's received the Southern Chemista" Award! "for dlia- tinguished service, to the profession of chemistry in the southern states." Dr. Samfield, has served' as assistant, director of research since 1960. He be- gan his career with Liggett & Myers as supervisor of engineering research, and development in 1951 Prior to that, he was employed as a researchi fellow and a chemical engineer by the Bureau of Industrial Chemistry in Austin, Tex- as, from 1941 to 1947, andl as a Unit Engineer with Servel, Inc., in Evans- ville, Ind.,, between 1947 and 1952. B'orn, In 1Vlemphis;, Tenn., and, reared in Port Arthur Tex., Dr. Samfield graduated with a B.S. from Rice Ynsti., tute in 1*J40; and received' his M.S.. anrl' Ph.D. in chemical engineering f'rom the Universitly' of'Texas in 1945. :He is a member of' the American Chemical Society, American Institute of Chemi-, cal Englneers; Americani Association for the Advancement of Science, the North Carolina Academy of Science, the North Carolina Society of' Engi- neers; Sigma Xi, 'Phi Lambda Upsilon and Omega Chi Epsilon, He is alho a member and former vice presid;ent, andi director of the Durham, Engineers Club, and a member, past president andl founder of the Durham Toastmasters. Club. Dr. Samfielii is president of' the Jud'ea Reform Congregation of' Dur- ham andl Chapel Hill. Dr. Mo1H has served as supervisor of'f research in organic chemistry s'fncee his employment in the, Liggett & My- ers research department in 1I955': From 1'940 to 1947, he was employed by thei U. 1SJ Federal Security Agency, andl 'from 1947 to 1949, by Parke-Davis &. Co. Born in Carleton, Minn., and rearedl in Duluth, Minn., Dr. Mold' attendedl Duluth Junior College and receivedi his B.Ch. at the University of' Minne- sota~ He received his M.S. and' Ph.D:, degrees at, biorthtivest'ern University. He servedl with the U. S. Army Chemi- cal Corps between 1+049 and 19'55. Hee is a member of Sigma Xi and Pt Lanrb- da Upsilon. Mr. Rogers' has served as supervisor' of leaf' tobacco investigations since, 1000 and began his career with, Liggettr & Myers as a chemist iin the research department in 1952. Prior to that'6 he worked with the St. Louis and! South, western Rkilway in Texarkana, Tex. Born in Mansfield, Ark., and reared In Texarkana, Ark:, Mr. Rogers re- ceived his B.S. in chemistry from Tp- lane University., Iile served inithe U. S. Marine Corps, attaining , the rank of captain clurin•.g Wor1t1,1War I'I and agai'n, during the Korean confllcE, UI . S . Tobacco Journali ~ug118: ' ,9-' P8$e' 1], Montana Senat'or Scores Cigarette Revenue Proposal JQInDAN, MONT., Saturday (CS),- State Senator John J. MacDonald of G'arfiel'd! County accused Cov. Tlmi Bab• cock of "riding, a good horse to d'eat?i"' in criticining, the chief executive's pl'an to finance a new buildi g program through cigarette tax, revenue. Sen. Mae~Donald challenged the ad-' miinietration's plan in, a t'alk before the, Garfield County Democratic W'o• men'e C1Ub,it was reported'.* "I feel I:t iie about time the cigarette rmokers in the state get a little tax relief," the legislator said. "I feet they' have contributed generoualy in, the past years in financing the bonus for World War •IS, Korean War and mow World War I veterans." He said a recent reportby Maurice ~ A. Harmon, director of the Skate De- bb partment of Public Institutions, that W many buildlings• in, the state cuatodial, (0 sysem are ramshackle remnants of ter- " ritoriall days is "niothing, new to us, Q. legislators who have been trying for %J years, to squeeze appropriation re- M quests for cust'odiall improvements past'~ the governor."' ),.T
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IJl. S . Tobacco: Journal ~u.gus +i96T - Pges 12 & 18 ~ir. Vv Tkcinn ~atosto ~,-~eac~ L n,)~~~~~~~ ~~ ew~Ven, 2 e S e << 1 -CcI Succeeds Dr. Fredleriick~ R. D~al Retiring, a~:s~ Director of' Research for Firml Samfielld', Mold And Rogers Also Moved to' New Research Posts Dr. Fealcri'c•k LL Darkiw has, retired in 1!p56 and was elected a vice pre+i- ns vice president andi rllrcctor of re- dent in, 1060: A native of, F'redeisick; search f.-r, i,iggvtt & Mycrs' Tnbacco Xid., Dr. Darkie rece:ivedl his 8;5.,, \t.ti, Co, 11c will I,n -m-ceedi•d by Dr. William • and! Ph.D: at the' University of ainry- 11'., l3:atrr., Jr.. who has bi•cni nanedl land, director of research and a member of the boardl of'directors, it' was announced' last week by Milton E., Harrington, pre.<ident of' the company. Afterli:s retiremcnt, Dr. Darkis will serve as a cansult'ant to the re- search departmentl of L & M. It was also announced that Dr. Max M. Samfield has bee-r app-)inted senior assiEtantl director of research, Dr. James D. Mold has been advancedi to assistanti director, of research and James D. Rogers has been namedd spe. •cial assistant to the director of re- search. Dr. Bates, co-inventor of the Keith Filter on Lark cigarettes, has served as associate director of research since 1958. He began his career as a research ~p~ehemist with Liggett &: Myers in 1950 ~"~ndi was named! assistant to the diree- t\ tor of' research in 1953. A native of (~ Orangeburg;, S! C., Dr. Bates attended V rchools in Camden, S1 C., and graduat'ed ~`t•,,from The Citadel with a B.S'. in chem- `to,ihtry. He served in the Chemical War- fare Service with the U. S. Army a•nd'. _Nn the U. iS!. Army Air Force during 71~World War II, achieving the rank of <~,major and receiving the Purple Heart, the Air M'edall with Cluster, and! the Distinguished Flying Cross. Dr. Bates entered' graduate school at Duke University in 19;46' and received, X is Ph.D as a physicafe-hemist iin 1:151.. He is a member of Sigma Ri, Sik:ma, Pi Sigma, the, American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society and the North Carolina Academy of Science.. He is a member of the St. Luke's Episcopal Church, the Rotary Club and the Willohaven Country Club,, all', in Durha•tn„ N. C. Dr., Darkis had a distinguished'carecr at Liggett & Myers, which began in 1928 when he joined the company. Since that time he has: been primarily re- sponsible,for developing, research facili- ties,, res:earch, staff and a~ research: pro- gram recognized, as one of' the finevt in the industry. In 1933 Dr. Darkis went to Duke University' as tobacco research associate in the chemistry de- partment: He returnedl to Liggett' .'l'• Myers in 194a as director of rescarch, was elected to, the board of direcfnrs Honored inTrad'e .lournall In: 1959 the "Tobacco Science" trade journal published a citation in hom-r of Dr. Darkis, "who, through hi.v rc• searches and, close cooperation w•iih governmental, academic and indtistrial research groups, has, contributed' grv•:1!' ly to our knowledge of toF,acrn; i%il•s has encouraged the publicatiun nf 1hs resuits of these studies for the: Ur•m f?^ of the grower, the scienti:~t, an+l' ;1• manufacturer;, and who, through wise eounsel, has influenced, many to follow careers relatedl to agricultural scienc- es:'° In 1962, Dr:, Darkis receivedl the Southerm Chemists' Award "for dis- tinguished' service to the profession of chemistry in the southern states."' Dr. Samfieldl has served as assistant director of research since 1960. He be- gan his career withi Liggett & Myers as: supervisor of engineering research and development in 1952. Prior to that, he was employed as a research fellow and a chemicall engineer by the Bureau, of'Industri,al Chemistry im Austin, Tex- as, from 1941 to 1947, and as a Unit Engineer with, Servel, Inc.,, in Evans- ville, Ind,, between 1947 and' 1952. Born In Memphis, Tenn:,, and reared in Port Arthur Tex., Dr. Samfield graduated with a B',,S. from Rice Tnsti- tute in 1040, and received his MLS; and Ph.D. in chemical, engineering from the University of •Texas in 1945. He is a mcmber of' the American Chemical Society, American Institute of' Chemi- cal Engineers,, American Association for the Advancementl of! Science, the North Carolina Academy of' Science, the North, Carolina, Society of' Engi- neers, Sigma Xi, Phi Lambda Upsilon and Omega Chi' Epsilon. He Is also a member andl former vice president aod'd director of the Durham Engineers Club and a member,, past president and founder of' the Durhami Toastmasters Club. Dr. Samf'ield' is president of' the Judea Reform Ccngregation of, Dnr- ham iand Chapel l Hill., Dr., 1Vlold: has served as supervisor of' research, in organic chemistry since his employment ini the Liggett & My- ers research department in 1955.. From 1943 to 1947, he was employed by the U'. ~S. Federal Security Agency, andl 'from 1•947 to 1949„ by Parke-Davis & Co. Born in Carlet'on,, Minn., and reared in Duluth, Minn.,, Dr., Mold attended Duluth: Junior College and' receivedd his B'.Ch: at the University of Minne., sot'a,. He received his M.S: and' Ph,D., degrees at Northwestern University. He servedl with the U. S. Army Chemi, cali Corps between 1049 and 1955. He Is a member of Sigma Xi andl Pi Lam-b- da U'psilon., Mr. Rogers has serve& as supervisor of' leaf tobacco investigationa since 10dp andlbegan his career with Liggetb & MyRers' as a chemist in the research department in 1',952: Prior to that; he worked with the St. Louis and South- western Railway in Texarkana,, Tex. B'orni in Mansfiictdj Ark., and rearedi In Texarkana, Ark,,, Mr., Rogers re- ceived hii+, $S. in chemistry from Tp- lane, University. I'i:e servrdl in the U. S. Marine Corps, attaining the rank of' captain during World, War II andlagain during the Korean confli'ct; t1. S. Tobe,cco, Journal nigtla '. y 9 - Nge 1S Montana Senator Scores Clgaretta Revenue Pro~osal~ JOIn'IAA•hP,, 1140tV'T.,, $aturday (CS')- 8tate Senator aohn J:, blacIDonaldl of. Garf'ield' County accused Gov. Tim Bab- cock of "nid3ng,a good horse to death" in, criticizing the chief' executive' plan to finance a, new building progmam throughi cigarette bax revenue. Sen. MlaaDonal'd challenged the ad-' ministration's plan, ia a talk before the Garfield' Countyr Democratic Wo- men's Club, it was reported.* "f feel: it is about' time the cigarette nmokers in the state get a little tax reiief;' the legislator said. "I feell they have cont'ributedl generously in the past years in financing the ~bonus for Worl'di War Iii,, 11Eorean War and' now Worl'd War I veterans:"' He said' a recent report by Maurice 0, A. Harmon„ director of' the State Ds- ~y parttnent of' Public Institutions, that M.1 many buildings in the state custiodialf i~ sysem are ramshackle remnants of ter- a" ritorial days is "nothing new to us, Q i legislators who have been tryi•nng, for QtJ I years, to squeeze appropria:tlon re- M quest's for custodial improvements past~ the governor." ~`
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Tobacc o ,. ~tuIy 3,~,' 1964 Dr. W. G. Woltz Appointed Chairman Of "Tobacco Science" EditorialBoard, Tobacco ,9 y 10,, 1964 - Page T Forum RAi:.EICH, N.C.-The appo:ntment faculty of the College of Agricuilture!of . of Dr. W'. G. W'oltz as phaimnan of theN'orth: Carolina State of the, U'niversity; ed'itoriAl board of "Tobaccoi Science," of North Carolina, succeeds Dr. We -' eff'ectiue July 1, 1984, was announced' brew who has been, chairman of t~e here last week by Dr. J. A. Weybrew, editorial hoard and editor of "`Tobaeco charrmani of the TobaccoScience Coun- Science"'since 1957. cil, which sponsors "Tobacco Science." Dr-. Weybrew, professor of chemistry Dr. Woltz, who is professor of soils at North Carolina State, was the second! at' the North Carolina Agricultural Ex- chairman of the editorial' board of' the periment Station and a membetr of the unique scientific journall which appean nlegal. and Ulogital , MhteNti testimony was presentedl before the Hovae of Representatives InteretateandForeign CormmterceComrmiit3eerecen~tliyon eigarettelabel- img: Because they suceinct'ly expose the illegality andl illogic of the Federal' Trad'eCommission order, "ToBACCO" cornmendaibs, readerei' attention to the statemenbsi made by B. C. Mangttmy, president of the North CarolYna' Farm Bureau, and Senator Strom Thurrmond~ of South Carolina. This is the way Mr. Mangum looks at itiy:. It is' inconceivable that the courts taould' permit the order to stand as it is now crsnstitutcd'."lw'obody kas even come close to convicting tobacco of causing cancer, and it ufilf be many years;, if' ever,, before anybody does. And' yet t'hat' is exactly uvliat the FTC presumes, and it is the basis of its action on labeling." "AGf'ore than 17 million Americans receive part or all'of'their income from tobacco. Over 70' million Americans smoke. The FTC, in its high-handed order, apparently is trying to establish itself as the rule of ' the tobacco indtrstry and the' smoking publ'ic. "'ri'irst' there was the lfeport of the SurgAon tf eneral' on Smoking and Health in January---at best a questionable report' scientifically. Then Congressmen who have no understanding of tobacceo's problems or its val'uetotlie economyy o f' this nation begam to introduce bills to, kill the tobacco program. Next' came the attempt' by a f eux Georgia tobacco growers to have their own little tobacco program. "And now the FTC, without even, the sure authority to issue such'k an order,, liaa abrogatetl' the responsibility of Congress and is trying to force the tobacco farmer and his industry into bankruptcy:. The order hard'lygivestbe tobacco manufacturerstimetosetupt']ie print-ing o f, those deadly labels,, since it's supposed to go, into effect in just six months. "We ufill see, suits filcd' very quir.k,ly to test this outrageous order.. Here iis, how: Senator Thiurmond sees the eituatiion:~ ""L'he~tobacco l'ab'eGimg~req,ui'rement~whick~is lieing~ordered bythe~~y h'ederal T'rade. Commission is too harsh and unreasonable. If the gotu- ernment is going to require thel'abel'ing of cigarettes as being,d'an$er-, ous„ then what about alcohol.or even the purchase of' an automobil'e, which the~courta~~~harve~~l'abeled'as: being `a~danger,ous instrumentality.' "The tobacco industry has indicated' a good' faith willingness to pol'ice~ its own advertrsing~and to, engage~i'ru research irork, to find~'ways: to, solve any problems, or health hazards which may be posed to the consuming pudilic~~ by u:sing~ tob~acco~ prodinct's. ]f' these efforta~, should' prove inegecti've,, then the Congress might consider taking some action of a more reasonable nature:"' weekly in "Tobacco"' and' is published asi an annual ubiication by tlhe Lock+ woodl Trade• gutmall Company. Dr. Weybrew also announced' that;~ Dr. T. W. Graham, senior p1ant pa- thologist at the USDA Pee Dee Agri+ cultural Ezperitment Station, Florenee;; S'. C.,, has been named vice-chairman of the editorial board. Other members of' the new edit!ariall board4 which, has been expanded from seven to nine to, reflect the widening industry participation in the publNca-, tion, are: D. F. Dlbjatzinger, of North Carolina, State,, UNCR;2.A. Patrick, of Canada Department of Agriculture, Harrow, mnt.; Al'an Rod'"n;, of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacca Q'~omtmpany, Winston-Salem, N.C.; R'. L. StedmanM of the USDA' Eastern Utilization and Research Laborato PhiPadelphia, Pia. Rush D'. Touton, Bayuk Cigars, Inc:;. Phdladelphda,, Pa.; H. E. Wright, Jr., 4 the American, Tobacco Comp any, Rich-~ mond, Va., and B. C, Nichols of the' University of Tennessee and'the United St'ates' Department' of Agriculture.
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"More than 17'mill'ion Americans receive part or allof'tleeir income from tobacco: Over 70 million Akrtericans smoke. The FTC, in its Iinigh4anded' order, apparently is trying to establish itself as the rule of the tobacco industry and the smoking public. "L'irst' there was the Report oj' t'he Surgeon General on Smoking and' Health in .lanuary-at best a questionable report acientiftaall}r: Then Congressmen uoho~ have no understanding of' tobaccco's problems or its value to the economy of t'his~ nation began to introduce bills to ktill' the tobacco program. Next came the attempt by a f ew, Georgia tobacco growers: toh,avetlieir own litt'letobacco, program. "A'nd' now the 1•'TC, without even the sure authority to iissue, suc.lt an order, li,as, a:brogated' the responsibility of,' Congress and is trying, to force the tobacco farmer and his industry into bankruptcy. The order hardly give-s the tobacco manufacturers time to set up the print- ing o f' those deadly labels, since i't's su pposed to go into effect in just six months. "We wi.ll' see suits fnhd' very quickly to test this outrageous order.. dt ia' in.conceivable tliaut the courts would' permit the order to stand ar it is now constituted'."Nobody has even come, close to convicting tobacco of causing cancer,, and' it will' b'e many years, if' ever,, be f'ore anybody does, And' yet that' is exactly what t'h.e, FTC presumes, and it is the hasis of' its action onn l'abeling."' Dobacco, J :'.19s4 ~"oltz' Aptao1'ated Chairman Dr. W. G Of "Tobacco Science" Editorial Board Tobacco J.'u '3? 1o', 196'4 - Page 7 . tDilroA's I Forum RALEIIGf{„ N:C.-The appontment of Dr. W. G: Woltz as phairman of the editorial board' of "Tobacco Science," effective July 1, 1964, was announced here last week by Dr. J!. A. Weybrew,, chairman of the Tobacco Science Coun- ci1; which sponsors "Tobacco Science." Dr. Woltz, who is professor of soils at the North Clrolina~ Agricultural Ex- periment Station, and a member of' the Iilegal. and, Ul0gOcal ~ Much testyrnony was presented before the House of Representatives Interstate andl Foreign Cor'ntmerce' Committee recently on cigarette label- irig~.~ Blecaue~e~~ they su~ecinctly: expose~ the~~ illegality ~ and' illogic of' the: ~ Federal Trade Commission order, "To$ACCO'"' commends its readers' attention to the sta'~t~ennentb~ mad'e~ by~ B. ~ C. .11$angurn,, president of~~ the~ North Caro~~linw Farm ~ Bureau, and! Senator Strom~ T1i'utmnond,: of~~ South Carolina: Z?his' }s the way 1VIIr., Mangum looks at it: Here is how Senator Tliuu•rnond sees the situation: "The tobacco labeling requirement which is~ being ordered' by tlie~ Federal, Trad'eCommiasion is too harsJiand' urureasonable.if,'th'egow-ernment is going to' require the labeling o f cigarettes as being,d'anger- ous; then what about aleohol:, or even the purcikase of an automobile, whd.clithecourtsliavel'a~bel'ed as being 'adanger,ous, instrumentality.' "The tobacco industry has iiudicat'ed' a' good faith willingness to police its own advertising aued' to engage in research icork, to /iund' ways to sol'veanyproblema or liealt'lihazard's wh'ich: may be' posedito tlieconsuming, public by using tobaccw products. !f these.' efforts should prove ineffective, then the Congress might consider takin;g some action of,' a more reasonable nat'ure."' faculty of the College of Agriculture of' . North Carolina State of the Universityi of North raroCina„ succeed's Dr. We y~-' brew who has been chairman of the editoriall bnardl and editor of' "Tobacco. Science" since 1957: Dr: Weybrew; professor of chemistry at North Carolina State, was the second chairman of the editorial board of the unique scientific )purnal which appeare weekly in, "Tobacco" and is published as an annual publication by the Lock- wood Trade• Journal Company. Dr: Weybrew also announced thah Dr. T. W: Crrahami senior plant pa- thologist at the USDA Pee Dee Agril- cultural Experiment Station, Florence; S: C., haa' been namedI vice-chairman of the editorial board. Other members of the new editodat board; which, has been expanded from, seven to nine to reflect the widening industry participa~ion in the pu blica- tion, are: D. F. M'atzinger4 of' North Carolina State, UNCR; Z. A. Pat>rick,, of' Canad'a Department of Agriculture, Harrow, Ont.; Alan Rodgman, of the R. J. R'eynoldi Tobaceo Company,. Winston-Salem, NiC.; R. L. Stednan, of' the USDA Eastern Utilization and! Research ll.aboratory Philad'eiphih, Pa.;. Rush D. Touton„ of Bayru'k Cig~rs, lnc., Philadelphia, Pa.;, Wriglit; Jh., 06F the American Tobacco Cotnpany, R'ich- mond', Va., and B: C. Niclioly of' the' University of Tennessee and the United States Department of Agriculture.
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Cortaumer Reports 1. ~ Su t„ 9 - Page 365. SWit+elr f~o emall „elgars, perl>tnp4Y Ever since some of the most out- spoken critics of cigarett'e,smoking be- gani suggesting a switch to cigars or rpe for smokers who can't kick the. ~abit completely, cigar manufacturers. 6ve fished aroundi for ways to makee the changeover more appealing, to more people. The cigarett'e-sized cigar was thei'r answer to the ilncreased con- tern over cigarette smoking in the Igte. 1i95(i,,, and for a short whiile thib Item, enjpyed a sharp upsurge of pop- Ularity (coNSUDtBW REPORTS, October 1959). Then. late last year,,the U.S. Surgeon Qeneral's report appeared, with, iitss strong, support for the indictment against cigarette smoking, and once again cigarette-sized' cigars were in the. limelight. This time, though, they did not:have it all to themselves: they were joined there by cigarillos, small cigars' ofl'the 50 variety. To get some picture of how smokers reaet, to both products, Cti lined up a ~p smalC' panel of' inhaiing, cigarette amok- Ners willling to try them. Cachi panelist O was asked! to smoke a pack ofi the cig- ~,~ arette-sizedl cirars and 20 cigarill''os. A. V`week later, the panelists were asked to= C),,fill out a questionnaire pertaining to ~ their experience. ,.~ The results indicate that relatively ~ few smokers will find these proditcts an easy way out of' their unhealthy habit. Very few of the panell members liked the cigarette-sized cigars, and only' about' one-third of themiliked the ciga- rillos: Because inhaling appears to be, aa major factor in the effects of' smoking on health, the cigarette-inhaling panel- letb were questioned about their in- lialing of' the cigars. About halt of' them did not inhale ciigarillos;, most off the others inhaled them less deeply or less,frequently than they did cigarettes. The results wi2h, the cigarette-sized cigars were much less favorable. About three+quartersi of' the panelists inhaled these. However, though three-quarters of the panel' said that they wouldl not be able to stop inhaling, cigarettes, al- most alll believed they could, eventually stop inhaling cigar smoke. CU' included' one loadedl question in the questionnaire and got back answers to it hardly, likely to raise the spirits of those (ineluding, CU) who have been trying to do a job of' public health ed'ucation, on the now unquestionable: dangers of' cigarette smoking. The quest'ion :"If you were to be convinced I that' cigarette smoking was unhealthy,, would you switch to such cigars?"' More than one-third of the panel mem~ bers (includiing a few who saidl they didn'tl like the ciigars) answered yes- thus i'nd'icatimg that, since they hadn't„ switched yet, they were not convinced that their habit was unhealthy:, Indeed, a recheck ttvo months Ihter revealed' that not one had- yet switched from cigarettes to cigars.. If' you, too, remain unconvinced on, thisiscore, you willi do, well i to, read': (!orre-read ) ' CU'e "Rsport on Smoking andl the Public lnterest:"' You shouldi of course, quit smoking altogether if you' can. Ilf' you i can't, try cigars or a pipe. On the basis of CU's small sam. pling of smokers, chances seem sdme-, what -better that you'll atop inhaliing and find the sw'stch imore acceptablle if', from the smaller, varieties of' cigar„ you choose cigarildos. il . S. Tobacco ,Jnurne:l. Ju11y 16, , '96. - Pagee 1 & 2'IF Survey Points Out Features Of Smokers The Characteristics of Cigarette Smokers Are Outlined In a, Study A total of 28;819,000, families - out of the estimatedl41i,888,000 familtes in the. Unitedl Statea-lnclude one or more smokers, according to a survey conduct- ed recently by "'U. S., News d4 World Report" in conjunction with Benson & Benson, Inc., an independ'ent, research firm. Of' the total, 24I,811,000 famtlies in, clude male smokers andi 16,860;000 have female smokers, the 91~dy' indicated.. Ini, breakdown of the number of cig- arettes smoked a day, the study, a na, tional projection based on a sampling of' 110;,000 owners of' passenger auto- mobiles, found that these familiea con• sumedi an average of' 1.64 packs a day. The report showed that' 0.3' per cent of the families smoked' one-half pack aa day, 36.9 per cent of the family units consumed 1.0 pack a day, 10.6 per centt of the famiilies smoked 1'.8' packs a day; 27.1 per cent used 2:0 packs a day;, 2:7' -per cent smokedl 2.6' packs a day; and' 1!3.4, per cent of' the families consumed 3.0 or more packs per day. King-size filtered ci'garettes seemed to be the most popular, with 17;897,000, of the smoking families using the king- dse f'ilters compared' with 3,843,000 of' the families smoking regul'ar-sise fit'- teray 6J87,000 consuming non-filtered" ki'ngs andl 8;676,000 family units smok-; fng regular-sise non-filt'ered.. Families' Ieseareai Cempared ~ Reporting on, family income as re- lated to preference for filtered or non- filtered cigarettes, the recent survey' of the publication found! that all Income groups with one exception--the less- than,-;6j000 category - pref erred the filtered brands. Families earning $18,000 or more, preferred' filters 9.0 per asnt to 6.6 per, ecent for non-filters; those earning $10,r 000, or, more consumed' filters 28A I per cent as against 22.5 per cent for non- filters; families with income of' more. than ;7,h00 preferred filters 48.1 psr "nt against 45.2 psr cent for unfill- tered' cigarettes; those earnings ;6y000 or more amoked' filters 80:2' per cent ass against 77:2iper cent for non«filtered;; and families' in the less - than -=6,000 category favored nonrfilters 22~:8 per cent to 19'.tt per cent for filtered brands. Exactly tlie'same.pattertr was shown for the king-size, which also were fa- vored by all' groups except the under- ;b,000, classification over the regular. Eauaatlioa .E Baedt} Had' One of' the more interesting sections of' the study related education of the family headl ta the type smoked. For college graduates, 17:3' per cent smoked filtered' ciga'rett'es to 10:7 perr cent smoking non-filtered, and 18.7' per cent smoked king-size cigarettes to 11.6 per cent smoking regular. In families where the family head attended college, 32.6 per cent smoked' fiitsred' as compared with 2668 per cent preferring non-fillters, and' 33,3 per cent favored kfhg-size to 23.7'per cent smoking regulars: Of the high schooll graduates, 68.6; per cent smoked filters and 81L3 per cent used, non-fiilters„ whil'e~ 65.9 per cent favored king-siza tis 59.2' per cent smoking regular cigarettes. In the families where the head was not' a high school graduate, 34'.6' perr cent smoke filltered' brandls,, 38.7 per cent use non-filters, 34'.11 per cent use king-size and' 40:8' per cent use regular.
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Conaulner Reports 1u Qugtlst, T9_UT - Page 365 Switclil taemn1I cigArey pcrLnpsY Ever sihce' some of the, most out- spokenicritias' of cigarette smoking be- lian sugrest'ing, a switch to cigars or iEpe for smokers who can't kick the ~abik completely, cigar manufacturers ]tave fished around for ways to make_ the changeover more appealing to, morepeople: The' cigarette-sized cigar *was their answer to the increasedl con• eern over cigarette smoking in the'llate 1950s, and: for a short whille this ikem enjoyed a sharp upsurge of pop. nlarity (CONSUMER REroRrs, October 1959). Then. late last year, the U.S. Surgeon General's report appeared, withi its strong support for the indictment againeU cigarette smoking, and once againi cirarette•sizedlcigars were in the limelight. This time, thoughi they d'id' not have it all to themselves: they were joined there by cigarillos, small cigars ofi the 5~ variety. To get some picture of how smokers ~ react to both products, CI11 lined up, a ~ amall panel of inhaling cigarette amok- ers willing to try them. Eachi panelist Q was askedl to smoke a pack of the cig- arette-sized ciga'rs and 20 cigarillbs. A :~_rreek later„ the panelists were asked tor out a qucGtionnaire' pertaining to their experience. .~ The results indicate that relatively few smokers will find these products an easy way out of their unhealthy habit. Very few of the panel' members liked the cigarette-sized cigars, and only about one-third ofthem, liked the ciga- rillos, Because inhaling appears to he a major factor in the: effects of smoking oni healthi the ciigarette-inhaling paneh fet's were questioned about their in, haling of the cigars. About half of them!diid notinhalecigarillos; most of' the others inhaled them less deeply or, lless frequently than they diid'cigarettes. The results withi the cigarette-sized' cigars were much less favorable. tLbout three-quarters of' the panelists inhaled these. However, though three-quarters of the panell said that they would not be able to stop, inhaliing cigarettes, al- most all believe& they could eventually stop inhaling cigar smoke. CU included one lbaded question in the questionnaireandl got back answers to it hardly IikeNy to raise'the spirits of those (including CU)' who have been trying to do a job of' public healthi education on the' now unquestionable dangers of cigarette smoking. The question: "if you were to be convinced that cigarette smoking was unhealthy, would you switch, to such cigars?"' More than one-third of the panel I mem• bers (including a few who saidl they didn't like the cigars)i answered yes- thus indicating, that, since they hadn't, switchedl yet, they were not convinced that their habit was unhealthy. Indeed, a recheck two months later revealed' that not one had-'yet switchedl from cigarettes to cigars. If you, too, remain unconvincedl on this ecore„ you will do welll to, read (or re•read) CU's "Report on Smoking andl the Publlic Interest." You shouldl, of course, quit smoking altogether iE you can. If you can'ti, try cigars or a pipe. On the basis of CIU's small sam- plling of smokers, chances i seem sd'me•, what •better that you'll stop, inhaling' and find the switch more acceptable if, from the smaller varieties of cigar, you choose cigarillos. U. S. Tobacco Journal ,July 16, 1964 - Peges 1 & 24 Survey Pointsi Out Features Of Smokers The Characteristics of Cigprette Smokers Are Qutlined in, a Study A total of 28,819,000' familfew- out of the estimated 41,888,000 famil'ies i'n' the. United States-include one or more smokers, according to a survey conduct. ed recently by, "U. S. N'ews & World Report" im conjunction with Benson & Benson, Inc., anindependenk research firm. Of the total~ 24,61'1,0001 families In- clude male smokers i and 16,860,000 1have female smokers, the 9104y ilndicatedl In i breakdown of the number afcig- aretties smoked a' day, the study, a na- tionall projection based on a sampling of 10,000 owners of passenger auto- mobiles, foundl that these famillies con- sumed an average of 1.64 packs a day. The report showed that U:3 per cent of the families smoked one-half pack a day, 36.9 per cent of' the family units consumedl 1.0 pack a day, 10.6' per cent of'the familHes smoked ll6 packs a day; 27:1 per cent used 2'.0 packs a day;, 2.7 per cent smoked' 2'.6 packs a day; andl' 13.4 per cent of the families consumed! 3.0 or more packs per day. King-size filtered cigarettes seemedl to be the most popular, with 17,897,000' afthe smoking familllec using the king- size fliters compared with, 3,343;000, of the famillies smoking regular-sise tii, ters, 6ji87,0001 consuming non-filtered'i :kfmgs and 8,675,000 family units amok- 3ng regular-eise' non-filtered. Families' ineomes Compared I Reporting on family income as rs- lated to preference for filtered or non, filtered cigarettes,the recent survey of the publication found! that' all income groups with one exception-the Iess- than-a6+000 category- preferred the filtered brands. Families earning $15,000 or more preferredlfilters 9.8 per cent to 8.8 per cent for non"filters; those'earning i10,• 000 or more consumed fllters 284 per cent as against 22.6 per cent for non- filters; families with Income of more than $7,500 preferred filters 48.11 pQr cent against 45.2 per, cent for unfil} tered cigarettes; those earnings $5,000 or more smoked filters 80.2' per, eent as against 77.2 per cent for nanfiltered; and famiilies in the less - than -=6,000' category favored non-filters 22.8 per cent to 19.8 per cent for filteredlbrande. Exactly the'same pattsrn was shown, for the king-size, which also were fa- vored by al'l! group4 except the under- i66000 classification over' the regular. Bduoati'oa ef' Family Haad One of the more i'nteresting sections of the studjr related education of the family head to the type smoked. For college graduates, 17:3 per cent smoked fiilterred! cigarettes to 10.7 per aent smoking non,filltered, and 18l7 per cent smokedl king-size ci'garettes to 1166 per cent smaking' regulkr. In families where the family headl attended! college, 32.8 per cent smoked' filtered' as comparedl with, 25.8 per cent preferring, non-filters, and 33.3 per cent favored kihg-size to 23.7 per cent smoking regulars. Of the high school graduates, 66:6; per cent smoked filters and 81.3 per cent used non-filters, while 66.9 per cent favored! king-size to 69'.2 per cent smoking regular ci'garett.es. In the families where the head was not a high school graduate, 34.6 per cent smoke filltered' brands, 38.7 per cent use non-filters, 34.1 per cent use king-size and 40.8 per cent use regular.
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Cangressman C hallenges Tobacco Health Findings By nQck Scism, "Tlobacco's" Editor in Danville A Nbrth Carolina congressman says the consensus of doctors and scientists who appeared before the House of Commerce Committee Is that there Is's no definite proof that smoking cigA. rettes causes lung, cancer or any otfiier dreadedl d'isense: Rep. Horace Korncgay of' Greens- boro is a member of the House Com•, mittee on Interstate and' Forelgn, Cam+ merce which has been holding lnearings on bills to brand cigarettes as a healtll hazard andl has introd'uced legislation to prohibit Federall Trad'e Commissiort rulinb•sto brand' aignrettesuntill duly authorized to do so by Congressi. In an i article prepared' for newspapers in North Chrol'ina and Virginia, Rep. ' Korngay quoted extensively from testir mony giGen the committee bv seven. doctors and scientists, rnuchi of' which had been unreported previously~ Their testimony, concluded R'ep. Kornegay, "emphasized that the Sur- E on Generals' report' on Smoking and ealth"is inconclusive and that it is not the final word I on this issue." He added, "It further stressed that there is a critical need for additional research in the area of smoking and health." Rep: Korngay said the doctors and scientists appearing, before the com- mittee generallly agreed: 1. The cause of' cancer in general' and of l'ung, cancer In particular is not' proven. ' 2. A great deal of laboratory• work has been done, but not in a single in- stance has lung; cancer been induced by tobacco products. 3. Lung cancer occurs in nonr smokers as well as smokers and a tre- mendous majority of' smokers, inelud'-' Ing heavy smokers, never develop lung cancer. The testimony by these experts, Rep: Kornegay said, "woulid' fill a book as large as the re ort on 'Smokin and Haalth"and wou~dl be a great den~more informativc."' The Congressman said'~ they were criticall of the report and repeatedly pointed out it was based on statisticall data rather than clinicall "and that even the statistical d1t'a~ was of''highly dubi- ous quality'." In his article, Rep. Korncgav quoted' from a few of' the dF'ctors nndsair.ntlNits to give a gisG of'' what was brought outt in, their testimony. Among the testi'-, mony quoted by himr Dr. Thomas II. Ilurford of' St. Loui's, a medical aloctort and professor of' thoracic surgery who, has treatedl over, 44,000 cases ofl lung, cancer. "L do not believe that lung cancer is cauae& by cigarette smoking and I do not believe that smokin is responsible for any shortening o~lifc: ... There i's as much or, mone reason to suspect air pollutants ua there is to suspect cigarette smoking.". Dr. L. H. Garland, a doctor and [professor, at the Universit+v of Californin Medicall School in San Prnnclisco: "My own studies on the locus of' origin of' primary bronchial cancer lndicate al- most two-thin]s, of''~ them arise i'n, por- tions of' the bronchial' tree removedl from the main ibronchi' where the eon, aentrations of cigarette smoke are sup- posed to be the greatest in the lunga. The peak incidence of primary bron- chial cancer in U'.S: males is around years, both in smokers and non- 57 smokers, and, this peak tends to be maintained irrespective of the amount smoked or when the ci~' arette smoking, alleged9y commenced: 'I hese are extra- ordinary findings which in my opinion seriously qpestion the cigarette Ncypo- thesis." Dr: Thomas J. Moran, pathologist, Memoriall Hospital, Danville, Va.: "Over 95 per cent of smokers, includ- ing heavy smokers, do not develop lung cancer. . . There is relatively little cancer of the mouth, nose, throat or trachae, although these areas are more exposed to cigarette smoke than the lungs; and the incidence of cancer inn these organs is not increasin : There is more lung cancer in ngland! than in this country, despite the fact that heavy smoking is more common in this counrtry:" Dn Hiram Langston of Chicago~ a cl'Inicall professor of'surgery at the Uni- versity of Illinois College of' Mediciner "This rising', incidenee began prior to the popularity of cigarettes, which casts doubt again on there being any causal relation between cigarette smoking and' the disease." Dr. Israel Rappaport, consulting', Csician at Rellevue Hospital in New ks "In chronic lung, disease we have an ill'-definedl disease indefinitely Ihnked. to a number of undetennined' agents. Action against any particular one of' the possible agents is 111bgical„ unjustiy 6ed, unreasonable and purposeless." Dr. Henry Russek„ a consultant in, cardiovascular disease at the U.S. PUb1ic Health Service Hospitall at Staten Island, N:Y'.: "No evid'ence to date has excluded the possibilit'y that, in the development of coronary dibeaee, smoking may be but a symptom of the real cause." Dr. Theodor Sterlittg,i director of the Medical Computie Center, Uniiversftar of Cincinnati: "A~ experiments thatt have atttmpted t'o prod6ce 1ung icancer by the use of dgafatta tnnoTcehave failed so far,,'lrhe total weigMt of'the evidence at thir't'hne ... iy such that it. suggests the necessity for certaih ex- periments but does not support definite conclusiona." TobaccoJulx 17, 1964 - Pagee 13' b 19
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Tob~rco I ndustry Presents Congress Data , ~ To Refute L il~~tkbng of Cigarets and Disease'_1 --- ~!. RIAlI'WNt.l. STRF:F.T'.1(SURNAL.StnfJ'R.CtlorfL'r 1vASH3NCTOl+i= The' tobaccoindustr,ypre• sented Congress with its own statistihal and medics.l,evidence ahout the corretation between' emnking andl disease. Irlotl surprisingly, the in- dustry concluded that' a link doesnit exist. Studies the U.S. Surgeon General cited' aai .evid'ence that cigaret smoking is a"signifi, cant health hazard"' contain hazardous incon- eistencies, a; Virginia statistician advised the lawmakers. And' a professor of' lung, surgery at' Washingtoni University in St. Louis saidi there is "a, large volume of' good, scientific evidence which, tends to refute the rather hastily accepted premise that' cigaret smoking i's causally related to cancer of the lung." The two men led off'a series of expert:wit- Itesses for cigaret makers to buttress their' case against legislation before the House Com- merce Committee. The panel has under con- "aifleratinn several' bills that would require warnings on cigaret labels and in advertising. The Federal Trade Commission independentlyy has proposed requiring warnings that amok- tng "may cause death from cancer and other diseases."' ' Alan S! Donnahoe, a, newspaper executive and a lecturer on statistics at the University of Richmond, told the committee that the data on smoking and' health compiled by the Sur- geon General's office, and' relied on by the FTC, "fail to meetl the minimum standards of' scientific sampling." I3e termed the data "in- ternally inconsistent" and "unreasonable"' in, their implications. He said the Surgeon General"s: study shows ~ for instance, that cigaret smokers who take" heavy exercise have a lower mortality rate j, than inactive nonsmokers; and that marriedj' men who smoke live just as long as single l men who don',t I. Even more "aRtonishing;" he edded; is that,. Tobacco Q//l~ O u' Q in three of' the sevcn atYjdies lumpedl together I in the Surgeon General's report~ "the mor. tality, rate for clgaret smokers was lower than , the avrerage"' for all U;BA males. The re- port's explanation that the smokers surveyed were healthier than the average male popula- tfon ia hardly satisfying, he said. Under questioning, however, Mr. Donnahoe acknowledged that, both smokers and non- smokere, surveyed probably, did: enjoy better I than average, health. The Surgeon: General"s ~ report found the incidence of lung cancer to be 10, times as great among the smokers. Thomas: H.' Burford a St. Lwuis surgeon, + dismissed this finding as no more than "a sta- tistical association which falls far short of , proving a eausal' connection."' The causes of cancer remain unknown and until they are j determined "it would, seem only reasonable i that to raise an alarm about', cigaret smoking is unwarranted,"' Dr. Burford saidl This, is the position taken, for the record, by tobacco, Industry leaders in opposing Fed- eral legislation. But.the industry was, jolted by the FTC proposal and is worried aboutl ani ab- Isence of, restraint in the state legtsl'ahUres.. Thus the work the industry appears to be ispreading among, tobacco-state Congressmen is thatl a little Federal regulation might not 'hurt. "There's no question that' the industi:y wants legislation. They'd have an impossible I situation, lft'hestates moved in andl ereatedll !a patchwork of conflicting regulations," a( South Carolina, House' member saidl ANorth, Carolinian, addedl "There's a definite need for 1 July 10, 1964 - Pages 9 & 21 Tobacco` Industry Rea.dy - to Modify Stand on Laheling ~ WASHINGTON, D.C.-Witha nod from the advertising and radio-televi'.- sion indiustries, the tobacco indust'ry is' said to be quietly modifying', its all}out opposition to any type of health«hazard labeling on cigarette packages. This' was indit:ated at a, session last week of the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, which is stmd d some ten bills alFeady introd'uced in i the House and what to do i'n the wakee of the Surgeon-GeneralTs study commit- tee report linking, cigarette smoking with th' e lung' cancer death rate. While not directly statedl by the in- dustry, the new position is said to be to accept ackage-labeling legis- lation that would also try to prohibit local! governments from getting into the labeling or, smoking-control field. Rep. Oren Harris (D-Ark), chairman, of'the , Commerce Committee, is saidl to feel, as do industry officials,, that' a s prefer- health, warning labeling law able to allowing the Federal Trad'e' Commission to carry out its intentions of requiring labels on packages and'& ad+vertising'. Among the numerous bills now in, the Hbuse is a"mild" Package lnbeling measure' introduced , by Rep. Walter Ragera ( D-Texi ), a member of the Commerce Committee. It would re- guire cigarettes to bear a warning, Caution: cigarette smoking may be hazardous to your health." But it', does not refer to advertising. The Rogers bill, would rohibit states from acting if a. Federarlaw was enacted.. VN'arnings: on both packages and in advertising , would! be required , under a' rule by the' Federal! Trade Commission, announcedl two, weeks ago by Chair- man Paull Rand Dixon at a Commerce Committee session. It would not go in- to effect until next year, but, even, so, it could be delayed three to four years if the question gets into court. The appropriate Federal action to put smokers oh I guard, so long as the notice isn't, made puni, III tive." Thus, the tnd'ustry's pritne', objective ap- pears' to be a Federal' law that would pre+ clude the states from taking desperate actlons: (Public-health officials in several states, tn- cluding New York and California, have proni- isEd! to ~ post their own antismoking codes un- less Federal sanctions are applled.), A secondary aitn„ less urgent at: the mo- ment„ is to undercut the FTC's proposed i warning requirement, especially as It applies ' to advertising. Cigaret' makers can, and' tnr d tend to, delay enforcement of' the FTC ruling by challenging, it ih court.: But' only Congress ican allay the threat contained in the FTC's I death1 warni'ngbyactingl:ng the agency's st'ead.: , Moreover,, an FTC regulation, whether stiff or mild, wouldn't prevent thei states from, ilm- posing thel'r own standards in addition. None of the billi before the House accom-?, pli'shes all, these objct'ives.. The one: that; comes closest ia a measure sponored by Rep.' Rogers (D., Texas), whi'ch, would re uire sl warning m±+ xiaar&t pac_ agesoEad'a, sttiting: "Caution: CigareT'emallfi-gmsy .be~ fia-zardo_ue To`yQuT lieai'Kn.____ ~ ~Phis labelint;, finds' favor withi tobacco-state lawmakers, and Lhe Rogera bill' alko would prohibit the states from acting once a Federal! law i's on the books. A further insertion,stipu-n lating that no other warning may be required would' effectively gag, the FTC, tobacco atrate- ; gists figure. Paradoxically;, the prime obetacle to such a btili would come from, liberal Democratic lawmakers who have led the fight for Federal curbs. In her appearance before the House committee last week; the most impassioned advocate of Federal action, Sen. N'euberger. (D:, Ore.J, appealed, to the members to keep handb oft' and' leave a clear path for the FTC to press its case in court. The Wall Street Journal. June 30, 1964 advertising and communications Indus- tries have' some reservations about im- plieations In alllowin g', the FTC the authority it seeks; T7hey' feet that, if' permitted, it could lead! to' restMetions n on ad!vertising practices for other prod- ucts, At the Cornmerce' Committee session last week, Rcp. Alton, Iiennon (1)-I`riC) said FTC had "usurlpated congressional authority" in proposing the health warning' label rule. He thought the,. qu~~estion was of such, itnportanee that. Congress should be the policy-making, suthority, not "any agency." Rep. I.en- non, also saidI that if there is'to be llegis- lation requiring a warning,, it should "pre-empt the field"' of'' legislation. "Itt would create a chaotic, impossible sit- uation If local laws" were allowed. He' did not, believe such 'pre-em tion would constitute "congressionall ~nva- sion of the states," since the Federal' government has always had' authority'y to deal with interstate commerce mat- ters. Coneern over local acti vity resulted chiefly from promises of New hork State health officials that' they will seek such laws if the Federal' govern-, ment does not act.-HAD.
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Taba"ricroi I ndustry Presents Congress Data , To Refute Lbtking d!f. Cigarets andDIi_seasie_,l -- I ~ BU'n '\S'Ar0..STRF:F.T'.1oURNALSfnfJ'F'e+,Or/rp WASHINGTON- The' tobacco Indu9try pre• sented Congress with' Its own sta:tistihal and medleal evidence about the correlation between' kmoking andl discase. Not surprisingly, the In, dustry concluded that a link' doesn't exist., Studies the U.S. Surgeon General', cited aa e evid'ence that cigaret smoking is a"signifi- cant health haza.rd" contain hazardous incon- sistencies, a Virginia' statistician advised' the lawmakers. And' a professor of' Iung surgery at Washington University' in St. Louis safdl there' is "a large volume of good' scientific' evidence which tends to refute the rather' hastily accepted premise that cigaret smoking Is causally related to' cancer ofI the lung." The'two men led off a series of',expert wi[ nesses' for cigaret makers to buttress their case against legislation before the House Com-, merce Committee. The panel has under con- sideratinn several bills that would require warnings on cigaret labels and' in' advertising. The Federal Tra:de Commission independentlx' has proposed requiring', warnings that smok- ing "tnay cause death from cancer and' other diseases."' " Alani S;, Donnahoe, ai newspaper exGputive and' a lecturer on statistics at the University of Richni toidi the committee that the data oni smoking', and health compil;ed' by the Sur- geon Generalls office, and reliedl on by the FTC, "fail to meetl the minimum standards of scientific sampling." He termed the data "In• ternally incons'ist'ent" and "unreasonable" in, their implications. He said the Surgeon General's study shows' for instance, that cigaret smokers who take' heavy exercise have' a lowetr mortality, rate j than inactive nonsmokers„ and that married'i) men who smoke live just as' long as single men who don't. 1£ven more "astonlshing,"' he added, is that, Tobacco a// ~//'oF0 Ih three of't'he seven studies:lumped together~ lin the 8tlrgeon General's report, "the mor- tali'iy' rate for cigaret smokers was lower t'han !the average"' for all Uid. males. The re- port's explanation that the emokers surveyed were healthier than the average male popula- tion Is' hardly satisfying, he eatd, Und'er, questloning; however, ritr.. Donnahoe acknowledged that, both smokers and non- smokerb, surveyed probably did enjoy better I than average. health. The Surgeon Generalra report found' the incidence of l lung cancer to be iD times as great among the smokersi Thomas H.' Burford a St. Louis surgeon,, ; dismissed this finding as no more than: "a sta- tistical, association which falls far short of proving a' causal connection."' The causes of I cancer remaitr, _unknown, and until they are j determined! "it would seem only reasonable I that to raise an alarm about cigaret smoking Ys, unwarranted," Dr. Burford said. This is the position takeni, for the reeord,, by tobacco industry leaders In opposing Fed- eral', legislation',. But,the lndustry was jolted by the FTC' proposal' and is worried about an ab- eence of restraint in the state leglelatures. Thus the work the industry appears to i be spreading among, to.bacco•state Congressmen is that a little Federal regulation might not, hurt. "There's no question, that' the industry wants' legislation. They'dl have an Impossible situation if the states moved in and created I 'al patchwork of confllcting, regulations ' a l South, Carolina House member satd A North, Carolinian, added, "There's a definite needl for 1 appropriate Federal action to, put, smokers on ' ~ guard, so long' as the notice Isn't made puni- 'I tive." Thus; the industry"s prime objective ap+ pears to be a Federali law that would pre+ ciude the'states from taking desperate actions. (Fublic-health officials in several states, iri- cluding, New York and' California, have prorrt- isedl t'o post their own antismoking codes un- less Federal sanctions are appl'led.)! A secondary afm, lees' urgent at the mo- ment„ is to undercut the FTC's proposed I warning requirement, especially as it applies ' to ad'vertising. C(garet makers can, and itf« , tend' to, delay enforcement of the FTC rulirtg ~ by challenging it In court: But only Congress ~ can allay the threat contained in the FTC's ~ death 1 warning by acting In i the agency's stead. Moreover, an FTC regulatlotti, whether stiff or mild, would'n',t prevent the', atatesi from, fm- poeing their awn standardh' in ad'ditton: " None of the bills before t'he' House accon[ , plishee all these objctives. The one, that comes cloeest ls a measure sponorsd, by Rep, Rogers (D„ Texas), which would requ~fre a warnina os ~iQa~t.pac_ ageeknof Tn ade, II stating: "Caution: Clre'f-smo'king may 'be fia`zardous_„^Toj~Qur healtfi."'-` ~ ~ -Tlrib lwbeling flnds favor with, tobacco-statie lawmakers, and' the Rogere billl alko wouldl prohibit the statee from acting once a Fed'eralk law is on the books. A further Inaertion sti)ru-:i lating that no other warning may be required~ would effectively gag the FTC, tobacco atrate-' gists figure. Paradoxicallly;, the prime obstacle to such a bill would come from liberal' Democratic , lawmakers wha, have led the', fight for Federall curbs. In her appearance before the House I committee last week, the most impassioned I advocate of Federal action, Sen. Neuberger (D., Ore.), appealed to the members to keepp hands' off and! leave a clear path for the FTC to press its case' in, eourt. The' Wal'1. Street Journali . June 30, 1964 JuLy ~~ 10, 1961#': -~ Pages ~ 9~~ & 21~ ~ d rti 1 di i' ti i d' Ta'baccQ Ind!ustr.y l~eady to tries have some' reservations about im-, plicatiorrs in allowing the FTC the ~ he h k ' T v feell that_ if oritv it see s. . r . ~id aut permitted, it oould lead to restNctione lvlaciity btail~.ia on L~.iiaelllii~ on advertising, practices for other prod- WASHINGTON I~:C'-V1Jith a nod' health warning labeling. 1'aw i~ g pre er- ucts. . from the advertising and radio-tellevi- able to allowing the Federal Trade At the Commerce Committee session, Coinmission to carry out' its intentions last week, R'ep. Alton Lennon (1J~NC) said sion to ind be ustries, the tobaccoo industry is of requiring labels on packages and said FTC' had "usu~ated con ionall quietly modifying ita all-out ~"s ' opposition to any type' of health-hazard advertising. labeling on cigarette packages, This Among the numerous bills' now in was indicated at a session last week of' ~e' House is a"mild"' package labeling the House Committee,on Interstate and measure introduced'' by Rep. Walter Foreign Commerce, which is studying, Rogers ( D=Tex ), a member, of the some ten bills already introduced' in' Commerce Committee. It would re- the' House and what to do, in the: wake guire' cigarettes to bear a warning, of the Surgeon-GeneraLs study commit- Caukionr cigarette smoking may' be hazardous to your health." Bttt it' does tee report IInking, cigarette smoking not refer to advertising. The Rogers bill with tlhe lh.ng cancer dkath rate: would prohibit states from acting if a While not directly stated by the in• Federal law was enactedl dustry, the new position is said' to be VGrarrrings on both packages andl in to accept mild package-labeling, legis, advertising would be requi'redl under a lation, that wouldl aIso try to prohibit rule by the Federal Trade Commission local governments from getting into'the' announced two weeks ago by Chair- labeling or, smoking-control' field. man Paul Randl Dixon, at a, Commerce Rep. Oren Harris (D~Ark), chairman Committee session, It would'' not go in= of' the Commerce Committee, is said toi to effect until next year, but, even so, feel, as d'o, industry officials, that a it could be delayed three to four years if the question gets into, court. The ment does not act.-HAD. N a e s ng an commun ea ons us- n in proposing the healah authority" warning label rule. Iie thought the T • uestion was of' su'ch importanoe that ongress should be the policy-making authority, not' "any agency." Rep. Len- non al'soi said that if there is to be legis - lation, requiring a warning, it should "pre-empt the field" of legislation. "It woul'd create a chaotic, Impossible sit- uation if local laws " were' all'owed. He did not believe such "pre-emption would constitute' ••congressionall inva- sion of' the states," sinee the Federal government' has always had authority : to deal with interstatle commerce mat- ters. Concern over local activity' resulted chiefly fromi promises of New York State health ocias that tey virilll ffilh seek such laws if the Federal govern-
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EShWQ111's' Forum Tobacco July 17f 1964 - Page 7 "UnwAso aand Unvi¢arrr¢arated" ' The Na tiional Association of Toha~ecoD'ist'riiiuitorspointed out toilt;e members tlhisweek-inaletteraccompanyinga, copy of 1Wllnnaging', Director Joseph Kolodny'e masterful statement on the economic impactt of the proposed cigarette lla}tellingregulbtion onluundreds of't'ltou~aande of small merchants-tliat one insidious ef'fect' of such legilsl'ation ie that it would slow progress in the area of tobacco-lhealitlr researclt„ much . of which is being financed by the tobacco industry ilseM Here is how the NAM views the action of the Federal Trade Cocn- mtiseion : "The I'nterstat'e and ' Foreign Commerce Committee ofl the House of Representatives concl''uded' hearings last week on a variety of bills designed,, in one ucay or another, to, regulate cigarette advertising and to require a warning label on each pack and' carton ... "While ~ t lte hearingsuuere in progress, the cliairmanof theFed'eralTrade Gi orrrrnission~ announced the promulgation of a traderegulation rule wl'oich purports to bring, the subject matter of' the Congres- sional'hearings under the jurisdiction of the FTC. We are unalterably opposed' to such precipitous, injudicious action.. "The IWATD' has opposed the labeling of cigarettes, as a health hazard'and the regulation of cigarette advertising by any.government '. agency because the medical f act's as regards sntokirag and' health are clouded and' significantly fail to shout that a causal' relationship exists between smoking and various diseases. "V . "Under these circumstances, it would seem unwise and indeed' un-' Q' urarranted to, impose regulations which coultD' well deter the vasA ~K , research efforts now in progress by stranglinjg the uxell-being, of' 0,, the tobacco indu.stry,, the paternal' sponsors of tnost' of ' this research,, and+bylull%ngtJceci'tizenryinto, apat)bytoward's~ aliazard utliich. may wcll have its roots elsewhere. Q'"`T/te FTC action is based on a, dogmatic acceptance of theconr cltti.ions reached by the advisory committee to the Sirrgeon General'-, conclusions which are very much circumspect from both a medical and'statistical standpoint. "The ftrl'lf;acts for and'against: regul'at'ionhavebeen presentedtoth.e Congress of tlie United States. We subrn.it that as an arbiter of these f acts this arigust' body knows, no peer and that they alone should render the decision. "A~ joint resolu~tionhas been intrrrd'uced by a num ber o f' Congress- men, princi pally f rom tobacco st'ates, designed' to def er the action proposecItobe taken bytike Fed'eralTradaConpmissiom., unttl'such time as ad'diti'onal research can be evaluat'ed'"' mobaeco July T, 1~~1~ - Pege' 12 AMA Foundation Approves Tobacco Rcsearch G'rants,, ChIICAGO; ILL.-Seven new to- bacco research grants have been ap- proved by the American Medical Asso- ciation Education andl Research Foun- dation, Raymond M. McKeown, MLD., Foundation president, announcedl here recently.. The first-year grants for the seven projects totaled just under $183,000. Duration of the projects ranges from one to five years, and~ full', commitment for the duration of the projects subject to annual evaluation by the five-member committee of scientists directing the re- search ' program, willl total about $;440;000. The seven projects were the second group approved by the Foundation. In June, Dr. MclCeown announced ap- provaP of 10 project grants-the Fi'rst under the Foundation's research pro.- gram ~ on tobacco and' health authorized last December by the Americani Medl-, cal Association House of Delegates. If the 17 projects so, far approved are carried through as now planned andl set up, the Found'ation will expend more than $1,300,000 toward their support. The seven new projiects and (irrst-year grantsapproved' weret C: Doug1'as 'I'albott, M.D., medical' director of the American Mledicall Re- search F~aund'ationy, Dayton, Ohio, (a private organization which has no can, nection wit hthe American Med'ical As- sociation-$37,842' to study the effectt of smoking on, circulation and' respira- tion, with, the use of a computer system to store andl analyze the results: With tests continuously monitored, Dr. Tal- bott will study variability in blood ressure and' heart rate, variations in ~eart beat and the effect on total heartt work resulting from smoking, both in normaU human subjects and' in coronary patients, Dr. Talbott willl use laboratory facilities available at Dayton Conrection FarM-6 __ Stuart Bondurant, M.D., Ind!inn:1 University Medical Center Indianapolis -$22,200 to seek identificationi of' agents in tobacco smoke which pro- duce changes ini the surface tension, of the film lining', the inside of the Irmg. Members of the Committee directing the AMA-ER'F tolincco research pro- • gram said they believe this mroject cnn prove, valuable in contributing~ knowll- edge about devclopment oflcmphysama. ~'Ksttts R. Webb„ IVf.D., chairman of the Division of Cardiovasculhr Surgery atl theUniMersityof Texas Southwest Medical School, Ditllas-$44',888 to stud'v the effects of' tobacco smoke on blood' circulation. George E. Moore,, M:D:, RoswelT Park Ir-femorial Institute, I3uifalo{, New 1Gork-$13,358 to undertake a, quantita- tive evalitation of the distribution off labeled (radioactive)' smoke through the system. Sheldon H. Steinery M:D'., Indiana University School of M+edicine-;29,04a to' study reactioni of bloodi vesselis off the brain to inhaled smoke and to inr jeeted nicotine. J. P. Long. PhD, State University of Iowa College of Medicine Iowa City, Iowa -$21,750 to, investigate the ac- tion of nicotine on the autonomic ('in- voluntary) nervous systemi Grace M. Roth, PhD;,Lovel'ace Foun, dation, for Medicali Education and Re- search, Albu quer4pe„ New Mexico- $14,046' to studythe effects of cigarette smoking on pulse volume by impedance plethysmography (a technique for measuring chauge; in volume), and'~ on skin temperature simultaneouslly in leg, arm,, hand and foot segments.-VIT.
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EMU Qn's' Toiaacco ~ ' ~~ 1 ~ Forum -~-- ~s81n~r,>!~%~e aanr' The National Association of Tobacco Distributors pointed out to ilts members t~his~ weel~~-i~n a~ lette~r~~ accolnpanying~ a copy of 1Nanagiing~~ Director J~osep~l~ rr Kolodny's masterful statement on~ tli~e~ economi'~c~ impact of~ t~li~e~ p~roposed~ cilgarett~e~ lJa~be~lliing regulation on~ hundreds of~ tltousanda of small rnercllarnts-t~iat one insidious effect ofl such legislation ile that it~ wo~~ul'~dl s~lonv~~ progress ib t'lue~ area of' tol~a~eo-lxealll'~al research, much of which is being fiinanced hy the tobacco industry itself. Here is how the NATD views tiue action of the Federal Trade C'onv- nlissi C~ln i: "Tliel'nterstat'ea~nd' Foreign Conrmerce~~ ~Commi'tteeof't'heFlous~eof Repres.rntatir~es concluded hearings last week on a, variety of billa designed, in one way or anot'her,, to regulate cigarette advertising and to require a warning label on each pack and cart'on ... "Wlii~,le the hcari~ngs were in progress, tlae chai'rmanofn the Federal ~'~ TrarleCommiJsionannounced'the promulgation of'a trade~regtsGationrudc which purports to bring the subject matter of' the Congresr sional hearings, under the jurisdiction o f the F'Z'C. We are unalterably opposed' to such precipitous, injudicious action. "The N'A'T'D has opposed' the labeling of' cigarettes as a health hazard and the regulation of cigarette advertising by an~rgovernment agency because the medical' f acts as regards smoking and' health are clouded' and signi fcantl'y f ail' to show tliat' a causal reGationslt,i'p, exists lietu~een smoking, and various diseases. ~l . "Und'er these circumstances, it would seem unwise and' indeed un-' Qwarranted to impos~eregulations~:c]iich could~welld'~eter the vast ~ research e f f orts now in progress by strangling the well-being o f 0,, the tobacco inditstry, the paternal' sponsors o f' most o f' this research;, and' by lulling the citizenry intoapat'hy toward'sa hazard'which ~ may well have its roots elsewhere. ~'. "The h"TC: actinn is based' on a dogmatic acceptance of' the con+ eltwaion~s reached by the advisory committee t,o the Surgeon General=~ conclusions which are very much circumspect from both a meducal' and statistical' standpoint. "'T hef ull f acts f or and 'against regulat i~on have been presented to, the C~ongressof theURited States. We submit' that as an arbiter of'these facts this awgutst' body knows no peer and'that' they alone should' render the decision. "A joint resolution has been irrtroduced by a numb'~er of Congress: men, principally from tobacco states, designed' to defer the action proposed ttr •be taken by the Federal' Trade Contmi1sion until such time as additional research can be evalucated'."' mobacco Ju1y 2, 1~ i~+ - Page 12 AMA Foundaitia~.~ Approves Tobaeco Research Gramts CHICACO,; IL L:.-Seven new to- bacco, research grants have been ap- Provedl by the American Medical Asso- ciation Education andl Research Foun- dation, Raymond M., McKeown, MI.D., Foundation president, announcedihere' recently. The first-ycar grants for the seven projects tot'aled1Nst under $183;~: Duration of the projects ranges from one to five years;, andl full commitment for, the duration of the projects subject to annual evaluation by the five-member committee ofl scientists directing the re- search program, will'~ total about $440,0001 The seven projects were the secondi group approved by the Found'ation. In , 1;96'4 - >aage, 7~ June, Dr. McKeown announced ap- proval of 10 project grants-the fint under the Foundetion's research i pro- g~ram on tobacco and health ~ authorized last December by the American, Medi- cal Association House of Delegates. If the 17' projects so far approved are carried through~~ as now p'anned and' set up, the p'ound'ation will expend more than $1,300,000 toward their support. The seven new projects and first-year grants approved were: G: Douglas Thlbott„ MiD:, medical director of the American Medical Re- search Found'ation4 Dayton, Ohio,, (aa private organization which has no con- nection with the American Mled'ical' As- sociation-$37,642 to study the effects of' smoking on circulation and respira- tion, with the use of a computer system to store and analyze the results. With tests continuously monitored, Dr. Tal- bott will study variability in hlood! ressure and heart rate, variations in, ~eart beat and the effect on totall heart work resulting from smoking, both in, normal human subjects and in coronary patients: Dr. Talbott will use laboratory facilities availabl'e at' Daytan Correction Fnrm.-- . Stuart Rondurant„ M'.Dl, Indiana Un3versibyMledicalCenter, InrlianaTolia-822,200, to, seek identification of' agents in tobacco smoke which pro- duce changes in the surface tension of' the fiim, lining the inside of the' lung; M'embers of' the Committee d'irecting, the AMA-ERF tobacco research pro- • gram, said they believe this project can prove vnlunbl'o in contributing knowl- ed e about development of empliysema.. ~WhttS R. Wcbb,, htiD., chairman, of the Division of Cardiovascular Surgery at the University of' Texas Southwest Medical School, Dallas-$44,868 too studv the effects of tobacco smoke on blood circulhtion, George E. Moore, M.D.. Roswell. Park Memorial Institute, liu(fallo, New York-$13,358 to undertake a qnantita• tive evaluation of the distribution of' labeled (radioactive) smoke through the system. Sheldon H. Steiner„ M'.D'., Indiana University School of Medicine=$29,040' to study reaction of' blood! vessels of' the brain to inhaled smoke andl to in- jectedlnilcotine.J: P. Long, PhD, State U'niversity' C. of Iowa College of Medicine Iowa City, Iowa -$21,750' to investigate the ac- 6A' tion of nicotine on the autonomic (in- ~ voluntary) nervous system4 ~ Grace M. Roth, PhD; Lovelace Foun+ ~, dation for Medical! Education andl R'e- ~ search, Albuquerque, New Mexico- (~A ~ $14,048'to study the effects of cigarette smoking on pulse volume by impedance plethysmography (a technique for measuri'ng changes in volume), and on skin temperature simulltaneously in lleg,, arm, hand and' foot segments.-VIT.
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Tot:a3cE!o Jiy'24, 1964 - Page 26 Tobacco Research Plays I mportant Rol.'ein Kentucky By Gaden $tiincoe "TolSacco's" ' Editor tn Lexinqton While the National Tobacco Re- search Laboratory at the University of'' Kentucky waits for a $1.5 million ap- propriation to clear the Senate, re- searchers are not sitting on their hand's counting tobacco sticks. Research in, tobacco has always been, a major concern of the Kentucky Agri.cultural' Experiment Stption. Study carried on at the National Tobacco Re- search Laboratory includes projects from genetics andivariety development throu~h, culture, insect and disease con- trol, harvesting, curing and' marketing- control programs, chemical analysis and cooperative work with tobacco manu-, (~facturers on quality factors. The House recently passed a$5i2' ~imillion farm appropriations billl after © turning down a proposal to end price. ~ supports on tobacco. Instead, the House agreed' to spend! ~$1.5 million for research on bow to -,make cigarettes safe. The study will be conducted at the National Tobacco Research Laboratory in Lexington. The bill is now in the Senate, where it Is stacked with other bills bottled upp until the Senate unties itself from the civil rights figlit, Tobacco research, has been Rreatlyy stimulated at the University of Ken- tucky by creation of the National To- bacco Research Laboratory,, a Uni- versity spokesman saidl The laboratory is supported both by federal and state money and by private grants. Researchers at Kentucky work inn close cooperation with tobacco acir entists in other states and the United' States Department of Agriculture so that progness can, be made in solving the i basic and I common problems of the tobacco industry. In, recent months, with increasing general concern about the problem of smokin and' health, researchers at the Kentuc~y laboratory have given thought to this problem, in plhnning their re- aearch, a spokesman said. Discussions have been held tir In- volve the Universitiv of Kentucky Mcdi, eal' Center and otfier segments of' the University in planning and condhct'ing, research. Dr. John W. Oswald, presi-, dent of' the University, has stated his' intentioni of appointing a uniiversity, wide committee on tobacco research. The National Tobacco Research Laboratory is located in the University"s new agricultural building on South Limestone Street,, A fourth of thepe r- sonnel, facilities and' funda of the Uni- versity's Agricultural Experiment Sta- tion are devoted to tobacco rasearch: There are 24 professional worieers and 25 laboratory technicians and researcli assistants working, in tobacco research, including ernployees of'the Agrieultural Experiment anct the USDA Research Servioe. Over the past ten years, tobacco re- searchers at Kentucky have publbshed' 59'research papers or bulletins and 274 progress report, about tobacco research.. Tobacca July 17, 1964 - Page 1 "mti-Labe1 DilT3 Flood U.S. Congress. WA'SI'i::VGTOirI,, D'.C:-A flood of' bills to: i,.ytrairr Federal Trade Com- mission or other gpveroiaient agencies from rnovinr, too fast in their onslaughtt on cigarcttcs has been sent to Congress since annoiunccment of thc plan to im- pose punitive labciing and, advertising restrictions on the industry: Among othersare l;iPs bv Rep.Tuck,, Dem., Va.; Fountain;D'ern.,, N!C.; Taylor, Dcm,, N.C.; lionneir„ Dtsm,, 141:C.; Korncg:i3•, Dcm., N.C.; and' L.an- non„ Drin,, NIC: ."i:! would pra4lbit F.T.C. from enfio:ciiig labeang r,a1es on cigarette packages, as i aceutly an- nounced' by the agencsy!. , U . S . Tobacco Journal u y 30, 1964 h H nI1y Tnis ~ Corner" WITH THE EDi1TOR' IN' A storr receiving broad aoteran earlier, tbls, month, two docters at Cbi- eago Mbd'ical Canter disclosed' tbat, according to tests they kad' been coa- ductinr, charceal'- broll.d steaks were i riah in benso (a) pyrensj a substsareer which has been under suspicion for some time as a cause of lung eaneer. Ind'eed, one of the steaks under stYdy!' conRained as much of tke aromatie bXdirocarbon, as Is f'oand' in the smeke ~f 600, cigarettes. . . . PRODUCTION of the chemil¢al was, thought toi be caused by the burning, of' fat as It drippedi down onto the charcoalL In any e.ent, there has been, no great outcry to date over the pos- sible threat to theistomachs of'the na- tlion's barbecue devotees. Specialists, in fact, pointed out that the incidencce of'sto2naahi cancer in the U. S. has de- clined' steadily dbepite the growingg popularity of' charcoal broiling. IT WOULD seem, that If tkir lhcid'ent illlnstrates .nxtkiag, it rnd'erlises tbe, vitall need for researck Cnte tB: entire cancer, cycUs-wkat causes it, kew Gl d..eiops, its eiiscts en,.ario.s parts, of' the body, andi with inc4, bew itC can beeared« r • • f THE REPORT concerning, broiling, emphasized that the chemical was only suspected •of causing, cancer. One has now been put tn, the position of being askedl to give up everything from char- coal broiled steaks to milk because of ' the havoc they caa wreak. It i's tiMe thatl the acienti8¢ communitX stopped trying for big headlines on euppositions and began looking for actual causesi -and real' cites. 0111?`1V0F.2,6
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~'klo1~1cE~o J•, , 1961+ - Page' 26 Tobacco Research Plays Important Role in Kentucky By Caden $iincae. "Tobacco's"' Editor tn Lexington. While the Nntionnl Tobacco Re- search Laboratory at the University of' Kentucky waits for a $1.5 million ap. propriation tio clear the Senate, re- aearchers are not sitting on their hands counting tobacco sticks. Research ini tobacco has i always been, a major concern of the Kentucky Agriy culturall Experiment Station. Studry carried on at the National Tobacco Re- search Laboratory includes projects from, genetics and' variety development throu~h culture, insect and disease con- trol, harvesting, curing and marketing- control programs, chemical analysis and cooperative work vMith: tobaeco~ manu-(~facturers on quality factors. The House recently paased aM2 , ~mil'lion farm appropriations billi after ~ turning down a' proposal to end price. ~ supports on tobacco. Q., Instead, the Hbuse agreed to spendl _,~, ''1'.5 million for research on how to. `~,make cigarettes safe. The i study will Q be conducted at the National Tobacco. Research Laboratory in Lexington. The bill is now in the Senate, where it' i>r' stacked withi other bil'1s bottl'ed up until, the Senate unties' itself from the civil rights fight. Tobacco research has been greatly stimulated at the University of' Ken- ttrcky by creation, of' the rlatipnail 'I'.o• bacco, Research Laboratory, u Uni= versity spokesman said. The laboraiory is supported' both by federal' and, state money and' by private grant5a Researchers at Kentucky work in close cooperation with tobacco scir entists in other states and the Uni'ted, States Department of Agriculture so that progress can, be mad'e in solving the basic andl common problems of the tobacco industry. In, recent months, with increasing general concern about the problem of smoking and health, researchers' at the Kentuclry laboratory have given thought to this problemi in pl'anning their re- search, a spokesman said'. Discussions have been held to i'n•~ volve the University of' Kentucky 1Gtedi eal Center and' otner segments of' the University in planning and cond'ucting, research. Dr. John W: Oswald', presi- dent of' the University, has statect his intentioni of appointing a universityL wide committee on tobacco research. The National Tobacco Research Laboratory is located in the University's, new agricultural building on South Limestone Street, A fourth of' the per- sonnel, facilities and fYanda of the Uni- versity's Agricultural Experiment' Sta- tion are devoted to tobacco rzsearch, There are 24' professional woricers and 25, laboratory technicians and researchh assistants working in tobacco research; including employees of the Agricultural Experiment and the USDA Research Service. Over the past ten years, tobacco re- searchers at Kentucky have published 59 research papers or bulletins and 274 progress reporrs about tobaceo research. T oba'cco. JuYy 17, 1964- Page 1 Anti-Label Pi1ls Flood U.S. Congress WASIi.:VGTOiId, D.C.-A Hood' of bills to ri strain~ Federal Trade Com- mission or other government agencies from movinn too fast' hi their onslhugiht, on cigarettes has been i sent to Congress since annonnccmcnt of the planitnlinn- pose punitive lah,ling, and a&•crtising restrictions on the industry. Among others arc l6iL's bv Rep: Tuck,, Dem., V-a.;, Fountain, llem., h1:C.;' Taylor, Dcm:, 1`.C:; Bonner, Dem., N',C:; Korncg..iy, I'Jc.sn:, MC:; and Lan. non, Drro., N.C. .;:,' would l:r•j:~i'bit F.T.C: from cnfo.uog l.rbeiing r,des on cigarette p;ckahcs, as s~.ace~atly anr nounced b j~ t'hr. ageu W}*. • 0 1'/ '7V 0 Fl~:2 S U . S'. Tobacco Journal u y 30, ' ~ "In This ~ Corner" VKiTtI THE EDiITOR' IN' A story reaeivins broad eo.erage earliier thi. I month, two decters at Cbh easo Medical Cinter disclosed tluat, accord'ing,te tests they hed' b.ew con-, direttng, charcoal - Wroilod' steaks wste, tich ln benso (a) p7rene; a substawte which bas bean under swsRia(ee itsr' some time as a caaae of, lung taaaer. ' Indeed, one of the steaks uad'er, stddY contained as much of the, aremsttie, bxdiocarbon, as is found' In the swteke. .46U6 cigarettes. PRODUCTION of' the chemical waai thought to be caused by the burning of' fatas, it dhippeddowrn, anto, thei charcoal. In, any event, there has been no great outcry to date over the pos- sible threat to the stomaehs of the na- tion's barbecue devotees. 8peeialists, in fact, point'edI out that the Incid'en¢e of atomach, cancer in the U. S., ihas' die- clined stead'ily' despite the growing popularitg of charcoall broiling. . . .. IT WOULD seem tbat, if' thi's ineident', illustrates anything, it' •ndalines i the, .itall need for research iato the enti're cancer crcte-wkat' carses ilt„ how It dewelopa, iite eftects on .ario.s parts of' tbo, body, and, with luck, Low It can be cured. « ~ r v. TIIE' RDPORT concerning broiling emphasized that the chemical was only suspected •of' causing cancer. One haa now been, put in the posi'tion of bei'ng' asked to give up, everything from, char- coal broiled steaka to milk because of the havoc thex' can wreak. It is time that the' scilenti'Sc eommunityr' stopped' trying for big keadlines on suppositions and begani looki'ng' for actual' causes -and real ct i:es.
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'.! ot`s"1ct~o ~'aYy' 240, 1964! - Page 26 Tobacco Research Plays Important Role in Kentucky By Caden Blincoe "Tobacco's" Editor in Lexington ~~Whilo the Nntionnl Tobacco Re-, search Laborato ry~ at the University of' Kentttcky waits for a$1.5' million ap,propriation to clear the Senate, re- searchers are not' sitting on their hands counting tobacco sticks. . Research in tobacco has always beew a majpr concern of the Kentucky Agrir culturali Experiment Station: Stiudy t:arriedl on at the National T'obacco Re- search Laboratory includes projects from genetics and variety development through culture, insect and disease con- troll, harvesting, curing, and marketing- control' programs, chemical analysis and' cooperative work with, tobacco manu- (Vacturers on quality factors.. The House recently passed a$5:2 ~milllion farm appropriations bill' after, d turning down a proposall to endl price ~" supports on tobacco. p.,, instead, the House agreed to spend -,~ $1.5 million for research on how to "-.make cigarettes safe. The study will Q be conducted at the National Tobacco Research Laboratory in Lexinl The bill' is now in the Senate, where it ik stacked with other bills bottled' up untill the Senate unties itsel'f' from the. civil' rights fight. Toliacco research has been greatly stimulated at the University of'' Ken, tucky by creat,ion, of' the National' To- bacco Research Laboratory, a U'ni', versity spokesman said. The laboratory is supported both by fed'eral' and state money and by private grants. Researchers at Kentucky work in closo cooperation with tobacco sci'- entists in other states and the United States Department of Ag~iculture so that progress can be madb in solving the basic and common problems of the tobacco industry. In recent months, with i'ncreasin ' general concern about the problcm o~~' sm~okin and health, researchers at' the Kentuc~ryrlaboratory have given thought to this probl'em in planning their ra- search„ a spokesman said: Discussions have been held to !n. ~ volve the, Undversith+ of Kent'ucky]wiedi- cali Center and otjter segments of t'ne. University in planning and conducting reseaa•cha Dr. John W. Oswal'd, presi- dent of the University, has stated his intention of appointing a university- wide committee on tobacco, research, The National Tobacco Research Laboratory is located in the University's new agricultural building on South Limestone Street, A fourth of' thepe r- sonnel, facilities and' funds of the Uni- versity's Agricultirral. Experiment Sta- tion are devoted to tobacco rzsearch, There are 24' professional workers and 25' laboratory technicians and research assistants working in tobacco research4 including employees of the Agricultural Experiment and the USDA Research Service. Over the past ten years, tobacco re- searchers at Kentucky have published 59 research papers or bulletins and' 274' progress reportSabout tobacco research. Tobe.cco July 177, 1961+ - Page 1 Anti,T.Qbol hi'1ls '. ff 1'ood' U.S'. Congress WAS1i,.NCTON; D.C.-A floodl of, bil'ls to t. strain Federctl' Trade Com- mission, or other i;overnrient agencies. :rom movinr, too fast in their onslaught on cigarcttes has been sent' to Congress siirceanntoutmcament ofl the pl'.1n to~: imrhose pu,nitive lab,~ iing and advertisingg restrictinns, on the industry.. Among others arc Li]:s bv Rep. Tuck, DEm.,, Va.; Fotintainy Ucm,, N.C.;. Taylor;, Dem., 1`.C.;, 13onncr, Dem., NlC'r, Konncgtty„ rJr.m.,, N.C.; and L.an- non; Di`tn., N.C. .3:, would lwi iibit F.T.C. fromi cnio.ciag,iitbe:ir,g r;tles on cigarette packuges, as racently an- nounced' by the agen;,•y.- aQ~'~ ,' U. S'. Tobacco Journal July 30, . rn rh,•s Corner" WIITH THE EDITOR IINi A stbrr receiving bread' soterare, earlier this month, two doctors at ChiY- earo Medical Conter disctosed that, according to tests tber had!been cew- decting, charcoal - broill.d steaha wero t+ich in benso (ia) pyrrene, a substanse whieh has been under saspicioq for some time ar a cause of lung cancer. Indeed, one of the sreahs under study contained' ar much of the aromitie hrdrocarbon as is lloand in the smoke .4 ' 600 ciparettes. I'RODUGTfOPI' of the chemical was thought to be caused'bx the burning of fat ae it dripped downi onto the charcoal. In, any event, there has been no great outcry to date over the pos+ sible threat to the stomachs of the tta- tion'e barbecue devotees. 8pecialtsts, in fact, pointed out that' the incidence of st'omach cancer in the U. 9: has d'e- cltned steadily despite the growing popularity of charcoall broiling. r . « can be cured. [IT' WOiU11.iD seem that iif' thi. Incidewt illlustrates anything, (t underlines the vital I need for researeh inte tbs entilrr cancer cXcisr-wbat eaases it, how It de.elops, its alfeob eA various parts of the body, aad, witli lack, Yow it' . . ., THE' RIDPOtiT concerning broiliitg emphasized that the chemicali was only suspected' •of causing cancer. One has now been put In the position of being asked to give up everything from char= coal broiled steaks to milk because i of the havoc they can wreak. It 1s time that the saientiBC communitx stopped trying f or big t~eadli'nes on suppositions andibegan tooking for actual causes -and real ai:res.

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