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Awareness Bulletin

Date: 19790921/P
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Anthony, A.
Bradley, T.
Cundell, C.
Moring, T.
Parrish, L.
Skladanowski, L.
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13 Jul 1999
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ADVERTISING AGE August 27, 1979 p. 2 RJR UNIT TO TAKE BUYS Harper, Sam .. Ncw YoaK-Though last week R. ;.: J. Reynolds Tobacco spokesmen in ~ Winston-Salem had "absolutely nothing to say" about "rumors" that the nation s leading cigaret marketer planned to move all of its media buying in-house, they will be doing a lot of talking this week and for the next few months as - they initiate the Cust stages of just ^ such a plan. - I An industry source here has con- : firmed that RJR will shift all of its media buying, or about $129,000,000 in billings,. in-house with the first of its six agencies be- ing affectcd by January, 1980. . The source predicted the agen- cies might "break out the cham- '.pagne" upon hearing the news they are to be relieved of what - many agency execs view as an "all work and little gain" chore. Agencies are William Esty Co. - (Camel and Salem cigarets), BBDO (Doral), Dancer Fitzgerald Sample (Winston and Winchester little ci- gars), LKP International (More, Now and Vantage), Ogilvy & Mather (Real) and Tatham-Laird & Kudner, Chicago (new products). .The addition of an RJR media buying department will cost the marketer "an arm and a leg," one ' source predicted. However, re- ports indicate that RJR has already : invested heavily in-a management Information system which, with the help of newly trained person- nel, will scan and evaluate media buying information. Previously the system was reserved for the ac- cumulation of out-o6home media buying information, handled in- house for a number of years. The action by RJR is said to be largely the work of Robert E. An- derson, RJR Tobacco's exec vp- marketing. Mr. Anderson was for- merly vp-general manager at Lever Bros. household division and was reportedly instrumental in that company's 1976 shift to in-house buying. He joined RJR in early 1978. Industry sources speculated that RJR's move, which apparently has been planned for some time, may have been speeded up by Loews Corp.'s Lorillard division's worries over Media Corp. of America. The media buying shop was dropped by Lorillard prior to the announce- ment that it was close to $16.000,000 in debt (AA. Aug. 6). -The movement of RJR's media buying in-house reportedly will be gradual. The last of the agencies are expected to be affected in late 1980. Though industry analysts feel the RJR move is among the most significant to hit the ad industry .-I this year, they do not feel it will 'stagger the RJ R agencies involved. RJR had not planned to notify the -agencies and the press of its plans . until next month, but n,mors cir- culating here last week humed the announcement, sources say. • Greensboro Daily News August 23,-1979 p. D7 BAKERY AND TOBACCO UNION OPENS OFFICE IN WINSTON I WINSTOy-SALEv1 (AP) - Citing an area interest in their organization, offi- ' Icials of the Bakery, Confectionary and Jobacco Workers Union have opened an ,office in Winston-Salem. . "The interest is here," said Pete ~Branch, an organizer for the union. "We -are looking for places to organize." : Branch said the bakery workers' union - headquarters in Washington has received several telephone inquiries from work- ers in the area. - - i A union official, who declined to be ,identified, said the organization has got- :ten an excellent response from workers . at the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. during the past year. . 1. "They have been in and out of the area over the past year:',the oflicial_ said. "Over one five-month period this ' year, they collected a good number of ;signed union cards from Reynolds work- : ers.,, . • . . ~ Reynolds is the only major tobacco company that it is not unionized. - However, Branch said the major thrust of his effort would be directed at the bakery industry. "We are in town looking at several possibilities," he said. The union was formed in 1978 by the merger of the Bakery and Confectionary Workers Un- ion and the Tobacco Workers Interna- tional Union. The organization now has 170,000 members,at least 50 percent of Ithem employed in the baking industry. s !VOL. 9, No, I2, SEPT. 21, 1979 ii42
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LABSTRACTS The Law Officer July - August 1977 THE MARIJUANA HEALTH HAZARD Pace, Nicholas A. During the last seven years, a very active organization called NORML (Na- tional Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) has been vigorously campaigning state by state for the de- - criminalization of marijuana. This or- ganization has campaigned nationally to make marijuana appear harmless. - They a re dedicated to fostering the idea thaf marijuana should be de- criminalized since so many people are using it. Recently, it has been learned that high on the list of President Caner s - priorities in the field of public health is - the decriminalization of marijuana. In order for you as law officers to under- stand the health aspect of this complex issue, we would like to give you the following information. , It is the contenoen of this author that the public has not been properly in- formed concerning the harmful medi- cal effects of this drug. If anything, the media tends to portray marijuana as no more harmful than tobacco or alcohol. This comparison is absurd. - Tobacco August 24, 1979 v. 181, no. 17, p. 22 SELLING U.S. FLUE-CURED TOBACCO IN 1,000-POUND BALES Graves, Albert H. Sowell, Robert. S. uring the 1978 marketing sea- , ®son, large bales that Wei_ehed approximately 1,000 pounds each were sold at auction at the Caro- lina Rrarchousc in Fuquay (dia- gram, Fig. 1). The bales were made with a 42-inch-square press - loaned by Imperial Tobacco Co. :`VoL. 9, No. 12. SEPT. 21. 1979 Cancer Research - August 1979 - v. 39, p. 2923 COLLAGEN SYNTHESIS IN CAPSULES SURROUNDING DIMETHYLBENZANTHRACENE- INDUCED RAT BREAST TUMORS AND THE ~EFFECT OF PRETREATMENT WITH /!-AMINOPROPIONITRILE Cohen, I. Kelman et al Collagen synthesis is increased over three-fold in capsule: surrounding dimethylbenzanthracene-inducetl rat breast tumors Compared to the tumor parenchyma and over six-tolc compared to normal breast connective tissue. Increased col lagen synthesis is independent of the rate of tumor growth ant final tumor size. Pretreatment of animals with Q-aminopropio nitrile to inhibit collagen cross-linking caused an 82%decreasr in tumor formation and a significant reduction in lumor volum. (approximately 0.4 cu cm) compared to controls (approxi mately 10 cu cm). The four small tumors that did develop in th• lathyritic animals had increased collagen synthesis in the inte- rior tumor stroma and reduced collagen synthesis in the tumo capsule. These findings suggest that the collagenous capsul surrounding dimethylbenzanthracene tumors functions as physical barrier to protect the tumor from the immune syster of the host. The apparent antitumor effects of (1-aminopropic nitrile may be due to immunopotentiation and/or cytotoxi actions of the drug. 79-t0725 A 82.2:T 551101977 Tobacco allotted, by counties and kinds. Washington, Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation 5er•- viee, Tobacco & Peanut Division. 20250 26 am. 1977. - Annual. Y l. Tobacco manufacture and trade - United Sutes- Statfstics-Periodicalf. 1. United States. Agrieultural Sta- bilization and Conservation Service. Tobacco & Peanut Divi• tion. OCLC 3803169
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~ABSTRACTS HRC & CC Journal 'July 1979 Iv. 2, no. 7, p. 416 POLARITY CHANGE IN CAPILLARY GC BY SERIAL-COLUMN TEMPERATURE OPTIMIZATION (SECAT MODE IN CAPILLARY GC) iKaiser, R. E. IRieder, R. I. GC, including capillary GC, Is rather inflexible, if a certain column length and stationary phase has been fixed for a given analytical problem. If the sample composition changes, one often has to change the column length and/or stationary pha se, at least when something like optimum analytical conditions areneeded.Temperaturechanges(orheatingrates)canchange the selectivity ot a given column only within very limited ra nges, due to the exponential effect of temperature on retention time. By serial coupling two chemically different capillaries, each run at another temperature, even the slightest changes _ of these two temperature values have a dramatic effect on the selectivity of the system for polar substances. We call this technique the SECAT mode of GC. Results are reported as retention index shifts, dependent on SECAT temperature data. This technique can in future easily be automated, thus enabling the analyst, f or polar sample analysis, to adjust a given chroma- tographic system to his specific sample composition without touching the instrument. ITOBACCO ;August 10, 1979 v. 181, no. 16, p. 30 EFFECT OF CIGARETTE PRESSURE DROP AND WEIGHT AND TOBACCO STALK POSITION ON SMOKE TAR AND NICOTINE YIELDS Walker, E. K. Zilkey, B. F. - A number ol bulk lots Igradesl of flue<ured tobacco from different stalk posilions were made into cigarettes and selecled within relatively narrcw ranges of welgnt and pressure drop to provide a large number at subsamples Ior smoking. A large proportion of the suosamples within fach graoe provided comparisons of tne effects of var,able-pressure drop at constant weignt of of variable welght at constant pressure~rop on Smoke caramelers. Based on sucn comparisons aopropr,ale aaluslmenB were tabulated lor each smoke parameter in order to minimize the ,nlluence of vanable cigarette vieigm and pressure drop. - Increasing we,gm and pressure drop aflecleo botn tar and nicotine levels: nicotine wa5 alfected to a greater eatent than lac Adlusled values for the smo.e parameters were less d.vergent from the means than Ine original values. e.ceot to, lar and nicotine per cigarene where adiusleo and unad/usted values were simdar. All parameters of the smoke im ereafen w,lh ascending staik posnion- but nicotine increased propor. bonately more than lar. VOL. 9, No. 12. SEPT. 21, 1979 American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal September 1979 v. 40, no. 9, p. 832 'RESPIRA.TOR USE AND PROTECTIOtd .FROM EXPOSURE TO CARBON MONOXIDE Levine, Marshal S. Investigations of the protective effect afforded by respirators in Baltimore firefighters are presented. The data indicates_that the continuous use of respirators offers significant- protection from exposure to carbon monoxide but that this protection is not absolute. A surprising finding is that the intermittent use of the face mask offers as little protection to the men as does non-use. Thesefindings emphasize the difficulties in relying- upon respiratory _ personal protective equipment for-protection from exposure. Environmental Science and Technology August 1979 p. 989 MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AT TRACE LEVELS ,Boethling, Robert S. jAlexander, Martin ! s A sensitive method was developed for measuring the bio- degradation of organic chemicals based on the formation of 1ICO. from I4C-labeled compounds. It was shown that glumse at an initial concentration of IS ng/L was degraded by microorganisms in culture at rates well below those predicted by \lichaelis-i\tenlepn kinetics from the degradation ratesal higher glucose levels. The rate of glucose degradalinn al 1.8 n„/L was affected by the density uf the bacterial )wpulatinn. The macimutn rate of biodegradation of dimelhclamine, di- ethylamine, and diethanolamine added to stream Italer was proportional to the initial amine concentratiun over a ranle of concentrations from several nanugrams to several milli- grams per liter.
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I NEWS BRIEFS ADVERTISING AGE !September 3, 1979 p. 49 RJR THROTTLES BACK ON `REAL ADS Harper, Sam 9' New Yoax-Though R. J. Rey- nolds Tobacco has decreased ad ; spending for its lackluster low-tar brand Real, the nation's leading ci- .,~. garet marketer selms intent on ' making the smoke a winner. a : ;; Highly touted Real has not 1°1 grown significantly in market `share or unit sales despite a two- year advertising and introductory Investment of more than . $60,000,000. ' - - RJR has reformulated the 10mg brand's tobacco blend, a change .- now being touted in major con- - - sumer magazines. I An RJR spokesman said the re- , Cuction tn aa spenamg erom i18,000,000-plus last year to ~- slightly over $715,000 during the first half of 1979, is not the begin- ning of the end for Real. Said an- other source close to RJR. "They are merely spending what should . be spent on Real given its present `;market share and unit sales." Real's current market share is 0.5%. -The new campaign, via Ogilvy & Mather, features the headline, _ "Taste Real's new golden taste! Richer... mellower than before." Copy reads: "Real's new golden leaf tobacco blend does it. Tastes richer... mellower... more satis- : fying.A taste thaPs pure gold."The tag line is "The smoking man's . low-tar." Graphics feature a photo- graph of a mustachioed man smil- s fngas he smokes a Real. The photo- graph is set against a gold and or- ange background. . .~ . The new positioning of Real is the third since June, 1977, when in- troductory ads stressed the brand was "the first natural cigaret with nothing artificial added." That ad tack, RJR sources admitted, created communications prob- lems. By October, 1977, RJR had changed the theme on the basis of national taste test results which supported the company's position that Real was the "besttasting low- -tar.' !VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 .., 4 4 .~. In an effort to penetrate the low- tar ad clutter, which RJR felt was ` ' .. hplding back Real sales, the ci- . garet marketer repositioned Real asacigaretwith"strongtaste."The , :. headline of that 1978 campaign _ -''read, "Real's got strong taste. More _ .,likeahightar." . .. RJR hoped that ad efforts would push Real above its sluggish 0.5% market share to a 1.2% to 1.5% "" share. However, Real's unit sales have dipped 15%a this year and its - share remains at 0.5%u. One per- -'centage point in market share rep• resents about $100,000,000 at the .. manufacturer's level. ' . "Naturally, when there is a sales slip you look for a way to make up .; for it," said Michael Newbrand, ' ' 'management supervisor on Real at ,Ogilvy & Mather. • . Greensboro Record 'September 11, 1979 p. C5 1R?R DROPS SPORTS CARS WINSTON-SALEM (AP) - R.J. Reynolds To6acco ICo. says it will terminate its sponsorship ol sportscar ;racing and increase its support of 6ve other motorsports I s onsorshi s , ~ . ' ..~ p p . ._ . .. The decision to terminate v,^as purely a busineas; one, officials said. '.. . . ."_:. ~ Reynolds announced Monday an Increase from_ $35,000 to $210,000 in support of the NASCAR Winston: Cup drivers' point fund and said its AMA motorcycle. racing point fund was being increased from $100,000 to: i125,000nextseason.. .. .., . . •.-. tSimilar increases will come in each of Reynolds'drag-racing sponsorships. I Reynolds will award bonuses to second- and ttiir -- ;place finishers in the ooint standines at oarticiwti~e NASCAR tracks for the first time in the Winston Racing' iSeries. In addition to the $1,000 bonus for first-place fin-'ishers, $500 will go to second-place drivers and $250 to,th0se who finish third. . , ,
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[ABSTRACTS .Tabak-Journal International June 1979 p. 189 CURING TOBACCO BY SOLAR ENERGY .Seibert, Theo Solar energy was successfully utilised for the first time in the Federal Republic of Germany for the curing of tobacco. Serious dry spells, causing house burn and the risk of rotten stems, were overcome. Yellowing and colour fixing were carried out with satisfactory results- As it is now possible to hang larger quanti- ties of the harvested tobacco in the barns, the curing operations are accord- ingly more economical. Tobacco curing requires plenty of heat in the summer and autumn, that is to say when the sun is able to provide a lot of energy. After brief preliminary guidance, the tobacco growers are themselves capable of building and erecting large-surface non-stationary air collectors. Tobacco Reporter August 1979 p- 6 WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO CAB SMOKING RESTRICTIONS ON AIRCRAFT? _' Mike Craig, Director - Media Relations, The Tobacco Institute, Washington, D.C. I think that judging by the number of complaints that we've seen registered by airline passengers with the individual airlines or with the CAB, the level is very low, which means that most non-smokers are satisfied with the present segregated seating. I don't feel, personally, that the CAB needs as one of its last official acts, to further complicate the way airlines handle their smokers and non-smokers. Congress has voted the CAB out of existence in response to a general anti-regulatory movement in this country. So, obviously Congress feels the CAB regulatory activity is not necessary for the safety and comfort of airline passengers. Michael Kowolsky, President, Cigar Association of America, Washington, D.C. I wouldn't say that some time down the road the CAB won't consider a total ban on smoking, but as I understand it right now, they are not. It is my feeling that the board is now over extending its authority to regulate. They're using as justification a provision of economic regulation which concerns itself with what is known as-adequacy of service. The industry over the years has accepted the authority of CAB to provide adequate service to smokers and non-smokers, ergo you had seating separation. 'Vnt - q. Nn. 1 7, -$FPT. 21, 1979 _ 0
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LABSTRACTS Science August 10, 1979 p. 591 TOXAPHENE, A COMPLEX MIXTURE OF POLYCHLOROTERPENES AND A MAJOR INSECTICIDE, IS MUTAGENIC Hooper, N. Kim et al Abstract. Tu.raphene. 1he urost eriJe(r used chlurinurrd inserticiilet is wurtugenic LI the Salmonella rrst u'irhout rrquiriug lin'er humu,¢r'trure fbr nctirirp. This in- secticide is a[anrple-x mi.t7rve (more rlran 177 pulccldorurerperres) rrirlr carcinngenir aetiritr in rodents. Snnrr but rrat n!I rif tiie nvrrrrgenie cr»npuucrrts are rasity srpa- ralerl jrour thr insecticidnl ingrerlirrrrs. Journal of Chromatography July 13, 1979 v. 175, no. 2, p. 350 SEPARATION OF MAJOR COMPONENTS IN LICORICE USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY Beasley, Thomas H., Sr. et al Licorice extract (Succus liquiririar) is the product of the aqueous extraction of licorice root, Gl,tryrrlrira glabra. The extract is an important commercial product used in the tobacco, food, and pharmaceutical industries throughout the world. Nieman' presented an interesting and informative treatise on licorice root, extract, chemistry, analysis, etc. The sweet tasting component of licorice extract is knoon as glycyrrhizin. The aqueous extract is a combined calcium-potassium salt form of glycyrrhizin acid, plus starches, gums, and various sugars. A pure form of glycyrrhizin is ammonium glycyrrhizinate. A widely used method for the determination of elycyrrhizin is the acid pre- eipitation procedure described by Houseman', which is slow and lacks specificity. Cundiffl presented a method where glycyrrhizin is assayed by hydrolysis to its aclyeon, glycyrrhetinic acid, which is determined colorimetrically using the sulfuric acid-ethanol-vanillin reaction. Methodology for the determination of 2lycyrrhizin has been revie%red by Steinceger and Marty', and by Zr~aving'. Various methods were conipared by Thieme and Hartman'. Thin-layer chromatography was used for the separation of plNcyr- rhizin rrith subsequent UV determination'. A gas-liquid chrornato^raphic (GLC) method has been reported'. A GLC assay for atnmonium clycyrrhizinatc n'as presented by Larry et aL9. Hi_h-pcrformance liquid chromatographic (H PLC) methods ha.c been reported for the specific determination of _lycyrrhizin'o'". These methods utilized anion ex- ehan,e column pacl.ines %%ith various mobile phases and buffers. Killachy <•r rd.'r report an HPLC determination for (1-glycyrretinic acid only using a reversed-phase column packin_ after acid hydrolysis and chloroform extraction. In this paper %re describe a separation of at least eight major componchts in licorice extract using a gradient. reversed-phase HPLC system. Glgcyrrhizin was identified at about 22 min based on the elution time of ammonium clycyrrhizinate. :'VoL, 9, No. 12. SEPT. 21, 1979 C O O N ~ N QD ~. . ..~„i . .: •. "6'•'.Y`k:..~.+..aIY~.A~•f~bl,.~..
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'NEWS.BRlEFS ,'tGreensboro Daily News ;rAugust 30, 1979 p. Dl r:.i.!FUEL CRISIS' WORRIED HIM IN 1917 `; Greene, David S. '; ~ • t``~ ' ;` "IN V R' Marty Whalen With Find : ~ The aging inventor was addressing the grad• uating elass of the scientific technical school -, In Washington, telling them their future was ., bright but that they must overcome one ma- jor jor problem facing the naaon. n> . n. _ He said, "There is, however,one obstacle . to further advance, in the increasing price of the fuel necessary to work machinery.Coal • and oil are going up and are strictly limited in quantity." A little later in his address, he said, "In re- .lation to coal and oil, the world's annual con- sumpGon has become so enormous that we are now actually within measurable distance of the end of the supply. What shall we do when we have no more coal or oil! . a °Apart from water power (which is strictly 6mited) and tidal and wave power (which we 4l•ave not yet learned to utilize), and the em- !VoL. 9, No. 12, SE?T, 21, 1979 , ployment of the sun> rays directly as a source~~ ' .. of power, wehave little left, exccpting wood, '.~ and it takes at least hventyfive years to grow '. a crop of trees.'• -.~'-.With that, theninventor suggested to the ' X aduating class that they might look to alco- .~, l as the fuel of the future. Alcohol, he said, ~can be made from sawdust, corn stalks and )vegetable matter capable of fermentation, in- '-'!cluding weeds "and even the garbage from - .. ; our citles." . . . c ;', ( . ~ { -.7Te speaker was Alexander Graham Bell ~-: and he was addressing the graduating class of I the McKinley Manual Training School, Wash- r t _ ~Ington, D.C., on-Feb. 1, 1917. .'}. The tezt of his address, revised somewhat, ... " .: was published in the February, 1917, issue of, _ , ,the National Geographic Magazine. A copy of the issue was recently discovered by a '. '~'Greensboro woman in a Danville, Va., slore. . Marty Whalen, training manager at the Lor. !~illard Corp. in Greensboro, said she picked-up .: tthe copy with plans to mail it to a friend in -;Africa. Flipping through the copy. she said, ishe spotted Bell's article and got "a kick out : lof it" with his 1917 views of the rising costs of ~ coal and oil and what he saw as an impending energy cnsis. ' Bell, who was 70 at the tmie, obviously was ~,not prescienl'enough to foresee the ultimate ~discovery of enough oil to make this country Iso addicted to it that, when it did begin to . ''nm out, the nation's economy was left reel- '- He also probably did not anticipate that his [words would take on an inflationary value. jThe National Geographic in which his address .-~Jappeared sold for 25 cents. When Whalen - .bought it in what she described as "a junk - shop, really; " she paid $1 each for 10 different 1917 issues. . . . ,- , ,. . . - . ,
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' i ABSTRACTS Nature August 9, 1979 v. 280, p. 487 TOXICITY INDUCED IN THE TOBACCO HORN-WORM (MANDUCA SEXTA L.) (SPHINGIDAE, LEPIDOPTERA) INSECTS feeding on toxic plants demonstrate three fairly dis- tinct types of life-style'-s. There are cryptic species, which metabolise or rapidly excrete the toxic substances present or avoid their ingestion by selective feeding; aposematic or warn- ingly coloured species which store plant toxins in their tissues unchanged or slightly modified'; and aposematic species which superficially resemble or mimic toxic species-without actually storing poisonous plant products-or those warningly-coloured non-storers which secrete their own toxins. It is gen erally agreed that the cryptic life-style is more 'successful' than either of the other two, which are relatively rare, and it is ditf cult to envisage the evolutionary steps necessary to enable a species to change to - the more hazardous warning life-style. If, however, circum- stances favour a switch to certain toxic host plants, a cryptic insect is frequently destined to become warningly coloured". On the basis of experiments with hfanduca sexra, the tobacco horn-worm, we suggest that the evolution of an aposematic poisonous_ insect, from the more common, harmless, cryptic ~ type, may simply involve a change to a related food plant ° containing different toxic properties from those of its usual host. ~ Storage and the acquisition of toxicity and w•arningcolour could I follow this crucial switch. - t Journal of the National Cancer Institute August 1979 v. 63, no. 2, p. 441 INHALATION BIOASSAY CHEMISTRY WALTON HORIZONTAL SMOKING f•]ACHINE FOR INHALATION EXPOSURE OF RODENTS TO CIGARETTE SMOKE Guerin, Michael R. et al ABSTRACT-Studlea of experimental tobacco smoke earclno- genests have sultered from Ihe lack of a conveniently available and well-cheracterized device for exposing animals lo tobacco smoke for Inhatalton. The Walton Horizontal Smoking Machine, a commercially avallable-aystem designed to expose up to 20 mlce 10 the smoke of a single clgaretle, may fulfill this need. This system produced a uniform smoke aerosol of predictable con- centration and appropriate composition for cigarettes wllh high delivery of nicotine (40 mg total parltculate matter, 2.6 mg nle- o11ne, and 17 cm' carbon monoxide per cigarette) and with low delivery of nicotine (30 mg total particulate matler, 0.3 mg nlce- t)ne, and 17 em' carbon monoxide). In thls experiment C57BL and DBA/2Bd stralns of mice were used. Ltm!lallons of the concept oe exposing animals to standing smoke were deflned- dN CI 63:. 441-448, 1979. ~VoL. 9, Nor 12, SEPTr 21, 1979 Atomic absorption spectroscopy Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Second edition. By M. Salavin. Pp.193. (Wiley: New York and Chichester. UK, 1979.) f l4; $26. THts monograph is the second edition of Volume 25 of a series on analytical chemistry and its applications edited by P.J. Elving, J.D. Winefordner and I.M. Kolthoff. As the first edition was written by Walter Slavin, son of the present author, Morris, they join that select company of father-and-son books so prized by collectors, but in reverse order. In his preface the author states that this should be regarded as a new book on atomic absorption spectroscopy from a different perspective. The organisation and layout of the book, however, follow lines similar to the first edition but, naturally, in view of the developments that have occurred in the intervening eleven years, the material content of the sections has been brought up to date and in many ! cases completely rewritten. The additional areas covered include a section on electrothermal atomisation and greater emphasis is given to the chemical preparation of samples and to environmental applications. The author rightly draws attention to the neglected area of high precision analysis for major elemental constituents but offers little fresh guidance on how to achieve it. An appendix on commercial instrumentation contents itself with a list of eleven sources of relevant commercial equipment of which only four are actual suppliers of atomic absorption instruments. The information in this section is cursory and refrains from mentioning any European manufacturers. V „r,a'! 16 5
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I ~ARSTRACTS Journal of Chromatography August 1,-1979 - .v. 176, no. 1, p. 19 ELECTRON CAPTURE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH SPLITLESS INJECTION ON ISOTHERMALLY OPERATED WIDE-BORE GLASS CAPILLARY COLUMNS. Brotell, Harald et al The injection of large volumes (up to 50 pd) of diluted samples into a tvide-bore isothermally operated glass capillary column has been studied. A series of n-alkanes (C„-C,.) have been evaluated as sample solvents by measurement of the resolution between the pesticides p,p'-DDD and o,p'-DDT. Variations in retention time for the solutes injected in different solvents and in different volumes of the same solvent have been measured. The effect on resolution of chan_- inc the injector port temperature has been studied at a constant column temperature of'_10°. - A double-injection technique utilizing a combination of a high-boiling (C,s) and a low-boiling (C,) n-alkane solvent is described. More than 500 injections eith sample volumes of >5,u1 have been made on a 0.77 mm I.D. SE-30 column without significant deteriotation of its performance. American Review of Respiratory Disease July 1979 v. 120, no. 1, p. 5 THE INFLUENCE OF LOWER RESPIRATORY ILLNESS_IN INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD AND SUBSEQUENT CIGARETTE SMOKING ON LUNG FUNCTION IN SYDNEY SCHOOLCHILDREN - Woolcock, Ann J. et al - A prospective study of respiraloq illness history and lung functinn of 10 898 school childrut in $aduey Was )segun iu 1971. At the frnt sisit, a history of prcciuus astluna and of Lroudritis before and aller the first 2)'ears of life was nbuined from a parenul qucstionuaire, aud masimal <zpira. lony flnw.rnlume cunef were recorded. These lung function studics were repeaced )rarly hettrecn 197^_ atd 1974. at which time a history of respiratory iltucss during, the prcrious I^_ mnnihs and a personal smo4iug history were recorded. Two groups of children Irom a random selection of pri- mary and accmWar) schools in Sahicr scctc sutdicd. Thcir rt~pcctisc mcau ages wcrc 8.9 )r (pri. marr group) ond 12-6 yr (high sehrwl group) in 1971. \lcan s'alucs for the masimal Ilox at 50 per eent nf the forced rital capacity were lower in childreu with a histury of hrun[hitis audFor astluua than those in thc conrrnl grnup. This was true in botlt afle groups in hoth sexes. No differences were found in the 0.i-s forced expiratory sulume or forced rital capcity. The differences in maximal flow at !A per eent of the furced sital capacity were present again in 1971. fu 1971. the data from smokers srcre cornpared wilh thnse fram unnsmnkers; small di8crences teere fouud. The results suR. gcst that hrouchitis in infauc% aud childh.wd as nall as a.thma ma+ affect luug function as chil- drrn grow, that the abnormality may nut be detected by the forced ccpiralnn' enhnne, that t[m abnormality pcrsias, and that it is possible that the abnormality is further affected h)'smokiug. :VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979
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IIABSTRACTS 185 Ast.ast A. - Analyses of gas vapour-phase of smoke, and influence of charcoal on Its filtration. 4th Iran. Tob. Cig. Res. Corr/., 1977, p. 21, abstr. Gas chromatoe_raphy analysis on the gas- vapour phase of cigarette smoke sho:ced 130 different peaks on the chromatogram, each corresponding to one particular sub- stance. Research was conducted to study the adsorption of this phase by active earbon, notably with respect to the effect of the different sizes of sranules on ad- sorption. This appeared to be inversely proportional to size. Ho.cever, the adsorp- tion rate varied with the substances studi- ed. Another aspect of the study was con- cerned with the effect of carbon ageing on its filtering efficiency : the.latter ap- peared to decrease as a function of the former. 38 1lrmrr. F.H., P.+Nor.va R.S.,-Dtims VA. Correlation studies among and bc- thveen agronomic, chemical, physical and smoke characlcristics in fluc- eured tobacco (Nicotian:r labacunt L) Can. l. Plnnr Sci., 1979, 59-1, P. 111-20. Coefficients of correlation among 23 char- acteristics were.dcterminrdd for several flue- cured tobacco (A'icotiarra tabaumt L.) cul- tirars and advanced r:eneration breeding lines, rcpresenting a wide ran_ec of variability for each characteristic. The variables veere grouped into a^_ronomic, chemical and phy-y sical characteristics of the leaf and smoke properties of cigarettes. Most of the traits studied in these individual aroups could be classed into two main catceorias in terms of their relationship to yield, leaf alkaloids, smoke total particulate matter (TP.\I) and wet tar (%VT). Those azronomic characteristics positively associated with yield were ne_~atieelv correlated with leaf total alkaloids lamina vccioht and smoke TPM, WT and alkaloids on a per ci_a- rette basis. Conversely, grade index and the aceraee length of the three top leaves, whicli were in ne_atice association tcith vield, showed a positice relationship with leaf total alkaloids and smoke characteristics. Leaf total alkaloids and lamina tcei^-ht, in positive association with each other. were positively correlated with smoke TPM, WT NATURE iAugust 23, 1979 and alkaloids. Hosvecerr both of these traits were negatively correlated with yield. v. 280, p. 664 SILICALITE-2, A SILICA ANALOGUE OF THE ALUMINOSILICATE ZEOLITE ZSM-11 THE structure of silicalite, a new polymorph of silica which was first prepared by Flanigen et al', is so similar to that of the silica-rich aluminosilicate zeolite ZSbf-5 (ref. 2) that we suggest that it should be regarded as the aluminium-free end member of this zeolite series. Therefore it should be possible to prepare silica analogues of other silica-rich aluminosilicate zeolites such as ZSM-11 (ref. 3), ZSM-12 (ref. 4), ZSM-21 (ref. 5) and ZSM-34 (ref. 6). We report here the preparation of what we believe is the analogue of ZSM-11, which we call silicalite-2, adopting the terminology silicalite-1 for the form prepared by Flanigen er al.'. The silicalite-1, ZSM-5, ZS\f-11- and, by inference, silicalite-2 frameworks contain 4-, 5- and 6- membered rings linked to form a system of channels with 10-membered ring openings'-'. In silicalite-l and ZS\t-5 the channels are a combination of lincar and zig-zag''', while in ZSJt-11' and silicalite-2 all the channels are linear. The lack of substitutional aluminium results in silicalites having no significant catalytic or cation exchange properties 'compared with the zeolites. However, silicalites are unusual in that they are the only known hydrophobic forms of silica and are capable of absorbing organic molecules up to -6 A kinetic diameter. Thermogravimetric studies of silicalites-I and -2 containing absorbed long straight-chain hydrocarbon compounds (C,-Cie) show that degassing occurs in two stages, which we consider to be due to sell-blocking of the channels at intersection points. 'VOL. 9, No. 12. SEPT. 21. 1979 IAgricultural and Biological Chemistry June 1979 p. 1351 GC AND GC-MS ANALYSIS OF HEADSPACE VOLATILES BY TENAX GC TRAPPING TECHNIQUES Tsugita, Takashi et al Voladlc componenu in foodstuffs are usually pres.nts in a low concentration. During eollecting proccdures of the volatilc compancnts, thc composition of samp!es changes quamitaticcly and'or qualimtiscly. In Ov'or chcmistry, the analysis of hccdspacc volatiks is vcry - important. Ho,sever, rhe conccntional direct samp ling method using a syrince is und<sirablc, since it leads the volatilc sample eontaininc a large amount of uatcf to rapid dclcrioration of the GC column, especially a class capillary column. Thus, clfective teehniques to trap the headap3ce colatiles are required.
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i ABSTRACTS Chemistry and Industry July 21, 1979 p. 480 INTERPRETATION OF CATALYSIS IN THE ALKYLATION OF TOLUENE OVER MOLECULAR SIEVES ON T11E BASIS OF A LINEAR FREE ENERGY RELATIONSHIP Coughlan, Brendan et al Up to 1953, high proportions of nreta isomers observed in the alkylation of monoalkylbenzenes in homogeneous catalytic systems under non-isomerising conditions were thought to be anomalous. The position was clarified when Brown and Nelson' related the high proportion of n+era isomer obtained in the Fricdcl-Crafis alkylation of toluene to the high acrirrrp and low selectivity of the attacking species; further, it was shown that a linear relationship existed between the log of the relative toluene,rbenzene reactivities (acticity) vs the log of the tolucne para,tmeta ratios (selectivity). The relationship, which is a direct result of a Hammett frez energy relationship, has been highly successful in accounting for variations with diflerent reactions in para to meta substitution and also has been valuable in the study of the mechanisms of aromatic substitution. ; in 1970 it was reported'- that p-xylene could be obtained seleaicelv in the heterogeneous catalysis of the alkylation of toluene with methanol over Y zeolite catalysts. The results were interpreted on the basis that the methylation was orrLo-para oriented and that isomerisation to the meta isomer was virtually eliminated in the super cage of the zeolite crystal owing to hindered secondary movement of the methyl group. In this communication representative results are reported from a careful study of the alkylation of toluene with methanol and ethanol over nickel and nickel, tin Y zeolite c:nalysts; the results are interpreted using Brow'n-s lincar free energy rclationship, It is shown that the reaction has all the characteristics of Friedel-Crafts alk39:uion; further, the relative amounts of;mra and nreta isomer formed tinder our conditions can be interpreted on the basis of a quantitative relationship ttithout rccourse to hindered moeement of the methyl group. ,,N.,.. IVOL. 9, No. 12. SEPT. 21, 1979 I Industrial Research/Development I August 1979 p. 48 jIONENE POLYMERS PROMISE IANTISTATIC COATING PROPERTIES ~ PItOS1t5tNC POSSt6ILfT1E5 for anti- _static coatings on pl:utics have been investigutcd in two separate sntdies at NASA's Jet Propulsion Labnr.uu- ries. One progra m, com pleted Lu t eear, found two low molecuLtr-w•eight polymers that work well with polymethyl meth.cry6de (P\I\I, or "Plexiglass"). In the other, more recent work, systems based on ionene polymers were examined and muy have application to a broader runge of plastics. NATURE 'August 23, 1979 'v. 280, p. 623 IPRESS BANNED FROM CONFERENCE IHay, Alastair The press is to be excluded from a meeting to evaluate short term, in vitro tests for carcinogenicity, following a ruling by the conference's organising committee. A decision not to invite journalists to attend the October, 1979 meeting in Atlanta, Georgia was taken when some of the participants voiced fears that the attendance of the press at the event would have an inhibitory effect and restrict the usual scientific discussions on such occasions. It has been decided, however, that in vietc of media interest in the su bject, information on the conclusions of the conference will eventually be issued in December, at a press conference to be held in Washington. s
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~ASSTRACTS TOBACCO July 27, 1979 v. 181, no. 15, p. 179 CHLOROPLAST PIGMENT DISTRIBUTION IN YELLOW MUTAIITS OF TOBACCO AS RELATED TO PHOTOSYNTHETIC BEHAVIOR De Jong, Donald W. Alberte, Randall S. Tne pholosynlnenD caDaDnlt,es antl enloropy9 properbes of two yellow tobacco INrcobana IaDacum L.I genotypes. yellow green (consolation (yyyg/ and pale yellow 17.1. 13721. were compared wlth those of Iwo normal green genotypes. NC-95 and SC-58. Despite a wide range in enleroonyll content. CO, lixalion rates based on leaf area did not deler srgndreantly. The pnptosyntnenc unit slle was smallest in yellow green q10 chVl P7D01 wnereas rne pnolosyntheTic unit Oensvly was lowest (52 Om'') in pale yellow. Pigment concentrations IEnd2d to be intermediate in pale yellow leaves excepl for the xanthppnylls. The relatrve proportions of 12menNr chloroohyeprolein vaneC in a con5tstenl manner among Ihe lour genotypes. Yellow green was particularly DencRnt In Ihe I,ghDharrel Chlorophyll a/b proleln. The data demonstrated thal the photosynthetic traas of Ihe Iwo yellow genotypes were expressed in quite ddrerent ways. The slpenor growth vigor ol the pale yellow genotype cannot be attributed to pigment levels or dls- :nbul.onbelxeentneCplorOphyl6prolCineomolCxcs - ' Journal of Chromatographic Science August 1978 v. 17, no. 8, p. 464 .APPLICATION OF THE COMBINED ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES OF HPLC/FT-IR, GC/FT-IR, AND GC/MS - TO THE ANALYSIS OF REAL SAMPLES Shafer, K. H. et al Comparisons are made between GC/FT-IR, HPLClFT-1R, and GCIMS concerning the-capabilily of each as analytical techniques in the analysis of an industrial wastewater effluent. Shown is the capability of infrared spectroscopy to - Idenlify specific isomers which is not accomplished by mass spectroscopy. Spectral data obtained from GClFT-IR and GClMS are complementary, making possible precise identi- fications which would otherwise be impossible. Fewer sample components are identilied by HPLCIFT-IR than GC/FT-IR as a consequence of the decreased sensitivity of the former and the presence of opaque solvent band regions in the spectra. The sample isomers of chloronitrobenzene are belter separated by HPLC than packed column GC, demonstrating the dillerence in selectivity of the two types of chromatogra- phy. Infrared reconstructed chromatograms are used in locating scan sets of maximum SlN. comparing the sensi- tivities of HPLC/FT-IR and GCIFT-IR, and monitoring the effect of the GC and HPLC interfaces pn chromalographie peak shape. A major limitation to rapid and positive identifi- cation by GC/FT-IR is the lack of adequate vapor phase spectra. ~VoL. 9, No - 12, SEur. 2L 1979 iJournal of Chromatographic - Science August 1979 ,v. 17, no. 8, p. 441 ITHE STATUS OF INFRARED DATA 'BASES .Fisk, Cherie L. et al Computerized data bases o11R spectra are among the oldesl spectroscopic data bases to have been made available and used by the scientific community. Their use has nol, how- ever, lived up to expectations or been as extensive as that of , other related tools, such as mass spectral data bases. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the computer - search systems that work with these collections of spectral data. The history of the major collections of condensed IR spectra will be outlined, and more recent work directed towards the compilalionof coflections of contlensed-phase and gas-phase spectra, with-or-withoul the use of-Fourier transform techniques, will also be summarized. - Journal of Chromatographic Science August 1979 v. 17 no. 8 p. 434 O- O O N , , ~ A GC/FT-IR COMPOUND IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM N `ii,] Hanna, Alan et al 00 ~. The use of GC/IR for the routine analysis of organic pollu• tants can result in the collection of thousands of interfaro- grams for each analysis performed, requlring days to be reduced to useful information. The time consuming process of evaluating such data necessltates the development of appropriate data processing systems. The semi-automatic GC/IR compound idenlification has been designed with the lotlowing goals In mind: the rapid reconstruction o{ the or101- nel CC trace from the collection ol interlerograms, the selea - lion of appropriate (Informallon containing) interferograms for furthor processtng, and the searching of the spectra Irans- formed /rom these Inlerforograms against a library of known spectra. It Is also des!rable that the program be able to lunc- tion with or without operator Interventipn at critical points and that Inlermodlate resulls be saved for Ia1or review, odil- Ing, and reprocessing. These goals have been met with a program package designed to run on a Nova minicomputer using the ROOS disk operating system. The program allows the operator to set up all run time parameters and program Instructions initially, after which the program may run un- attended. Intermedlale results may-be printed or plotted at a later time, and such tesults fromm separate GClIR experi- ments kept In uniquely named disk Illes. The structure and operation of the program package Is described.
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t "We~have'i feeling that a place like ~ . !Greensboro ts an entry point to one of ; the most economically viable parts of the country." he added. "Greensboro " thau always had a good reputation for . ,.1 I business and a lot of business people fn ., i the East know Greensboro. We think it can be a major, regional convention and . meeting center with the convention cett- . . The details of the f.oewiproposal are awaiting the resuLLs of a market study by ` : the corporauon a hotel and finance de- ~artment However Loews is lookmg at a hotel -. containing between 350 and 400 rooms .: and an estimated price tag of:22.8 mn- ~ Bon. However, he noted that the typical =57,000 development cost per room for- _-~ mula Loews relies on could be shaved as I a result of savings through shared facili- I ales with'the convention center. I He also said it is likely that the hotel - Nature August 30, 1979 v. 280 p. 715 Watches waming: Stricter control of some digital displays for liquid crystal watches has been urged by the UK's National Radio- logical Protection Board following publication of its first consumer products report. The board began testing devices which could expose the public to radiation in 1976 and its report con- centrates on two main devices - ionisation chamber smoke detectors and liquid crystal digital watches that contain gaseous tritium light sources. Most of the smoke detectors, were found to be satisfactory, and where problems were detected, the board reports that these have now been identified and solved. However, in some watches, the tritium light displays= which eliminate the need for batteries - were found to leak "significant" amounts of tritium when subjected to fairly violent tests. In some cases, this reached as much as 10,000 times the recommended limit for radiation emission. The board described this as "clearly unacceptable", although in reality it is unlikely that watches would be subject to the tests' stringent criteria. Nevertheless the board urged that greater care be taken in manufacture and added that in cooperation with the Federal Office of Public Health in Switzerland - where many of the light displays are made - a new set of guidelines was now being drawn up. ;'TOBACCO . Julv 27. 1979 iv. 181. rio. 15. n. ' 169 '... Lorillard has announced the promotions of Greens- boro employees Judy Mishoe and Allen Sallez. `: ;,Mishoe of Greensboro has been 'promoted to I ~v senior systems analyst for Lorillard's management r,:information- services department. She joined ~":Lorillard in 1962 as a keypunch operator. Prior to ;her new appointment, Mishoe was a programmer `analyst. . : 1 Sallez has been promoted to senior industrial engineer at Lorillard. He has served as an industrial ;.'engineer with Lorillard since 1971. IThe Greensboro Record September 3, 1979 p. B5 LORILLARD CHANGES Lorillard Corp. has announced one hiring and two .". 1promotions at its research and production facility here. They are: . .. . . :. : :; . . ,. ,.. --0 Amelia Poole, a Rockingham native who earned a degree in biology at UNC-Greensboro, who joined the iresearch center as a biologist. 1.....i Harold T. Friddle, a Lorillard employee since - 1962, promoted to technical specialist. •.. -•. .i O David H. Bryan, formerly a quality 'crontrol aru- lys[ in the central quality control department, promoted to quality control senior analyst. _ __ , , .,, . . x. .~.~ `:.
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SS LPTRACTS Archives of Environmental Health July-August 1979 p. 228 EFFECTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON ELASTIN AND COLLAGEN CONTENTS OF LUNG Kleinerman, J. et al ABSTRACT. \lale Syrian hamsters were exposed to 30 ± 5 ppm nitrogen dioxide for 22 hr daily-for 3 wk. Nitrogen dioxideexposed hamsters sacrificed at various times during the 3 wk exposure showed a general loss of body weight and an increased dry lung weight when compared with the controls, which were housed in a similar, but nitrogen dioxide-free environment. Analysis of total lung collaeen and total lung elastin revealed a net decrease in the moieties within 4 and 10 days. resnectively, following commence- ment of nitrogen dioxide exposure. Total lung collagen returned toward pretxposure levels by the l4th day of nitrogen dioxide exposure. Total lung elastin did not return toward normal until termination of nitrogen dioxide exposure. Recovery in room air for 3 wl: following 21 days of nitrogen dioxide exposure restored the total pulmonary collagen and elastin to values similar to the control groups. These data suggest that the dynamics of elastin and collagen degradation and synthesis differ during and after nitrogen dioxide exposure. Lung collaeen loss was observed earlier and was restored to normal values during the continuation of nitrogen dioxide exposure. Lung elastin loss occurred later and persisted during the entire period of exposure but returned to normal after exposure was terminated. Archives of Environmental Health July-August 1979 p. 240 MESOTHELIOMA AND EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF CHRYSOTILE AND AMPHIBOLE ASBESTOS Acheson, E. D. Gardner, M. J. ABSTRACT. This paper provides a new analysis of previ- ously published work and draws attention to the possibility that mixtures of amphiboles and chrysotile appear mure commonly in the lungs of inesothelioma patients compared to controls than do either of the main types of fiber alone. The possibility that these results may indicate a synergistic interaction between chrysotile and the amphiboles is dis- cussed in the liJtt of the epidemiological data. Cosmetics and Toiletries August 1979 p. 9 - ~COSMETIC SCIENCES I.deiJavarre, Maison G. I The Dallas meeting of the SCC last May more strongly than ever made me realize that the Society should be re-named (as the British have done) the Soci- ety of Cosmetic Scientists, if the : British let us use the name as we- , did when their British SCC started. Indeed this "new" name i was discussed at the founding I meeting of the SCC in 1943, but " it was then thought to be too ostentatious. But times have changed and so has the industry. ;Ce:tainly the title of the May Setninar states it rather well- ":he Basic & Clinical Sciences of Cosmetics.` The final address of the morning was given by Dr. William Holder especially eni- phasizing his work on finding that 6-methylcoumarin used as a fragrance ingredient in suntan preparations is a photo sen- - sitizer. The speaker used numer- ous slides to pinpoint the contact dermatitis.-He said that ordinary coumarin, long used as a fra- grance ingredient and as a flavoring agent with vanillin, 'also produces photoallergic con- I tactdermatitis. Chemical Forecasts by Computcr11978-19S3-ffull & Co., 5 Oak St., Greenwich, CT OGS10; 400 pages S^_5. A 20 cear statistical review ofproduction and sales for more than 200 large-volume chemical, plastic, and related products is contained in this comprehensive .vork. For each produet, four computerforecnsts ofprnduction are pmvided in tabu- lar form for the period 197S to 19S:1. A graph is provided for each product to show past perfnrrnance, the regression fit .cith past performance, and a range of forecasts of future performance. Prices and price trends also are calculated. t.VOL. 9, N0.,12. SEPT. 21, 1979 _ 1179 a&=
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1ABSTRACTS Chemical Reviews August 1979 v. 79, no. 4, p. 287 ORGANOMETALLIC INTRAMOLECULAR- COORDINATION COMPOUNDS CONTAINING A NITROGEN DONOR LIGAND Omae, Iwao Contents - 1. Introduction - . 287 P. Organometallic Intramolecular-Coordination Compounds Containing a Nitrogen Donor Ligand 288 A. Alkylamines .288 B. Benzylamines 291 Benzoylamines C 300 . 0. Ammoalkyllerrocenes 301 E. Benzylideneamines 303 F. Imines 308 G. Azobenzenes - 309 H. Phenyldiazenes 316 I. Heteroaromatic Compounds 317 Ill. ConcludingRemarks 319 IV. References 319 Analytical Chemistry September 1979 v. 51, no. 11, p. 1675 DETERMINATION OF N-NITROSODIMETHYLAMINE IN DIFIETHYLA[4INE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH NITROGEN SELECTIVE DETECTION AND NITROSAMINE SELECTIVE DETECTION Parees, David Marc The separation of N-nitrosodimelhylamine from dimelhylamine using a silica gel column chromatography procedure which permits trace analysis of the nitrosamine in the amine matrix using a gas chromatographie nitrogen selective detector (NPD) procedure Is described. Recovery percentages are over 90% for nitrosamine levels as low as 4 ppm and 60-80°S, for levels around 0.1-0.2 ppm. Precision at the lowest level was t15%. Contirmalion of the nitrosamine idenlity was provided by examination on gas chromatographic columns of dilferent characteristics, gas chromatography/mass spectometry, Thermal Energy Analysis (TEA) and photodecomposiiion studies. Conlirmation uf the quantitative GC/NPD work was provided by GC/iEA. The presence of dimethylnitramine, and Its deteellon using GC/TEA, are also discussed. VOL. 9, No. 12. SEPTr 21, 1979 43 . Bucr:+tuN M.S., \IcDaMrt. C.N. Amino acid transport in suspension cultured plant cells : 1. \fethods and kinetics of Lleucine uptake. Plant Sci. Letr., 1978, 13-1, p. 27-3-1. A method for studying amino acid transport into suspension-cultured Nicotiaua tabaaon cv. \tlisc. 38 cells has been developed. Re- sults from espcrimental analcsis of this method demonstrate that the mcthod yields precise measurements of initial uptake ~rates. This method vvas employed to measure LG leucine transport and two systems have been identified. At the locrer substrate levels investigated (0-03 m.N to 20.0 ma1) transport is via an energy dependent, sa- turable svstem while at the hi^-her substrate levels(20.0 mAf to 150.0 m.til) uptake in- creases result from an energy independent, !Lcs cires d'hydrocarbures ont 616 cxtraitcs a I'acctonc ct dcterminecs par GC apri:s purification par 1'acide silicique Les chloro- phplles et carotcnoides diminunu au cours du sicha^_e, tandis que Ic ncophytadiinc au^_mente. II y a une corrclation movenne . entre la disparition des piemcnts et I'auq- mentation du nioph}~tadienc au cours du sicha;e. Cette substancerepri•sente la plus grande partie des cires d'hvdrocarbures ; elle se trouve en plus yrandc quantitc dans les parties basses de la plante que dans Ics partics hautcs, au moment de la rccoltc ct au cours du jaunissement. Les autres hy- drocarbures et la iUPT restent constants au cours du sechaee. Coresta - - '1979, no. 1, p. 16 THE TOBACCO IYHITE PAPER O 0 0 for an art of better smokin_s!, followed IJ by a smokers' guide. 'A ba (D 0 This Freirch book eontnius 96 pages, fornml 21S x 14, and tLerefore closclv related ro fhe Colden recfmo,le, is hrotieht aert bp the Jean NICOT Urorherood (laurded in ,1larch 1961) atd publislred by Jacques GRdNcIICR Lt h'oventber 1978. !t'ritten by Ned RtcalL it is prefaced by Edaar F.+en[ forueer Speaker of Nte lower house of the Frcnch paziiautent.-This book makcs plcasart read- ine, a plc'nsroe increased by smnc forty i!- hrstrarions. lts tcrr cLnprers lead the rcader to meditatc on ntan)' Qlrestiorts rr:latinc to the pipe, ci;ars, cigarettes,-tcays of smoking artd bad sntoking habits.
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'Industrial Research Development .'September 1979 ' p. 56 :.UIVULKIaKVV1VL LK8 VCCnnJ ivia-.a+ . ,ENVIRONNaEN'PAl. CUNUI'I'IVNA l;Viv-1-xV:, •ISELF-SUSTAtNtNC,energy indepen- _dent buildin s are on the ver e of - g g ~`becoming.p mctical realities. That is ., about to be demonstrated next spring when construction of a new, underground teaching and research .,•facility for the Department of Civil and Mineral Engineering (C\tE) at the University-of \tinnesota begins. t The 13,935-ms (150,000-fP) build- ing, which carries a $16.5 million ' project cost, will be located 95 per cent underground. It might well be considered a prototype of a self- sustaining, energy-independent structure, according to Dr. Raymond Sterling, director of the Under- ground Space Center at the Univer- , sity, because it will combine solar heating, cooling, and electrical gen- eration systems that as yet have not been combi ned in a single structure. These systems, together.vith the building's passive solar construc- ltion, make it a national demonstra- . lion project that will "try to show that you can build a large, very ienergy-efficient building that is also a very attractive and fu netional place 1 to work," Sterling says. Industrial Research Development September 1979 .'p. 42 - AMINO ACIDS PRODUCED BY CHEMIST FOR FIRST TIME USING SUNLIGHT NATURE August 23, 1979 v. 280, p. 623 HAZARDS AT WORK 'KILL 100,000 {A YEAR' S ,,- y +; t,. 1' ~ - i I dfh Pidh 'n arat report to tereseRt te Toxic ' Substances Strategy Committee of the US 'Council on Environmental Quality claims ~- •that "more than 100,000 workers are . believed to die each year as a result of . physical and chemical hazards at work". The committee estimates that between 20%s '. and 38% of all cancer may be caused, in '. part, by occupational exposure to carcinogens. - . - , The report says prevention is the major key to controlling these environmental hazards-and calls for the rigorous -application of more than two dozen statutes for the regulation of toxic ~chemicals already on the books. It ~ also advocated more legislation, including .setting up a federal authority responsible I : for cleaning up hazardous waste sites. ~ More than 43,000chemicals arelisted by ~the Environmental Protection Agency as being subject to regulation. It may take . years to determine whether or not a substance is hazardous and the complex- ities in reaching such a judgement are enormous. But the committee feels that the difficulties can be mitigated, to some extent, by greater cooperation between agencies involved in toxics-related research. The Government is to spend .around S1 billion on toxics research next year. . . . . .. . . - The report has drawn some criticism ..from the chemical industry. The Chemical Manufacturers Association called it a "hodgepodge of concepts and recom- mendations that havebeen either disputed . or discredited since the committe was created in 1977." , ' . s A Univ. of Texas chemist has produced amino acids using sun- light to duplicate certain aspects of photosynthesis, substituting inorganics for the chlerophyl used by green plants. This is the first time such a reaction has been carried out under lab condi- tions using only sunlight. Similar reactions in rocksor clays may have played a role in the initial production of amino acids in nature and provided for their continuous production as nutrients for early life until biological photosynthetic systems were able to develop. . . - . •-
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' A~ BSTRACTS American Review of Respiratory Disease August 1979 v. 120, no. 2, p. 293 A FOUR-YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF LUNG MECHANICS IN SMOKERS Corbin, Richard P. et al We performed a prospectire sttsdy of pulmonary funuion in'1 smokers, 9 ec-smakers, and 12 non- amokers. The smokers and es-smokcrs tvere presclectetl, because thcV mere partieipants in a smol- 6sg cessatims clinic. An ascrage inters'al o( i ccan separated the first and secoud (follow-up) sludics. The smoking group showed a signibcattt decrease in maximal espintors• flow measured at low lung volume. Ioss of elastic recoil• increase in hmg compliance, increase in totol lung capacity; increase In the ntio of residual solume to total lung capacity. and au increase in the ratio of functional refidtul apacitv to rotal lung <apa<ity. The ex-smokers shotred changes similar to those of tlre amoAers, but of lesser magnitude. The nonsmoking group demonstrated few changes in function during the study interval. Commonly measuretl parameters of function• including the ratio of thc forced expiratory colume in I see to the forced vital capacity and the maximal expiratory flow after exhalation of 50 per cent of the siul capacity. did not change significantly in any group. Sensitive tests of lung function scrre abnormal in a very high percentage of the combined group Of smokers and e<-smo4ers rvhen measured at the time of dte second study: only a small number of abnormalities in these parameters were noted iu the nonsmoking group. U'c conclude that there was a deterioration of lung fmretiou in smokers far in excess of that predicted by age. These chan,rs suggest the development of emphssema and were predictable for the group as a whole by a high presalence of abnormality of dynamic compliance, closing solume, masimal mid.expiratory flow, and residual volume at the time of the initial study. American Review of Respiratory Disease ~August 1979 ;v. 120, no. 2, p. 369 MACROMOLECULAR BINDING OF H-BEN2O(A)PYRENE METABOLITES AND LYMPHOCYTE TRANSFORMATION IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER, AND IN SMOKING AND•NONSMOKING CONTROL SUBJECTS - Jett, James R. et al The binding Of 3H-bcnrn(a)prrcut metahulit,s to tnaaomolccules vux esalualcd in peripheral blood morwnudear eells of patients nith hm., cancer and smoliu•y aud nonsrnoAing cunaol sub- jects. Simultancotu mcauurmerrt of Lnspbncrte traosfmmatiau rras catricd nut iu blood samples from all subjt•ets by dclcrmining ~1H-tltsrnidiuc incm'pnratian futo acid-piaipitable nsatcrial. An attrmpt to asscss sarimn tyns uf ard hrdror_atbon b)thas)lasc actisiu mutnhuting to macrnmolcc nlar binding was made by ming 7.9-bcnlu0asnuc. an iuhibiror Of puhcsclic arormtic tndrocar- ~bon-induced arrl hsdiocarbun hnboxslase actisits. The 7.8 Lcumll~twm eaused a causistcut de- erease in macromolecular binding iu 111 Of 150 subjects esamiurd. ?tactomolcuilar binding in lhe absnrcc of 7-8Lrnconasonr rraa uut signifirantly dilfcrcnt in thc patkurs srith IunL canccr com- pared 10 the control groups. \faaonsolecular bindin~ in the presntce of 7.S-hcurollasnne was sig. nibcantlc lower in the patirut% widt Imr4 c+r^cer than iu thc control subjccts. Lsmphoo te transfor- mation r.as not signibcantic dilfetent in any Of the Fluups tested. ?Ianumolecular bind•.ng svas not dependent on the dagrte of Isnrpbncyte ttan•formation. Iu the lung raucer gtmip. maauutolecular binding in the prs.cuce or ahacnce of 78-bonrallasonc rras nut signiGrantly different in the pa- lients s.ith adenocarcinoma cnrnparsd tu ulnam"ns cell catcinunu, ur lu smnt.en cotnpared to ta-smokcn. a
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j ABSTRAC T S Journal of Food Science September-October 1979 p. 1263 NITRITE LIPID REACTION IN AQUEOUS SYSTEM: INHIBITORY EFFECTS Old iQ-NITROSA[4INE FORMATION Kurechi, Tsutao Kikugawa,-Kiyomi The chemical interaction of lipids and lipid-containing foods with nitrite in a mild acidic aqueous system was investigated. %tethyl Gnoleate-eoatcd siGca gel, Inuatipid, cow's milk, mayonnaise, yolk and rniro reduced a considerable amount of nitrite. >Itthyl lino- kate-eoated silicdgel and cosv's milk extensively prevented the foo- - mation of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. It seemed bkely that the unsaturated fatty acid residues were responsible for the interaction of lipids with nitrite. Methyl linoleate was changed into two or more unidentilied products, neither of which was the hydroperosides of the ester. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry June 1979 p. 1355 CHANGES IN VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS AND FREE AI4IN0 ACIDS DURING AIRTIGHT FERMENTATION OF TOBACCO STALKS Miyake, Yoshiyuki • et al In a previous pap:r,s' we reported utilization of to- bacco stalks as a raw material of cicarcttcs. As a result, it was darified that an air-ticht pile fermentation of tobacco stalks was effective for impros'cmcnt of aroma and laue, anJ the fermented stalks was esa- lualcd to bc a useful tobacco maicrial. Sincc no analy- lical data hacc been obtained, we havc planned to examine tlte chanccs of chcmical componenla during 'thc fcrmenution, focussing on volatile materials and free amino acid; sshich eou!d concern to aroma and taste of tobacco. Journal of Chromatographic Science August 1979 v. 17, no. 8, p. 428 INTEGRATED APPROACH TO AUTOMATIC INTERPRETATION OF VAPOR PHASE INFRARED SPECTRA FOR GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY Delaney, Michael f. Uden, Peter C. : Computerized inlerpretation ol vapor phase inlrared spectra as an identilication tool for gas chromatography Is diseussed: Approaches based on library searching, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence are compared. Il Is seen that a com- bination of these techniques and the incorporation ol addi- tional information, such as selective detector response, will lead to improved performance ol the interpretation system. IJournal of Food Science September-October 1979 p. 1525 SEPARATION OF FLAVOR COMPOUNDS FROM LIPIDS IN A MODEL SYSTEM BY MEANS OF MEMBRANE DIALYSIS Benkler, K. F. Reineccius, G. A. The separation of da.ur compounds from lipids by membrane dialy sis svas studied usine a mudel system eonsiwng of I I Ilavor eom- pounds and corn oil di<volva•d in solvent. Several solvent systems and . three perlluurusuhonic acid membranes were studied. The most ef- feaice solvent syscens nas a misture of 74} acctone ald )0'.i pen- lane whila the more ettvctlce manbranes were ones suth equivalenl weichts of 1200 _nd 1100, and thicknesses of 5 and IU mils, tespei- tivety. Uiffusion of the cum oil seJa less [luo 0.1]^. of the od added. Cal.ulmiun of perme:mces shmced that diffmion decreased with incrcased mul.•cclar srre. lhc diitusion of ]-melhu\ypyrarina scas hindered by euhvr Aeorprion un tn or reaction u'nh the dulysrs memhranc. Itca.uun ot the membrane widl acelone fsolvenll rr- isolta•d in the funniuun uf pco atldicts. ~ ~ ~ N rA N ~ C!f '•VOL. 9, No. 12. SEPT. 21, 1979 1~1_~73
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`-~'Analytical Chemistry ,iSeptember 1979 K ;':'v. 51, no. 11, p.' 1136 A ..;z:`;,WRITING THE TECHNICAL PAPER The progress of modern science de- ,; pends on the dissemination-of infor• • mation, and the research paper is the -•.vehicle of communication. Writing is . ;not an interruption of the research --process, but an integral part of that . prucess. A number of publications are ',available to smooth the road to manu- . ~ script preparation and submission. "How to Write and Publish a Scien- ~, tific Paper" by Robert A. Day (ISI . '. ~ Press: Philadelphia, 1979) is a good 't' cookbook nn scientific writing. AI- • though Day's field is microbiology, the , principles discussed in this book apply to any of the scientific disciplines, in- g eluding analytical chemistry. Day begins by defining the scientific - - paper and delineating the tess of . valid publication. He points out that . a scientific paper is a published report . describing the results of original re- :search,butthatthesesand conference ' reports do not usually meet the test of . ~ valid publication. Many of the criteria he mentions are valuable, not only for the writer, but also for the reviewer of technical papers. It is essential that - reviewers recognize the standards de- fining an acceptable primary scientific . publication, including the concepts of . f rst disclosure and experimental re- peatability. . ., - '....-::. .. . , peatability. .' Day discusses the parts of the tech- nical paper one by one: title, abstract, . introduction, experimental, results, . discussion, and literature cited. He also gives the reader valuable advice concerning tables and illustrations, how to type the manuscript, how to - deal with editors, how to deal with ' printers,-how to order reprints, and in- formation on correct English. In addi- tion, there are chapters on writing re- view view papers, conference reports, and i theses. - . ! Day's book contains helpful hints gleaned from the author's many years of experience in scientific publishing. He recommends, for instance, identi- fying the first reference to a table or illustration in the text margin. This provides a flag to the printer to break the text at that point to insert the table. He elucidates the tricky tense conventions, which require the use of present and past tense in specific in- stances which are by no means ob- vious. -(Vot_. 9, Nor 12, SEpT. 21, 1979 . ;x,. ~• Day also admonishes the reader to begin writing the paper while the re- - 'search i4still •,n progress_"This makes '. the writing easier because everything '- is fresh in mind," Day writes."Fur- - .-.Therrnore, the writing process itself is likely to point to inconsistencies in the ~ results or perhaps to suggest inter •4, sting sidelines that mr"ht he fol r , krwed: _: ;r -`'~ "Huw to 1Vrite and Publish a Scien- .~'. ti(;c Papei' may be ordered from IJI - Press, 325 Chestnut Street, Philndcl- .- 'phia, Pa. 19106. The price is $8.95 for .'. the paperback and $15.00 for the . ' hardcover edition. ISI Press will pay pnstage ifpay'ment is enclosed with -the order. More speciGcinformation for chem- .-iss may be found in•'Handbook for - Authors of Papers in American Chem-- ical Society Publications", Americarv . Chemical Society: IVashington, D.C., : 1978. This handbook is a guide to . • writing for ACS books and journals. defining the sections of the scientific . paper, detailing the physical composi- " tion of the manuscript, and describing the editorial process. It explains all the rules and conventions for num- '• hers, mathematical expressions, ab• -breviations, symbols, and units. There -. ' is detailed information on preparation af tables, graphs, and illustrations for _, ACS publications. Proofreaders' • . marks are explained, and there are many valuable tables on topics such as SI units, multiplicative prefixes. - ~ and symbols for physicochemical . 1 quantities. .' . - . . ; -The "Handbook for Authors" is .~ available from Special Issues Sales, °- -: American Chemical Society, 1155 16th Street N.SV.,1Vashington, D.C. 20036, ~ at 56.75 (paperback) or $7.50 (hard , cnver). .. . - ~ ~ . .,
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LABSTRACTS Journal of Chromatography Science- July 11, 1979 ,v. 175, no. 1, p. 194 'EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE DETEILLIINATION OF - N-NITROSODIMENTHYLAMINE USING - CHEMILUMINESCENT DETECTION Alliston, Geraldine V. et al It is widely accepted that the only unambiguous method for the estimation and identification of N-nitrosantines in complex mixtures involves confirmation by combined gas chromatography (GC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). However, much work has been devoted to the development of reliable and reason- ably specific screening techniques to be used prior to GC-i<1S confirmation'. The most satisfactory technique is that based on the catalytic denitrosation of N-nitrosamides and subsequent measurement of the chemiluminescence of the reaction bemren nitric oxide and ozone? d. This technique shows high specificity and results arc in excellent agreement with those obtained by NIS'. There have, however, been occasional reports of false positive results'.6. The enhanced and erratic response of a chemiluminescent detector to solutions of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in hexane-ethanol mix- tures is described here. - Journal of Chromatography July 13, 1979 v. 175, no. 2, p. 335 VAPOUR-PHASE METHOD FOR PREPARING COLUMN PACKINGS FOR GAS-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY USING A VACUUM TECHNIQUE - Filchev, P. I. et-al An important operation in the preparation of gas chromatogapiiic coltumu is the coating of the stationary phase on the solid support surface. The problem of eoating is connected with the distribution of the liquid layer and hence s%ith the heieht equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP). The method of coatin_ is of impor- tance both in analytical 2as-liquid chromatography (GLC) and in invcsti:ations on the nature of the interaction between the solute, stationary phase and support surface. In previous papers'•' the possibility of coating the stationaty phase in the vapour phase on the solid support was demonstrated. Packines with diferent station- ary phases were prepared, including squalane, dinonyl phthalate, I?,3-tris-(2- eyanoethoxy) propane and polymethylsiloxane PMS-100, and the applicability of the method for liquids with different vapour pressures scas demonstrated. According to sonic datal, the application of a vacuum when preparing the paekine results in improved spreading of the liquidfilm, acceleration of mass transfer and increased etBciency. The present work was an attempt to combine the best points of the method of vapour-phase coating with a lotc-pressure technique. For this purpose, the fluidized bed-techniquc used in previous work' had to be modified, so that the movententof the particles was attained by means of vibration instead of a gas flow. `VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 O O O tA O ~A I
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Greensboro Daily News ISeptember 13, '1979 ,p: A5 ~NATURAL INSECTICIDE FOUND IN ~ . Tl1MATOF.S . :•:;c....:. . .. .. 1 WASHINGTON (AP) - Scientists have discovered a natural in- .secticide in wild tomatoes that they say could reduce the need for -'artilicial pesticides on the cultivated commercial type. ` North Carolina State University researchers said Wednesday that this is the first time a natural insecticide has been isolated and identi- ,Ited in the tomato. . • - - . . . . . The discovery means that natural pest resistance can be bred 'back into the cultivated tomato, which inadvertently lost the ability when bred for oprunum commercial harvesting, the scientists told .the national meeting of the American Chemical Society. . I Dr. Jon Bordner• the senior investigator, said the insecticide, -ealled 2-tridecanone, is released from glandular hairs on the surface of the wild tomato's leaf. Domestic tomatoes contain a small amount of 2-tridecanone. but the wild species have about 74 times as much, he said. - The report said insects cause significant tosses-to the :i500.milGon-a-year commercial tomato industry.. • - However, the wild tomato has proved resistant to many of the common pests, including tomato fruitworm, tomato pinworm, leaf- ,miners, spider mites and Ithe tobacco homwortn. .. ;VO1, q, No. 12, $EPT.'Z1, 1979 tsreensAoro xecora JSeptember 12, 1979 °p: A1 ~'.Ypsf ;,'. ;NON-SMOKER POLICY BREAK,TO BE EYED i RALEIGH (AP) - State insurance o4 i; Bcizls say they will reviewpollnes that rT ~ y~,~rq~ t , - '~- ~ offer discounts to non-smokers to deter- -'tstl-~,rr ..•. ' -' mine if they are unfairly discrirninatory . fn a state with an agriculture Industry. ,:, ;. . based on tobacco.. ' Thi iepstoi e revew isn rsane criticism , -,r. from tobacco industry officials Tuesday of a plan by Allstate Insurance Co. to of- fer as much as a 5 percent discount on whole life insurance,policies to non- Billy Yeargie, managing director of the Tobaeco Growers Information Com- mittee Inc., said premium discounts for non-smokers undermine a pillar of North orth Carolina's economy. - . W,' Kenneth Brown, deputy commis- sioner of insurance, said Tuesday he would review the so-called "good health" life insurance policies sold by 31 companies in the state to determine whether they discriminate or could be detrimental to the state's economy. The review could result in public hear- ings concerning the possible discrimina- tion against smokers and whether the sale of such policies should be contin- ' ued.. +Brown said he was not sure whether A policies with special rates were in the best interest of the customer. Such poli- cies were approved by the Insurance Ik- ;partment, Brown said, because they ioffered benefits consistent with their - rates. He said the department had not . : ~considered them wn-smoker Folidee. ,@'' .,> v:.:. N _1 Greensboro Record September 14, 1979 p. A6 LORILLARD CHANGES Lorillard Corp. has announced one hiring and one promotion in Greensboro. They are: 0 G. Rowe SocAwell Jr., who joined the company as a programmer/analyst. A McLeansville native, he is a graduate of of N.C. State University and comes to Lorillard from a similar positimn with Hanes Knitw•earr in Winston-Salem. - , . . .. 0 William R. Nichols, promoted to chemist in the product development secLon at the company's research icenter here. A city native, he joined Lorillard in 1958. .
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~ABSiRACiS Cancer Research September 1979 v. 39, p. 3471 OVARIAN ARYL HYDROCARBON - HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY AND PRIMORDIAL OOCYTE TOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN MICE Mattison, Donald R. Thorgeirsson, Snorri S. Mouse ovarian aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH. EC 1.14.14.2) activity was measured in control mice and in DBA/ 2N (hereafter called o2) and C578L/6N (hereafter called 136) mice treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (MC). Basal ovarian AHH activity was similar in both strains (3 pmol/mg/min). Ovarian AHH was induced 2- to 3-fold in B6 mice after MC Ireatment, while no change was observed in similarly treated D2 mice. Primordial oocytes of both o2 and B6 mice were destroyed by the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocar- . bons (PAH), MC, benzo(a)pyrene (BP), and 7,12-dimethyl- benz(a)anthracene (DMBA), but not by the noncarcinogens, pyrene, a-naphtho/lavone, and ()-naphthoflavone. The rate of primordial oocyte destruction aiter PAH administration was /asler in responsive 86 mice than in nonresponsive D2 mice. After a single i.p. injection of PAH (80 mg/kg), 50% of the oocytes were destroyed by the following times: Dh1BA, 1 day for 66. 2 days for D2: MC, between 2 and 3 days for 136. 6 days for D2: BP, between 2 and 3 days for B6, 12-days for D2.- Dose-response curves of DMBA. MC, and BP also indicated greater primordial oocyte toxicity in responsive B6 mice than in r.onresponsive. D2 mice. The threshold dose for oocyte destruction 5 days after PAH injection was: DMBA, <1 mg/kg for 86, <2.5 mg/kg for D2; MC. <5 mg/kg for 66, -80 rng/ kg for 02: BP. <5 mg/kg for B6, -80 mg/kg for D2. In MC- Ireated D286F, x D2 backcross mice. PAH-inducible ovarian AHH activity and rapid primordial oocyte toxicity cosegregated with inducible hepatic AHH activity. Primordial oocyte toxicity was blocked by simultaneous treatment with a-naphthoflavone. The relative toxicity of the carcinogens to primordial oocytes in both D2 and 86 mice was DMBA > MC > BP. 79•I507. Elliott, M.; Janes. N. F. (Dep. Insectic. & Fun- gie., Rolham.ted Exp. Stn., Harpenden, Herts. AL5 23Q, England) S)nthetie pyrethroids • a new class-of insecticide. Che+n. Soc. Rov. 7(4): 473-505; 1978. (163 references) . A detailed descriprion of synthetic pyrethrnids is prc- sented in this extensive literature review. Thdtopics coscred include structural variations and insecticidal actirity, a chronological survey of ciTecti.e combinations, symhcsis of components nf pyrethroid esters. photochemistry, struc- ture-to.ucily relationships of pyrethroids in vertebrates, and variou% other aspects of bioloeicrl aetisit)'. !VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPTr 21, 1979 ! Asbestos sourcebook Asbestos. Vol.l: Properries, Appllrati^ns and Hazards. Edited by L. Michaels and S. S. Chissick. Pp. 553. l Chichester, UK, and New York. 197'JJ i?5. lu 1976, Dr Michacls and Dr Chissick, of the University of London, could discosrr . no comprehensive source book on all . aspects of asbestos. This first of Mo volumes is the result of a useful, and at ~ times cnicrtaininc. attempt to provide I such a bonk. The volume covers ihe mmcraloy), chrmistrc and physics of I asbr+tos, its use,- monitoring, ' idnnification, and substitute materials; and ficc chapters are dcsotmd to asbestos- ,relatcd- discases. There are also contributions on attitudes to asbestos, and !,dealmc , ith a.hcstos problcros. Chromatoeraphic methods Laboratory Handbook oj Chromarographie and Allied Methods. Edited by O. htikei. Pp. 764. (Ellis Horwood/Wiley: Chichester, UK, 1979.) £38.50. - . THIS is an excellent addition to the numerous practically oriented books in the Ellis Horwood Series in Analytical Chemistry. Dr Mikei has enGsted the help of 13 of his colleagues, all employed in the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, to produce a completely rewritten version of his Laboratory Handbook of Chromatographic Methods (1966). 1 consider the present book to be a worthy successor to E. and M. Lederer's Chromalography(1953, 1957). S
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I ~ARSTRACTS Nature August 9, 1979 :v. 280, p. 464 THE AMINO ACID SEQUENCE OF THE V-CHAIN OF HUMAN FIBRINOGEN Doolittle, R. F. et al The amino acid sequence of the human fibrinogen n-eJrairt reveals a structure that can be divided into three zones of unique amino acid conrposition. The middle of these contains the two primary a-chain cross-linking acceptor sites and consists of a remarkable series of inrernal dupli- cations. - NATURE August 23, 1979 ;v. 280, p. 619 'SCIEidCE, NONSENSE AND RESPOiVSIBILITY TxEright-and responsibility -of the layman to exert an influence on the actions of scientists and technologists is becoming firmly established, as is evidenced this week by the controversy over the exclusion of journalists from an international meeting on short-term testing for carcinogens (see p.623). But is there not an equal right and responsibility for the scientist to guide the layman? Guidance is surely needed. The misuse of science by those often lacking in scientific training and understanding, but never lacking either conviction or commercial acumen, is now commonplace. It is commonplace because there are profits to be made from it. For example, it is there even in the bookshops. A new form of escapism has been packaged as an alternative to science fiction, romantic fiction and thrillers. The new genre treats as fact a wide rangeof spurious topics. Themes include the artefacts left by our extragalactic forefathers, the possibility of disappearing through triangular holes in the sky over the Caribbean, the everyday lives of UFO- flying folk, paranormal fork-bending and outrageous claims about the influence that this additive-free food or that celestial body might have on our lives. A factor common to all these books, it seems, is the need for belief. A recent example of the extent to which strongly held but totally unfounded belief can resist the weight of fact is the saga of the alleged anti-cancer drug lactrile. .VOL. 9, N0,, 12, SEPT. 21, Iy/y 1 , . .-.kA-i>,- Coresta 1979, no. 1, p. 19 CUTTING TOBACCO'S TOLI, by Erik Ect;uottt A 40 pqee, 2I5 x 14 format booklet, print- td in 1975 ou recYcled paper by the lPorld- watn/r Irrstiutte of A'aslrinyron (1776 rVaS- saclutsetts Avenne, N.IY.). This instiutta is a non-profit rescarch organization which armlpces overall progranuues and brings tltenr to the aucution of the public. The document receired is rr• 18. 71tis booklet sometvhat calls to mind Doc- ror Nigel GRar's book-. Lwr; Cancer Pre- rcnriou . published in 1977 Lt• 28 of the series of tecknical reports issncrf by tlre lntenmtio- rtat muieancer Uniomr)srhich we auaiy,ed in CORESTA Irr/orrtratiou Bullctin n• 4 of 1977 (p. 46 et seq.). NATURE August 23, 1979 iv. 280, p. 632 IIP~I:4UNOTHERAPEUTIC T CELLS? Beverley, Peter !TwENTV years ago Thomas proposed the theory of immune surveillance. Since then it has been a hope of cancer immunologists that the immune system might be persuaded to do the work of physicians and surgeons and destroy the tumours of cancer patients. Initially, because of their role in allograft rejection, thymus-dcrived lymphocytes (T cells) were thought to be the main agent of surveillance. Later data have thrown up other candidates for the role of 'surveyor' (8aldwin Nature 270, 557; 1977) and the very idea of surveillance has been challenged (\toller & Moller J. Norn. Cartcer lrssr. 55, 755; 1975). Nevertheless T cells remain an attractive possibility for immunotherapy because of their extreme speci6ciq• of response and because high levels of activity~can begenerated by stimu• lation in virro. 0
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, ; ASSTRACTS ~- Advertising Age September 6, 1979 p. 2 ADVERTISING AND MARKETING REPORTS ON 100 LEADING NATIONAL ADVERTISERS Presented here is ADVERTISING AGE'S unique annual collection of facts about the marketing operations of the nation's advertising glants-what they spend on advenis- ing, how they're doing in sales and profits, how their leading product lines and brands rank nationally,,vhat share of the market they hold-and many other vital details. The profiles include listings of each company's marketing executives, the agency lineup and a rundown of account personnel serving the various product lines. Much of the material has never been published before, including estimates of total advertising and promotion expenditures for the 100 advertisers covered, and sales f igures for privately owned companies. Journal of Chromatography August 11, 1979 v. 176, no. 2, p. 165 SURVEY AND_DETERt4INATION OF TRACE - CO.iPONENTS IN AIR BY SERIAL MASS -FRAGi4ENTOGRAPHIC RUNS OVER THE ENTIRE MASS RANGE Fujii, Toshihiro et al . A new, sensitive and precise gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method is described for the survey and the determination of trace components in air. The method involves serial mass-fragmento_raphfc runs over the entire mass range studied (which we have termed survey mass fragmentography), with direct injection of 50 ml of the air sample on to a cryogenic gas chromatograph combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer; no concentration, extraction or collection of the compounds on adsorbents is required. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal September 1979 - - v. 90, no. 9, p. A-14 PNEUMOCONIOSIS AND FIBROUS GLASS Upton, Arthur C. Fink, Diane J. Reports have appeared in the public press suggesting that dust from fibrous glass may be responsible for causing a form of lung-disease in workers similar to that produced by asbestos. These reports are attributed to information about a case of pneumoconiosis presented at a meeting held under the auspices of the National Cancer Institute on November 15, 1978. They have occasioned widespread concern among those who make and use fibrous glass. The purpose of this communication is to provide additional information which now shows that the case in question was almost certainly due to asbestos and not to exposure to fibrous glass. ~..'VoL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 , V
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~ARSTRACTS 79-12143 T 70.712:978 United States. Bureau of Alcohol. Tobacco, and Firearms. Cumulative bulletin - Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms. [lVashington) Treasury Dept.. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms; for sale by the Supt. of Doc.. U.S. Govt. Print. Off. - 20402 v. 24 cm. $3.50 Cover title: Alcohol, tobacco and firearms cumulative bul- klin 1977- Spine title: ATF cumulative bulletin 1977- 1978. •Item 961-B S/N 048-012-00047-7 ISSN 01614484 - Consinues: Alcohol, tobacco and firearms cumulative bul- ktin ISSN 0094-5919 1. Alcohol-Law and )egislation-United States- Periodicals. 2. Tobacco-Law and legislation-Uniled Slams-Periodicals. 3. Firearms-Laws and regulation.- United Slates-Periodicals. 4. Internal revenue law- United Stams-Periodicals. Key Title: Cumulative bulletin - Department of the Treau- ry. Bureau of Alcohol. Tobacco & Firearms 1. Title. KF7919.A34 344/.731053 OCLC 3860574 79-11290 E I.28:ORNL/CSD(fM-44 McCoOough, Dianne H. . A revised version of SLIDES : a program to draw slides and posters I Dianne H. McCollough, Kathleen N. Fischer. - Oak Ridge. Tenn. : Dept. of Energy. (Office of Energy Technology], Oak Ridge National Laboratory ; Springfield. Va. : for sale by the National Technical Information Service. 1978. 22161 vii, 78 p. ; 28 cm. - (ORNL/CSDffM ; 44) Contract no. W-7405 eng 26. Sept. 1978. Bibliography: p. 43. Oltem 429-T-4 (microfichel pbk. - 1. Slides (Photography) - Electronic data processing. 2. Posters-Eientronic data processing. 1. Fischer, Kathleen N., joint author. 11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 111. Title. OCLC 4822994 ;„ 'VOLr 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 ; 179-10824 C 21.5/2:977/pt.2 _ United States. Patent and Trademark Office. - Indcx of patents issued from the United States Patent and Trademark Olfine. Washington, Dept. of Commerce. Patcnt and Trademark Offrce; for sale by the Supt. of Doca., U.S. -- Govt. Print. Off. - 20402 26 cm. 310.00 - 1977. Issues for 1974 published in 2 vols. CONTENTS: pt. 2. Index lc subjects of invention. Cltem 253 .. SIN 0 0 3-004-00 5 47-5 ISSN 0362-0719 - Continues: United States. Patent Office. Index af patents (ssued from the United States Patent Office 1. Patents - United States - Collected works. 2. Trade- marks - United Starec - Collectcd works. I. Title. T221 D3 ' 608/.7/73 ' i OCLC 2441302 . 79-/1327 E 1.28:ORNL-541t Travis. C. C. Carcinogenic risk of Iead1210 and polonium-210 in tobac- co smoke : a selccted, annotated bibliography / C. C. Travis, E. L. Etnier, K. A. Kirkscey.-Oak Ridge. Tenn. : Dept. of Energy. (Office of Energy Technology], Oak Ridge National ' Laboratory ; Springfmld, Va. : for sale by the National Technical Information Ser.icc, 1978. 5285 Port Royal Rd.. 22161 vii. 32 p. ; 28 cm. - (ORNL ; 5411) Contract no. tY-7405-eng-26. May 1978. Oltem 429-T-4 (microfiche) pbk. f 1. Tobacco - Physiological effect - D ibGography. 1. Etni- er. E. L„ joint athor. It. Kirkscey. K. A., joint athor. Ill. Oak Ridge National Laboratory. IV. Title. OCLC 4814518
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S LABTRACTS Nature September 6, 1979 p. 87 CANCER FOR THE LAYMAN Neville, A. Munro The Wcyward Ceflis a most interesting and unique treatise on various aspects of oncological diseases, their origins, nature _ and clinical care. It aims to provide facts and figures about cancer which are easily understandable to the intelligent layman as well as those involved with paramedical disciplines. However, I believe that this book will also interest and stimulate clinical oncologists, both those who are established and those in training. Nature September 6, 1979 p. 60 PERCOLATIVE CONDUCTION IN MICROEMULSION TYPE SYSTEMS Lagourette, B. et al In the presence of-a suitable combination of surfactants (an alkaline metal soap and a medium chain length alcohol, for _ example), water and oil type organic liquids can form trans- parent compounds of low viscosity that have been labelled '•microemulsions", with little or no mechanical agitation (spon- laneous emulsi6cation) (refs 1-3). Depending on the chemical nature of the surface active agents and the relative constituent proportions, water-in-oil (w/o) or oil-in-water (olw) systems can be obtained. (Because of the similarity between tertiary - solutions of inverted micelles and wJo microemulsions, the term 'inverted micellar solutions' has also been suggested".) ,Nlicroemulsions have been investigated by many scientists Interested in liquid stale and surface physicochemistryy and by many technologists foreseeing numerous applications in industry°''. It has been suggested'-0J that conductivity and permitti.ity studiescoutd provide, along with other techniques, . valuable information about the structure and phase behaviour of microemulsions which are considered to consist of dispersions between a few tens and a few hundreds of angstroms in diameter globules made up of an inner spherical core surrounded by a concentric shell of mixed surfactant and cosurfactant'-10. The experiments reported here show that the conductive behaviour of certain microemulsion svstems can be accounted for using the percolation and elfective-medium theories"" that have depic- ted transport properties and continuous metal-non-metal tran- silions in disordered materials with microscopic inhomo- geneities associated with, for example, density, composi lion" or bonding conhguration" /luctuations. This result, which could help in understanding the structural behaviour of micro- emulsions, is considered in connection with the postulated existence in liquid systems of equilibrium biconlinuous struc- lures, a state described by Scriven" as 'related to ordinary liquids as porous media are to homogeneous solids'. VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 , TOBACCO July 27, 1979 - v. 181,- no. 15, p. 106 WHARTON STUDY: TO13aCCO'S ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION IN U.S. In order to procidethe indus- try with an objective assess- ment of the facts, the latv firm of Covington & Burling, which represents the Tobacco Inslitute, was authorized by its client to commission and coor- dinate this study, and to f+ro- vide the 1\'harton Applied Research Center and Wharton Econometric Forecasting Associates, Inc. with necessary a_er"ate industre data. This stud!i•, then addresses the question: fi'Lor x•ere the confribtr- fions, both direct and indirect, oJ' fite Unired States tobacco itrdarsn-r rr•, nafiataf and stale ecotrornies in 1977? CHROMATOGRAPHIA July, 1979 v. 12, no. 7, p. 509 SELECTION OF CARRIER GAS VELOCITY IN THE ANALYSIS OF A MULTICOMPONENT SAI4PLE IEttre, L. S. The selection of the average linear carrier gas velocily in the analysis of a multicomponent mixture urltfer iso- thermal and programmed-tempenture conditions is discussed. It is shown that one should always select a velocity which is at least equal but preferably higher than the optinmm avcra;e ;as velocity of the earliest peak at the initial column temperature. , O 0 Q tH ~ ~ CD (0 ~1177~
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ABSTRACTS CHROIATOGRAPHIA July, 1979 v. 12, no. 7, p. 467 THE EFFICIENCY OF OPEN TUBULAR GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC COLUMIdS PART II. A COMPARISON OF THEORETICAL EQUATIONS FOR THE EFFICIENCY OF SUPPORT COATED OPEN TUBULAR COLUMNS- -Brown, I. - - A detailed comparison is given of the various equations derived by Colay and that derived by Hatvkes for assessing the theoretical efficiency of SCOT columns. The terms in these equations which describe the resis- tance to mass transfer in both the gas phase and in the liquid phase are given in a form which permits thee equations to be compared directly. A numerical comparison is then made of the potential efficiency predicted by the different equations for frve partition ratio values for a set of nine idealized SCOT columns with a wide range of porous layer thickness and liquid loading. The potential column efficiencies are expressed in terms of the maximum theoretical mean specific plate number. It is shown that appreciable differences occur between the theoretical efficiencies given by the different equa- tions when the porous layer thickness and liquid loading are high, but these differences ate small for most of the columns used in practice. - - 40 Aw>;. Reporl of - tar • and nicotine content of Ihe smoke of 167 varieties of ciga- retlcs. Fed. Tradc Corruu., lYashington, 1978, 17 p. The - Federal Trade Commission has do lcnnincd Ille • lar • Idrv Partiuilalc mnllcr) and lutal alk;tluid content trcportcd as nicotincl o( 167 rarictirs of dumcstic ci;:a- rcttcs. The Camhrich_c liltcr methud, tciih apprupriatc mudilicutiuns, ivas used in_anab vsic. Tipc (filtcr, nonfiltcr, mcnthul), avcr- -ce %r,•i_ht and bull lcneth s%crc tabul;tted for each carictv. Tar contcnt ramulcd trum a luic of < 0.5 mJci_aarcitc (filicr) tu 33 m:;ci_irctrc tnanhlterl. \icotinc content rangcd Irom < 0.03 mc/cigarcttc (filter) to 25 mg/eigaretta (nunltllcr). '.Analytical Chemistry September 1979 ;v. 51, no. 11, p. 1706 CONFIRMATORY METHODS FOR THE THERMAL ENERGY DETERMINATION OF N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS AT TRACE LEVELS Krull, I. S. et al . Methods are presented which allow for the rapid and reliable contirmalion of N-nilroso compounds as determined by use of the nitrosyl specific thermal energy analyzer. These ap- proaches utilize minor modifications In the normal operation of the analyzer, gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography Interfaced with the analyzer, ultraviolet irradialion of the sample, and wet chemical procedures. Comparisons are made between these analyzer associated methods of confirmation, and other approaches for lhe de- lemilnallon of N-nitroso compounds at trace levels. An overall general scheme is described which allows lor the confirmation of nitrosyl analyzer responsive materials as either N-nitroso, X-nitroso (X = C, 0) or X-nitro (X = N, C, 0). Analytical Chemistry September 1979 v. 51, no. 11, p. 1814 GEL CHROMATOGRAPHIC ISOLATION OF CATECHOLS AND HYDROQUINONES Snook, M. E. .Fortson, P. J. i A/ast, simple, and quantitative method was developed for the i Isolation of calechots and hydroquinones from cigarette smoke : condensate (CSC). It Is based on a single, gel chromato- graphic separation of crude CSC on the lipophilic gel, Sephadex LH-20. The method avoids acid-base extractions, solvent parli/ionings, orother chromatographic separations. All ol these steps, during previously reported procedllres, have lead to severe losses of catechols. Isolaled compounds included: caiechol, 7tnethyl-, 4-methyl-, and 4clhytcalechol, hydroquinnne, melhyl-, and dimethylhydroquinones. By use ol 5% MeOH/CHCIr as solvent, hydroquinone could be directly isoialed Irom CSC, and it was shown to be pure by GC, h14, and UV spectral data. The method was also successfully applied to tobacco pyrolyzates and should have wide use in Isolating these phenolic compounds Jrom other complex miatures. 'Vnl, q, Nn. 19. SEPT. 21, 1979 . . . ~.,_ :: ,K a • r , 1 155
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[ABSTRACTS -.. Biology of the Neonate Articles and Abstsacts in Eng7ish VOL. 35 NO. 5-6 1979 Nsmosh. Ar.; Si.aq A7.R.. enQ Nannth. I. tK'ashmpon- D.C.): Effecl of Nicotine on the ' Deeebpmcnt of Fetal and Suckling Rats . . . 290 Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology Articles in English or Gesman-Each Abstract in English S Gennan VOL. 94 NO. 3 1979 T+awn end ilrperylsseic Lesions in Syrian H.msten Follo.ine Tnnsplennul and l:eonetet Tre.tmrnl with Cigarette Smoke ConJenselr. AG Nre/ux IN. Chernoeemrky 3e9 BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL Abstracts in English VOL. 2 NO. 6164 JULY 28 1979 PAPERS AND ORIGINALS E/fea N b..r.l puJsMnen' .Jrkr ar.lnn .meY:ne .. n aeutu. c witwn, c rc¢oe, c o e..u....... 3)1 tWNW...f.elkul.enlahellel fwetNe by aelA .nd Its vl.ebn.a yoalelcn:e. reecJans . EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF - CARDIOLCGY Articles and Abstracts in English VOL. 10 NG. 2 AUGUST 1979 P. Dlecirneticre and 1. Efgrishi Systolic time intervals in middle-aged men according to smoking hobits and other risk-factors of coronary heart disezse 101 O O O tA GS N F+ -:`VoL. 9, No. 12y SEPT. 2L 1979
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tAgSTRACTS Cancer Research August 1979 v. 39, p. 3177 EFFECTS OF SMOKING ON BENZO(A)PYRENE METABOLISM BY HUMAN PLACENTAL MICROSOMES Vaught, J. B. et al Placentas were collected at term from a series of 21 women. Thirteen were smokers, and eight were nonsmokers. Micro- somes were prepared and used in the following studies of - benzo(a)pyrene metabolism: aryll hydrocarbon hydroxy!ase, epoxide hydrase, high-pressure liquid chromatographic anal- ysis of benzc(a)pyrene metabolites, and DNA binding. DNA- binding adducts were further characterized by Sephadex LH- 20 chromatography. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was much higher in smokers than in nonsmokers. Epoxide hydrase activity with styrene oxide as the substrate showed no differ- ence between smokers and nonsmokers. High-pressure liquid ehromatographie analysis showed much greater formation of dihydrodio!s, quinones, and phenols by microsomes from smokers. The amount of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol was almost equal to the amount of phenols produced by the micro- somes of the smokers. Sephadex LH-20 analysis of DNA binding resulted in only one major benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adduct - when rnicrosomes from smokers were usetl; this peak corre- - sponds to benzo(a)pyrene 7,8-diol-9,10-oxide bound to DNA nucieoside(s). 'HRC & CC Journal 'July 1979 v. 2, no. 7, p. 395 ARE WE USING THE FULL RESOLVING POWER OF CAPILLARY GC? Neu, H. J. - Zinburg, R. Precise evaluation of the chromatographic data by means of the relative retention will allow the full use of the resolution achieved by capillary co!umns. In practice, retention-index determination is best suited for this purpose. The reproducibility of retention-index determination strongly depends, among other factors, on the accuracy of retention time measurement. A reproducibility of ± 0,05 i.u. can be easily achieved with modern gas chromatographic equipment, provided lhe retention times can be measured with an accuracy of at least y 0.01%. This can be shown by error propagation analysis of retention- Index calculation performed with the aid of a programmable pocket calculator. - 'VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 200 SVALTERS D.B., CuAStaeRLAts \1'J., Aktn F.L&al. - Fractionation of cigarette smoke con- densate for chemical and bio_lugical testing. Anaf. CJtinr. Acta, 1978, 99-1, P. 113-50. Large scale fractionation of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) is effected by pcl filtra- tion and chromatography on a silica acid eolumn, and selected fractions, and sub- fractions, are tested on mouse skin for tumor-formine properties. The weak acids fraction is dicided into 3 sub-fractions ; thc polynuclear aromatic h%drocarbon fraction (PAH) into 2 sub-fractions and-the polar neutral liquids fraction into 3 sub-fractions. The synereetic effects when sub-fractions were combined were also examined, and portions of all active material were sub- jected to chemical analysis by filtration on gei, column, thin layer and -as chromatd- eraphy and also UV and mass spectrometry. : sent plus sures que celles avec filtre, a la fois pour les hommes ct pour les fcm- mes, dans tuute la population dc fumcurs. Les fumcurs dc ciearcttes sans filtrc au- raient un avantaec en lone&ite de 2-3 ans par rapport a ecox fumant des cicarettes a filtre. Dans tous les cas, la lon_~dvite des femmes qui fumcnt apparalt plus courte que celles des fumcurs. Par rapport a la population tutale, celle des fumeurs de eicarcttcs avec uusans filtre a une lonc_c- ciic plus courte de 2-3 ans. 199 PFEIFER H.J., (~iREE\6LATT D.J. Clinical toxicity of theophylline iu re- lation to cigarette smoking. A report from the- tsoston collaborative drug surveillance program. Chest, 1978, 73-0, p. 455-9. Adverse reactions to derivatives of theo- phylline were studied among 2,766 medical patients. Adverse effects of~administration of thcophcllineo•erereportedin 29S patients, notablr eastrointestinal disturbances, and cardiovascular disturbances. A hi^_her fre- quencv of adcerse reactions tcas assocated tcith hi^_her doses of thcoph}Iline ; ho~re- t•er, cicarette smokine was nc__aticety eor- related with the frequencc of adcerse reac- tions. Adrerse effects tcere experienced by 13 °b of the nonsmok:rs bv ll °•b of those who smoked up to 20 ei2areucs daily, and by 7?o of those who smoked more heavily. From Authors' Swiwmry. s
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~ASSTRACTS TRANSLATI Ot]S 79-117,69-07C Yoshloka, H.c MiYamoto, J. - SYNTHETIC PYRETHROIDES. PART II. Kaku to SelWrsu.v. 14, P- $-/9-556. 1976. Order from N7C as 79-11769-(rC: HC $12.75. 79-11830-07D AL-rtin. \t.: Gutochoo, C. REVIEW AND DiSCL'SSIO\ OF THE VARIOUS TECFLUQUES OF PACKING OF COLU5INS FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY. Chromatoeraphia, v- 10, p. 194-204. i977.- Orde: i'rom \TC as 7 9-11 83 0-07D: HC 5II.75. _ 79-11775-07^_ Roper. H. DIRECT QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF NITRO5O:1\II\ES FROM AQUEROUS SOLUTION WITH GAS CIIROUATOGR:IPHY- OR HIGIIPRES- SURE LIQUIDLHP.OSIATOGR:IPHY. Inurnal of Chr.nnamcr:mlrr, v. 166. p. 305-309. 1978. Ordcr from \TC-as 7 9-1 177 5-07C: HC 510.51 79-11770-07C Yoshicka. H. t hHvamom, J. - SY\'THETIC PYRETHROIDS. PART 1. Kapaku to SelWtsu. v. 14, p. 427-434, 1976. Order from KTC as 79-L1770-07C: HC $15. 00. 79-11583-06J - 6fellenbergh, J. H.C. SUCSTITUTES FOR ASOESTOS. Veilicheid, v. 46, p. 293-295, 1970. Order from \TC as 79-1155 3-06J: HC-S12.75. VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 . 79-11545-iLC . Schrcier. P.;Drawerr, F.tKerencl, 7.. GAS CHRON,ITOGRAPI/IC-MASS SPECTROMETRIC IKVESTIGATIO\ OF THE VOLATILE COSiPONENTS OF WINES. PART VI. AROMA CO,%IPOU\DS OF TOKAY ASZU 6'INES.a) NEUTRAL COMPOUNDS. Zeirschri0 fuer LehcnemirielunrersuchuiG:md- Forschun¢q v. 161, p. 250-2>5, 1976. Order from NTC as 79-115 4 5-07C: HC $12.75. ' 79-11546-07C Drawerrs F. p Schreier. P.; Leupnld. C. GAS CHP.OSiATOGRAPHIC - MASS SPECTROMETP.IC INVESTIGATION OF THE VOLATILE COMPONENTS OF WINES. PART VII. AROMA CO}fPOL1US IN TAKAY WINES. E)ORGAKIC ACIDS. Zeiruhrifr •tuer Lehensmirtelunrersuchuns und- Forechune, iv- 162. p. 11-20. 1976. IOrder from NTC as 79-11 54 6-07C: HC 512.75. 79-11975-06A - rnhri_. R. TIIE USEFULNESS OF .'.tUT:1CE\ICITI' TESTS jAS CANCER PRESCREEUSC TESTS+ CO\IPARA- ITICE STL77IES L\ THC "l1OSTAtEU1ATED ASSAY" A\U'11A\I\IALI.)S SPOT TEST". Stnu6 - Rcin- h.iltun¢dcr Lrtft. v. 35, p. ?33-735. 1975. jOrdcr from NTC as 79-11375-WA: 11C $12.75. s
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LABSTRACTS -- Psvrho- pharmacoloby Multilingual Journal (Largely Engiish)-Abstracts in English VOL. 64 NO. 2 1979 V. ScMauer. K. Batti9 : DiUerenual ERecls ol - - Nitoline and Amnhelarrune on Lucomolar Acl-ny and Man 4olaalwn a iwo Rat l.nes 155 - D. C. Wilbams, DiIlvem Ci9areueSmosn . _ dassil¢auon ixlors ann Sublecl,.e Slate in Aeute - AbAmence 231 PAROI ARTERIELLE ARTERIAL i1!iLL Aaticles in English or French-Each Abstract in English and French - This is the latest issue of this journal. . The cuter date does not correspond to the actual date of publication. i VOL. 5 N0. 1 APRIL 1979 Esperimenta/ arteriosclerosis in Rhesus monkey induced by multiple risk factors: cholesterol. vitamin D and Nicotine. UU L. B., TAYLOR C. B.. PENG S. K.. MIKKELSON B. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 25 CLINICA CHIh1ICA ACTA . Multilingual Journal (Lasgcly Engluh)-Abstr.cts in English VOL. 95 NO. 3 AUGUS7 1 1979 iAutomated rsdioimmunwssiy or nicotine I A. Castro. N. hlonji, HH hlalkus, \Y. Eisenhart, H. Mcl:ennis Jr. and E.R. Bowman (Dliami, FL, Richmond, VA and Tarrytown, NY) (January 4, 1979) ........... 473 T i: Tr {~ L M. 3 139 LONDON SATCRDAY 25 ACGUS7' 1979 1.......... a.n. r as...w. lae I^.-r. Us 'VoL. 9, Noe 12. SEPT. 21, 1979 Li iOL. n fna 1979 I
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LABTRACTS S Archives of Environmental Health July-August 1979 p. 248 SYNERGISM OF METHYLMERCURY AND SELENIUM PRODUCING ENHANCED ANTIBODY FORMATION IN ?IICE - Koller, Loren D. et al ABSTRACT. Mice fed 1, 5, and 10 ppm methylmercury plus 6 ppm selenium for 10 wk had a significant increase in antibody synthesis. Since methylmercury singly depresses antibody synthesis and the response was greater than that _ produced by selenium alone, synergism between methyl- mercury and selenium occurred. In this case, the synergism is considered to be advantageous to a host, while exposure by other combinations of environmental contaminants may be detrimental. 1lercury concentrations in the kidney were markedly elevated whcn methylmercury and selenium were adminis- tered simultaneously compared to -when methylmercluy was given without seienium supplement. These results indi- cate that data collected from individual pollutants may not be of value in predicting responses to multiple exposure- Industrial Research Development :September 1979 p. 209 BIOb1ASS...SOURCE OF CHEMICALS FOR TODAY, TOMORROW, AND THE FUTURE Biomass ... Source of Chemicals for Today, Tomorrow, and the Future, Technical Insights Inc., Box 1304, Fort - Lee, NJ 07024; 196 pages; $365. The major conclusion of this analvsis is that the chemical industry must switch to renewable resources before natural gas and petroleum raw materials are no longer available. And, that switch will rely to a great extent on biomass. Biomass has been used as a major source of chemicals such as rubber, oils, starches. Now, biomass is getting serious attention in the U.S. and abroad as a major raw material for chemical production. This report consists of four parts. First, the existing chemurqic industry and its present use of biomass is dis- cussed.The second part-details.vhatsources of biomass exist to producechemicals.Partthteeanalyzesthecherni- eal products from building blocks to polymers that can be produced from biomass. Finally, part four points to . opportunities that exist for chemical producers and in different geographical areas. More than 100 references to reports and studies are included. 'Vol , 9. No. -12. SE!'T. 21, 1979 ; TOBACCO ;July 27, 1979 - :v. 181, no. 15, p. 184 PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF BURLEY VARIETIES AFFECTING LODGING RESISTANCE Walton, Linus R. Casada, James H. An experiment was designed to determine Ihc relative resistance el KY 9, KY 10. KY 14, and KY d1A to wind load and IC determine lne dllference among these varieties wite respect to morphological chi leristics that ailect resistance to wind load. The resuns anowep that KY _ 9 was more suscepiiole to wind load than the other Yarreties. Ths root system of KY 9 was found to be particularly denUenl in small roots less - than 3 mm diameter. An analysis showed that the rUol wenghl/plant heighi and sta!k diameterlpiant height raiios pt KY 9 were signdicanny lower than those of the over varieties. To have a h,gh resistance to wino lodgmg, a tobacco variety shou!d have a hravy root system, large etalk {diameler, and low profile. Analytical Chemistry__ September 1979_ v. 51, no. 11, p. 1807 PACKED MICROCAPILLARY COLUMNS WITH DIFFERENT SELECTIVITIES FOR LIQUID CHRONLATOGRAPHY Hirata, Yukio et al i packed microcapillary columns tor hfgh-pertormance LC are 1prepared by drawing alumina or silica particles Inside the - thick-walled glass tubing, and a subsequent in situ bonding of various silanes to their surfaces. The columns with dilterent_ selectivities were prepared, including a polar phase, a re- versed-phase column, and an ion-exchanger packing. Chromalographic results are presented with standard solutes. Mlcrocolumns with different selectivities and very high effi- ciencies are now available. - a
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Greensboro Record September 13, 1979 p. B6 JURY IS STILL OUT- ON SACCIIaRIN 1USE ;Solomon, Neil Dear Dr. Solomon: All the talk about whether sac• I'charin is or is not carcinogenic confuses more than it r(larifies. Would you have any-advice for a lay person :who only knows what he reads in the papers? - Mt. A.E.K. - Dear Mr. K.: 73e jury is still out on the guilt or ' innocence of saccharin, but the National Academy of . . Sciences (NASI has made some observations that bear repeating. While an NAS panel that studied the subject concluded that saccharin is a potential carcinogen, a)- -though one with a comparatively low risk, it did not make any specific recommendations for action by the -Food and Drug Administration. The panel took note, 7however, of two groups that appear to be at greatest -i 'rsk. One group is comprised of children under 10 years of age, a third of whom use food products containing saccharin. (Artificially-sweetened soft drinks are a ma- jor culprit.) According to NAS, Lle consumption of the sweetener by this group has increased 160 percent since 1972. Their increased risk results from-the fact that the amount children consume is very substantial relative to their body weight ~.. ~. -.. . . . • . . Along the same lines, the NAS panel noted that for males, the highest proportion of those using saccharin was in boys below nine years of age, while for females the largest users were in the 20- to 39-year age group. . This assumes a great deal of significance since in exper- iments done with rats, saccharin was found to be car- -c cinogenic only In male rats first exposed while the t Thi i ttt it i mothers were pregnansnurn suggess thas in the most vulnerable groups - boys and women of ehildbearing age - that the greatest exposure to a'pm- ~ili i tkil ~ - abe carcnogensang pace. -Much of the controversy about saccharin revolves around whether any health benefits that may accrue• . ;Irom its use outweigh the risks. The NAS noted that .. there have been no studies that support either point of view. While some people maintain that saccharin is a valuable product for obese and diabetic patients, valid studies documenting this point of view are lacking. ~ The controversy over saccharin involves adamant supporters on either side of the argument over its safe- ty. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is against restricting the use of saccharin. Dr. Ronald Kalkoff, an endocrinologist who serves as chairman of the ADA .panel on saccha.in, feels the NAS panel report and the ADA views are not incompatible. He argues that ciga- rettes and the use of coffee pose tar greater risks than the use of saccharin, and that the quality of life for dia- betio would be adversely affected if saccharin were not available. ' . Clearly, the last word on the subject has not been 'hnrd. A study being conducted by the Food and Drug Administration and the National Cancer InsGtute of pa- Uents with bladder cancer may help shed additional light on the subjl~cL • • --. 'VOL. 9. No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 jGreensboro Daily News September 17, 1979 ;`p." Al' ' SMOKERS AIR D7AYS TO KICK THE "•' ~HABIT a ~ o CHAPEL HILL (AP) - Smokers trying to quit the habit turned up at a ; ichurch in Chapel Hill this weekend to `di hb kiki thi scussow to go aoutcnge nco- tine addiction. ' And, as one manput it,it isn't easy. "It took, practice to learn to become a smoker," said Dr. Robert H. Shipley, associate professor of medical psycholo- gy at Duke University. "And it will take {practice to become a nonsmoker." Shipley's comments focused on the Aversion Smoking Control Program, one ` jof several methods to quit smoking that were discussed at a conference Saturday at the Church of Reconciliation. • Shipley'said-the aversion method works to recondition the taste buds. -y~j fjHe said a surprising number of per- - '.1sons reported that cigarettes tasted bad ;_ after smokersheld the smoke of their fa- vorite cigarettes in their mouths for 30 '.seconds. , . ; North Carolina'sAmerican Lung Asso- :ciation prescribes-a-co)d turkey method of stopping. : . •. *: . . . ~. ~ . -"We take the attitude that the smoker ts not dropping an old habit but chang- ing his whole lifestyle," said Sally Gar• rett, program director for the Research ~; Triangle Region. l'. "H a person is not wilUng-to do that , '--~he's not ready." she said. . The Self-Hypnosis and Problem-Solv- -( Ing Method helps the smoker find other activities to distract him while he gives ` up smoking. - ~~r.. ... -.. _5.. _; .. Another idea, Smoking Withdrawal, is..' described as an attempt to "overcome the overwhelming craving for tobacco by providing a prolonged support system," according to Betty Heath, the executive director of Health Consultants, Inc. Dr. Bernard G. Greenberg, dean of the School of Public Heath at the Uni- versity of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, said that no one program was better than another but that it was a question of appeal and which one works best for .,. Q . the individual . Dr. Godfrey M. Hochbaum, professor -sp, , of health education and behavioral .: N sciences at UNC, discussed the reasons •'Q) smokers smoke and noted, "The power '.~ j of habit is very strong.•' . , "The difficulty is not a matter of will I power but an inteUectual, emotional and social factor," he said. „ . ...114Z
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~` ealaum to thE bones. Cabbage, auliflower; mustard and collard greens and brussel sprouts deny the thyroid f .•.iodine, and n produce goiters. There are traces o "laancer.ausing a n chemicals in cabbage, lettuce, spinach, ',; Jeeks and tea. There are chemicals related to cyanide an lima beans, sweet potatoes, yams, peas, cherries and i aprcots, -„ . . .., . . :' - But in natural chemicals, control is far more diffi- ' 'eult: Rodricks wonders what would happen if some- ,,...thing was found in coffee or some other,American ~ ~favorite :..• , . .. . , ...,,; . .. : . . ._. The thrust of control is aimed at synthetic chemi- -ak, the reasoning bemg that we ve lived long enough with the others, and we re strll healthy, but the synlhet- fts are new, . .. . . ... ... . . .. .:_ . - : j An article fn "Sctence" tharged that federal agen- des are slow to control even the synthetics. It said, of 1,500 ingredients in registered pesticides, one-third are • toxic, one-fourth are ancer-rausng. White the Environ- . mental Protection Agency has established pesticide liro- lits in food, only five have been restricted specifically, theartidesaid. But the very numbers are overwhelming. The arti- cle also said 20 percent of the 70,000 chemicals in com- mercial use examined by EPA are suspected arcinogens. It added that of 28,000 chen¢cals listed as toxic by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, 2,200 were suspected carcinogens. Few had been seriously restricted, which could in- diate the questionability of such labels, or the political •pressure brought against restrictions. Scientists, legitla- tors, regulaton; even the courts ponder the dichotomy . between tisk=taking and avoidance-' . • - - ~~• Judge Bazelon notes that scientists question leaving auch decisions to the public, which tolerates 50,000 au- tomobile deaths a year, yet worries about suspected 'eancereausing agents- . :. .. '-. ~..- . .. I The public, one observei~says, can be better in- med, or ~ Richard Wilson, in compiling his list of risks, found "Ytthhhaaat it was equally hazardous to have one chest X-ray, ve two months with a cigarette smoker, eat 100 char- coal broiled steaks, live 20 years near a polyvinyl chlor- I I ~Ide plant or live 150 years within 20 miles of a nuclear ' power plant I "I find these comparisons help me evaluate risks, and I imagine that they may help others as well;' Wil- son says. "But theimportant use of these comparisons must be to help the decisions we make, as a nation, to improve our health and reduce our accident rate." To give yet another measure of risk, Bemaia L- ICohen and I-Sing Lee of the University of Pittsburgh translated various states of risk into the number of days of life expectancy lost. ' ~ By far the riskiest condition, they found, was being an unmarried male, which costs a person 3,500 days of life expectancy. Although they didn't say why, it is pre- sumed that unmarried males are generally excessive in their lifestyles. . - . . . , Second on the list - male cigarette smoking. Cost '2,250 days. Third - heart disease. Cost 2,100 days. Being 30 percent overweight costs 1,300 days. Being a coal miner costs 1,100 days, Serving In the Army In Vietnam cost 400 days. Motor vehicle accidents cost 207 ,,. ._ ". ! days. Average alcohol intake costs 130 days. Home acci- ' ' dents cost 95 days. Drinking coffee costs six days and takine oral contraceotives costs five. . . .. .., 1- Diet drinks cost two days as do nuclear accidents, r presuming all U.S. power ame from•nuclar sources. .r ... '~ But you can make up for the bad news. Having a .PAP test adds four days to your life espectancy. Driv-. . ing with an air bag adds 50. Mobile coronary care units . ~ add 125, and all of the safety Improvements from 1966 ; Ito1976add110, -•_-„-_. ... . _-.-II Why did Cohen and Lee perform this mathematical. ~. exercise? "The public Is constantly harangued about all sorts .- of risks," they wrote in "Health Physics" journal, "and : its perception of risks plays an important role in govern- !mental decision making. The risks of radiation have jespeaally been emphasized in the popular press. This ..;ceates a very serious problem since the public does not :undentand risk It gets highly excited about radiation risks which are almost never fatal, whereas it largely ~ ignores other risks which claim thousands of lives every Ir.._., .. . ... ,.. .,_. ..:. ,:.?~ Very little in the_risk game is absolute. Even people who work with risks find a gap be- tween their professional responsibilities and their per-- ' sonal behavior. Dr. Rodricks worries about nitrites in ;bacon and hot dogs professionally, but personally: , •'I appreciate the risks in cigarettes very well. I know absolutely. There's no question. One of the few certainties of our times. But I still smoke ocrasionally- I know it's wrong in a health sense, but obviously it gives ,me some other satisfaction. I know I take other kinds of- ~risks when I drive or do a little mountain climbing.., "What I don't like is the hidden risks. When I know there is a risk, I have a choice. I'm not a zero risk per- .. eon. Hell, why avoid all risks anyway7 _ ~~..Youcan't.
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LABSTRACTS Archives of Environmental Health July-August 1979 p. 252 POLYCYTHEMIA PRODUCED IN RATS BY ENVIRON!`li.NTAL CO.)TAMINANTS Koller, Loren D. Exon, Jerry H. _ A6STRACT. Polycythemia developed in progeny from mothers who were exposed during pregtlancy to-a com- bination of methylmercury chloride plus ethylurea and sodium nitrite. The polycythemia occurred as early as one month_ of age and as many as 24% of the offspring devel- oped the polycythemic condition. Many features of this condition are similar to those of polycythemia vera in man, such as elevated hematocrits and white and red blood cell counts, splenomegaly, and hyperplasia of bone marrow accompanied by megakaryocytosis. Cancer Research September 1979 v. 39, p. 3644 CARCINOGENESIS IN RAT ESOPHAGUS BY INTRAPERITIONEAL INJECTION OF DIFFERENT DOSES OF METH YL-N-t1I+lYLN ITROSAMINE :Bu1ay, Orhan !Mirvish, Sidney The carcinogenicity of inethyl-n-amylnilrosamine in MFC- Wistar rats was determined after i.p. injection at a variety of dose schedules. Alter 6 weekly methyl-n-amylnitrosamine in- jections of 25 mg/kg or 12 weekly injections of either 12.5 or 25 mg/kg, the incidence of esophageal squamous cell_papil- lomas was 85 to 100% and that of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas was 40 to 65%. With 12 injections, the mean survival time was 25 to 31 weeks. Treatment with 1 or 2 doses of 50 mg/kg produced a lesser incidence (<20°0) of esopha- geal tumors, with a longer survival time of 67 to 77 weeks. One 85-mg/kg injection caused esophageal carcinomas in 5 of 7 rats. The treated groups also had squamous cell papillomas and carcinomas in the nasal cavity (up to 5046 incidence) and trachea (up to 30°o incidence). Hence, a 6- or 12-week treat- ment schedule was adequate for inducing esophageal tumors and-could be used for studies on agents modifying esophageal tumor induction by melhyl-n-amylnitrosamine. `VoL, 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 i Archives of Environmental Health July-August 1979 p. 211 EFFECTS OF ELECTRIC ARC WELDING Otl VENTILATORY LUNG FUNCTION Oxhoj, H. et al ABSTRACT. Respiratory symptoms, spirometry, forced expiratory flows, and the nitrogen closing volumeYest were studied in 119 welders and 90 controls, matched with res- pect to age, height, and smoking habits. Respiratory sym- ptoins according to a questionnaire were more prevalent in the welders. No short-term changes of the measured var- iables during the day or week attributable to welding were found in twenty-one nonsmoking welders. Compared to the controls, closing volume and closing capacity (i. e., clos- ing volume + residual volume) were significantly hicher, - ,and total lung _ capacity and the amplitude of the -tardio,enic oscillations in the nitrogen-turve were signifi- cantly lower in the welders who were nonsmokers or exsmokers, whereas there were no differences among . smokers. These findings in welders may be attribulable to deposition of welding fume particles in peripheral small airways or alveoli. \-\itrossmincs. Jcan-Picrrc Ansclmc, Ed. x + 204 pa^cs. \1:Irkclin2 ,\lan- agcr- Books Dept.. American Chcmi- cal Socicty, II?> 1601 St., N.\V., \\'a,hin, ton- DC 20036. 1979. 522.i0, hard cuvcr% t\-Nitru<:mlines. Hardl) a house- hold v.ord. But these compounds arc susptcted of being potent carcinogcns and. indccd- have often come out pos- itivc on muta.gcnicitv tcsts.Thcv :Irc - produced in manc ways, but a princi- pcd way is through nitrite reactions in food. Their chcmistry- rcactivit~, cmd othtr aspccU cuc considered in this book, whidl is No. 101 of the ACS Sgnlpo.iurtm Series. 0
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I .: Mt ,st specific to the needs of au- lhurs submitting papers to ANALI"r1- , : CAL CHr:xllSTRY are the'iyanuscript ' ~ Requirements,", "Guide for Use of „~.Terms in Reporting Data in ANALIT- ': ICAI.CH6n1IS'1'RY","Spectrometry ' ; `Nomenclature", and "SI Units", all '_ (rf which are published annually at the end uf the technical section of the :?d i A ffh - 'anuaryssue.ree copy o tese documents may also be obtained b ,y d l sening aetter to ANALITICAL -~ CHEMISTRY, 1155 16th Street N.W., ~ O°ashington, D.C. 20036. Here you will ~ -- find specific information on the scope .: or the JOURNAL, and on the prepara- -'tiun of manuscripts for submission. , ' The words analysis, determination, . identiLcation, and assay are defined . and contrasted. There is a review of statistics as it applies toJOURNAL re- quirements, and a glossary of spec- trometry definitions. The ACS "Handbook" lists many other books that may be consulted. Reference to this literature should - make the writing of technical papers a more straightforward, if not entirely - painless, process. - Stuart Rorman C & E NEWS " --August 27,°1979 v. 57, no. 35, p.`13 ACS concerned about HEW lab guidelines , i In a letter to W. Emmet Barkley. chairman of the HEW Subcommittee on LaboratoryChemical Carcinogen Safety Standards, the American Chemical Society says that it endorses the goal behind the guidelines the subcommittee has developed-that of prolecting laboratory workers and-their environment (C&EN. July 9, page 8). But it expresses concern about possible limitations on research arising from economic bur- dens related to medical surveillance, additional lab fa- cilities, and maintenance of records required by the guidelines. ACS recommends that an economic im- pact analysis be conducted that takes these factors tnto account and assesses-possible consequences in teaching and research. ACS also is concerned about Inclusion of both powerful and weak carcinogens on the list of substances to be covered by the guidelines. "Certainly, the same laboratory procedures need not apply for work with carbon tetrachloride as should .' apply for work with aflatoxins;' ACS says. -iVOL. 9, No. I2. $EPT. 21• 1979 g NATURE August 23, 1979 :v. 280, p. 623 US SCIENTISTS FIND CARCIIdOGEN TRACES IN SCOTCH WHISKY :.US scientists have found traces of nitro• ". ,-'-samines, one of the most potent known carcinogens, in six brands of Scotch whisky. A few months ago, similar traces '- were found in various types of beer. : In both cases it appears that the nitro- samines are formed during the drying of sprouted barley malt. The levels detected are small, less than two parts per billion, according to Dr David H. Fine and Dr E. Ulku Gorf, who carried out a study as part of a project funded by the National Science ~Foundation. - '' However levels as low as10 parts per 'billion of nitrosamines are known to increase the incidence of tumours in ~' laboratory animals. The beer industry has _.already said that, although little is ~ known about the effects of such low doses on humans, it is taking steps to eliminate t'-the presence or nitrosamines. It expects to have a solution "within a matter of months". .'A spokesman for the Distilled Spirits Council of the US .. said last week that there was a marked discrepancy between the , results of the NSF study and measurements `,reported last year by the World Health Organisation in Geneva, which had found nitrosaminelevelsoflessthan0.2partsper ~billion in Scotch whiskies. The council said :'this difference "may raise questions about ~'the accuracy" of the new measurements. But Dr Lawrence Garfinckel of the American Cancer Society doubted that I such small amounts of nitrosamines would -'-Ieause cancer. The most significant factor ;'`for him was that manydrinkers were also ~ld i smokers; a synergistic ef fcct cou account :for the increased death rate from mouth . and throat cancers that had shown up in studies of beer, wine and whisky drinkers. The brands of Scotch whisky said by the NSF study to contain nitrosamines are: Chivas Regal, Black and White, 7& B, Ballantine's Sandy Scot and Cuuy Sark. Nitrosamines were not discocered in White .-Label whisky, nor in 46 other alcoholic ~ beverages that were also studied.
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' ABSTRAC E S Tabak-Journal International - June 1979 p. 193 JOB INTRODUCES A NEW CIGARETTE FILTER - Societe JOB,-one of the world's !argest- cigarette paper and cigarette filter manufacturers, announces the launching of a completeiy original cigarette filter, since it combines the already known advantages of paper filters and cellulose acetate filters. Journal of Chromatography - July 13, 1979 - v. 175, no. 2, p. 325 SCREENING METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF THIRTEEN COMMON MYCOTOXINS Gorst-Allman, Charles P. et al A study of screening methods for thirteen mycotoxins shoseed that they can be separated as neutral and acidirmetabolites. R, values s+ere determined in several solvent systems. The reactions of the mycotoxins with acll known spray reagents were investigated, and their detection limits %%ere established. A general proc;dme for the extraction of mycotoxins from contaminated samples is described. Journal of Chromatography August 11, 1979 ,V. 176, no. 2, p. 171 - PROGRAMMING THE ELUTION GRADIENT IN HIGH-PERFOREIANCE LIGUID - CHROMATOGRAPHY BY VARYING THE VOLUME OF THE MIXING CHAMBERS Kaminski, Marian et al An apparatus is described for gradient elution in high-performance liquid chromatography that operates by programming the volume of the mixing chambers. General equations determine the volume or weight fraction changes in any component of a multi-component mobile phase flowing out of any chosen tank constituting Ihe ith clement of an n-element battery of tanks connected in series. Equations were solved for the simplest cases, tt'hich are actually the most im- portant ones. Dependences were verified experimentally and good a2reements with predicted theoretical dependences were obtained. Chromatograms representing several modes of use of the method are presented. This method of programming the composition of mobile phases in liquid column chromatography has been found to provide a simple and sufficiently accurate means of obtaining a larce variety of pro- grammes for the gradient of cluent composition. The tank system described is appli- cable to all types of pumping devices used in liquid chromatography. ~VOL. 9, N0. 12, $EPT. 21, 1979 I
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{ABSTRACTS Cancer Research September 1979 v. 39, p. 3463 METABOLISM A1dD MACROMOLECULAR BINDING OF THE CARCINOGEN BENZO(A)PYRENE AND ITS RELATIVELY INSERT ISOMER BENZO(E)PYRENE BY HAMSTER EMBRYO CELLS Macleod, Michael C. el al The metabolism and macromolecular binding of the carcin- ogen benzo(a)pyrene IB(a)P) and its relatively inert structural isomer benzc(e)pyrene (8(e)Pj have been studied in order to determine if a metabolic basis exists for their very different biological activities. B(aIP and B(e)P are metabolized by hamster embryo cells to - organic solvent-soluble and water-soluble metabolites. Signifi- cant quanlitative and qualitative differences are observed in the nature of the metabolites from the different hydrocarbons and the distribution of these metabolites between the cytoplasm and the extracellular medium. B(a)P is metabolized more ex- tensrvefy than B(e)P to both ethyl acetate-soluble and water- - soluble metabolites. The major ethyl acetate-soluble metabolite in the medium atter 24-hr culture with B(a)P (4 pre) is the bay- region 9.10-dthydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene (66.79b of total metabolites in medium). Rapid excretion of this product from the cells is indicative of its observed subsequent biological inactivity. Smaller amounts of 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxy- benzo(a)pyrene were found, but more of this dihydrodicl than _ the 9,10-dihydrod,ol was retained inlracellularly. where it could be metabolized to an active diol-epoxide. The major metabo- lites lound in the cytoplasm are 9-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene and -3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene (40.7 and 16.5;0 of metabolites in cytoplasm, respectively) and7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxy- benzo(a)pyrene (18.4% of metabolites in cytoplasm) with smaller amounts of 9,10-dihydro-9,f0-dihydroxybenzo- (a)pyrene (9.2'0 of metabolites in cytoplasm). The low amounts of phenols in the medium are due to their relatively rapid removal as water-soluble. 9lueuronide conjugates. - The mator ethyl acetate-soluble metabolite formed in the extraceuufar medium, atter 24 hr of culture with B(e)P (4 µM), is the K-region dihydrodiol, 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxyben- zo(c)pyrene (69.600 of organic solvent-soluble metabolites in medmm), with only small amounts of monohydroxybenzo(e)- pyrenes (21.9°b of organic solvent-soluble metabolites in me- dium) being formed. Most of the monohydroxybenzo(e)- pyrc•nes formed and sign,ficant amounts of 4,5-dihydro-4,5- d.hydroxybenze(e)pyrene are metabolized to their rescective water.soWtle glucuronide conjugates. The much higher bind- ing of B(a)P than B(e)P Io both DNA and RNA of isolated nuclei :~.,.~VOL..9. N0. 12, $EPT. 21, 1979 from cells treated with the parent hydrocarbons reflects the higher biological activity of B(a)P. The metabolic formation of 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dlhydroxybenzo(a)pyrene from B(a)P and Ihe apparent lack of formation of 9,10-dihydro-9.10-dihydroxy- benzo(e)pyrene from B(e)P suggest a metabolic basis for the relative biological activities of the parent hydrocarbons. While B(a)P forms a dihydrodiol which may be metabolized on an adjacent olefinic double bond to a Potentially reactive diol- epoxide adjacent to the bay-region, it is apparent that B(e)P does not enzymatically favor this mechanism and forms an iner; • K-regwn dihydrodiol. - Industrial Research Development September 1979 p. 121 IS YOUR LAB TARGETED BY EPA Frick, G. William Sullivan, Thomas F. P. •IN 1976, CONGRESS PASSED the Resource Con- sen•ation Recovery Act, no.v commonly re- ferred to as RCRA. The title is misleading inasmuch as the Congress failed to pass a significantresourcerecover~~programaspart of the Act. In fact, RCRA is primarily a new Federal program regulating the handling of hazardous wastes. RCRA directs the United States Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop a broad and comprehensive regulatory pro- gratn forcontrol ofhazardouswastes disposal that .vill encompass the generation, trans- portation, and the ultimate storage, treat- ment, or disposal of those wastes designated as hazardous. By requiring extensive pa- penvork to track-liazardous svastes from thi time of their generation to the time of ulti- mate disposal, Congress has created asvstem for identifying, monitoring, and regulating hazardous wastes disposal in the UniteaStates. 1178 . „ i"
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LABSTRACTS Science July 20, 1979 p. 323 CADMIUM: IN VIVO MEASUREMENT IN SMOKERS AND NONSMOKERS - - Ellis, Kenneth J. et al Abstract. Ab.rohrte mnamrts of cadmium (in milligrnrns) in the left kidney and corr eentrntioru of radmimn (nirrograrns per grrorr) in the liver rrere measnred irt vivo in I06eaGh' v adult rnale valruveers. Organ rarfnrnan lerets ofsnrakers rrere significant- ly elmared nbore those of nonsmoAers. No relationslrip was evident benveen body stores of cadnriam (lirer and lidue,r) and radarimn or f3rnricroglobalin in nrine or blood. Tbe m•erage total bodr burden of cadmiam in mmt at age 50 is estimated to be 193 nriBigrams for nonsmokers and 35.5-milligrnms for smokers (38.7 pack-year smokiag history). Biaingical )mlf-tinre for rhe u'lrnle bodc was. on average, 15.7 years (10- to 33-year range). Dietary absorption ,ras 2.7 microgrnnrs per.day. Cigarerte smnking resrdted in dre absorption of 1.9 micrograms per pack. Journal of Chromatography August 1, 1979 v. 176, no. 1, p. 25 USE OF SPECIFIC RETENTION VOLUMES IN THE EVALUATION OF VARIOUS TYPES OF COLUMNS FOR USE IN THE TRACE DETERMINATION OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY Kashtock, Michael E. Various types of column packin.-s were evaluated for use in the gas chromato- graphic determination of ppm concentrations of ethylene elycol in aqueous systems. The columns were evaluated by determining specific retention volumes and observine peak shapes for progressively smaller concentrations of ethylene dycol-in water in- jeeted on to the column. An increase in the specific retention volume, accompanied by significant peak tailing, was taken to indicate that quantitative analysis would not be feasible below a certain concentration ranee, because of chemisorptive effects. The most desirable column for quantitative analysis at trace levels (10 ppnt or more in- jected on to the column) was selected on dte basis of comparative evaluation. Acid- washed and silane<trcated diatomaceous supports coated with Carbowas 20M, un- eoated porous polymers (Chromosorb 101 and 10?), and Chromosorb 10?-coated sAith Carbosrax 20\I were considered-unsatisfactory. Super-Pak 20M coated svith Carbowax 20M nas marginally successful, schile Chromosorb 101 coated %cith Carbo- Nax 20M scas clearly the column packing of choice. These results are discussed in terms of column support adsorption effects. VOL. 9. No. 12, SENT. 21, 1979 I
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I 1ABSTRAC T S i Tobacco Reporter - -- August 1979 p. 32 TOBACCO'S CONTRIBUTIONS: THE PAY-OFF This Wharton School of $usiness Applied Research Center study, commissioned on behalf of the Tobacco Institute, outlines tobacco's total contributions to the U.S. economy in 1977. The American Journal of PATHOLOGY Abstracls in English VOL. 96 NO. 1 JULY 1979 I ('hadrs.\. Baulrs. Bidard D. {IuMn. and Thomas 1.. 1t'olfle 249 Indurti-m ~4 IKt: Antibr-0in la Anli4en Isnlated Frnm Tnbacan t~a.n and Fmm (3Rarettr G+.Ienvte 5m.Ae Cad C. Berrrr. Bulxrto La:i. and/amrs yacrre Chromatography Newsletter ' August 1979 v. 7, no. 2, p. 18 - GLASS OPEN- TUBULAR COLUNII9S WITH THICK LIQUID-PHASE FILMS FOR LOW BOILING COMPOUNDS Johansen, Neil G. The performance of a 0.27-mm ID open tubular column prepared with a 0.9'_-um thick liquid phase coating is demonstrated. It is shown that for the analysis of low boiling com- pounds, this column is to be preferred to the thin-fi!m coated columns. Chromatography Newsletter August 1979 v. 7, no. 2, p. 31 APPLICATIONS OF A NEW HEAD SPACE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY DEVICE Widomski, J. Thompson, W. ° We describe applications of the new gas chromatography (GC) head space sampling ac- cessory, the \lodel HS-6. It provides a ma.intunt tempcraturc of 190 'C. Precision of 0.r,, as a coefficient of variation, is shown. A series of n-alkanc standards showed that even C_= could be detected although its boiling point is greater than 300 'C. The vola- tiles from coffee are easily measured at 140 *C. Viscous samples arc handled and ethylene glycol is determined in a caulking compound. Epichlurohydrin is measured in an epoxy Iresin. a-----~ --- -..__. .. _ -s M4 'VOLe 9, NOr 12, $EPT. 21, 19i9
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j_ABSTRAC TS Cancer Research - September 1979, v. 39, p. 3353 AGGLUTINATION OF BLADDER CELLS BY CONCANAVALIN A DURING THE EARLY PHASE OF TREATI'4ENT OF RATS WITH N-BUTYL-N-(4-HYDROXYBUTYL)NITROSAMINE Kakizoe, Tadao et al N-Hutyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyqnitrosamine was given to male Wistar rals at a dose of 0.05"6 in the drinking waler for one to five weeks, and agglutination of cells isolated from their bladder by concanavalin A (Con A) was determined at intervals during and after treatment. Mucosal cells were isolated from everted . .bladder by ethylenediaminetetraacetate treatment and sonica. tion. As early as one week after the start of treatment, Con A caused some agglutination of isolated bladder cells, and this agglutination increased with time, reaching an almost constant value from Ihe third week. Con A agglutination of bladder cells induced by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyqnitrosamine treatment for only one week appeared to be irreversible, and it was still observed two weeks atter the end of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy showed that microvilli developed on the luminal surtace of mucosal cells in situ at the time when the isolated cells became agglulinable with Con A. Measurement of agglulinabilily of isolated bladder cells with Con A might be a useful way of detecting very early changes in bladder carci- nogenesis. - Environmental Science-and Technology September 1979 p. 1145 AN EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF ATMOSPHERIC NITROSAI•IINE. FORMATION Glasson, William A. e It has been suggested that carcinogenic nitrosamines can be formed in the atmosphere from ambient N0, and amines. A long-palh infrared study of the reaction of dimethylamine, N0, and N02 has been carried out at various parts per million levels of the reactants to test this suggestion. It was found that low concentrations of dimethylnitrosamine were formed at rates independent of the amine concentration. Further ex- s periments showed that the amine was adsorbed on the cell ~ walls and that nitrosamine formation was probably proceeding heterr,eneously. Using the data of this investigation and the results of a recent EPA study, it was shmvn that homogeneous nitrosamine formation in the atmosphere should not pose a significant health hazard, although further work will be re- _d quired to establish whether nitrusamine formation'on aerosol i surfaces could result in a significant health risk. 'VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT..21, 1979 Industrial Research Development-_ September 1979 p. Cl STUDYING ORGANICS WITH HR-GC Rooney, Terrence A. Freeman, Robert R. Ia 11eCENT YEARS concern over water and air quality has occupied a major - part of the work of environmen- talists. Pollution from industrial sources, agricultural sources, and man-made disasters such as oil spills and accidental waste dumping has ` made it clear that modern technol- ogv is required to unravel the com- plexities of environmental monitor- ing Class capillary gas chromatog-- raphy provides the ultimate in separation efficiency currently ~available. Columns-are now com- - ~ mercially available which have sep- arating power of greater than 3,000 effective plates per meter and the deactivated surfaces necessary for - ,analyzing complex unknowns. :Industrial Research Development September 1979 p. 108 PATENTS AND PROFITS Eifler, R. J. What -makes a. patent valuable? How are valuable patents ob- tained? How does a business exec- utive determine-the overall value of his patent portfolio? And how are patents used? Analysis of these points provides a corporate execu- tive with the measuring rod he needs for patent management. O O N sA CJ
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~ABSIRACTS 1. Ps)choingp. 1. Psacho/o-ry. Eaperimcntal f. Eijkman, E O. l lL Ahrk, L F Ia: de. 11, Alichon. lohn .Vbrrnrs. 1L1.\'DHOOA" ofulurarion 660.T8s2 techniqurs for ehemxal engineers / Philip A. Bch.enaer, ednor-m2hRf. NeM' York : McGraW- Hill. 1979. p. cm. -A James Peter book' Includes indea. [TPI56.S:5H35J 79-a096 ISBN 0-07-05 5 7 90. \ : 42.50 1. Sepantion (Technoloey)-Nandbooks, uunua4 etc. L Sch.errrer, Phrhp A. DOWLING. John R., 658.31'2a3 1936- Deseloping and administerint industrial training p%rratns / John R. Dowhng and Robert P. Drolct Boston : CBI Pub. Co.. 1979. p. cm. [HF55J9 5.T7D67J 79-10713 ISBN 0-8s36-0777- s pbk. : 8.95 1. Emplorees. Tniniqr o1-Handbookr• manuals, erc. 2. Dsmint ma.vn/s. 1. Droler, Robert P., 19J6- joint uutFas 11. Tide. roxrcococr 615.9'S binchemrstry, and Psrholnr). of rnmv.otnsms / edited by Kcnp Craecchi• Vikio Ysmataki. Tokyo : Kodansha ; Se. York : Wiley. c197S. viii. 288 p. : ill. ; 24 em. (Kodansha scientiiie books) 'A Halsted Press book.' Includes biblio¢nphinl references and indaes. fRA1242.519aT68 1978/ 78-8992 ISBN 0.470. 26423-3. : 3195 1. .Sfrcoto.ricoses. 2 Alrcototins I Food tonbririnarian. L Uraguc$i, AenJi, 1906- It. Yamaraki, .Ni6c, 1911- . MARCUS, Burson. 658:8 Afarketing .nalyyrs and dea}ion •nakine / Burton H. blarcus, Edrard 5/. Tauber. Bostdn : Little, Bro.n. c1979. aaiii. 368 p. : iIL ; 23 cm. Includef biblinrraphical references and -indea. (HF5s15.11279f 78-708te ISBN 0-316-54599-6 : 15.95 1. ,Sfarkrting 2. ALrketine manarement L ,Tauber. Edwerd.Sf, joinr author. 11. TiNe. FROST & 381'.a5'68111:0973 HL•NT, James W. 658J1•5l Sullivan. The 6'nrred S:ares .'atch markct. Neu• York : EnrClo-trr's euide to labor relanbns / bc Jamrs t5'. Hune Rev. ed. Sfashln:ton : Buresu of Frost k Sullivan. c1978. iii. 256 P. : ill. ; 29 cm. /HD9999.C6C525 1978] 79-1120r6 775 00 Natinnal AlTairs• c1979. sii. I)i p.: ill. : 23 cm. Includes Indea. [HU9072.H95 19791 76-31:58 l. Clock and .arrh making-United States. 2 ISB'~ 0-87179-296-6 pok. : 7.50 Afartet surreyi-L'nirrd States. L Title. 1. lndusrnzl rcExrnns-L'mied Srates. 1. Trade- unions-Lirited Sratea. L Title. BE/LdV1ORAL problems in 158.7 organiauions / Cary L Cooper, editor. Englewood Cliffs, NJ. : Prenticc-Hall. 1919- p. em. Includes indca. Bibliagraphy: p. IHD58.7.8+2] 78-12451 ISBN 0-13-073090-7 : 13.95 1. Organizational beharior. L Cooper, Cary L TNE 1-.\'R concise cuide to 658.5 indmtrial manarrment / edited by Carl Heyel. No.' York : Van \osinnd Reinhold, (1979J p. cm. (l'\R concise manatement serics) Includes .indea. (T56.Y16J 79-793 ISBN 0-at2-23t03-1 p6k. : 7.95 J. fndustrial engineering 1. Industrial managemrnt l. Nncl. Car( 1908- 11. ritle: Industrlal management. .,0,.,•:VOLe 9,.-,Noa_12, SEPT. 21, 1979 BEXDER, David A. 57J.1'33 Amino acid metabolism / David A. Bender: Chichester (Eng.] ; NewYork : 3. SPile,v, 1978, e1975. ai, 234 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. 'A K'iley- Interscience publication.' Include, {ndes. Biblwznphy: p. 218-221. [QP561.8s6 1978J-78- 318897 ISBV 0-a71-06a98-a.:32.25 1. Amino acid merabolism. f. Tirle. 1s Wl]HI. Ei-ichi• 193@- 5aT.05 Or:annnxtalh2s in nrrsnic sy-nthesis : general disvsvons : organorimetalhcs of inein group meuis in nr8ame symhesrs / Ei-ichi \eeishi. O \ec Yort : N'ile). 1979. p. em. 'A Niley- Q In¢ncmnce publicolion' Includes indes.[00 - 111.\351 %9-16818 ISBN 0-a71-0i193-3 : 24,50 ~ 1. O:esnomerashc comrounds. 2. Chemistry. N Organrc-Spnrhesri 1. Lrle. ~ N cD ~ s
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NEWS BRIEFS ` ` Several other North Carolina-based companies such as Integon Life Insur- ance ance Co. in Winston-Salem and Home Security Life Insurance Co. in Durham do not offer the reduced rates and have -.'no plans to begin them. . ''. One life insurance company that plans -': ; lo offer lower rates for non-smokers is -.'American Defender Life Insurance Co. ::. `td Raleigh. . •:..,: .-~: .. ,.. : . ~. .. (Senior Vice President Earl Paris said the new program probably will become . effective in 1980. He said the company seca the lower rates as a marketing tool that is justified by studies showing that .'" non-smokers are a better risk than smok- . en. . .. . As to the possible psychological effect ~. on the state's tobacco industry, "•'we have not discussed it ... We're just trying to price our products competitive- . ly;' Paris said. INature . ~Septetttber 6, 1979 p. 281 WOMEN IN SCIENCE: SOME IMPROVEMENT, BUT STILL A LONG WAY TO GO - ;There has been a considerable improvement in the status of women PhDs in academic science over the past decade, ` but further substantial gains are still needed before equal opportinuty is fully realised, aeeording to a report published recently by a committee of the US National Academy 'of Sciences. " . . . Onthepositiveside,therepon,prepared . by the academy's committee on the education and employment of women in science and engineering, says that in the past decade women's share of all science . doctorates_has doubled, from 9%a to I87o, and is still increasing in all fields of science. Furthermore women are occupying a - growing proportion of research faculty positions, particularly in the larger institutions; in the top 25 research universities, for example, women account for 35°'0 of the growth of science faculties since 1973. However there remain several areas of concern. One is that there continues to be a disproportionate number of women in two kinds of position: part•time instructors or lecturers which are outside the tenure stream offer little chance for productive Iresearch; and postdoctoral or research staff positions. _ ra ir :Greensboro Daily News -Septerrtber 12, 1979 p. B8 LEAF SPOKEMAN RAPS ALLSTATE Paysour, Conrad -William Yeargin, a tobacco Industry spokesman. ~: ~7Lesday crHcized Allstate Insurance Co. for offering discounts on life insurance policies to people who do ot smoke cigarettes. ':~.. • ~•- . .1 , - - -:~ •:-Yeargin, managing director of the Tobacco Grow- ,ers Information Comn¢ttee Inc., said the discounts un- dermine a pillar of the state's economy and should be . opposed. . . Yeargin also criticized Sears, Roebuck and Co., par- ent company of AAstate . ~ t- "Sears is the largest department store and mail or• - der house and it was born thanks to the patronage of farmers, especially in the Southeast," Yeargin said. "Now their insurance company is discriminating against " farmers who grow tobactro. . ,.- . . Actually, it has become a fairly common practice . of life insurance companies to offer policies that give i discounts to non-smokers. • . . - . , Guy Phillips, secretary of Jefferson-Pilot Corp. of :Greensboro, said the medical director of the Tobacco 'Institute called last week to inquire about policies o4 ifered by Jefferson Standard Life Insurance and Pilot ALife Insurance Co. that give non-smokers breaks on - rates. Jefferson Standard and Pilot Life are subsidiaries of Jefferson-Pilot. The Tobacco Institute is' another industry trade - ; group. . . ~ . ~ . . Tobacco August 24, 1979 v. 181, no. 17, p. 53 BAT WORKING TO MARKET KENT Wotiwo, U.K.-As from July 1, marketing and distribution of Kent cigarette brands in Britainis being handled by BAT (U.K. and Ex- port), of 11'oking, Surrey. Pretiously,they, haNe been han- dlcd by Imperial Tobacco (Im- ports) undcr a fite-year agrecmcnt teith Lorrilard that ended on June 30. BAT bou;;ht all the non- American interesu of Lorillard in Junc. 1977. BAT has indicatecf, hrnvcvcr, thal "at this sta;c" it has no maior Promotional boost pIanncd for f:cnt in Britain. wOL. 9, N0. 12, SEPT. 21," 1979 115U,,~,
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LSTRAbTS AB_. Cancer Research - September 1979 v. 39, p. 3411 THE N-HYDROXY METABOLITES OF N-METHYL-4-Afr1IN0AZOBENZENE AND RELATED DYES AS PROXIMATE CARCINOGENS IN THE RATE AND MOUSE Miller, Elizabeth C. et al ' The carcinogenicities for rats and mice of N-methyl-4-ami- noazobenzene (MAB) and its hepatic microsomal metabolite N- hydroxy-N-methyl-4-aminoazobenzene (N-hydroxy-MAB) were comDared under several conditions. N-Ethyl-4-aminoazoben- zene. 4-aminoazobenzene. and their N-hydroxy derivatives were also included in some of the assays. Aboul 25% of the rats given MAB or N-hydroxy-MAB (3 to 5 mmol/kg body weight) by stomach tube over a 5-week period developed hepatic tumors by 18 to 22 months. Similarly treated rats subsequently given phenobarbilal in the drinking water until the termination of the experiment developed about twice as many hepatic tumors. N-Hydroxy-MAB• administered p.o., but not MAB. also induced multiple papillomas and extensive carcinomas of the forestomach in approximately 50% of the rats. Only low incidences of hepatocellular carcinomas oc- curred in partially hepatectomized rats given a single i.p- injec- tion of 180 µmol/kg body weight of MAB or N-hydroxy-MAB with or without subsequent administration of phenobarbital. Although repeated s.c. doses of N-benzoyloxy-N-methyl-4- aminoazobenzene induced sarcomas at the injection site in 90% ol the [ats• only 3 of 20 rats-developed sarcomas at the siteof s.c. injections of N-hydroxy-MAB. N-Ethyl-4-aminoazo- benzene. 4-aminoazobenzene• and their N-hydroxy derivatives- did not induce significant numbers of tumors in any of the above assay systems. Administration to preweanling male mice of MAB• N-hydroxy- MAB. N-hydroxy-N-ethyl-4-aminoazobenzene,and N-hydroxy- 4-aminoazobenzene resulted in high incidences and high mul- tiplicities of hepatic tumors (averages of 5 to 7 tumors/mouse) within 1 year. N-Ethyl-4-aminoazobenzene and 4-aminoazo- benzene also induced hepatic tumors under the same condi- tions, but they were less active. - These data support the conclusion that the N-hydroxy me- laboliles of these aminoazo dyes are-proximate carcinogens. Nature - September 13, 1979 v. 281, p.-134 INTERCALATION OF AMINO ACIDS AND POLYPEPTIDES INTO 2H-TAS2 Chapela, V. M. Parry, G. S. 2ff-TaS, can be intercalated by organic amines and empirical rules have been formulated'-' governing the properties that chemical species must possess in order to intercalate. One of these rules is that molecules in which the nitrogen is basic (pKa») usually form stable compounds provided the amine does not have bulky substituents. For certain amino acids, the values of pKa are signifitantly larger than this critical value (for example, glycine pK,=9.78)' so that if the zwitterion is in a state where it can function as a base, it might be expected that the amino acid would intercalate 2H-TaS,. This prediction has been verified for a number of amino acids. The discovery of- these intercalation reactions provides a-new range of inter- calated compounds for study and also opens up the possibility of Jn Siru polymer7sation. Nature September 13, 1979 v. 281, p. 129 THE SYNTHESIS OF FLUOR-ANALOGUES OF NATURAL ASBESTOS BY UNIDIRECTIONAL CRYSTALLISATION Campbell, M et al A previous letter' reported a novel technique for the pre- paration of aligned fibrous crystals by drawing filaments of glass through a supported molten zone. -The method was subsequently modified so that the filament is drawn from a meh through an orifice in the base of a conical platinum crucible'. This technique has now been successfully applied to the pre- paration of filaments consisting of aligned fibres of fluor- amphiboles; synthetic analogues of natural amphiboles with , isomorphous replacement of hydroxyl by fluorine. Thesr aligned fibrous crystals can be com pared with natural amphibolr asbestos. - a
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~ARSTRACTS Tobacco Tobacco '- July 13, 1979 August 24, 1979 v. 181, no. 14, p. 27 v. 181, no. 17, p. 58 ENZYMATIC DETERMINATION GLUCOSE, FRUCTOSE, AND OF SUCROSE : PERFORMA1dCE LINES ISOGE OF NIC BURLEY TOBACCO FOR REACTION TO IN TOBACCO Sekin, Seval PSEUDOMONAS iLegg, Paul, TAB D. ACI et al A mooifisalion of the Boehringer enzymatic method for a rapid and accurate micro determmallon ol glucose. fructose, and sucrose in tobacco leaves is described. This method of analysis needs no sophancated laboratory equipment except a photometer and it enables one lo work wnh very small guanUl ies ol samples which are im portant in plant breemng. I/sogemc or nearisogenic lines in seven culbvar backgrounds ul lwrley lobacco I N¢Grrant lapaCum t.) were developed with the N. longrllora factor lor wildfire resistance. For each cull,var background. a resistant and a susceGlible selection IIUm the seventh baCkClo55 generation plua the recurrent parenlal cultivar were evaluated ior len agronomic ana ehemical baits. Resistant selections flowered an iverage or Iwo days later than Ihe suscepnble seleclions and parental pWnvars. For nine other Iralls. the resistant selecllons. me susceptible selEcbons. and the parental cultivars were not stabstically dilferent. The data indicated a general lack o1 an association between wJabre resistance and morpno logical, agronomic and chemical traits. Environmental Science and Technology September 1979 p. 1138 WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM, A NEW SOURCE OF MUTAGENS IN DRINKING- WATERS Schwartz, David J. et al  Compounds capable of reverting base pair substitution and frame shift mutants of Salmonella typhimurism are intro- duced in some drinking waters during transportation from urnal of Food Science September-October 1979 1558 treatnient site to the consumers. EFFECT OF AMMONIATED Chemistry and Industry June 16, 1979 p. 393 FERMENTED FOODS Hesseltine, Clifford W. Wang, Hwa L. The use of microorganisms in the processing of foods is a neglected field of research in food technology and fermenta- tion science. When we look about us, we see many foods, which we are all familiar with, that have been made by fermentation. This method of food processing goes back to ancient times; one could cite the use of yeast in bread, beer and wine making, or the use of bacteria in producin,^ vine_ar, acid milks, cheeses, tea, soured ve.-etables such as kimchi and sauerkraut, sausages and soy sauce. e,,_.Vrn . 9. No. 12..$EPT. 21. 1979 jGLYCYRRHIZIN ON THE MINERAL 'UTILIZATION OF RATS West, Leslie G. et al ' Adminisuation of ammoniated glycyrrhizin for 14 days in the diets of rats at a?40 Level caused a sienificant increase in iron exeretion and a sirnifmant depletion in titer iron stores as eompared to pair• fed conlrol rats. Zinc and mz¢nesium fecal and tissue levels were not simnicmtb' influenced by this dietary saponin. Body and feeal weights were also sienifieanny increased in animals consuming the saponin<onlainine diet. s
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LABSTftACTS Evaluation of Alpha Radiation-Induced Respiratoq l'areinoCenesis in Syrian Hamstera -Total Dose and Dase-Rate. JB. Little. A.R. A-rnnrdy ........... ..__............ .......... ........ ............. _....... ................. 7c6 Model Studies in Tob.icco CarcinoKenesis a-ith the Svrian Golden Hamster. D. RoJjmann, AR,renson, SS HrcAt-l dtlirlcA, N RoDrtvathi, EL ll'vnder .............................. _.............. 3A PANCREAS Unique Role of the Hamster in Specific CarcinoRenesis Studies.'P. Pour ................ ........ .._....... ...... 391 Fine structure or Pancreatic Duct \eoplasm in Syrian Golden Hamsters. 1. AllAo/% RB H'ilson. D. Oqroa-s4 y. P. Pour .................. _............... ....... .............. _.... .----- _......................... 39T Demonstration of a Tumor-Associated Antigen in Pancreatic Carcinoma. R. Runue .......................406 MAMMARY CANCER Aeth.icholanthrene-Induced Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma in Several Inbred Hamster Strains. R.A. Adams, P. Nomdurper. A.B. Russfietd. E. Soto ............ .............. _.._....... _.._............ ........ 405 EfISCELLANEOUS Charuteritation of a Syrian Hamster Plasma Cell Tumor..S1..ti"efies, J. Slrinstreilein, D. Har4 R Proiu. J.It: S/.ntein ..................................................................................................41 4 Rapid Induction of Epithelial Hyperplasia and Lpmphoplasmaqtosis in the Chinese Hamster (Cricetulus-Griseus) by Mineral and Pristane Oil. G. Yerqaniaq L Paika, KJ. Gagnon, .l Ba tta91 i na ................ ..... .... _............. _.............. ....................... _................................ ............. 424 VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 0 Q ~ ~ W C4 N
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LABSTRPcTS Chemistry and Industry July 21, 1979 p. 461 FREEZE DRYING OF FOODSTUFFS PRINCIPLES AND EXPERIENCES Schafer, Werner Stahnke, Otto The practical use of industrial freeze drying over the past 15 _ years has been characterised by a number of contradictory aspects. In the early '60s, in different countries, plants svere. - built with great energy, imagination and enthusiasm; pro- grammes were planned, marketing gaps and opportunities analysed. The conversion from laboratory-bascd physical parameters to industrial plants with high-tommee capacities succeeded without difficulties. The quality of selected pro- ducts proved to be at least equal; most, however, were dis- tinctly better. Finally, the costs - also a relatively early result - of suitable food products proved to be reasonable. Freeze drying, it seemed, could expect a big future. However, this expectation has not been borne out. There - are several reasons for this. First, favourable economics de- pend on the possibility of drying large quantities of uniform products: coffee is still a-standard product. On the other . hand, freeze drying of structured products, like mushrooms, crabs, meat and fruits, proved not to have sufficient consumer demand tojustify building high capacities, in spite of apparent . attractiveness. Second, the conventional procedures of drying and preservation have made considerable progress in respect of capacity, quality and costs. The judgcment on freeze drying made in an article in the 1978 cditioqof the leading German text book on drying technique is typical:' Agricultural and Biological Chemistry June 1979 p. 1347 DIRECT DETERMINATION OF -COPPER, LEAD AND CADMIUM IN TEA INFUSIONS BY FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY Tsushida, Tojiro Takeo. Tadakazu Rccent developmenl of Ilamcless atomic absorption spectrophotonutry has enabled the dErecl nucrodcter- minalion of trace mctals in bio:ocical matcrials:-:' bceuse of its hieh absolute sensitivily and the small sample size ncedcd. 79-1638. Fishbein, L. (Natl. Cent. Toximl. Res.. Jcller.. sun, AR) Ovcrvicw -of potential r.uitagcnic problenls posed. , by some pesticides and their trace impurities. Enciron. ~ Nralth Pecspecr. 27: 125-131; 1978. (53 references) The scope of pesticide use and the populations at po- lential risk are discussed in this review. It is estimated that 1.6 billion pounds of peaicide are produced annually in the United States, utilizing approximately 1400 actire ingredi- ents. The importance of knowin¢ the structural features of peiticides, their degradation and transformation produels, and their impuritia is cmphasized. Current know9edge on the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic effects of certain pesticides is presented. Among the pesticides considered art: DDT, hexachlnrobenzene, 2,4,5-T. pentachlorophenol (E CP), vari- ous herbicide precursors of nitrosainines and nitroso derisa- tnes, and halu-unsaturated pesticides. 79-1620. Murakami, M.; Fukami. J. (Inst. Ph)s. & Chem. Res., Wako-shi, Saitama 351, Japan) Uptake of benzofalpy- rene, carbaryl, DDT and parathion in cultured human cells; re-evaluation. Bull. Environ. Contam. To.rirol. 21(4-5): 478-482; 1979. (6 references) Studies were perfermed to determine the uptake of benzo(a)pyrene, carbaryt. DDT and parathion by human embryonic lung diploid cells in culture. The extent ofadsorp- tion by the cell surface of the labeled compounds was exam- ined. A large amount of DDT was taken up by cells, primari- ly associated with the lipid-rich surface membrane structure. Carbaryl and parathion were taken up lo a smaller extent than was DDT, but these chemicals appeared to be more closely associated with cellular components such as.proteins. The carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene was found mainle in the in- soluble residue. It is sugeestcd that furthcr studics be con- ducted on the incorporatton and binding of chemicah to cel- lular constituents in cultured cell systems to aid in the study 3f the pos.ible toxic action of Ihe compounds in geteral.
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[ABSTRACTS NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods. Second Edition. Volume 4. 530 p. National Institute for Occupational Salety and Health. Dept of HEW, Cincinnali, Ohio. 1978. Price an application. RevNw by Menr y MM r.qrur; CAeater• Virginia This fourth volume of the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods contains 60 environmental monitoring methods. These NIOSH sampling and analytical procedures give step-by-step information and instructions on how- to monitor for toxic chemicals found in the workdace-. All but one of the methods is designed for personal air monitoring to determine exposures to individual workers. The majority of the methods have been validated using the protocol developed under the joint NIOSH/OSHA Standards Completion Program. The other methods have been only partly evaluated and are presented for the readers information and trial use. In spite of the obvious problems of trying to relate •'pure'• laboratory methodology with the mixed chemical environment often encountered in the industrial world, this volume offers the concerned company a place to start their search to define chemical exposure dose. A most useful reference tool. Cancer Research August 1979 v. 39, p. 3141 EFFECT OF DELAY IN ADMINISTRATION OF 13-CIS-RETINOIC ACID ON THE INHIBITION OF URINARY BLADDER CARCINOGENESIS IN THE RAT ; Becci, Peter J. et al . The effect of a delay in starting 13-cis-retinoic acid treatment ' on the inhibition of urinary bladder carcinoma induced by N- butyl-N-(4-hydroxybuty0nitrosamine was studied in male Fischer 344 rats. Animals received a total p.o. dose of eilher 1200, 1800, or 2400 mg N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nilro- samine over a period of six weeks. At either pne, live, anc nine weeks after the last N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nilrosamine intubation, animals were started on a diet supplementec with 13-cis-retinoic acid (240 mg/kg of laboratory chow) o, continued on laboratory chow. Animals were killed at nne yea after the first carcinogen intubation for histological_evaluatior of the bladder. Feeding of 13-cis-retinoic acid reduced Ihr incidence, average number, and severity of transitional ce carcinomas as well as hyperplasia and cellular atypia. Further . more, even a nine-week delay in starting the retinoid leedir. did not diminish the ability of 13-crs-retinoic acid to inhib bladder carcinogenesis. - Industrial Research/Development August 1979 p. 75 ASSURING ACCURATE MEASUREtQENTS AND TRACEABLE STANDARDS Landvater, John TFItS IS T}fE SECOND in a series of three arti- cles on measurement. The first, which ap- peared in the July 1979 issue, discussed traceable standards. This article focuses on nteasurement errors. \Ieasuretnents can be made with ac- curacies in parts per million, and better. Yet 110 measurentent can he made with "ZerO crror" The cost of measurement increases as accuracv requirements increase. Fnran efficientand reliable uteasurclncnt system, sotne decisions are required in tLe selection of eduipulent. \Ve require suffi- cientaccuracvto assure dependable results. ofeoune-with reasnnable first cost andeco- nomtc;d operating and maintenance costs a second;trv goal. Tobacco ,August 24, 1979 iv. 181, no. 17, p. 60 STACK STABILITY OF BALED BURLEY TOBACCO ,Walton, L. R. et,al I Burley leaves from the middle 51alk.oosibon were slrlpped in three general moisture content ranges: low (17-18 .. wb6 normal (1922':, wbl, and high (above 22°:. wb) anp were compressed Iranaom orientabonl rn to bales at three aensnies-176, 224, and 272 kgrml. Bales of common moisture level and density were stacked three hlGh, and a pate of bUdey tobacco oi svmllar weigm was placed no top to produce stakks that were fourbales high. The stabrhly ollhe slacks was determined by measunn; Ihe horizontal movement and vertical delormalion ol me stack. The angle of lean of the slacks was round to be d,rectly correlaled to maumumm deformalion but not correlated to density varlahon wnhin the bale. It ap pears that slack inslabilny is a lunct,on ol hkgh rates of deiormaaon Apparenny, enough varialion in density exists in all bales to cause uneven delormabon. The solut,on to pOdacmo bal9s that'x,lt Slack and hold Iner, shapz curing hand hng ,5 to make rngh density bales Ihar eelorm lor CreeC very nttle under lonqlerm load. The general weighl_ranges reoulrep to pro duce bales that will stack and maintain their shape ouring hanbling ar, given. Vol-. 9. No. .12, SEPT. 21, 1979 :,~'r 1171 ~
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[ABSTRACTS 79-1556. Giacoia, G. P.; Catz, C. S. (Div. Neonatol., Tulsa htcd. Coll., Univ. Oklahoma. Tulsa, OK) Drugs and pollu - lants in breast milk. Clin. PcrinaroL 6(t): 181-196; 1979. (S2 references) The contamination of buman breast milk wit h a num- ber of drugs and pollutants and the possibilitics of passing these contaminants onto the infant are examined. The toxic effects to the infant depend-not on-the amount of the sub- stance that is consumcd by the mother but on the amount that is present in the site of reception, the breast milk. The importance of the mother-infant model is stressed svhen ex. amining the passing of pollutants in milk from mother lo baby. The mode of passage of drugs and pollutants from the maternal plasma into the breas: milk is reviewed as well as the means of storage of pollutants in either the aqueous or fat phases of milk according to the compound oil/water parti- tion coe(ficient. The mechanisms of gastrointestinal absorp- tion of milk contaminants by the infants, and the factors af- feeting distribution, metabolism, and excretion of these subaances are diccussed. Experiments showing the absorp- tion of salieylates from molhers' milk by infants are reviewed. Other environmental pollutants found in breast milk include organochlorine pesticides (DDT, dieldrin, aldrin, heptachlor, hepachlor eposidc, chlordecone, and mirex). PCD, hexa- ehlornphene, and lexachlbrDethylene. The concentration of drugs in breast milk has been show'r•n in a number-of studies. The anticoagulant, warfarin, has been found to be a safe ther- apeutic agent for breast-feeding mothers as it is no: trans- ferred in the milk. A number of hormones are-found lo be tiansfcrred to the infant via the breast milk. Radiophar- maceuticals are also found fn infants breastfeeding from mothers exposed to these substances. The transfer of compo- nents of cigarette and marijuana smoke via the breast milk are also considered. Although it is believed that the theoreti eal risks are outweighed by the known benefits of breastfeed ing, some practical considerations for this practice are given 79-1494. Itagaki. Y. (Appl. Cent., Sci. Instrum. Proj., JEOL Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) (Recent advances of GC/>1S analysis in the pesticides and environmental toxic materials.] Nippon Noyaku Gakkaishi (J. Pestie. Sei.) 3(Suppl.): 511-521; 1978. (14 references) (Japanese) A review of recent advances in gas chromatography - and mass spcctroscopy in the determination of minute amounts of pesticides is given. Several analyses are explained, such as trichlorfon. and fenitrothion determination by gas ehromatographc, identification-of mixtures, of O.O,S- tri- methyi phosphorodithioate, O,O.-diethyl S-methyl phos- phoro dithioate, and O.o.S- tricthyl phophoro dithioate by ultra high resolution mass and analysis of bromacil by ma ss-fragmen t og raph y. I VoL. 9, No. 12~ SEPT, 21, 1979 _' 79-I571. Dourquin, A. \V.; Gibson. D. T. (Eneirnn. Res. Lab., US EPA, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561) Microbial degrada.- tion of haingcnatcd hydrocarbons. In: Water Chlorinarion: F.nrirmtmernal lmpncr and Healrh Eflrrs Jolley. R. L.- Ed. fdnn Arbor: Ann Arbor Sciencel 2(Chapter 19): 253-267; 1977. (21 references) Various organochlorine compounds have entered the emironman due to their use611ness, such as in agriculture where these chemicals can be used as hcrbicides. Meehanisms ~ which are available fur the degradation of these compounds include microbial degradation. It is suggested that biodegrp- dation of synthetic halogenated chemicals occurs more readi- ly if the compound bcars sonic similarity to naturally occur- ring compounds. Many synthetic organic pssticides do not bear a very close relationship to natural compounds. Sp<cifie pathways of degradation are described for eermin agrieultur- 'aI chemicals. The mineralization of the extensively used her- bicide 2.4-D is described. Enzyme systems capable of degrad- fne halogenated aliphauc and aronutic hydrocarbons are .discusscd. 79-1516.- Wouters. W.; Van Den Bercken, J. (Inst. Vet. Pharmacol. & Toxicol.. Univ. Utrecht. Utrecht. The Nether- lands) Action of pyrcthroids. Gen. Pharrnaco(. 9(6): 387-398; 1978. (83 references) A review of the mode of action of the pyrethroid insecticides is given. The structural formulas of allclhrin, bi- oresmethrin, permethrin, deeamelhrio, fenvalerate, and py- rethrin I show the common intact ester group which is re- sponsible for most of the compounds activity. Allethrin has received much attention in pyrcthroid studies. It is believed that allethrin acts on the sodium channels of the nerve mem- brane by slowing down the turning-off process of the increase in sodium conductance during excitation. No distinct rela- tionship has been postulated between the effects of py're- throids on membrane conductance and the insecticidal activi- ty of these compounds. Studies have indieaiF d that knockdown activitv in locusts is probably related lo thc abili- ty to-stimulate repetitive aetivity in the sensory nervous sys- lem. The insecticidal activity of pyrethroids seems to be relaP ed to molecular structure. Little is known about pyrethroid action in the higher animals and man. It is believed that in sufLcicnt concentrations the pyrethroids might also have deleterious effects on the nervous systems of higher species.
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Greensboro Daily News September 9, 1979 . p. C11 .LIVZNG CAN BE HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH " ;aarbour, John : -Americans ans are living longer and ~ - healthier than ever before. Yet, every minute of their fruitful lives, some a- pert or another finds a new hazard in their wonderful world. : - . . . . A constant chorus wams them of poi- sons in every pleasure, risks in every eonvenience, peril in every pastime. Ominous statistics abound, People are told to beware of nitrites in bacon, sac- it9udne in soft drinks, and lately cancer, perhaps, in the daily ration of Scotch. '.; What to make of it all? How does one measure risks in a practical wal? When !does benefit outweigh harard? How pro- . 'tective should government be? The trouble with these rational ques- tions is that theyyre all but unanswera- ble. . . . . . Harvard University physics professor Richard Wilson tallied up some risk sta- tistics tistics to put them in perspective. Each . of the following is equal, increasing your chance of death by one-millionth: . Smoking 1.4 cigarettes. Drinking 54lit- % lit- er of wine. Spending three hours in a coal mine. Living two days in New York . or Boston. Drinking Miaau tap water for one year. Traveling six minutes by can- oe, or ten miles by bicycle, or 300 miles . by ear, or 1,000 miles by jetL .-, -" Or eating 10-tablespoons of peanut butter. Or drinking 30 12-ounce cans of . diet soda. . . . , -... .: . . ~ . . Cigarettes, of course, are associated with cancer and heart disease. Drinking, . cirrhosis of the liver. The coal mine, " lblack lung disease and physical injury. lIt's air pollution in Bostonand New -,York. Accidents by any means of Locom- .otion. And it's cancer from the aflatoxin In peanut butter and thesaccharin_in ' :diet soda. " _ ~ More and more, experts are looking at the growing catalogue o'trisks, looking for a rational compromise between a daredevil life and one in which people are wrapped in cotton, boxed in card-, board, stamped fragileand told which end is up. Wilson created his list of risks to help himself put risks in some perspective. How much is a millionth of your life worth? And shouldn't you have some -. choice? . . .. .. . . . At Purdue University, bionucleonics professor Paul Zeimer seriously mea- sures radiation, but even he has to smile at some of the ironies conjured up by adllirems and rads. . ~ 'Take ndioactive potassium 40. Ites• -;ists in nature. It's absorbed into musde ; :with ordinary potassium because the ;.tbody can't tell the difference. And the ..'more.muscle you have, the more ra- , dioactive you are. - ;:. Dr. Zeimer's implicit advice to women on campus: Stay away from men, or at '` least choose a 97-pound weakling. No ' ~ football players. No crowded elevators. "L r. Risk statistics are fragile. But risk '~measurement - relative risk - Is a seri- ous problem,,and a growing number of people are paying attention to iL ~ ~ Senior Circuit Judge David L. Bazelon of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washing- ton put it succinctly in a recent article in the journal "Science.". •- ,. . . "Ironically, scientific progress not only creates new risks, but also uncovers previously unknown risks. As our under- - ~standing of the world grows exponential- ..ily, we are constantly learning that old ~ activities, once thought safe, in fact pose substantial risks. The question'is not .- whether we will have risk at all, but how- much risk and from what source. Per- . *haps even more important, the question who will decide." "~ One must measure the !bst of avoidingg eertain risks. -0ne must measure envi• .` ionmental considerations like cleaner air :'and water against energy shortages, and the balance sheet keeps changing. •. 1; Most Americans accept the risks in- ~ volved in driving automobiles. And some .''ezperts who measure those risks are , quick to point out that the root of acci- dents is in human error, the falling at- •. tention span. . .. . .. ' Highswy sa(ety Prof. IlaroldMichael '-af Purdde says. "Most of the problems -.~that result in"traffic accidents are'Ltso• ciated with the absence of human Eapac- Ity. We can minimize it ~by education,.bp training, by scare. But mosj:ofjt is;tiU . human error." . .. . ,". . Recently, Dr. Wiiliam Baiclay, editoi ~' of the American Medical-Associatidn -, Journal, cited inequities in the measure• 'menl of everything from artificial_swee- Iteners to nuclear plants. - "Tests that form the hasis of f~hese ie1 ports are often conduRed with dosages ithat exceed any to whicli:mancould be exposed, are administer;d for periods that equal the naturalGte-span oC.Ltie ~test animals, and are given by inappro- priate routes, and are finally evaluated by persons of qnestionable expertise _ ~•• . .
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~ NEWS BRIEFS 1Vnt . 9. No. I2. -SEPT. 21, 109 !t"is equally hunrdous to have one chee!'X; ray, live lao months with a cigarette-smok+-er, eat 100 charcoal broiled steaks, live 20years near a polyvinyl chloride plant or livc, 150 years within 20 miles of a nuclear power plant. -Riclurd Wilson _ . ...:~ Few people object to 'a food color -,being banned, but when it ame down :; Ito nitrites and saccharine,-ihere was '. -considerable uproa ',1s biany other alien substances are found . In food - aatural torins, pesticide resi- : r! !~dues, contaminants. The absolutlst Dela ;:. ney amendment does not apply to these: ~: 'and therefore the FDA can establish toF .. 'erance levels, limiting the amount that ' t`reaches the public. .i-In the case ot com and peanuts there Is a toxin caQed-aflatostn, the product of a common mold, which is a proven and strong cause of liver cancer. "To get rid of it entirely would mean :" we'd have to get rid of a food; `Rodrncks . '.;expains.-"And nobody is going to ban ' '- ieorn and peanuts." instead the FDA -'~limits the amount that can be present in -'Qroducts such as peanut butter.- ' rThe fact is that poisons occurnaturai. _ ...Ily in everyday food. ::.:•: 'If we look at foods the way we look ' '~at some of the things we intentionally . " add to them, we are going to find a lot of substances that look dangerous,'+ ~ ~ Rodricks says. . ..:.:::: -I- And In fact they do The National ~ Academy of Sciences has published a.book discussing natura0y occurring poi- .Iscns-in food. Potatoes and spinach con- ...Ram_ a natural chemical that denies .~ ~~ ~+u'. 4' S'. , Ff K 3 ; -. It is the job of Dr. JosejiLMdsieks of 'i :-the Food and Drug Administraton to- ~-`deal with risk. In the pasl two.decaAes,. b ha besensittve' ..:e says, weveecome mor~- , to risks. That was prompted by.lbeue-. ;: rnendous spread of synthetid'chemials• ;, eipecially since World War IL 0f ;coqrse '-~' those chemicals proteetagalnst bugs: ; ` package :ood, color hair and in other mi- . ~aror-ways tenhance life But they are new: -, 3nour env¢onment. I ;So;.the:questionarose Arethese -`Cemicals'which we come in daily con- ' tact, with through food, air, water, re-, ' sponsible for4human disease? ~ 7here are sevenl ways of testing tisky . chemicals. First,'it'ls fairly easy to dis- '.eoverif chemicals injure.cells or parts of c8lls including the genetic material. Second, there are occupational data, not i(ways easy to come by, which may indi- cate that workers eiposed to chemicals 'ai•e hurt in the long rua Then there_are samals. . - . . ::. . . _ . i'rhe mosC usefut animal mode'sare . -Uie iodedtsbeause ot.their biological siilitis t ha': f;til .mareoumnsut anmas ~don't live as"long as humaps, and they pre exposed tu.:cbemicaas In ways hu- , - tnans might noC encounter them. In typical animal experiments, rats are _ested atabout three dosage leveLs: The . highest dosage i6' just_short of toxic. If Ia chemical produces cancer in five per-- Icent of ahe animals above.what normally . ~occurs in a control group, it is consid ;ered''iairly' dartudng evidence that the iCher.tical will ause cancer in.humans. There are about 30 chemical sub- tances that appear to cause cancer-in- umans and do ause oncer in animals. In the Delaneyamendment, Congress 'Emade a policy decision that can be ~: iouglity stated this way: Since we don't . , ". J h tfid risk level for - .rnowowo-n a zero_il tht in ani - any chemaa causes cancer. ;-'mals, then we will ban any chemical that does. only in the convenience area_of --`food addi0ves, such a; food colors, pres- ervatives, ervatives, stabitizers, including nitritesi - 'and saccharine.
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' I ABSTRACTS Nature September 6, 1979 p. 56 UNSATURATED WATER FLOW WITHIN POROUS MATERIALS OBSERVED BY NMR IMAGING Gtuntnerson, R. J. et al \1'etting, drying and permeation processes in various porous _ materials are of special interest to soil science and agriculture, building science and chemical engineering. Direct experimental study of unsaturated flow within such materials is hampered by - the difficulty of detecting with precision changes in their internal water content distributions. In laboratory work on soils gravi- metric sampling is widely used'. However, this is a destructivee method which interferes with water flow processes and in any case is not easy to apply accurately to rigid materials such as permeable rocks, ceramics and building materials. y-ray attenuation is the on!y established non-destructive instrumental method in laboratory use"-1Ye report the first use of a nuclear magnetic resonance (N>1R) imaging technique to monitor the dynamics of the interna7 water content distribution in several porous inorganic materials during capillary inflow. The-Chemistry of Silica, Ralph K. Iler-John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York; 866 pages; $65. Silica, the major component of the EartNs solid surface and the constituent of ordinary sand, is involved in many phases of modern technology and science. This is a comp rehensive account of the basic chemistry involved in a wide range of res earch and development activities and a wealth ofinformation on production and production-control. Beginning with the solubilitv of different forms of si!ica and the factors that influence dissolution and deposition, the solution chemis- try of silica is introduced. The r uthor also compares and recommends-analvtical methods. The digest of all currently available information provides a bacL:gmund as to the nature of soluble silicates and particularly t.he rnech- -anism of polymerization of silicic acid-and furmation of colloid. The mechanism by which silica sols, powders and gels are formed and their properties controlled-is dc- seribed. Next, the hpes and uses of commercial concen- trated sols, gels, and ultrafine powders are examined, fol- lesved by a discussion of the biochemical properties and applications of the surface chemistry of silica. The final ehapter covers all aspects of the occurrence and im- portance of silica in different life forms. VoL..9, No. 12, SEPT.,21, 1979 Industrial Research Development _ September 1979 p. 142 GC OF COMPLEX MIXTURES Freeman, R. R. et al IN A RECENT ARTICLE (IRID, Oct 1973, . 143), we have described the use of a singPsingle liquid phase to improve resolution and quan- titation in glass capillary gas chromatng- raphy. And great advances in capillary technology (see related article, IRID, April 1978, p. 89) have made glass capillaries a routine tool for many types of separations. - Yet even these improvemcnts do not give definitive answers in complex systems in which the compounds of interest may all be present in nanogram quantities or less. For example, the single-column analysis of sur- face waters for polyccclic aromatic hydro- carbons may indicate the presence ofsi,nifi- cant amounts of several of these pollutants. In realitv, only one or two may be present. The possibility of co-eluting substances may indicate the presence ofa material.vithin the retention time window, when actually none i of the material does exist in the sample. While studying the prioriri pollutants, we have observed that the order of elution for the polycyclic materials is the same, whether the column is coated with methyl silicone or with phen,vl methyl silicone. Only the elu- tion times are different-lon~er retention times on the phenyl methyl silicone column. But the elution times of straight-chain hy- drocarbons change with respectto those of the pol,vcyclics. 389 9toscu' L.H., FlNsrrn F., Cooor M. Nicotine and its effect on wound hcaling. (En an_~lais) La nicotine et son in• tlu^_ncc sur la cicatrisation. - Plasr. recmtslr: Surg., 1973, 61-4, p. 570- 5. s
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l ~ ABSI"RAC iTS Archives of Environmental Hea1t-1- July-August 1979 p. 274 AUGPIEiITATION OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEl4IA BY LOW LEVEL CARBON MONOXIDE EXPOSURE IN DOGS Becker, Lewis C. - Haak, Jr., Edward D. ABSTRACT. This study was conducted to determine whether low level exposure to carbon monoxide would increase myocardial ischemia associated with acute myo- - eardial infaretion- An hour after coronary artery ligation, eleven anesthetized dogs underwent five sequential respir- alory exposures to 5,000 ppm carbon monoxide, producing mean blood carboxyhemoglobin levels of 4.9^o to 17.090. Ischemia, as indicated by the amount of S-T segment eleva- tion in epicardial electrocardiograms, increased significantly at the lowest carboxyhemoe}obin level and increased fur- ther with increasing carbon monoxide exposure. These changes occurred 'ur-ttre absence of altered heart rate, blood pressure, left atrial pressure, cardiac output, or blood tlow to ischcmic myocardiurn. Flow to non-ischemic myocard- ium increased with carbon monoxide exposure,-the percent- age increase being approximately double the increase in car• boxyhemoglobin level. Thus• low level exposure to carbon -monoxide can significantly augment ischemia in acute myo- cardial infarction, apparently through a reduction in oxy-- gen supplied to ischemic tissue. The data suggest that hypoxia induced by carbon monoxide exposure is more severe than can be accounted for by a simple reduction in oxygenated hemoglobin. Chromatographia • August 1979 v. 12, no. 8, p. 519 A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR THE SAMPLING AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF VAPOURS Colenutt, B. A. Thorburn, S. A eonventional pyrolysis gas chromato;raphy system has been adapted to the analysis of vapours. A Curie point pyrolysis wire is used as a holder for granular actice carbon on which the sample can be adsorbed. Desorp• tion is achieved in the pyrolysis unit, but no pyrolysis occurs. The present study reports on the completenesss of adsorption by the sampler and on the dc;ree of release of adsorbate from it. VOL. 9, N0. 12. $EPT. 21, 1979 Industrial Research Development-_ Septetnber 1979 p. 115 PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP ... A PROGRAI•t THAT WORKS Wolfe, R. C. :IN THIS DECADE, widespread distrust and 'alienation has developed toward many American institutions, including business, the press, and ~ovemment. This distrust has been produceAy a myriad of causes, includ- ing Watergate, doubte-digit inflation, the problem of PCBs, the well-publicized worker-asbestos problem, and inner-city problerns. Much of socieh•'s cynicism has been directed toward the large corporation. The business community has an uphill - battle to regain its former position of public trust and to mend its image. Business must demonstrate to the public and to government that it recognizes a social responsibility to manufacture and to sell safe and efficacious products. - In addition, business must show that it has great concern for the impact of its operations and products on the environment and the communitv. In many companies, this con- cept of corporate social responsibility is called product stewardship. '.lcrosnl \Icasuremcnt. Dale A. - Lund,rcn ct al. xxiv + 716 pages. Uniccrsitv Presscs of Florida. 15 \.R•. 15th St.. Gainc.eille• FL 32G03. 1979. S4>-. hard cover. - Hcre, there is explained hmv to clas,ify acru.olk and analc7a thcm. Ori=in and bchavior of acrosul: are 11 cunsidcrcd. as %ccll as numerous mcthods of mc:aurcmcnt. Undcr- standin_ of :wro.uh is cstrcmchim- porumt to the t.rwr%lcd_c and control of air pollutiun. ~,:"119-0 ;
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~ABSiRACiS Cancer Research September 1979 v. 39, p. 3349 EARLY EFFECT OF DIMETHYLNITROSAMINE ON PROTEIN CHAIN INITIATION AND ,°POSTMICROSOMAL POLYADENYLIC ;ACID-CONTAINING RNA CONTENT IN 'MOUSE LIVER lNygard, Odd :Hultin, Tore - A mouse liver S-30 system was used to study the early_ effects of dimethylnitrosamine (DMNA) on polypeptide chain initiation and messenger RNA content. The inhibition of protein synthesis after DMNA administration was associated with a reduced capacity of the S-30 system to form 80S ribosomal initiation complexes. The binding of for- mylatable methionyl transfer RNA to polysomes was also de- pressed. The initiation defect was detectable in the assay system slightly later than the decrease in protein synthesis. -Addition of mRNA stimulated both translation and 80Srnitiation complex format/on but could not fully restore the activity of the S-30 system from DMNA-treated mice. - A loss of poly(A1' RNA from the postmicrosomal subtraction of the S-30 fraction was observed as early as 15 min after DMNA administration. Laler, polyriboadenylic acid also de- creased in the microsomal fraction. Monosomes accumulating in response to-DMNA treatment were deficient in mRNA as measured by polyriboadenylic acid analysis. Conversely, the proportion of polyriboadenylic acid in the remaining polysomes increased. indicating that the mRNA had become less densely occupied with ribosomes. Nature September 13, 1979. v. 281, p. 135 EFFECT OF 114 SITU LEACHIIIG ON AMINO ACID RACEMISATION RATES IN FOSSIL BONE King Jr., Kenneth Bada, Jeffrey L. Amino acid racemisation reactions provide a promising approach for estimating the absolute ages of fossil bones'. flowe+zr, an important question remains unanswered: s.hat is the effect of in situ leaching on apparent racemisation rates''"! We report here the relationship between leaching history and the corresponding nlL aspartic acid ratio for 12 well-dated fossil samples, using y-carbocyqlutamic acid (Cla) as a quantitative index of leachinC , in arn attempt to resolve this problem. *VoL. 9, No, 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 Archives of Environraental Health July-August 1979 p. 255 CARBON MONOXIDE: -A HAZARD TO FIRE FIGHTERS Barnard, R. James Weber, Joe S. ABSTRACT. Carbon monoxide levels were measured in twenty-five fires in the city of Los Angeles to obtain -ittformation about fire fighten exposure to carbon mon- oxide. tevcls as high as 3,000 ppmwere observed for some fires. In general, when carbon monoxide levels were- sip ificantly elevated (> 100 ppm) the smoke was quite heasy and noxious, but in some cases the smoke was heavy - and carbon monoxide levels were minimal. In two-story structures, the highest concentrations of carbon monox- ide were found on the second-floor level-and were usually istill elevated aftet the fire had been "knocked down" but was still smoldering. These data show that fire fighters are exposed to levels of carbon monoxide which could be a serious health hazard and may be-related to the high incidence of heart disease in fue fighters. Environmental Science and Technology September 1979 p. 1077 FACTOR ANALYSIS AND DERIVATION OF JAN EXPERIMENTAL EQUATION ON fPOLYNUCLi;AR AROMATIC HYDROCARBON .;_EMISSIONS FROM AUTOMOBILES `Handa, Takashi ~ e Factor analysis on polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon .(PAH) emissions from gasoline engine automobiles was made on the data from test runs of more than 50 000 km on each of 26 cars. The average emission rate of PAH from cars was di- rectly linked to average car mileage. The consumRtion of en- gine oil was a significant factor governing PAH emissionsfrutn cars in ordinary city service. An experimental equation which can give the average emission rate of P AH from cars was de-rived as a function of car milea;e anden-ine oil mileage. The - validity uf this equation was>uppnrted by field data.
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[NEWS RRIEFS Greensboro Daily News ; ` September 12, 1979 p. B8 CIGARETTE CHANGES Philip Morris Tobacco Co. will take over the manufacture of lrggett & Myers Tobacco Co.'s overseas brands early next year, a Liggett official said. ~ .' . - Philip Morris~ovms most of the overseas rights to L&M cigarettes, but L&M had been manufac- , turing the cigarettes under contract for more thanayear. -. - .~> . Don Mott, an L&M vice president, said it is too '. "early to say what impact the loss will have on- .~ L&M's Durham work force. "As you can imagine, ~ we have a lot of studies going on to try and figure ,: out the best way to handle this. It's very prema- ture ture to say anything right now," Mott said. About 20 percent of f.&M's production in Dur- .' ham is cigarettes for ezport. The tobacco compa- ay, a subsidiary of the Liggett Group of ..Montvale, N.J., employs 1,700 hourly workers in - Its cigarette operations. . . ,_~ . 1 Philip Morris bought Liggett's foreign eigarette . -tbusiness in late June 1978. At that time, Philip . -Morris contracted to continue to have the ciga- rettes made by L&M. "~ ..-•-~- : :: . 't Offieiab at Philip Morris in New York declined ~ to discuss details of the contract cancellation. iWaBy McDowell in the operations division said, "ll Liggett said it, it must be true." _.- /, ~ Asked where the company might manufacture - ihe cigarettes, McDowell said, "We make most '-of our export cigarettes in Richmond. That would . be a good assumption." . ,. . ... . - t Philip Morris paid;108 million for the foreign -'eigarette business. A subsidiary of Philip Morris, - Fabriques de Tabac Reunies S.A. took over IJg- -, gelt's licensing agreements in 22 countries. . The parent company is also seeking a buyer for Itts domestic cigarette business. . • 'Greensboro Record September 13, 1979 p. A8 tCIGARETTE DEAL IS OFF DURH.A.M (AP) - Philip Morris To- .bacco Co. has cancelled a contract with 'Liggett & Meyers Tobacco Co. in which Liggett made cigarettes for Philip Mor- ris to sell overseas. ' Philip Morris owns most of the over- seas rights to LSdt's cigarettes. Liggett has been manufacturing the cigarettes ;onder contract for. more than a year. I Don Molt, an L&91 vice president, ;said Philip hior>•is recently notified the ~Durham-based tobacco company that it ;would take over the manufacture of the ;eaport brands next year. ,, . Wo1,9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 Philip Morris bought Liggett's roretgn Icigarette business about a year ago for - ' :' i more than ;100 millfon. A subsidiary, _lFabriques de Tabac Reunies SA. took - . - over Liggett's licensing agreements in 22 , 4: n '.l , ~4:.,,: =rS ;{? eountries "We received word early this year that `: ~PhiLp Morris wanted the original (one .' ryear) contract extended for six months; ;~~`that is, through December 1979. But a ._~;while back, we began working with .,;them to insure an orderly transition ~,-when-and if they took over their own '.~ ~manufacture ' Mott sard r. , Mott sa'd tt•is-too early to tell what ~~impact the loss of the business will have '.on L&M's work force in Durham._ . Tobacco August 24, 1979 v. 181, no. 17, p.'53 , .. . ._. . - / ... _. . , . IASPE\ Now in lest markets. Aspen is packed in ' green and white. ' ' Lorillard sends out a new menthol NEW YORK. N.Y.-l.prillard i% lest- marketing a new 9 nig. tar nun• iY:r'4.'tY r t r' thol product, Aspen. The proctuct O is the contpan)''c third maior new ~ entry into the loti-tar ratecorv ot' ~ cigarettca within the last nine La months. • N Aspen beg_an tcals in l3uFfalo, Kansas City, 11'ichita and C)kla- ' homa City in mitl-.lul)•. It is the company's first new menthol brand introduced .ince 1957. ASPEN IOOS -r^ ~... lf .; .;
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Greensboro Daily News - September 17, 1979 p. Al '-.BOWS TO TOBACCO '.STATE EYES DISCOUNT FOR NON-SMOKERS L RALEIGH (AP) - The sWte Depart- _! ,_..+....n 6+. ...Ld1 .,..n ~6+w . -:950 life insurance companies to submit ~ •detailed information about policies that • . -offer discounts to non-smokers - a re• spoase to pressure from the tobacco ia ~•. dustry,'which has been angered by such ~ ..:pohcies. .: : ;In letters mailed to thernmpanies, the ,department requested information that- ~• -: one official said would help determine : whether the policies discriminate against . : smokea. . . .. .. . .. E W. Byron Tatum, director of technical - operations for the department, said the . special rates may be in violation of laws {oveming discriminatory sales practices. Tatum said the requested information , must be submitted by Oct. 3. Meanwhile, a spokesman fora major . tobacco interest said his organization did not object to the discounts unless legisla- .tures tried-to mandate them through 'law. Also, a representative of tobacco . i growers vowed to inform farmers about the policies and let farmers make the de- cision on their merits. This week, Allstate Life Insurance Co. . of Northbrook, iLL, announced it would offer up to S percent discounts on whole ;)ife policies to persons between the ages of 21 and 75 who had not smoked in one .' year and could pass a physical : Lfon. . . - . . ', Walter P. Merryman, assistant to the ' president of the Tobacco Institute Ine-, • satd in a telephone interview from ..-Washington that his group considers -;non-smokers' discounts "a marketing .:~ gimmick," but did not oppose them. . . i Merryman said legislation is pending ' in Oregon and Wisconsin that would re- quire insurance companies to offer dis 'count rates for non-smokers. Similar -. -legislation was defeated in five states this year, he said. . - j The discount, for which advertising campaigns were begun Sunday, drew :f¢e from W.W. "Billy" Yeargin Jr., di- ;reclor of the Tobacco Growers Informa- tion Committee.- ' - ~ Yeargin claimed the policies were dis- .eriminatory because they offered lower rates to non-smokers than smokers for the same insusance. : . Yeargin's criticism of the discounts contributed to the Insurance Depart- ment's decision to investigate the lega& ty of the poliaes, officials said. Tatum said if the companies decide to offer lower rates for the policies, the de• -partment does not require that they jus- itify that decision as long as rates are consistent with benefits. . . . 'VOL. 9, NO, 12. SE?T, 21, 1979 'Greensboro Record September 14, 1979 ` p.'A1 `r VITAMIN A LIKELY CANCER WEAPON WASHINGTON (AP) - Scientists have developed some new forms of vita- min A that they say show preliminary promise in preventing some kinds of cancer-tvithout toxic side elfects. r The new synthetic vitamin A deriva- tives have not been tested in humans, but preliminary laboratory and animal work is "encounging," Dr. Nahcy Ac- ton, a National Institutes of Health re- searcher, said Thursday. . -, The research hopes to find agents that can be used on a preventive basis for ilong periods of time by people who have 'a high risk of developing cancer, she {said. _ .. -'.~.t ...- .. .- . , I Ms. Acton told the national meeting of ,the American Chemical Society that : some of the NIH-developed vitamin A ; derivatives have shown a protective ef- - ' fect against chemically-induced cancers In early rat tests. ... But unlike natural vitamin A and many synthetic forms, some of the new ~ derivatives appear far less toxic and bet- ter tolerated with repeated use, she told : a news briefing. . , "Gur preliminary results with this ! class of compounds are encouraging be- Icause they show that compounds with ~ anti-tumor properties need not be tox- ic," ic,' Ms. Acton said.:...:-.:,.` .•....:. Past research has shown that natural and synthetic vitamin A can prevent or slow down cancers of the epithelial tis• sues - those that line body organs. Al- most 90 percent of the cancers which are i fatal to man are in these tissues. , The drugs have proved effective in preventing cancer of the lung, skin, blad- der and breast in experimental aninWs. However, vitamin A accumulates in the liver and at high doses causes severe liver damage, Ms. Acton said in caution- g ing people against taking large amounts ', in hopes of preventing cancer. This ' eventually leads to toxicity throughout . the body, resulting in such symptoms as extensive bone cracks, she added. - ~ Ms. Acton noted that much more ex- tensive testing would have to be com- pleted before it is known if any of the derivatives can be used in hvman caucer prevention. - - The primary concern of her research has been seeking a deri<•ative that pre- vents breast cancer in women with a ge- netic predisposition to the dlsease. Ms. Actod played down a suggestion hat the drugs might be used by workers dealing with cancerous substances in tieu of efforts to clean up the workplace. I 1148 . ..,~Rm_•*.
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; ABSTRACTS WINKLER. Anthony C_ 808'.023 Hiiting the resevch paper : a handbook I Anthony C Winkler. Jo Ray McCuen. New York : Hatcoun Brace lovanurich. c1979. xik 276 p: ill. ; 21 cm. Includes indn. Bibifoeraph q~: p 26-73. (LB2369.W55J 78-73967 ISBN 0-15- 598290-7. : 4.50 - J. Report .nting. 2. Research L .1fcCuen, Jo Ray, 1919-prnt auMoc 11. Tide - BA1;ER.Stephen, 1924- 659.1 Systemane appnaach to adverrisine creati.it'•/- Stephen Baker. 1e• York : S1cGrfw-Hill, c1919. y em. Includes index. IHF5823.B254J 78-2381a ISB\ 0-07-003352-g : 19.95 J. Adrertising. 2. Creatire abifity in buiinesc L T'itle. BISGHAV, Robert E. 6564 Trsps to m-oid in Food administratian / Robert E. Bingham. .\'ashvdle: Broadman Press, c1979. 140 p. : ill. • 18 cm. Includes bibliographical se[erences.(HD31.B8971 78-67265 pbk.: 3.50 1, ;Vanagcmcnt L Title. - MAR~fIOhl, Daniel St., 664'.06 1935- Handbook of IlS colorantr for foods. dm-•s- and eosneriu / by Daniel SI. Marmion. New-York : Wiley, e1979. p. em. 'A Hiley-Intersclcnce pubhcation' Includes indea. (TPS56.C6S\t37] 7g-109t9 ISBN 0-a71-03684-1 : 26.50 J. Colonng mater in food 1 Coloring matter. !. Tatle: t. HANCOCK. William A. 3J6'.73'01 f.recunsei cuidc to business law / µ'illiam A. Hancwc. Sew York : 51cGnw-Hill, 0979. p em. Inaludes index. IKF1609.H36J 79-1350 ISB\ 007-025978-:i 29.95 1. Trade re-ruhtion-L'nirtd States' 1. Labor lavi - and f.•gisbnon-L'nned Sratcs. 3. Ta.unon-f~ and letir6tion-L'nited Snres. 4. Eaeeutisrs- L'nitt0 Statrs-Honn.ools, manuals, era L Title. ;VOL. 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 REAY. David Anthony. - 658.2 fndustnil energy conservation : a handbook for engineers and managers I David A. Reav. 2d ed. Oxford ; Ncw Yott : Pesgamon Press. 1979. p. cm. Includes indea. Bibliography: p. (M63.3.RJ 1979J 78-z0982 ISBN 0-08-023273-6 :- 40.00 ISBS 0-08-02327a-4 pbk. : 20.00 J. lndusrry-Enerry consuvarion-HandbooJ; manuah, era I Titlc. PHAP.dfACOLOGYar,d 615'.1'025 pharmacolositts - an international directory, 1978-9. Oxford ; New York : Oxford Universny Press. 1979. 0. cm. fRM37.P13J 79-60202 ISBN 0-19-20010 L9 : 65 D0. 1. Pharmaeololtsat-Oirecto»rs. MOULTON. Peter. 001.6'32a Foundrtions of programming Mrourh BASfC / Peter Moulton. \ew York : 0.iley, e1979. p cm. Includes indcx. Q,176.73.B35f673J 78- 21569 ISBN 0-i71-0331I-I : 11.95 1. Buic (Computer progssm langusge) L Trtle. HODGE. Billy J. 658.a Ornmzarion theors•: an environmental approach / B. 1. Hodee and R'illiam P.-Anthony. Boston : Atlyn and Bucon. 0979- xvii. 557 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliognohies and index. I11D31.H572J 78-25999 ISBN 0-105-06523-6 : 1 4.95 1. Organization. I. bfana£ement L Anthony. It17Jiam P- joint author. 1f. 'Tifle. GA\NO\, Startln 1. 651 Orpaniraoimal beharior, : a maneeerial and organiaanonal perspective 1 Martin 3. Gannon. Boston : Liule, Browr., c1979. uil, 484 p., (1( leai of plntes : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes indexes. Bibliography: p. te7-465. 111D58.7.G35J 78- 2:6d5 IJB S 0-316-30331 J: 16.95 l. Orramzanona/ feha.ioc 2. Organization 1 ,Sfamgemene 1. Tiele.
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~ ABSTRACTS ~_--------- (.aborororr hmrdbno4 oJchrnrnara<rnphir ond aflird nrr+hn.B. edited by D. Ntikes. Ellis Horwood, Chicessar, 1979. 764 pp., price L 3S.50, iSnN 0.3531?-050-3. This book deals with laboratory methods of separming all kinds of matarials, from pseous hydroearbons and inoreanie ions to annbody-producin¢ cells. The methods include adsorption column, ion-enchange, gel. afnnity, paper, and thin-layer ehromatopnphy, eouncer-eurrenc distribution- and electrophoresis. The editor of this rolumr- O. hlikei. has been remarkably successful in melding the contributions of 14 authors into a book which reads as if it had been written by a sin_le author. This is- in no small part due to the superb translation by 2. Prochiska. As editor and trans- lator, 1 can apprenats: quality and say without fear of contradiction that this is one of the two best books on the subject. After an introductory chapter on the fundamental types of chromatography by Mi4e1 and a list of s)mbots used in this work, 7. NosSk presents a brief and lucid chapter on the theory of ehromatocraphy. The chapcen dealinx aith the chromaso- Iraphic methods are written by research.chemists in the various institutes of the Cxechoslos-ak Academy of Sciences. Each chapter contains a historical introduction, an «ptanation of the principles and techniques with uell-chosen pictures of matarials- and equipment. and a few selected applications to a broad raner of problems, fol- bwed by a list of references. The chapter on eounter-currcnt distribution by 2. Prochiz4a contains details of various discontinuous and continuous methods. Z. Prusik's chapter on electromigration methods deals with moving boundary eiectro- phoresis as well as the various zone-electrophoretic methods and conuins sections nn isosachophotesis and isoelectrie focusine, and e<amples of applications to proteins, aueleic acids, and tEFr constituents. The work ends with lists of books and journals in the separation sciences and of British sources of laboratory equipment and materials, and finally, a rery Food subjecs index. 1 am tqin, to think of sonse neeasise aspccts of this monorraph to temper my praiu of iq but I find is difficull. Perhaps I should xarn the neophyte that the authors have attempted to coser a laree area uniformly and uncrilically, and therefore. eome of thrir material is of nore historical and didaaic than practical caluc. Finally, i also feel that the paper and bindine of this valuable book will probably not stand up to thc extensi.e use a is bound to see. Berkrlry, CelrJ. (U.S..1.) ERICH HER)IA?? Journal of Chromatography - July 11, 1979 v. 175, no. 1, p- •21 HIGHLY STABLE AND SENSITIVE THERMAEROSOL DETECTOR FOR THE ANALYSIS OF PHOSPHORUS- AND NITROGEN-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS Brazhnikov, V. V. et al nsotlutcals(1n5 to IncrnlioniC t1ClCclors I1:Prc WntC Iinlit:niun5 JSxuCifllCS1 lsith a COtltiidCrdb!C lJCfsdI7sICI1CC Of tI1C SCI111111'lt)311t1 rC(sl.!ucibilily of thc dctcnor op.rr tiun on Ihe Ilolt-rtttc of hyslroccni air and canncr eclc, r;lpid cth:m.tion of the aIl.ali r•.lctal xtll wurcc and the Jilficulty, ol'rcplacinc onc salt by another. The proposcd Ihcrmacrocol detector makcs it possiblc to alf+id thc,a linlitations. The c!laract.ristics of the detector antl cnamplcs of its application to Utt anaFysis of pcaticidds arc pro- xcntcd. VOL. 9, No. 12, SENrr 2L 1979 I
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I NEWS BRIEFS TOBACCO ~ ;; ~1 ;.: August 10, 1979 ' v. 181, no.. 16, p. 25 :' Hershel Carroll has been promoted to manager of Chewing Tobaccos for Lorillard. He will be respon- - sible for national marketing of .?e the company's tobacco chewing products. ~ Carroll, who joined Lorillard as a sales representative in 1949, was previously a field manager for _-, Lorillard.-.He has also served as division manaaer in Jackson, Miss., Birmingham, Ala., and At- lanta. Hershel Carroll k 7 77 77^ "':...I . _.fS.rr r.-.: .. - : .. ~"~"~` tr ~.~~i~k r ; 'TOM ..~ . , 1 .tf a Nature August 30, 1979 .v. 280, p. 715 Carcinogen data criticised: In an editorial in the Journal of the American '%[cdical Association, the editor, Dr William Barclay, eriticises scientific reports of carcinogens and the tests on which they are based. He accuses the media of encouraging "the ehicken little phenomenon", heightening public anxiety by a constant barragc of news stories citing substances in general u se as earcinogens, based on evidence which "is often tenuous and unconfirmed". Dr Barclay also castigates the methods of testing these substances, on the grounds that dosages used often exceed any that man might be exposed to. He also claims that the results Of tests are finally evaluated by "persons of questionable axpcrtise in the ficld of tumour histopalhology". NoL. 9, Nor 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 .ADVERTISING AGE September 3, 1979 p. 21 . '° "' 'SEAGRAI4 TOPS RJR IN tIAGAZINE ADS ' .: NEW YORK-For the first time -. S C Ld b •; thisyear.eagramo.t.ecame '.'.`the leading magazine advertiser in •.Jthhddi ~-une, a mon w•err a expen- ~tures rose 14% and ad pates X climbed 590. Second-place R.J. . Reynolds Industries had held the di lead in four of the five preceng <months. -. : ..1. . . .. , c, -: :; " These figures represent a sharp ~increase over May when there were no page gains and expenditures in- -: creased by only G`7a . ;.AIl of the top 10 advertisers in. ~ ` creased their magazine budgets: ; Seagram by 33%. Reynolds by 239e, •--and third-place Philip Morris by :~19%. :.... . .~.•,~.~.-.,..,. . ..- Despite a 64^ increase over last . June. General Atotors Corp. slip- -~ ped from second to fourth place. --!CeneralFoodsCorp.heldontothe ;~fifth slot with a 46% magazine ' spending hike. - - _ s.s American Brands, which in- creased ereased spending 11%, moved from eighth to sixth place; B.A.T. Indus-. -- tries, with an 81% increase-the ;largest of the top 10 advertisers- ~•, retained seventh place and biggest advertiser Procter & Gamble slid _- from sixth to eighth place, with an .18% spending increase. Loews Corp. retained the No. 1n iid spot afterncreasing magazne a- vertising by 8% and newcomer .. Kraft Inc. moved into ninth spot with a 2i^r increase, replacing the U.S. Government. . ~ -' . Cigarets and tobacco moved into ' the top category spot after boost- ' ing magazine spending 259o. Auto- ~motive.whichhadpacedtheficlda . month earlier, slipped to fourth- -place and trimmed magazine spending 5!'r. Second place beer, wine and liquor advertisers in- creased spending 27%. and third ., place toiletries and cosmetics in- - creased their allowances 26%. ~ 'Ninth-place drugs and remcdics. a .~netccomer to the list, hiked spend- ~ ing the most: i-I :r. Data in the accompanying chart rQ was compiled by the.Leading Na- N tiunal Advertisers for the Pub GGG~- lishers Information Bureau and J!l111 :An\'FHTISINC At:E. # .
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;ABSTRACTS 191. BARDELL D. Infecticity titers of adenovirus type 5 suspensions after exposure to cie-r- relte smoke. Appl. erviron. Microbiof., 1978, 36-5, p. 774-5. Suspensions of adenovirus type 5 in 2.0 ml of cell culture fluid at 37•C were subjected to smoke from four cigarettes over a 4-h period. The cigarettes were-smoked in a normal manner, and the inhaled smoke was exhaled through glass tubing into the virus-containing fluid. The virus suspensions were then titrated, using monolayer cultures of HEp-2 cells. Smoke from -filter-tipped or regular cigarettes caused a 2 to 3-log drop in titer of tissue culture infectious doses of adenovirus type 5 per 0.1 ml of virus suspension. No reductions in titers were observed with parallel suspensions of the virus subjected to normal inhaled and exhaled air. AuOtor's Summary. 192 DCDLEY D.L., AtcklN NI., ,SLIRT/N CJ. Cigarette smoking in a chest clinic. Population psychophysiologic variables. J, psychosom. Res., 1971, 21-5. p. 367-73. The primary variables associated with the capacity to stop smoking are : good psy- choso^ial assets. psychologic stability and the ability to express depression openly. The studv is consistent with the hypothesis that patients with high psychosocial assets have several behaviors to substitute for that of smolinz. These patients are psycho- logically stable and their psycholooic com- fort is not seriouslY threatened if they need to stop smoking. Smoking may be a learned behavior associated with an in- crease in comfort and capacity to deal with the problems of licin_^_. To some patients who lure difficulty in adapting , the dangers of sniokin^ mav not oun.ei^h the certain loss in abilit_v to deal taith the immediate environment if they stop. From Authors' Summary. VoL, 9, No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 193 Gonl G.B., LYNCH C.J. . Toward less hazardous cigarettes : current advances. l. Atner. mcd. Assoc., 1978. 2a0-12, p. 1253A. The critical levels of selected components of cigarette smoke : CO. NO., HCN and acrolcin, are expressed in the form of the maximum amounts of pre-1950 cigarettes a smoker can smoke per day scithout appre- ciably increasing his risk of dcine compar- cd with a non-smoker. These levels are re- lated to the -yiclds of 27 present day fow tar and nicotine commercial cigarettes, ac- cording to the mcasurcments rriade by the Oak Ridge Laboratory. In addition,thc yields of these selected components corresponding to a yield of I mg nicotine are ei.cn, to act as a^uide for smokers %cho adiust their smoking habits to absorb a given amount of nicotine each day. 195 HCBF.R G.L., SORNBER6ER G.C., VIdHA- : JAY V.ka1. - Impairment of alveolar ntacrophage bactericidal function by cigar smoke. Bull. Eur. Physioputhol. rcsp., 1977, 13-4, p. 513-21. The addition of 2, 4 or 8 ml fresh cigar or ci^_arette smoke to a culture of rat alveolar maerophaees (obtained by broncho- .pulmonary .eashin^_) procressively hindered ! lhe bactericidal action of macropha_es to ~ Staphylococcus albus. Aged smoke also'hindered bactericidal actiJiev of the macro- phaces. The filtrated ^as phase of cigar or• eiearette smoke still hindered the antibac- terial action of macrophaccs whereas fil- :tration bv bubbling throu8h .eatcr removcd the toxic component from both cicar and 'eicarette smoke. Therefore, it is a hvdro- soluble fraction of fresh cigar (or eiearctte) smoke that would be cetotosic to alecofar macropha:es.
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The Greensboro Record ` Auqust 27, 1979 p. C1 LOEWS SAYS IT WAtdTS HOTEL BID " ' Martha ' odall W • c , Officials from the Loews Corp:, a New York-based International conglomerate, Wednesday announced they .~~.:eant to build the hotel portion of the city's proposed ;.. ieonvention center complea. .., ,~ ," ; .. .•. l' Sanford Freedman, executive vice presidentof_~-': ' Loews said toda that he ho es to be ablee to unveil p , y ~a "complete hotel package" proposal to city officials , : 'toon after Labor Day. ' .,.- -. ....• .. ~ . , t "We want Greensboro, if Greensboro wants us," Freedman said today. .,•. I .. , . . The t.oews Corp operates major hotels here and 'abroad and is the parent company of Greensboro's P. - Lorillani Tobacco Co . . , " .•. . . . • t Meanwhile, Mayor Tun Melvin said-today be ea- •peMs consultants will be ready to recommend a down- town iown site for the convention center complex by early ne:t week. Melvin said be will schedule a special City Council meeting to act on such a recommendation. Conceding that citizens have many unanswered ;questlons about the convention center proposal, includ- ,tng its locatioo. Melvin added, _ We would plan on - : . • .. . : -- . . .. 'dearing that up immediately." 'Since the city's proposal to liusld a $7.5 miltion con- . ;vention center and parking garage is contingent on lin- ; ing up a major hotel chain to build a privately financed, - 'attached 350-room hotel, the Loews announcement is : viewed as a major boost to the city s plans. : -Freedman confumed city offcials' assertions thit there are several major hotel chains interested in build- ling the downtown hotel He said Greensboro would rhave no trouble liniog up a hotel opentor and predicted '; that the hotels may compete for Greensboro's favors it- :.the city passes a f7-5 million bond issue to•pay for the ' ` mnvention center Oct 9..• "I think that to a great estent, the race will belong .•;to the swiftest," Freedman said in explaining the fu•rn's - ' dedsion to make its plaru publie. , .... _ : ; „ .. ! •tYeedman said tbat Loews' interest in Greensboro ` was created by Lorillard Co. officials and predates the :cty's convention center announcement• However, the corporation's interests were sharpened by the conven- ...,_- .. ..• _prospects. - ,.', . . ~ . n tion center . . - . _.. . ..: ._ _ .. "We're basing all our work on the- -premise that the bond issue will be ap proved and the convention center built," he said. Loews Hotels, a sudsidiary of Loews , Corp., operates 15 major hotels, several ;of which-are convention-type facilities. ,The hotels are located In New York, iLondon, Washington, and elsewhere. ! The fims recently opened a 900-room ho- ~ tel in Dallas aeross from the huge Trade Mart• Freedman agreed that Greensboro Is less ezotic than any of 1•oews' other ho- tel iootions• _- , . • -. . 1VoL. 9. NO, 12. SEPT. 2L 1979 _- , ; would contaln a high quality restaurant ; and coffee shop. - - ,. - ~.- Freedman said thatbe does not view .. Koury Imperial Corp.'s plans to build i convention center at the Holiday Inn- ~~1Fout Seasons as a threat and questioned ' . f whether it will be built• ~ i• Informed of Freedman's comments today, Joe Koury, president of Koury. I Corp. repGed, "I've got doubts whether- ' I his $55-a-night singles will fly in Greens- boro either. He can plan his own project and we can take care of oun." CMelvin today noted that he has spoken .'1 to Loews officials by telephone on at j least four occasions since the city an- rnounced its convention center proposal , I July 26. He said he has told them and' t other hotel operators that the cil-y will ' not be able to discuss a hotel deal until . .~ after the Oct. 9 referendum. . ~ j`."Our job will be to strike the best eco- ~ nomic deal for our citizens," he said. I•'We want to be put in a position of ;. i strength on this thing. We're not taking :'1 the first offer that comes along by any 'Ishakes Wednesday the city a project picked ~i up more backing when the Greater - . Greensboro Merchants Association voted :" to support both the city's project and the. Holiday Inn expansion. The association's 23-member board said city voters should approved the $7•5 million bond sale• 1 Meanwhile, another hotel chain. Mar- i i riott Corp.; said it has reassessed the -"' market potential of the Triad and is ex- ploring ploring the prospects for locating a hotel , In Greensboro, WinstonSalem or High : Poinl . , .- . : :- . .. -j -Tim Aho, an executivein the corpon- ,Uon's hotel development division in Be- - Jthesda, Md., said results of a :- preliminary study suggests that Marriott could succeed if favorable financing ',could be arranged. . . . ~'•I think ith fair to say we'd Wre to put a hotel in the Triad," Aho said. "We -haven't homed in on specific sites ••. . ' We're probably a couple of months away from that." ... _._ . -•_ - . . "We're concentrating on finding some 'key sites in the United States," Freed- man said. "With with the dollar dectin- ing in Europe and air fares going up, : we've done an about-face in the last six to eight months•" . . . Since many of the major American ei- ;ttes have enough hotels, the corporation ;has been looking at smaller cities. I
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,ABSTRACTS ~-- ---- REH)1. Thomas 0. 389'.152'02166 SI lW AICAE : a guidc for the implementation of the international system of units by the chemical tngineerinr, profession I sponsored by the AIChE htetncauon Committee ; prepared by - Thomm R. Rchm. New York : American Institute of Chemical Engineers, c1979. iii. I1 p. 29 em. Includcs biblioeraphical references. P139.R33[ 79-112032 ISB~ pbk.: 6.00 J. Cherninl en5inecnng. 2 AJUnc system. l Americanlnstirure of Chemical Engincctz Mebxaton Commirtee. IJ. Title. PARKI\SON, Cynl 658.4'5 - Nonhcme. 1909. Communicate : Parkinson i formula for business sursrcal I C. Northcme Parkinson and Nigel Rowe. London ; Eng!ewood Cliffs N.J. • PrentlcelHall Imernalional, 1978, c1977. xi, 205 p 23 cm. (HD30.3.P31 1978] 7 9-30819 8 ISBN P13-153+60-2 : 9.95 1. Communicstion in maneremen[ d Rowe, A'igel, 19a0-)Omt author JJ. ?itfa - GREGORY. James, 1949. 608'.7 2'he patent book : an illustrated guide and history - for inventors. dcsignen, and dreamers- I by James Grceory and Kcvin Mulligan. New York : A&. W Publishcrs. 1979. 126 p. : in. ; 29 cm. (T215.G7J 78-68388 ISBN 0-89<79-037-a : 1295 - !. Patenv. 2. Jnventions. l lnsrnrors- Biornphy L SJulligan. A-enn, joint author. l/. Title. BOGARD, Morris R. 658.4'S The manareri sry/e book : communication skills to improve your performance 1 Morris R. BoFard. Englewood Cliffs. N.J. : Prentice-Hal1, e1919. p. em. (A Spectrum book) Includes biblioeraphical references and index. rHDiJ3.B6a) 79-10766 ISBN 0-133a9203-I : 0.95 ISBN 0-13-5a9196-7 pbk.: 4.95 1. Commum'casion in manaament L Ti11e. GOOD. Richard. 6911114,09 Ritches in colour /(by] Richard Good. Paole : Blandford Press- 1978. 218 p- : ill. (chitsly col) ; 20 cm. Includes indexes. BibliograpAy: p. 207- 208. [TS5a2.G66 1978] 79-307671 9.95 J. Cloc/s and watches-Jfistdy. L Title. Distnbuted by Stcrling Fub. Co. Two Park Ave., New York, NY 10016 VOL. 9, No. 12, SEpre 21, 1979 MOREAU, Claude. 615.9'51'92 Moulds. tavhsL and food / Claude Sloreau ; Iranslated with additional malerial by MauAte Moss. Chichester. (EnS.) ; New York : Rilcy, c1979, a. 477 p. dl. ; 24 cm. 'A R'iley- fnterscience publication' Translation of Moisissures tnaioues dans I'alimentatmn. Includes indexes. Biblia_araphv: p. [320J-a58. [QgR~ .F6S16713/ 78-8115 ISBN 0-471-99681-5 I. Food po/snniny Z Mycotosina-Toxicology. ). Sfoulds (Boony) 4. Vrtcnnary mycoiogy. 1. Title. RUDU'ICK, Bernard H. 65g.7-032 Solvin_r msnaeement Oroblems : a systems approach to planning and control / Bernard H. Rudwick. New York : Wiley, [1979J p. cm. (Wilcy series on systems -engineenng and analysts) 'A Wilev-Intencience publication.' Inciudes tndex. (HDSI.R796) 78-23266 ISBN 0- I71-0aa6-3 : 28.95 L bfanarement-Case studies. 2. S,vstem - analysis-GaSe studics. 2 ,Sfanarz.r.ent informations sysrem-Case studies. 4. Proc!em solving-Case studies. L T.•ile. DO\ALD, Archibald 65g.a'032 Gordon. Afanatemen4 information, and r_estems / by Archie Donald. 2d cd. Oxford ; New York : Pergemon Press, 1919. p. cm. (Pegamon internanonal library of science, sechnology, ensineering, and social studies) Includes inden. Biblioeraphy: p. (HD31.D565 19781 78-40631 JSB\ 0-08-021271-9 : 20.00 ISBN 0-08-021270- 0 pbk.: 10.00 1. bftnagement J. Title. LANCASTER. Frederick 029.7 K'i!fnd. 1933- lnlnrmaoon «trinal slstems : charactcristics, tesdng, aod evaluation / F- 0.'ilfrid Lancaster. 2d ed. \ew Ybrk : Kiley- c19799 avlii, 381 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. (Information scicnces series) -A 5{'iiey- Interxicr.ce publication.' Includes index. Bibliocr:ahv: P 359-373. /Z699.L35 1979) 78- ' 1078 ISBN 0-471,0a673-6: 18.95 1. Inlmmnnon storage and rcrnaval sysrems. L Tirle. f
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,ABSTRACTS - - American Review of Respiratory Disease August 1979 v. 120, no. 2, p. 305 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEid THE SINGLE BREATH N TEST AND AGE, SEX, AND SMOKING HABIT IN THREE NORTH AMERICAN CITIES Buist, A. S. et al This report daprilse.s a collabontire study conducted in \[ontreal• Canada. Portland, Ore.• and Winnipeg. Canada. to establish the relatio/lships between the single-breath N, test and agc. sex, aud smoking and to detemine the pre.alrnce of functional abnormalities in these populations. In nousmnken, age-reiated regreesions for closing sohlmc. closiug capacity, and the slope of phase III obtained from the single-bTealh \., test. plu9 the ratio of the 1-s forced expiratory rolume tn the forced vital capacity had +'erl'similar slopes, su-~;estilsg that dilfercuces in geographic location. cli- mare• air pollutioss. and occupalion had Ilo clfect on lung function detectable by these tests. Among the 6 cityjsex groups there was no scstematic difference in the prevalence of functional abnormali- tia betwrell the cities, hut closing capacitg expresacd as a percentage of total lung capacity was abnormal most often iu men and the slope of the ahenlar plateau Wat abnnrmal most ofteu in s.om- en. The preulenc< of respiratorr scmptoms within di/feteut smoking caleporics s.as similar in the 3 cities. Although the number of cigarettes smoked had a significant effect on every test except Ihe ratio of the I-s forced expintorq solume to forced vital capacitv in Inen• the effect of agg scas con- siderablv greater than the effect of smnl:ing• and the doxaesponse rclauionship l.as weak. We con- eludc that additional factors mar iuteraci with smoking ta place a smokcr-at risk of doctlopin, cllronic airflow limiutiou. 'Advertising Age September 6, 1979 p. 3 INDEX TO MARKETING REPORTS Ct+rKnt 1.9e eemprrr - hge ARCSx ............... 2 Aqeno-CJetrCo. ....... 3 AmereanAn4nes ........ 4 AmercanBran65 ........ 4 AnrrK]nCYdnansaCO. ... 10 ATCr<anE.pwCO. .... tt MnHKan Npny AcOrLrsCprp. .......- 14 Amereanr.orrpa r.bbr Co. . 16 ArnersankbrorsCOrp. .... 20 Amercan Te<pnart f TNtorapnCO. ......... 20 Anneustr.eusrn ......... 24 AronAOpucB .......... 26 BAT YpusUw ......... te 9easceFOUOSCU. ....... 32 eeecnamGmup ......... a2 Baw.n kre . ............. 33 36 &o.n.FOnnan pslsesCOro......-... ao CeStc ............... all tiR[InINn]DpnY ........ 51 CamypeaSnupCD. ....... 52 Cama:enCO. ........... N CrYUdorqr.PaN f ..... 5/ CWr54rCUG...........• Se Cbro.CO . .............. 66 cora-cer,Cn. .......... To Cdpilt-PalnplnNr~•o_ . ]1 Consq.WteU FpuaaCay. . 75 lbe.aarunes ........... 76 DuPon[ ................ 75 EasrernArtrnes ......... 78 Easrmanrlooa.CO. ...... ]9 Esmarvlrc . ............. an E..onCwp ............ e2 Fo•or.brorCp. .......... ea GeneruElearaCa. ...... 66 GenerNFOOpsCwp ...... 92 Generu ra+s . .. _ .... .. . 9a Gener.v/.!api Cwp. ..... 94 G•rleneCo. ...........•• 99 GrerrrourWCUrY. ........ 10, GJI.rbSemMGOV~s .. lea H J Nena Cp ........... 10e 1Mu0:rnYK. .._....... s0t/ M<rnarnnir rellproM {Tert9rapnCdD. ...... 109 J[N.ssn+aJpnnson ...... llo SCJOVrwn65m..-.•• Its Kma•ICOrp. ............ 112 CemWnr FaA Kerb9gCO . ............. 112 Ksmpmlr'ClarkCorp. ..... 114 Knh rnc . . ....... ..... .. I l6 t.yge!tfiroup ......-.... 117 lqewsCOrp. ............ 11e MCAInc . ............... 119 Manrnc . ............... 120 Mantlrnc. ......._ ...., 12, McOonalesCOro- .....-.. 122 MJesLaOOramuts ...... 123 MoolCOrg ............. 12+ Rrn•o n•oros rnc. . .. .. .. . . 126 Mor';nYOnrnwo.'ucls .... 1$ Napscalnc . ............ 12e Nesl~e EnorC•.ses . ...... 129 N4sdn61DWrCOrp ....... 13n sbnnam vnd-osCOro- .... 130 Nonpn$~monlM ........ 132 No.esLOrD ............ 134 J.C PennerCa ......... laa Peos~Carnc . ............ 13s Poaeru•s . .............. 136 15, PoraroaCoro .......... 13e Aouer a GJ•noe Cp. ..... l3e t7uase.Oars Ca. ......... IaD 'VOLr 9. ND. 12, SEPTr 21, 1979 1 Canwnr RCACOrp . ............. Rakron Pu.m Co. ..... .. aa9e lat 1a3 Re.bn Inc. ....... _ .... 1a3- R.J.ReyMlCSlndusvYf .. 14 RSharUSOn.r.!errlll . ...... A.R Roo•nsCG. ......... 145 146 a Scnenn9Pbu4^Corp . .. 146 JDf SCnMZ2/ewrngCO. ... 147 xon Vaxr Co. ... .. .... 149 Sea•s aoeoucrr6 Cn. .... 1ae 149 $mnnq.eCOrp ........ 5guooCuro .......... la9 150 Slartlam9ranps ........ 151 SraungOru9 Cu. ........ 152 TxM rnf . . . .. .......... 152 ~ Tcro!ar.b[arCU ........ T 15] 0 TanslvunpCprp. .._.... 15a UALN= ............... 15t 0 Umlera . . 1 55 ~ Unrpr,Careb.CorY U S Gorem-raM .. ...~.. . ..... 153 156 SQ VOlel.' a'Ifn Or ATlrGI . 15r W warntrCOmm~suons .. warr..•r.tarnxn GJ. ~...... wm Wr.g~tvJr CD. ...... t5a l$e leo W
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DIALOG Illeat CA SfARCM 77-70/VOL 91(00( (Ceor. Aw, Cnew. Soc.) (lule 37 of 00( URar1906 264009 CAU91oTCS7o70v fu7:,tto /lavorant At~lnur: nlf,tYl, faku,Ot MIADw/, VOICnIt KolYal, MOCOrV luCatiat: J.+Udn Serliun: CAOIt0U7 Publ Cln:el PAT ' rnal: Jan• TohMyn Munn C40en: JAXXAD Publl 790330 Poyuu. 6 oP. Wn0u10e: Jaoan i.0ent r•u: 70 065]9 Apul ie Not •]J/1A0669 Oatel 741227 C101S: A21103/17 A•.fi0nrr: J.+Pd~l TnUaccO antl Sall Public COrb. lu:nllliert: tubaccu Ilovoranl, nornlCotlne fructafe tobecce Ila.ornnl CA09101050907v Scrrenln9 OI nonnn.+Y on0 rel,teC vOlellle f1a.Or canaounOa Gn Ine Clrmle•.llm~ cf 10 LofeflS af .CeU •.Y[O fu:nm•: f~rn.:~, n,UV~ra C.; lantPnr, Orra10 R. lncalluo: Plant G,s. nea. to0., Scl. EUuC. AOm., RaOerlCk, MD, ]Ii01, USe Sv[liOnt CAnG:057 Puol Cleffl JUVRNAL JJVrnal: J. foua Crelen: JAFCAU Publt 79 Ser~rt: ]/ Ivn,: 4 P,+yus: 0]G-J] Iccntln ees: tal .eQa sleU Oeroinet/Un, volatlle coboo .rrJ LeeU Orrmin,.tlon OSE6I000 7]6 0
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LIPSTRACTS -- Chemistry and Industry- July 21, 1979 p. 476 IDENTIFICATION OF AMINES AND AMINO ACIDS AS THEIR FLUORESCAMINE DERIVATIVES BY FIELD DESORPTION MASS SPECTROMETRY Murray, Keith E. Ingles, David L. 'Fluorescamine (i) is a relatively new reagent nfiich reacts specifically aith primary amines to form hi;hly fluorescent derivatives Such reaction is usually achieved in aqueous buffer at pH 8-9 by rapid addition of Iluorescamine in acetone solution. The resultant fluorphor exists in solution - as the sodium salt of (11). The reagent may be used to deri3atise amines both bcfore3.4 and after resolution by chrontato_craphy.= H.p.l.c. separation of fluorescamine deri'atites (Na- salt form) has been achieved on both reverse phase3 and normal phctse` silica gel columns and the methods have been applied to the analysisofbiologicalsamples - - The authors have developed h.p.l.c. and t.l.c. procedures for the separation of fluorescamine derivatives of amines in foods 6 In both methods the derivatives are separated- ehromatocraphically as their ammonium salts or as the lactone forms (111). The complexity of an7ine mixtures from - foods has demonstrated a need for unequivocal identification of the sept[rated components. The use of mass spectrometry- particularly field desorption mass spectrometry (FD-A1S)?g of the Iluorescamine derivatives is being explored for this purpose. ~I.ass spcctra of fluorescaminc derieati.es of some an7ines and amino acids in electron in7pact".tu and ne^_ativc chemical ionisation modestl have been reported. FD-\tS has been applied to the analysis of the bansyl derivatives of dopamine and some of its metabolitesl' and FD spectra of some underivatised biortenic antines have been recordetU3 i BAKER, R.R. Environmental conditions inside a burning cigaretle. In: Analytical calorimetry d:193-202. Edited by R. S. Porter and J. F. Johnson. New York, Plenum Press. 1977. This paper discusses the results of studies pertainine to I the interior of the combustion coal of a ciearette, together ~ with studies on the pyrolysis of tobacco in smsll furnacea. 1677 'VoLa 9, INTERNATIONAL 616.8'65'0019 Smoking Conference. Susses, Eng.. 1977. Smokin-e 6chavmur phssiological and Wcholo;ical m0ucntes I edima bv Raymand E. . omtnn. Edinburrh ; New York : Churchill Llvingstone ; New York : distnbutcd by Longman, 1978. 405 p. : ill. ; 21 cm. "This kboo is the result of the International SmaGn6 Behadour Conference held at Chelwooa Vachery, Sussec, Eneland, in November 1977." Includes bubliocrapnical aferences and index. IBF209.N52156 19711 78-40889 ISBN 0-4+3- 01815-s :a5.00 1. Smo[in-e-Pslrholqeical aspecu-Congrtssea 2. Smoiing-Phlsialnercal eOrrr-Congresses. L Thomtun. Raymond t. 11. Tirle. ;NAHAS. Gabriel G., 615.9'52'3961 1920- Keep off thr Brass : a scientific enquiry into the biolocical effects of marijuana I Gabriel G. Kahas. Osford ; New York : Pergamon Press, 1979, e1978. p. em. (Perpmon iniernational library of science, technaloey. enzineerin8, and social studies) Precious <d. published by Readeis Dixest Press, New York, 1976. Includee index. Biblloeraphv: p. (RA12c2 CI7N33 1979) 78- e117D ISB\ 0-08-0 7 3 7 7 9-7 : 14.00 ISBN 0-08- oI37S0-0 pbk. : 9.50 1. dfannuana-To.sicolccy. 2. :Sfanhuana- . Phvsio/onnl dkct J. .Slinhuana-Ph)sioingical tl/ecr-Researrh. L Title. UNITED Nations. 300'-8 s Conference on Trade and Development. Secraanat. ,SLvlcrrqe and disni5urinn nf to6uccu : study 1 rrpred by the UNRpD Secretnrint. 1\ew R'ork) : United \atmns, 1978. 166 p. in various paeines : ill. ; 30 cm. ((Document) - United Nations - TD/B/C.11205) At head of tule: United Nstians Conference on Trade and De.eloCmcnt. Trade and Development Board, Commutee on Commodities. 'United Nations gubhunon. Soles no. E. 78.II.D.13.' Includes a iblmu:pnr. 1151977.A2 TD/B/C.U:051 380.1':1' 311 79-101662 10.00 1. Tobacco nunuGcture and trade. L United tatians. Cnnb-rcnce on Trade and Dcvclopment. CoMmnrce on Commndures. 1/ 7itR. Il! Stries: L'niteJ.\'ationt Document; TDr'B/Cl/10iI r
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LaB STRACTS . r_ LEL'ITT. Paul M.• GDRALNICK, Elissa S.. KAGAN, A. Roben. and GILBERT. Haney. The Cancer Reference Book: Direct and Clear AnsWers to Ever.one's Qunttens. Pp.211. ISBN~0.7092-W62-1. INe.v York and London: PaddsnFlon Pras. Lrd.. 1979.) E4.95. RATHE R. L. 3. The Gmnis o! fanttr: a Smdy in she Hlsmry af Ideas. Pc. dii i 362. ISaN-0-i018-7103-7.ITEe Johni Houuins Un..asny Press. 197N.: [I2.25. . KAY. Ned bt. The InnmaunB Firm: a IkhaHouuI Thco.y orCmooratv R & D. Pn.a•-2M. ISON.OJJ]-2J1ebtl.ILonuon and Baunl'atolr: The \lacmnlan Prcu. Ltd.. 1919) .u2. O'CALLAGHAV, Paul W. IN.1 Eneray ror Indunry. IA Cnllrnian of Scnmi6e anA Enyn<nml Pann Ceneernea .nn UuLUnr Eneay ~;n ]la.imum Effunnp m InCUUp.I P4ur. all. ISB%UUaaIITw.X. lOsford ana 6w York: PerPmon Prns. 19'9.1 C5. DAY, Robert A. Ho. to P'rim and Publish a Scienrific Paper. Pp.xi.160. ISBV089.w3-006-1. (Phdadelphia. Penn.: ISt Prrss- a Division of the Innilute fur Scrcnmsc Informatron. 197Y.1 Cloth 51 k Papcr 58.95. Potential Industrial Carcinogens and Mutagens. Series: Studles in Environmental Science 4. Lawrence Fishbein. New York: Elsevler/ ' North-Holland. Inc.. 1979. 534 pp. 566.75. Methods for Caranogenesis Tests at the Cellular Level and fheir Evaluation tor the Assessmenl ol Occupational Cancer Haa2rds. Mdano: Carlo Erba Foundation, 1978. 188 op. Free. Address for free eopy: Carlo Erba Foundation. Occupabonal and Environmental Health Section. Via Crna del Duca. 8. 20122 r•ldano. Italy. Proceed,ngs ol the Meetrng ol the SCsentdic Commntee on Occupalional and Envnonmen- lal Health. Milan 4 lo 6. December 1977. VoLe 9, Noe 12, SEPTe 2L 1979 RYL\S7DER, Paul Nels, 117'.23 1920- Card)mc hrdrogenarion in organie syntheses I Paul N. R)'lander. Nevr York : Academic Press, 1979. p. cm. Includcs biblmeraphies. LQD:SI.H8R89J 79-9711 ISBN 0.12-605355•3 : ,1.00 .1. Hydropenuion. 1. CatalFis 2 Cbemisrr3l Or,.nic-Synthesai L Title. DESATNICK, Robert L 6583 The erpanding role of the human rnources mannaer / Robert L Desamict. So, York : ASIdCO51, e1919. p. cm. Includes indea. (HF5519.Df37sJ 79-12496 ISBN 0.81J:-3528-X : 15.95 1. Personnel directors 2. Personnel managtmen6 i I. Tir7e. . STREIT\UTTER, Cer.e A. 001 67'01 Sf6'ru?rrrrsmrs : thenrv and applications 2 Gene A. Slmumaueq Yitu Finre. Resmn, Va. : Reslon Pub. Co., c1979. ax. 456 p. :: ill. ; 25 cm. Includes index. Blbliozr-.piv: p. fJ3-+J5. fQA76.5.S783J 18-31e66 ISBN 0-8359.a37P2 : 15.95 L Sfiooprocessors.-1. Fiorq L'ito, 1945. joint author. I/. Titlc. KOTTER, 3ahn P., 1917- 658.4- Posser in mana¢ement / John P. Kotlcr. New York c A\fACON, c1979. 105 p. : ill. ; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. rHD38.F:64] 78-31558 ISBN 0.81;i-S507•7 : 9.95 1. Management. 2. Power (Social xier.ces) /. Titlr. OXENFELDT. Alfred 658.403 Richard, 19I7- Cost-benefit anabtix for executive decision malicg : the dan¢erof plain common sense / Alfred R. OacnfddL NeW Yotk : A)SACOSI, e1979. p. cm. Includes index. IHDi0.23.095J 79d4617 ISBN 0-811d-5J90-9 : 2195 1. Occision•mzEing. 2. Cost el7ecti.cr.esa /. Title.
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DIALOG E/le•I: CA SEAIION ))-)9/VOl 911/01 (COOr. As• Cnew. SoC.I (Item 30 a/ 40) Uco1906 t16e0)9 CxG•/ICOaCUAt•Jt </lvr,l. o/ nlcullno bn InnlnntJllan In 1.0 rCt A•tlYOr: CnrJ, J• P.: 1.1110,11, , J. A. l ual,un: 5tn. mco.. h:.lyuo Stnte Unlv•, Oetrull, N1, e0]01, USA Sucllon: CA0U1005, C:•00•1%xR PuUI CIP.e: JOURNAL J.u•'n.il: G/ol. Ra•rN. CY.IVn: lIREGV PuDli )p $e,.•:: 23 3 P.pea: .!)-0 ' luantll•cr:: nlcoanP cmervo Imolantatlon CA09109COU1•tIF n,•Ie,,cr Inuucee pv nl<otm,le Pponl.te , A„Inar: l.a//ellwli, N. lo,:•a IM~ Pnor,~:J~ol. Ina•, Unlv, NJ/nl, RJlnl, FeU• RPC• Ger. ' S/a lon: CJOGtU00 Puul Clnsa: CONF POOC J.•irnJl: ll..lra:c CauPanol,n••ine: Jorenerdlt Neuronl Cotlenf iCf\:0 ' PVY1: ]9 P.r,.•'.: ))5']DI PwYllslqr: rrlq,nnon ,1Jdrass: O./er0, Enpl A.J11: P,Ilcn, UJViC M tu;ntllmrs: rorlu+ nKOnnlc aponla catecnolanlne !99 w D n n ;o D z .0 U) ~ v;. ~ : m w ~ -~ w D -~ ~ P6ebT000 0
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NEWS BRIEFS ' .eRRTqRC.CLfnn .•. I . Cre.{ M4~L X« Y,r.-[,.. ' ::.a.wvw.-~sa..n•-. _. ..: ' w e„~a t.. M.. r..a-n.....~ ; r...,r_,.. t-.;. ~.. . {•;',• LS,.rMA.•nrwN.X«YN-«~.sar ~-Y/,.vY w M.R,we W,u--LU.A1M. ; r. Y..+... ' pMwY-xJl•,~ J.Y«,.. J„1 YN C«. w,..,. ' MC..4,WC.-X«YM-X«ynr.OY •. ` c.r....,.....-c..ra. M.wr..s+r,~. "IAEWSaIOrCLs ~~11ARR[TI%G RRLOMX[L :~:,..._..~..... _ Y Cw.w.Iw,r~. N. ..OLLRTI51\O.G[>CILS . LYRn a L..b.. R« Yoa-Y.,... Cwr4r. SY., i M1.I~y X,. Yw1- W [.w lR...a..a. L...... . Yx-..r,.,.n.xe Lr•+Mr AL,-,f. G«I„-Sr.T S.~eW,r. , ' .1,..... . LOEN's THEATRES i MASR[n]L.[SSOSX[L C Wan.•wM, ~T.A..«..,a.R.M..n+. .pV[Rn9%G Ac[]Cr CMY. Sr.L./n i C~ R« YM-/M. . I I:RA FINANCIAL CORP. I sYRRn1.G ILG\OX..[L LC MIIM. - R.C+.....RMWV I l CY4~w. r R Luae.IM,.a+i+. n.y 1 pL.M { S. Rj.,R aar. 1 l L,,.y..1.wr,. W L u,w.rwr R ""...........r.,.....,...."r_"" a . {p\iRTl56c R(.C?cY n~. C X..~r r-._ L.. ,.ti...... Y.M SW/Mn.,-Rw \YU,..R GEYERAL FI V ANCE CORP. . . yAMSLTI GY[MSOX\[L LJ.Tnw..u.w,..w. ' = - AaC[ "ROOts: TM Netl Genera• tbn' IaMd a[ ine secoiw ~,.ost o0o- Was sror n iv n~sary. I LpYt,lns~ic.c[MtY N.,.[.....c.r.,,r. cb„t,-L,a '..,..,. ««,,.,. aULOVA WATCHCONPANY INC ' uatrnnc rt.noXSn PR T~Le4.w-n,xr,,.urw MS X,.,.,1,4.w •Y Y.,.1yy.M,yRr,1 AlL Tn,a, a MIY,n,Rw.. MCTUrN6rRM Ia......~.~~M~ i ' .mxRTwsl:RCtX[t o.,l. tw. [rr.... A.. ,.r.a~... I <•/YYLM~/w.~e. WOL. 9, No. 12, $EPT. 21, 1979 New York Tiines September 16, 1979 p. E7 HEREDITARY LINK FOUND BETiQEEN GENES AND CANCER • ./ If "cancer genes" exist, scientists at . Boston's Beth Israel Hospital have moved closer to finding them. Noting 'the high Incidence of a specific kidney cancer iun one lamily-I0 members - affected over three generatfons-t8ey have traced the disease to an inherited -genetic abnormality. Since some forms of cancer are hereditary, the discovery could help identify high can- . - eer-risk families. . . ~' , I According to Dr. Robert 8rvwn, head of the hospital's kidney unit and a principal investigator iun the case, the - :abnormality is a characteristic, seem- lingly hereditary exchange of genetic - - material between chromosomes 3 and ~' 8 in all body cells. Human cells have 23 chromosome parts that together con- stitute the genetic blueprint for our traits and tendencies. Genes, the basic . I units of heredity, are Incorporated in ~ the chromosomes. . Chromosomalexchangesarenotun-- - usual and Dr. Brown warned that per- ," sons unrelated to the Boston family but exhibiting the same exchange be- tween chromosomes 3 and 8 do not nec- essarily carry the same risk of kidney cancer. Rather, the extraordinarily - thigh incidence of the disease in the one . family, coupled with the presence of- this particular exchange trait only ID family members with the cancer, sug- , gests an abnormality In either or both chromosomes Involved, or In the I particular er,change process itself. Family members whose cells ex- 'hibit the exchange had an 87 percent j -.~ i risk of developing the kidnev eancer ~:. by age 59. In the general population, " O : only one of every 1,000 Americans will . C . _ develop the same general type of can- .O cer, renal carcinoma, by that age. De- spite continuing study, researchers /S havebeenunabletndetectthespecific t17 - a abnormallry. - ~ NATURE August 23, 1979 v. 280, p. 624 Draft code to protect asbestos workers: A consultative documen has been produced by the UK Health and Safety Commission on: proposcd code of practice for workers dealing with asbesto insulation. The proposals are an extension and clari@cation o existing legislation. They include proposals- for improvin:. lasbestos dust containment, waste disposal, personal protecties and training for insulation workers. Industry and trade union have until 30 November to give their view before a final eode o yractice is drawn up.
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N /J . DIAIOG Illca: CA SEAxCII )f-70/VOL 9110D1 (COPr. A/. CnOrs. SoC.( (SIlw A9 ef SO( U+.r1900 fEnaV79 CA091AfCA?ISIR Ra•1•Il1en5 belYl'Pn ,IICV[InC~IneVCaJ Cenvul+lve bPnaVlor an0 OIn..J arW Urarn I,rveln o/ nIC.]tlna a+ a Iuncll0n e/ +a+ nn0 J'Jr „1 [sp tnnreJ +tr`nurl+ el IyiCC ~ Icnnor. Jx--e+tA•; MiIWn, JOieP+R.I SenlP+lnDPr, xyrl lnbtiav Inn[. D.•nav. Gene[., UnW. Colerarf), ooulpar, Co, OD!09. Vie S;cllan: CADOIOOS Vubl ClOsrI JOURI:4L Juur.n,l: Pr,Area .• OIOCnSlr: Denav• CDEPnI PODNAU PuUI: 19 Serles: 10 ISSUC: 3 VuOS+I 1)<9-S) Itl:nll/lnr1: niC~llrnt DIUG\I nr01rY CurrvUlRlVn, +.x nlCCllnP b16oJ orPln convvl5lun, d0a niCOllne Ulootl Drdln CnnvulEion, 9e•IUIYPe nlc4trnC CIOVJ brO,n cunVUlslat CA091019e91114r A , M anp•uJCn to the uptinleatlon Gf Cnronato0rnonle +YSIe~:enJ t-~V V:0 n/ n I/n_nern115• +cCn:5lblf eJla bPnh In +YSIVn.,,tlC IVriCU1VDIC.\1 a,1.111-y15 Mru•or: Dc leeuw, R,,MUS Ir.: iCnepPr+. Pnul: GrPV/n9r JaO E.; irnn:.y, Jnn Pirl tucalla,: Dru. foacvl.• SUtP Univ., Oron/n0em, 9713 AM, Neln. S:ction: CAJ0/001 PuDI CIS.S: CONP PROC Jownal: Inpl^ui.. Auul. tmrensic Drug Cnor.., Proe. Int. Sv^u. Cuutn: '•IJT/Ai Punl: 79 viVa•x: J01-19 SluPtin9 0stv: 78 P,.ulr:ro,•: Oro nn,.r,..n maeninOton. D. C Ar.U I: rrlc•In, L'iU~aa•I: Rrut•oel• Alice V.: Sobul, Slnnley P l[mnA,rrw5: cnrrra.,lu9 Jctn th•vG forVnslc, thin IaVOr Cnru~rmlo0 aruqlurenae CA09101049030C [•vIlnerCl: anJ non-cnollner0le n^.pects of th. b~5cr+inln:ti e+n ulo+ prOnerlie5 of nicotine lr,lnor: RJ:~CCr..nS. J,rnn A.; ChnnCP• Lillian 1. Lucalbn: Alru. Coll. virQrn,a, Vr.9io/a Cornrrmnw. Unlv., Rinn.unp. VA. )R^D• USA Srclron: CA001000 Pobl CIn55: JUU(IrIAL Journal: Am•. 9a•nuv. Oiol. CorMa: ADDUOw Publ: 77 Scra.•s: 22 Issue: Discri,n. Stimulus Prop. Drugs PoOes: 155-05 IJantlfllM: rPVlew /llcollne Ern.lvlNr Cnollner0lC receptor 8EM000 0
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, ...,.., EWS BRIEFS ;Greensboro Record lSeptefnber 13, 1979 p SSHHHHH CUP' RACE .Rothenberg, Fred . C6 "Warning: The Surgeon General Has Deter- mined mined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your , , ;. -: !. , Health " : t < , . . I . One television network also has determined that -. calling a certain horse race by its brand name could i be dangerous to its health. . . ... . ' I i' ' For the past five years, CBS had given the Marl- boro Cup the young-girl-smoking-in-the-bathroom ..• treatment. Instead of calling the race by its given I ~;name, CBS called it "The Cup"-- except for an- eouncer Jack Whitaker who slipped twice last year ;'and blasphemed "Marlboro Cup". -..s.- I The Federal Communications Commission, which regulates the broadcasting industry, took the : Marlboro Man and all the other cigarette hawkers • off the air in 1968. The FCC felt television shouldn't ..' be the medium for launching another generation of • ~smokers. .. _ . .. , . . . . . . CBS feels the horse race with the cigarette name- eomes under the FCC's restrictions. NBC feels oth- . erwise, and got its chance Saturday because the New . York Racing Authority (NYRA) had moved up the date of the Marlboro Cup. That caused a conflict ',with CBS' U.S. Open tennis coverage and forced CBS jo pass on its option to televise the race. . I . CBS got into trouble with the FCC in 1978 be- nuse of its deception over "Winner-Take-All" tennis ~ thhihthif tht Thl maces, wc were nong oe sor.e pay- ~ers in those matches were oromised cuarantees. !CBS may have once considered changing its pnli- Fey on the Marlboro Cup, but last September - after the run-in with the FCC - was certainly not the right time. .t. ,::._: .i.:; -;:::. z,- "CBS took an extraordinarily conservative posi- .tion which was not founded, in our opinion, in law," said Alan B. Kaufman, NBC's director of Compli- - /ances and Practicec. "There have been no reported 'Cases in court or before the FCC which would .• prohibit the mention of a cigarette company in an -- established sports event. . :. ,, .---:-~ . "The Marlboro Cup has always been the htarl- ' boro Cup." . . I Kaufman says NBC's general policy is to controt •gratuitous commercials. Even though it called the ~htariboro Cup by-its given name, NBC wanted to ,make certain that Phillip Morris, the cigarette com- ;pany sponsoring the race, didn't get too much of a free ride. The FCC and NBC's paying customers Iwouldn't like that. . . He told the producers to limit visual references Ito Marlboro Cup in the telecast. When NBC broke ~away from the race buildup, the visuals said coming up was "more thoroughbred racing" or "more rac- ing from Belmont " ' . ~ And at a meeting before the race, Kaufman asked the 1'YR4 what other exposure possibilities -eould exist for Jfarlboro during the broadcast The NYRA said a flag with the Marlboro logo - which the cameras wouldn't be able to see - and free plugs on the grooms' jackets and the horses' saddle t:bths. But the NYR.4 said jackets and saddle cloths j wouldn't be needed if the weather was cool. -•:VoL. 9. No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 ' Saturday was warm, and Kaufman,was argry that the grooms wore red jackets with the Marlboro logo for the feature race after going in shirt sleeves .,I for the seven previous races. The saddle cloths with ~ their cigarette trademark were also very apparent c for the big race. "At that stage you can't tell the grooms to take ;~off their jackets, you can't tell (trainer) Buddy Delp .' Ito pull off Spectacular Bid's blanket and you can t !tell (executive producer) Don Ohlmeyer not to shoot '~the horses," Kaufman said. "Personally, I don't ;think the NYRA met its commitment to NBC." A r} . 4 In one area, NBC was also negligent, failing to >. meet its responsibility to the public. An NBC adver- °' tisement appeared in local New York newspapers ;4 .` 'and around the country Friday heralding the \farl- , .{, boro Cup. The copy said Affirmed, Spectacular Bid " ')and Coastal "are set to clash . ..r. . ,' . ' . ~ .r,': j ~ Yet early in the week, trainer Iaz Barerra had - 'safd Affirmed would not race and, in fact, the horse 4as not entered on Thursday. NBC contends that its '_ iconditional phrase "are set" covered any lineup fhanges and that Affirmed's non-entry on Thursday .- was too late to modify the ad. . .' "But we should have used a stronger conditional phrase (scheduled or expected) said Kaufman ;"We went uith our softest phrase, when we should _, ihave used our strongest." r}s One solution would be for NBC to handle its adst •the way CBS does, labeling the promos with the day ` +~ '. they were written. . ~ . , - . .. . . . , .. -Greensboro Daily News Septetnber 14,_ 1979 p.'B5 ILORILLARD ADDS NEW CIGARETTE TO !BRANDS ' , r, I - Lorillard has added Kent HI 100s to the cigarette br.inds it has introduced this year. The new cigarettF, ' hv'hich has 5 mg. tar, joins Kent Ill kings and Triumph , 'regularand methol kings as Lorillard's 1919 addition m'the cigarette market. - . '. ' Lorillard, which has majoi manufacturing and pro- ' cessing facilities in Greensboro and Danville, Va., will ~promote the new l(los with four-color two-age spreads ;and full page ads in national magazines and Sunday sup-,plements next month. . ; R ; - . , , . O O .O N 0) . (71
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Greensboro Daily News August 23, 1979 p. Al LOEWS READY TO BUILD DOWNTOWN HOTEL ''- .Cavin, Winston ' r Loews Corp., agiant international conglomerate -'that owns 15 major hotels, is ready to propose construc- ~lion of a 354roon hotel to accompany Greensboro's -d planned downtown convention center. ~ . A vice president of the diverse, New York based corporation said Wednesday his company will be ready ' to make specific plans available to city leats within ' two and a half weeks • . ' Among Loews holdings is the P.. Lorillard Tobacco ~. Co. of Greensboro. ~ . . . - The hotel commitment gave Greensboro officials a ' major boost in their campaign to win voter approval .'-OcL 9 of a $7.5 million bond issue to finance the con- vention center. Many critics of the convention center have expressed doubt thata high-quality, privately fi- runced hotel chain was ready'to put millions of dollars ort the line in downtown Greensboro. _ ; Sanford Freeman, executive viee presideni of • Loews in charge of hotel development, said his firm is ; not the only major hotel chain that's seriously interest- ed in the Greensboro project. .-..... .-. -. .~ "I don't think they (Greensboro officials) will have any trouble (attracting a hotel)," Freedman said 'Ijust - ,hope they take our deaL ' I Major Jim Melvin said he was delighted, but not ;surprised; by Freedman's public statements. "They've lbeen-tearing my phone off the hook for the lact couple 'of weeks;' he-said of l.oews. "This substantiates and gives encouragement to what we know - that there are private investors who l . are serious about participating in a project like this," • Melvin said. "We have known all along there are specif.- ;•Ic hotel developers interested in this market and in this . project." : .. .. -:. ::-. -:?.. -:_ _ - .. Hyatt Haddison and Marriott hqtel chains are re ortedly mterested in Greensboro ~ .1 l.oews holdings include hotels theaters, tobaccolmanufacturing and insurance companies stretching across the United StatesFreedman said-the hotel business is a sentimental 'as well as business strength of the conglomerate, mainly - because top Loews' officials hi've long channeled their interests into family hotel pursuits. •.- l Freedman said the firm was interested in Greens- born as a hotel market before lhE convention center proposal materialized this summer, but it was clear from his statements the convention center is crucial to ~tbeir plans. "We are basing all our work on the premise lthat the bond issue will be approved and the convention center built," he said.. _. . _ . , - . . . - " He said some of the firm's initial interest stemmed from its knowledge of the city through Lorillard, which has a large plant on East Market Street. Passage of li- ,quor•bythe-0rink atio* "helped,"_he added.. o • '."Several people had ralled us frem the Creensbor area about possible hotel development," he said.'lLese~ :;Iincluded Lorillard officials, other local buclnessmen and ~' -city officials. Freedman praised cily, officials for "being bbildi" ihtio «: very realistic aout not overung oneeonvenn ~tenter. '"fhey're not making the big mistakes many c{- ; ties made,' he said '. Melvin said the proposed 45G00•square-fool conven- ,Uon center would be more realistic than "the white ele• ! '~hants all over the country" which were built too big ~ (and too costly." ..::f Freedman said Loew s is using the city's feasibility :~;itudy, prepared by Zuchelli. Hunter and Associates of ;: ~•Annapola, Md., but is not relying solely on It. "We got " a team of three of our financial people to do our feasi- ' - -; bility study;' he said. "We got studies prepared from :.'other sources." He said the in-house study would be ' ;ready soon after Labor Day. n.tr: !J` :,'? '-F'' Freedman said the Loews' track record on down- . town, convention-oriented hotels is sterling. Most of -:thidW heir 15 hotels are of that type,-e sa. "e're very -'. careful about the cities we pirk;' he said. "We don't - .: go into cities where we don't think we can do very well. ' ,'Dow•ntown hotels are the backbone of our business. 1-- '~ would have no problem in your asking anyone in the • -• industry about our ability to market hotels and operate them." , i I- { -- The Loews official said he does not constderthe " `~'~ planned Holiday Inn expansion and convention center .~ ~ I at Four Seasons a threat and in fact questioned that -~ It w•ould ever be built. i "I'll believe the.oNer one (Four Seasons) when I see it;' he said "I don't cosid tht something .nera as which has to enter into our equation at this point. A Hot of things are announced in the real estate develop• ment world that never get built Few of them do." ; - C Freedman said the possible Greensboro hotel would be one of the smallest built by Loews at 350.to 400 rooms. (Loews recently opened a 9110.room hotel in Dallas, Texas). Freedman said Greensboro has a lot tooHer. "It's `well-located, it's a town that is Loew favorite tt's got •goodair transportation it's one of the regional cen- - ters " he said. - . , „- „ - Loews has no hotel interests m North Carolina or ~ Sh hddldb -A theout now,e sai, an wou proably not enter any other Tar Heei hotel market if it develops here. I. Loews hotels are Iocated in New York City, Wash- ington, the Bahamas, Monte Carlo, London and Cana4a. ~ The Loews hotel, if built, would have two restau- rants, Freedman said. Both, he said, would be carefully planned and coordinated so as not to compete with din- .g ing facilities in the convention center. . . I "If this (convention center bond issue) passes,"he said, "I will be in competition with every major hotel chain in the country.l want to be there early." .
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DIALOG P11tt: CA SCaRCM 77-70/V0L 911051 (COOP. W1. CMer. SoC.) (Itt. 31 of 7:1) User1900 77su079 Ct09107050e35V Glna cap,l)ary 0°t chronrato0"nnlllC OtteCtlon and mast Speclral ~nnl\'fif n/ ~onrp nyorOrYl Yerivallvef o/ PolrCl'IOr/nateJ brPnlnvty IiCO'fl 4.Inur: LulJnnen, Sr.r,; •yr•av. Perttll PYNSaIo, Ha1MYl luCOlial[ Ue0. Cnim., Unlv. HuoPlo, RuoPlo, Sf-70101. flnlonn Seelrant C1004001 PuUl ClasSl JDUOAAL Juurnal: finn. Cue'-. lcll. Co.`,n: ICULAS PVD1: 79 If:.re: 2 P_lca: 51-GO lucnlIfIerf: Oao cnromntu9 I:hloroblPnenYl hyaroeY Oeelv, lacs sPeclrWrrelry Cr,lorobrPl.e4y1 hyoro.y Ibrlv, olpnenYl nYQ'o.y Cnloru Cltran•:ItJ9 niSS th.•Ctra C?091070504755 Ol..a caorllarY Culumn Ons elvernalo0raphy of pht/blato esl.,•f +utnor: h•lucourt. ra. P.1 Oerthuu. F.; Pica.l, O.t DreonO, Y.: fIOU4 H. H. Lucatrn-l: L+b. 01oU+m., Fac. e1eC.. 0rvft. 20279. eP. S,[Irun: C4004U01 PuUI Clatsl JOIIRItIL Jw al: J. Cnro-••ecnur CoUI•n: JOCNMI Vu01: 79 Serr.•~^ /1]. nJrl`%' =L1'/I IU.M ,I.ers: PnUUlnta• efter Oas ctrrdnJtC9. PlastlC/4er Yas cnrunr.r 100 GU01070e9164Z D.'ICrm,n.iliYn 4/ nr'IlrlnuCitl (n ChIGhln tissues by 0.1 Cnrt.•~•.rlu.~r.lnnY m.~:.. :IreClru~rrrtr'Y •ulnur: 1.4v• PztrlC,a Caln; Wood, Jamcf S.. Jn i Downln0, Ceor,;c V. tucal,on: t'arch SnarP Donmo R•a. Lab., Rah.ey, HJ, 07065. USA Seetlon: CC00I001 Puol Class: JOU11HqL Jaurnal: J. •Orlc. Food Cne,n. CnUan: JAFCAU Pu01: 79 Seriea: 27 Issuc: 4 P..prt: 75J-6 Ioenttllers: ArPrInGCla aetn chlcl.cn Oae ellror..tb0 U9e6r0o0 tns .
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~Greensboro Record Septetttber 11, 1979 p. Al NON-SMOKER BREAK , LEAFMEN ATTACK INSURANCE POLICY 'iRoberts, 'Johli A top tobacco Industry spokesnuvi to- - ' Ida atta k d a lan b Allstate In ur y p y c e s ,.~ance Co., a subsidiary of Sears, Roebuck ~' and Co., to offer a discount on whole life insurance policies to non-smoken.. . . ! William Yeargin, managing-director of . the Tobacco Growers Infomution Com- mittee Inc., said premium discounts for nonsmoken undermine a pillar of the .~. state's economy and should be opposed. -"Sears is the largest department store and mail order house and it was born thanks to the patronage of farmers, especially in the Southeast;' Yeargin_ said. "Now their insurance company is . discr'urinating against fatmers wbo grow . " , tobacco." .-. .. :,~. 4~ , ,/ .= ... ~ . ~ While he did not caUfor a boycott, . ~Yeargin said, "I will tell you I will not .patronize Sears and it is my opinion that once the tobacco farmers find out what Sears is doing, they will also choose to . apend their money elsewhere." William Russell, spokesman at Al- :Istate's regional headquarters in Char- 1otte. said the company's forthcoming "Healthy American Plan" is based on ~ long-term population studies that show . that cigarette smoking is a "major risk ol' for heart attacks and cancer. ~'d°fhere is no intent on our part to d'u- criminate against tobacco farmers," Russell said. "Probably a goodly portion - lof tobacco farmers themselves are non- ... ;smokers ..:..,,'. .r. ,.`_., : : t, He noted that provisions of the new ;. plan permit policyholders to smoke pipes or cigars and is limited to persons :who have stopped smoking for at.least- 'one year. ,. , . .... , _ .....: .• - ' The "Healthy American Plan" will not "necessarily encourage anyone to go out . and quit smoking tomorrow;' Russell said. "If it has any impact on tobacco farmers at all, it will be negligible." ~ Allstate's new plan, to become effec- tive Sept. 15, will offer as much as a 5 percent discount to persons aged 21 to 75 who do not smoke and whose height and weight are within prescribed limits for preferred risks. - ; . . Many other life insurance cempanies, including the Jefferson Standard aod Pi- lot-Life subsidiaries of Jeffarson-Pilot Corp. in Greensboro, offer lower premi- ums for non-smokers. Some companies ~ that do not now offer the lower rates are ;considering them. Yeargin, whose information commit- tee speaks for tobacco farmers, proces- son and cigarette manufacturers, says non-smoker rates are "sGck Madison Av- enue advertising" and are based on scientific studies of questionable merit. . He characterized them as partof a general assault on tobacco that could se• riously damage an Important and tradi- tional mainstay of-North Carolina's economy. -.rr~ 1 - , A 30 percent reductionin cigarette smoking nationally would rebound In $3 : billion in economic losses in the state, hurting farmers, bankers, oil distribu- tors, fertilizer companies, cigarette pro- ,,-~duction workers and others, Yeargin Tobacco is the b:ggest single agricul- tural commodity in North Carolina, bringing in more than $1.3 billion for growers in 1978, Yeargin said. More than 270.000 North Carolinians, including some 1,000 Guilford County farm families, are engaged in producing and processing tobacco, he added._ .. Local farm leades, while not criliciz- ing Allstate, pointed to reduced premi- ums as another signal of troubles facing ~- itobacco. ~ - _ . .~. . . - : '°Ihe people who grow tobacco proba- bly ~ bly are not going to look upon this very ' - aid John Crawford chair fbl; .,avoray s,- I man of the Guiltord County agricultural I . - eztencion serviee. ' . • Lloyd Massey of Greensboro, presi- dent dent of the N.C. State Grange, said he ' Is not upset by Allstate's action: "If they .' can provide a service at a reduced cost, ., iI've got no argument with that." But Massey, noting that "tobacco is a vital part of our economy;" said that so- ciety needs to "take a more temperate . approach to tobacco ... I think that any- thing, no matter what it is, can be harm- ful ful to your tieaith if taken to excess." Guy Phillips, secretary of Jefferson- _ Pilot Corp. here, said the medical direc- tor of the Tobacco Institute, another trade group, called fast week to inquire about the company's reduced rates for : nonsntokecs. He said Jefferson-Pilot, with more than $19.5 billion in ordinary and group bfe insurance in force, began offering lower rates to non-smokers in 1977. Q O According to Phillips, Jefferson-Pilot's 0 move to non-smoker rates was prompted }s by similar reductions by other life insur- ~ en, although the company "is certainly N. aware" of the state's status as a large to- _J bacco producer. •..~„a
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N 1--1 LD DIALOG f,lccl CA SCARCII 77-'/9/VOL 01(10) (CCPr. Arp. CnDA. SoC.) (ItOnl 7 O/ 101 User1906 IIfc079 CAO•)1090Y11)]•1 Anunralus In'• CIrcVlatln9 nnP conlactln0 a Oas with a IIYUIU lut.al,...r: lnra. S1"l,un: l>D14001, Ci0•1]%%.\ PvUI Claf1i PAT Ju,ir..+l: O:Iry. Cud:n: Gf%%AL Pual: 700207 PaOp+: 20 OP. Unqo.ye: Pr P~.ICnI •: Ori9'v09 APa11cND: ]7/))l)0 Dat1: 7]01109 Clm,.: DDIJ, CI]U COUnIrY: Orlt• A,lOnr.: In.Ver•Inl Cnrwle:,l IntluslrlCS LIO. LI,•nll/iers: rcrmn npo n.vnt,on, Orololn PretM aollwnol ferun aer'+llon CA0910907]OGZY 0,•,~On or aeralOJ /ersenlers Inr non-Npwtonlan IlaulO9 \uln;r: r,n•., F• N,: C,nS,•IC, A. Luaal, ,•rn: Sc•.. Cmml. fnU•. CurnollUniv„ Etnacu, NY, USA SrC1iWr: Cd1114D01 ruUl Cluyi: C01Ir PROC nal: 4r.or. - Eu. Can9.o. Oiotecnrwl., Ist Coden: <OSU•:O PWI: ]0 Pxoes-: 21-2 , P,~nl,fnl•r: DLCnC:.IA nnOicss: iPanMfurl/lA3In. GCr la: nli/ler's. fermn nnV a~'r'•+11on, ltlrrCr nCr.+t1Un IprAn wcd.a C%O1109070013J N:rVlc,n+l ccmOOSltlonA contalninD 1,4-VUlnanps Or der.rdt..e: lrmroDl A,rlnp-•: Lrl.aslle, Inn DarlO: Ollwersan, TerCncc; UevIln, C>-ry fo:• Jonn lnc,' l,rn: n,.ll,. 5>cl,cn: L.10G500]. CA025%c¢, CA02U%%%, CAD27%%K, CAO:UUIt Punl cl,,c: Pnl Drll. ,C•hpn: nn..A Punlt 701129 PaDCf: 12 PP. P.,tcrV r:u: I51n]75 AnVllc uo: 75/4104 Datc: .7'ioL]0 Cloa: nOluO/70, CO]C'C]ilA, C07C93/26. C07C97/22 S.rll !nt„rn~ll0'i+lc nescai'cn L1.rntaCnaVP/f 6. V. Id.`n1,11Crsl: qu,non. nprD,c,rle CA091090fA4355 LLrt..'1•"r'Cllv Of cyClrC nitrOfa+•Inp• In Salwrcll• tYL',,.•.r,un: CI/CCI PI r'n,l 411e AuUrd••: Ir.c. T. I(au,.:wnr: O.v,wY, Dells W.; LlfinsYy. Y.: EP h,. J. l. L.,.:nlien: Oiol• Dlv., Oak M,dOD Aatl. LaO.. Onl, ale0e, 1N, l]UID. U'.A ~ :cl,on: C:COd00) PuUI ClJxs: JDUPNAL J,.urnal: r.•ulzt. Iles. Gsan: f.toPE•:v Puoll 79 Sorlps: 67 It•.ue: 1 Po,a: 21-1. tdentlflers: n/lroca.inc cYC11C nutn0enlelty ~ '~ zs£vz ~ ~ o00 ~o~' . ,DS
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~ DIALOG Pllet; CA StJRCJI 17-79/VDL 91(OBI ICoPe. Am. Cnen. SoG.) (lte+ 6 ul 5Y) User1906 2510.79 9]a W V I ' w~7 CA0910705]1101/ C10010705:1005P Currel.llicn0 DetxOen CPider..\1 DNA ayntnflls and nerolYylll a1Jl••rul:,f Clurr/nQ 01 tobJeCO CbloeoPleSt rltlOaMra1 RNA Qana{ ecJysleru•d tller Cur1,1Q \n,/ last larval Inator o/ the tobacco f Lla n Ca e110 ~ulnur: 5uo/urn, Masnnlro; XusuUn, Jun lon: rl Nlsnir.A \11 Genol L Inal JIDan 411 - p n.Jrn. n0u 5 Author: JreIDUS, Juf~•1 J.; DollenbnCNYr, Walter (.1 Dllbert, La 1 . , . . . ., u:n{ Se n tun: CAOllol] Puol Clasa:. JDURNAL nal: Inol Coaen: MGGEAE Pub Gen Gm1e1 J ll 79 •renee . Locat,al: Drp. Olol• Scl., NOrln.eatcrn Unlv., Evanston. IL, USA , • . e m SOrirs: 172 IswP: 2 PaOes: 137-41 ' IUtntlyllrs: lobact0 Cnloroplasl Dl/a eIPn1 ' Settlon: etCl]0C] PuSI Clno}: JOVR:/AL Jpurnal: J. IrILCCt Pny5f01. CONCn:JIPXAP PYeli 79 $erltP: 25 Issuc: I Pages: 9-IB A-ma-m! IOCntlllera: AIAnUVCa eYlUermla DNA fOrnat/Gn lcdyatefOld CA091070rt]90511 TOna[C11 aru,Mr and taste and eC/dIC COnatltYente ea5u\:lal oll . In tne ~~ \/ rr A,/lhJr: IraI5trlm0, 1oU01G: MOlun/, Ahlra CA091070S]0]?a - Lu:nliml: DhJlmnm Too. E.p. Sln., Japan TOD. Salt Public RAnin ^utl,Od fOr Continuous Vreparatlon Of a tObaCcO su'.u^n"lOn L l n: USA COrp., NuraSnihl, JAPan Q St•a lnn: CAD11007 Vubl Class: JOUn//AL frlal: Oky an,n IaD'Jh0 $nlhenjo HVHOku Cpeen: Di$XAO Jp n:.,l o Seetlcm: CACI1007 Pobl ClAsst PAf Jmu•n~l: upl9. CoJen: OfaxAL PuDll 790502 PaQCsI IS : P y l Puul: 77 Ser/es: ]0, PaquS: 9i-IOi Lan0ua9e: Jwan lu>ntlllers: tobacco conallluent r pp. l,q.•\,/e Pqtenl rp: 67]ae] APpIiC Not 7B/15i1 Date: 780114 C1.\5:: A:JD, COIF CDUrIIrY: Brll. r- A,:iunv.: 011' Inc. ' CAGOIC7GST90]M /-4 Iuenll/iCre: lUbaCeo suspension DrCpn ,1Pp I/Clvy mftA1 (eaLFalum, 11nc, IYad. eopPer, and C11rOmIuP) CorlC:ntrallun5 In tODnCCCS O/ ClQarat• freCuently SmOheO In 0 tl\P r-lcr'aI NCDUD1iG Gf GRrwany ~ D AJttmrl Llueller, Cerman CA0910705]0]IN r•~y Lo:.+tlml: inst. Se0lupntieyen., Unlv. Me1da1Der9, `^ T4U.1cCU 11.\IVrA,It • , Nriu:lbcr9, D•6U00, Ped.'RCp. CDr. Aulnor: Ilu•JuCnl, alaSaO; Mnkaurna, TPtsufl L n: J \•1 ' Srttlmll CA011007 PuUI Class: JOURNAL Cuuen: CMx2AT Publl 79 Serieal O Jcarnal: Cnem -2t nn. nCAI,O Sr~aron: (:ADI1001 >uDl Class: PAT . Q• 103 Issue: 4 Pages! 1]]-7 Lan0uA0e : Ger Juurr.]1: upn. IOMhyp kon0 COtlCn: JAaFaD PYD1: 790330 Idantlfltr5t metal heavy clparet tobacco D PnO.>: 4 Pn. LanOu\0.': JOPan z P.a,•nt rv: 70 Oswu Auollc NO: 7a/1aa607 OalPt 741227 0 CIeSs: .'}10 ]/IP AaiQnre: JurAn tODACCD and Salt Public CO/'P• CA09107052982V lOt'nUflors: tubaccu /lOVUronl I:olm lon of denydrolollollda and 0•'oeo-aclln/dol fro+ Nlcotlana Inbutur. Aulnpr: Ut•9nn1, Rolho; PullmOrl, im.Onel MDneko , Haflr.el 0 Nplo. nunlo; No0ucnl, L41sao A C49910705]0 ]0v Lucalion: Cent. Rea. Inst., Japan Tobacco and Salt PuO11C m Iobntcu IlavurDnt COrG., Yuhonnma, 227, JAPan Auln:.r: ItiiAkl. tar,urD: A1/Fan/. YO/Cnl$ Xp1Val. NODOPV 5.•utlon: CAG110U7 Puol Claas: JOURNAL D LaCAtiun: Jeunn Journ.ll: AQriC. R101 . Cnew. Cu,:Cn: A6CMA6 Puhlt 79 Seelron: C.LOIIOU7 PoDI Clao: PAT Ser/cs: 43 Issue: 5 PaOes: 11a9-50 W Journal: Jpn. Iul,hy0 xor,0 CoOen: JAlIAaO Publ: 790330 Idanll11er5: COGOCCO CanydrO1011011eR CaOaCtln1d01 (n PaCee: 6 pD. lanqtay¢: Jnnan Palent /r,: 79 04G19 Applic No: 70/ItUG69 :6] 1] l 2 DatP: 741227 ~ AS.: A • / c 4s,Q'•r:: J:nan icu.¢co and Sall Pvnllc Coro. D n Icnnt,(•cri: lol.a<CU IIa.Cr:nl, nornlcotrne 1ruC1o>e lObaccG ~ flaru•'anl ~ M
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LORILLARD AWARENESS BULLETIN DISTRIBUTION LIST R-Barker, Harold Barnes, Winston R-Smith, Howard Thaggard, Neil Bell, J. H. Bledsoe, Quincy Tong, Dr. H. S. Tucker, C. L. Bondurant, Richard Bogue, H. D. Wagner, J. R. Williams, David Bohlken, J. H. M. Crouse, Bill Deaton, Bill Douglas, Joe Wu, Dr. E'Chung -Adebahr, H. F. Dumas, Glenda Duncan, Brenda Efird, Heath Block, M. S. Bowes, Major Bullock, J. S. Gains, Dr. L. Edwards, R. P. Garrard, V. Hudson, A. B. Hurst, Dr. R. Ihrig, Dr. A. M. Falvey, T.-C. Fowler, William Goettman, A. T. Jessup, Joyce Ireland, Sue Jessup, Terry Johnson, Lynn Jones, Dr. S. T. Lewis, Dr..C. I. McGee, Sam Kirschstein, W. Manduley, Octavio Kraus, Bob Larson, Tom Meadows, Pearman, C. H. E. R. Lassiter, C. W. Lewis, Jane - Spears, Dr. Tedder, D. A. W. R. McGeady, McGeady, Marmor, Ja John Dr. R. S. Thompson, Tillman, Welborn, Young, R. A W. C. C . W. M. B. . Middleton, Bobby Mills, Ken Minnemeyer, Dr. H. J. Morgan, J. P. Moring, Tom Moss, Burma Murphy, Donna Nichols, Bill Norman; Dr. V. _ Patterson, Dr. R. B. Perini, Dr. Florian Poole, Amelia Redmond, Don Reid, Dr. Jack Schickedantz, Dr. P. D. Schultz, Dr. F. J. Shoffner, Rose Skladanowski, M. Slaven, Dr. R. Smart, Dave . Smith, Ed L-Brislin, L. Didelot, J. E. Feige, Jr., A. F. Gutermuth, L. N.- Hetsch, J. E. Hottell, P. A. McNeil,- S. G. Norris, J. P. - Rains, E. D. - Rayburn, Pat Richardson, J. L. D-Blair, Bobby Cowan, Scott Moorefield, F. NY-Goldbrenner, R. Sausa, R. J. Smith, Dennis Stevens, A. J. "The more extensive-a man's knowledge of what has been done, the greater will be his power of knowing what to do." - ,A.~..JVo 9, _No.. 12, SEPT-. .21, 1979 0
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G. 0 ~OI . OIAtOG 111aN: CA SEARCH 77-T9/vOl 911061 (COpr. Aw. C/wn. Soc.) 111l+ ]4 o1 50) Uslrl906 56nev79 226 01 /luw)r ucuicel tlssu! CU001070521/10N ' ANlnur: Ilcnry, Ennerl v, Unl kl CNlallr YI 6 f--A I Ine IntCrJt.ll on bC11.Olln OxYOen !nd larOOn d10.Id! and y.. lO:dllaul: 0a•P• D101• SC1.. Oa SA D61 A . , 0 COnCCnlr]llons on t ! o b I ln! re9ulatlOn Yf OlyCOlat! sYntnOSIL• In s , U 0 50" lPn: CR011001 Publ CIlss: JOURNAI cn to .a acco R : Olivrr Davlp J Jo.:nJl: J. E.P. Ool• CoUen: JE00A6 Pub11 79 , u wnr loClllon: Da'N• • UioCnvn~,. ConnlCllCUt AOr/C, Esp• 5tn., N!w 5ar30 laru•!: 115 Pa00s: 7]]-7 C'e) I Mav •c U6'iV•1. C1 USA Id)ntlfaers: lbunccn /lol+er ubsclulOn iOn! PavwldiN. m' a , , Sea:110n: CAJIID O] Publ CIC(f: JDUR\AL 011~YIenC Y"rd.ICdaO IOUJCCO /IO+Or V • JnYrnal: YI•.nl Scl. LOtt. Owlon: PTSLAP ue: / P .Vas: ]5-•IU Scr I 19 1s• • h.bll 79 . . ~a . IJenllfllr/: Olyeolatl tYbdtto CarbCn U10{Id! Oay90n C4091090+70495 N {J U7 RC.luctiun o1 earbon fEonOllld! In C/(laret Wwk! Rulnor: 6ar1, Olo 0.: Ellis, Richard L• CA09u0705779PH Lo:alion: uatl• CanCOr Insl•, Nb/, Oelnlsda. N0. 20205, USA Dl/lvrrnli:1l lon allmulatlOn Of n10SlnallnMd adenOSln! SC.:t:Un: CAO110/1U Publ Cl.+ls: JOURI/Al lr1Pnn:pn,adse Iromn ivnf cpiUCrmis nnU alasoPnyll,o/ NieOtinn! I Jounml: PrCr. Med. Cooent Pv1nlA) Puel: 79 Serilat a L B 1s2uu: 3 PaUes: J50-60 ruiullLurIC', Sufdn: Hefldrf\I, UCnald L. Id)nlif~prS: review ClQlrel Yn4k0 CJrbOn Inonnnlde Lncation: D:J. AOr1c. out „ 14brow unlv., Ranbvot. Iceland Sscliun: CAOIIUU7 Publ Class: JOUIINAL Journdl: PIJnt Pnyslol. CoUOn: PLPIIAY Publ: 79 Ser.es: 6] Issue: 9 Pages: 9~]U-0 CA091070AICn9U lucntifi0rs: PIAs.n]l0ond AIPasO iOn allnulOtlon balnrtl•.•cw•n: pl<nt proleclion by a sublatnal. nOnLl\ollnerU:C nCt1Gn On tll! CCnlral nCrvOUf sYftOn Au1nVr: LunU, AlbCrl E.: Ho1lfnVvorln, Robert N.Y Snanklan0. Dani.el L. CA991010527770 LO:al/ul\: OcP. EnlOalol„ Purdu! Univ., YaSt LafaYOtll, LN. N.orolylic enpYmes In Ine eCntTnl vueuol! of planlCalls ' a790/, USA . R,nnur: Oollrr, Tno•asl ItenJe, Hans ' ' Se<tion: CAOOSOOA Publ tlass: JOURNAL lisntim•: Pla'nt ne>. L.,b.. nllrni0]n State Unlv., East~ Ja•.rnnl: YC,tic. Bloclleix. I'nYSinl, Coden: PCUPUS Pub1J Lnnun,l. O1, JbU:.I. 05.1 79 SerIC9: 11 Issuc: I Onryef: 117-3e - SrLt~on: C]011001 Punl Class: JDUfNAI IO:nU flora: cnlol•aime/orln tooac<o nornworn, nlrvous aYstel. Juurn~l: P,lan1 Pnyslol. CoOen: PLPNAY Publl 79 Insecl onlurJimC/orm ' 50r,us: 63 I+sue: 6 PnOCa: 1123-32 lu]ntifiCrs: nYUrolaf0 plint COII vaCu01! CA0910701,2757A DCCUren~O Of nicotine In aam0 sneells of the genus aCJWn Aulnnr: Gill. Sldnislaw: D15Iefa, ManUJ: SlynkiCwILt, Gertra.au I Lutal~on: (nkt. Pann. Insl. TcCnn01. Anal. LOYU. Axod. Uud., GO:In.x, Pol. ' Seclion: CA0110Gt Pu01 Class: JOURNAL Jaurn:~l: r]rm, Pal. Cooen: sAPOAe Publ: 79 Ser/!s: ]5 Is[•.a•: 3 PJ9es: 151-J Lan0ua0c: P01 Ioa•nlfl:ers: SCU,.n i1sAlGfd niSO[/nw. LaaOnOTY SCUYT nl<oline CA09107050993A In.+lblllOn of adnlNl tObnCCo auCklr growth by CamptOlNeCln Autnur: NJr1cY, J. F.: SPauldlnU, D. M,i Outs, J. 6. Lu:ntlunl DCltsvillV AOrIC. ROs. Cenl.. SC1. EduO. Adm.. Beltsvllle, 1.10. )0105, OSA Se.:lion: CAOO.OOA Publ Class: JOURNAL Jovrnai: lon. SC1. CoGrn: IDSCAV 0.011 79 5lrllal 23 Iseue: 43-40 Pa9cs+ a0-a ' Joarnal: Iouacco 101101, 26-7 lalentl/lcrs: tobaceo bud inhibitor DlmptdtnlC/n, Camplotnlea ext tObaCCo Dlld CR091010517A97 PC`OaiO]'-O In IYU]CCO FUiclsllOn tOnO IIS1u0. VII. Ullf)vaOlel aUSOrPl1On CPOCIr.+ O/ 'ptl\ylen0-lrldled tobacco SEE6I000 w f
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DIALOG I110a: CA SCAaCM 71-79/VOL 91(081 (COpr. Aru. Cher. Soe.) (Ite. 10 of 501 Usar1900 76nov19 fQS Ca0q10T05291111) Slrl•alanycrn resLLlante in tobaece. 111. A lest un perm,n.rllnp '6eeOl/nus InJleale:l eYtCplaenlC Innor/tanee In Ilr.• Srnnn nulaal AnllrOr: V+~iel, I/ahJlnrpn ' LnL'.r1,ur1: /;•C• A,yrlL., Nobrev unlv., {enuvot. )sreel SPrn:cn: CA01100] Puul Cluss: JDUDLAL ' Juyfnul: 1. PlLvntenVnyfiPl, CCJer: ZSPPAD Publl 79 Ser•es: 92 lasuy: 4 P,•qes: 295-]01 IJentiflpri: 11rCVtVin',Cln feaist/nCe tGbaCCo tRallnO, per,YinatlUO tooGLCO sCVO slrcplonYeln CA091010579534 Ib: bllCcl of AntlboCles to vlol114nt111n on pnotosynlnetlC eleclrun tran:nort ' AuuroN Lcn,.ann-NIrN, Ursula: Sc.l0, Georp H.) RaOUnl. A11p\s Lo'mtlun: Erv/n-DJUr-Inal., MaY-PlancN-Inst. ZuecntunOSferV C/r., Colu9ne, IeJ. Ocp. Ger. SectlM: CAD11006 Publ CIass: JOUOIIAL JuJrn.,l: 1. N,rtyrforSCn., C: O/OsCi. CDOenI ZNCO9A Publf 79 Serlrs: 34C Issue: 5-6 Pa9es1 427-30 \ ~1 L~r9 ItlYntll/orsl pnolosyntnes/s ele0lron transporl viole>antnln CntlbnUy CiD9I01057U57M Cvi[ICnLe lor a raD/e osy9en-uPlnNe In tobar.Ce CtL1orOPbstl Autnur: 5cnudJ, Georo H.; Tniboult, P/erro Lu:atlun: Dep, Oi01.• CCnt. EtuJ. NuCI. laoaraCne, Sa mt-1LU1-ler-Dwon<e, f-11115. Fr. Sa•ctrm.: CA0I1006 PuUI Class: JDUR9AL JJ1rnal: Z. Nalur/orsLn., C: Oloscl• CoPen: ZNCBDA Publ: 79 Seris•s: ]aC Issue: 5-6 Pa9ef: a1e-IB Ib]nllflcrs: ony9Cn tVbnCto cnloloplast . IJy•11f1 ri: C19JrCl /lltel Pnlynur SrohO CA09107057907y D • oif/crer.ces In tne .Pectrun o'f PeroYloase IsoeneY'ses in • n CA0911170521797 9C-u- v ieh ef Nleollana liV.lClrr. " 0 Cnrndcal Cluoies on arorna constlluents of Turkish tobacco 'LUlnor: ': o+.rn, ).rtnuli n N]r•]]ICY, LaJI]I,lv ' AVlnar Lo:aliun: Cenet. SIeCJllenl Rostl. Selaenarstrl, yyt• SN. Io Cant. nvi. Insl., JnpJn TJy, }alt Publle Corp., . taeellar: Y Y Zerroa., Dr'nn, Dl:a 6ri, C:ccn. SPalml: CA01100A PyUI CIaSn: JW01AL ' ' Z e ..r.... .. r.•On: CA011001 PyOI Clnss: JOIrnYAL Jpyrn.a : 11•1'nyn Snnbai Nnina Cn„e hUrYyu]NO NCnhyy NyNeNV Jnjrnal: aCln AUAA117 Puol: Univ. AVrIC.. 70 Svr•les: IaC. AOrnn. I9rn0/ Coaenl 26 IssuCY 7 PJ'9ot1 111-]e ~ I Coac,,: NISu•+6 Pul.l: 77 Serla•v: 119, Pa0<s: n5-02 Lanrl~:u/e: C(CCII ' N 111•rr{I/i`r . IUD.1LCU areina CO,nVn IVr'Irl]n, ta`r`PCnoID TVrYlin IJ:nllfleri: tCbacCO OSnonb series nCrorllease (soensyrne teU•,C.:C O'y~nn, Lllly ,1CIe IVfhlLn.loe.lr.CO arOin.l, arOT iLle T1rfY1-,n Iyll.lCCO arLUV O CA09101057115911 ' ' Drvclyp•~'rnt of anaro0>netIC Croryps 'an0 Plants. in Mlnfe W09107052)70Y eultuPO: OI NICVtlarre tmerun l. 'l/ ]D' Aulnor: 4„Jrr9al. Renr9lo D )n{nl CYr'L•.nylt an0 Pncnols In eiparlnenlal burleY an0 Lu[atiun: Univ. California, Rivrrsi0e, CA, USA W brlont IoDrccy ScCtion: G1011007 Puul Clazs: DISS ~ >ulnur: ' pln'sen, RoOer A.; Tsa. 1. C.: Cnnplln, James F. LOLUl14n:D.•y. A9rOn., Vnrv, IlCnluC•.r, Lfiln9tOn, NY, 40506, CuJen: DAIIIIUA Publ: 70 PanC]: 225 GG. Cltatlon: Dres. Abs{r. Inl. 0 1919, 79(111, 5206 ~ ~ USs Av..il: unFa. MM1croftlns tnt•, Drcar N>. 191Y)i9 , SCction: C>01I90) PuDI Clai]: JOURnAL ' )aCnll/IGrs: tOVacco antllfr Culture 9rV.rln ~ Jaw•n.l: J. A,rr<. fcou Cncm• Cuuen: JAICAU 5lrlri: 11 IS:yL•: e P:Jr):S: 991-5 IoMllflers: tOUaccO <ar6onyl pnCnol cultlvetlon PuDI: 79 VI bEEfiii000 Cs0.i1D:0579n01 r ' SIUU.es ml a flltcr /or Cl9.sro1 e.w6e. xtL The itrG] of n'-ion/C n 10^ VOruui Polfnrcr >uUmn: r•I., hn:.m; NitaJOrl• Tainoi; Anenl, YurlNU:~ No9uur/. xat..nrcql: IIJVahI. rahnnavn: Lmvmrra. yUSnlo L..C:Illa,: C•'rrt. Re]. Init., Jnnnn lLls. :.all Puo11C COrp•, Sr[Iron: OAOIIOOT Vuel C:ais: JOVn+>L ' J.-yrn•11: /Iir:VOn SlnUai N01na CnuO I:er'1•yystrD MenhyV HLhohU Con.•n: Nlinnf P•,ul: 77 Series: 119, PaOes: ]9-aJ la.•OU.•'In: J:rnJrr ` • lO W .
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DIALOG ell.•1: CA SCANC// 77-/9iVOL 91109) 1COpr. Am, CnOa. Soe.) (ltow 1S o/ 30) User1906 26nov79 232 CA09107050USi CA091070'iAV]]A rA AAA •ylltol or s4rbltol as a • OI Iruclo1e U': su99tener In Cnlnrin0 Jnu flevurln9 alerlnl. for ICrO.eve Cqo111n9 , , . tlinLelCa ~ell,lu n Aalbur: SnlO, llnruhi: luflrora, HIOPhI: Arao, LtsvrOi N Orun:e~l, Junn 0. auu~or: NIYO Jli, r m,aoi: NJ9al. Alauho lvcatlm: O,ro• PPd., Univ, gasnlnOlon, BPnll10, 5act,4n: CA01G000 Publ CIa.1: JGUFhAI Jaw•nel: D.cucles Care Cola•n: DICAD] WA. USA Publ: 76 la-allun: Jnlr„n SC:IIOn: CAOIiOO] P4bl Class: PAT J4I,•ual: JPn. IuFhYO KunU' CoUOn: JAAKAU Publl 790410 Ser,e:: I L•suv: a CaOef: T01-]0 4/entifien: rovic. wePteninn eOCnt olnbPtle, sorbltol diet Pa•les: 5 pP. lnn,luopJ: Jnnan Pntent Ilo: 79 07U.9 AnPlIC No: 74/123769 Dale/ 741023 tll,p,etic revier. rylLlql Olet Oinoqtle rwl.w, /ruC/Ote blet ClacLl AT]LI/01, A21010/00 ~ OieuVtiG revlen AsLIOneJ: lannbo S91yal.u CO., Ltd., Tokyo ' Snlbauru 6leCIrIC r Co•. Lta. IU`IIII/InrS: fish O111ytlrOryoCelOne plucnie IlliCrowave, J U IrlcrOw>vC CuUhlnp flan, waCherel IlovOr Coler n/1erVwave CA091070549•19P lnClu'a In ..Ilh Cnoeulnle ewreten/n0 ' / \a--uflli: Alsuslll tA091G7C94915L ,I:•n.ln acllon: C.t01i00A Pool CInoL: PAT PI•~nl„CIn11 Ir4w YOOtl tqr a IIqVID SMhO prDOVCt LOr VSe In Journal: J/n\. lJhhyU MUnO CuUC n: JAARAD Publl 790416 foua n„nce.eln0 ' PP'-: 5 Pn. L:~nnuanc: Japan •uUun . Uainins, OalY MarS. James al Dalne, Cnarlea: O ~ a:,lent Im: 71 0n]u AuuIie Nol 75/7]GQ Date: 750619 Lu:Jliw: USA P T I C1.,•,::: A7-C1:03 SCa ion: C•L0110G2 Pubi CDass: A ]~::IOnr.•: Llur/nayP CunfOctlUnerY Co., 11U. Jo.rna:: N.5• COOCn: USAxnN Publ: 79C51S Pa9es: S ~ I,••:ntrllPr~: lactose cnocolatP CinOY, f.erl<nCr Ill/lh CnOCqIXt1 pP Pntenl Nn: 4,54000 APpllc No: 71T]69 DPte: 160B7A ~ Clnsf: nCG-G50, A7]Ll/70] , T Assi9,luC: SIJnbC CO. IUinli/lars: s,n4he ylYVOrlnp proV1'lene 9lycol . CA0910705491::J P,ui,r IViCe fl•lvnr i~•PrOVCr.C,\l Yltn tnreCnlnC ' Auln,ar: i, .\wif] l1 \ J.1I. SeCl,onCAU1]004 Pl:bl CIa33: PAT J,•u. 'nA l: JPn. eoFal TuFhyu knno Coden: JNtRAi Poblt 790.IJ] P.\nee: 2 Pv. LnnneanN Jnn.an PJl.nt Ir.: [9 41365 Ap:/1,C uo: 77/105677 Dalel 770202 ClavG: AT]L7/JU ' ~ A:sIqnCV: AllnnmOl4 CO., InC. IUCnlifrer•.: Prune luice ll•\vOr InrVOnlne CA091070549310 P,-uCe3s tor Ireallnq YnrIInIIY Eefatlrtl nVtf Aulnor: Can,uS, PCler M.p OYscu. Peta•r LI. Loo:rt i Vn: V$! Sactlon: Ce01700e Publ Clo:3: PAT Jwr„al: Or,t. CoUen: DnAIAA Publ: 790124 Po9C1t S pP• Patent NO: 1530791 AnnllC I/o: 6]]1GB Date: 751016 Class: A2lbl/]5 Can\try: ui atylpnfe: StJnJn•n Gr.\nJi InC. ' IUCntlf/er:: nut ua/Jlletl plYCer01 treale.nt, pebnut OCf.9l1o OlYcerol trCnlwtnt z9tcvZo00 . CA09107054913C Co.r.entralc0 IIqu10 lor-Calerle a.eHener A„um,r ntrq, Jelfrey H.: Haa+, GCrnarO J, Lo:.rtlm\: USA ~ ScctlUn: CAOIi0U] pool Cluss: PAT JO./rnJl: U.S, CSJCn: US%yAN Publl 790509 Iapea: 4 ppnalent Nu: •15J1]0 APPIIC No: 239792 Date; 770]]0 Clas.: •ITG-5411, AT]LI/7]0 Assipnle: Cena•rnl Foods CVrp. IO:ntl/iers: usoarto,ne sall peetuner, aqpartylGnenylalanlm pr4VYICne Glycol s.Cetenef, pGtaulum AsoertaAe plyCol s.uCtenar , f
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OIa1OG IIICJ: CA SCAOL'I/ ))-iD/Y0L U1(101 (Coor. Aw• C/tM• SOC.) (110m 37 of 401 LIP<r1500 IIYCD)Y CAO•lt090GU1010 S:yarrilun an0 analyf1• of the Pvratnrln• by eaMflneU P+s-Ilouiu enronmlOUrnuny-Cnemlea lonizatlon maPs OOeetrUmCt- ry AulnOf: NJLi91P•10, IIUY L.: Su.lerlunG, David /l. 1orAtiun: DIp• fnlW.•cl, 7c6., Unhv, Oelifonnle, OerYelly, CA r 91"i}D. USA 5.•cllon: CA005001, Ca0)OKIS, Ca0U011[C PVbI Class: JOUIIN.IL Ja.~rnal: PvruUhrum Post CmN•n: PYN>AY Pu01: 70 SCr.a•:: le IssuC: 3 Pn•)0e: SO-0] IO:nllliers: DVrrlnr•in Ya5 Cnronuln0lW1f lPOCtrMvetry CAO•1100C W ]0•IY Cerinav+.c oropcrtlon of euu•n cubatltmos esoelnoJ In Onull'Ui.btIC ral C.yCronicnt9 A.,11•nr: Lr1,InJ• P• Luc.•I~nn: D•:nt. Scn., Unlv. Muepabvrp, Mu0N0ur0. 0 P)00, frO, V, . GCY. S,t•on: CA00a000, CA01)lKI(, CA0G]ItA1t PVul Cla511 CUM1P nfJC J.n•rnal: u.vIln suO.,r Sub-n tluleu, Prpc. CXLDD Cunf. SuO.n• Suo,l~lulCS CoJan: •IOI/Ca) Puul: 70 PnGes: ]09-JJ Me.-"n0 uale: 70 . P,e•Ilsnrr: n.~rypr AtlUress: Oanel, Svill _ z..~,I: GunnCnn.•im, 0 ' ILI..a~I~Crs: reV4u+ $uoar sVbstitVle Cbr/ODCnIOI{Y. tooth car~es GoU~r fWSlitulR rea,N CAE•110900u1D3e S.•••n11m.COUS tleterminal/nn of IsosorCltle Olnitrate and III me..... ilret, ~n num:m Pla:ma Ey' Ca0111ary Column 4LC n rA Ia t :r l O t 0 • l,ssee . .; .ul er , , . aulnnr: Lu.n11w~: J. P• anJ C. I/Cymans 'Inxl• PbnrmaCol„ Univ. Gnont 0-t•C00, Oelo. 5:[I.w.: CADOIUUI PuDI Cliss: JOU0II.1L I: J. rnarm• Sc1. Cuuon: JPtISA[ Publ: 70 Ser.es: L0 lauo: S eeJes: C•3TG0 lurntiflcrsl isusoruRlP n4 Va1e DIooJ gas cnromalo0 Os09109GCSlC•9v , U:1er•.•nel~c•+ of c1on.VCydm /n numan Dla:•na by Uas enr,.•.alY~l•'~nn/ ne~.tllve IJ~1 chemical lonlt•llion m•1:5 Spe.a•'vi•CIrY 1/. l••.alu ud N ll • P9. O.uVw~n. 07110 USA Druq l1HaU., Moffwann-La Ro che Inc•r . . y, . u CA001001 Publ Class: dDUllNSI J,rurnul: )) J. Curu~•~nln0••. COac•n: JOCPAb P : ]]9- d Pu01: )9 ,+pes , u $rrros: 1 lu•-nllllera: Clnnate4'•+m .:Jln OIOOG. niP1 /yTClronCtrY na0 89M000 lon ClonavePa/s 311
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Not nocdcd Rcquesler's Data of after. Order no. reque.a: Call No. ur.Rnr:Y LO2ILLARD RESERRCH CENTER POD 21683 GREEI.SL'ORO, NC 27420 For use of - Status Book author: OR: periodical title, vol. snd date Dept. A REQUEST Book title, edilion, ptace. year, series: OR: periodical article author, title, pages. 11his edition only. Verified Lri: On: i:em cited in ISBN, or ISSN, or LC card. or OCLC, or other number it known It norrcircula6ng, & cost does not exceed S , please supplyOPAicrofilm a Hard copy RequestcomptmsnRh pUTHORIZEDOY: O /0F(9) (?i GuiCalines (CCG) (FULL NAM@! ' - O o:hcr provrslons of oopYr+gnt law (CCL) Title c Date of Nol needed Requesters e request: after: order no. ~ - u e P,Ar,v LORILU.:RD RESE/:.n,CH CENTER PO"u 21698 G1:EENSEORO, NC 27420 For use of Status - Dept. . Book author. OR: periodical titte. vot. and date REQUEST Book title, edition, place. year. series: OR: periodical article author, title. pages.CThis edilion only. Verified in: OR: itcm cited in ISBN, or ISSN. or LC card, or OCLC. or other numCCr if known II non-circutating, & cost does not exceed $_ . please supplyQt.licroldm Q Hard copy RMurntcompheswith AUTI(OFtl7.CODY:_ 11101119) Of Crndrnnvs (C CC) (FULL t+M.ll-1 _ OO/ne/pror.,wnsu/aop)r~9nflaa(CCL) TiilO ivOL. 9..-N0.._12,. $EPT.. 21. , . 1979 f
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t.o Prb\t ]/]/1-6 DIaLOG s//ea: CA SCAeCN 77-79/VDL 91(00) (Copr. Ar., Cnew. SaC,) Itts,s I of /:1 Uso1906 26.009 Insntl/iOrst rulrosamine berGlclde soll EeOrdn CA09107057/1190 N,jrO•.O,erf.l COnylnunJ{ r.rlnnr: Swrmr, It•ISUJ Sfa lPnl CAO)]005 Publ Clessl PAT Jaurrul: Lrr. Ollrn. Cudc•n: DM%N!% PuOlt 790503 9,la:f: 19 pn. Lnna"nOr: Car • P.rtent Ilp: ]ua6lU] AImIiC Na: T:/ItB048 Dets1 771027 , CIaLa: C0T115/12, A61M]1/PI CountrY: Jaunn. IOCnrlflcrs: lunor Innl611ar nltroscrlDO/ulYnosylurea, Isur.Cni] rnn•Gilor r10o/prpnuxYlyrea, rIGO/VranosYlurca nltrusp Cnlo•-oclnyl CA00107056264K Iln-nlonstru nilro-trr•.pres. fOrmatlOn and fOV111Dratlnn Of VIny1,L anU .IIIYI/L nltrOx.lixlulx n]I•rrl: Irlr,:nCl(la. Cnrlstopner J• I/,:nt,Cn: li.'J:rrC4 CrnLC: Nrx. CCnI., Notl. Callcsr lrlNt., Rr•,u•rcn. 2IV01• USA Sc•~lrnn: Cn4]]JOfi Punl Class: JOUONAL Juu•n.rll e. Or9• Cnrrx• Cctlrn: JOCEAN Oubl: 79 SCr.ro: 4 4 13 P•ures: 2324-0 1(IrnlrlrCr:: L.'ICnVICInYln,lr•p!.a~ninC CliAln,ltipn. nltlonaml- nyl, •ylnmlriC n,tr(r:0, aiu/rle n1{rp60 Vlnyl, tpsylp.y.`InYlOirinf nClOSylp.ylatlpn, O11Y1 nltr4•:a•nlne INnu.rirallor, . C107107054736S EI(rCt ur pork bvtly comOUSltlon and nltrlte level On nib•n:.\niin.. Yoryn+tipn In frieU baecn dutnu:: .:•qarrr, .I. IY,; leinuerJ• d. I.; OoclCVr C. J.; Pnrll,pi. Jr„U.: irOUl.•r, Ir, Lu.alrw\: ENf10. Sci. (JUC• AUrs., PnlladOlp/n a, PA, 19118, USA S.clion: CA01700] P,.nl Clnss: JOU6NAL Jourrml: J. aorlc. fouJ C Co,lrno JAfCAU' PuGI: 79 Ssrlex: 07 Issu.•: n pe0~a: Be0-5 lpentlfrrrs: bacon nrlrosa+rn0 nltrlts CA091010C0977Y Dc4rJdnllOrl Cf ner'OIeIdC-relaled nltrpsar/nes In aerOblC spil: Autnur: Olivcr. J•mm: C•: Nrarnevr Philip C.: Kontson. Arnuln loeation: Cra ie. Oryranelinn lap.. %9r10. Enrlren. Oual, InSI., Cf11:..•Ila`, r.")• )01p5. USr S.rl1Yn: Cr:G±OC] Pu41 Cla:{: JOURNAL JOUrnil: J. 4i-"C. roorl Cncn. CLU.`n: JAFCAU PVO1: 79 Ssr/ex: ]7 IL:ue: 4 Pa9ex: Bu7-91 SS4vTOpo w 236 CA091010500e7P bHrnnu:am,r ronlets In undlflerenlloleo Oerelnnro6 Of ul/,nrv •IlOmll In straln A•ICe Irl a studY Invplvino a tJb]:Co 61rfCillC nllrOxamino, N-nllrOSonOrnlcot/ne APln,lr: Iliruta, NJrip Lu:utlaU r/aylor Dana Inst. O/s. Prev., As. Nealtn Found.. ValNtl l•+, NY, 10!r94. USA SC:ilun: CA00n011) Puol Clasl: J011RNAL Jo rtnalt C.u\rrr LetAr ISnannun, 1,01.1 Codenl CALEDt7 Pool: 79 SeriOs: 6 Issue: 6 Paqes: ]6S-9 lb:ntr/lors: rJtrospnprnleOlinO earelno.na 1u11vAry 01.10 CA09107050429N , Tn! UeleGllon of 1.110.11 nltrOeaminls In tne nepatoCyte pri,xlry rulturrCiONA rePalr test Autnor: Mllll,rmy, OOry M.: Lpsnla. Y/cnael F. Lrn:ntlon: Naylor Dana Inst. Dls. PrCV.• Am. Nsaltn EoVnd., VAlnllla, NY, 10595. USA ' ~ Seation: CAGOe001 Pubi Class: JOUOIIAL dnarnal: Cancer Lelt• (Snennorl, Irsl.l Codfnt CALEDO Puul: 79 Serles: 0 Issue: •I-5 P.19rst 199-]06 ' IJUnli/il•r1: nltrpraminC 1lepalOCyle DNA rspalr carclno9Cnicily
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Print 11/1/1-.10 294 DIAL04 r uun: Cs SEARCH 11-19/VOL 911101 ICObr. Am. Cnow, Sne.i (lter• 1 of' 40) Ussr1906 11sep19 CAO910901n7630 Convn.wnt ~,iC11•.oo for tnD GreVaratlon of eotlninc Aull•u••: 1_ull'•o• Ya1uTa: 1.',,l:,uCn14J, HJJIr,p: SJilb, ANfra: Na l.., rlunlu: nl::,xl. laxYrb: IrnUUCn/, IJJ:.ao Lu.atra.n: Conl. RO:. IP}l., J:,Pnn tobacco unD Salt Publlc Cvy., Yoxanra~+, T]1, JnpJn 5ectlo.p CAOJ1005 PtNI Claa: JOURUAL J„urnal: AWiC. Olol . Cn,m. CoJUn: ABCHA G Publ: 79 SerlcD: 13 1 • .Ja: p7r] co l i/l I r1 La"t I/ i er 1: a DrCi`n, n I CUl l ne O.I Dn O0091090106U1 61 / A Si••PIC teCnnlbue for tE! DrCCDaratlon Df solutlons for OunlrlJl,vC infrarCP SPCCIrusCaPy Auv'ur: Soutn.ICw. CvCrett e.p Nlnu, DouOlas N , l,.c,tiun: IrCS. CCnt., LlOlell anJ Llyer. TCDaccU CO.: Dur•nanr, NC, 7i]07, U5A S:rlron: C.:O]C003 PJbI Clas.: JOURNAL J.,.n-nJI: J. Cnan. EDuc. CnOCn: JCEDAB Publ: 79 56 Ia•ue: G PeJos: 304 Itlan[r0Cr'S: IaD C'.Pt IR 6PCCtrbfCOpy. fDln pl'OVrI IR iPeClro:!uuY C.PI ' CA011109072740F M.un-J,,.:tY 11PuP"olOfn, rI51r faCtors of IsCnenlC heart m:-.>e. n..q •.umr wC'al-Ue+VWnFnle Intl A,i:unr. Ln.rl!aov, IL G.; OCJV, A. p.; C.es TIIOY. V. N,t IOJOY41• A. A. 5,~. l.'.,Ii./," 5:'alrun: . S. US''rl I::.01•IG0a N. Publ Cla•.s: JOURN AL J.n•'r..,l: Uvarl. vsvs. HJrn,ol. Na uch. Tsentra AXIN SS£R Cuo•u: COJUUd Pu•JI: i0 Iscuc: I Pn90s: •10-1 L.nu•'_t,c: Rui: Cii\llu.,: Ra•1, I/I„ 9601. KHlrn. 1979. Abitr. NO. 10iaA]1 tJ;ntrl'le•'.: olas'••a nlyn JunsltY IIPO?rotaln CaroloValny, Cisx f]-.1Jr 11<+rl CI::JSe CAOU10907071H T~rcC crr•.•<•+IS: tnC essance of sC.Val eonv.unleallon •Y=:~n•.. i,111CtICtn{s SDCCiCf Nlun, J. A.: Pllm,.rr, J. R.: 61er1-LCOnbJrDt, B. s.: $P1. x1. A. 1/.: CnaP•nJn, 0. l. Lu...Ation: O.U. Cn..n. Stnc,. Lab.. OPlesvnla .Orle. Ra•.. Crnt., CCllsville, IFJ. :070'i, YSJ. Sral,Gn: U0t7001 Puu4 CIJia: J0UR%:L J,.u"nal: -•nco I+IJ:n"rolon, 0. C.) CoOOn: SCICAS Pu01: 79 SJrlc::: 204 Issu>: A90 Paqes:13IU-30 In.•nt'rf,erl: /^]IH D'r0/•orpne I,erJUCCCniI, HC4lolnfi PnerDn•Dne ovlDOXilo9 LelriDCCenJI 6vE6I000 CA091UOU':100]Y Nlcullno ra.•oval fro,rr tobacco with a.vrqnlun 9ot Autnurl frMUtm./, TetsuP: NunaVasnl, H/Oeot SnlnOnara, 1aNU0 "uruxr. 1•I~U,I,n]aa; SDne, Yu\Jb • lne.,l IU'r: J:,Ir.rni Srcl,o•': CA011007 Publ cla•s: PAT JuurnJl: Jun, koMa/ fDYAyD Nuna CODCn: JNXXAP Publ: T90n75 Pwo,y: 5 On. Lanyua;la•: Japan 1'Jlenl Iro: ]9 5I]90 Allolie rb: 77/116116 Data 770929 Cln.s: A2.11119/0,1 Asslonec: JuPan TobACCO end Salt Public CorP, Inentllla•rH tobaCCO nlCotinC renaval i,nnun/• CA0910U07t9021t 1-!,fulnVl-3-1lOPrOPY1CYClapen[.1nC-1.=-DICirbO.Y11C ACID an6 1ts nstrrs o'vIny 0'+DC uNOr nno taste to tbbacco Aul/wr: lnin.,a. TLt.ullp NJqucnl, Lta1ab Lu.nllen: J.yran 5eelian: CA'0IIOG7 Publ Class: PAT Juu•'nal: Jr'n. Xqxal Toxxyo Rnl,o COCen: JNXXAX PyDMi 790•IIB a,bes: 4 PD. LonOU?~c: JaVnn PJIOnI No: 79 607!11 ApPlrc No: 7V/11311Y Dalal 770922 CIJS:: C07C01/0U, A7apJ/1], CO7C51/C0. C0vC09/1A J.ry.en louaeen anu S:,It PubIIC Coro. l.lcnlltiurs: tobacto metnyllauVroVYlcYClOVCntaM CICirborryl- •ta csle'• ' CA09109091071F CrrluroPlJyl annerenCP to' Plant DrotoPlast. In4r.¢t'r•'n uflpl/, caleluw ano PEO Aulbnr: Ua:nIw1YJ. H. SD.Olfie lucatiun: AGriC. SC1. Lab., Union Carb/De CorD•. Tarryloun, NY. 10'i•J1, USA 5CC1,0•~: CAU11017 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: tlaturw''sennCna/lOn Cauen: NAIMAY Pb01t 11 Sarfes: G6 Issue: B PJOes: 31e-I5 loenllfiors: CnloroDlasL abnerenCO ProtuDlast calclun
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OIaIDG Pllvae CA 5EA01'N 77-75/MOL 01(101 (Cbpr. As.'Cnew. Sac.) (Item i] o/ 401 UfaP1900 1116079 i97 1.0 CAO•11090G^•r6pJ Pr,.r,~.er•rpu,C olallclJes: e noval meellanl]n ol aetion In trP•trunterwa IarrnO Aulr•Or: lunU, AI4Cr1 E.: NOIIInOwOrln. RObfrl Y,I \1VrtlbCM, wrrv L. lrrr..ilron: OCU. [ntPnol., Purnua Un/v., w. LafaYetta, IN, 47007. . USA Srul,on: CA0U50UJ Puol Clao: CDNf PROC Jnurnal: nnv. PCSIIC.'sel., Plneiry Lcu.Synp• Pap• Int• Ca..r• . :I b -wlen: <CIYAJ PuUI: 79 SYrreY: ].• • Pa9CSi45~9 M1:COIInvI Oale: 711, C,.ulisbCr: epr0•1••ron AOJrexx: O./orU, En01 , A.,,1: C;IS'.buenlCr•, /lan0 it::nlilier]: /OrrnJmi0in0 IePipOpICrOVf IarVa, Cn10r/11xN//Ora1 In].•ct nCrVOUt iystem , Cai^1090r•995nR 11,> InlCr.tCllOn O/ PC]IlCltlef vltn QatOf, reCCplor\ LnC ens..Ct W 1n,/ nervnu9 ]YF1rm A..tluur: 0'Orirn, R. 0. L..:.,Ir4n: Scct. Mauroulol, UCnav., Cornell Univ„ Ithaca, NY , 1-111i0, VSA 5-Ct•nn: CA00500A Punl Clasl: C0/6, PROC Juu•'nal: nar. P.•stle. SC1.. Olenary leCt. Sy'nP• PoP. Inl. COn„•. PYa,c. CnC•n., .Ilh Cc•JCn: a0IVAJ Publ: )9 Sen rz: ]• Pnr.Ct: .1 .Il-S7 LMelrnO ortle: 7u P..hllsr.Cr: h.rO.r.npn A,L~u.ea: O./Grd, E.,3 . . A„~,I: GC•::IryCnltr, /l:nlt Llerr111iCr'S: IICtliciUC InleraGtlon nervous fyllCP, acftYlCnGlr/•caeri:e Ily nCStleitrC Interaction ' CAOVIC'JCG99a0C ' EC:I,:C,•C ,1CtiCn Of inlCCl cCll IInPb auurur: 1,, 1,1: EOwln P.d uul,nan, G. Ilnrl. luc.rtial: L•`I,+b, P\,Ilnl, Pex. lnb,', AOric. RCl. SC1, EOVC, Aom„' f,u'o•+. nD, •.•V10J, u5A R¢t•u••: CAC0500a Puul CIVST: JOUONAL Ju.,rnnl: In VllrP Cuaen: IICSAP Puoll 70 Serles: 15 i P.,npf: ]G0-{ IJ:ntl/lers: ectlvsunC loo.¢co nornwrn, alanpuca morphol eeav.one CAOntO9049847C Ellecl G/ ],C-0 On IGUacco Plantx ayll•Ur: Ia,..rf•'J] Lr•n.rVO, 1.: CorICS LIU,10t, 4, SGaiI1 S,,a ,dn:~CJJ0.00) Vubl Cless:~J0U0::Al Juurnil: Pn. Ina. IL,C, IuvCa, AOrJr., SCr•: PCOI• VCp, (5aa•nl CuPan: AP1vAn Puul: 70 Serlex: 0. PaVes: 159-IS Lan4ua4e: Snan zvsvtooo . Itlunt1/lerft C/IIOrOpnenG\yaCetale toOlCCo prb,Itn CA0910906911200 Mlylotn,lcily of COr/CUlllnral CnfrxiGalf to Cropf• IV. Eunt,llcltl.S 111" Conlr,ollin0 UInsL AuU•Or: Sbn4a'.r, Y.is•':hl: TofnrOe, f0)I hu-ili.'n: AOr'IC. CnOm. Innp. Sln., luhyo, JCGan Seetion: CA00pG0] Puol CInAS: JOUb:uL Juur,l.~l: fluyahu Nn1la)h0 IIJhoNU' Cbllent NNNOAM Plrbll 77 5ur'/ct: I), PaOes: ia-7 Lampa9C1 Japan IJCIn111,Cr>: fun01C'IEe riCe Clasl, crop /unplClOe pnylOldaclly ' Ca091090419122/1 , IhinGVIn.:1C n! an InOICaIOr Of lobACCO fWMlnp A„Inn•': Onr,ICr'l, DICICr: J1rr14C. DVeChb,lrO lxallurr: lusl, Soc. uJO. Enlucnuol., Fed. Ne]Itn 01f., Ocrlln. PYtl. n<u. Gcr. Sccllon: CAOOa01] Pvol Class: JOURNAL .lourwl: Pr•CV. „I~V. CcOen: PvlIM7 Pu011 79 . SOrIMt a 3 P.loe]: 351-7 IpPnli/•Cr•:: OIOOtl terum 1n10Cyanale fmOwlnp, tOba<CO trr.ohlu0 UIVUU tnlOCVanatf `CA09100069115/1 Eflc•cl'1 n/ maternat ymoMlnO on ClrculOtlnO CaIICAol],IIIn1 ICrCI: Jn.1 /Clal heart ratCx AuU.Or: Du'UICy• IA• E,: Sheehan, K. L.: wllhe], 11, Y.: Yen, S. S. C. loc,ltlon: aN. ucC., Univ. CJlifornla, La Jolla,. CA, USA 5•¢llor,: CA00•IUI] Publ Clas]: JOVNnAI' Journnl: Anr. J. Obllel. Gyrrecol, Conen: AJOOAN Pu011 70 Scrlev: IJ] Issue: u PnOes: CO$-90 IU.•nllfrers: malernal SmpMlnp CalaCnolamine /etA1 heart CA00109011971 oC Cn,r,pC in body weight In rats treated wlln nicotine an0 ta(/e•np Au Olor: DimiOh P. YanCa: SJtta. Y. , Lucallufr: Univ, Sassm•i, Snssari, Italy Svclro•1. CA00A01] P,r01 Clnss: JDURNAL ' Journsl: Sel,u,r. UvU. cooen: SCIYAJ Publt 75 Ser.<s: 65 IxsaC: 3 Pa00x:199-70a Lan0ua0e: Ilal lUtntl/lers: nicotine eYllelne body wt, /ooU Intahe nicOtlne CY/IV'nC
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D1A:0G P1Ha1 CA SCANbI 77-79/VOL 91100/ (COon AS. Cnels• Sec.) (IteN 9 of 701 Usar1900 21nav79 ' 231 CA04107G564770 Ir,cyclelS.0.1.07.6 hdee-J-,rn-91B1-YI •Ikyl- pr alnors Iwlnur: /ln//mnnn, Nr•rner: Scllubler, lbtl./p W:dl,on: frn. NeP. Ger. Srct,on: Cao]a010 yubl Clnas: PAT Jaurual: L•r. Offen.i Cuclen: ONYXUA PeO:s: e rn. Lcr,OUenJ: por P,llfr•t 9pl 26•qS19 APPIIC No: 7E•@51D CI:-:S: C01C<l/IU. L01Ca1/10 a_;ylqn:f: OASP A.-D. Publl' Date: elkenyl 700]17 7D09]9 IJ.u411rCrs: Iriq'ClotleeanYl a1kY1 allrer Varlulne, elsrlu•evclooecenyl etner pfr/uln, etnee trleyCloUecenvl a1FV1 p.•rlrn,f, Per/umf tr1CYCIJdcCCnvl nikyl fln¢I•, UI_yc1a~P[n1+J•enC Jlr,n~lol u(Nln, allranul :redn UICVCIOpentnClenf , a•Allr all•n+ul uiGYGlppfnlaOieM . CA0910705L4120 Ja5leJniC , uU e9terf Aulnor; full:n.A, Talnotsu: Noberl, Taafo: /'uMUSnlma, Asoko: SaF.li. aun•Y.I/u Lnc.n r J.wan Sr,::/on: ~ CAUJAOOn Puul Clnns: PAT 1.11: J/rn. Xel,.li TU41.yn M/.no ro(ICnt JKXXAF Vubl: 7901U'1 a,+.p.;: l0 nP. lunqu.•Oel Ju(an P,ltr•n1 N): 70 32,150 App11C IIC: 7]/9p]G(/ Date: 770010 CL1•.s: COT:49/•/5 ~ A'-'.,./nCe a4:r CneIn/CJl PnSe.+rCn Ceita`r: IJ:,,trfr:r]: la:n011iC aCle C.ICr PCrf1.mC A CA09111705617Sv .na.nn,J....V•Ita.-Un.nluret.•e CnrbonYG lomPPVnds Lm:,al•on: .•t!. Spc:lcn: [a0!]J11 PuUI Class: PAT JOU,n:l: J(•n. 4nFFyn Nnne CuaCn: •.aAAA(I Publi 790417 IJ9:l: 20 pn, l.meupqC: Japan r.ltxllt :(.u j9 0::0`.xSPUIrc Pu: 701190111 Dat9: 701222 Claa: COl•:a]/]0. [O7Gn/^S. [0]Cf9/70, C07(49/45 CeuntrY• S.ISs Rrr,nCnrCl, S. A. ILCnt/1rJr1: VnSi:p C.lrponyl IlavorlrQ roed, decad Lnb.Tte prepn Icoe fli+or• nClrtenYl GrJmiCf aJOn prCPynoalV CAC91C705C19vr . I,t-UCI.•u•un-]-ona Auln~r: I~,~li• Jrre ' ' LUCit,Gn: J•1:f.,:1 Seetlo0: CAU]JG15 Fuul Class: PAT Juurnal0 Cer. Ol/un. Cuoen: CIIt110S PVOIt 790412 PaOJS: 14 ep, lana..l0e: Ger Palenl Nnl G0e•1155 Apollo No: 77/1909]5 DaLel 771011Clnss: COJCJ9/70, C0'lCAS/IG CpuntrY: Jaoun. AeliUnee: llrlsuUrSrll PetrOCnrml[al CO., Ltd. Id)n111(ers: octadiCnol o~1aa, pncnantnrenCner perfume oCIJ:11enJne, 1•In9 annela{lon OC{Jeianone ' ' CA09107056351M ' Allyl Clurrp In prrlLU+ery Aulnorf Utllur, Mhurshld P,: pecMer. JosepO J. Lo:allun: Snllc. Scaiolr: CA023009 Publ C1nss: PAT Jn/rnal: U.S, Ceuen: USASAIA Publ1 790417 /a9ast 3 pp• ! PalCnt so: 4150000 Apollc No: 77/6054 Datel Class: ]5]-•.=}, CIID9/Otl, A41N7/94 . CounlPyl Swiss As:iNnCe: firn~•:nitn S. •• IG:ntlller5: allyl elner PerltMne 710516 CA091010551e5M 9//ect Of Sweeleners on enerOY uptake and tn01r utllltatlon Uy rpts Aylnort GJ.eeMi. Jan: DVCnerrLMi, MJCIefI Itur•ninsFa, Annal UrWlluwic), 1AiCCJynlpu Lo:ol•on: In5t. Stmnalol., Scn. slccl., Pornan, Pol. . SCCllon: CA01000A Publ Class: JCUPI/AL Jp~rual: ACta PI,VSICI. yol. CuJCrI: APYPAY Publl 79 SCI•I.s:]J ISVU•:: 5 PaUCS: ADI-7 ld:nllflrrf: sucr'usP fnerOY metau. Olucose appetite growth, 91vCine Ornwm ener•uY mCtab CAC91070+'19041` ir,.CleSe n\ e dlflary sueetenfr In diabetes alallltus Auulor: xulvlslo, Vflklro A. , le:nllon: 5cn. u,•d.. vnl4 Unlv., Nrw Naven, CT, USA Sc a iun: CAOt0000 Publ Class: JOURNAL Jo./rnal: pleuetCS eare Cederl: OICAD2 Puoll 70 ~ Serles: I ISSuo: 4 Pnaes: ]<1•6 IbJnllllCrs: rfvie• eiaoftos frVcto!o mftao, s•reelfner IrNCtC1o alUbVtes rev1GV sbebtooo
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rrba L:/1-)0 DIALOG Ille<: CA 47AYCN /1-19/VCL 91(06) (COPr. A.. CN,b SoG•) (ltan I oF 3111 User1906 R6nOw79 7-e1NY1 IleinlnurCinP/10ri to CA091UOC67SJ7J tyf/y+l• GV"OULIIIOna Fu1nC~': I•,rui, YPhO LuC.Tllun: J~nO,n Sucnun: G:On70o5 Publ Clnssi PAT Juurnal: Jl,n. kohn/ toMLYO NOno COOOni JMFLAF 19LdJ] P.,ya: 3 GP. lai~yun//c: U.van Paarnl MyP '/9 nl]]U noullC No: TY/IOU790 pita[ CIatS: E41M1/Jfi i:.siynee: l.,naua ScIyuhu Cn., Ltd. In+nt,J wr~: m,lnu OclO mm+osCCCnaOlde DerhJma• Oluccse P'rlume PVbIt 770907 IYaln. CA09100007570Y ' CJ:~~•<tlt I~u DerfmnurY rae mntlr1E19 aurvey AytUUr: 9,:n.•, Pctm• l,¢>l,on: Cr,ll. $rcl1cn: Cs':U1000 PuUI CIasN JOURNAL Juu•'nali VJ~~vI. Cllrn,. At•ruSUl /IOVS COdent LICANAN - Publt 79 S•.rle.: 50 I:•:uC: 9 PnOCS: 37-0. AI-~, 45 Icnntlfiers: rtvio-.• cosmelie rPU naterlal, Derlume rnv malrf~nl ••lvla.• nnlr Orenn fnn mPlerlal revlew CACYICUOC]Sr.60 Pr.r/mnr;n nnJ sunscrMm: Pnrl 7 , Aolnar: a•.4nie, b.un.t! VdfauJil lu:J:io•~: r~."aa Il,lls„Nl'• L:a , :.41ion: C;•fL:J)0 P„pl Clags: JOUONIL Jturn„1: Ofuu CO;~n•t. InU. Coden: CCIN.ID Publl 79 Str,r.: IN ~zsu^: 5 nngts: 30-41. IqO, ISp luantlfl.•ra: r.vrrw >unsmroln Per/un,C ' Ci091070517^G4 T~ A 1 h Y I nurt a~•Pl,Ort Au:ncr: Fullsa.a, TdmOt)u: NohunV, renOCf Fu\ushlni, bMOp SJItn av ie.,ly ' . :4rut,c-I: J..I:an SretlOt: CAO.lo010 rubl Clnsse PAT J,•ufr,al: Jur. Noha/ TOlu.yo NuhO COODnt JNL[Af PVnll T90.t07 P.ryrs: a On. LanOUnrla: Jnoon Patrnt ilc:. 79 41059 AOVI,c no: 11/9a6lD Dntli T1o609 cla..s: COTC•w/TT •ssiu^Ce: 5,Ip---,l [ne~nleal Lrsrureh CC•nllr IJ:nli!ICr:: aln•/InGrCa~MnOr ~PrrrVme DrlPn. CYC10110tln YILyl,dtnaLYCloGenlatlicnr cnlcruicrYlunilflle . CA091010517:SN SloE6IOQ0 . . 7]0 Aul/1:rf: rulla:u,a, TanMtaul IIONOrIi Tih.01 /VNUSNIUa, AsikOi Sahal, Ny,Ihn/1l 10:,\ I l y l: .L,:In„ 5lalvI' LAOJP010 Publ Clnsa[ PAT ' Jairnal: Jan. NnN./ Tokkyo Nunu COdenf JN7Uf Iubli 790433 PuU.re: U nP. tnnyya0l: Janan Palcnl 'In: 79 nin61 APVIIC NO[ n/sa667 Dala 770002 Clda: C0:'Cr9/R;, eu1NT/•16, C1109/G0 ' As>Iy,m.N S.,puul CnCialcal ntar•,rcn Canler lu>n111Crs: VOr/umY aYhYl,OCnenOrCanPnOr OrPDn. CYGIOa00n a1NY11JVUacvelopenL\dleno cnlo:•OaCrYlenilrlls ' CA09107050994Y 11\Irnola,7-il(IS(olhlaiOlOne dlOalde aiulnnr: rru~n.nlftl, Cuonter: SaeOer, Crnst: Cn911, YOIAnard Lu:allu•r: fa0. RlD. 6cr. sCalml: Cn07000, PuA1 Classi PAT Jo urvil:, Cc:•. Of/en. COOen: GUM%6A Pubit 7UC510 PPyr{: Ip nP. Lanqunflc: Ger Falpnl'11u: 274,640 APPIIC NO/ 2749640 DON: 771105 Clasl: CO'/0517/Oa, 17]L1/7J6 ' nspi9nce: IbumaO, Dr. flarl., C.n.b•N. Iel:Oll/,erf: svCnl.nVr lnleYOlaotntalClon., tlllene/sotnlito- IUUO OIO.IVc ICAO91o7E5C5A]z 5v-\Ine':OS nf polVwerlaable .eOlals, IY. Readlly nYJrOlI+'IUI! ncCtals 1ron, CllronellPl on0 vltamina Aulhur: N.InIJyl.a, HIr4YO1nI: /laramOlO, Yu1CnIr0: Nanafa•a, Masafn lOValiOn: (iCP• An01, Cnem., YNna~wsnl Unlv., Nolu. 400. Jauon Sea lont CA02501S Pybl Cless: JOURNAL JO~rnal: Dull. CnM. SaC. JOn. CoOen: 6CSJAB Vubli 79 Serlas: 57 Issue: 7~ Papes: 0<G-0 IDwlifflrsl Pyrfum0 cllrunalloE vlnylbMlylOaybeOlaldenyDi icllel PrePn, wltamin aeevsl nydWlyaia T I
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DIALOG Pllea: Ca SCA9b1 77••79/YOL 91/001 (Cppr. A.. Cncv.• SoC.) 111eta 30 uf ]p) Uaar19V6 76noy79 234 V CAO•1I0705.>210 A mpla wC(hop for PJtarnlnin9 lria Carbonyl value o/ volatlle caivnnil cOq`ountls. II1. Orlltlons betwean Ina en'bnnyl vJlue u1 volatil4 earbbnyl euaccmnaN and flavor aeore of Ir,rO rICC Cracher5 with anllOnlllahla 4ulnnr: GnyJ_u. DJiyo: aluhal- AAlra: Cnla, 'ahlluyuhI lui.llidt: AIrnU.~'Jl0 CO., Inc., IlyOb:,altl, JaPan SCCtrun: CA017002 Pub) Clnsn: JOl11P•Al JnurnJ1: y'uLaVaNU CoOCr1: YNLnAII Publt 79 SerlOa: 26 S Payaa: JIf-20 LancuaGe: Jnpan (JC:rllflarat nnlloni0ant cracaur ranClAltyr elleate antlnalJant cret\er, GIIA Gnt/Oelt/ant OrEChpr, UNT LnllOSlqint, crac.ur CA091010541241n AGitl Pru:luCtlOn ffOm fUCrOS• aVballlutea In nunin tlQnlal Dl,.our Autne•: nrrbm0. 0,: Eowarptsan, S. LoC.rl-,: $cn. 0l•itl„ Unlv, Lund. LI,i1r/Ca. 5-21a yl, $wetl. Seatren: Ca01]002 Punl Class: COIrt PROC Juurnal: n:Jlln Suqsr SubStitutes, Prrn. I:RC00 Con/, Suqar Sublt: CU:rCn: 'IOR:.IA1 Pu01: '!9 P,IUCa: ]II-17 ' FI:CI ino 1`.+la: 7 0 P,•ulisna••: Ner9cr aOJras.: 6ascl, Sw1ta , larntilr+rst cariunun.cltY test leoR D U(Na. 'aeltl Dteqae mrfonen/City Lest ' J CA0911,7054122n ' Aco-.ulfanf-N, n ne+ noncalorlC soeeterer AutnOr: ArI:C, n, J. luo,t•un: /!.•cencl A.-0„ rrmmfurt, DOJO/00, leo, Rep. Ger•, S(v.ticn: CeolYp02 rubl pnss: C016 PPOC J.•o.. nrl: uealn Su9.+r S,rnslrlotea. YrcC, LROLIU Conf. Su9ar Sunzl.tul^1 Cutlcn: aOnbIAT PuUI: 79 Paqes: 170-03 e•CCrr.q DJro: :u Pun11LnC~: M(irQCr AJOreasl Oas01. 5.11[ A.nfl: :r/V•:,mera, 0 . I:h•ntll/.lra: aCCaVI1JmC K a.eCtanln0 aDCn[ cAD9161o$JG;1s Orlerndneliun of sweet cdnpnnqnt' In Stevla rObnu(IIanA by h!On-p_rfurin_nCe IinJ1J Cnrtrn.ilCUr,•pl\Y• IIIIraYlola•l OetcCllon aJlnur: II,;~M1,nrltJ. YOn..i: L:Ur•Y:`:.U. bJSaIJMi loC.lt.dl: a,1.n0 y.'O~ren'S Call, PI•ann„ MOOY• Jipin SvCtron: CaC110U1 rubl Clasn: JUVOn>L JPUr:lal: SnoYanuOa\u basn, Cc.:¢n: SNLAAY Pvbli 16 Slrlei: 32 ISSVC: A P,I"s: :OJ-11 I(1Cn(Ifrerl: $tCVli luee:fner el!rGrnaCe9, rlbOUPloslqe Eatn, stt•7rCM1lCa tletn 6bet,I000 . e/A9107C'iA61]J .o1Pn•1•'U'GlucnPYrsYwa100-1,6-wrbllol Nr0 ,a1Pna.-D-Olucop- yrana.JO~1,G-uSlnnllol IPalallnitl Au1FOr: Srt•'Jerl, G•I GruuP. U. 1n:nllnn: OP,II• biol. Cnnn., Unlv. Nonennalm, ShelOart, D-Tp)0/20, ICd. RCp• Lar. $ea lmr: CAOn00U Publ Clasal CONf PROC daurnal: Nralln SuOar Suuslllutea, Proc• CRGOII Cunf, $uVar SuuStilulca Con.•n:a0RC1A1 Publt 79 Ps9es1 109-10 Sleelinq Dala: 70 PuUli.ncr: Narqer Ftltlrense 6aaa ,Swlt[ Av.lll: GVl1UCnnCiw• 5 ' Inantf/inrs: revle+ ROlallnlt su0ar aubstltutb a+estan/n0 pent Palntinlt review CA00107054G42N peplication an0 permeab11/lY In the enimal wo0a1 AulhGr: LOUSUwr„T• A. Lo:a(lun: [pDley Inal. RCs. Cancer Allied OS9., Vnlv. Nnur.~swa, tDmal•a, uE, 60105, USA SCardt: CAU17000 Vubl Cla4fi CUr/r PROC Juurual: llcalln Suqar Sunstltutes• ProC. ERG06 Con1. Sugar Sub:allula•s CuOCn: a0nOA1 Publ: 79 Pa9ua: <0-5] 1.leelinq UJtc: 70 P.Nll:bvr: Narqar AtlOreatl Bosel, Swlti Av111: cu99ennCim. D • . luentl(iers: revlew swretenln0 agent q1atl0er tunar, CYrclrm0:•n OCtuctlun CA09107053021N iObarCO /lavOl•anl Authur: NUqu<nf. NA{00: NaMaumC. ?elaM)I loallun: Jnpan Seclion: CAp11G01, Pool Clnsa: PAT Joornal: Jpn, Tol•IrYp Nono CoUen: JFAK•h Publi 790330 PaOea: 4 Pp. Lanqua9e: Japan P..tent u•J: 79 040+0 ADplle No: 7•/1a6667 Date: 741227 Clas.: •2403/12 ' Asaunnt•C: Japan Tobacco antlSalt Public Corp• IOentffiera: tobaCcO flavOrJnt
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t P87 EI~Ti S 4,167,091 4.165.811 -" IAL GRIPPING DEVICE CHUTE FILLING DEVICE FOR FILTER CIGARETTE • CASINGS Heinrich W Ruppert Klaus Gltschmann, and Hans Haller, all nors to Efka- an msi f G R F d F.a• Christian \1e "' 8assens, France. assianor to Senice d ploitation 1..: . Nle des Tabao « dn Allumetta. Paris, France - y, erm ep. o of Trossingen, e . 8 Rep of Germany en Fed Trossir N- k i Ki h G bH F Conlinuation-In-pars of Scr- No. 74:•175, Nor. 17, 1976, , - . •g r a m , er e tz e abndoned This Jan 651 784 23 1076 f S C i i N _ abandoned. This application ?ICr. 3, 1978, Scr. No. 993.280 . . , , , , on o er. o. ont nuat application Apr. 15, 1977, Ser. No. 788-037 of Germany -OcL 14 F d Re li i Claims priority, application Frar,ce, Vo.. 17, 1975, 7S 34949 Int. CI? D65G 65/U! , , on e . nl Claims priority, app p- - - 75 254589 4S. Cl. 41" ' S Claims 19 , 1 i lnL CLr B658 33/30 149 8 Claims C 53 L - i u.s. 1. In a chute filling device for use solely with cigarette tubes emp[y of tobacco ssd having respective filters on one end thereof.the device including a funnel and a chute divided by penitions with a discharge opening and-a pushing nm, the improvement comprising: ~ means for loosely suspending said partitions with substam • tially uniform play throughout their lengths. said means for suspending including a first plurality of slits of substan- tially uniform width along their lengths and depths in a plate deftning a Ooor of the device and a second plurality of slits of substantially uniform width along their length, and depths in a swing frame, one end of each of said ~ panitians being placed in a respe^•tive one of said slits of I uniform width in said plate and the other end of each of aaW partitions being placed in a respective one ofsaid slits of uniform width in said swing frame, said uniform width ~ of each of said slits being greater than the thickness of the . respeetive end of that partition positioned therein, and i maans to vibrate said partitions to impart lateral movements tof adjaccnt ones of said partitions toward and away from ' one another so that the cig_arette tubes empty of tobacco - - and having the respective filters at ends thereof are braked in their downward fall after each action of the pushing ram by frequent contact with slides of said partitions which vibrate with lateral motion towards and away from adjacent ones thereof in said slits of substantially uniform widihs• the tubes moving downwardly while maintaining a wbsuntiaL'y horizontal position as a result of the braking action. !VoLr 9, Noe 12, SEPTr 21, 1979 ~._ ~~ . ~~.. 1. A device for engaging the fabric material of a sack-like or . bale-like object comprising (a) a support. (b) at least a pair of gripping assemblies mounted on said support for independent reciprocal movement along the vertical aais. each of said assemblies comprising (i) a vertically shafted, reversible, low torque motor. (ii) a gripping disc disposed on the shaft of said motor. and (iii) at least one tine disposed on said gripping disc offset from the asis of rotaiiun of said shaft and operable to pierce and engage fabric material upon totaGon of said motor and tli.c in a first rotational direction- (e) means operable to lowrr each of said gripptng assemblies independently until each has made contact with the fabric to be engaeed, (d) means-nperable to energize each of said motors for rou- tion in said first direction u'hen all ofseid gripping assem- blin have made contact with said fabric, said motors in each pair of gripping assemblies being energized for op posing rotation. - (e) m<ans responsive to the tension created within the fabric enqaged between the gripping assemblles upon their op- posing rotation and operable to terminate rotauon at a predetermined tension valve. (f) means operable to raise aaid gripping assemblies tihen said predelermined tension is reached, and (g) means operable to energize and reverie each of said motors to relieve said temmn and disengage svd fabric. 8
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DIALOG /Ilc•Il CA SCARCH 77-T9/VOL 91(10) (Cnnr. Ara. CNn• SoC.) CA0!1109073442J (Itere 6 of 201 Usef1906 IISe079 301 CA09109073200M O,nuu:•n•Gal activlly In ptu runen Ot Zebu caltle (eC ufee N;Hur]I f/nvoriny substances. V. EnePl+ie byOrolysls Of f b l l nlC i fl anJ wr,+-st.•ro fIavOr IIquor Au1nJr: Srn1,n• o.+lo:v. MJk4ar. G. S. ro .vor o Yr Yr s cnrcl.¢n uone prnte n 0.0 Aulhor: Icn1c1.,, xen0o; MJII• Yosninrbul varmmoto, Atfusbl \ r/ L.wcatl{.n: D.v. anlm. Sci., Pun)Jb Ap,•1c. Unl.., Lutlmlwv. Lucatpm: IuuJ lecn. oev. ' lob., Myu.a Halko Mo9yO CO.. L10.. Inwa Ibnr•rnl. Jdlr.m . 5acllun: CA01000] Publ Class~: JOUq:/AL Juurndl: Inor:rn Vet. J. Conent ]VCJAC Publ: 71 5cctr0n: Cno17U00 Puol Jaurnul: IbppJO Snoxunin C Nsst JOUGHAL xo9YO OJMAC{enl C{Mertl MSxOAS sen.•s: $a Issue: 1 e2-5 Vubl: 1V SerICH 2G . Issue: •PaVes: 166-7A IJCnlificr5: corn ftCep litiuur ca9lle. YrCa nutrltlon ealtlC Lantluarlt•: JJn:H+ ' Inlly aCro ur.e luentl/re'•c: {:nICFOn bone Pruleln nYOrolYals, peplltlea'e cnlr:ken mrnC Pr•oteln• flovorln9 cnlektn bCnO VrOteolysls CA09109C7]]'/2:, L.-d /raCllunJtlOn nntl by{IraO•`nntlon A•.Inur: ru..nin..n3• N•9.•uU: Snim:m,uPa• Umallro Lu.nl• S:cliunl[:ol>OO] PuUI Closs: PAT J~.urnal: J:+n. MoM.ll lo4kye Mr•nV CptlCn: JX/t4( DuDI: T901po r•,•/a: 3 ou. L.,nauer,.•: Jap.n P..Ia"+t r::r: 1V 53,09 anr•I,G rlV: 71/1 1 9996 Djtat cla.:: n:]OS./u)• CI wT/DO• u IG1/1: A'.•.rflnre: /nnnon Olly pnu rali Cu.• Ltd. 771007 I~Ir•1{1/rery: lar(l /I'.1CIrLn\{IOrI 1+ytlro9enat/on, Ilnoleillp IarJ CAO-110901336:u Slrr,u;rde s.CClenCr eonE.a n/n9 pCptluee A„Innr: Yn..•.+1.u„lu. At]n.nl; ISr11e.r, NivnDe l,.[.+1 iLn: J.•la.r., S.Ctiun: Cn017002 Pvbl Clnis: PAf J.•urnalt Jn+. fuuk yu xuoo Coqcn: JAS%AO Publ : 790531 Par::: G on. Lennu.+pv: Jnunn P.,tcnt ru: )) IY:90 =n.+lic No: Y]/97]5] Date : 7]00]1 ApJLI/J2 I{•ewJ H_4k0 MJ9+'o Co... Ltq. Id.ntrfivrn: elevrosiJe peV{IOa elrletener, 9elatin ny{lrolytete nlvios+aa CAOn109011297q Cr/e.l U/ free ewlno aerOs on the quPllty of sour milk e.,lnor: YJhnrlev. 0. A.; IbrJ9lmuvi• A. Z.t AvOUnlru, K. P•: Ilv.c.n,na• N• I. 1u:atrrn: vses. ILwennu-ISSICa. Inal. Snlrovol Prom.. LeninprnJ. U55q ' S.•CI.On: C3J1'/00], CApI61tAM Punl Claas: JOURNAL Juu•n..l: LUlocnn. Proe-st. COU:n: MOPqA1 PuDI: 79 Iaaac: S PaCes: 16-19 LJn0uo00: Russ 1{mntlf,ers: mllh /crmn c.nino Pcltl zsEKooo CA09109013273E Ounrrlllalirr determination of som! Iwportmt flJVOr Cu'l•nV'rrnt. ,n nnlry products ufln9 the nCatl space tecnnlque Aulhur: 111 W. J. LucJ114n: Cnem. UntCrsuCnunO••omt. Staul HaOen, Ha9an, Is0• qen. Gor Srcliun: GA01700] Publ CIPSS: JOUONAL Juurn.rl: LIi1c/r.I54Cnscn.,lt Ctnlun: MILCAD Publt 79 Ser'ia: 34 Iauel 5 Pnn.'s: 201-3 lar+9WOa: Ger Iucell//vrs: milk prePn JrO~'w• Yo0ur1 vClJtile subflenCl -n CA091090732041) , I Ib.e .wrelucss potency uf Saeenarln an0 elrCtarnale in hot 4• tlr n , nulbm•: IrnVlre, x.t GJSCmann• U. ' Z lucatlun: ZeMr'allhst. Erna.•nr., Ber9nol:-Renbweexe. O ODII-I505. .cr•. 11a~n• Rcp, S.clion: CA01l001 Publ Claas: JOURNAL ~ Journrr: r:.'nru'p Cuucnf NMUTAII Puall 79 Svrles: 23 tssue: 3 1'ayC.: ]19-]5 LanW,:•bl•: Lor ~ loentlllCrs: y.eetnecs tenb• cvclamal• telMl s.eelness, eretl0•JC Iw-•p sktlelness, saccnCrln tmrp s.eelnCif rn m -A CA091090%319cG m Z Ar1if/Cla1 6aaQCtlnore ' m Aulbor: LlCltun• Laurence 0. M Loaatlnn: 0^p• Nutr.• Unlr. OtapO, OuneOln, M. Z. Section: C~•011000 Publ Cloa: JOUrrrqL D J'UUrnJI: PruC. Wutr. Su<. N. t. Coorn: PNSZDI Publt 76 W Suries: 3 lawet 1-2 P:,0C5: 54-62 • V) Ivent//rtrs: Pevlev s.eJtaner ~ -4 ~ 0 ~
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Prll,l 11/:/1-33 240 DIALOG s11aA: CA SEAOL'H 17-79/VOL 911061 (COee. Am. Cnew. Soe.) (ltem I of 33) Usar1906 ]7au979' CA09100067901f A limple s01111L'1s InfeCllon Aetn00 Of sample CY1u:nn Aulnari NlrOln. Munla: T,lanlU, VofnlnCrl Into C80111411, Cnru:naln0 Vas ,J4yla1c0 antlUearessant. mass sOeCtra alnylate0 anll,lc•pl'e:sont, tlaa:ntnrslsinu elnyl quanpltation, nor•VinlYli•• ilOyl quanlitJtlon, nrUlrrplyllne ethyl quanlltallon, - OC'netNylOuneNln ItM1yl quanlltatlon CA0910q007y7CV Lus sLlnu,lrtllsatlon of CruOe Orups Pro0uCe0 In Ho44al0o IJBPVI), Pnrt Lv, fnC quantllativa,analysls of kabsyl 6lytol Olac!latc In valCrlana rn01:1 Autnor: Ynu:eNi:nl, TuRasbl ' Loo:alle,U /b.f,I,alUO InLI. Vuelle Healtn, SappOrO, Jopan SCa rOnl CAUC••:002, CAOG]ALA, CA04lsAA Publ Clnsa: JDURI/AL JOarnaI; Hu4Y,,iNOrllsu Elsei ItCr.4yuuno HO CoUen: HDENAN PuUI: 70 lueue: :a Parp•al y-11 Lan0ua0o: Jupan Inllltl/lers: MeeCyl plycal PIaCelJle Ueln Valarlnn Locallon: I/,IarUl R.•s. L.10., MIInePI, L10., Hitachi, JYpOn St'Clion: CaC11000] PuUI Clns:: JOUONLI JCUrnal: Uunarnl HaV+hu I CO!ICn: ONSXAN PUbI: 79 Ser,<:: ]6 Iss,m: I Pa0C0/ 5U-GO LanJUnao: Jaonn ll:entlfiOre: CPIIIleS•l InjeCllOn app gas Cnrolnal09• cap/11arV column cnPO-nalo9 suI/11Cis IUlCCt1Vn CA091oC0ds0]0T Cn,na ncl.nn nnP nOpliCatIen of Inter/acCS an 9an Urro-alo0:.\ury/mass eueel:'auetry Ceuplinp fOr plea Caplllary COly.w,a A,~tlrtl-: Iau1Cn, (IChrl•t: I/,u,<41, CnrlslVlln l~•/':.tlCn: Uea'.•rr. $IUOlenqe3. AIO.nenJr9, 6,w,q•H,r Vlenna, A-ICII:, Ar•,lr,.\ Y:Ilen: CAa19U0Y Pubt L:I,ys: IEIH NEP J.wrnal: ber, oes[rrr, SluJle,are. aamenerCl• Collen: OOL.1 Punl: ] 9 I:sua: SCAC 2t•r, Nn, SUSL, Pa9es: 1] pa. Le• . LL•ntie~ur.t ,nt.•naro cas enr•n.nato,~ ass fpletroseopy, cao/llary cuh.n•n :nte••lace ma:y sPeClro:rlNOr. Vlass eaplllary Cnlum, yey Cnrur,•.,te, , CA6I,ICnVC77•vuP `:::n~=ro 9'•% analY'•is by V.li CnromntuprnpM1y Lutnur: Dro:U, J,•.CI: //UV.Ih. JoSC/ t•.<alion: Inct, Lnnl. Cncm., C[ttn, sCao. Sel., 6rno, 611 2 C:Ueb, ::t,Gn: CA079CDJ PUUI CIa:S: JUll~n[t Jn~rc,l: J. r,ryr:.In;,.oV"• Concn: JOCPA/A PUbI: 79 Sur,s: ICS Is:ur: 2 r,19C9: /al-b5 IUantl/rcrs: r,!vie. qas no-unatop he:ASOaeo analys/s CA091000Dn113V 9-AII.VInt wr\ of socunJary -n{ne trIcVClie antlOrOressants as a Orn.•ral mClnuU for t1,Cir qu,lr,lll.lliun by G35 cM1rO:natuq.-m,i3s speclra--,Clenca Inn na•nturlny 1CehniquC. Pvepa,~ation of //-elnrl r Jlrve OI t.~.rnlPr.:lnln¢, pratr,6rlYI/~nCllnJ U!.r.µ•IN,'IN•CNrn nOrlelptyl,na, W.: lriCJ~I, Rob•!rt 0 ''~ . ln'.\Irnn: Ccn. yY<n,alry, I;uJ. Call. VlrClnl a, RlCnmonO, VA USL ~ i.cLren: C•tOL400] PuUI Cla~a: JOVR/IAL JJUrnal: AnJI, Lell. Cun:n: ANAICP Publ : CI P •CUa: ]v-OY 12 : 79 Saries: ' . 1asoe IOCnlAtlers: anlrOCpressant alNylatlon quanlltatlon, CA09100062•147P • . Is•llal'Ir;rl ;rrro CnaraClerltatlon Of TNT and Its rnelnUOlltes In .Oroumn,.rler uy pas eM1ro~lula0rapn-mass speetrometer-ao:WUter [en~nin•r:o Auumr: :rrcira, W. E.p Snort. D. L.; Manl9ole, Dl 6•t noscln. 1. s. Lm:atlun: U, $. 6c01, 5unv „ Arvnna, C0, 00U0], USA Sea lon: CA0a100/, CA050LAM, CAO]9st% Publ Clnsat JDURI4L Jrn,rnal: aull, Envlron, COnl.lnl, IOnieCl, COUen: OCCMIi PuLI: 79 Scrl<•s: 21 Iace: a-5 VaOes: 55i-G) 1<L!nllllu•Y• inl UlnltrotalurnC melabOllte Jutn VreunOWtPr CA091000t1U1711 Cnar,lclvrirntlon ef Insoluble carUUnaceous eaterlel Inat:notrvnerlc p.lrtlrulGteC by pvrOlvsis/pas enrCmalO0rap/1Y/eass aPoClrm~mlry nrocenurls ~AnUmr: Munvn, Stevrn Nar..ell 1n],rtlnn: Univ. Arl[o0a, lucspn, AZ, USA Se aion: CA05900], Cn079114A ?uDl Classi 0155 ColCn: DAL'OIIA PuUI: '!0 PaVUS: 1]a np• Crtali0,1: OISP• ANStr. Int, 6 1079. 39/111, S701-] Avlil: Vniv. picruflllns inl „ Droor No. 7909477 IaanLi/r[•rs: cnrounaccous atn partrCUlalC cnarPClCr/catlOn 9Sebt00o
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.. * PATENT~ ! ..165:90F - CIGARERE PACKACE CLOSURE AND PROTECTOR Islien Geoagopoulos, J2-70 ]3th SL, Long Island City, N.Y. 111D6 Condnuation of Ser. No. DJ6.539- Oct. 28, 1977, abandoned. This application Aug. 9. 1978. Ser. No. 932,450 I /nt. CL= A25F 15/00 J7/0Q' B65D 8J/10 - ; US. CI. 206-259- - 6 Claims tIll 1. A cigarette package closure for covering an upper end of - a eonventional. generally rectangular, Rexibla cigarette pack- ~ age after the package has been opened to expose the upper end " of at least one of the cigarettes eonrained therein, the package . generally including a foil inner wrapper, an indicia bearing ~ middle layer, and a transparent outer wrapper, the closure ! eommising; a frame comprising a pair of parallel, spaced, Uahaped members having upper poruons which extend or- Ihogonaliy toward the corresponding upper portion of the opposite member of the pair; a stationary cover member fixed b said upper portions of the frame and extending over (major ' portion of the surface defined by said upper portions of the - frame, the cover member including at leasrtwo apertures along une edge thereof. e.posing swo portions of the frame, and eomprising a clip member depending downwardly from the long edge of said cover member opposite said at least two ~ apertures for angaging the lip of a shin pocket or the like; a lid - I portion hinged to a short edge of the stationary cover member and displaceable between a closed position coplanar with the slationary eover memberand an open position at an angle thercto. the lid ponion including catch means engageable with said frame for maintaining said lid portion in its closed position; a lid spring fixed to saW stationary cover member and conuct- ing mid displaceable lid portion for busing said lid portion toward sald open position; and a match-book retaining elon- gated lip portion hingedly conrrected tb said partionrof said frame exposed by said at least two apertures in said stationary cover member, for holding a conventional book of paper matches, the lip portion depending downwardly from said- eover member and including a slot for insertion of the conven- tional book of paper matches between a back layer of the paper matches and a rear portion of the cover enveloping the paper matches- vid lip portion being pivotable about said expo•ed frame portions by at least 180- to allow access to all sides of the covering enveloping the paper matches. I o~a 9, Noe 12. SEPT. 21, 1979 i. ; 1,165,152 - . ~ TOBACCO SUBSTITUTE MADE FROM COFFEE CHERRIES AND A PROCESS FOR MAKING SUCH i Carlos R. Bustamante, 5J07 Alta Vista Rd., Bethesda. Md. 20014 ;Continualion-in-parl of Ser, N'o.61J.677, \fay 5- 1976. •hich is a cuntinumion-in-parl of Ser. No. 620,271, Oct. 7, 1975, abandoned. This application Au¢. 6. 1976, Ser. \o. 712.356 tnt. CL- A24D 1/18 US. CI. 1J1-2 4 Claims 1. A process for making a coffee product from whole coffee cherries comprrsing the steps of: . a. applying a compressional force to said whole coffee cher- ries of sufficient magnitude to dehydrate said cherries to a selected degree; b. comminuting said dehydrated cherries into particles; c. roasiing said particles to provide an intermediate brcwable coffee product of enhanced shelf lift and d. hydrating said intermediate brewable coffee product and - subsequently evaporating same to provide a smokable coffee pro'°" 00014369 4.166.134 METHOD FOR I\1PROV1\G FLESIBILITI' REfENTIO\ OF CHEWING GUM Frank Witeel, Spring Valley; K. yyvren Clark, Bre.ster, both of X.Y.-and Abraham 1. Bakal. Parsippany, \J., assignorl to Life Sa.ers. Inc.. New York, N.Y. Filed Jun. 8. 1977, Ser. No. $04,840 Int. CI.! A23G )/)0 US. Cl. 426-3 - S Claims- 1. In a method for improving Rexibility retention w•hile mainuining swcat resistance of chewing gum prepared by mixing gum base, aqueous softener. sucrose, and a solid sorbi- tol humenant, the :mprovement which comprises subsranttally isolating said aqueous softcner from said humectant in said chewing gum and minimizing the amount of surface aqueous softener by incorporating said aqueous softener in said gum base to form a water-msoluble phase. admtxsng said sucrose with said water-insoluble phase. and lastly admixing from about 2 to about 50% by weight of said solid sorbaol humee- tant with said sucrose water-insoluble phase combination to form a chewing gum wherein said humectant is provided in a waler-soluble phase which is substantially isolated from said aqueous softener in said water-insoluble phase.
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G O r UD z 1ALOG Illet: CA SEAOCII 7b9/VOl 11001 CoDe. Am. nra. oe.) 0 CA0•IIOUO•i9U0.11 Oc1L•r.unalu.n of tnt IntllvlJual Connosltlen of wal0/r-snluUle • . r CCiJ. nrCaa.•CY Dy Cu al an/Ja11Gn GY d'[nfO~ndtapnOnlC-raJS{ fP^:Ir4•.•CI„rf. nC1/raJ N 'v1NOr: G+rlvv.m, 0. D.~ PL,nrydnbcve• Z. A.: Gr lsnln, N. N.t m Sanrn, V. 6. -O 1 luc.rtlon: bl••t. Nnlra.• Duslunbr, USSR SuC114n: CA051019, :aOpOXF% PuYI Cldf9t JOUP NAL . Juurnal: /:ni,n. :vSrJ. LJJI• INVSCa,/l C4 tlpn: NTYT6Y I Publ: )9 l::ur: 2 Pnqea: EOS-tl Lan9ua0o: Russ IOentlflrri: e 0a1 uslJn a[i0 Cnrornd[OY.' mass sPP[lrO3COPY H . . Coal b<ly ' I H CAO914n0595p:E tD V Duucl conneci C:J.Ilar'/ Cnlu-m lnp of d Curle-polnt PYrnlYrrr wltM 9 LD Lul/~nr: S10•:v. G . L,.l.rl,4rr: D.'P. R 115L. Oulu. uE'J.r TcCnnul., In3t. CnC.. TCCnnul., Salla, Scn ,un: Ca01)00'J, Cn0]SAxA, CA0lOXAA• CAGI9AXA, CA0U0XXA Pua Cl:~si: Jl:Illf/nL JJU.'n.1l: DnYI. IIJ111. n4aa1. N.rul, CC(ICn: DPANAG Publ: 70 Scrit's: :1! I:'.uc: 2 P••'acsl 179-00 Io.mLilrCr3: Do ha••`f Dyrolve^r eanltlury eolumll Connotlor, Cnr'4••'aI1:Y Cnlux.n cunn.Clor pyrolylOr• CAOOIC005^IS'JP Il~u.y-aCy1 C4'nbin.r1i0M1 in tMe rnn estOrl troln wlntOriCDa sPer•e xnele eil 4y r~.r:: cnrowal0uraony-mnss s00<lrouetry futnn.: Cr'~.Lfr'. G,tVIpnJ r. Lwel-on: IIIrRC. Sei. Ldut. mw., PcOrld. IL, 0,604. USA secl~4r,: 11.w.I:d4: yrUl ClasJl JOIJRNIL Juurnel: J. .b+. 011 Lnc••. S C4Jen: JAOCA7 Pu01: )9 Sef;•s: 55 IssuC: 0 PJGn3: 6e0-G laem lfien: spern uil CSlcr canPn, pa{ CnrOnalop sperm oll, wasf SPCCU'ometry spc•'nr bll CA09I0UUS9IS7P ' Ouintit.slivC DLC IICICrnlnatlen of methyl IIn4lenate In the Drra+¢e D1 plnJu,jAlc'J Drene3 Au1nOr: M1erilala. S. lu4.Llrnn: NuRC. SC1. EJUC. AJin., PCarla, IL, 61604, USA SrctlOn: CA0ab0Q, CA017eAA, CA00GAxs Publ Class; JOURNAL Jwn.ul: 4. A~. 0/1 Cn<m. 501. CuJen: JADCAi Publ: 79 rJefrCS: SG Is3r.C: 1, Pap••s: 6)]-] lJCntlf:5r3: 1{nelCnale melnl•1 Yaf Cafo~natep Ca099070L1.6920 14S£V100Q 0 (ltew 0 n/ ]?) Yfarl906 27eu079 242 U.SuiJ Chro+aloDrnpnlC Ana1VS/9 O/ /oo0 9n6 0eveeepes, Vol. 1 Aull.or: CAnrnldmbuas, Geer03; Loller 14:n11n:r: b5] ':fron: CAJ1~001 Publ Cldss: OCON CuJ.•n: f109hA) Publ: 79 Pcpo3: 236 pp. Pu•p11sM•^. (M:noenie Pre.O APJrr:s: New York. N. V.) IJ mtl/lcrs: boow cnr4malop 1ooJ bev.rapa OA091070540104 Detecti:~n o/ 0-reslLluO oil In eolneerL:l.l oliv9 0ll{ Luu,Cr: SnCnccr, Giylane F. LO:atlur: /u1n1:, Scl. EOUC. A6n., Peorla, IL, 61604, USA Sfa lon: CAOI;qGa Publ Class: JOURNAL Jounal: J. Anr. UII Cne~n• Soc. Coucn: JAOCA7 Publl 79 Scrl:•Y. S!i Insuc: 5 PaOL•e: 500-9 IJ!n111,Cr3: 411ve 411 dUVltCrallOn. IerpCna a1C o11Ve Dllr Gas :nroar:rluV 411VC e/l CA091070511110GO u.IL ••nln4fannlC Slutly Of InD Pr•Orna ef tumbled anC unI"innl•,•IUCMrVJInIC n Auumr: Erm.u,uvJ, i. P.; OoOOtl, L. N.; GolLrvnya, F. V,; Nui'aYU, 1. E. Lo]dlian: Vars. NnJCMtD-ISSIetl. Inlt. NbntlllMi f'loucav. USSR So-a lon: C50170Cd Publ Class: JOURNAL JU'Irndl: MnIL'bePL•N. Ma1.J/1Cr•• PrQn-{t, COJCnt Punl: 19 Issuc: 9' PoJOS: ]0-1 lanpuo0r/ Russ NIIPRA] IJ:nl111ers: CnucolaLe aromJ gas cnromato9, odor chocolate concnilw CA0910705eG940 , Ople•'rnlnetl4n of funrarlt acid in feeds Au11Wf: SC,bu111. RuCJlper: RuCh, NCrrlCr Lmollun: Inst. Cncm. lanocsansl. Ldntlulrtsen. Cne.., Ilnlv. I/olrvnnoi,n. UuncnnCrm, EeP. NCD. Ger Sc:tlon: CA017001 Publ Cla4s: JDURNAL Jodsn•d: Lanbxrrtacn. Scnri/tenr. Oeeen, P/lanee• T1er C4een: LSUIDU Puel: 79 Serreu 10 Issuut Eunar9aeure n crerndrnr. PJ,ef: 52-60 1antlua0e: Crr IJCntiliYrs: feed fumarato Oas CnrOmalop
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r y PATENTS 1 166 916 APPAR BETIEE Peter Schum . assignor to • Rep•ofGe i 4,167.995 ATUS FOR Cf1A\GIYG THE DISTA ] ROWS OF CIGAREFiFS OR THE acher. HamburF-Stapelfeld, Fed. Rep.af Ilauni-Werke Korber d: Co. KG., Ham rmany 562 1977 Srr. No. 795 Filed May 10 RCE- LIKE Germany, burg. Fed. , , SUBSTITUi'ED DILYCLOOCIESEMETHANOIS James AI. Sanders. Eatontown; Joaquin F. Vluls• Red Bank, and Frederick L Schmitt. Holmdel. all of N.J„ asdgnors to International Fla.ors & Fragrances. Inc.. New York. N.Y. Division of Ser. No. 780,685. \l.r• 23.1977. Pat. No. i,128•729. - This application Jun. g. 1978. Seo No. 913,697 ' Claims pri , , . ority, application Fed. Rep. of German,v . J1ay 21. 1at. CI: CO7C JS/J2; C07F 3102 568-820 3 Claims Cl US 1976,262271 3 lot. CI? B65G 47126 . , 1. An organometallic compound having the structure: liS. CL 198 --451 10 Claims /CHs C ~ OMgX H ~ 1. Apparatus for changing the spacing between rows of substantially parallel elongated articles, such as cigarettes, comprising a first conveyor having means for advancing scv- eral rows of arteles sideways along a fsrst path to a first trans- fer statiom a second conveyor having a plurality of transpors- ing devices each dcGning a discrete second path for a different - rme of said rows• said devices including annuli having different ' dumeters and said annuli including a larger-diameier annulus and a smallerdiameter annulus eccentr,o to and disposed within the confines of said larger-diameter annulus• and second paths extending from said first to a second transfer stmian and ' each of wid devices having a plurality of receiving means for - the articles of the respective row, said devices being routable about substantially parallel aaes and the receiving means of each of said devices being substantially coplanar and extending substantiall,v radially of the respective axis so that the elon- gated artieles which are admitted into successlve receiving means at said first station also extend substantially radially of the axes of the respective transporting devices whereby the distance betw'een the rows in said second paths, as considered in the longitudinal direction of the articles• varies during move- ment from said first to said second station; and a third con- veyor having means for receiving said rows-at said second station and for advancing the articles af said rows sideways along a third path. - wherein X is selected from the group consisting of chloro. bromo and iodo and wherein the wavy lines represent tao or endo configurations of the bicyclooctcr.e nucleus with respect . to the organometallfc oxyethane moiety. 1,16g•323 - PROCESS OF EATRACTING STI\SUL1:¢TS FROM COFFEE '- Ludwig Roselius, Bremen; Hans-Albert Kurahals, Heiuenb'ut• tel; Klaus F. Sylla, Bremen• and Peter Hubert; Bremen- - Lesum. all of Fed. Rep. of Germany, asign_ors to HAG Ak• tiengesellsahaft. Fed. Rep- of Germany Filed Feb. 25, 1977, Ser. Ko. 772,365 Claims priority, application Fed. Rep. of Germany. Aug. 30, 1976,2639066 Inh CI? A23F 1/04 . US.-CI. 426-312 18 Claims - 1. Process for the production of cotfce low in undesired stimulants normally produced during roasting while retaining the original caffeine content which comprises removing coffee was from unroasted coffee beans by treating said beans with a solvent harmless to health• said solvent comprising a supererit- / ical Duid. and adsorbing said coffee wax by means nf an adsor• bent which is precharged with pure caffeine. 000143e71 'VOL. 9e No. 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 1249.4,"
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OIAIOG PIIrA: CA SCAnCbI 90-19/VOL 91(00) (COOr. Am. Chem. SoC,( (Ilerl ]e of 721 VSer1906 2fau0T9 244 i " CA0J10905n0+9b A nr. procruare ldr olrtraction andJeternlnatlon of blpnenyl In crl•u5 /ru't Auu,nr: Dav,S• Pnul L.: Nunroe. Fninleen, A, Lr;,t•Un: Scl. EauC. Aanr. IbrIIC: RCS. Lab., Orland0, FL. ]200], LSL S,:C:ion: CAGI}001 PYCI Clnl51 JOUpNAt Journal: J. AOr•ie. Food Chem. CoJen: JAFCAU Publ: 79 Serir,: ;11 Is.uc: 4 PaDUli 91B-20 I,1.•ntlllerl: blpnCnyl Oel,+ Cltrllu, 9nS ehromotC9 blpnenyl, prapvlrull Ulpnenyl Uctn, oranie b'IPhenYl aeln CA09101054GCt10 Drterrr•inulinn Of vlnYl Chloride In polywlr IYterlals, food tir.,,l.lntS. .urd 100r13 Auv~ur: In••d;uva, N. A•: MatnCVa, S. E. l0<]:Ip,+t Llu:k. ICNI1r+01. InSI. Mynln. f.tOtOCnn. PrOn., L1plCOV US'.R Seeticn: CAOIP001 Publ CloaSt JDURNAL Juur'n.]I: G,o. SaniL Catl:n: GISAAA Publi 79 Ialue: 3 ~ nuqrr. S:I-SO lenVn;WC: nvla inyl cnln,•InC nCtn polY'ner, vlnYliaCne Cnlu,',au Oc•ln nOlyyer, pOlynn;r Pa[Fa91n0 mOnu:nCr tlOtn. Ont CnrO"a100 10:•J p]CNar)'1+0 Cl010105235LE I Slu•lies on the bio0enen15 of vltnrnin 0. Part tv, G.+YI InuiU cn-ornarn9r:':'ny/n'as1 tPCCtrnmCtruc Idsnl1/lcation of prlvilUnJn UJ +na ,tu n b'J ln tnC SFin of v1lGmin D-CUliCient relt Irrarli]tro,.ith ultraviolet IIUht -nlr,ur•: ON;.no, T.: Lliluno, N•: LtulSUYa'ni, N.I f/oUuhara, N.; Mouuya5nl. 1. ' LuCalinn: Drp. IIYO• Cnem., NabO womrn's Coll. Pnarm„ Mep.. 659. 5:•cl•nn: La01]J02 Publ ClnSS: JWffNtl ' rul: IIrCI. T,•rvv. Cn'n. P,lYS-Da5 CCGen: R1CPA2 PYU1VrT9 Sa•r,es: 9U i!••ue: S P,+OCl: ]S]-) IoCnl+fiCr>: F"evlla'nin O] SFin W, vilamin 03 Skln UV CA091010521)a5 aa;s /r.,OmentoOmpnlC a<lerminatlon Of orOSta0lanaln 12.alpna. in nu'n.m ana rnbbit urine Autnor: 51orw'St. D.; 01iv, E.: LunUCn, 1.: Aan00nra, E. tuc.+tran: O-:n. AICnl+ol DrvO AWIiCt. RCU•, KarOllnihn In1t., SIG.Fnulm. 10.1 01. Sard. SCCt.cn:'C.00900a PuUl Class: JOU8/1AL Journal: J• Cnrcaot09r. CoJCn: JOCRAM Publ: '19 Serir.: IC] IS:uC: I Pnres: 1-0 ' IUCntl/,ert: PLi'/,JIPna aCln urine• 9a! CnrollltC9 ma:f. UeelrOlCCpY PCP CA09107052113N ' Ga{ cnrun. 11u0enPnY-wq CVeCIrolrVtrY and loloCteb lan m0'+Ilarlrl.l •II 1hp aiponiLfluOrOOr'uplOrlylhera/luOr'Oiiaprp- Prl .r;tcr Of Ul.,ta~unp Aulhor: Mu11C•.SherVCr,'M,i nCdwelk, U.: Curllu!• It, C. LoO:allun: Dra•„ Ra'f. Inl1„ llniv. lurlth, ZurlCh. S.Ite. secllo'I: CA009004 Pu01 Class: JOUpNAL JoJrn.ll: J. CnrUFaloUr. Coaen: JOCRAM PUOlt 19 Seri n: ly2• PJnol: G11-5 , Ir1;n1111Crs1 OIU1C,nale CnrOm]100 rna!! !plCtromatry, o1Vl+ml,lr Chrdnatp0'n'aig lpeClrOnle{ry CA4910]0•+205AU , Nl's rCSU1ir110n Dnt ,<nromntoarnphlt/reA1-Iime /IIOn re±uli.tl0n,m.151 tpCC{r•O,ne1r•IC Idenl111Cat1on Of ol'DaniC aCIdS 1n h.n,:lv urlne 1 AuU+orl Lewit, SYUC11: ItenYon, C. N.S Me/11, Juer9i BurI1rlU.l•"a, A. L•' Lo¢ntion: Svncc SC1. Lnb„ Unlv. Callfornla, Eerkelly• CA• 9a12), USA Se:tlan. CA00J002 Publ Class: JOURNAL Ju~rn.+l' An.rl. Cnern. CnUent ANCIIAN iubll 19 $or1el: 51 11..••+: u yaocl: 127'v.05 ' Idvnlllrarsl urinC PTruu.ylats dCtn, 9as chromCto9 aCla yrln~, nSS SneClruSCopy nr0 aCld Yr1ne. CarbOnylate aCtn ri,v, l•+actone Orln urlne, pnenal deln W ine. eurbonYarete ' dCtl+ VrInC CA09101052014P /.ta;s lnCCtrlnnCtrV In a blonleoltal lnVironwent Rutnor: Ualy, J. 0. Lo=alion: Uen. DioehCm. Med„ Vn/v, Dnndce, Oundne, Seat. sCa icn: CAOO9000 PPbi Cllss: JOURNAL Jo~rnal: Prcc. Anal. Div. Cnem. Soc. Cooonl PADSDS Publ: ]9 Serlel: ID Issue: 2 PaOell 51-3 10>nllf/erl: rovle. ma!! SPCClromilfy Clln ana1y115, 9.6 chrO:nGlCO masn Spa•CtrosCOpY Pawlev
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LPATENTS 6,166,869 _ USE OF CERTAINACYL-PYRIStI01\ES AS FLAVOURING AGE\7S - Iaon Flamenl, PetfeLaney, Switzerland, assignor to Firmenich, SA, Gene.a, Swilzerland Filed Jan. 6, 1978, Ser. \o. 867.367 Clalma p•i.rity, app:ieatien Switzerland. Jan. 10, 1977, 227177 Int. CI: A23L 1/22Q 1/131. 1/23! - US. CI. 426-537 6 Claims - 1. Process for enhancing or improving animal, grilled. ronmd and fany Ravour notn in foodstuffs, beverages and - animal feeds which compri;es the step of adding thereto from about 0.02 to about 20 parts per million by weight, based on the total weight of the said materuls, of at least one of the com- pounds of formula - wherein symbol RI represents a hydrogen alam or a methyl radical and R2sunds for a lower alkyl radical containing from ; 1 to 6 carbon atoms. 4.167.943 CIGARETTE MAKING MACHINE Hermaa hfosee.itch, 2759 de hlaisonneuse Bl.d. East, Von- tred. Quebec. Canada - Filed 1far.3. 1978. Ser. 1u. 382,774 lat. CL' A24C S/e2 US. Cl. 131-70 - 5 Claims 1. A machine for injecting a compacted eloncate cylindrical wad nf tobacco into a hollnw ciearnte paper tube. compnsing ~ a casing and an opcrating handle pivotally (A) carried thereby; ~ the operating handle being of bell-crank shape and having cne ~VOLr 9, N0. 12, $EPTe 21, 1979 end of a single link pivotally (B) secured to its inner arm, the - other end of the link being pivma9c (C) secured to a tobaceo eompaciing member- and an elone_me injection sponn slidably movable within the casing from a tobacco receiving prnition no an eatending posnion to inject a cylindrical wad nf tobneco into a tube positioned on an alicncd nipple exmrinrly of the easing and a spoon handle exlending esrertorly of the casing enabling manual sliding movement of the spoon. and a pivot- dly mounted tube retaming Iner to hold the tube in position - on the nipple during insertion of the tobacco wad. a spring holding the tube retaining lever in contact with the nipple when the operating handlc is in tobacco compaeting position. and a stud on the tube retaining Icver, the said single link - eomacting rhe said stud and pivotingthe tube retaining lever out of contact with the said nipple when the operating haodle is in tobacco receiving position. {-165.6J3 -APPARATUS FOR INTRODUCING SAMPLES INTO HIGH PRESSURE GAS CHRO>(ATOGRAPHS OR LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHS - ~ Hans-Walter Bnndt, Unter-Odenthal; Giinter Schnabel, \Par• melskirchen, and Karl-Heinz Miiller, Bergiseh-Gladbaah. all of Fed. Rep. of Germany, usignors to BayerAktiengesell- schaft. Lererkusen. Fed. Rep. of Germany Filed Jlar. 27, 1978,;er. \o. 890.733 - Claims priority, application Fed. Rep. of-Germaay. Apr. 9. 1977,2716013 fnt. Cf.= COIN 1/10 U.S. CI. 7I-422 GC - I Claim 1. An apparatus for introducing samples into a high pressure fluid chromatograph haring a panition column and a high pressure carrier fluid flow passage to the partnion, comprising a double passage cross over sphericel valve, two single-passage - spherical valves connected in series therewith to define a sam- ple passage, wherein one passage of the cross-over spherral ' valve is alignable with the carrier fluid passage to the partition -- -column w•hile the other passage of the crossover spherical valve is aligned with the sample passage for introducing the I sample under atmosNmric pre•sure when the sample is injected I and wherein the one passage is thereaftar alignable with the I sample passage while the other pasaagc is aligned with the I carrier passage to enable the carrier fluid lo deliver the umple therein to the partition and a check valve wherein one end of i the sample passage communicates cia one aingk-passage spher- ~ ical valve with the atmosphere and the other end of the sample ' passage is connected, via the check valve adapted to open at a ' predetermined pressure and close after preseure compensation ~ and via the other single-passagr spherical valve, to a gas under -- I said predesermined pressure foe dissolving the sample sub- slaOce.
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Prlnt In/1-50 01'ALOQ I11e4: CA SURC/I 77-79/VOL S110l1 223 (COer. A.. Cneel. See.) (ltam I of 50) Usfr1900 ]Onovl9 CAGOtOQOG]1044 Detrrm~nallan ef nlFallno dru9s In unMno.n cawplaa ualnQ tnin-layer cl.rwnatoprnf+nv . Autnor; Conitn•llinesru, f,; fnneM, StyYanIS; Vaslllev, A. Locut`cn: Cent. Cnl•n. fls., Intl. Cercet. Cnln„ Oucnaresl, No.. Secllun: CACOC00] Publ OIa30: JOURNAL .Inurllol: r>`Cla (USnarcall CoJCnt IRLIqAj Publ: 79 Sl:r.ry: OG Issbt: 4 PaOCS; 19]-i00 Lannuopet No.[ loant,! wrs: tnin layer cnru•natu0 olwrmaaeutlenl, bel•iuJlnirpiuC thin IaVer enr0lnntOV• a1FalYiU lnlil IaYe• :nrJm,il09. PnCnnlaiarlno (Ilfll layer ChrOmnl00, JibCni•li'ePlne tnln lalL¢ cr•rnmstoG. o.eolnv tnln Invcr mronwtn0• emint uru0 thin IaYer er]IUG CA0010/0b7252S I:m ar^:I`ras Vr neuter/um labeled tobacco •IFaloldfl n' l~ n.u n•cutlnC llnU celinln111. e suulnur: NOU,~m tron0 Lan9: b•i1aGn011, Neal, Jr. Le:.,l1U•`: `+ilI. Univ. CnlI/ornla, San Francisco. CA. USA ::(I lnn: tl.0J1905 P•NI Clu:f: JllUnllAl Jo,nnA l; J. L.li•.•Ile.l Cu•nilU, N,.diaunnrm, Convni JLCR04 Puul: iU Srrl<.: 1.1 Ia•.ue•: V Pr•Ues: 910-J4 o.ul[rlu•n I,ll,elIU toUncca a1FnlUi<I, nleollna d.•ulerlum I:e1CJ, nornlcullne Jey(erlum InoCled. eotin/ne OiulPrluin Id1.C1eU Ca091010549'l l A vrn•Na;/ml :uA Uiulu9`cal evalWllen of Crvftalllne Iractlon I PrJ:vin Ir~•in tull.l•:cn Ir•~vCli Au;nJr: :rlld~-ln, S. 6.: 1t~.lnyuCn, P.: frcnJl/, b. H. Lucation: Dau. Olul., Unlv• GIiln.ula, los Angeles. CA, USA Srcllon: CAO11004 Puul U•l:s: 1f61 RfP J-rn.ll: ualI• Scl, fou"U„ il.•a• APYI. Ndtl, Ncent, INCn•) /6r/;a IU• ..I Cenvn: [nolml PuDI: 19 Issuet Irif/FA-))J210, Non-Clnv. Proleina PoeGS Proc, Con1.; PJ-70] 91.5, V.,9.•s: I`i5•it 1.2.•n1/1trrL: arulelll leaf Cainpn, /raCtlOrl I protein tubaCCe u0!1101p5q5J9 -a•+oc1D`nl nntltx+Jiea nnalnst Purlfle0 nltotinlr. aeet,lcnnllne rlCryltor A„IliOr: Wnei. CnristOnnCr LI,; NfcnNn, b.lvld P.; Orrman, /nIll•a H.: L'urrv:. Slvveo A.; arna:un. oarrY C. a.: Fitch. fr.fnN w. tn:]Ildl: arltiFer $[n. MCC.. Univ. Cnl<a'JO, Cnll:aQO. IL, 60G]1• USA Seetlon: CAOI:oO] Pool Claaa: JOUONAIL zEEt,I000 Josrnnl: Olocnen. OIoDhYt. RDS• Canmun. CGdenl lt19fJ9 PUUI: 79 SCriCa: 00 . fsaaet 2 Papest 515-0] lUrntl/lers: nlcollnf acvtylcM1allna ra«ptor onoplonal anllUOOy CA09107053104[ Pu(^utiel m.qnunldna for tna aupoentallon of .t/leroaCltrOfl9 and st.rcrP••OlCrutic Ulaca•.C by GiOnret unolJ nQ Aulum: I:.c0111, HCnry C., Jr. LO:stJn11: He.ailn Sel. Cent.. Univ. laltns. San Antonlo, iR. 70731. USA Sa:liun: CA014000 Publ Class: JOURNAL PreV• Lled. CVUan: PVILIA] PYblt 79 9erIest e Ix:up: 3 Pu9Ca; 790-403 IU>nliliC•'!: rCUier alM1r.roSCler041t <19aPat amONf, tobacco amuef atnrrosclcrosis ruvI er CA09107051193Y IVl1U.1t1Us1 of thf POIC of CarbOn a10nOM10e and nlcotinf In tnC P•Illiunenesl9 of srl<rloaeleroala and Cardlevsseul.r disese iul;l ' rl,lerelb[in. H. Lu::htlon: Inst. Clfn. COCn., German Heart Cent.. Munich. icul. 0.•P. GCr. Sca lon: CA01400o Publ Clasf: JOURNAL Ja1rNll: Prw. L1eU• Coden: Pv1pA] Publ: 79 Sorleai B I"ue: 3 Payeat •]]9-H!1 IU!•Ill/l•`ra: rCVIY.. CnrbOn [IOnUeldO nlCOtlnf arl[riOfclrrnsla, COrtliJV.l.CUlar Jlafafa carbon Tp1o[{dt , reYifu, cn•uFlnp eardi0oa[ny arterl9yclerosla reYlev CA09107053502• lnr rCl•`t Ian4nIP batween poabinad Pinsela pbAoaf and blood pre5fure at d.llerant rCYtln9 neart rale{ Aull\Ur: I~[rSNY. Vit(Oria: pYCr. Alan; Stamll/•, Jart•.lan: 511e1•iI1C. R•[N:~rU B.e r+CnOCnNCrpCr. ,Ia~nC{: Mann.lm.lNfn, Julln: Uotol, Prl15:n LG.aliO`l: AIrO• 5Ch•, NOrlnweflCrn Unlr„ Chicago, ll, USA Sr a,al: Cn01)045 PoDI Clast: JOURNAL do.rnal: J• Cnrunic Oia• CeOen: JOCO•lf Publ: 79 5lrli.: 32 tl.sue: 3 PaOes: 20]-0 luznlf/,ers: plucosa blood PrClaurC neart rotf, sanescence plunse D1unU nc,.rt rata, sec Qlue4se blood heCrt rate, clyarCl sn`oNinO pCart ralv, vt blood Orvssurc, ny0ertenaion hyPPrQlyccmia tncnyCar01• 0
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Pr/nt 9/2/1-29 300 111At0G fllea: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL DI(10/ ICOPr. As. CnM. Soc.) (7tCm I of 291 USer1906 1140079 , CA0911000251.1'1 m ~ I 4r5 Cnrux,.llP'R'•1PnIC C01,M1 A,.Ir•Or: Snim..nn, Idasaol Aty, MlrGtl4e ln l rl: J pCnlrV .In. SpctrOn: CAO'/900A, C.l0U3S{A Publ CIal91 PAT J,n,fnJl: Jn.Y. XOh.11 TP4Ihyo NJnJ C0:1Cn: 702.:0i' Pno^s: 4 Po. L.,"yunVC: Japan p„l,•Itl l:o: ]l .]0'.,0 Af1uIrC Mo: 71/109299 JMRRAP Publ: Datel 770910 s. ( CI- , bal9nea: Sni+aJtu Se-ISawasn0 Ltd. { I,r••nIr110r,:: VJlyethvlenC Olveol phthalata OlpllCnary PhisO, ~I 1D r i p01t,•aer V.•. Cnryn]l40 +lJtlnniry PhaSC, perfuma 9ab CnrOxatoD +IntlOnarY Ph.SCe , LD CA341100/OUtyU Su,ru:e ns ., s.eclener for netlv111ed ehireoal Auvmr: Cpun2Y• D]VrU 0.I ILWCh. Uark L_.a.Ln: n.:l. Cnu.n. CnO., Clarw.cn Coll, TlChnol„ Uc I.CiO U.A POtsUan, , . S,.cl,cn: LnOG]200 PuUl CIa;S: JOUR1IAL J.:urr,.ll: A.. J. rIOCO. Pnar., CuJCn: AJISpA9 Pybl: 79 Ser„•S: ]G 19Lm•: G 797-0 I,lrnl./1er5: SucrOS< s:•JelenCr actlveled eharcoal, aOf."'nliOn cn.Src001 :ucrO,N. Sel'ICylate ad5JrpllOn c11afCOJ1 srOroap CAO!I11O0101U1D A. -....1 Orn••rat/on by o.V90n lOr a1/• freshpnlny Aul~;or: L,.~m.r,, FOOO lu.ot,W1: J1P~Jt S~clrpn: UCL2U05 Publ Class: PAT Jiurnal: •Irn. e0hn l lOUnqo nbho COtlen: JMRM•lP Publ: ]EC:)a P.rnve: 3 pp. Lm,VUty.•: JJPJn P.It.•nl ao: 79 SI^C] .unlic Mu: 77/117919 Oata: f710o] tla;'v: A41L9/l0, o01J1/oo - IJa.ti/rers: PL•rll.mc upma yenerptlon o.v0en, .Ir /r.shenlny aI p,,\ CAO'111Y09D15u0 tLC II:.CIiy.~nVSICJI /unCtltnl ll n `w St[ N, : J J A anP In1 PCr/Wner n ' . . , ., Jlnur r I . Lncalun: VurwaulaeerUerunO, D.O9oto MOlaainOen, 1/o1.Swindun , rv1. 4ell. llc,. Sclaiun: Ca0Gi005 Pvbl CIiSC: JJUpf1AL JyurnPl: Drar,ucu POp. IeCr. EU.) CoUenl DIICRAy Pub~l: 25 $NrrCi: 2D IS.1rv: 3 Payus: U5-7 LOnDunOet Cer IJ;ntifia'rs: psycM.unyS runcttan odor, par/ume p5yehupnye /ynctlan tSc6T00p CA09110074511070 , OdaJ,ly-JrYrnO natur-eonlHn/n0 Aerosul AnlllJr: Llnrlia, 1/utPlahai Xyxtln•n10, InhP01 raNdi, Tel.iup: Ncwnl.l• Saloc/ri: NiVOm1Ya, Ahlra: Mimura, TSutorny; Aoya91, Mlsaurl Lur.lllnnl Jdpnn ' ~ Secllyn: C•50.1)049• CAOSIXXX. CA062RSR Puol CInSS: PAT Journol: JPn, kohnl lohYyo xuno COden: JMRMAF Publl 790419 P•WeS: 5 Op. LenOuJOe: Jopon Palcnt bn: i•J a990G APRIic Ilo: 77/116461 Oate: 770920 Class: COnN]/]0 I•sniynap: OoawJ ACrosol Induslry CO•, Ltd. Yd.•nt1/1cr:: ocro001 aProY rrnur, llOy.fl.0 9.6 ..rO.pl iPrPy. pa'rlunw ipvo.ol SPray CA091O901425t10 R:rl11Yl 2-nlhyl-]-hYdrOVYCyClOpentYlacelalOS Aull,nr' /ul~aJUa, IDxrOtiu: Nd/Jrl, fPI,eO: lukn//I/ma, A./hpi $aM:ri, Nunlh.l/Y LnC•IlIn' l: •I1n.ln Srctlo'1: CAp2•10J<, CA0G2II%% P„bl Clasf: PAT Journall •Ilm. Ituvul Sukxyo Kcno Coden:, JBRRAP Pyblt 790309 nanry: 11 PP. LnnOanyc: Jnn.ln P.11.•nl U,,:70 ]2a`i1 ApPlic IWI 21/DU2G9 Date: .110818 'Claa: C07CG5/7•1, A61X1/J6, C01CG1/00 Asu1Gn••e: S:,•yonl Chemlcal FcsRnrch CNntcr IOcntillr„S: mCthyl nlwYlnYaro.ycYClopwntaneacetae PerlwM , 4.1(1111rJ1'bVr11n11J,10. rln9 LIeJV.1,2C P.ub1LYCIpPCla11Pn1 CA091090735500 O,lte CnIlstnnle /pi` the reeetlOnf oV elwrli O.yOen(2P( ntomS nl ln bcneS•nc :.n•I teluune oJer 111C ta•r•Pmalur0 ran0e 299-aa0K Autlmr: Stnin,.un, 8,; Pitlc, J• Jr. l,•,:.111Jn: St.IIC+lllu Air Pullut. DCS. COnt•, UnIV. CaIISJI'nl• , n1v~n•srU^. CA, y2521, USA sc<liOn: CaU2'1005 Publ Clavt: JOURI/AL Journal: Cncm. PnYi. tell. Caucn: CMPLOC Pubil 79 Scr,e's: 0] Issuc: 3 Vanes: a05-9 IornLllicrs: hlnetlei auto.Itln peutlna loluene, YtomiL OnVOen benecne kinetl<L.' trlplel 0.yyen bOntene hlnetlcS. fL1VUl• Pr1U1ply11i benl'e11e axyl)L•11, CnCMr1Um1/1e5cCnCC pCnlene o.yOerl, t'Lruyrn dio.rOe beniene o.yVCn, nitric Ga 0e ony0en CbWnrlumrntsLL'nca . m
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DIALO6 PIIeA: CA SEARCII 77-79!YOL 91(10) (Copr. Anl. Cllaw. SoG.) llte. 7 of 40) VserI906 11nep79 CAO;n 10011754:10 6•r, cnro.n.rtinavaOnlc Calumn Iulnnr': SHrruanJ. FIaS•lu; Atu. HlralaFa l.matnn: Jauan Srcllun: C•l0IJO04, CaOG]nxa rubl Clnef: PAP J„urnJl: Jpn• NUr.ar TJM„yp Huno COUJn: Jf:RAAP PVblt 790.105 PdOr.: 4 pp• L.re0ua0e: JPpan P,Ilcnl /ln: 70 9]090 141.11 1 . nJ: 77/Ip9yB9 Oale: 770910 C l a,.,: 4011:71 / OJ A>yl(u~•ue: Sn,rLdzu Selsalaucno Ltd. ItP:nli/iar-:: Do11Cll•y1cnC Vlycnl Fntnalele elatlonfry pnasn, DDIVrstcr• pa: Cnra•ulul stationary pnase. Der/uma gas CIIru..nPIVV slJllonary Hnase CA0911007117D7V ,' An ' nv u proGC:s lor I/runVCllan of plne oll tram inlllan LVrr+rnl.CJ,a~I Au u.ur; Ib•.ra, L, N.: SiJ.lraul• m. S.{ Scn. T. Lu.allr.n: C••nt. 1nst. /;.•d. ]. Ynial. Planli, Ln-'Anaw, INdla S:cllan: CACG]00) Publ fl,,;a: JOUO:uI J:u•nal: Nrv. I~lalt li:rn;J, /'ru/um,. P,an11 0//., Afon•.Yt., S"n,:vt'.• S.rlwni, Cqcrna .• d'-a:ol. CuCrn: pIEADU Publ: 79 Ser•ea: 01 Issuc: 3 Pa,es: UO-a I,7fntlfiers: prne Gil proml lurpenllno ' CAO'111007f1751u C..~•.trlar¢'tts o/ Ine avsenllal oll of Lantana Inb/Ca Rullbur0 A„InVr: Sat':d. /alal: Sani)r.l, P.; Vlrtela, 41. l,rcalrcn: l:.u. Dr0• Cn,•m•, Stale Uniy. Onent, Onenl, 0-9000r 9VIU. S.aipn: CAOC:COZ PuUI Clasf: JOUDIIAL J,•u,•nal: Rlv. Ital. Earnte, Pro/mei, Piante D11•, Aronol., SlmdJla. Sapnnl, CoCm,•1., avro.ols CaJrn: RIEADU Dupl: 79 Serle•,: 61 lavJ: 3 PJws: 1]0-7 lCOnlllrcrs: Lanlan,a oil rcmFn CAOe11007U7501 SI,.Jr nl Clrtaln P,Ialnallef abaefvYd In Deranlum 9ourCOn ei:a•n1i.Jl ViI Aulnor: rivrlbattea l, J¢arl Claude; Cenan• JacOVes Yve;l Cue•n,•, ^,cna•I 6•c.,lran: l.,D. Cnim. DrO., Ir•st. ftvo. Supen Ser., SJmlu-[loli4:r, U7•190, fr. S.Ctlo'r: C:46700: Puul Clacst JOUnfLLI lnu,nal: NIV. IU1, C:brnrc, R'n/u,.i, Piante Off.. Aro•'ml•, SYn~:tt, Sapenl, Co:m,'t., A,•roials Cauzrl: pIEnDU PuUI: 79 Sarles: 61 Is:ua: 3 Fayef: 119-22 Lan0u:0o: fr IUrn1u„•rs: Oeeaniw Oil aUUlleralon 4nrp.aluv. ErlOw•on pll iGro-wlo0 v9E6L000 707 CA091100'10530 Use of C,•n•nVIVrL for processing results of patrDlaUr1 protluCt annlyyla by uya Ilary gas Cnromalp0rapnVMrtnur: 4rlnuery, A, A,; Lermsn, A. G.i Dovletav, I. A.I Leonl'cva, S. A.; Lulova• N• 1• loCaliull: US50 Seatlon: CA051V09. CAOIlOAAIt Publ Class: JOVRNAL Juurna/: AvlomJt/z. f Uontrol'no-IL,rerll. Prlbory v Nelleuer:- b. I NJflel,nlin. From-{tl, NauCb.-IpAnn, R6/, SD. Cod<n: D'IJOUS PuUll 70 Issue: It Pa9e.: 5-7 LanD,Nlte: Ilu" Citallun: Ref. ZN., xnil.• 1979, Ab[Ir. No. 91204 lderillflcrs: petroleum prpduct gas Cnromalo9 computer CA09c100ir.19•IP nunlvsis nf the C7-t5 frootlon of Oafollno by CaplllOry,oos Cn,•U•x:11D1r'~rnlry rrlln b.lCllvaalln,) Aulnur: 11.•~.on, Jan; Ocvus. tlllos{ HrIV/uF• Jen luGlllonf SlJVna/l N.P•, llrallfl,eva. Qetn, 5rctimn: CTUS100G, CAOUOAnA P,rol Claa: JOUR//AL JVVr'nal: IIL.I-J Unlie CJJen: pOUI/AY PuUI: 79 Senle/1 21 In•-c: 9 Puycs: 7Z-6 Lar.OUaq.•: 510 Idt•nlif,er5: (I+ILUIIno an.11y515 9a•, Cnrtnn,llo0• baCaweenlny CnrVniJlu] V•19JI/na•, CJpiIlPry CIIroT1,lUC Da3olina CaCwwainlnD CA0911007540011 Scaonin4 eluctron InlerJScoDIC Investl0atlons o1 nylon G-I+uly1r11,Vleny 1••repnthaletel blCOmpinent sVSlems. TnP JfICGt of ui,neJlinO on lne stl'ess-brt•Ih relallonsnlp Gf ErpstlCs Author: Scnult, E.: Peltbauar, Z. Lecallon: lnst. Polymerenchcm., DAY, Te1tGw-Sienof, DD11-1S], Der. Dem. nrn. Smtion: CA0]000e Publ Clnsl: JOURNAL Journnl: Acla Pdlyarl. CJdcn: ACVCDY Publl 79 Serlos: 30 laarn: G PeOas: ]GG-a Lan9ua0e: Der ICantafrer[: PolVa'"IOC polypster blCOmponmq flbar prcperty. InterfaCr VrCUn,ponent fIGCr property /
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, v Ln , OLALDD s11eA: CA SEARCH 77-79wOL 91(10) (Copr. Ars. Cnen. Soe.) (Itmn 14 o/ 40) uaerL9o6 llsep79 706 V09110075556y . 5unn,n0 electron wiarnseepy and t-roy nleroenalysli AutnoY, Dla.eY. P. n.l /.li•:Nletnupit., e. Luc.H inn: Sen, StuU. IeXt., Unlv, 6rb.HUrUrvr.r4,hire, Er,DI. Section: Cn0]9000 Publ CIasN Colls VaOC J.ur-nal: AVpI, FIUre Scr. Codrn: OIAOA7 Seri.'a: 1. /'dacs: ]+9-00 P,.:IliSnnr: A•:~.I~•iiriC Au.lre){; Londen, En01 H.lil: I/e~l:.ey, F OradforU, Publt 711 Ith'nlllrtr4% rCVICU /IUCr SEM, n rny floor analyfi\ revlpl/ CAOU1090711.101's Cu,r.uwl U,:•IranS, uurt V. Structural analysis Uf denlr•Or1a COn1n~n~nr1 ?-b-.nlpF].-P'•IIrrGVSYl.llt•U .nlplla.-D-91VCJpYrnnV:yl rCt,UveS nl lnC br.lnu~ nOlnll, bl• VSr o/ cJrlron-1] nueledr niJyyqrC rrsw•:,nCe opoCtron~mdY nntl RaYliUUltl cnrumnlo9r'Apnn' - :nl•CtrVn.rtry ifr,l R,: XrL.C:), PO'y1Cr 0.; Cllen. Cdr,ar'U C. M.; Ally-..; Urynrlpr StuUnen N. l•,•:.llrrAr: fC..li lL:d. C.nt., U,rYlnr COII. /.1CU., MOVsIOn: )ll, '7)O/o, uiA ' S:rlrOr•: CAO]l00], 1A01GlAA, CAO)2s%A PuUI Class: JOVRNAL Jzurnal: CerUUnyUr. P a'. CoUCn: CNCNAf Publ: 79 SCrrr1: )I, P,Irlr•=: ])1-SJ IG•~iq llrerl: lctKU•r~ao< U<ntrnn siructurC, mol slruGture aC.tlr',rn, I,.;fl Ua•.Ir'nn, poly+.lzrn.lrrUC L•Cntr'ar1 firuclure CA0910907333YY Lqno.<:nrnt of Sntstrrnn nantlarln Julee Quality and utili:allorr trl Ule PeVllir Anlloniteliv. Ccml~onenls uI yar'.:a citru: C:a:nlrel oI1S recOl•CrCU frOin wi.lCa of InC In-li lu te .atraclwn LvCiliN1: A•)rrG. (<nn. FCJ. HiApyamJ Pre)ela., Xolnan FOea. FCCiI., X.\rnln, J,p`n S:clinn: Vr01)0]•1, CAOd2ttlt Pyal Closs: JOVRIML J./ur•n.,ll //,pPUn SnulrVnin Xo•7y0 /',.lL4ailhl CUdonl NSIfD.AR Puulv )U 5:'ritc: 25 h:ue: 12 PaOCS: 60)-UO Lan:I,i.rO' : JaO.,n Iuu.Hillery: Citrus all Garoteno/q lacoPherul, Anllon/Jen1 Cltrus ull S9CVi000 CAO'1109Y7]2]9y 9.•lara~~rlinn of vlt.nnins E and X In faads And tl{sues us/n0 n19n orrlur.ar,Ce IiOmJ cnro'.alua•~VhY Autnur: InV••JSOn, J. N.; ll.,lrn.l, G.; L'.a.wCll, V. 6. Wcatron: l/ulr• RCS. L.b., Nrallll PrOl'• lrarqh. Ottlva, OH, Can. :eelfon: CAGI7001 Pual Pa55: JOVRNAL Journ,ld: //DS Spet. Publ, (U. Srl CeCOn: RNOSAV PuUll' 79 S:•r'to:: 519 Issue: trace Org. Ansl,i HeM iront. Anil. Cnb•. P"es: 3'/9-UO Inrntrliers: vrlundn tletn food. Ilb cnromato9 food vltanin. pny110riurnVnC 110 ChrOmnt00, totopherCl I10 cnromalo9, minnulunr.na 110 uvornOloO . CACDI00073230A Uu.urlll.rllve nnilVSll Of C•ImpIC Carbo/lydrates In /CGdf A,kl,or: L1. Ot•tlY Y.i Steuart, XCrll K. lu[aCl.ur: Ilulr. Ina., SCI. EJuc. Adn„ Bellsvllle, MD, 30)0:/, U;A ' Srctio'•: CA017401 Publ Class: JOVN:µ JJurn,ll: NI1S SII!;C. PVO1, (U. 5.1 CVOCn: IIDSAV Publl 79. 5=r'iCS: 519 Isa„e: trat. Org. Anal•: na/ Frunt. Anal. Cnno, P..pes: 271-0 IOnnlillOrs: surl.lr Oetn food Cnrewyt09, saGchnrlCe dCta food , 11, ChrO•nnlno su0sr fPGd. gas clrrO/nuto0 suVar food p10910007,3236V •multanrous dat.rrl/natlon a1 enlarntn.lonll, e.otan, and `tllaelrmn Jnplea Aar111V1•:r5ar:upr, ShIDCO: DJa, MnantSUne LuC:rtrrul:Arlr•it• CI\Cni, Irl:/l. Stn„ LuNMp, J1pin Seetiun% CA017UJ1 Publ Clase: JDVIb/Al Jurr„nal: /luy.ilu Xt+l:.l:noi IIUNOIru CuU•'n: NXIIDAM Publl 17 I), PmjC:: tY5 Lan0uJ40: J.:Nan IU.nlllrCr't: C/IloPUlllllOn{L UClnaphle, pest,CiUe detn aople capton uvbi nppln Oas cnranao0 PVCtltltle, Olaafnen UPtn UppIV CA09109002335 LI..tI,OJ'1 lor calculating the Content of IndlaOull fatty aGro'. in /VUJ prOtluCla ~ Au1hOr: XOlnet:av. D. 1.; Sem.•nOva, L. I. , LocaLfnn: Irrsl. Pitan., MufCow, USSR SCClrurl: CA01)001 Publ Claa: JOLrINAL JournJl: Votr., Pibsn, Codt'n: VPIIAR Pl.bll 79 losuet 3 F.r9rs% $G-6G LnnOUane: Rnns Identrl•ors: /alty ae/n artvl Inod• 9.1s e4rornet00 tCtIY eGla
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print 10/2/1-10 304 01AloG rrla•'1: CA SLA96/ 1f-10/VDL 01110) (Collr. An. Cnew. Sol:.) lllers I 0/ 101 Useri906 1150079 Ca09110UU21v112G Crror,lcLrr•r:.\tion ef pvrolysll conditions en(l Inlt•rference by Vlnrr p'i'DUU11Ui Irl 1n0 CnCIn11VMInCSCCM1Ce OCLeCtIOn O/ n r lrosJ:nr•ra•1 Auurur: Nenaen, inalsen J.: Arenar, Nienael C.;TannenU..u., StC.:n 9 Lo.alnun: DCp. Nutri rau[1 sel., Maa.OCnusln a Inst. re<mlol. , C::nuf,c.!• LID, 0]10). USA Sncliun: CAOJ0005, CA01.'x>s Publ Class: JUUONAL Jaurnal: rnel• Glvm. G'Jen: uKNLM Publ: 79 Serloe: 51 Is~.ur: 9 •'::0°v IS~L•0 muclntlu>Irlrccc- IIICnIrllCri: n/IPOS.rnInV .'91.:Ct1Vn pyrolysis nee, Ira cnroinatn9 n•Ir4.:a:x/rw tletre(rOn ennnllv'nlnesh'n\;0. 0.1• CnrV:••JtUr) IIrJS.ulrine Uaa•LI/On CI1Crn1Il:IninCiG:r1Ct, Cnl'u1•::\lu•1 IrIrUl,lnin: OCIrLIiOn CnC•:r11VInlnCSCClICe pYf4lysls, nC•` i1rVi.lmrrla• CI\••nrll\r'.nlrla`SCCr1CC f/ClCCl10r1, rtr'O [Cl'..J rpYrolyirs CnV.nllullr•nCiCCnCC UCICC11ull, nltrpO.rnrlrlC V'/rU1YSiJ [I,C.n11VmlrlrsCCnCJ IlC(CCtlnn, nllflle pyrolysrs cnn.nlu'r:itl•^.LencJ neteClion• nltrosCOrCa pyrolysiv LnCI•ilu:.inC.[un[O O.IfCIIJn, anln0 n/1rn10 pyrolysis cnt••,ilu,.•lut•:CUUCC u:lec(:an, urla nllrOio PYrOlvSla Lne.rrrlu,•Irn,,•:Cence peta•LtlVn CAUOt1G015J011 PrCVCnlron o/ YOllo-nlnp of tner/lrolllastlp CG:n,n•.•IrUn/ . : %,rXal, IIIUOFi: Yus.lwa• Nbloyaru: IuMrMhO, t.:,.,1 l \url: J:rn.rn S.Ctrpn: CaOauOGG Publ Closs: PAT J,urnal: Jnn. MoN•11'IOhF)'O IIO/r0 COr/0n: JN.{IIAr 7901,7 Pa:p:: 6 pG- LarlOuapc•: Jar.'n P,•tent 1/•J: 1'] CNOa] Aoallc Ilu: 1'/115001 UJIe: Cl.:a: couns/19 aip:l::`: '.litsu/ PCIrOCnCn•Cal Irltlu:tr/es, Ltd. PUbI: 77002? Iyrller/: polyu••nurlrua uracalOraliun orCVlnl/pn e1FYlr:niU~tOIC, neat •tuUrllla•r bu1Y1Cre101 polynrOpylCrlC, tVC.:unEr01 antlo.\U.rnl nolypropylCnC. IIn1/1,11010 UCr•iV OaculOrelJOn po1Y0rOfrylene CA3?100074321N rlr.n.nyiun of nltrusntlrul a0ents eontHneC In 1-<n/ufV-'!,L-UinllrO-a-Itr1/luor'omCtnYllUCnlVnO +u:nor: Carr•lon, Yillra:n N.dn;.nill; rlePmber, Nicnor0 rran\ LuCatlun: USA SCClron: CL0)5006 Puol CI1/s: PAT Juurnal: 0110. CoO.an: O[uAl Publ: 190]]0 Pa9ef: 19 pp. lan0ua}c: rr ' Patenl NOe G>06i] APPIiC NOO BlSDB7 oaL1: '!]09]1 Cl.a: CO>C CountrY: us Ays'rpnee: Lilly. CI•, nna Co. i9£vI000 . IJCntl//er1: nllrosatlon POUrII ollminatlon enloroOlnllretrl- 1 hwrul\Vlnylbcnsene. nitrosanlne formallon preyenl/on alr:Irr.lliU•r. 11•Illur'allrle pfL•p,l nltr0lar.tne Innr0llIOn. bOnlen! Cn1urU IIrnI1rV IrIIIVOfOmOl11Y1 purl/n CA09109073332y In'urcr:l••.•nt o/ Sateuna reanL/orIn Ju10e buOI/ty and ulllllallun o/ Ib! plcll. ylll. AntlanlUal/ve Oornoonents O/ VpriOUS rltr'us l5lcnllal 0115 r•CCOVerlU Ir01. waalas o/ lna 111-Irn[ fViCr: CrrlraCllVn . ~ ?ulncr: Ifu4u, yasulnl: L1nrsJa• NISao LOCirllVUr: /.11••IC• LCOn. rCU. MiF.ll'nrna Pf!/OCI.. Malnan r000. raCll., h. in.ur, J..nan r2ctlou: CA01]U0•1, CI•OG]AAA Publ CloSSt JOVO/AL JVVr'I1n1` /IiYnUrr $nOFl.n1n NO9YO G•rFMOlsnl CVJCni N$AC•A.'C Pulal: 71, Si•rics: 25 11suc: 1] , Papesl 687-90 lenlnm6C: JnPn•1 I,ICntlllcrs: cltru. 011 cerelenolo tocoonarol, antlmlaant Cltr'u/ Oil CA091090133/31 Anlionioifln0 On0 antlra01Ca1 acllvltles Or the naln Isoners ol tof.ny^Vrols suUlur: Nlr:rfirnv, R. Nb,; Nnrapeva, N. O.t Sahneva, A. F. lur.9lmn: Mn[an. Nb/N.-TCFnn01. Insl., BaaaO, USSn SeCli4'l: CAUI'/00! Publ LIaSS: JOUnNAL JJUr'Ir,ll: lev. VYSin. UGIICUn. :::VCU., PISnCn. tehnnCl. CeN:n: IvuPtu' Puoll 79 Issue+ 2 PaOas: ]9-Je Larlquaya: Ituss IUCnll/rer'f: IoCOPnlrot a11t10lIUJnt OCllvlly ' cLO0109o:]9s6n Antla.luelrVe netlrllles ur arnlno eompuunUS on fets sno oil. IV. 1nliU.i{L1lIVC LCIIYItICf 0/ Ilr•CtClll nYUr•GlyrJlCs Aut11Jr•: T:.n,l.lurnl, N.1O1111FV: YOhuV. YGS/I•Oi rullnahl, MasaO LocnlwrV r.ma naa• Ins1.. NYmy.l. e•.ndn . Sa•CtlOn: Cn01]UO'! yu01 Cl,lss: JO\CNAL Juornal: ulnuurl SnO1.un1n,11o0YJ eahaarsnl Cotlen] N$IICAR Pubi: TO Sar/es: ]o Issue: 2 Pa9rs: 65-10 tarr~unC••: Jaaan IOCnll/ier5: antlYSlpint prOleln nyJfOlytat! 6
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W DIA10G ellenl CA SEARCH 77-70/VOL 911101 (CoPr. Am• CneM. Sec.( (Itela 10 O( 40) User1906 11seP79 196 , CA09E09J)0o)UJ , CA091090109<CiR Drl,•-in,rllVn OI C19r~Plll`i I tne Yranly~e COnlen l In 10 r0 Indlan Plnrll Il•'u•Iq re0ulallen Au11Wr: Collins, DaVIG J. LUG+l/url: Fn01, ~rr A,•tnur: Cnawarvarl/ , S• K.1 Dninan, J•; M oOpaul• K , K. Svttion: CA005003 Putfl Class: PAT I.,.cltlun: Pllvo, OeP L ., Kuruwnnelra Unlv., Kuhrxsnclr b, 111119 Jeyrnal: U.S. CoOen: USKAAM Publl 790S22 Pe9ast a, vri Suelron: CA000G01, W'•aurrl.ll' I/Jilln Ca011Xxs Publ Class: JOURHAL Pnya, Cun..vll NLTPAD PYblf 79 pnPatcnt No: q1557a1 AppldC NO% 77/10007 Oatal 770429 Class: 71-10, A01N5/00 CountrV: Orlt. 6arics: )6 l.:uo: 5 P,rOest 6)U-CO AsslOnva•: b•pm•iol Chrnrrlcal InaWStrles Lld. , IJ.`rv(Iflers: uranllrn o01rr ClOarcl, tobacco uranlun potn IUUntillers: too..cco 'suckerin0 ccntrol nllroaeelopnenons. acatupnenOna dlnltroJhuelhyloulyl tObacCO wCMOrlnO control V I CA09109070e32V loou.;"nlry of a 11e.lble rlOOnuCleoGroteln /101 Vx: prola•rn•nrnlCln Conla(:1! In S<nOal Vlruf nuC1e,JCaPslds Autnur: NaVno,,. R!ia•ndra: N1r106burU• David N,; POrlner, •Ilru; Guurv!e, StePr:en lu,•nlinn: St. Judo Cnlld. Roa. Ilnap•. MCnnnla. TNr ]D101, UsA r„Ctlon: CA00001], C0.010X1X PVUI ClaSs: JOURNAL Ser•lest Juurnal: J, Vrrul. CoO:u: JOVIAM PVbI: 79 30 3 Pa0•:0: 101-10 IJ~nti/lers: protein cr•o:.slInalnp rlCOnucleoprotC/n Stndal vvus, rmunucl0oorotJrn tona0 SenJal virus CA091090701570 r In,in9c-pl,o•1 In nuile/ d.olaten Irom tobacco tlsaueC1,~IraJr: l,,:, II.: L'a`IneY, A. M, Lib:.enpn K. R. lo::n IGn: Dfp^• Plant Atur•P:rVq•r RIJMSUniv. LalOCn, LCIIfOn, 2311 VJ. N;lu, . Srctlan: CdODu001, CAD11K5• PiNl Class: JOUR`IAL •Li•unal: /C14 Lult. Co.l,•n: ICDLAL Publ: 79 Sarlast 101 2 Pa90s: 301-71 ' IJ.•nt/frura: IOUacCU nycla•us DNA lrunsr.riptlOn CA091090+002911 1"scctrcill.n Co•rnoeitlona eor.nrMlno N'-arYl-H-r.elnYlfOr•man- Idruvs :-d ]-vr~no.yC::::il carpq.rlates AutnPr: PI:OP. Freder'ICw Y., Jr. lu~allr,,: USA Srclion: C.•00500A 'PUOt Cla;sl PAT Juurnal: U.S. CoJen: UStAAI.I PuDlt 790501 Pa9asf ] pP. Palt•nt No: •I5:•1$a Anulle Nol 15)0)7 Dale: 11i1iZ1 Cla>s: C]0-?0A, AOIIr3/0G. AOINn/16, A01xy/]0, AOINU/2e rL:C COrn. h!cntlLrprs: pn.`nwrbunLyl carbo.ylate fOrlnanldlne Inc;cticlce, tobacco YuO+or. /nsee¢IeICe 0 CA091090>0006J Virucinun AuUrur: `.ni0e•natsu, Talenlrol KaeuVal, Hiroshi: Snibanara, 7el::uy'\: N.1F.lfiua, IetauO: leraOwa, 1Urp LVrallun: Jnlr.in Sccllcir: CA00:00] Publ Class: PAT Journal: Jun, No4a1 TOM1wyo Npna CoJent JKXXAr PVbll 790y10 Pnqos: 7 P/I, Larpumle: Japan P.nenl Nm: 79 ]1D]4 Anpl{e tla: 77/90044 Date: 770616 Class: A01u9ln0, co)Ca7/]o A;;slUneu: MIIsVUicni CnOnrltal InOustrles Co., Ltd. ldcnll./lel•s: V/ruCloo aILylCarbOxyethylan.nOnluT Conpd CA09109069994V Cnemical'pruteetlon against eaons Injury to tobacco IeavM Autnor: Knrual, AMlra LGr:.lllun: J.rn,in Src11a+: f.A00501), CA0IIXXA PWI Class: JOURNAL JJyrnll: UFJy,ima IatIJ4o SnlFanla I/ox0\Y COGent OTSNAO Publ: 77 Seric:: ]0, PaOes: I-SO lanOuoCe: Japan IOOnlll/fra: IObPCCO Olane inyVry P:'otecIIGn
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C 0 r DIALOG Ellea: CA SEARCN 77-79/VOL 911001 (CeDr, As. Chew. Sne,l (lten 37 of SO) User1906 26nev79 227 4.0 GA091070rv0991v SIUJ,es on tne walur.ttlorl PI•nGesy DI faluan tobuCCo Itavee. IN. Lllect cl Etntvl AVpllcnllon on the malurllY And eoNOx,tfan if 'Iniean tobaero lenves anE its rllation with toe 1lnt tlrV ~01941 AuU,ori Lu, Il-She001 Shien, So-E6n lUClliJn: tnlvnrl IuU. Ret. Jn31., Natl, 7eInD Hua Itn1V., HYlnr.nu, ta~v'.n Srellp,l: Cneni033 Publ Clnf~: JOIItVAL JournJl: 1'u,wan Sncno Yun Cnlu Nuntl Llai Chu Yen You Snin Yen 5n vat Cnlu HW aao Cutlenq B799o0. Publl 79 Serle:: 0, P.•UVS: 51-5 lnn•rvn0el Cn IJOi,tillfr5: Etltfel 1o1,,lcCU Ie.)f CA091070509721 rnu influG'ncC DI lhree nc,•UICIUCS on the apnaltlVltY of yrcennuu,o-O•o'+n lluo-CUreO tl•U.,ceo fNlculleno CabaCumi plm,te to o:un• Autnor: S ny, Shi-Jeau Susanp; Munre, laurrnee 0. Loc.it,m,:t~0.•N. PIJnt ratl,nl, Pnyslol., VIr0lnla PolYteen. En.l. ar.tl Sl,llr Jnlv., UIJCwsUuf9. V.1, 14061, USA 5rcl,r.n: C.IOLSC03 ruUl Cla:•:: JOURNAL Jo..,;,l: 1•.:e Sr- CoU•n: wEESAG Publt 19 Su•lof< 27 Is.ue! 2 n.ioea: 167-]] Eu.•nll nrr:: nCroiC.aC orm,e tubaCCo . , u0ula7os,11,99t C.Varvite w pwlnU.' raPbon aonoClUa nollutJOn and their efli•,:t: o, V'~v-:CJ1 antl neuruUN,evlOrnl PerlOrmJnco A„tnur: S.I,u.,nen. A.I•p t•..,t, U.,•v. E,,,,rl••ra•, rn,nl)vr0, fo,lan0 stel._n',Ctoo•0n PuUI C1,.5•.: JnulluAL .IOUnnI: •,:rn un,v. ranyerc.. SCr. A Cotlenl AuiA07 PJ-I: 77 Str,t•s: OS, Poocn: e]P. Itlrnlilllrs: c.u'Uan mUnC,ItIC InslcltY LmOwln9, alr pollullo0 Ci•b,:n ~unn.itlC .i~n~wln0, InnAC[C :molte CJrbon aTJnotlCl.• ID~,C,IY r CA0n107050096Y I:eeleclr,c analy5le OF re4nlralorY Inueuf 1rp,11 nprmal rate and rJli a ..n In 1-111cro ~• ,.C Yuln 0111.1 ~ ' IGre: Plra,,Ulla loCaliO'~: C.'n•"~ty0., Unlv. Unn1a14, UnpSala, SveP. SeC:,On: CADD1013 PuUI Cl.l:s: JOIInNAL Juurnal: .. Nr.. 11esu,r. D,c, Conrn: AnGSDL PublE 79 Ser,ns: 119m 5 P.,nes: 779-03 IOVntlfler:: muCUS oronCnu: nrolCVr. IYDaCCo am0110, I:ou1rC IaCU::InD oronCnup i,ucuy prote,n 9ccvL000 CA0910105:111931 u•unul•.,piCal ItlentlflCallOn of nlpna'IVnIItrYDtln In puL„pnn~.l ewCro141a9es Aulou,•: l:eUta. PrnGoJn N.: Erosl, Jonn K.1 De00ea, SuSan; ArJCII, n.lnnie: D.IV~aPVaMI, ElorenCC Lo:nlior. San. NcU., Jonns ncpwins Unlv., Salllmnre, M0, USA Sl•:tlOn: CAOOnDI] Publ Clas*.: JOUDNAL Jolrnul: Ilu,,, Patnul. COaln: HPCDAC PVnI[ 79 SarIes: 10 Il.we: ] PaOes: 3a5-7 lUtnlll-erN nntlteypsln lung maCropna0e, apultM antltrYPSln IunO smow.n9 cA091o7OSOOOUV Ef. - I,I,n Cnrr!Iatea Of al[onol eOnaumPIlon In tnoMers and J t nOni.nowCr'.. kllettf 01muwln9 nnD smuwln9 aCPr1VMt1011 ,1u{11Ur Knott. VCI'nt'r J.: VenJUlt•i, PCICr N. lo:ntiun: nb,.brcw Coll., Univ, Lonuon. LonOOn, En01. Su a iun: CA004013 Punl Class: JUVOWAL Jn,,,•nJl: J. 5luJ• Alcohol COnCn: JS1lDP PuDlt 79 5eries: nn 1 ... e! 3 Papes: 247-57 IUlntlliera: E(G e1C smowln9• alnanel smoNlmQ EEG CA091070'•01175P Elfa•Ct ol pH and urlne flou on urlnarY nleotina.ercretlon aI1Cr "ww•n9 C,9nrCtf Auvtnr: M,,I..,wura; SMVeru: SuwA~~wlo. Noboru: lawanJtnl, NC1i:1„; IA.,1!.uy,,,,.J, Htlo:ni: MuranJwa, IIIOCO lo_atlon: Sc,,. L:ru., IIOUO Univ•, wub0. 650, Japan SC:IiOn: CC004013 Pobl CIa:G: JOURNAL Jounnl: Clin. Pnarmncol. Iner. CoUOn: CIPIVt Publt 79 25 Iasun: S. Pt. I PadCS: 540-5e ItUntllIers: nleotlnp el0arel urine It.. pN CA0910705UIp4N Ellect of cnrOnle laposure to toUaeto a,nGAe an some b1ooD Ilpi.u anU cn,~nulatlon ParrvrolOrs In th0 ra2 AuUwr: lalwn~il, Mahvr M,: EI-Sa.V, M.p SIDru4, M. S.i Gnuneim, la. 1. locution: Inc. Fleo., Ale,anCrla Unlv., AleaanOrla, EPVpt Sect:Un: 1A004013 Pu01 Class: JCURNAL Jpurnnl: Pnnrmatie Cuuen: PNAOAi Publl 79 Serleat 34 Is'e,r: 2 VaOes: 95-0 IUC'nllliers: loC.,cSO tmowe bloutl CoaOulatlon IIpiE, C19aret amowe blouo CoJDulalion liplo
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C 0 r DIAtOG PIICJ: CA SCAabI 77-P9/VDl 911101 (COOr. Aw. Cnen1 Soe•1 (11es1 21 of 40) Uusr1900 Ilsep79 Cs0!+1000717310 Detcrnnnatron ar lo.apnrne /n mlJk, butter snd weat Aullvor: UJSnul/, P. O.; P„elcrlu:, V. Luc,rt+url: tnSt. Chru.•nto0•'., Unlr, Prelorla, Prolorlk, 0002, Srclion: CA01)001, CL0051aL Pubi Class: JOUbwAL d=ruroal: Cull, Cn.lrun, C.+nln.n, los/cnll CoUOnt BCCiAO Puel: 79 Sc.ies: TT 1.•nue: 3 P.~pas: Co5-1] InrntlllCrs: to..1Fl+Cne O+s cnrmnato0 milx, meat to.opn<no Ea••, O+.I:C: Jain CAOil109071929V S;Jt,'.IiC:rl lre/r1m:.lt O/ rtsulls Gr an InlCrlabOr,ltOry e/rrul.m s1uUy Ccncrrnln0 tne UulcrrnlnntiCn of nr0anoehlUrlno peSl+t+/l:6 ~n m,IM .1+1•1 rn+lY prollu,:14 u,•: vn+ 11.'nlrryl„•m. If.: Aluvrn~ans. N.i B{Ililt. D•1 Cra,r„ J.: Oc t'UOr, 1/.; duY•'t, A,p Lnura/s. Il,p NanrlaCrtr P.; Pcu:rumn9. Il.: Cl al. ' 1,...11+,,n: ~ilx5_Y/v+•L,I„ r.lelle, OCIQ. 5„xl+on: CLOIIUJI, C500511at ioUl ClJS9t JOUNNAL n,ll: anil CaJau: 1s11AG PYU1: 79 SCrIH: 59 IsSUe: SnJ-CNe anryrr.: Ixl-.n LannuJOt: sr I,ICntielers: r++ser.trelJC ualn milk, enaasC /nsaetlclCe ot'In, pas N`r:~~+.+to9 InseetlClYC, out\cr Insret{CIOC Ua[n, CnlurinalCJ /nsCCllciJJ dvbi nillk . Cs001090v]]2nV uSJ or L+un'prrssuro li0uld cnroeulo0ronlry for Plaly[In9 so••p Su-v• n"unpcl5 Aulhur:r ky,:`1, ilCfJn L+,:atlon: Ina. Pf::Ir, CUNrOVnICIC9D. wJrSaM, POI• 5_'CtrUn: CA01]OG1, CM1OC.csA PuJI Class: JOUFNAL J.,urn,al: Cet. Cur•ro.+. CuUCn: CACUA2 PuOlt 79 SCr„•,: 07 Issut: '1 p..uenl 79-01 WnGU•IfC: Pol 1,ICnt/liers: su9ar Uabl mulnss¢s syrusf, Cnro+n[,toV su0ar CA0010130732170 Pu-,V4ulunin cwrple.alLOn ICCl+nlbue /or the spoCtrOpnOlomCtr- IC UCICCIiYn O/ NOIYIU.Y'1.1-ClnJr+Ctl,YIJ o1lyYmer6 In tICrIC e.Cl„„nn CnrO+.llotlr],Il+y A„umr• NJroer, Cncrlcs x.: Sel{~., Smnl; Dmlels• Dan/.l N, li'J.llim+: Div. Cnuw. PnYi., fOUb Orue lNA„ k'JSninDlOn. OC, 10:Q1, U:A S:Cti.r.: C~01:001I+u:vl Cltssl JCU:1':sL J1: J. C1+ru'n.+lurr, Co•:Cn: JOCpAIA PUbI: 79 Ser,u•,: 173 Issu,: 2 ]i7-GJ IJCnlr/,ert: ptlrelnylc•..• Dlywl e/lro'+raloD. SGrbllan pO11u1nYlcr•r• 911'COl C1,'o+',JIU:/, CnrusatOD polyethylene DIYCOI. CCI enrosatoV palletnvlenJ 0{YCO1 99E61000 009 'CA0919Y07320611A U,;Ierin+nal{nrl of rooJ presarvntlvPS and saCCbar/n by nlNr-pLrlo•'nu+'¢0 1lnuld cnro'•alo0rnpny ApUmr: tcumroerOtr, U•; Laucn, D„ OaumOarlnar, C. lucaliun: wnnlonalas lao., OCrn, ¢1-a000/0. S.Itr. Srcllon: CA011001 Pwl Clacs: JOI/buAL JourrlJl: J. CI+rMnntn9r, Co<lan: JOCl1AM Publ: 79 Serles: 173 lssua: 2 PaOes: ]O-0 INent/tIers: ehroni,stGO /oo0 nre6erratlve seCC/1ar1O, nYrlru.vOe'l+U^tvpl'In fuod, paraUCrl dcln f000. 9orbale dltn /uoJ, bCn/,lale Celn food . CA09109073013N . AnalvS'S ol Royal Jelly by Das ChrM0ta9Nnny l+ul Nur: 1 SII i,JUr•O. IJ,\iilJn,l LncatlL•+l: I+I+yo CustovIs lab,; loxYO, 100. Japan $CCtion: C.01)001 P,NI Clnss: JOURNAL JUUrii,ll: h.1n+C, ChUO OunsCx{yhunn CuNCn: yCBSDI PYD1: 78 Serl:•s: 10. Po0C5: 77-BI lnn0upyal JJpxn Idan11/{CrS: rOyJl lal/y OOU110r•,ItIM Iefl, nydroayAOClnoale drln rur•ll JeI1Y. 9ns CnruruJl09 roYal Ia11Y, cnrCrnalo0 Oa5 rnyul )vllv : CA0910007]t111/ Orlur'n~nrt10.+ of aCrylonl1rl15 awVnp+r.Cr in p1.atlC PJCko91n9 antl U^vC••+•i•'a by I+.`n<I:Nace gas chr•Wxalo9rnp/1y Au1NUr: 1:...,•1 I, G. O. AI. LcLJt{..r r,,,J nL'a. 0:p.• Natl. /oou AO.., Uposola. Sved. SJCt,onl CC017001, CAU4DYqt P„1/1 Class: JOURNAL Ja•UrnJl': ArtJ1Y3t (LUnUnn) COJCn: ANALAO Puhll 99 SCrlvs: 104 IssuC: 1:)5 PaOes: 100-10 IVcntl/iurs: oCrVlonltrlle oebl plosE{C oacka0In0 bevH•a0e CA0910007300314 6:,s c1+m+rdo0repn10 nlaJapace nnalYsls of .ol{d substrase /Cr'n.Wltal r, I AplhGr: IWn•StJCB, J. /J4Ch1Jl; LanCastOr. Carl B.; oolnest, 9oUney J. LuCatlnn: IInPC, D.S. pCp. ADrI[.. PCOrIa, IL, USA SCrtluu: CA91G001 Pu61 Clits: JCUONAL Juurnnl: P,•ucess B{oene•s. Codan: PROCAP Pu01t 99 SerlCf: 14 16fuC: 2 Pa0CS1 2-4 I4entlflOrS: ICrM SC11d'SWStral! analy515 Chlomat09
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LABSTRACTS B 017S SYRIAIY-HA2NS'I'ER IN TOXICOLOGY AND CARCISOGENESISRESEARCH - PROGRESS !N EXPERIAfENTAL TU.NOR RESEARCH. VOL. 24 Symp on the Syrian Hamsqr in Toxicology and Carcinogeneiis Research. Boston. MA. November 30-Dnember?. 1977. Sponsors: Fannie E Rippel Fdn / Bio Res Consultants Inc EDITED BY F. HOMBURGER S. Karger AG (BaseD. 1979. 439 Pages. Figures. Plates. $97.75/ S.•F 163.00. ISBN: 3.8p55-23946 Individuals lwF.ere invoice recipient is not a library, institute or firm) quxlif,v to receive a 20°.t discount on the gross selling price. In the event af prcpayment. no postal charges for surface mail will be madc. STUDIES USING HAMSTER CELLS Cytogenetia of Syrian Hamster and its Relationships to Invitro Neoplastic Transformation. JA. Dipnolo• N.C Popescu ............ ............... __.._..... ..... _..._............... ........... _.... ............ .__.... 2 Progressive Nature of Neoplastic Transformation of Syrian Hamster Embryo Cells in Culture. J.C Barvett ............ ........ _._...... _......... ............. ......... ........ ..•.......... .............. _.... _............. 17 Isolation and Biochemical Characteriution of Hamster Cheek Pouch Epithelium. C.D..t7ccoy, P.C Tambone. EL H-9nder.._ ................ .... ._._._..... ._............................. ........•_..... ................. 28 Use se of Hamster Tracheal Organ Cultures for Assessing the Courcinogenic Effects of Inorganic Par- titulates un the Respiratory Epithelium. B.T ,Ilossman• L£ CraigAend ................................ _...37 Carcinoma Induction by 3-Methyleholanthrene in Hamster Tracheal Tissue Implanted in Syngeneic Animals. J.£ Crnignead B.T..lfossman ........... ........................................ .................... _..._............ 68 Comparative Metabolism of Benao(A)pyrene in Rodent Liver and Embryonic Cells in Tissue Culture.- JK Selkirk FJ 1Viebel .......................................... .................. ................ .......................... ___....61 Effects of Tumor-Promoting Phorbol Diester on Hamster Cells in Culture. TG. Onnan, L Diamond ...... _....... ....... _..__._ ............................... ...... _................................ ......... _............... 73 Hamster Tracheal Organ Cultures as Models for Infeceion and Toxicology Studies. S1.C Gob,id9e ...................... ...__...._....._.._..........._.._.•....••...•.................._........,.........._._..•..... .g5 STUDIES USING INTACT ANINALS Variations in Reproductive Performance Among Certain Strains of Inbred Syrian Hamsters. CG. Vandongen ............................... .... :............... ........... ....................... ........................................ 98 : Survival Distribution of Syrian Hamsters (>tesocricetus-Auratus, Sch, SYR)Used during 1972.1977. ! ILC. Redman. CH Hobbs, AtL Rebar ................ _..n.-...._........... .......... _........... ........................ 10g Longevtty of the Syrian Hamster. P. Bernfeld ............ Nutrition of the Syrian Golden Hamster. P.M. Xau•bcree, R.G. .tlcconnell...._ ................................. L7 Glycerolkinase Itvels in Adipose Tissues of Obese Hamsters. P. Brrnfeld .......................... _........... 139 Spontaneaus Diseases df Syrian Hamsters - Their Implications in Toxicological Research - Facts, Thougha and Suggestions. P. Ponr. D. Dirt .......................... _........................ _............................. 145 Recent Advances in Hamster Cenetim. CH. Yoon. J.S Pelerson ............................ .................... ...... 157 ~ TOXICOLOGY Effects of Exposure to Acetaldehyde in Syrian Hamsters Simultaneously Treated with Benzo(A)py- rene or Drethylnitrosamine. VJ. Feron .................. _..... _.......................................... .......... _..... 162 Inhalatiann Studies with Syrian Golden Hamsten. A.P. H'ehner, B.O. StuarS CL Sanders ........... 177 Comparative Studies on Spontaneous Tumor Incidence Based on Systematic Histologic Examination - ~ of Rat and Hamster Strains of the Same Colony. P. Ponn }', li.-J. Althoff ................................. 199 Significance of the Hamster Model in Carcinagenesis Testing. Gl Grnndjean, J. AltAoff .............207 Susceptibility and Resistance to Chemical Carcinogens in Inbred Syrian Hamsters. C Hnmburgrr R.A. Adams. E Soto. CC. Vnndangen ................................................................215 Use of the Synan Hamster in Toxicology Studies, with Emphasis on Carcinogenesis Dfoassay. '~ D.L Arno(d H.C Cnce...... _..... ...... _.... ......... ..._ ....... .................... ........... ...... ............ ..............___ Carcmogenesis of K-Sitroso-Horpholine and Derivatires in Syrian Golden Hamsters. U.IfaA.....235 Syrian Golden Hamster as a Model in Caneer Research. Ll Dlnhr ................................. _._................ 2s5 Toucsty Tests for the Purpose of Regulating Peaticides. R. Englrr ...................................................258 ORALCARCISOGE]E51S link-ual lwukuplakia and Cardnoma- Experimental Aodel. P..Harrfal• C. SA4(a. 259 Immunoenhanemg Agents and Experimental L<ukoplakia and Carctmma uf the Hamster Buccal Pouch. G. ihkeur. E. £iseabrr9. £. Flynn .......................................................................................2G9 RESPIRATORY TRACT CARt60Q'Nf51S Alteratianrin the \asal >lucou of Syrian Golden Hamsters Exposrd tu Cigarette Smoke. P.A: Baarun T l/nradn . ........ .. ......................................... .............................................:.............:....253 - Respiratory System Differences Relevant to Lung Cartinogxnesis between Synan Ilamsters and Other Specus A.R. Kennedy. J.B. Little ........ ......... _.... ....... ............... ................ .................... ........30_ Cigarette Smoke-Induced Cancer of the laryns in Hamzters (CI.%CIIS- Method to Assay the Car- anogemnty of Cigarette Smoke. P Btrrnfrld• F.Ilomburgr•. A.B. Ru.wrield ............................315 . Influence of Ciumm-A on the I. ryngeal Response of Hamsters Expobed to Cigarette Smoke. P.D .tleade. S Yamashvo. T Ha*ndn. P.A-. Ba.srur :.............. ............. ........................................ 390 Studies wtth a\e. Espertmental Model in Respiratory Car<inogenests. P..\'rtftshnnt T. )'anra ......... _..... _......... ...................... .................._ ....... _.................. . .......... ..... . . ...... ... _ ................................ 330 1-Neths9-I-Nitroburea Indxtionof Cancer in a IncaHteJ Area of the Syrian Golden Hamster Tra- chea. CJ Grubbs. P..C..Voon, K..\'ankane• IU. TAompso¢ P.J Brcu ........ ......... ..................... 345 !Vm . 9F,~lo. ,12e SEPT. 21e 1979
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LD D OOALOG PIle4: CA S[ARCH 77-79/VOL 91(001 (Cepr. An, Cne.. Soo.l Illon 40 of 501 Ussr1906 ]Onav79 7}R CJ ~mI Cd09101050070H N/cnUne and cotlnlne In brlall fluid A t1oN Hill peter• Vvnder Ernust L, ~ II,C aCliOn Of nlrOtlne pn t/1e pltVllary-adrenet CprtlG•l/ Lu•:atiun: Nzylar Oana Ina1• OIS. Prav., Am. Health lounC., 641, ya u.,l:o. NY. 10595• USA ' n„Plor: Cm+. G. R.; Oassett. J. R.; Calsneross• K. 0. l North Rype. 2113 LInCYVarle Ln1Y. D101 SC1 ,l{on:'• Cn Se;tlal: CA0Gn007 Publ Class: JOVRIIAL doarnaI: Cnnccr Latt• (Snannun, Irel,) CuUOnt CALE00 ., , . nt: . v a ,a Puull 79 Saries: 0 Issuol 4-5 P•.9asl 751-L , u:Lral Suttion: CA0040 q Publ CInSS: JOURNAL IdJntlfiersl nicGtl,nP eotlnlne brlast f1u10, smO41nD breast \ r .Inurnal: Arcn. Inl. Pnarm..conyn• tncr• CodCN , AIF1AIt 110.1 nleotine • ' Publ: :9 Srrles: 237 Issue: I PaVOS: 49-00 ~. IOCnlillers: rl/toll.lp aUrrnal LVr1C4 p/tVl{.1rY aYSlemu CorllcnaCront CIOOE nlcotlne ACfH CA09107050102p L•anb19 and NealtPt >atno0snlc and orewntlvs COnsiJ.•r•llionS Cs0 070500370 Autnur: wpmer, Ernst L.t Ho/Hnenn, Dietrich )1 Vse of pnlC-y ello.' tobllCco to I'eGuce Lmohe PolynuClear Lo:01u+n: 4,nerlcan Hraltn foun0.• NaylOr bana IOat. Ols, era:r•,tiC nyJrUtn„ 40nn : CNaplln, RleNUrd F F 110 n Ra ; 4rrend PrCY.• New York, NY. USA . Sc•:t{on: CA004G00 Pu01 Class: JOURr1AL . . , y . . Au{I,Vr: Y~reriu ••sonnelnn E N Illo Jo•ir,,alt Dull. SCn'.Cll• AF.iJ. bCU. Nlls. Cpdent 9SANAS , . . Jd•'•c: F.: 70GOC USA Atnens GA l Anm S E+ Puul: 79 5evlcs: 35 Issuc: 1-7 PaOes: 67-90 . . . .• , c uc. lucnt,a+: tuu. lau.• Scu Ibn: C4004G17 Puol CIa•..r•: JOUNAAL Jnurnnl: J. `.nrlc. foocl Cnq,.. Caticn: JLfCAO Publt 79 : 4 U9c-D4C 7 1' Id)ntl/ltrs: revlCw SmoNln9 health I4llar0 ssoe Scrlm:: 2 IUenl,fi.•r•s: rrOm nYd•'Gtirbon lPEecCO anOla• .O CA09107050740U ' P'+ys1o10y1ca1 and Patnola9lCal ellettf of RarN/ tobacco SKNe CIO F 4 'Cpponcn a on tNe Cardlovascular sYSlem A„IhOr: AstruP. Po„1 D . G091u7050J 7 :nt,•.nutle.+r ruJlnls In UnUi/fsrertlotrC eer'Clnbnas O~ n lo:alnn: alin•-NOn. Afde11n0 A. RIOSnosp., Copslms0en, n D sal,.•,ry ulmNa In ,tr.,,n A mice in n slnJy InvPlyln9 a cn. DN-]100• OURNAL : ' toUA<r0 sP•-c,/lc n,truia•ninc, N-nttrosorPrnl<.otlne 000 Publ Clnss J S,-1]ia,: CA004 /oornal: DuOOecim Conen: DUOOAG Publt 71 0 9lrlest 93 AutnUr: NirUla. Nur,o I { sl 547-54 LnnCUaoo: Finnish : 0 P lcc.ll.on: r/•r;lor Ce•m Inst. DIS. PrL•v„ AO. Mcaltn f0an0., ;:ye Is:uc D ar0loWScular sy{tfn . 10'i'I5. USA ' I/Y Valnnlla e e Id;ntlfllrH rlvie,/ tobaccG smo Z , . Soc[ICS: CAOC•160] Publ Clasp: JOVRfaL l Codonl CALE00 Sn n tl I v oono , r . Joo•nnl: Canccr lru . I ' - i 9 Publ: 71 ScriP::G Issuc: 6 PJGcs: i6 iUel,tltlo„s: niVUSUnornicoline Curelcwna f.allYarY gland (J) CA091070502000 r,.l•a,ty of protein sYrrtMS/s in vltrtl Is InCrMsed In the 5 CA091070501450 P~'o.••oti•14 ellect And .'ecGan/s'n of the CI9nrCtte smONP COnU:'+'.~t.' On IYiIJ {w••ur' In m,Ce InJYCad by 4-nitrOOulnoll,le ,U.• 14-u001 Ar,+NOr: I:~n..,:P. Yafunlra; S:,Ya/, HeCVC: RaISUNI• HIUCO: D.n•••nto. tauuw . LnCntlon: Fao. Pnarw. S01•, CnIEa U:IY., Cl+lba. Japan Satllpn: CLn04007 PuCI Close: JUURnAI Journal: /la,yan CeOen: I/GS:ao Publt ]9 Ser/ost /B ISSUC: 2 P..Ves: ISI-] Lnn•lunea: Japnn tuentlfler5: nllreau,nellnx e.ioa lune tu+Or C/oaret smoYo CA091070SO520C GMT000 As prC4:"1CP OI LnCrmlUinC Autnor: Abronnm, ibranam K.: 016.11. SIVri Plnl. Aleranden Lu:nliVn: 11ursM NyJra'S InM1t. CnnCCr RL•S., DSIa• 7. Morway SectJlfn: CAOU]001 Publ Class: EDURNAL JVurnal: FEOS lett• CoOen: IEUL4L Publt .19 Serlesl 101 1-vv: I PaOOSt 95-6 Idtntl/lers: prate/n fOrnJ{IOn apsr.ldlns. NMA tranflallon spermidl'v '
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i L PATENI S N United States Patent o+l Green et RI. (N1 TORACCf>S?fOKE FILTERS - /7SI Lvanton loka D. Cr9en- Ronney: 1. R. . Mann, Altoa both of England (151 Assignea: BrinWAm.neae Tobacco Cewpur • Ualed• Loulort Enyarrd 1211 AppL Nn: L96,3M - p21 Filee: ae. L t9n - (511 IeL 0.' A3J81S/27; BOID 21/02 (5v) Ds CL _ u1np A;13!na.2; 131/109; 131/265; 55/74 13q FnN et SevA I3Il161, 262.2i3 , 16a, 131/265. 10 A. 10.5. 10 R. 10.1, 10.9, 268, 269; 55lf4 1561 RaferteavGled U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 1159p11 1L1M1 T6mmsan . 131/761 A 3}9QMa 1/!91t TowletLL JSI/168 p11 - 4,163,452 1451 Aug. 7, 1979 FOREIGN PATEAT DOCUMENTS 1233t1a V19T1 V.ileE Kuedoe _.._ Il!R62 A hima.Y Eanm/nee-Robere W. Michell Assuron/ Eaamw.-ThOmas Wallen Aramrt. Aeene oe Finn-Kaee, Dalsin9er, Ksna Sulhvan & Kurucx 1511 ABSfRAL7 - An improred to6.eeo-smoke Bher nr Rlter mamrial eonraim granuln of pnro•-•s aclivatcd carbon to which hu been applied a nltroalde of the group consisting of the uitroude baa12.6.blelrameshl'Ip.perdmoaaY. the nivoaide 1•nisronYl•3aaYlaJ,S.Sdenamcohy4S- phenyM,hydroimidazole and mlarurn thereoL The car- ban ma> t,c loadcd vith 0.5 tu 258. scitably I 0 to I S'.'e, by weight of the nnroaide Advanugzously such a 61ter has proviaian for (dmr venulatwn. For instance. in a triple filter with a center seawn eonuinmg the treated carbon, the said oenter seclron and/or Ilm section up Yrearn thereof is venlJatW. 11 Ctim., No Dnoie;s United States Patent 1191 ~' Wilding I (Sal CIIANSEL BELT CONVEYOR 1731 In entor: Ed•ia L. uiWina• Loulsville. Ky. 1731 Assigneer Griffin & Cmopan), Loufsville, KY. 12:1 Fikd: Sept. 16, 1974 1?II Appl. No.:506,2./1 - • R 1521 U.S. tt...___..._..___...__....... 198,192 1311 gnL CL'...._-....-....._ .................. B65G 15108 • 1581 Fdd c1 Sarch_..._-_ 19Kf192 R, 192 A. 191. - Relerrnces Caed 198/109 I UNITED STATES PATENTS 191119] 3,430.756 )/1969 AllcndM... . 19Y1195 J}ea.r92 9/1Y7! KinaM.......... ..___ 196:19! /JIS.l:J 6/IYIJ -Nan....._. 19t1191 PrInqIF EeYminer-J]mt9 B. hLarhert AssavntY• .egenr, ue F4m- Woud, Nerron & j:•'ans 111] - 3,942,626 1451 \tar. 9, 1976 (371 ABSfRACT A channel belt eanvnor includes a bcd, an c!ongaeed- bclL and hen suppnrting Ranges adjust.bh mounled on the bed and havm; iova edges spaeed from Ihe bed to form arn esil passage thereheteeen. The belt aupponing Banges are raised abo•e the bcd m support the bnll edges so the belt assumes a channeblike con- ftguratwn in iu lead beuine run. Dnplaeed panieles of conreYed mmerial..hlch bnd thnr vray between the belt and rte Danges or bed, can ,.ork thcir .av free Ih7ough the passage without beine tapsured or inpacud, thereby reducing accumulatmn of impacted .wtenal and con.cquenl bclt loading. Conve.ed to- aaero is conuined by the belt so that it does mx slyde -along sutionaq punions of the conve.or. thereby forming deleterious "shorti and dumt, nor is therc anv area in w Leh the tohacco can'lump'-. The bed of the eonrevor u estend.W outwardl,v of the Ranges an6 is lurncd do.nwardly to form the conve)or sides and venkal bed support. 12 Claims.4 on..inK Flgures 90 201J10u Aroma and/or DavorinR compositions. Kaiser, Roman; Lamparsky, Dietmar (Givaudan, L., et Cie. S. A.) Cer. Offen. 2.627,636 (Cl. C07C43lbl). 11 Jan 1979, Lux. Appl. 77,627. 27 Jun 1977; 35 pp. Fifteen iryl and ionyl ethers I(Rt Kr is 2 v 'h 11 1ia C! , alkrl, CI 9 alicenyl; Rt =.H, \fe; Rs = Ve, Et; dashed line in the side chain ar an optional bond and in the rinK addrll, - hnndin;;). useful as odorous substances andlnr) flacnrin¢s, were - prepd. Thus. J-iunul was converterl with NaH to the alcnholat6 - which .va< methvlated with Ve:S09 to Five 60% Q-iunol S1e ethet 11l1, with a xodc and raspberry nroma. ~, ~Vot_a 9,,No. 12..SEP7. 21, 1979
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DIALOG r/lCa: CA SGiRCII T1-19/VaL 91(lel (Cepr. A.. CnOm. Soe.) (Item IO of 291 us.r1900 IIeeYE9 CA0V100013100/ '//,ilrilir.• .,`elenCre mnde frOrr. starch A.r<nor•: Y.,IAIIrGIVr, NUUC.'l V. Lecallcn: A Dlv. St.uw. 6•nnd5 Inc., Clinton Corn Prpeess. C/Went ACOYAP 302 CA99199073111V 1'raclrc:ll Pr•oblens Of CYClar.vle and saCCnarln InCOrporatl0n in lu„rlarr/le , Auumr: Lol/, E. Luc.,urrn: COluo,le, p5000, F.d. ReO. GCr. Secllon: CA01Y000 Puol Class: CON/ PROC Juurn,ll: uvnlln SuOar ,Sunslilotes, Proc. ERGOB Con/, CO., Clintnn, IA,'fi:1J], USA SCnl;on: CA015000 PuUI ClaGfl JOURNAL Ju, al: Au.. CnrUOUVOr. Cnem. YraCnea. Publ: 79 Snrles: J6, n;,,cs: 1•i-56 lll:ntf/lar.: revinY :wee[ener• .tnrcn CA091090ESIPAY Pul4ntlaI Iruens0 Swretenlra of natural nrlDln <ull,u,r: In9letl, G. C. lusal,aa: r/orlnl ne0. RCs. Cent., Sel. EduC. Adm., Peprle, IL. 41604, U.1 5._Ilun:,CA011000 PuUl Claas: CONP PIIOC J,~urn.n: Ne.rlrn SuOar 5.•b:.titu[Ca, Proe. EOD00 Con/. SuOnr• Suu,1,[nICY Ccpen: <0:n•IAI Puol: 79 Pa00s: 10.1-y0 Lleelin,J Pxe: 711 Punl/>nCr: enr0er ACJre,f4 OasCl, Svfti Avell: 0 ILI;n1i/.Cfs: rtv,e. natural sweetener, euoa„ Clubstltllte natur•11 re.;ew ' CA09109017193t i.\I.n - nnuel S.PCI prolrin /rOm E. dnnlellll Auuior: rlirqinbolnan, J. D. t.•t.,t,Un: Pn,l,p LVIC LICn. RCS. Lab., Tale Prld LYIe, Ltd., Rea.l,nb. RC/, '..'.lA, (n01. Sr-t,an: Cl0r)000 Puul Class: C0`:F POOC J~urnrl: /l:;.lln Sy9.Sr $ubailule:, nruc. ERLOB COnf. 9u9ar S,h,l.lul[z Cooen: J01/CA9 Publ: 79 PJ9Ct1 1]2-9 MC„1•n0 r,itc: ) 0 P,d,l,sl•rr': NarOer AOdrs•ss: Beeol, S.It[ Ar ,1: GuTr•:nnCi... 0 I. rCntllrvr•.I revrew prulcln s.eClenar, Tllau..te<oC<us prol,•in rer,.. Sugar Subvlilulrs CcJenl .0Rr•IA] Puoll 79 Pn0os1 157-8 MeClln9 D.rlu: TO Pu0li:nurl Na.•9el• AddrCae: 94,01, SVltt lv,ii I: 6„G'Inrumlm, 5 Identlllrrs: raview CYClamule aaeeflYrin food CA09109J731E00 'iCCllnolnn~r:al problems In the Incorporatlon of nydro9enabd Qlur:nyC LYrunS .lnd L-40rbOse Aotnor: Z remJrr,nan0, tt. Lucallu,n: Fnou Oep., Rooaetto Prere., Lestrem, E01]6. ir. $CCtiun: CA011060 Publ Cla.'.a: CIJNF PROC Juurn:fl: Nealln SuOnr SubslilulOS, PrOG. ERO00 Cen/. SuOa• Sulrailult•: CUJCn: 41111GIA1 Publ: 79 Pa6ea: 155-52 NeCtrnO N.rta: CO P.mllv.,,~: N.irwr Addressl Onsel, Srlt+ . Avwil: WOT-unelm. B ~ IoentlJiJPS: r•PVICw bee[ener sOrbose nydropeneted syrup CA09/09013169A PalotJn;t - teehnofo0lcal propOrtles Aulnur: SCnlyyrCh, H. Locutluni Cerq. Lub „ Sueodtacll. Y.6MOr-A•-0., Druensladl, 0-6110/1. reu. Rep. Gar. S,•ction: Ca01>000 Pubt Class: CONi PROC Journal; /leatlh Sugar Seostltutes, Proe. ERGOB ConL. 5w9ar SuU:.lltulef Couent <0RMA1 PoUI: 79 PaOCa: 130-i4 ElCellnO Oaie4 10 Puulis:'er•: RarOer AddrOss: Oase-t, Sritt AVall: Gr.LlOrnnefm, 0 ' Ident/l,ers: reviow Pplatln/t sweetener ' CA09100073111N D~1,1Jr[.Gn.IIGOn1 iveCleneri Autncr: uw o..rlt, R. N.; Oantlll, Oruna Lu;ation: Froit ve9. enem. LaU., Scl. Edue. Adw., Pes00pna, CA. 0.106, OS.1 SCCIIJn: C%•pI1C0V ruul ClasS: CCNF PRDC J•~rnall nmlln $u01r S,roJll[oles• Pree, ERG00 COn/, Sugar Sub,titu[r. COU¢n: a0T:1.V Pu01: 79 PatJes: IGY-11 AV•el /n9 Ilate: 70 P„blrt/.er: sarCOr Addrul?: Basel, Svitt A..irl: 6uc9rM,e1., 0 tdunll/rers: rfvlc. cilnYdroCnalCOne 6waetG•Mr £SE6t000 0 ,
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OIAIUG Plleal CA SEA9CH 77-79/V0L 911,10) (COpr, Am. Chem. Sup.) IItMa B of 401 Vser1906'IIYep79 CA09109071072A tr•e flrsl publlslleb Chemlcol analyses of srwk0 from Souln Alrlc,ln Lr9arclles a,iln'ar: ~C/lel, H. C. l:c.llro~l: DCP. IJL•tl., JOnbnrresbur9 General 1blO., Jnlqmup:.BUrO, 5, Alr. S::IIO•r: U011007 Pupl Clecu JOUM/AL J,•urnal: S. AbE, J, Con.•n: SANJAP Sor,l•a: 55 Isauct 19 Poncs: 743-0 IrICn111iCrs: Cloarea lnoke Compn Publt 79 CAC•r109¢710T 1 z Fu-n;lllon and analysis of carbon mpnoaee In OlGaret nU :IUeatr e a.Wke ' I majutnul!r"NO1/m.vnn, 0rCt,e•icn : •icn: Atl„ws, Jobn D.1 NynOCr Ernst L. ir,n: Il,,ylar D.ln,l 1/1'.1. Dls• PrCV., Anrel•ICan 1/.•altn FnUrrl.,V:,In,\Iln, NY, I0595. USA s.clion: CAaI1COV Puhl Classt JOUBNAL ~ Jaurn:ll: Prcv, VeO. CoJCr•: Pvir:Al Publ: 79 Serles: 3 PorOel: 344-50 lucnlll/rrs: c0rbon mano.rJO elVarft smoke• tobacco smoke caroun ..w•ouoa CJ0J1090710T<M - I.miU,Eion of rfbulose 1,5-bispnospnateCarboaylnle by a to•rn rsdlalco Fro.n P.culrom,m.•, tnoac/ A•tu.or•: Craltc, Leul:, u.: Sheen. S. J• L•crtlnn: 011. Plant f•athcl., U.nir. NentuckY, l<elnOlon, KY, a05co, u5a ' S•rtlun: f}L011005 Publ Clasn: JOUr.NAL Jnrrnnl: f•nylapsl1,01a91 Cuoen: PHYrAJ PUY1: 79 Serl,.;: 1•9 Issua•: 9 Pn9es: ]7G-o ' 1,\.nllflerf: rlbulose Olspnospnate CarbovylPSe toaln PfONornCnaS C4091090717990 A Hrrynwnrcln-rlslslant l/na of Nlcotlanp sylVestrls In,.mlp t0 Ilu.ar J•,u\ur: Ga110a, P,; Nlss• tsuzsa N.: Olt. P. J,: Larnr, G.vu..,el:a la[.llion: Biol, Pes. Cent.. I'nst. Plant Pnyslol., S1e0lC. N-G)01, Ilun9, S;aicn: C•IOIIGOa Puol Class: J0U911JL Wournal: Nol, Oen, Gcnc1. Con:n: e\LGCAE Puol: 79 \72 IGSUC: I P,,ges: u-Is IU.'nt1/ilCrl: itrn•PluniYCln rarftant Nlentlin:r 9enetlC! CA09109071767V 29S Genetic And pnys/olo01Ca1 InvelllOallens of 1,.-D rn4cunl CCIY lir\e li^IaICU /POm lI1sUC CUIIUr•CS In 1oO,sCC0. 111. L/( rct uf tlvirra plrotl On tna tlenSUr'opolYwerllntlon o/ the pnCnollc sunslanCCs In Vrlro Autnar: Ono, HnlilnC: NOkullnwa, l/llosnii IlaMUla, Ianolfu LocallortJ fac, A9r•IC., Itubc Univ., P.ube, Jaoan 5ectlon: CAOIt00] PuCI OIaSS: JOVNNAL Jullrn,ll: FuUe DaloaFU //o'Jnk.rbY ner,kyl/ /lokoku Cotllnt NNLnnP I'ubl: 79 SCrlenl 13 Isue: 2 Pi,9eSt 203-7 Lanpu:IVC: Jnna,\ ' IUantl/iurs'• OahYtlr'opolynn pnenol tCGaeco lissue Culture C.t09 t09o%170w Sllnulallrrn of pnospnalaN rOllase frOnl CultureC tobacco Cell: by U/CnlCrlt C•lliOn! Aulnu,•: UCki, Nal::ull Wcation: Int. •OrIC•. YnaaOala Unlv., YawaVatJ, 997. JCpan .:otlun: C>OIIOO] PUOI Class: JOUOIJAL Jnurnpl: rlant cbll Pnys,ul. Ca[kn: PCPHAS PubY: 79 Serics: ?0 Issua: A PaOOst 709-90 IPCnli/ierl: p/lO:pnataSe tobacco cell menbrane Catlon CA09109071730C SluOies U/ nlant memorano Colnlaonenls usln0 proloplasls Ai•Inor: fisnar, D. J. lucaliun: lnnD Ashton 91:9,. Sln•, Unir. Orlstol, Briftol., OSIU sAr. Conl, 5rcllnn: C1011o01 Publ Class: JOUONAL Joun,al: 1'lant 50. Lutt. Cou[m PTSUE Publ: 79 SarleC: 15 I;suc: 2 . PaO.•s: 121-7,1 ' , IUOnllllwr•s: plant plasma nerDrane YeolOplalt CA091UrJ0:16500 lr;¢c \nalyslf In s9rlcultural proUUCts• IJelnopf for nYnrnJlnCS, Lnrb,VnaleR. N-nltr4fotlietnanplarlrlnC anp olnCr Cn~rp•/rnnl ~ Aulnu•: Sen.elCe, Irwin; prunnemom, Klaus D.; Hol/menn, OlelriCl\ tocdllur\: Naylor Galm Inlt. Dlf, her., American Health founJ., Yalnnlla, NY, 10595• USA ScCllo•\: CAG110U0 publ CLS!!: JOU9NAL Journil: 1rNS SuvC. Iubl. 10. S.) Cooan: N9SAV Punl: 79 Serrc:: L 9 Iaue: Vaee OrO. }nal.: Na. Fronl. Anal, ln.•n. PaSeC: 491-]G9 Itlaltllier5: rCV\p• IunaCCO lroNe ana1YlIB, nYWailne amlysr: nrylCUlt~ural prJJucl revlC.. Careamate nalysrs a9•'1CUlmral orouact , nitro:nrlletnanolamrne analys u Y9r'iCUllural pr<•outl revle+,w ~ LI
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LPATENTS - 4,167,238 TOBACCO POUCH WITH EJECfOR bfECHANIS]1 Phifip A. Koski, 7588 Groseland Rd,Minnnpolis. 9f inn. 55432 Fikd Jan. 9, 1978, Ser-?1o. 867,398 IntC1.=G01F11/20 - US. CL 222--417 1 Claim - N l. In a tobacco pouch for containing and dispensing a quan- tiay of pipe tobacco. (a) a bag of flexible shees matcrial, - . (b) said bag having Rat side walls connected by front, rear, lop and bottom walk with a aipper closure extending - along the top wall• (c) the bag held in a distended condition by a framework having rigid front and rear ribs extending-along the bag front and rear walls and elongated members interconnect- ing the ribs for retaining the ribs in longitudinally spaced ( condition. (d) the front rib having an aperture at the longitudinal center thereof which receives and secures the end of a discharge tube which extends through an opening in the front wall ofthe bag, ' (e) a spiral spring auger member disposed within the bag in • uial alignment wilh the tube and having one end filting loosely withir. Ihe tube. and (f) a handle member connected to the auger member and extending through the rear rib and rear wall whereby as the handle member is rotated the auger member will move tobacco within the bag toward and outwardly through said opening and tube. _ ' 4,167;497 l.(2,6.6-T'RIsiI ETHYL1}CYCLOHEXADIEN-1-YLl-f,2- BU2ANEDIONE AND PERFU1fE COMPOSI7IONS Braja D. pfookherjee, Holmdeh Richard A. Wilson, Westfield; Fredtrick L Scchmitl, Holmdel; Joaquin F, Vinals, Red Banl,- dl of NJ., ud Jacob Kirrala, Brooklyn, N.Y., assignors tn Ialernaliooal Flamrs & Fngnnces Inc- New York, N.Y. Disisiun of Ser. No. 887.6J0, DBr. 17, 1978. This application Noe. 17, 1978. Ser. No. 961,877 InL CI? A61K 7/46: CI1D 9/00 . US. Ca. 252-522 5 Claima 1. A process for augmenting or enhancing the organoleptic properties of consumable materials selected from the group consisting of perfume cnmpoutions and colognes compnsmg the step of adding to said consumable material an organoleptic property modifying quantity of the composition which is an equilibrium mixture containing compounds having the slruc- lures: IVOL. 9r No. 12. SEPTa 21, 1979 4.167,947 SUBSTITUTED BICYCLOOCfENEMF.THA%OIS, PROCESS FOR PRODUC-INGSAMEANDUSESOFSAmE - FOR AL'GNIE\TING OR EIHA.%CING THE ORGANOLEPfIC PROPERTIES OF S)1OKING COMPOSITIONS James V. Sanden. Eaontowrr, Joaquin F. Vinala, Red Bank. and Frederick L Schmitt, Holmdel• all of NJ., assignors lo International Flavors & Fragrancn Inc.. Nes. York• N.Y. . Dirision of Ser. Nn. 780,6g5, Mar. 22, 1977. Pat. No.4•128,729. This application Jun. 8. 1978, Scr. No. 913.696 Int. CI.=A24B J/12: A24D 1/!d U.S. O. 17I-2 5 Claims Iurrant rtn tnanti 4. A smoking composition having added thereto at least one bicyclo[2.2.2]ocmne derivadve having the formula selected from the group consisting of: ~ or a mixture thereof wherein the wavy lines represent exo and i endo configurations of the ethanol moiety with respect to the carbon-carbon double bond of the bicyclo[2.2.21ottene moiety, I and as a flavor adjuvani therefor a compound selected from ~ the group consisting of ethyl buiyrme. ethyl valerale and mal- ; tol. - 00014373 I 4,166•847 ANFI-VICOTINE AGENT PREPARED FRO>f A SACCHARIDE AND ROSIN OR TURPENTINE HissshLUitsui, Yokohama, Japan, assignor to hliya On.a, Yokohama, Japan a ~. Filed Mar. 2• 1977, Ser. No. 777.482 I Qaims priority. application Japan. Jfar. 22. 1976, 51-J0992 Inl. CI.2 A61K J1/7Q Q,U7H J/02 I US. Cl. 424-180 - 4 Claims 1. An anti-nicotine agent prepared by the steps of: ,. mixing (a) 45 to 450 parts by weight of a monosaccharide or - disaeeharide and (b) 1 tn 10 parts by weight of ac<lie acid ' or glacial acetic acid• and heating the resultant mixture to produce a viscous material; _ mixing (c) 30 to 300 parts by weight of rosin or turpentine ~ and (d) 1.68 to 16.8 parts by weight of ammonia in the ~ form of an aqueous solution, and healing the resultant mixture to produce.a jelly-like material;tand mixing said viscous material and said jelly-iike mamrial• and heating the resultant mixture to remove substantially all water.
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LPATENTS ~ .•165,753 - $MOAER'S PIPE ' Timothy J. $tryker, 94 Hammersmith Aprs., Danbury, Conn. 06610 . Filed Nnv_ 18. 1976, Ser. \o. 743,199 - Inl, CL' A24F 1/14. 1/J0 - US Cl. 131-173 7 Claims 1. A smokei s pipe, comprising, - - a means for producing smoke. a chamber means formed within a housing means. said hous- ing means including a.plurality-of intersecting walls. said chamber means being subdivided into a dccmrainmcnt ' subchamber means for preventing fluid entrained in the smoke from reaching the smoker, and a imoke-cooling subchamber means containing a-volume of fluid. smoke inlet means opemtivel,y connecting said means for producing smoke with said smok<cooling subch3mber means, for introducing smoke into said smoke-cooling ' subchamber. one end of said srnoke inlet means being diaposed within siid Ouid, a smuke omltl opening means for wilhdraaring smoke from said chamber, locasnd substantially-at the intcisecuon of at kml luo of said walls defrning said ehamber, whereby a - smoker's lips may be placed r<spectivclv againat uid two of cdd wulls to surround suid smoke outl-et opening means, and xhercby a reduced prcvure at said smoke outlet opening means will draw smoke tram said smoke-produe- ing means through said smoke inlet means and into said chambcr, said dc<ntrmnment subchumber means being aper:rtivclc tonneeted to said smnke-ermlmg subehamber means and to ud smuke outlet opening mrans, uid connection be- - laeen said decutraiumcnt subehanrbcr means and atid smuke-eoulmg subchambcr means indudmg grjs'rtatWnal dum meam connected to said dcentrzmmcns sub<hx.nber - mvuns near their b.atom. for chmndLn¢ dcentumed fluid b,.k into d smnkeeoobng suhchambcr between _ draugirts, - sard 6rani.tnsnal drain means includine check val•e means ~ di.ryned so as to sub4mually prescm the p+sa.e of fluid ~ and snwkc through oW gravitational drain muns xhcn I the preswre tn said smoke-coohng subchamber subntan• tially e.eeeds that in said deentrainmens sulx:hambar. OLr 9, hOr 12. $E?Tr 21, 1979 I .,165,63J S1'STEM FOR V E.%SURI]G MOISTURE CONTENT SYalfred R. Raisanen, Scottsdale, Aria„ assignor to Alotorola -Process Control Inc.. Tempe, Ari : Filed Feb. 9, 1978, Ser. No. 676 l00 Int. CI-r GO IN 15/36 US Cl. 73-76 11 Claims 9 18 17 HEATER HEAT OiSRLAY CONTROL i 1. A gravimetric moisture measuring system. cnmprning: ~ means for w'eighing a material whose moisture content is to be determmed: (he means for xeighing producing an output dec- I trical signal representative of xerght of the material: an analog- todicital converter coupled'to the means for weighing to i provide a digital output representative of the weight of the material; a digital data processor for processing the digital I output and for de.erminrng change of the digital output to allow the digital data processor to provide a concinuously updated outpul representative of the morseure content of the I rrtaterial, the digital dma proccssorrncluding a mrcroproccssor. •. a random access memory, and a read only memory; maans for ~ displaying the output of the digital data proceasori and means for heating the masnrial to cause a change in the moisture content of the material the means for heatrng being controlled by the digital data processor. 4,169,351, - STABILIZED GLASS•TO-11ETAL SEALS IN LITHIUM CELL ENVIRONMENTS ~ Alwyn H. Taylor, Wellesley Hills, >1ass., mignor to P. R- Isfallory & Co., Inc., Indianapolis, Ind. _ , Filed Feb. 10, 1978, Ser. No. 876,786 Int. C1.= HOM1 7/03 - US. CL 429-48 10 Claims 0 1. An electrochemical cell cumprising a lithium anode, an electrolyte and a cathode within a container with said eon- uiner having a glass-to-metal seal as a part thereof. ihe glass of said seal being sublect todegradasion in a lithium envrnnment, subsunually the entire surface of said glass eaposed to the interior of said container betng adherently coated with a mate• rul comprivng a member of the group consisting of inesal oaides having a free energy of formation in eacess of -IfMy Kcal/gm-aiom of osygcn at 700• K., polYUlefins, and adhering polymeric Ruorocarbons. - ~
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OIALOG sllat: CA 5SA4CN 11-I9/VOL 91110), 'Conr, AN• C/lem Soc,) /Itnn 31 of 401 User100B IIse019 796 N N ~ ~ to V L,O CAO'11090G9709J . Lu. nalar.ol klller-Cell nCtIV'ItY and IwunbVlOluulin levels •a!ecialcJ wrtn s.'uoku,0 In ntnw'm subfCGls •;•Ir:Cr: ECrton, I•1.; Et1.arJtl, AnnC: LInJ, Anne: CIIIIOn, 0. 4. ; H.raCY. P. ' Lu:ntrun: nnnanelw ucm, ln+t., SVdneY HOSP•r SYdneV, AVflrnlfa • CACOn017, UOlsltas Publ Olnsst JOURxAI Journul: lot• J. Ca.aer Coden: IJGIAH Publt 79 Scria•:: 23 IssuC: 5 P.IOUS: O03-9 lucnliflers: kllle•• ull pctlv{IY IooaCCO unoM{n9. Ixnuna •Y=lyn tobaCeo LnmMln,J CA0;,1090UOfonO 1.•nlar•I:,I,ur, Of ClqarCl SnrOke COndenaate /n the IIH105 Or Srr n.,IJ:n n]'',tCr4 ' Aulr•or: M,•tk,•r, r.:. 11.; N.I,L. H.: AllnO/f• J. to~.,l,r.n: ?nt. E.n. Palnul „ NJd, HOChOCh. NannOVifr Na~u•uvCr, D-]C00/C•1, lvJ. n:V. Gcr, 'S':ctlJn: CA00401] Put,l Clnss: JDI/iiYAL J. ClnCer RCS. Clin. OnCOI. CGdant JCR001 PuUI: ]9 Scries: 94 ItSUY: 1 PayC3: 111-1•1 ' ItlCntlllef'.: CIn.1fCl SmOMC LVndCn{atC UenI4VyrCne tVmar CAO;100COV6737 O~yl,.,lr[.il acllvlly OI tObVCCO Smoke altd (OhnCCO BnVl,y-r.•L,Itsl Cl,.•n~iCnl9 OuJe• inomoe H.: Currln, PaUOOr 0.1 0, 'mVl. c.lrcn n,; SVSnn..sMl, Ponal<I G.; 5^.becnt'nan, Lro".lrtl r•:.: B.•nCaict, Rrlll.,a f.: Il:nry• Cnrol J,' lu,::IlrJn: P,o. OIVZ1'u~n. :.IICrOUi01. ASSOC.. OOtnc•.J.1, .IU• )Q010„ USA SCarurA Cm00•1001 PuUI Claisl JGUB:rAI J,•urnnl: E/I^, EnVlrnn. Ir1:111n Ir,•r::1CCt. COtlCn: EVIIPRZ Publ: '/9 SCrie:: 79, P,,nen: OJ-9 Iucnl/fierse ta'bacro s•~wlrtk nronne.y0anase, el9aret +rnprre c.lrcrnuD:nC•.r] CA091090G9+G011 ` Ire~'srer macnnnisms O/ orOdnoenlorlne OCStIC10.`s (OCP), PCO, an0 PCI /rJn, InC er1v11'onment 10 InC numan body l,r:.,l•on: Sc". :'C0.• Al.il., Unlv., Akita, Ja,'nn C•,00a00a, CA01]AU nubl Gais: JOVOIiAI JournJl: rbCPUn EIbC,O+:u Zossnl CoUtnf uElAAO Publ: 79 Strlc:: .]] Icsuc•: 0 oa0er: /i0-d,) LanOUSOC: JaPa•, IG.•n11/1lrt: Or9sne<nlOelna yest10/de resldue food Evc6L000 CA091090495050 InC pra•valcnc0 of esrbu.vnerrn9lobinenle'In Mem Yorkers an0 IEs efleJtS un lne cnronary and sysle'ni< oireulel{en Aulnnr: Ayres, SlL•Pnc,l Y.; Evnnt, Rober•t D.1 Buahllh RNHa E• LocntluI.: SCh. Ped., St. Leyl9'Unlv.• St. loule, YD, 6510e, USk Sectlm,: OAn0+o01 Pebl Class: JOURNAL Journal: Prov. uao. Codcn: PVIrJA] Publt 79 Serl.nt a L•,sue: 3 PnVOS: ]]3-J] Idenll/lers: Cnrbon eAn0a00 CIrCUlallen CenbO.YhernO9lObine- wla 649109061YOnP , EffCCt nr <:drbGn MnorloC on carelovaaculer G/uesq AutlvID: Ar•miJw, NilUCrl S. LuCali•••,: C.irtlrov:se. Secl•, LorlO Oeaen VA HOSP., Lonp 6eaeh , CA, 90n)2, LISA Srtllou: CAOOi00] Publ Class: JOUPNAL Juurna,l: Prrv. Lled. CoOen: PVILI.I] Publl 99 Strlest a Is.u•`: 3 PaOos: ]11-0 ICentl/1erN earbarl mOnonldC CarOlovaftular Cisea+e CA0910906•33010 ICP[I:L• 1'unliCPtlOn Na• 2. Clff\f!t frrWLlin9 - doea Il lcal•rY a Oar,elrC r t.Mt AuU'Sr:,n•IJncs, U. A.; Clemmcsen, J.; SuOlnura, 1. Localleo: Norr. Giol. LcU., tuo, nll~•1)k, 2200 As, Netn, Secliur,: CA00-100f/ PuGI Cli:.: JUl:I1aAL Journ.,l: Lbtel. Nuv. Collccn: AIUnEAV Publl 79 Serles: 65 15'•un: I 1':r9C5: 11-111 InOntl/iCrs: rCViC+C{9ar•et smokln9 9onelles CA09109011910314 Isolal'un Of ]-nminp-9N-pYri0ol7,]-b)Indelc anE 7-nrsinp-]-rn- elnrl"Jr/-n/'•I'1o19.1-bllnoOlC US nylJDens Irow Oyrolysla Pro0uC1 nr t~'vnloPn.v, ' A,rInVN YuvnrtA, PlisusC: Llalsunrolo, lakCSni ' 1uC211nu: CCnI. ne+. Insl., Japan lcuaCCo and Selt PubllC Coru. • Ynnur,.,~~.u, =21, JnOAn SCr.llon: CL00]00t, CR00LLSA Publ CIasS: JOUa1/AL Juur•nal: AnrIC. Olol„ Cnen, CoVen: AOCNAG Puol: 19 Scr,eC: 43 '1>suc: S Ponen: .It•5-b IJCnellrers: trvnlo0nan pv"ulys'+ Pvri001noole nuutlon; Sa4n.anella nulatvor• Ir•yPlepnan PyrolY01+
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, PAI ENTS . ` 4.167.191 . 4.168.466 John N TOBACCO DRYING PROCESS . JeweB; Ardath B- Canon, both of Iauisville, and Rich- MOISTURE TESTER Robert R. Doldt.-Taylor Ridge, DL, assignor to- Agridustrlal - ard Brow P. Ne.ton, Jr., lfiddletown, all of Ky., assignors to n & 1Villiamson Tobacco Corporation, Louisville, Ky. Electronics, Inc.. Dettendorf. Iowa Filed Oct. 21, 1977. See \o. 817,218 I- Filed Sep- 27, 1977, Ser- 1o. 837,331 lnt C1.r A24B J/18 Int. Cl? CO1R !7/0? U.S. CI. 321-61 R g Claima i U.S. CL 131-140 R 21 Claims ' etll rnY[. p rrt awa rrnRn.nmt (raer[w.au.l.st'p utr aua TMRr.nMK-n 1. A method of reducing the moisture content of an ea- panded tobaceo, which comprises: beating the eapanded tobacco in a gas, said gas having an initial tempenmrewithin the range of from about 250' F. toabout 650' F.-in the presence of an absolute humidity at i a level above that which will provide a wet-bulb tempera- ture reading of at least about 150' F. , {,166,97J ' METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR DETECTION OF THIN METAL LAYERS IN PACKAGED ARTICLES ~ A. Clifton Lilly. Jr. Francis Jl. watson, 111; Peter Nartin, end Jobn S. Priee. all of Richmond. Va, assignors to Philip hlur- r(s Ineorporated, New York, N.Y. - Ftled Nar.7, 1978. Sec Vo. $34,367 lal. C1.= GO1R 17/0i US. CI. 323-58.5 8 15 Claims 1. 1, a method for de¢aing the presence or absence of radhnt energy.reflective matter in an article, the stepe nf: ' (a) generating radiant energy at a predetermined frequency; I (b)defining.a location for issuance of such generated radiant energy and prrselectmg a distance range outwardly of ' such issuantt loeauon within which said article may be positioncd during such detection; and (c) propagating said generated radiant energy outwardly of said issuance location in pattern having a maximum char- KteristlC value ]t sald issuance location and a minimum r--• -~ J A-YYa ry v6ue in said distance range first exhibited-at the outward end ofvsd distance range. 'VOL. 9, Nor 12, SEPT. 21, 1979 1-A moisture tester for continuously measuring the moisture eontent of a matnrial flowing therethrough, eomprising: a first ' electrode member comprising a generally cylindrical tube of electrically conductive material, a second electrode member comprising a generally planar body of electrically conductive material disposed inside of said first electrode member closely adjacent an inner wallthereof and electrically isolated thcre- from. said electrodes defining a eapacdis< test cell having_a substantially unobstructed passageway between the electrodes, said tesoer further including material carrying means eon- - nected with said passageway for providing a substantially even flow of material iherethrough and for cooperating with wid passageway to maintain said passageway substantially evenly filled with said flowing material, and circuit means electrically connected with said capacitive test celLfor producing signal means corresponding to the moisture content of said mauerial Bowing therethrough, in accordance with electrical properties of the material-filled capacitive test eell. 4.169,244 PERFUME COMPOSITIONS : Kurt Kulka. New York. N.l'., assignor to Frituche Dodge dt ' Olcott Inc.. %e. York. N.Y. ~ Continuation-in-part of Ser. Su. 305.793. No+. 13, 1972. : abandoned. Ser. No. 12,e95, Jun. I, 1970, abandoned. Ser. No. ~ 750.459. Aug.6, 1968. abandoned. and Ser. No.559.708, Jun. 23. - 1966, abandoned. This application Feb. 23. 1978, Ser. \a.s ~ - - 880.580 Int. CL° A61K 7/44CI18 9/00 ~ U.S. Cl. 252-52E 15 Claims ~ 1. A perfume composition eomprising at Ieast 9% by sveight of a perfume component and at least ICr by weight of a mem- ber which enhances the odoriferous properties of said perfume component selected from tlm group consisting of 3-meth)9no- nand-ol, 3-methyl-I-nonen-3-ul, 3-methydnanan-I-ol, 3-meth- y13-nonen-lol, esters produced by «action of any of said specified alcohols wfth a monocarbosylie .eid selected from the group eonsistingof satunted I to 7 carbon atoms>hphatic monocarboxyhc actds, unsaturated ) to 7 carbon atoms ali- phanc monocarboxylic acids having one double bond. cyclo- pemmne carboayhe acid, cyclohexane earbo.ylie acid. sali- mie and p-tolme aeid. - eylic. einnamic, hea06614370 - -
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D 00 ~ DIALOG PIIeC: CA SEARCH )1-Y9/V0L 91(10) (Cepr. An. Cnew. SOC.) (Ile. 23 u/ 201 User1900 Ilsep79 707 -~ ~ 1-L1elnY1•]-ISUPrIfnYleYClopeninne-l,7-CICarbOeYI1C aC10 an0 CA09109073IE02 Its esle^:. OlvinO VunJ o0or an0 l>fte to tabaCep Aylrt0l; food apPllCal/Ons Of e nenCar1p90n1b euVar Aulnar: Cn.n'n, lalsullp Nuiucnl. Llabau suba l lute 1oCatlnn: J.rpnn Auumr: Valrol, Eell. 5uct/u.•: Cn011007 Publ class: PAT . \ I Lu:alil.n: syro/in Llu., B..ar,..G740. Swits. Juurn,ll: Jnn. Xoltel IOAltyn NunO COCen: JNRAAE Publ: 1 5.•ctrnn: CA01'l000 Pt/ol Class: CONf PROC 790,112 PaO.b: 4 rNM. Lan0uu0u: Japnn J.urn,rl: llualln SuPSr Subitltules, ProC. CR009 Conf, Supan 'Pntmst No: Y9.r10sSt . Applic Nu: 11/1 q217 DP1e1 770922 9 Sub:l,l,tles Cuorn: 401:UA1 Publ: 79 Pa9ei1 1]0-1 Clrss: C01CG1/oG, A9A0]/17, COYCSI/40, COYCG9/74 L:<el.n0 Cole: lo As.ipn.C: J:'nnr1 toG.lCta anJ Salt Publlt Cur•p, sy / -::IIC.=t : Y.C:G=r e,y~raa: Caael, Svlitt Irlanliflurs: toOJCCO memyllmuuropYlcvcloPentane CiGarbnsyl- Av>iI: Guq91nneln, B ate CLler IJentif,erst revlau .ylitol Sweelener CA09100011671.1 CAOJI00093161Y ~ Pll,n'ryc.vrtic.al anti etonO.11C u+ps of tne Compos/lsn S.n'u,lrrl Ls i LoOa•' Subelilull: soma factors clouding new Autnc•r: wnnnCr, N. prOb•[1 / rP•`cls ' Lucntir•n: Insl. Ponrm. Arinaln., Univ. YunlCn, Munich, EeO. !„tnur~ t..,r ,.rY. Oon.1 10 A. fl. RL'n. Gcr. l,csliu-r'Lr/.• SaverS, Inu., Now YnrF, NY, 10019, USA Secllal: CAOIIJ00, CAOOIA;tt, CA011sttA Publ Clasu: CONP leelron: CA011000 Puol Clnss: COvf C00C PnOC O CNG00 Con/. 9u0nr 11.11 : Ne.~ltn SuD lr Suu:.lI tulas ' Journnl:I ninl• Cnem. CmuGps.. ISV•o.) Cooen: 4ur0AE ,Suu.l •lulvu Cur1Cn: •t0/11.1A) P,.bl: )9 P>Vea: 121-9 L' i l : 70 Puul: 77 Snl`lutt 1, 1'.i~lesl 411-]] 1/ee11nV Oale: 75 -fl VuU11CnJr1 AednJinlC AOJres9: LCnJUn Cn91 ..rle Vel n0 P,.ulrs/.:r-1 e.rter AOUrnss: Oaael, Sulte , Avail: IleyvCUU, VernOn.N.; NarUorne. JCffreY Barry: Turner. A.>il: Ciu00errnClrA. B Blllio Lee IJIntlliur'a: revle. tnrEllol f440. LweetQner sCrb/t01 food . IJentlfierc: review Conpesita- fnutl pnat`naaul nOrleulture I CA0010n09]OSf.! CA091090u910/1Y iD In'nl,I,cv lon and uetsr:vinntlon of ms eff-11avOr Compuune, Cnrl,•O:nic Propertl0f Of tu0ar fuCetltute9 eeaAllneO In I Z Yi,r.•Inyl ••nlf„rC, In s3MU bi'JUeJ wlln OIO /•iCe Aulnur:l..Mn.19M11, N.; 0r,ua, l.: L.r\.10i, P,; Sal'C. S.: pnJloll,nl 1C /'.lt QV/ICr lmante Autllur: 0.•nrin0, F. 0 Nnrnl,>. Y. ' Locutlwl: 0,•ul. 5cn., Univ. Nueraburp, NuOrtbur0v 0 0700, C/) Ln.allen: NNtI. Res. inst. 0r.•.InO, lolryo, ttt, JJO:m Sr~liwv bs016o0] Prml Class: ,uun:uL PeJ. IICP• Ger. Seetron: CAOGn000, CA011aTR, CAG6JaA0 Publ tless: CONe i* J„u•'r.I l: Nuflll,u Hai:M1l Cup.•rl: I/NOAGE Pupl: 79 Ser„•:: 51 Ismre: 3 P,rJt's: /c0-Sl Lm,OunON JaPml POOc Jour•nal: ucnlln Stroar Suuslllutcs, Proc, ERC00 Conf, SuGar m I,f:nlrlrers: snAe flovor unnetnYl Sulfide Substllulcs Cu,ferlt 40RIAA1 Publl 79 11 : PaOe.: 779-J4 m •-4 >le Aleutln0 111 P„ullsn.•r: N:u•Oer ASWNSN llnsel, SwItt rn r C C l B A II CA04109073037e n ,rrm, v> : u9 l Z Iuuntil,ers: raalew su0nq suCSiltull C,1rlGpenlCllY. tooth m Leurovin0 Ine becr Carles su0er su0•.trtute rev1Y. ~ A„IrrGr: NuJ:un,. J. R. Luc>liun: Ur'e.. InO. RCL. founU., Nutf/e10/RrCnlll/SurrOY, En01. S,•Ctlun: CA01600D Puul CI•.SC: JOUN:LL J,.vrnal: fl,on conuf. CoJO,r, f0'.uAO Publ: )9' SeriPS: S4 IssuC: 4 VaP s: ]5• }), ]tl , Ibenllllerf: revit, bCer JI>vpr CA09199071907C N Y.74vIUUo +
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DIALOG f11N: CA SCARCM 77-79/VOL 01(D0) ICOPr. Am. Cnem. SOc.) (Item I6 of ])) UPr1900 27au91f 243 CAO•110705-1603c llm cetrrrnmptlon o/ 1-2 lorln, OlaeetOCysCIrPOnel, nnJ deUry,IvJICnJI In fOpl\ and 1r1'U" Aulnf•r: Slnnr. 11. 51.: Mr•a/l, A. A.: SCr•Vn, Mr14 ln•:•,{•u•1: D:n. /OnU ]CCI,nVI„ IOUO Slu1e Llnlv., AmeS, IA, $0011• USn SCCtlon: CaO17001 Pub) Cluss: J0U0AAL Jeurn.ll: lnPl. Sn•:ct.wsc. Ccucn: APSPAI Publ:79 Sene+.: 33 IsweN 3 oJO,a: 29e-7 ' IUrntlf'ers: mrcotwrn uan fopG.,D:IS enrnmato0 touln fun01, relrn{p.fn aatn frCU• trfCndtne[enf delrl feed CAGn107054679A I.LltbnCln'irl /Or slnxiltNle4YS ectlctlon ef :'r.5 Plant IrealPtnt prrl~.•r`:~Ilr/n5 or• plnrlt •'•JICr•lal A./In,.r: IlpCl•rl'. GnCnln;r loc:IlrOn: Lntm• unla•r.ucnunp5or.t Saorlend, SaarbruecYan, Peu. Neu. Orr. SCction: Ca017001 Pu]1 Cln:n: JOURrAL Jowrnal: Dt:ch. LrE.•n.•n.-nlmn:cn. CuUen: DLnUAJ Publ: 79 Setlas: 75 1-sue•: 5 Pages: 1•10-57 lanyaaVC: Ger lerut,r~Crs: frull postlciUC ur{n, vtueennlx pestlCldc CJtn ncrbiCiUC Vls cnr'nnmlc9. OJs cnrVmnl00 PtytlC:lde CA0911170S4471S OClrrminltiun of IrlClne and eonvlCint In IaUnbCan C111tlrir{ br l:.'(-IIA/iU cnrOmJtV,IrJpny AuVrur: P•tr• H. J.I'SUSUISr.I, F. W. ' Lr¢.,tlon: D^P• Crxu Str., Unlv. SdsxIDl^navOn, SnshatOOn, SM, $]// Ou0• CIn. Svction': Ca0t7001 vubl CIJSS: JUUnAAL Journal: [Jn. Ima• 1noU Sci. IecMUI. J. CnuOn1 CFSSD] Publ: 79 Srr/rs: 11 Is.uO: 2 Procs: 03-7 lu;ntlllnrs: uronU bcan vlelne cenv4eble drln, Oas enrpn•sto0 ip CA09101051-169a ' Deler¢Irrq r,.n of cnlorlnateU Pest/clde resl0ues In fooJs, II. Pota a•um PermarnlJnJlt o.rnatlOn /or Cleanup Of sOm/ •a•9rtnblr C.Ir.eC15 Anlnnr: Su/uil. ].14J:ni;,ISnin.l..l, I:I1o1111: SatJ, NOPUtOenl: SS.J,• ht/ruu LO[Jl/On: U,ydpl PrC/CGI. Inel. Pub IC Iltalln, SenUal, 003. Jap.ul ' S,cllen: CSD17Et11 Pool Claos: JOUN:.AL :ournal: J. J;suc. 0//, Jnol. Cnc•. Cedcn: JpICAt Publ: 79 5er•es: C) Issve: 3 Pa9at 605-0 Idenlllltrs: perm,/mlalmlt p..Un Peft K/de detn, enlerlnalee InSCCllele0 Uetn rCVel••blt• C•'f GnPpn•lICO InSectICIGY CA001070'AGGIP AppI1r.Y11on nf MPLC to cneracterlratlpn of InO/vldual Cal•U•)/1yU•'•Ilt'S In fOOd4 Autnor: :In••r.t, w. J.; MJrtln, R. A., Jr.: 20umaf, 0. Lr Lutatlxn: Rr:. LaU.r NcrsneY Fobd Cerp., MereGey• PA. 17033, US• Sectlont CA017001 Publ Cl-ss% JOURNAL Jourrmt: J, Food Sc1. Caaun: JFDSAI Publl 70 5er1<5: •+4 lasuc: S PnDas: U9]-5, 90e IUan111LIrsf s,•yar dPtn food, cnromato0 su9ar ' I CA00107054G57S Ooteru1luAllun of svect eoraonanls In Stevle rebauClpna by Myl,-Perlur^~rnce IIWId enrOnatoVl'nPnY. UIIrEV/0101 JeleCllOn Aulnur: Il;,animoto.,YUrICI; Murly/1\u, IJJ{alah,l lV':Jllfnl: x.Ue N:xven'S COlI.'Pll,ll•l... MuUe, Jnpan $u,aiarr: CAOI70D/ PWI CIaaS: JDYn11AL Jo.rnnl: SnJr.,y,•Uahu 2ascnl CudCn: SM2AAY Publi 79 Strlazv 32 Isuut: 'I PPUes: ]09-II Ieantlllers: Stevla Sueetener enroruolue. rebauUYeslde detn• a[evlnslUO dOln CAb910)050LSGR Iq ]n-prr/u-=ance llould Cnrolnato0rapniedeteranaelon of Dlnryalmlu. In /CCUs Aulllor•: Dor'Irs, G. F. W.otlo,u L.+U. Hecn. AedItIFS A1lmepl., Snst. Mall, ROCn, A9ror.. luuleua•• 31 000, Fr. SPo-:tfon: Cn01)001 P,ml Class: JDUIn/AL JeurnJl: J. Cnromnlurjr. Coaen: JOCRAM PW11 79 SOrI•:s: 17], Pr.OCs: 505-U IU:n1111Crs: olaqalnuot bctn PRCd• cOromptGO Ulauulndot CA091010901550 Aulnm.ilcd Ucl Ptrrreatlun enromntOOraPnIC Preuerntlpn Of vCOeluUln~, rrult/, Jnd CrOPi IOr Gr9.ynnpno:Pn•lIC relltlue detC;xmnt/pn ulllirln9 flauru pnolo•nrtrlc tlclCClipn Autnur•: Ault, Jae•es A.; Scnof/elU• C. MlCnacll JonnsOn, Lyle D.' VnIII, R. H. . Locotlun: Anal. Grocnem. LaO„ Ine., Columota, sU, 65]05, USA Suellun: CAGIt0Y1 Publ Class: JOURNAL Jaurn.ll: J. •CrIC. Food Cnrm. CuUCn: JAFCAU Pu>11 79 Sfrrna: ]] LsGue: 4 4np.•s: 0]S-0 IUUn11/1Crs: In.eCl101da pnpSpnale 4e1 CnrOmalOD SS£6I000
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DIAL00 7/1e•I: CA SEARP/ 77-19/y0l 911101 (Copr. Am. Cnol.. SoC.) (ltam 19 of 401 uaCr/906 IISep79, 310 CA0)/0907]0x4E A;•Iinntr<•Ui•11 aCtlvity of /,lttV aCltls antl Enale ester• Autlmr: Sl,~o.lsm•I, 1• . Lo_atlon: fnc• En0 „ Osaxa Univ., Sulla, 565, Japan Sacttnn: CAO14000, Cd01P%tn, CA002P4 Publ Olasal JDURNAI 411,111.1 1 ! Ile%no MuOu,u na,ani CoOrn: NNOMCE Publ: 79 SerIC:: 57 I1suU: 3 P.ILIef: I4J-y4 LanV'yaQe: JapJll IU.•ntlliOrs: revilw mlarob,ciae fatty acid ector CA091090720700 I CJrillarY colVmn Dns CHromaloDr,lpnlC proflle analysis of volnl,le ccnyumWi In sCru•os of nurm.\1 and vlrus-In/ecletl pat „••.ts Auu•Or: ZlplMS, Aloert; lvo, M.Im YounD: Pools, Colln E.: 6caliun: Cncm. Deo., Unlv, luustun, Houslon, TL, 77004. USA S.c'l,on: 1:ADIn001 PVUI CIJSS: •J0110:lSL J..Vinnl: J. Cnro•nslo9r, CGCIL•n: JOCRAM Publ: 79 senfs: 163 Iaue: 2 Pages: 1]5-0] IUrnt,lror): acrun v41At/1! Co•npa v/rus Infeetlell CMOnIMOtIx:Di u:osure~~mnli of falty .vc,a syntnesis by Incorporstlon of pCUlvr„•.n Ir•r.n o.•Vlrr:,l^^n u.,lrr A,•II~Vr: VJllun, C~:VrVC f.l.: lOUpn:,lrin, John M. 1-,1ltVrt: Gr,la. DLp. U•pCnC~n„ OrJrl('cis U/llv., MaltnbM, MA, 0]1!.J, U5A CaGC9009 Publ Clnss: JOURNAL J;•urnJl: r inuwnistrY CuJen: OIC/usl PuU1: 79 5er-•.•.: ID ISUUe: IJ Pn,fY: DIU6-9 IJ:ntiflcrs: I,var /a1lY JCip fon:ulien avln. aeullrlyn a+la:' fatty JCIp (ormalron, o,'it CnromaoD fallY aCia, IGotopC islav /atlY ac.a C•u011090711 •tbU Cu.•ulnla qns c/vumpto9raphY ana mass speetrUnelfy Of ari•11~e .U.•1.1.-LVfUalinfi Aulnnr: Suo•:n,,na•r, D. f•, DiUalr, T. 0•t 9olbt0er, H. G.1 Cuun,n-, J. f.: Evan:, IA LnC.\litrt: Ps I•all. Ca•.t., Sa1:olveUa, CA, 917•I], USA Se<:,J•,: C.W0^0Dx Pobl CY.\y:: JOUn':AL JV•••nJl: J. Cnrlan\IOtI". lu.l:•4: JUCIIA••1 PVbI: 79 5lr,r:: 1'r4 It:vu: I,:.nl,f~a•':: C+rJOl,ne 9~5 C•'•rWnJIJD ~rJSf sUCClra f.s091070111236 flu+ a~o0ra•r+•/n9 In capillary 9ns cnrowalo9rapny Aulnan: Poy• F. Locntlun: OANI S.p•A „ Mllnn, Ilaly Srclida : CA00900Z Publ Class: JOURNAL Jnurn,ll: Cnrumaluvr. Synu• $,^r. Cuocn: CHSSUG AuE/t 79 Sarles: 1 Ir.ua: Ovcanl Dev. Cnromato0rn Eleetropnor. Po9L•s: IUl-90 IUOntlllora: COplllary 9as Cnro•nsso0 flov prc9rarcmin9 CA09109071177P /l,qn earlnr,nance Olais ee0ilhlrY columns with chemically OonUVJ slJliun.uY pnases o! virlous pClGrity eulnaP: Llanan,, C•1 Cna•nuai, E. b. ~ Lrycatlml: lau. Ironnunol„ Cnnt• /wip• Unly• Grenoble, La Tronum, n•. , Suc1/on: CA009VUZ, CA009Mxx PuCI Class: JOURNAL Juurnal: Cnromal09n $y"p.'Ser, Cuufn: CHS$DO Puol: 79 - •l•rL••s: o Issuu: Recent OCV. CnromalOOr, ElvClrvpner, PaOrs: li',-i/5 IflCnlifirrs: steroltl gas Cnroma149 stJl/onorY Fnase, Cep111Jr'Y gas enrOnmlo9 stero/tl. polysllo.ann s(allonary pnpse polarity CA09109011121E A slunY ul son•L• aOrlvnt1v05 ef vltaoln9 D an0 relatea Ranpuuntl~ Uy nnen tlrouler Capillary eolumn 9as CnrUn•]lUn•'an/•y-m.lL'/ ]nCClrU~uary AUUIur: liel•w, 0. P.; I/dlsel, J• M. Locatlun: Uuiv.-ProucnMlin• Eupclmurf, HaWUrO, lva. Rep. Ger. $Cctiun: C%.00•100x Publ Clavs: J0URf/AL JuurnJl: CGUyu.nto0r• $v'nn• Ser. Couun: C/ISSUG Ibbl; 79 Ser1rY• I issue: Recent DaY. Cnruuntu0r, Eleetropnnr. Pa9CS: 1•11-G] 111••n1i0n•••s: v/lanin 0 aarlv CnrCan21o0 Spel:trometry. gas Cn/'UUJIV.I N.Inaln U aCr1Y, ma13 speclfC•Tetry Yltamin 0 aerlv, enoll•cilc,lprol.enrlrnnto9 Weetron•.•trv fJ0910907111 GC 0.•IC,m•n.,1.un method ef blte aClas In biological nalerlals -•Ilnnrn4r,y Ml•II,Vr: SniUJ, Llil'.,rnaii: NCAU. YVlub: TaleYa•na, Iaaafnl: Sal.,\.Vltnl, MaUya: Malayana, MoVICnI; ISutsVml, JunfO: Ita.Jbe. M1YU'•il, Aut.rt••n,: Anal. Res• lau„ Eliai Co., LIa.. IoMYO. Jaaan $„CtCr,Or•ICOx P,•tfl f,la:e.: JOLRI!!L J•.ur•ial: 1.,n,•rl.nu xai:nr Cu,lr1: 1MNZAJ Publ: 79 Sfr~v'e: 'l1 I.vue: 4 1•n0~s: !pl-ll lJnOuJqe: Jeuan IUa•nlll,Cfs: Jrlnr bile .ICIti uCln, DIVU1: blle acla peln, fecls bil! a:La aptn, <nrumatov one aela. sJU rra(rnlmo9 blle aLio • Y . 9a ~ lE9E6i000
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Prlnl 11/2/1-40 306 DtAtO,S fllea: CA suRC/l 17-79/vOt 91(10) (Cepr. Am. CnNll. Soe.) (ltCls I of 401 Oser1906 ilsep79 CAO911OYU:5u)6 Cn.lracaerl;nllon Of pYrolVSls ceneltlOns pnrl IntCrfoeenCe bY Otnu.• µ:..puunUS In the CnamlluminCSClnC! Uole[tlOn of nitresn~ninv5 • aullWr: N:~nsen, InWnaa•n J,; trcnprr Micnael C.: l.nnenuaum, SlCVUn R. L•alUwl: DCO. MYIr• 1'UOe SC1., Uaspcnusetls Inst. IeG•nul. . C.nlUriVN. I:a, D]IJ•J. USa : ul:.n• iuul Clais: JOURNAL Juurnal: Anal•vCnlm•~ C.•'1Vn: RACN1a'.1 PVUI: l`J SCrICS: S1 ILCUC: 9 Paws: IriJ•:-0 IJanlillCrs: nllro..•minC Uell`ctlon PyrolYSls CnenllunlnCr.ce- n[e. 110 CnrVa~nlOp n~IrO..x~nU UelrCtlpn Cnemilt•nInCSVenGe• p.a c'vV~n>lu0 II,vAnri~m JelCnloO CI,Vmlltvn Cicrnce. cnn.nnnua ~ilrusa•cinu ucl.•etiun cnenllYmineacQnec Fy1'Vlv'!14. Inla'1'Iefe•1CC nllr0:.`~inC Clt..x{IUmIneSGenLe ll.la•GtlO•1. n11fP CV•nJ PYrVIY':•5 Gn.!..Iltxn.l.t'~S<• J.`lCGti,t Iilro5.nx~ip` Pl'Cn115i% c•'r•+•luinin:::enca• o.•iCCtlnn, nilrile'PVrp1Y5~5 Cnr.n, lummesC••nce nulvct•on• nilrpSOUrCn PYrVIYs15 C/•e.-ilun.inC••tfncC Ja•l:cli aminC n11rJ5o PYrolYS Gne•n,lu•x,nJSLenCC 11.•ICCII Yn. Yrea nllrPSp PYfP1Ye. 1 cne.•.IIVm. neuCrnCt eCleclIOn CAOJ1100J?S77J Aov CnnCL•nls of tlunnlll.+liOn In ItCarlsPlCC 9,3 annlyele by slriul•~"r~ 1nJ IraLPlnl cVinp~nirnt3 In \ GIVSen C/rCVit Rull.er: uuvel•, J.: J.: Wllas. J. l~•:aalYn: Inlt. Anul. C.mx-. Ceecn. AeaJ. Sel.,'0rno, 661]0, [ttn. s;ul~on: CAOi:oOOn yYOI CIa5.: JOUr.:l:.l J.urnal: r.CS , •.:e, nuul. (V. 5.1 Ceoenl RNOSAy Puul: 79 SfrleS: 510 1:• irnLO OfO. 1n.11.: I/py il•unt. Anal. Cn,~n. rJq<s: 7]9-m;• . IIJa•nl•/r.rz: C••:Int,talion nratIfPaCp 91. CnrOmatoO ana1V51f. SIr,nOtnO nN:.Spact• Ca5 alulYels, lrapJinD nCOUSGaGC bau inaly:i5. QYYII nenPpa:e •J.+S JnilY{1[• Iraea` ya5 inPlYSls nuu.ISUaee CAD)II0005030 ' CuncCr\eJ traG, or9mlf: n,talysle In Industrial resoareit Aulour: tiatenun• S. A.: levy, E. J.L..ctlilln: NvS• Da•v. Ca•nt.• armStrVna Corh Co., Lancaster. PA , I/tCJ• V:A Cii110a0], C.+O]GAtt PuPI Class: JOVRNaI J..urna: I.ii SnvC. 1•uYl• IV. S.I CnCen: t:ll'.AV PMV11 79 pr123: 519 Ia.un: lracu 0"• Anal.: Nc+ ironl. Anal. C/.•..n. Fa•1<Y :SI•60 ' lu,ntlliers+ Irace org an.llysis :rpP. O+s ellromato0 Irace or0 analy{It. 14 lrJce orq anallyis, IniCrl,cncn lfaca o^0 analysis, pbtyw.Cr trYCO Or9 analy115. PUllVtion lrACe pr9 analy{i5 Caa911oo1q501t Inl.•1•ac11vC YUIIICasNInQ t.eCullve (TMLLI -• r•fal-tlw. Lultila5wu~0 Fuurler sPCCtrpmetur sYltem for e..mina/an oi OC e/llurnl9 AulbOr: C1NI~Y10, R.; Foalaelt, C. L.1 Rnclasl, Q. Localluna D,Oilnb Int., Can•U/•IeJe. IdA, USA SCttlon: CnCU0002 Pi•DI CIasS: JOUPNAL JournaIl P•'oc. Soc. Plmto-Opt. Insarum• Cn9. Ceeenl SPIECJ PuUI: 70 SCrlos: 1<9 IssuC: CumPUI. Dpt. Syst• I•alCS: :IV-111 ' IJrnli/,er5: .Vlllla54 IR aas cnromPtoO analysls, CNnpulN' pro0ram /oorirr IR speclromCtar CA091100112555A ConiuulerlxCU elrect rpol tllne Infrare0 detection eb applied 10 livr u,/fvrcnt. IempOrP11Y and spectrally varYlnO eYPa•r Imo4a . Autl,ur: AnUCrson, Cnarles R.i Mri9nt, Jeremy C. lnc.itlJn: USA Snct.O•1: CAC110001• CA059%Iq Publ ClOss: J0IIDNAL Juurnt1: PrOC. SVC. PnOtO-DPt. Inslrum. tn9r COOenI SPIlcJ Pnu1: 7U ' Serlcs: 1.0 Issue: CmnPU1. Opt. Syst. I-.IVC•l: 111:-9] Iecnalfli+. 1: cnn5wlerl[CJ Fourier trensform IR anals's/s, tlmC re•culvS,l III analysis Fourler, WCCiroene,n IR analysla Fourlern N,+o Lf•rw~mlo0 1R anJlysls fouriC/'. Ii0 enromalo0 IR an4lyPl{ fuuriCr• c/•091\oon)S9?x Aotm•vtit•n q tnoCe er9nnlt analys/s Aulnur: L'au'no, Donn10 A. 'LPC,linn: IrClt. InU. SYSt., farrrYlown• NY, 10591, USA SeeliOn: CAOOO0U0, CA017AeA, C.1O61sA% Putll Clas51 JOUYNAL Jour.Wl: NU: SPeL. PuUl. (V. 5.( CoJCn: sI/11SiI Publ: 79 Sa••les: 519 issue: irane OrO. Anul.l Nev front. Anal. cn•mi. re0cs: 5]t-G00 IJCnl~l,ers: revlev ir:•ce anu/ya { nulonateU. <nromalo9 LroCC Url uulwnateV fYVI[w, 9a5 Cnron~~lo0 aulpm.5lCp rYVle.• 110 cnrwxalon aulanalce vlo•r. rnJioimnvnoa55ay suapnaaCe revler,, rnt'::no IObcICJ antibuJy AulomatCJ rcvlC., food •nalVSlf aV\u~nJleJ revlpe, Clin analYSls aJlolr.ateJ revlo+. environinent analvsis eVtwnatels review E9E6t000 w
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Advertising Age September 6, 1979 11- LOEWS CORP. eG. ` tsw tsls -Mlra .. ,saasUlaaM OtU.xiwe / b....r. Ia,m.•r• nan,rra • YanwW aa,YfJea K/u,rla - Loncs Corporation. New York, : . . M Sldi 'tOih largest natiena averlser, 6 axnuted to have hiked its 1978 . adverusmg expenauurea 19% to (ig.W3,600. . - . -S,ler reached a record ii.+5 bll- lion up nearly 7% over 1977. but net income declined to /168.1g3.000, from 3121,349,000. •fhe 1997 f gure includes income of , ' SLS,t00A0UfromtnevleofLuewi ' foreign alLaret bpsiness. Income from continuing operations -, Jumped 61•a 1o-1978 to a recprd ' {l6i)ODAOO,frem Se0,T0o,000. Loe..'s owns 5 a of lne stock In CNA Finanaal Corp. LDewi ea- slhy in C]A generated 50% of the parenes net rncome m 19T8, eom- pand Y,th ufa me year before. CNA property and casualty msur- antero'enuls were uP nearly SRto f1,i19A:6,0U0. and life insunnee ' aevrnues Increased by 3% to 31.003.937.000. C?.{'s covsumer fmann sub.i- dun'. General Flnance, genented revrnues of 5123.126P00, an m- erear of 11^, ucer the pre.'lous y.ar. This record .as atnreeed m the face of the Mgher money costs tha l.-ack the nigner prime interot rate. - ' - CSA's advertising program in lWg strcssed irs rommument tc ns . Independenl agmu in a 540i.300 magavnes camwign. CNA intro- - . duced a "hrgh performance eRnts" proeram and ex Wnded ita agent meenus'e plan. . Loews reports that its bbacco . aubvdory. f-onllard, enjoyed its f rsl.ear m m]Ig-year hlsloryin 19:g, as Ib anare of the domestic market rose to 9.1%. from L!'a in 19:7. A full share of the market was - surth about S,S:AU0,000 in sales at - the manufacturcts level in 19ig. Lonllard haa a growlh fate of - about I'_ limes the industry aeer- _ age. Produc'tlun of all LorWard brands tonled 3.29 billion umb. nve.l-r. - Lorillard continues as the Oilh large•.t elPnt manuraetunc trad- Ing,ndastry Ieader R.J. Reylwms, Philip Morris. Brown & N'illfam. son and dmerrean ToDacco The growth segment in eiRareh ' b bl..ur bnnds.-delinca as 16mg _ and under. l n 19:n, oneoul ofn cry frve uGren sold was low tar. By 1973. bv tar brands had captured cneaGrd of the market. Lanhard .m¢IPatcd this trend and pcenwned nuu aolidl.' Y,mm the muket, with four >nnm W I en- Inu- AenL at 1]mg: Golden Lghu, emt• Tfue. Smg. and the nrY'-Kmt III, at 7mg. • Newpnrt experienced a ules ' Lain of 1:.:.^<, to g.58 bdhon uniLL :!t was lhe enly myor low filuation menthol brand in the industry tnat enJqved growth in 19)8. Excludmg nesl'spaper., Newport spent 37.953.100 on major medla, wlth LL mosl a5^: of lhat amount allpned lo auldoor. '•qaaCOS,aeipareltaraetedtou- fice Y'omen. by mntnsl out no ; money into outdoon Mai estrma- ;ted 37.000.000 ad expenditures '-wtre concrntmted in m.paunes, . with some newspapcr adrennmL ~-1n an effnrt to carre mto the marka•t - :aealed and dominated by Philip : Norr.i Virginia Shms, w'hlch bad 197g sales af 969 bilLun, up 1-0~w eompared with 31ai 3`-% gain to 1.04 billion unds, -Llai pramotlunal approach is i'i6alwsCOrp.'sMax120sreuived irit.lsnon/dylkdtefashron,senvinglo $2000000 mOS101 wnKn wa5 pN - larn an image-ofsmartneu and sm ,,. Inlo ma9atoes and newspapers. ..-phlstlutlon. To thss end, )lax The ciyarsa is targeted to women J ~On Sept. 17, 1973. Lorillard ~dropped the Kent name ffem Kenl . Golden Lights brand in order to -. make the brand easrer to ask for, and to clear up any eonrusion that existed between Golden Lights and the parent brand KenL aceord- 1n9 to the company- . Golden Llghts recorded another -' yearaf hlghgrawtlt sellmg tl] bd- -. lion units, a 26^. surge over 3977. ~maklnpt one oflhe mdmtry's fasl- s estgrawingbrards.GoldenLighta ,10ar preed the growm, mjoying a wlume jump to 4.53 billion unns, from L99 billion, with total market -. share mpre tnan doublmg to 0.7 ., ;.'from0.3R. ' 1111 Golden Lights was backed by a ` aneasured media umpaign of 2,580]73.Includmg 58.251 d)5 in It'~ Y-spaper support Outdoor re- ceived 53,6pT,a0(. ' : Second among Lorillard apen- ~'~ den was True. with 513.7,152.115 for all meaaared media, including .,: nearly 56.000.000 tn mapzines, + 33,T77,0o0 In outdpor and Cit ~ { $2.321.415 ror newspapers.n iYles forTrue were up 6./8 to 11.55 -r -. Luriihrd's high volume eigant. Ken1, saw ulcs drop 17.9A. to 15.98 -- billion nnits. By year'a end, the enitl"nlurlledlfferentlalbetY'eenll '- and the soanng Golden Lights had Lhrunk from 09i bilbon to 1.28 bil- IWr In 19)7. Kent ngistered sales af ,. 70.16 bdlmrr. and ranked sixth '' among all brands. In 1978. after Golden Liphtl was spun off from its parent-. Kent held the No. 10 LpoL with Golden LiLhts fol luw'rng as Na. 11. Kent's precipitom sales drop ID 1998 was olfeet by Golden Liehti jllmp. so that thelr combined.ol- umrs in 19:a exceeded 1977 sales by a half b11LOn units. Kent's advcnlun[ budtct wvs subslanhal. Leudmg N.tlonl Ad- .erlisers reports that Kent put ~f,903,:w> snto magannes, nea'spa- iw, iper.upplelnents and nutdoor. An additional 53,986.50d w.r ehan- neled into oewspaperL Kent de- luse 1 Ws and kmg slrc cuW rres re- . telved the heavlral suppurt wOLa 9, No. 1?, $EPTr 21, 1979 makes use of sreepsukes, mad- inp. beauty market ue-ulund pln- ',.pomt umplmgs to select groups. ' OfdGoldsaleswereofLto3.3brb ' lion, from 7.5) billion. Sfyor medu . received S1.'_91A00. Last summrr. Old Gold parted ways wxll its agency of two yean. Kelly Nasoo. . New York. and settled at SSCAJ- .' Gralum. the agency.h¢h also ~ -manaSes the Newport account . Old Gold. and its IaYtar exten- ifion,Old Gold Lghts.lnlroduced In the summer of 19:7,are market- . i ed ma1n15-In zbe nonhem tler of rhe I<euntry. The brand has not shared ! in Ne solume growth generated by ' ether I-onllard Groduns. i• AM1erlesflngtwpn<wlewtuen- 'tries.Triumph and Kent IIl. bolh at 3 mL Lordlard rolled ouf Kent III : into the national markel early in 1979. with Triumph fullowing six . montLs later. By the end of 1979. Ithe ultra low lar segment of the ur , apecvum had the rastest growSR almost 30°k. • - R'dh Its new entries. Lonllard is Yking aIm ateh<msrketeonue0ed by American Brands' Carlton. '-which at 1mg witnessed growlh of " 2)Cm to 10.09 billion umts m 19Te. and R.J. Reynaldi Now, .i ^_mg also a comer. menaslnL its market . sh.re 13.1? to 3.20 bJhon units. In 19781est, Kent 11I had an ad budget of S160,]00: Triumph was allotted SN1,900. Both brands were supported p%mcipally In oul- door. LorlRard.pentevoa,sooad.ertrsl lrlg Brech-\ul chewing tpDKm m 1999. • Loewi hotel drclslon mcreesed ils revenues by 19.6'P. ar S1L62{.000, compared with 197.7. a se0ecuon oflncreased occupancy and higher room ntei. LOeIYt prea- ently operates IS proPertles around the vorld, including the soomtube completed Loews Bue- ritx Ilotal, a spo rescrt on Franee i touth Atlantic coast. On the French Rivlera n Loews Monte Carlo, which contains the only in- i house casm0ln Europe. - .'f..it;d. . i -; r T! In January. 1979. the holtl dhi- ~i.fon opened the new Laews Ana• vbk n Dallas, a L001 room hotel =i•ilh mnvmtlon heihtaa In Slan• Ii. +hattan, [.ne• a hotelL include the 'Regenry. Drake, Warwick and '.SummlL as well as lheRamad.lnn 'and the Howard Johnson Slotor 6nn. SAewa spent 516),0UD. pr1r11ar- ' . fly in magazlnea. to pmmme tneu :' New York facdmes last Svar. The Theatre dlvulan upped its revenue contribution in 1977 by ' SL7A, or 56.+_II.I100, aa the result of increased thener altendanc.. A liu ef popular flm releasea--euch as " ~Superman.'Ylou Encountersef - Kd"Sd the Thirdm, "awray Night . Fn'er" and'TM Gaedbye GW"- , atDaa-tM mere morle-gPera In 19:g than m 127 7 lo Leewa theatres. intenst . 1-eews acquired a 70,31, in Dutova Watch Ca. In Janu.rl'. 19:9. from the Hong KanCbased ' Stelux SIfL Co. for SI LaW JIW. A6 'ler KaYlrrng an additional I^r of theslock,lsewslaunchedatender affer an aeepire the remaining ' rbares at Slo eaeh, - Al the close of thr Ylitul perled of the offer. Loei a had control of .,' nearly gaer ofthe stnck. Total price . of the deal is put at around . Although polsessing anets of slgn.a D. xw. BYIO,'. haa nDt been In good Gscal ahape lately. It luat a toul of $46. I00.eW In the fast three years In tne first threeaJUarters ol 1973, Bulma nenld SIOJkkI.DX/on aalea or s171.9o0,ou0, altheech a bss was expected in the tradition ally Itow fauM euarter. - . Leews o sa/d to be attracted tr -Bulova Ins part becauae of lu wei knewncensumernamc,anditsex ; tensree netY'nrk of 20.000 reu, Loew" . >J!w'eby dislnbuturs. When 'jooknverthenaw•succenfulCNA ' 4'inancul Corp.. it luo was • bnubled. . .. .'. AptaaTlalxDtxleYpTp•as - Iwl ' tm ~ w.•earera ....... an.aas. psanr ~' Y aa1.lAM •l1Mlw ..rr,.n ......... ~' .rl.• ........... an.w rn ~~ wl.ra,........ ' laa,ele • -- ~ . ..... ...... arl,•. saa. ~ 0.1e..r .......... 11.111Jtr ItII.M T.r.IVwrM .. KleaYa Kalxn _ f.wr...a.... IaJwM rf.ll/w 4nw..a.•r4. 1•JUaN Klx.w `LOIIILLARD DtY15fON YAeaLT1aL ralaux]tL -lMiulx.M~••..' '. a a a•. y9 . r ..a e...r..•rCa nxa.r Ye • alr. y u ~e.y e.1w.a•.rra+.e•v~xNUnMr/ r ' t c«•.. • r.r...r. lLaN wY .. `nL.~ +.laeav Q' C Ilu~en..•a•rr O Y C.v..ll Lnena Dw¢a 6w.e.+ ~ nannrr, v A It..wn, G T•llxe arr Q Jll-r.aa wre.n ~. . LMVN^t.x.e.Lrwra.rxwW.a ..r . . _ .. k! . ..I. a V %J VI
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