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Where There's Smoke......There's A Hot Fight Between the Tobacco Industry and the Anti-Smoking Crowd and the Battle Has Been Joined on Your Television Set

Date: 19690209/P
Length: 2 pages
00625051-00625052
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Fields

Author
Nobbe, G.
Type
NEWS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLE
PHOT, PHOTOGRAPH
Alias
00625051/00625052
Area
LEGAL DEPT FILES/BASEMENT GMP
Named Organization
American Cancer Society
American Health Assn
American Heart Assn
Ash, Action on Smoking & Health
Ctr, Council for Tobacco Research
Federal Communications Commission
Ftc, Federal Trade Commission
Natl Assn of Broadcasters
Natl Tuberculosis Assn
Seventh Dax Adventist Church
Smoke Stoppers
Smoke Watchers
Society to Outlaw Puffing
TI, Tobacco Inst
US Health Service
Alcoholics Anonymous
Named Person
Banzhaf, J.F. III
Fredrickson, D.
Hemminger, G.L.
Little, C.C.
Nader, R.
Surgeon General
Date Loaded
05 Jun 1998
Request
R1-004
R1-037
Master ID
00624892/5574

Related Documents:
Litigation
Stmn/Produced
Author (Organization)
Sunday News
Characteristic
MARG, MARGINALIA
Site
G29
UCSF Legacy ID
tsz51e00

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Page 1: tsz51e00
. , . ,....,..>.,SUNDAY, -NEWS,..F,EBRUARY.. J, .1963 1 V ../. ~uri~-a-~...'+r-rwx~? p++.... . .iv.~- - ... . ~ . . ' - - - -- . . ., . -.-..... .~a.......... ~....... .. . - . .._ I . . : there's a h©t 'fiight between the tobacco industry and Vde anti-sm okin-V crowd and the baftle has. been joined. on your televys:on set ..~.~,~~..:._.,x. OON As though tobacco industry didn't have enough troub!e with proposed ban on radio and TV cigaret ads, new style of "uncommercials" such as these stills from American Cancer Society's anti-smoking message are causing more headaches. Voice behind film links smoking and cancer while film spoofs ads extolling virtues of smoking in smiling apres-ski (A, ) and picnic.scencs (->). Tag line is: "So why are all these people laughing?" ..,.~~.. .-.,.... ,.~ - , . ' tSOSZ900
Page 2: tsz51e00
1 "Tobacco is a dirty aueed. I like it. It satisfies iao norma.i noed.7 Yike it. '' . lt i+=nkee you thin, it inakes you lean, It takes the hair right of f yozcr' bean. It's the worst darn stuff I've ever see2t. I like it." -Graham Lee Heinminper, 1896-1949. By GEORGE NOBBE FOR the second time since the con- troversial 1964 Surgeon General's %1%r0 report linking cancer, emphysema and heart disease to smoking, the American public, apparentiy . haunted by a set of scary televi- sion "uncommercials," has cut back its tc.bacco consumption. The "messages," put out by the American Cancer Society, the Na- tional Tuberctilosis tlssociation, the American Heart Association, the U.S. Health Service and the Ameri- can Health Association, have been a factor in cutting the 545.1 billion cigarets smoked by Americans in 19671o 543.5 billion last year. That's a reduction, among smokers over 18, to 210-packs a year from 214 in 1967. While that's only a shred in the 2 bi1= lion pounds of tobacco puffed away inn the U. S. each year, it has served to encourage the country's anti - smoking forces. Dozens of give-it-up clinics sprouted when the Surgeon General's report was ueeess. It charges $3b for a 10-week Clarence C. Little: first issued, only to dissolve a few to eough and topple over ' c without • _ "Thr i n dmstrtdul eesoeonae casa re- The tag line is: "Cisarets, courseSpending money for a cure seems to , lationship between smoking and any dis- ~ntoththe~reroldhAhabhts their Nowta th_e Sre' ' firing a; . shot. ~ They re klller§" mstill determination in those-who en- ease. The gaps in knowledge are so back under such, na~mes as Smoke Stop- A third shows a man bemoaning the' ;;roll. Principally, the treatment seems great that those who dog.matically assert pcrs, Smoke 1Vatchers' and STOP, plus - fact that his son has begun to smoke " to lie in constantly admonishing the otherwise+-whether they state there is the elinic run by the Seventh Day, despite all he has done to~~discourage smoker to resist temptation by asking or is not such a causal relationship- Adventist Adventist Church. ' it "I can't understand t h h' ~ • lf ' , e sayS, imse su ch ch qucstions as . v Vhat is this are premature in jud;;ment. If anything, e They employ methods, xan: ing from I;.exhaling a huge cloud 0f srrioke• +.: cigatet goipg tp do fofi m 1` ~Nothing" th e e pure bjalogicaevidonce is pinting _,:., ,, :o gradual wilhdra.wnl to cold turkey, yua •,,.. 1 ha ultimate goal of : law yer BRfiz 1'To]s Also K•ivetu hmts on ho.4 o apy techniques similar to that of Alco- holics Anonymous. But the big battle is, being fought on TV. The "uncommercials," effective be- cause of the massive audience they reach, only got on the air in the first place through the efforts of a lawyer named John F. Banzhaf 3d, who has become the Ralph Nader of the tobacco industry. An aggressive non-smoker who be- lieves in the right not to have smoke blown in his face by weaker members of the species, Banzhaf complained to the Federal Communications Commission two years ago that the anti-cigaret cru- saders were not getting the same prime TV time as the cigaret manufacturers. Banzhaf cited the so-called "fairness doctrine" which compels broadcasters to present both sides of any controversial issue. Much to his surprise, and the , shock of the networks and the tobacco industry, the FCC agreed with him. Informally, the commission suggest- ed the networks air one anti-smoking ' pitch-for free-to every three spots plugging eigarets. This put both the broadcasters and the tobacco manufac- turers in a painful bind. ASH (Action on Smoking and Health), is to drive cigaret commercials off the air altogether, an objective he believes will be attained by the end of this year. The FCC moved to do just that last week when it voted to propose a ban on all radio and TV advertising, a proposal that will force a showdown in Congress between the regulatory agency and the powerful tobacco industry. The ban would take effect automatic- ally unless Con;;ress or the broadcasters themselves act in the meantime. News of the FCC votc had little ef- fect on tobacco stocks, and neither the industry nor the networks appeared overly anxious, aside from the National Association of Broadcasters. The NAB issued a statement that said in part: "Here is an agency telling the Congress what it will do unless the Congress does something-historically, Congress has told the agency." Banzhaf has found other ways to badger the tobacco industry, such as exposing articles written by persons as- sociated with the business and planted in magazines. Ife wants a sterner warning on cigaret packages than the present "Cau- tion: Cigaret smoking may be hazardous to c lth" h ea your , w en the Federal Cifi- aret Labeling Act expires on June 30. s HE NETWORKS are losing $75 m+1= lt was passed four years ago and prevents federal tmd t t i f om s a e ageuc es r lion a year in advertising time, and the acting on cigat, t advertising. Unless the tobacco industry, which annually spends ban is extended or a new law passed, some $225 million on TV, finds that the the Fedcral Trade Commission, on rec- more time it buys the more time its' )rd against present advertising prnc- t d , @nemies get-for free-to attack it. 9fter July 1. These "uncommercials" are as irri- It is known to favor a mandatory tating, in their own do-goodish way, as ; health warning so st*ong that many the commercials implying that happi= . tobacco companies would rather stop Rdvertising than waste good money ness is a burning cigaret: ' ' preaching about lung cancer. There's the one in which a man.turns Meanwhile, the habit-busting groups down the offer of a cigaret from his • such as Smoke Stoppers, Inc., of New friend with the observation: "No, thanks. Z'ork, which claims a 90% rate of sue- cess with the 300 to 400 heav smokers I can live without them." who have taken its $75, 12-week course, Another shows a cowboy walking have continued to enroll the repentant. into a saloon, obviously facing a gun Dr. Donald Fredrickson's STOP (So- °. ciety to Outlaw Puffing) claims similar b ttl On b hi a e e y one :, opponents s begin s :ces +s expcete to set up touaher rules 00625052 a substitute for cigarets, and how to avoid gaining too much weight. The effect of all this on the tobacco industry is difficult to assess. The ciga- ret companies, whose profits began to slide last year, aren't exactly closing their doors. Many h<+;e b;gun to diversify, buying up firms that make such items as candy, apple juice and clothing. As one execu- tive said: ';'::eryone assumes that it's a " hedge against the• depressed market. It mak~s s~nse to spend money diversifying, putting money to work." Said another: "The TV commercials • have probably had an effect. But some of them are positively inane. They haven't had to stick to the truth because they don't have to clear their stuff with anyone. The commercial advertisers do." ~,, 'Phe Tobacco Institute, the industry's lobbying and i,ublic relations arm, isn't ~~ waving any white flags yet, either,, de- spite the new onslaught. Said one , spokesman: "It's hard 0 say just what the effect of the television campaign has been. Sales only grew w by about 1% in the past year, whereas the normal growth rate has been running about 2'yo a year. I can't help thinking that if they were really effective, we would have seen a niuch sharper drop. f ~ HE YUBl.1C is being tragically mis- led by this type of campaign. At the very least, its authors are guilty of ex- treme oversimplificabion. "We spend more than $4 million a year on cancer research, which is more than any other organization in the coun- try, including the government, and part of what these commercials do is make research funds that much harder to raise. Everyone thinks the cause has already been found. It hasn't." The New York-based Council for To= bacco Research issued a statement in a similar vein last week, quoting Dr.. I . o c -- .;,, cay- pe away from nut tow rd theausl h ting, and all use supportive,gr+qup,(tl+err, i•_otBRntr,fltiolt,.c~11,e~j;t~:~ilrt~.w~hdnawaL_,"sy~mptoms,, hary', xo; ...rJ

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