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Lorillard

Awareness Bulletin

Date: 19790622/P
Length: 160 pages
00013769-00013928
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Anthony, A.
Bingaman, D.P.
Bradley, T.
Cundell, C.
Hughes, T.
Moring, T.
Skladanowski, L.
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00013769/00013928
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NELE, NEWSLETTER
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G31
Litigation
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R1-004
R1-132
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LIBRARY/AWARENESS BULLETINS
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MINI, MINIMUM CODING
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05 Jun 1998
UCSF Legacy ID
yjn61e00

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0 4 , ~~~ r ~ ' ~/ ~ J , ~ u o; l _- ,1.~ ' : - ' ~ . ,.._. ...... ~.,.. .., - .. . . ~_. . . c )akLG y .,. t~ I- ~clln Znz A Division of L'oew's Theatres, Inc. 4
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PUBLISHER LORILLARD EDITORIAL STAFF AUDREE ANTHONY, EDITOR TOMI4IE HUGHES, COr]P'ILER D:. P. BINGAMAN TERESA BRADLEY CATHY CUNDELL TOMMORING LARRY SKLADANOWSKI COVER: TOBACCO PLANT WITH FLOWERS DON REDMOND~ 7 7=7 -771~,4: ~~7 s
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., '6 A' Division iof Loew's Theatres, Inc. Research Center Library 420 English, St., Greensboro, N. C. 27420 Cable Address 'Lorillard' NEW YORK' OFFICE 200 E. 42wo ST. . COI'JTEidTS F,asr roeaCC~ '8USHED 11 x FOR CUMP'Ai`JY USE OI-JLY 1. fdEWS1 BR'I EFS ' 671 I I,I ABSTRACTS FKGhI CURREi4T LITERATURE 707 I I I, PATENTS 8113 Lorillardi,. 1979 ~ ~V ~L :•,~1:J10. Vr~~Uf:E Z IW-~- ;
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Greensboro Daily News .June 20, 1979 .:-p. B1 CIGARETTE SMUGGLING Gi?LLED : BLIGHT' Paysour, ` Conrad ; , ?.• 1'he chief executive ©fficer of the na-' i tion's fastest-growing cigarette manufac- turing company Tuesday described cigarette smuggling as "a blight.on our ' =:Curtfis H, Judge, president of Lorillard _ :. Corp., made the comment while he was ivn Greensboro to help break ground for. a $25-million expansion of the I:orillard'. plant' here. Judge also expressed concern about reports that this year's North Carolina . ` tbt bod lat i oacco crop may noe as go ass year's. After the groundbreaking, Judge was'' asked about the proposal that a nationall tax be put on i cigarettes to cut down 1 on bootlegging Many of'the cigarettes are being ooot-~' legged to states such as New York, i where state taxes on cigarettes are high,, ` from such low-tax states as North Caroli- WLL '` . l. Judge said he was not familiar enough;, :• with the tax proposal to comment, but ; i be questioned the, constitutionality of ~ such a proposal. He said' he thinks soinething,has to be done about cigarette smuggUng A "It's a blight on our.industry," he elared. "It's a blight on our nationi There's no question but that it is helpmg to. fmance organized crime " • .;r'Judge said cigarette` smuggling is in:I ~ terfering,with the cigarette industry's le-' gitimate distribution, system ' -'In reply to, another question, Judge -said that if, the tobacco crop is off this year it could force up the price the com- 'i pany will have to pay for tobacco. : In addition, he said, the economic '` health of' the tobacco farmer is unpor^ i tant to Lorillard There have been, reports that uncer-: tain Weather; a fungus andl damage* caused by a herbicide-contaminated fer-: tilizer mighf cut this year's tobacco a•op.,V - •. Asked about the future of the cigarette. industry in light of attacks on cigarette: smoking by the Departrnent of' Health, Education and!Welfare, Judge said there are some indications people are getting fed up with, "the government dictating to them," ,.. ~ ~ - ~ .. ..~ "Cigarettes are a legal product, and people conttnue ta enjoy them," Judge: said. , . Curtis H. Judgp part to "our pleasure and satisfaatso avith the business atmosphere in Greens-' boro and in North, Carolinai" :., ~ ' ;.'In responding to Judge's reinarks at, the groundbreaking. Greensboro Mayor 'Jim Melvin said, "This is a great day for Gteensboro" r C Melvin said the Lorillard expansion, would add $25 million to the city's tax ; base without any expense to the city: .1 •'.; Lorillard„ a diivision of' Loeiy's? Theatres Inc., now has 9.6 percent of the U.S. cigarette market - l'argely due the company's leadership in the''ligtit'.' cig-. arette field. In mid-1976, Lorillhrd's, market'_pentration was only 7:7.percent;,,
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The~Greensboro Record 11''I/f ..,7une 19, 1979 ~p~.. B2 A hORIT,LARD EXPANSION UNDER WAY' Roberts, ',John ';.-"'• Gtoand swas ltiroken here tdday'for aY ~,;;25=million expansion to the Lorillard ~ Corp. cigarette plant: on East Market: '' .Street. l ': vLorillard president Curtis H. Judge: ``and Greensboro Mayor Jim Melvin pre-; sided' at the ceremomes just east of the' present..Rlant-_: ==Wtien.complete in 1981,*thete.';xpansion, `will 1lawst the plant's cigarette-producing ! capacity by 30 percent; from 200~million; , cigarettes per day to about 260 milhon' . ; pelday think it is reflectiwe of thelaith•we have in this community and'in the future, prosperity of Loril'lard,". Judge said; in ~ explaining why the compan} is carryingl out the Prolect. ;.~;.. _y ;.~ ':..Lorillard employs about 2,500 workers :, here. Judge said that when the expan- sion Ls complete in;'1981„ einployment will rise but perhaps not by 30 percent. The e.+cpansion will contain the; most ad- "' :vanced tobacco machinery availeble: as, well as the latest in environmental and!! energy-savmg engtneering ':Giving,emphasis t.o:the *156,G00-square• foot project, Judge: said LoriIlard is m-. creasing penetration 'into the low-tar; low-nicotine market. One such brand;. Kent III; was unveiled by Lorillard in February and has already attained 11 per-,f cent.of the total cigarette market ~Staiting Wednesday, .Lorillsird will be= gin test marketing, a new, low-tar brand, ; •1Yiumph; an entry which'tlie firm.hopes: ;:, will prove as' popular , as Kent. III ~ T `'I:orillard is th'e nation's"'fastest gtow= , fng,cigarette manufacturer,,now ac,.: -counting for 9.6 percent of allI cigarette:; sales, up. from, 75 percent in 1976.1Near= ly. 0 percent of Lorillard'ssales'.are in ~ .. _,:.~....~.. ....:~r..~ t -i: 6 the low-tar categoi:q V~In reference to'attempts by HEW Sec I ,, ieary'Joseph Califano to combat eiga•,I 'rette smoking, Judge remarked, "I~~ ~ suspecC that a lot of'what the secretary . is" saying; is, falling, on deaf -ears. - Ciga- .rettes are a' legal' product ihat' millions of people are enjoying and will continue ~- to enloy." fv gv~ 'Duririg` today's ceremony,'Mel,v,in, `termed Lorillard's $25-million invest-' naent a`•`great day for Greensboro." e, pped', "A community is known by the' :qui companies it keeps ~.; -Referring to the efforts tiy city l'eaders~ :to attract new •ind'ustty, Melvin noted, ;; We sometimes • overlook the gems we Aready have."' Melvin said that the ex- jpansion will add $25 million to the city's tax base without costing a penny for new! water or sewer lines, police protection : or; other eity services ,., . 7 a L 1~79 .:.Llo....8. :wJuNE 22 , . C & E News Jinne 11, 1979 v. 57, no.- 24, p. 16 Nlore corrlpotinds picked for testing ~; lfhe Interagency Testing i ComrmitteeYhas pictcedd its : "'fourth list of chemical compounds for priority testing' nd'er the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The ' . . . z . :. + committee was established througM TSCA provisions : "'adaes va' n drws mmber fromrious federal agencies:. The' list i'nclud'es, acetonitrile; aniline andi chloro,_ =.r brorno, _nitro .anilines;; antimony and.its sulfide* and' ""trioxid'e; cyclohexanone; hexachlorocjrclbpentadiene; `=Asophorone-; mesityl ozide; : 4,4''-methylenedianiline; _• . . .,,..and solvents methyl ethyl ketone and methyl isobutyl ~: ketone. ITC recommends that most of the compounds a=. be tested for carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratoge- I `V''nicity„ chronic toxic effects, and environrrpntal ef* I r;. fects. EPA:has the final say about Just what tests itvvill ~ r order industry to perform~, on the compounds. So far, F; though, the agency has'yet to order testing.of any of ; ;' • the compounds selected by the committee, and ERA " =~;..is being suedl by the National Resources Defense'{ L~ ~Council to force it to act __-z y'T.,..1.A....-~~'. . . -q._..-. . , ...
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Nature Mav 31/19!79 i v, , 279 , ;:','INDUSTRY SPENDS MORE' ON RESEARCH; Privatc companies in the US are' expecting, the total amount of money~ spent on research and development to,: r~ ;;be about 13 ;',higher. , in 1979 than in ', `~ 1973; according to a survey published" las.r week in New York by MicGraw-.', ` . H'ill Publicatoons.* Replies from over, ~ 500 companies indicated that the total expenditure om R and! D would reaci;; ;` 540.0001 million, 54,600 million more. than 1978. Allowing for inflation, thisl ~ ; means a real increase of 4.6t;,'„ However the amount of money spent t~ : on It' and D has declined as a pro-'' , ; portion of manufacturing salesi from' a peak of 3°;. in the early, 1960s to just. ovcr 2' ;, Over a fifth of' research was' = ~: directly involved wrth energy and• poll'ution. Meanwhile, ' the National Scicnce~ r: Foundation has issued figures showing that the proportion ofi R and D fund-' ~" ing finaneed' by the ftderal government! has fallen below 50'„, of the total~ ` national R' and' D' budget for the first time since full' statistics were collected in 1953'. The survey suggests this is ~` partly because of cuts in research spend- •b ing on space and defence and an in-4 d' creased emphasis on civilian R andl Di ~ programmes. The survey also says thats ~. job prospects for scientists and ,~. engineers are expected to expand in ~ 1980, particularly in, industry. ;, 13 i . . . .. .,~ ~, . . .. = C & E News May 28, 1979 ~ v. 5?', no.' '2~', p: 13 SUPPLY OF INSECTICIDE PRECURSOR`;; IMPROVES ,4 ! PyTethrum will' be scaree agatn tliis' year, says George Kin'gori; marketing :manager for the Pyrethrum Market-.;, "°` ing,Board of Kenya. But not soscarce '' as it!'s been the past two years. And by the end of 1980 the shortage ltkely ; will be over. ^ ``r; - P ;,;; `-. `. At the recent Chicago nieettng of - the Chemical Specialties Manufac- turers Association, Kin'gori noted that some 65% of the world's com-: ' mercial supply of pyrethrum t7owers' is produced in the Kenyan highlands. ` (Most of the rest comes from~ Ecua- dor:) The daisylike flowers yield! py- rethrins, a family of insecticides val- ' ;° ued for their "quick knockd'own", properties and their.. low toxicity to mammals and! birds. Although syn-, :. thetic pyrethrins have been devel- oped, oped; none have beenable tosupplant . the natural!product. ` In fisca11975-76, Kenya produced. 14,000 tons of dried1pyrethrumflow- . ers containing an average 1.3% py-; , rethrins, Kin'gori says. But in. 1977-78, production dropped 40°'0, to 8400 tons. IV1eanwhile, the market .: price of 2006 pyrethrins extract'rose to about $24 per lb, about 40°'o above the. : = preshortage price. There are a number of reasons for the prod'uctiondecline, Kin'gori says:. :;.For one thing, the Pyrethrum Nfar- ,'•; ..lketing Board tried to maintain stable' ~ prices; however, the price hasn't kept ; pace with inflation or with farmers'; ? expectations. Although pyrethrum prices rose 10°0' in 1976, farmers have found it more profitable to grow cof ~ ; fee or tea, which require similar growing conditions. Also, manage ;` ment of some of the buyino coopera-; tiwes"lefta lot to be desirel" Finally,, too much rain the past three years has hampered picking, drying, and ship- ping the crops. . . . I ~ Currently,lCenya has about 60;000 acres planted in pyrethrum. The board's objective is to double pro- d~uction inthenext1i8to: 24m:onths,: Kin'gori says, noting that recent price ° increases have stimulated expansion.l. Selective breeding has developed newi~ strains that containias much as 1.8%{' ~ VOt_. 9. 00, 08.. JUNE 22-, '1979, .:v
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~'May 23, 1979 C3 ''SWEETENER CAUSES SOUR TASTE rody, Jane' E ;B 7 .. ai r-t...k-.. f. ::,: NESY YORK - This inonth~ the eon-~ ; gressional moratorium on the Food and Drug :.Adtninistration's proposal to ban saccharin comes to an end. In the 18 months of sacchar- , In's stay of execution, a few new studies have ! : been completed; many health, , consumer and i fndustry, groups have testified for or against ~ '.;. saccharin; millions of Americans have voiced : :.' their desire to have the noncaloric sweetener "'. remain on the market despite the possibility I• and two prestigious ' •that it ean cause cancer, ; national scientific panels have carefully•re- : viewed the saccharin indictment s <: . > But no conclusive findings have come forth{, : the issue is still being hotly debated and the moratorium will probably, be extended while Congress considers new tegislation 14feanwhile, from the 'consumer's'stand-~ point„ the sweet life has acquired a decidedly ! • sour taste, with overtones of confusion and ; uncertainty. Is saccharin dangerous? Isn't sug- ~ ar worse? If l saccharin is banned, what can ;, take its place? Following is a consumer'S : guide to the saccharin controversy: why it ex- ists, the known i•isks and benefits, possible' ; substitutes for saccharin and tips for enhano- ` ing sweetness without sweeteners. A checltered, past . .. f 1 ~'•! , I'Discovered in 1879 and marketed in 1900, saccharin was subjected to a safety review or.- dered by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1912. It passedi In 1955 and again in 1968, the ; National Academy of'Sciences scrutinized the • sweetener. Again, it was cleared, but further safety studies were recommended. In 1969, its ; `noncaloric companion, cyclamate, was banned after animal tests indicated that it! ' could cause bladder cancer. The study that ;• spelled cyclamate's doom used a 10:•to-1 com• bination of' cyclamate and saccharin, but the ; latter remained on the market as a "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) food' ad'ditive.. -. Use of' saccharin climbed precipitously, reaching, about seven •million pounds a year, by 1976. An estimated 50 to 70 million Ameri-I cans - including one-third of the children un.-! der 10, - consume saccharin regularly.il Saccharin's GRAS'status was revoked by the~ FDA in 1972 after a preliminary study involv- ing pellets of'saccharin implanted in the blad- ders of laboratory animals suggested that it too could cause cancer. * .~ j~The National Aoademy; of Sciences took ai% i' other look in 1974 and proclaimed the ev-+ denee for saccharin's carci'nogenicit ly inconclusive. An uneasy, truce remained until ;'March 1977, when a Canadian study showed' that large doses of saccharin fed to pregnant {i rats and their weanlings produced bladder cancers in the male offspring. The Canadians, immediately banned saccharin (although they stilli sell cyclamate); in this country,, the FDA ~ said that the law, which forbids the use ofi cancer-causing food additives, required that!' saccharin be banned here, too =,The outraged public response prompted'the ' congressional moratorium and two more re- views by the National' Academy. Meanwhile, all foods 'containing saccharin (but not sac- eharin-sweetenedi cosmeties and drugs) must bear this warning: "Use of this product may . : be hazard'ous to your health.. This product contains saccharin which has been deter, mined'to cause cancer in laboratory animals:"' Recent wiorries '; Three studies have. now shown that saechar- in, when, fed! to; pregnant animals, can cross the placenta, accumulate in the fetus and cause cancer in, male offspring. Several other studies showed that saccharin could enhance tbe cancer-causing potential of' other sub- : stanees: ; S'owever,' of 10 studies exploring, sacehar- I in's ability to damage genes (the presumed'' basis for a cancer-producing, effect),. only . three had positive findings. :• Since 1970, 10 human studies - a11 with l `> scientific shortcomings - have been complet- " ed with similar confusing results. They com- pared' bladder cancer incidence in diabetics' (who -presumably have used more saccharin for more . years than others) with nondiabet- ~ '; 'ics;, they looked into the use of'saccharin by° bladder oancerr patients, andl they searched' for a trend'in bladder cancer that might be' associated with increasing use of saccharin. ~ Ni1ie of the studies had negative findings, 'but the 10th, conducted by a team of Canadi+I& an researchers; showedla 60 percentinereased; risk of bladder cancer among, men (but not women) who used sac~harin Unceilatn risks ~ ..,.; ' The NationallAcademy,'the FDA and many ind'ependent scientists have concluded on the basis of these admittedly inadequate findings .that saccharin is a weak carcinogen in animals and is probably capable of causing cancer in people. Its primary action may be as a eo-car- cinogen or promoter of' other cancer-causing substances,,
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r S S BRIEF ? .' n w a t , s !t '' y:..w~ Three other approved sweeteners - xyldol; `'3 "!:, , sorbitoli and mannitol - are digestible by'.hu rr:.man, beings and therefore yield calories. How- ), .~.;, ;;; ever, they are absorbed so slowly.that they do ;;=Aot produce an abrupt rise in blood sugar, ~making, them useful for diabetics. All three can cause diarrhea whe 'n consumed in more ' w than moderate amounts. 'r~i,.-`Xylitol, found naturally in some fruits and ;vegetables, markedly reduces tooth decayi , when substituted for sugar. However, recent ! animal studies suggest that it', can cause*blad t ';~der tumors, gallstones and adrenal tumors.. SorbitoI, a GRAS substance used in candies, '•~-eough drops and other processed'food5, can ~ accumulate in cells, and a, Russian researcher ; has suggested that it may contribute to nerve' y` and blood vessel damage in, diabetics FYuctose, or fruit sugar, the latest sweeten-: ing rage,, also contributes as many calories as ' ; ."ordinary table sugar tsucrose). However, ' "`.since it is about 50 percent sweeter than1 suc- rose,_ somewhat fewer. fructose calories are' i needed I to get the same sweetening power: ' ~, The savings is piddling Eor, those concerned about their weight, But fructose has an iin ;,; portant advantage for the diabetic -'it doesn't need insulin to get iirto the bver and r~" body, ccells. Thus, there is no sudden demand ' for insulin, which diabetics cannot produce in adequate amounts. -t: Ftuetose'is also a useful sweetener for per- I ;: 'sons with reacti've :hypog(ycemia (low blood :. r sugar), who tend to ouerproduce insulin when sucrose is consumed °' ;j~ Affiernatives t© sv~reeteners~` c i: Since the greatest use of saccharin is in diet'I J)euerages, which offer nothing,at all of nutri- tional benefit, eliminating, consumption of these can greatly reduce your intake of the ,¢ontroversial sweetener. ,C ' Try substituting unsweetenedidrinks -.cIub soda, mineral water or just plain tap water. In you drink coffee or tea, gradually reduce the amount of sweetener you use; you may I be able to eliminate it altogether. ;~' •Nadine Condon of' the 'American Dietetie Assoeiation suggests some'ways to get the ef- fecb of sweetness without actually adding, any ' 3weetener. ..!;©ne is to use sweet spices and herbs„ such. as' cardamom, •.oriander, basil, nutmeg, gin- ger or mace. Another is:toiearamelize the sug- ar naturally present in, fruits and vegetables, for example, by putting, grapefruit, bananas, onions or tomatoes under the broiler or by letting,the water just cook out in a pan of carr rots. A' little shredded coconut will make I fruits taste sweeter. . a +• r , r .y r 1 ~ ru a : Other than the fetus, which seems especial- I ly vulnerable,~ it is not known who may be ~ rnost susceptible to saccharin's carcinogenic effects. At the least, it would seem wise to, avoidisaccharin exposure during,pregnancy .'and'while nursing. Although only males were _ affected in the studies so far,,there is no guar- antee antee that sacchana is safe for females.. Doubtful benefits Some 80 percent of ' the nation's 10 million' diabetics are said to use some artificially; ` sweetened' foods and drinks. Saccharin is also • ,. popular among the millions who are~trying to ~ shed or, keep off excess pounds. But, in fact, l tt ' Isn f saEcharin dangerous ls = `sugar worse? Cf saccharin is ..::-banned, whaf can - take its place? ., no studies have demonstrated that use of sac- ; charin helps dieters lose weight or diabetics control their blood sugar. Actually, there is. :'. some evidence that saccharin may increase appetite and interfere with blood sugar, regu- lation by stitnulating insulin. :. The average' American has gotten heavier ~ ".since the burgeoning popularity of noncalonc i `.sweeteners, andl consumption of'realf sugars ', has actually increased ©verweight persons ', b k th ' ddiction may do better to try to rea eu a to sweets rather than perpetuate it by the ~'continued use of saccharin. Certainly, those who put saccharin in their coffee or tea (sav- '',ang 18 calories per teaspoon 1 of sugar) and then consume a 400-calbne piece of cake or are kidding', no' one but themselves. ~; ?" At this point, sacchann'sinain benefit ap- pears to be psychological; giwng, the dieter and the diabetic a sense of security about their ability to deal with their problem. Such, qualityof-life benefits are not; unimportant,. but consumers must ask whether they are worth the' possible risk of ' cancer f ~ •;; l ..~:... 4w~ { ... ,.i:'i =-Alternative sweeteners -Currently, saccharin is''e the only noncaloricc sweetener approved for marketing in the; United States. While many believe that eycla-~ 'mate was unjustly banned and is far safer than saccharin, it is unlikely that cyclamatee will be put back on the market. Another pos- sibility, aspartame, is still under review' by the FDA after charges of testing irregularities delayed its marketing. Aspartame lacks the versatility of saccharin because it is broken down by high heat and prolonged contact l with water. rs.. ,:. 1 ~ . .. ; Y:. .. ~;w . I Vnl iln. f;. ;.turw 22. '1~~9 ~.,f,.~.. AYM
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-'r U,'T-- - VoL. % Il+o...8.,::JUHE 22, 1J79..
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W The Greensboro Recor June 6,'1979 ,p.'A12 LOEWS MAY BE' NEWiFOE FOR; WOOLWORTH Barmash, ,Ssadore . ' NEW VORK' -•The F.W.; Woolworth ! Co.,; which only a week ago emerged ! :, from the shadow of, a takeover bid by/ - Brascan Ltd., a Canadian holding, com+' Fti'~; .• ;: pany, said Tuesday that the Loews Corp:~ ~ had disclosed plans:-to acquire a major ; stake in the retailing cham ;~ Woolworth said Loews had' notified . .. the government of its intention to buy! up to 15 percent of Woolworth's out-: atanding shares and to make an invest-l ment of' more than $15 million in the? company. The Hart-Scott-Rodino Act, ; _. passed' in 1976, requires acquiring,com-; panies to notify, the Federal Trade Com-; mission and the Justice Department of ! ; their plans to buy more than ;w15' million ~ _' worth or 15 percent of . a company. If i, ' Loews were to purchase 15 percent of i' Woolworth, an investment ofmear1y;138;' ,. miltion would be required ;; Loews, a i diversified l concern with m-~ ,i ':.terests initobacco, real estate, hotels and; °'_; theaters, disclosed that it already owned f' 500,000 to 600,000 shares of Woolworth; ';common stock, or about 2 percent of the;' " total. Loews is regarded as one of the most ; acquisitive-minded conglomerates in, ; American industry. It has achieved sub-; stantial growth over the years through, corporate takeovers. Only last March, 1 .Loews acquired control of the Bulova , Watch Co. ' ; Ed'ward F` Gibbons, Woolworth's:~ o:::<.,chairman; declined to comment Tuesday; on conjecture that Loews might eventu- 1 ally make a takeover attempt. A spokest ' man for Loews also declined t'o; comment. The announcement' by Woolworth in' the early, afternoon came after a flurry; 'of financial market reports surrounding, a halt in Woolworth trading on the 111ew York Stock Exchange. The retailer's. stock resumed trading in the afternoon and closed at 257/a, up 13/t for the day:~ Woolworth said it had received writ-. ten notification that Loews was making; -a filing under the Hgrt-Scott Rodino Aet '' to enable Loews to acquire up to 15 per- cent of Woolworth's voting shares with-~'t out being required to make any~ additional fiiing unii'ar this law.., .~- VoL: 9. ilo. 8. JUNE 2'11-'. '1J79;
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Journal of the National Institute •"" 1Ka 1979 y v. 62, no. 129'5 r, IN THE MIDDLE ',:1954-63'-HISZ?ORICAL:. j N'OTE Shimkin, Michael B. TOBACCO AGA1N' I . .. . . ^ ) . . . ~ - : it ttiere is any,summtt ot acntevernent in cancer re- .search during the past several' decades, it must be the ;'discovery; irrefutable proof, and obvious importance off the fact that tobacco smoking causes lung, cancer in man and' is associated with other severe hazards to health. The elements in the discovery provide a para- digm as well .as an example of' rejiectionl of scientific benefi'ts by society. Suspicions that tobacco fumes are not healthful and that human lungs were not intended' to be tobacco smoke filters go back several centuries. But tobacco was > one of' the lucrati.•e. arops from the New World; the ; d l' i d d th • f h f v epen an es e on e e co t some o ery existence o y tobacco leaf. nd and the United En ) se i ' a g n ,. By 1950 ai concern aro States about the steep rise in mortalit~.~ from lung, cancer. Some of' the increasedi mortality was related to,;.urban residence, and'some clinicians, such as Dr. Alton, Ochsner, were convinced that it was related to smok-, ,ing. Three simui'taneous papers related smoking, to. ° lung, cancer by the retrospective case-control method. Plans were made shortly thereafter to mount prospec-: ~: tive studies in England and the United States, Doll and Hill (20), conducted their inquiry on 60,000 British, ; physicians, and Hammond and' Horn (21) of' the ACS, involved' 187,000 men for their investigation. At NCI, ; Diorn planned to use 'the holders of insurance among : ;; :,.ieterans of World War I but was delayed by restrictions against sending questionnaires and' having them ,,,•:.printed. The \CI statisticians, of course, were well •"-aware of the investigations and problems of design and interpretation they presented. . i .I' became interested in the problem while still in San ` Francisco and analyzed the literature as part of a review article on experimental lung, tumors (22). My interests extended even earlier, inasmuch as one of' my first research assignments in cancer was to test air dustt samples for carcinogenic activity. The data appeared suggestive, and I' considered that the results. of the prospective studies would pretty welll cinch matters; this conclusioni was added to the galley of the paper. Early returns from the Hammond and Horn (2Y) . study were announced at al small meeting, cailedl by the ' ACS, to which, I was invited. The results, as well as those of the British workers (20), showed' an increased' ) 1 21! 1WO (i1 t V in~ .~ n~~ . ~ . ~ ..~~: .~.~ mortality among smokers, proportionately, -Most marked' for lung cancer but numerically most evident for heart disease. Dr. Ernest L. Wynder by tlie6 also, 11 :`re orted that tobacco smoke condensates elicited cancer p ; on the skin of mice and thus gave further credence to the epidemiologic evidence. I was convinced suffi- '..ciently to stop, smoking, ' Heller appointed me as the NCI mernber ta a scientific committee organized by the ACS; also in- cluded were representatives of the National Heart Institute and the American Heart Associacion. The e committee was organized following a meeting of' the ACS at Lake George, New York, at which the ACS recommended more vigorous research and public health action in the area of smoking and lung cancer. The scientific committee on smoking and heal'thh held a series of' six 2-day meetings, ieviewed the data, and', prepared a short, definitive report (23). Itscon~cl~u- sions did not equivocate: ". ..the smoking, of tobacco, particularly in the form of cigarettes, is an important health hazard." The report; accepted for publicationl in Science, appeared! in 1957. It created no particular stir and was not accepted as sufficiently convincing b}• either the National Heart Institute or the American ,; Heart Association. I recall a conversation with the Director of the National! Heart Institute, who dismissed the report with a flip remark. The NCI, however, was doing, not much better. Heller gathered his laboratory chiefs and received more denials than support. Dr. M. J. Shear, an expert on carcinogenesis, and Dr. Harold L. Stesvart, the head pathologist, refused to recognize epidemiologic data that were not confirmed in laboratory animals. Dr. Wilhelm C: Hiueper thoughtt that occupational causes of lung cancer were of greater importance and' needed public health controls more -• than a social habit that represented, individual choice: Even the epiderniologists. with Giiliatn in the lead' voiced more doubts (24, 25). Thus no consensus ol scientific opinion was available for Heller to present tc his superiors. It is easy to take recourse in paranoia when onr meets opposition. Why would respected, secure scien' tists such as Shear, Stewart, and' Hueper o,ppose thc obvious fact that tobacco smoking caused' lung, cancei in man? Years later, I attributed their stance to z Kuhnian, explanation (26);, that their paradigm of can cer research simply did' not encompass the epidemio logic method. Pathologic morphologists of the general tion of Stewart and' Hueper did not use quantitation qualitative recognition of visual patterns was theii main stock in trade. Shear, one of the pioneers ii chemical carcinogenesis, never didl apply quantitativ, bioassay procedures to his research. Q N 47
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+ Whether the same ezplanations apply, to the opposi- tion to the tobacco=smoking facts by such giants as Dr. C. C. Little and Dr. R. A. Fisher ir conjectural. Little : preferred supporr of research by `private enterprise ; tycoons rather than • by the Government and could not : resist the blandishments offered Isy, the iobacco An-' terests. Fisher, along v`ith Dr.' Joseph Berhson, pointed out that the epidemiologic data lacked rigorous bio-, inetric design and was unacceptable to him unless the world of the real conformed with the world of theory.! The statistical group at NCI continued to addl data '-.on the subject. A transfer of funds to the Bureau of' the '-; Census allowed al systematic assessment of' tobacco-' smoking, patterns in the United States,, the first study of ' the distribution of the habit in our population (27). A' retrospective study of' lung cancer in women sustained! the relationship to smoking (28). Dorn's inquiry (29)) on 250,000 veterans fully, substantiated the prospective studies of Doll and Hill' (20) and' Hammond and' Horn (21). And a group of us, withl Cornfield in the lead both alphabetically andi intell'ectually, wrote a discus- sion (30) of the evidence and the questions that remain : relevant; this has found' its way into several compendia of papers on social problems. ~I •.Despite the lack of'_agreement at NCI, the Surgeon~ .General, at that time Dr. Leroy E. Burney (31), did issue a statement on July' 12, I957, declaring: "The `r Public Health Service feels the weight of the evidence':' :; is increasingly pointing in one direction: that excessive~ smoking is one of' the causative factors in lung cancer." : He then ordered a fuller account to be prepared for his ; signature; this task was assigned to Dr. Lewis Robbins,, newly appointed to cancer control activities in thei Bureau of State Services. Over 20 drafts were prepared; before the paper finally appeared in the November 28, ! 1939, issue of the fournaC of the American hledical i ~..Association (JA;WIA): The impactof the conclusion thatl' smoking is a principal factor in the increased' inci-l ..`dence of lung, cancer was practically nil, especially as an editorial in the December 12, 1959, issue of JAMA` (p, 21'0A); took the teeth out of the report by labeling it' as .conjecturaL Research on lung cancer epidemiollogy continued. AL contract with the Veterans Follow-Up Unit allowed am' investigation of the relation of lung cancer to the 1918. influenza epid'emic-and to mustard gas exposure (32):' Influenza was not related to subsequent developmeno of, lung cancer but gas exposure was. The subject of tobacco smoking and its health hazards moved to higher political andl social arenas, with the tobacco" industry doing well-supported battle for its interests: against unorganized, fractionated health interests. O'n the ACS board were recalcitrant members from the' tobacco states, and' they threatened secession at this! danger to the economy of their region. The Federal agencies were also under attack from legislators rep- resenting states in which tobacco was an important commodity.. Vnl 88. JllPJE 22-. 'I9I 9'' . ;" I became only peripherally invol'ved in~ soe of the ,`machinations, having, been 'unvited' to stay our;oE the subsequenr policy discussions Senator Maureen'Yew- berger took a personal interest in the matterr `aTMd I. became her informal advisor.`'Her' administre `as- ' Fs~sistant, Mr. Michael Pertschuk, 'wrote a book for her„ ~ entitled' Smoke Screen. Tobacco' and the Public 1•yelf,are. "(33). Pertschuk's later assigpment tw the Senate Cotn- *% merce Committee ' articulated with :,the. 'labeling of cigarettes as a health hazard and prohibition of ad'ver :'tising of cigarettes on television. I,was referred to `~;'several' members of the H©use .of' Representatives for .their support. They listened sympathetically and then :'painstakingly recounted' to me the political facts of life. ?',Idaho had no interest in tobacco, for exampl'e, 'but needed support from South Carolina on matters con- cerning potatoes, and politically, , one enemy ;is not worth ten friends. ~.On lecture tours, in which Hpller tacitly encouraged me to participate, I would lock horns with Little, feeling like an unsuccessful David against , this re- spected'~ giant of cancer research. I' gathered cigarette advertisements that on lantern slides in livingc eolbrs were a commentary on our mercantile advertisement culture, kept some audiences amused, and produced nc effects other than amusement. I recall one such lecttxrec toa a meeting of the Lost Chord, a'society of laryngec- tomized individuals, where the air was thick ,}vitl, tobacco smoke. When Ii decided to, offer my collectior for publication, it was not allowed by my , superiors Thus an alternate method of an authorless presentatior was devised (39), The story of the Surgeon General s report of 1964 carefully orchestrated for public impact, has been wel told by Breslow (35). P was excluded from the delibera :.tions because 11 was no longer open-minded' on th ; subject. However, my assistant, Dr. Herman Kraybi~ll' !-~was appointed to be the staff director for the enterprisc. 'Kraybill made a mistake in admitting to a reporter tha -it was not quite a carte blanche issue, and for thi. prejudicial revelation he was summarily fired. I' wa the beneficiary in. having his useful talents returned' tc my activities. Y ;r;. ~
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<., S BRIEF •..C. & EI News `~~:May 21, 1979 21,p. 57, no. :Chemicals InViintory read~ 'to gp r~ :EPA finally has pulled together its inventory of chemi- •' m' cals produced or imported into'the *U.S. As required T by the Toxic Substances Control -Act, the inventory ~. :;=_will be the starting point for the agency's efforts to. control!the manufacture and use of toxic chemicals in ( "` the U.S. It "gives us the mpst complete picture to I -: ~~ ~:date of chemicals in U.S. 'commerce," according to ! ~~~;EPA Administrator Douglas M. Costle. To be pub+a lished on June 1„the list includes 43,278 cornpounds.; Es;After that date, firms wishing to produce or Import a: `chemical not listed in the inventory will have to give ~`EPA advance notice and submit whatever health ef-~ `:~fects and environmental studies they have on the new compound. The agency will provide one free copy of f the inventory to each company, that requests on e _ . r i- .. 1 { t rY ~~1.. & E. New'.5: ~y-May 28, 1979 .. , «. w v. 57, no. '22, ,p,• T+House members support saccharln { : _. . . ... . .. . .. • .t: : .,.._ ,~..~a r, :'!.y_ ~jAlthough'the Congressionalfy imposed mratorium on ,' .+4 FDA action against the artificial sweetener saccharin ' ~--expired last week, it's likely that the product will be . ' Jk•aroundl for some time to come. Rep. Henry Waxman `. ;. (D.-Calif:); chairman of the influential House Com-t' merce Committee's Health Sulicommittee, is sup- 4' porting a bi11 that would' extend the Congressional ~, moratorium for: another three years. Other members ;. '~ have introduced similar legislation. But even inrthe ab ~.' ° r-.{sence of Congressional intervention, FDA's 'stiated ° ~ plan to curtrseveretythe use ofthe suspected carcin- :. +r ogen could take as much as a year and a half to take ,- effect: Meanwhile„ ©ther artificial sweeteners, such Y: as G: D Searle s Aspartame, might get the gp= ir M - ' ahead. _, , , ,,~,,, N C & ENews .May 28, 1979 v. 57, no. 22, p•.28 ~ Ozone triggers asthmalllce symptoms Exposure to ozone can cause asthmalike constric,'; tions of' the bronchial tubes, according to studies at ~ the Uniuersity of'California, San Franci'sco. In the` .~ ;course of'basic research on the niechanismsof bron-l cMia1 spasms, a team ofi physicians headed'by Jay A.'', ~V=Nadel exposed 16 young adults to ozone at 0.6 ppm 4 for two hours, then followed this immediately with an.;' aerosol histamine, the body's natural mediator of in=, ' :~.ffammation and congestion. The testsubjects reacted •with wheezing and discomfort about three times as. t,'.severe as in~ a control group.'The experiment used, ~;:ozone'levels five,times current EPA standards.'But' -.'such levels have occurred in~southern California, and~ ~?r true asthmatics maywetllbe more sensitive to ozone- ,. , '; than the test subjects . C' & E News ; May 21, 1979 ;c. .v. 57, no•, 21. P- ar As_ partame Will get hearfng this summer Amidst the saccharin controversy; FDA Comniission+ , er ponaldi Kennedy has disclosed i that he will decide whether to lift a stay on the use of :inother artificial sweetener,-Aspartame; following agency ad'mimstra- ''``Cive hearings this surnmer.'Use otAspartame; a~nutri= 4~ `tiive dipeptide sweeterier`developed by.G. D. Searle &; I ~~ Co has been held up.by FDA since 19744because of'; ., t~ y questions lf Aspartame~is cleared as a food': safet ' . Y its l 'some of the heat off FDA for additive; it '. could take.. ' ^efforts to restrict the use of saccharin, vuhieh is be- ~ -. ` lieved to be'a carcinogen. Safety questions about As- i `,partame are unrelated to carcinogenicity C & E News May 21, 1979 v. 57, no. 21, p. 11j' ' t cr. Nitrite reduction : WSDA has postponed regulatory action on use of food ; :' preservative sodium nitrites in bacon, pending i com, i pletion of'tests on a partial substitute for the ehemi~-~ -, .cals. USDA had been expected to reduce the limits of : -; .the substance in bacon from 120 ppmito 40 ppm. The ', ~" goal l of the lower level' was to reduce to 5' ppb. -amounts of carcinogenic nitrosamines that are ~ , ':;formed from nitrites :when bacon is cookedl ;,,t, !::;.I t>.;_Vof.. ~). ilo.{ ~. JrIr:~ 22~ 1~7~ ~fi
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E r S 1 :. , . , .... , .: •:.i{ V Industrial Researc~h't/D'evelopment; May 1979' U.S. INDUSTRY spent 11% more on R&D in 1977 thanini1976. ' "Science Resources Studies Highlights," just published by the National '; Science Foundation, says the increase represents a real growth of'5°/a In constant dbNars for both~ Federal and company funding for basic and applied~ research, and development. Largest increases in S Y, i +`' overall spending were in aircraft and missiles and the motor `" "` " time t:,: vehicle industries. And total industrial employment of R&D fule : equivalent scientists and engineers was found to have reached an all- time high of'40,000 in January, 1978. Data were obtained from NSF's .; annual Survey of' R&D in industry of' more than 1„500 companies. ANU THE COST of'the continued spending for R&D is increasing. :: :!: Successful high-technology firms continue to plow back into R8'D fundsequal :° to more than 50% of'their after-tax profits, according to a private study for General Electric by Booz„A11en & Hamilton, New York market consultants. Twelve of the worid's larger firms-located in,Japan, Europe and the U.S:-earned more than $90-billion in revenues last year, but ;. a'4-billion„ or4.5%„went into productand process R&D. Even so, increasing risks associated with researchiare causing companies to cut back long-term project funding and time horizons for planning, by up to 40%. ,. DESPITE THE financial support of'technology, many feel the U.S. has lost ' Its innovative advantage over othercountries: TRW founder Simon, Ramo told the recent Edison Centennial.symposium in San Francisco "t'he rate of t productivity increase for the U.S. is now lower than every other major ~. Industrial' nation. The reason: anti-technology prejudice of the public. ` ... . j ,...... . °+...'~. " ~ .-.. . • a ._ . µl , .• f c t 7 :1. t , 0 4 4 A.. _ S,ti.... ., r VI t x ! Ka, ., .. Industrial Research/Development May 1979 p. '36 COMMERCIAL CLEANER COMPOUNDS J i. .. . ._ ` OZONEDEPLETION' PROBLEM :: Regulations to restrict the use of inethylchloroform; a commer-, ciall cleaning solvent;, must be considered seriously because ot' , ' the compound's potential' forreducmg the Earth s stratosphenc: ozone, according to F. Sherwood'Rowland, professor of chemis- try at Univ. of California, Irvine. Rowland presented this view in March at a special meeting callediby the EPA in Washington; DC. In stating that chlorine compounds are harmful,, Rowland saidd that the dangerous parts of the compounds are the chlorine atoms. When they are freed frorn the original compound while in the stratosphere, chlorine atoms participate in a catalytic chain reaction that al lows each atom t'o destroy thousands of molecules of ozone. The professor warned that ozone reduction couid: cause yet-unknown climatic changes„ biological hazards, and occurrences of'skinicancer from unshielded sun rays. Rowland's previous research triggered the existing ban on fluorocarbons. Vnl : .~1. ih. 8. =.;ItlN F _:22. r '1979 !. 1
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Greensboro Dally NECas May 2'9, 1979 g'. ; Al AGENCY ASKS WORLD AD BAN' SMOKING ;.: GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) ~ -'A' _ port by 10 international health special- :'"Ists on the effects of smoking urges a •worldwide ban on tobacco advertising ' and a reduction in tobacco' production. In an 88-page report issued this week- .fn Geneva for the Worfd Health Organi- :. •' aation, the group i recommends that non- smoking' be regarded as "normal social behavior" and calls on gover'nments. worldwide to, step'up anti-smoking legis- lation lation to' establish the objective :=>t_1 The report urges member states to in-j troduce a "total prohibition of'alll formss of tobacco promotion," that they "dis- ' courage"' tobacco exports and that they "prog~essivel~ reduce" tobacco'growing and manufacturing. The report,.issued by the WHO's Ex- pert Committee on Smoking, Control, •is ~ one 'in a series of technical documents : designed to give the organization the lat-~ z.est information on a wide range oflpub= lic health probiems.~•;, ,, Yr. ~ :,~- ;,. ``"Th oftl ma=~ e purpose smoking conroe sures is not to pur.ish the smoker but to encourage recogn}tionof non-smoking ai i the norm," the par el said. :- Members of the committee~said tlieir ~ ;. `tnews arie "not neccesarily" shared'•b'y.l ,mtembers of the WHO secretariat: The organization is affiliated with the:United :. Nations '"- t i,, . ., ~The recommendations; the'first issuedd by the committee'since it last met in Oc= r', tober, 1978, will' be sent to' the health; ministries of all 151 WHO member coun tries as well as to the WHO'secretariat in Geneva. The committee is headed' by Sf•rj George'Godber of England„and includes: specialists from Nigeria, Norway;:. France Scotland Australia, the Unitedi. States, the' Soviet Union, Sweden andl'I Indonesia Vot. 9'', l1©, 8 , JUNE 22, 1979 il.;:. ...... r;c,~,R ,. . :.The Wall Street Journal May 21, 1979 ;; R. J. REYNOLDS UNIT IS THREATENIING. TO QUIT KEY STEAMSHIP'GROUP' $Y.o WALL STRF.ET'JOCRNAI. BfujIRCPGrter' 1 ...a :. MENLO PA'RK, NLJ:-Sea-Land Service „ ~•-.Inc. is threatening to resign J'ul.y, 17 from a f -: .major-steamship group' operating, between. ;; the Far East and the U.S. unless the,group 1`agrees to cut ocean rates. : ; Sea,Land, a unit ofl R.J. Reynolds Indus+. iries Inc. of' ti5'inston-Salem. N.C., is one of r lhe'worid's•lnrgest Steamship concerns. Its officials threw dow n the gauntlet at a meet- ing of the Transpacific Freight Conference , ,,of' Japan•Korea in! Tokyoi on Friday. The conference, comprising six Jlpanese, four U.S:, three Korean an.di eight other ltnostly. European) steamship companies, is consid- ered to lbe the key group for setting Pacific, ' ~ freight rates. " Sea•Land is miffed because the eanfer•'! ence has thus far refused toicut its rates to ` meet growing, competition from nonmember steamship, operators, mainly Russian ones but also some' based in Singapore and the U.S. I k"You can't be high-priced in a buyers' i market," said a spokesman of Sea-Land. i !, '"1'tore and more traffic is slipping away to, companies outside the conference,"' Competition is tntense for freight moving, from Japan and Korea to the' U.S. tti'esr : Coast, especially such high-value items as' -' television sets : , radios and other electrical, ~ electronic products: . ~There Isn't any quarrel in' the Pacific ` Westbound Conferrence; consisting largely of the same companies that are in the Trans- pacific group. That is because their ships have been heavily laden with goods moving from. the U.S. to Japan and Korea for •the.. -past 18 months: "The, fuller the ships are, ?•the fewer problems you have with outside rate cutters„" said an industry rate-mlking official. i : He added that there has been heaiier' movement westbound than eastbound be- cause Japan has recently been liuying more U.S. goods in an effort to narrow its surplus •In trade with the U.S! ;
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I q• ._. . ~ .. . . . .. _. . •FL ,r.P:L.. ._ ,'i.-.. 1 S BRIEF t .4g ~YSI^FY~y 1 i: f wiFSan.~ re+~ . , r. `x .~ .. + r~r !r L ps1 ~ r F 1r} .r y ,~ - i 1rt, ._ 1i,. t 1 ntiMy~•a,~iyi ` ti i~i ;i~ i 11.TS."r~ Sd~~'~Y ;The Greensboro Record IMay 31, °1979 ~ p. A12 r I 'MAN'WANTS PROTECTION FOR SMOKERS STATESVILLE (AP) - Leroy Templeton of'Union Grove says he's mad and he doesn't want to take it any F~a more. ~.;..~ The 36-yearold i employee of the Statesville Record :' & Landmark has started a new group and is urging ; smokers across the country to protect their nghts to the habit! ' r ^r- The group, called Smokers' Freedom Ring, of America, plans to run advertisements Sunday in news, " ` papers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia andl `' fennsy)'vania asking smokers to join the group. : "It all boils down to a few narrow-minded' people• ~; who want to imporse their views and feelings on the public," Templeton said. "And I think it's gone on, l'ong, .,•enough. People who choose to smoke have been ha-I : -.. :- ; jrassed long, enough by anti-smokers. ::"My intention is to lbbby for the rights of smokers ::. 11 plan to lobby on the local, state and eventually na- ! tional level§ for legislation protecting the rights of amokers," he said. The organization's symbol i's'a smoke ring. Mem- ;.bers wili receive a membershipicard and bumper.stick: erbearing the logo. ~~;':° Templeton smokes a pipe and said he resents the recent wave of anti-smoking, rules and regulations. '._ •"Merchants„ for example;'post 'No Smoking' signs iii their stores to cater to the anti-smokers, while smok- ers probably out-number the anti-smokers. We spend our money just like they do, and if I the merchants are vvilling to take our money, they should be willing to put .,, up with our habits,"' he said:. ; .' "I'm not adtrocating,smokingg l'.f'someone asked me If they should'smoke, I'd!have to tell them no. But for : those of'us who already smoke and who enjoy smoking, .I think we should have the right to d'o' so =`.Greensboro D'aily News :.:June 5, 1979 "P. B3 DISEASE-RESISTENT VARIETIES• OF'TOBACCO TO BE AVAILABLE'I - RALEIGH (AP) - Two new varieties of disease:-re- sistent tobacco will be avail~ble to growers next year, according to a, state agricultural-research official ., ., . .. . . • . .. . .. .. .. . ., .ol_r. "~ Dr: Kenneth R. Keller, director of the North Caroli'-' na Agricultural Research Service, said I the' new varieties ° contain the physical and chemical' characteristics re-, quired by growers to resist several' major diseases af= fecting flue-cured tobacco without flavor loss. He said the new varieties, NC' 82 and NC 628, have' been i approved' for use by the five-state Flue-Cured To-, bacco Variety Subcommittee. - -: , Z '-Field tests showed both varieties yielding as well ... M:.=.y as, and in •some cases better than, Coker 319. VQL. 9.. 110. o, JUt1~E ~~, LJ~~ rr ?"hM~ti Greerisboro Daily "Ner,as ~4; ''~7une 6, •1979 ~.p. "A3 ,.& #at u11~~';y . t:TOBACCO ADDS "$50 BILLION TO a 1 r s a`, ~ r r~ r !~ 4J ~t U. S. ECONOMY :PHILADELPHIA (AP) The tobacco industry; 4 °: y~conttibuted nearly $50 billion~ to the nation's economy~ ~a tn 1977, with North Carolina leading in wages and em i`~~~fi9~ s h f th d d T d l ..~; ues ay o e1 ease y re Yn ployment, according to a stu t ? ~ • F~ ti }~ s overall effects ~ j, d i . f~+ . us n i ' tsr.i•f+wt~" 1'C'§tr~l •' The study by the Wharton Applied Research Centerlf it the University, of Pennsylvania for The Tobacco Insts. •, a tute measured employment, incomes and spending,gen-1 erated by farming, auction warehouses, cigarette' ' manufacturing, wholesaling and vending The year 1977 was chosen because it was the most recent year for which data'was complete ;~„ '' According to the study, the 3obacco industry's total •' r.: contribution, to the 1'977' gross"nationaT product wasl $48.6 billion, or 2.6 percent of the GNP. Employment in; 00 persons or 2.3 percent' 067 the industry amounted to 2 , , of all those employed nationally: Excise and sales taiies: oa tobacco accuri ed' fo 9~~3 ,. percent and 3 percent of all indirect business taxes co1- ' lected' by the federal government and l state and: local: governments, respectively. The industry"s total tax con-; tribution amounted to $12' billion in federal taxes an& ;7:3 billion m state and local taxes .cq 1r • ~. ~ In Raleigh, N'.C., Billy Yeargin; managang director of the Tobacco Growers Information Committee, calledl the report the ' most detailed' in existence today. It ! clearly illustrates that the entire economy of'our coun- try depends even more,on tobacco than we:had pre- viously reahzedl' said Yeargm '? •About.490,000 farms in the southeast region of the. (Tnited States were involved in the production of burley ~ 1 ,. rt; a ~ L: I ~;. ,i; and flue-cured tobaccosi the two main varieties used in cigarettes, m 1977, while 152 auction markets accounted for roughly $2.1 billion in tobacco sales. ' )~+r The six rnaj'ar cigatette. manufacturers piodi~ced r _s 666 billion cigarettes in 1977, at 12 facilities in, four dif-" ferent states. Exports amounted to 67'billion cigarettes,f with the remainder shipped to public„warehouses ~ throughout the countty. ;, Z t + +.' ' ''=A"state by state breakdown of economic contribu+: tions iipdicated North Carolina leads all other states in; employment, 68,500, and' wages, $478.3 million. The to-~ bacco industry generates only $139 ! 1 million 1 in state and local taxes in the Tar Heel State, however, less than is' collected in Michigan, where only 3',800' workers are em-' 2, ,.. ployed in the tobacco industry In term's of total, industry employment, Kentucky is second to North Carolina, followed by V'irginia, Ten ,; t;:< nessee, Georgia, South Carolina, New York, Califorma, Pennsyivania and Illinois. Q0Q13'73~;Y c , A 'ti ,. ., .
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BRIEF ,•. n 1 ! 1 V P. ,official at the New York bffices of Loril-I 1ard1 she 'said that she believed. "I'loved ,'that company with all of my heart, and I' ' '-: ~,; had given that company a lot' of devo- ! X tion," she said in giving her deposEtaon' L ton March 111, 1976 i r44E;Mrs. Pons, who was f ired at 'age 48, ~ Z'contended in the affidavit that, she was fired after company executives showered i:;attention on "very young, very sexy : ; ;r•.very cute"' women in her department . „ while she was being "stereotyped ' as an: old-fashioned, straight lady ' .: Hpr lawyer, Norman B. Smith, was- e unavailable for comment Monday. He said earlier that he hears the same type; `of age and sex image discrimination complaint from older workers in many• businesses here. . x -: In ruling on, IVirs, Pons' right to a jury trial, the U.S. Supreme Court held that' : either the employee or the employer in~ '' an age discrimination, suit eouid reques lt ajurytrlal . ..aC- Lw .i. ' ,. Greensboro Daily News June 3, 1979 p. A7 ; Are you t'red of seeug Yaar rnphts as m indirciduol lokeo ormy by IewS inposld b/, fenol;<s ond special:nterest qroups? lAis ist ypr cAotke lo do sonxthng, obout il! roe tm pn SMq¢iRS FRFFDdM RINGIIF NUER. IEaI This is on oryaMZatuon dadcored sole!y to preserrieq tAe rigAts of smoken ie Imerico: Fbr your ~euhe.ship eard ond b,mper slicker._ loa! S3.ar and coupo Ee!o,m to: SAWttERS' FRFFp6M R1NC: P,p. {cs 1FlM. Mimston Salem.,N C.. Yl10p: fncbsed is 57:00, cosh, check or money orrder !or nq 1 yea membersl,p Nome a2:.ti. . i ~-1 Addresf r{r °~ t t+ 1- .+. y t . ~1 s ".Yer' t 1 . 3 «. ' 6. I srot. _ ..... , L •::-r~p ~ , Greensboro Daily.News .,'May 22I, 1979 p. B1 f; LO'RIILLARD SUIT ,; SECRETARY WIliTS AGE SETTLE1WiE1`TT~ Y 'Harris, "Harvey he• A Greensboro secretary who said s ~ was fired because of her age and failure I ~ to 1 project a young, sexy. image has won ; '; Qut-of-court settlement of her age dis+' : ~.' crimination suit against Lorillard Corp.: ; Thornton Brooks, one of the attorneysi for Lorillard, said Monday that the set-;. tl'ement was reached last week with Mrs. j Frances P. Pons, who was fired Jan. 31, I iD75, by the locali cigarette manufactur- J ' a ,Neither Brooks nor Mrs. Pons would;' 'discuss the terms of' the settlement. I- t " ;"It was a mtall satisfatory agree- uuyc,; :'' ment; but the parties dont want to dis- cuss the terms of the settlement," said Brooks. Mrs. Pons said she had' been or- dered to refrain from discussing the terms. feel vindicated,"'she said of the !! outcome of the legal maneuverings of : ?r four and a half years: "Ilve lived• every; ininute of' it and almost everything, up ;: until now has been painful.". She was also pleased, that the legaI: maneuverings resulted in a landmark de- l rision by the U.S. Supreme Court affirm-, I ing the Aight to jury triai' in age s ; : diserimination cases: ThAigh court~~ ' ruled Feb. 20, 1979, in-ber favor. ;. •"These things are always painful but, fn winning the right to a jury trial in age I discrimination cases, I've helped other ' people as well as myself, said, Mrs, Pons. Y "Thi tdt th It ngsurne ouo, were lus felt. 's`treated unfairly,"'she added'.."So I'stood: ' up for what I' believed were my mghts: Now everything's all, right' ; She was executive secretary and finan, ! efal'services coordinator for Lorillard.' After, her dismissal, she joined the staff! of'the county, manager's office at a salaT' ry of'almost $400 less per monthithan: she had been making at Lorillard..,:'•.~ Her lawsuit against Lorillard asked for ~ back wages and damages, although no, specific amount was requested, and' nei- ther ther Brooks nor Mrs. Pons would dis-~ cuss whether the settlement was based on back salary and' damages. She said that she was "'a company per= son inside out" and bore no grudges; against employees of the local cigarette! firml : Her firing was ordered by a.highI t VOLe 9Ir. 1liiv. Q)o JUNE 2LI 19791 7771 sr
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. a• .. y t ~4. Nature "iYV } x i +i v. 279, 'p. '363 Coneress moves to estendlmor'atorium on saccharin ban: A' number of bills were.introduced into the US Congress last' week to extend for a further three years a moratorium on,, the banning of the' artificial sweetener saccharin which was : . : imposed by Congress eighteen months ago. The purpose was ` f ` partly to allow more time to collect scientific data on the '; effects of saccharin;* which had been shown to cause caneer ` M in laboratory antmals but which is also claime,d to have; health benefits The moratorium expired last Wednesday. Ini the light ofr a recent report by the National Academy of Sciences, show- ing that saccharin posed a special health risk to children because ofi their high consumption of soft drinks, Dr Donald Kennedy, Commissioner of the Food and Drug', Administra- tion; said last week that he was opposed to extending the moratorium. "Chronic consumption, begun early in life, may significantly increase one's risk of dtveloping cancer as an adult," he said„ adding that, rather than a further • moratorium, he wouldl prefer, legislation outlawittg, the use of saccharin in diet' soda, but allowing tts continuedl use in. : certain types of' food. , .- ... „ The Greensboro Record June 4, 1979 'p. A1 a~. LEAF FIRMG' OPPOSING P'LAN' :'. ' ' ;WASHINGTGN i (AP) - Tobacco com-i pany eaecuUves aze thumbtng theu nos-- es at, a challenge from the federalr . -', government's No. 1 health officiall to; spend $80 million to i encourage children not to smoke. ia Th t k a ers mam e major dgarette ma their, *600 million advertising, and pro•; motion budgets are not directed at cbif-~ dren and do not Influence youngsters'~ decisions to smoke. Health, Education and Welfare Secre-; tary Joseph A. Califano Jr'.,, In an Aptili 26 speech in San, FYartcisco, challenged cigarette makers "to put' some of their advertising doll'ars, where their corporate rhetoric ts ".;.,,^ , He suggested that' the companies spend 10 percent of their ad budgets on a campaign to urge children not to smoke and to warnyoung women of the. .... as having parents or older siblings who'~ smoke....". Ys+~:~` c i -. . . V01:: 9. 110. 8. JUtJE 222-', '19'79i May 31, ~1979 1,. BRIEF S , 5 :~ o ~ yf.1s i,y t11R~q rr r*•.'~~? i'F ° . .. } . lo'rY , !:a 't. (. Y t v T >1 r'«~w : danger smoking poses to their unborn' babies. 16 71i b bt 12 d18 R! +5~ i ~a s r ~ 1 :Responding to' that challenge, one to- ~'f~~ , e bacco executive, Lorillard President; ;;Curtis H. Judge, quotQdl a passage from' ; i recent Siu•geon General's Iteport on the . mt on ays e ween ages an t who were regular smokers Raymond J. Mulligan, president of thel K c ~. i~.. , .t; 4 Smoking and Healtlt, that said °the influ-! `4t1_?~~~`yr , ", ence of the mass medta in the irtittation,~ of smoking is1" difficult to' determine 4:" "Mass inedia adverti'sin~B' iitakes ani + f-Y ~; easy and tempting target,, but its influ- enee is uncertain," Judge wrote.Cali t - "Everyone, including. Lorillard, agrees ;, that children should not smoke. Howev-) er, to our knwledge, nobody knows why children begin to smoke, including ex perts in the field;" Judge said.: ' 1 '~Althotigh 'the new:government survey released'Aprili26 sriowedthe percentage' of teen-age smokers had fallen since 1974 from 16 percent to12 percent, Cali- i~;: t': . fano isaid there were 1.7'million girls and ?; a Liggett Group, responded to Califano thafiit should be left to mothers and fa- ^is thers to use' "their own free will in dis- •~ couraging their children fromistarting to emoke or continuing smoking.",,; s.:.rrt:. Mulligan added that government i¢ttru- sfon would only encourage many young, to do "the very, opposite of, that wriich the government advocates." Mulligan said the industry does not,t'ry to encour- Ono he has seen little evidence that antii smoking ads are effective. '•'""There appears to us tw~e tio reasona-ble basis for believing that a'special, campaign by the tobacco industry aimed, at teen-agers andi children Is 'likely to' dissuade those inclined' to do, so froptn' amoking cigarettes," Weissman wrote. •1! board of Philip Morris Inc., told Cali-+ 1965 to stop using models under 25 t George Weissman, chairnnan-of the'~ ;` pers in 1963 andn adopted an ad code inl. licity group, said the cigarette makers : stopped' advertising I In, coltege newspa- o . l atitnte,, the indvstry's lobbying,and pub- age anyone under.211 to smoke. _,;,Y». .. In another re 'oinder the Tobacc In ~z. .~ :V Yr' , 3 Califano 1 contends that smoking, Is~' a powerful', habit often taken up by unsus- pecting, children, lured by seductive mul- timullion-dollar advertising campaigns."' ; .,.~ ' ",The surgeon~ general's :report cited peer pressure as a major Influence in teen-agers' decisions to smoke, as well F r . .,. i S .r
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'lI `'„`.. ` J:. w'I ment h/Deve1o d t i 1 R p l n us r a ~aearc June 1979 p. 78' . :. . ...: n~ . . .. . . .. . . . . . . Zndustrial Research/Developmenti '. June 1979 p. 69 "Wow, this computer is almost human! It makes a mistake' and then puts the blame on our other comp.uter!"' ,
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The New York Tllnes May 14, 1979 p. D1 LOEWS REPORTED TO OUST TOP. BULOVA EXECUTIVES .,Barmash, Isadore :'. The Loews Corporation" which com-'' ,' pleted a $35 million takeover of the, Bulova Watch Corporation in ivfarch„ has drastically revamped the manage-! 'tf thti'ldh men' oe naons oest watc com-; pany„ unseating. the ehief' executive 'officer and four other top executives, according to reliable industry sources. ." Sol E. Flick, Bulovars chief executive officer, vice chairman and chairman of -` the executive committee, left the com,- panyApril 24 under pressure from the :~ new owners, the sources said. Uthets: `;Aeparting shortly afterward under ` similar circumstances were David An- derson, executive vice president for manufacturing,and a Bulova director, ; and Leo Gale, vice president of'merch- "andising. Seymour Lesser, vice presi- dent7or finance, and' Arthur Levine, di- • rector of personnel~ have also resigned. ; Comment could not be obtained from; j:. Loewsor from Mr. Flickover the week, end. But the sources said Loews made ; the changes in anieffort to strenbt'hen , ' management and cut expenses. Many ~ •., other changes and' curtailments have ~_ tieen, made amono, junior executives ~! and rank-and-file employees of'Buiova. ~. Preston R. Tisch, 'presid'ent of' Loews, has been elected chairman of a I' new executive committee at Bulova, _•.which now includes Harry B. Henshel, ~ the watch company's chairman andi nephew of the late founder, Arde Bul'oa ;'tra. Andrew Tisch,; the 29-year-old son :;;'.of Laurence A. Tisch, the Loews chair-: ~• man, has offices at Bulova's Long ls-' land City headquarters where he repre- ?; aents'Loewsonthepremises. Mr. Henshel's appointment' to the' the° :; Bulova executive committee, sources said'„indicates his return to ac:: tive managemenC in the watch compa- ny. Although he had retained' the post of'. company chairman, Mr. Henshel' had not been involved' in direct operations since 1976 when C. P. Wong, a Hong Kong entrepreneur and headlof the. Stelux Manufacturing Company in Hong, Kong, paid about 514 million to acquirecontrolof'Bulova. _ i Mr. Flick, then a lbng-time Bulova' house counsel and executive committee chairman, was elected the company's chief executive officer and vice chair- manand was Siven the direct operating responsibility. ; After purchasing Stelux's 30 percent' Interest in Bulova earJy this year, Loews began a cash~tender offer of 5100 a share. This proved'successful in giv-" ing, Loews, a reaf-estate; hotel and tlteater chain, control of Bulova. The : V0U. % ~ _i~~a~. ~'~, ~1Ur~E~ 2~~~, ' 19T9 ! . ., .4~j sst=- . N Talst` . ,z !'.
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c , ,. NEWS BRIEFS , Old Gold; the promotion of`. Russell Goyette to group brand` director, supervising Golden ~ , Lights, True and Max; and the promotion of Charles Toti to group director - : product development, who will super--' ,.vise new products including ultra-low-tar brand, Triumph, now in test, and all chewing tobacco products. ~ Additionally, Mary Anne: Kayiatos was promoted to brand manager - new products' from assistant brand manager -i Golden Lights. In other brand' management shifts, Michelle'' Capra will be responsible for the Golden Lights brand;. George Telford will handle Kent and Kent III; and Joseph Giordano, currently brand man- ager on True, will assume addi- tional responsibility for Max. Louis Burch also was promot-' ed to director - leaf usage and foreign purchase. Burch is head-~ quartered in the company's~ Greensboro, North Carolina. plant. . . t - ". Yr ; n' T~...~~"'. ~~= --~`v'.y`~ y • ! Tobacco Reporter May 1979 - p. 62 LORILLARD ANNOUNCES MAJOR' MANAGEMENT'PROMOTIONS AND, REALIGNMENT r=ts; - orillard President Curtisi Judge (center) announcedl realignment of senior man-! ° agement affecting marketing; and manufacturing operations. : J. Robert Ave (pictured left) i was named executive vice presi- ~ dent - marketing and will have direct responsibility for all the : company's marketing and sales activities. Dr- Alexander Spears (at right) was named executive vice president - operations and research with overall respon- sibility for manufacturing, re- search and leaf operations. ` Other senior promotions in- cluded the naming of Richard Orcutt to senior vice president - sales, replacing A. Judson Bass,; senior vice president, who will continue to report to the pre-' sident's office on all matters' affecting general management` M. Alfred Peterson to senior vice president : - "" financial administration; Arthur Stevens to senior vice president - general . counsel; and Dewey Tedder to ' senior vice president - leaf and - support services. Further, Tom Mau was ' promoted to vice president -' advertising and brand man-' agement. Richard Smith was promoted to vice president -; marketing development. Prior -to these moves, both were group marketing directors. Other changes contained in' the expansion and realignment included the promotion of Constance Humphrey to group brand director, supervising Kent, Kent III, Newport and Vni .~l. I1n, f;, ,Iur!F 22, 1979' 0M3789 ~i$$
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c. r! i , n r t'1 3't+; :. ~Johannes Fhousen wasfprol `; moted to vending supervisor for! i, the Southern California and .; 'Arizona sales territories. He ,', previously worked as a sales J,i :representative for the com ' ,0 ,:`.pany's military and direct sales ,.. operation in Tucson, Arizona. ` •.James L. Arrington will man~-'i age the new West Palm Beach, Florida sales division, which will ,ry serve a nine-county area ~-previously handled by the Or-.~ ; lando andl Tampai divisions. Ar-: S; rington previously was assistant' division manager for the Tampa` ` division. Judy Mishoe, who joined thel . cornpany in 1962' as'a keypunch ~' operator and later became al ~ programmer analyst, has been~ ` ` promoted to senior systems ` analyst for Lorillard's man-f . ; agement information services ,~ ' ~ department in Greensboro. Also promotedi at Greensboro~ _ . ., ; is Allen Sallez, who will serve as~ _ senior industrial engineer. He: has been an industrial engineer for Lorillard since 1971. :."Analytical Chemistry , ' June 1979 v. 51, no. 7, p. 7301 A' PITTSBURGH CONFERENCE'MOVES T ATLANTIC CITY Harold' Sweeney, President of the. 1980 Pittsburgh Conference on Ana- lytical Chemistry and Applied Spec- (I . troscopy, has announced that nex !t year's meet'ing,will be held in Atlantic' ' ' City, N,J., March 10 to 14. Many fac- tors were involved in the decision to ; ~ move from Cleveland, where the meet- ing has beeni held for more than 10 ' years. Not the least of these were the 1 severe housing,problems encountered , by attendees. Atl'anticCi~ty~offers,excell'ent:exhi-~~~ ~• biltionand meeting room facilities and! ' cani accommodate the thousands of participants in new and, refurbished ; hotels. , 13 4 w. , , ..Tobacco Reporter; _ -May 1979 p- 3,72 i.Lorill'ar~d ;t~~~~;' " Promotions "at the 'Greeris=f. boro, North Carolina office in-~ cltide: Jerry Leahy, si~pervisorl o Rates/Services, who joine f d the new York Traffic Depart- ment in 19bS, William Vaughn,~ ' supervisor of Traffic `Opera- tions, was previously a Traffic Operations clerk; Gary Rroohs,;, supervisor of Warehouse Opera .`:. ,-tions, was formerly a Rate ~ Coordinator; and Roger H'ourer , ton, manager of Warehouse Operations, who has worked in : accounting, shipping and traffic management since ,lotning the :' company in 19581 ,. -' 'Jerry Gardner was appointed instrumentation and equipment. != specialist for the Greensboro` ..manufacturing, plant. He has anl associate's degree in industrial ;;'technology from New River ` ..Community College in Dublin,' Virginia. I ' Robert Calloway is the new production quality control ' supervisor at Lorillard's Louis ' ; ;"ville, Kentucky plant. Calloway~ : has a Liberal, Arts degree fromf ^t the University of'Louisville f~ r " In his new role as assistant '` ', division manager of the Spring '. ,: -_field, Missouri sales division,' ` l Robert Richardson will head! a! sales force of nine representa-1 tives and will be responsible for 63 counties. Richard' Scheiber was ap- pointed sales representative of six parish areas in the Ruston;' Louisiana area, He formerly, served in the U! S'. Air Force. i •.,tl...i(Jn. :5:. `l?. -1tl7ti't
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l .. .-:,, S BRIEFS .;: Tobacco May 18, 1979 t ;`i.~v. 181,- no.'.LO, ,p. 71 SMOKELESS' CIGARETTE `} , SOME A PEACE PIPE FOR '`.ATLANTIC' CITY, N.Ji.-Colite is' " ~ : inventor Charles Cohni s contribu-; ' ; tion to the quest for the smokeless ~ , . , cigarette. Colite is a clear liquid ~ :' brushed downi -the length . of aI cigarette and then left to dry. A k, ;-Colite treated cigarette gives off` : . only a bare w hiff of smoke unless it is puffed'. : Cohn, who is 'a former tecltnical' director of a Philadelphia metal! .'alloys company, and 77'y.~ears old',' say that his invention is non-car-~!I , "cinogcnic,'' non-allergenic, non-~ ~ -irritatiing, tasteless and, odorless. i~, : He has recently applied for a patent for Colite and _ hopes t6 ~ 'market it in wake of' the rising ,:~ .social' pressure to restrict smoking ; . in public places. The Colite - treated 'cigarette burns only in the stri~ps 'between. ' the strokes of Colite, and oniy ' when, drawn. Colite, in other' words, forms an insulating set of bands around'the live coal l Cohn emphasizes that wilth Colite a cigarette gives off' 65%! . ~~less smoke into the air-when it~ :",burns alone. Of the smoke that is~ ' given off the contents are less' toxic. Tests by the TJ.S'. Depart-' ment of Health, Education and Welfare have shown that Colite 'smoke contains 60'.2% less dxy tars and 43.4% less nicotine. -;I Cohni has been working on a: smokeless cigarette for 20 years. '', ~WoL. g'~, l1o~~, 8, JUnE~~ 22~, 19 79 Tobacco ; ry ..May 18, 1979 :,v. 181, no. 10, p. 58 LORILLARD PRICES ELBOW ROOM AT $25 MILLION I GREENSBORO, N.C'.-L.ortl-~ lard's Greensboro manufacturing ' facility will be enlarged by some -156,000' square feet in a$25 million construction project, al-,, w ready released for bids. I y W The construction will provide: the company with a new 62,000!-~ square-foot tobacco processing~ ~~. area, a 60,000-square-foot storage1 i - ; and reclamation processing area, l and a 34,000-square-foot unload- ing and storage facility. iill The new construction is expect- ed to be completed by 1981'. Upon completion, the new space will add 30% to the cigarette produc- tion capacity of the plant. .. ! ` Tobacco May 18, 1979 v. 181, no. 10, p. 85; Lorillard announces the appoint-' • ments of Jerry Gardner and' Roberti Calloway to their Greens-' boro, N.C., and' Louisville, Ky.,' manuflcturing, plants. ~ Gardner was appointed uistru-: mentation and equipment spe- ~ cialist for the Greensboro manu- ~ facturiing, plant. Calloway was appointed pro-~ duction quality control supervisor, for the Louisville plant. ~ L.
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BRIEF 1 ~ .j'.i..~ l~ .. ~ . -• ~+.~ xz Izsdustrial Reseaich/tievel0pment une 1979 ; P 35 vy 1VV'OMEN' ARE STILL a relatively small proportion of all U.S. scientists and r+ engineers (about 13% of'scientists and less than 2% of engineers); but that '"' ,•;; . proportion has increased significantly since 1950, with the most rapidl increase occurring in the last few years. The proportion of women earning science PhDs, however, is still well below their proportion ofithe total l population and is only slightly higher than it was in the 1920s, whenAhe last '•": great wave of'the drive for women's equality took place. Data from the ~ National Science Foundation's report "Increasing;The Participation ofWomen In Scientific Research" show the number of doctorates in every science field ..... nearly doubled during the first~§ix years of this decade, and the number of women entering engineenng has risen 76.3% over the same period. . . , . 4 . °~ . T `Yi,~ . . • _- • . BtfTP>:RHAPS industrial employment opportunities for women will be better in third world developing countries. M a meeting on the role of women in industrialization in Developing Countries, sponsored by the U.N. last winter in Vienna; Austria, participants discussed ways to improve women's participation ~ in Industry. A long series of recommendations, was proposedl including: technical and~ financial assistance to women in dustrialists and entrepreneurs; the reorientation of educational systems . . to encourage female participation in industrial.areas; urging governments. to encourage local industry to open a broad range of jobs to women; and investigating, the policies of foreign investors to eliminate possible discriminatory pract{ces e..., . .. .. ., ..~ . - ~ • ' . , - - •:l.,. ;a r~,r, ~7° i AI .•.. .,~F•.~~ ~ ~ • ..:,:r •-'' '~;~'i,~t: , ;•~{,; ~,: : , . . .r: .~. . , .. s ..:~z. ",;,_... 1I Nature June 7, 1979 v. 279,. p. 4671 CO_ increased by 1.5 p.p.m. In atmosphere last' year: 'hhe US National Oceanic andl Atmospheric Administration: reported that the average carbon dioxide concentrations in the earth'sl atmosphere rose to 335 parts per_million last year, an increase of 1.5 parts per million from 1977, and' '.af 21 parts per million-or 6.3%-ince 1958. A spokes-: man for the agency said that the increase was principally due to increasing emissions of carbon dioxide from the burning of' fossil fuel. Despite the increases, however,' government seientists still believe that they have severall years in which to decide whether the effects of the carbon, dioxide build-up warrant restrictions on the burning of. coal, to which the US is increasingly turning as an, alternative f eI t iL u o o r: 9.. i1o., 8. .JUriE 22, '1J79 k' `~:;.~:'. • %,~ •;.•.~; r, 3
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Tobacco ' 'May 18, 1979 v. 181, no.' 10, p. 63' ANTZ-SMOKING PRESSURE MOUNTS IN ~_NORTH' CAROLINA ' RALEIGH, N.C.-Governor Jim Hunt is being, urged • by health :: offcials in North Carolina to support a state information pro+ '. ;' gram on the hazards of smoking,' ' programs to help people stopi smoking, and a one-cent-per-pack cigarette t'ax for the furtherance ; of cancer research ini the U.S. The proposals are contained'I in a report distributcd to 'state ! , health personnel!. j ' The report was compiled by heal'th, professionals over an, 18- month period for the healt'h coordinating division of the De- partment partment of Human Resources. J Hunti is known to agree with some of the proposals, but his. press aide, Gary Peacre, said the ~ ~-governor will not support the' ~ cigarette tax for cancer researchi. :The state's cigarette tax of tvvol cents per pack is the lowest in the ~ whoo nat'ion. The Governor, doesn't- smoke,, supports educa-' tion about health hazards . of :'.. smoking, but believes the decision should be left to the individual. ' l Proposals contained in the ~ report include anti-smoking cam-: ; paigns aimed at young people,' women, adults with high risk of disease, and workers in ind'ustries' where exposure to industrial wastes intensify the risk of cancer. Programs in public schools. are also recommended. V~OL. 9, 110, ~, ~ S', JU~NE ~ 1~2,~ 1979 Woolworth's shares closed on the New~' York Stock Exchange composite tape yes- terday at $25.8751 up 51.75 a share, on trad ing,of 240,500 shares. Disciosure of' Tntentiions Loews's intentions were disclosed when Woolworth said that it had received written " notification from thao company. Edward F.. Gibbons. Woolworth chairman, said that he was informed by Loews that the sole pur. pose of the filing is to enable Loews to ae-, quire, subject toi market conditions, addi-. tionali shares in, the open market, or other- wise if it decides to do so in the future. The "otherwise," Mr. Gibbons said. probably meant private transactions. . . .". l. Reached by telephone,. Dir: Gibbons said' that' after receiving the written notice, he called! Lawrence Tiseh, Loews chairman, to say that he was issuing a release, but was told that Mr. Tisch, was in Chicago. •! Neither Mr. Ti'seh nor other top execu- ; tives: could be reached for comment. A- spokesman for the company said only that the company declined comment. The com- pany also declined' to make available a copy of its filing, under the HarC-Scott•FLodino Act. rr' ~'' l The Wall Street Journal `2 x~ h , '~ ''~ ~i f1 June 6 1979 5 , ~.- ;LOEWS MAKE& FILING' TO ENABLE ITi TO BOOST ITS WOOLWaRTIJi' STAKE TO; .rI•, ',©VER $15 MILLION ~ Co fki, .+ ' NEW YORK-Loewsrp,s mang a `filid th Act to en ng unere Hart-Scott-Rodino- "'8ble it to raise its holdings' of F.W. V~ool-: ';'~'worthiCo. stock to more than S15 million. The act is a relatively new federal' law' that gives the Federal Trade Commission time to study antitrust ramificanons of' "unfriendly" takeovers. : : The filing would enable Loew, after the applicable waiting period. to acquire up to, of Woolworth's voting shares without. •any additional' Hart-Scott-Rodino tiling: r Wai[ Street arbitragers seemed reluctant to conclirde that Loews has a Woolworth takeover in mind. It has been less than two; weeks since Brascan Ltd., a Canadian hold-? Ing company, said it was dropping, its ptv: posed tender offer for all 29!l million shares; oflWoolworth for S3ala share. . - A -They're smart over at Loews and, at this point, I think they're simply taking, ad+ vantage of assembling a nice investment po- stion at mintmum cost;"" said one arbitra•, ger. "Since the Brascan deal fell througir, there's ai lot of' Woolworth stock laying around for sale and they should be able to get a fair amount of it without running up the price:". .
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1 BRIEFS ';- Interested in Stock i' . Mr. Gibbons said that "Woolworth won't ; and, shouldn't discourage any open market _ purchases" of its stock. He said that he has : known Mr. Tisch since 19174 and that Uews .''; has owned Woolworth stock since then. He ';safd that he held conversations from time to time w ith Mr. Tisch who. Mr. Gibbons said `' ` a1%'ays expressed interest In the Woolworth r stock: Mr. Gibbons, said• that be unaerstands that i.oews already contmis 500.000' to 600.- ;' 000 shares of Woolworth stock and that un-' ~, r; der the Hart-Scott-Rodino pr3visions, Loews! must wait 30 days before it can acquire ad-; : ~ ditional Woolworth shares if anysuch acqw- . sitions would bring,its total holdings to more •than $15 million. - • At about 600.000 shares, said Mr. Gib- r.bons, Loews's Woolworth stock probabiy is ~" valued at nearly $15 million. r`. •If Loews increases its holdings to 617c, i't will have to file a form 13D with the Securi- " ',::.ties and Exchange Commission. Currentiy. ~' 600.000 shares would' be about 20olo•of Woo1-. r J worth's shares outstanding; • ~: Mr. Gibbons emphasized tliat Woolworth :`•and Loews haven't any understanding con- ~ cerning, possible additional' stock purchases + ` by Lnews. ~ '. Earlier this year. Loews acquired about ':. 91% of the 3.8 million shares outstanding of :'.Bulova Watch Co. In addition to watches, ;;:`Loews has interescsIn insurance, cigarets, hotels and theaters. i %Business Week ':'May 7', 'h979 4© TiHE LONG, 'SLOW STUNTING OF; -CZGARETTE SALES Smith Reuben M. , Last year the U: S. tobacco industry sold' 602' Lillion cigarettes to the nation's esti- tnat:.~d 50 million smokers-a sales volume increase of only 0.3% from 1977. This may well prove to be the last gain in volume that the cigarette prod'ucers will' ever see. Starting in 19791 cigarette: sales in~the U. S. seem bound to begin a loni;, slow decline. ! There is no doubt' that in the 27 years i since the first study linking, cigarette smoking with lung cancer was published, the health hazard issue has stunted the growt'h of cigarette sales: But during, those years the producers have proved remarkably resilient marketers, at firstt clouding the health-hazard issue with their own flurry of' statistical' studies„ :. VOL. % (1O'. 8, JUNE' 22-, 1979; ~s.. .. ..._ .., ,. W then seeking to ttie the aur&of'health to' their low-tar brands. Through such! ' advertising ,efforts-and'with the help of -budgets that in the decade of the 1970s' :: alone will probably total more than $2.2 ,'. billion-they managed to keep their C'mar:cet!,growing; albeit slowly. ' • Now,, though, as sales decline, the •,,producers ascribe the fall not' to the " health issue but to more recent' efforts to make smoking socially unacceptable.~ ;` The industry traces these efforts to a iI :` campaign begun in 1966 by Betty' ; Carnes, an ornithologist, of' Scottsdale, = -N ' K yS: tF" •n >R a yYr Ariz: She claims to have invented the _' sign, "Thank You for Not Smoking." She. was certainly the leader of a drive to~ban• :amoking in public buildings in Arizona, a! i crusade that has since spread' so that:' cigarette smoking is now widely banned: or restricted in airplanes, elevators,~ public buildings, trains, buses, some restaurants, and an increasing, numberj of corporate gatherings. I. Al' shrinkingl market. "It was a ereepingg thing. Ldon't think anyone in the indus-: try saw it as a major problem;" says; : Curtis H. Judge, president of ' Lorillard. And Lincoln Ball, a Long, Beach (Calif:). tobacco distributor, referring, to the anti- ' : smoking campaign launched by Joseph' A. Califano Jr., Health, Education~ & Welfare Secretary, adds: "The antipub-. . lic smoki'ng zealots are much more dangerous than Califano." From here on, the cigarette producers will be battling ea& other for shares of' a shrinking market, and their ranks are also likely to shrink. Within the next few ~ years, the six U. S, producers will proba- . bly become five as Liggett Group Inc., ) parent of Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., !, seeks to~get rid of'its troubled cigarette subsidiary, its best-selling brand ts way down in 17th place. I American Tobacco Co. and Brown & Williamsom Tobacco Corp. have both~ been losing market share during the past five years, and they will probably conti'n- I ue to~do so because of failure to develop new brands. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co: ! and Fhilip~ Morris Inc. have been more aggressive in introducing new brands, reformulating oldl ones, and maintaining advertising support for their higher-tar versions. As a result„the two giants now control nearly 60% of the market. r:i^ 14
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Lorillard, an $813 million-per-year subsidiary of Loews Corp., will' probably climb from fifth to third, place during the 1980s; chiefly because it has built' its one top-selling brand, Kent, into la fami-; ; ly of cigarettes, from regular Kent with l 15mg:of'tartoKentIIIwith3mg, Hanging in there. Low-tar brands will' keep the industry going-if not growing. Indeed, the low-tars have produced a long series of year -to-year sales gains that' now finally seem to have come to an endi Today low-tar brand§ account for. 36% of the market, up from less than : 5% only five years ago. .- ': , f'I Their gains, however,, may ultimately' lead to a faster decline in, the cigarett'e, ' business. Nobody has statistics to prove it, but it is probable that millions of smokers turned to low tars in the past few, years in an, effort to ease their addiction and break the smoking habit.. Reflecting on this probability, one tobac- co executive says in a burst of candor. "There is no loyalty to, the indust'ry,, outside of those of'us who benefit from it:' financially. I'think that all smokers real-'' ly want to quit and!that they are secretly for the other guy to' win."' .. In what certainlyy appears a vain effort: to counter the antismoking crusade, the. Tobacco Institute, the industry's lobby- ing group, recently producedi an ad campaign that' some in the industry itself' find' ridiculous. One approach: "Like jazz or, chamber music, some people like it and some 'don't. Most of you nonsmokers understand that. It would' be a dull world if everybody liked! the same thing," Such appeals, says one tobacco ind'us-' try executive, probably reflect a Tobaceo; Institute effort to justify itself' to the companies that support it. "We've got this thing,about talking to ourselves;" he adds. "The reason is, perhaps, that no one else is listening any more." •~ Wol.: 9 . , 110. .~. _ Jur.E 22J '1979 I Business Week June 4, 1979 'p. 108 ,,'-AFTERTHE EXPLOSION IN'BULOVA'S' EXEICUTIVE SUITE For the last four, years, corporate pun-' sters have had a field day with BulovaI A fo h C W ' mong, rmance. s sorry per ;ate o: other things, they suggested that Bulbva ` was a company "whose time is running out," a place where "the main ticking, is that of a time bomb." But now,, just a couple of months after Loews Corp. acquired'control of the ailing,watchmak- er, it is clear that time was running out on Bulova's top management, not neces- sarily on the company itself. The Tisches-Laurence A., Loews'' chairman; Preston R. (Bob),, Loews' president; and Andrew H., the 291year- oldi son of' Laurence-entered their newest company wielding axes. By the end' of April, most of Bulova's veteran top managers were forced to take early retirement. The list of those who have left includes Sol E. Flick,,64, whose main role during his 38 years with the compa-, FormerBWova CEO Flick "r:ouldn't communicate with his ownpeopln." ny was as general counsel but whose last year was spent as chief executive officer; Leo Gale, 63, vice-president of merchan- dising for the last 8 of his 19 years with Bulbva; David Anderson, 61, executive CA
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vice-president: of manufacturing for 13 of his 37 years with the company and a host of lower-level managers. Although Harry Bulova Henshel, 60, remains: - chairman, his influence over operations is virtually nil. In an unusual, display of ;.corporate candor, Bob Tisch says Hen4 l shel now "has an i assignment to make I 800 phone calls to top icustomers over the , next 20, dhys and spendl time with divi- : sion managers." Gone,, too, are Bulova's four outside directors, including, most notably,. George C. Sheinberg,, Bulova's former chief'Hnancial officer. Although he left the company in 1977' to join Shearson . . Hayden Stone Inc., Sheinberg,continued to be influential as a director initrying to stem the company's downward financial spiral. The power at Bulova now resides in an executive committee comprising the three Tisches, Loews"Vice-President Herbert C. Hofmann, Henshel, and I- Mark Bourquin+ who remains Bulova's president. Technically, there is no chief' executive officer at the moment. Stressing communication, Loews' goal,. : apparently, is to transform Bulova's management style from one that' was : decentralized to a debilitating extreme ~ into one that emphasizes interdepart- ~ :! mental communication. Sources close to ' Bulova confirm that such communica- I tions were certainly lacking, with man- i agers operating, almost in total isolation ! from one another. Anderson, for one, is' referred to by one Bulova executive as I "an autocratic manager who always , knew more than hus staff because he' ' " a charge that: didn't communicate , Anderson„not surprisingly, hotly denies ~' And Flick "was a lawyer -not a market-! ,, ing man, or a merchandising mani or a; technical man; but a lawyer,"' notes a: watch-industry expert. Bob Tisch saysl that "Flick couldn't communicate with j his own people, and he just eouldn'ti integrate the company." Other BulovaI insiders note that' while Henshel and, Flick had' been virtually inseparable for I most of'their years at the company, even communications between them: broker down when Flick was named CEO last year, effectively stripping Henshel of operating authority. VoL,, J. .IJo. 08. JuNE 21-. ]1J?~''
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The lack of / cooperation at the top filtered down throughout the company, Bob Tisch insists. When Loews took over, he says, "no one could give me a! count of the number of'employees in the' company or where they worked. Every° • : executive ran his own show without tell `" iag anyone what was going, on." As an example, Tisch says he recently visited a '' Bulova assembly plant in St. Croix when ' a shipment of, about 6,000 watch assem~ ' 'bl'ies-10' days' worth of'work-arrived" from Switzerland. "No one was expect - img it,"' he says incredulously. . . The Loews penchant for much tighter management is already evi} dent at Bulova. For the first time, a ; committee of' executives from the: manufacturing„ marketing, and'. : sales departments is meeting regu- larly. Both Andrew Tisch and Hof- mann have set up offices at the- company's Flushing (Nl Y.) 1 head- "' quarters, and Bob Tisch visits, frequently. Loews has also tapped management talent for Bulbval from the executive ranks at Lorillard, the tobacco company Loews acquired 10: years ago. James S. Waterwash, 40,; until recently general manager of LorillhrdTs Louisville (Ky:)i facili- ties, ties, is Anderson's replacement in( the manufacturing sloL And Al'ex-; ander W. Spears, Lorillard's execu-' tive vice-president for operations` and research, is spending several days each week• assessing which„ .Buloval operations need changing. I Just what Bulova needs? Even, some of'the departed executives grud'ging- ' ly admit t'hat the heavy Loews pres-. ence may be just what Bulova needs. : Although neither Flick nor Galee would talk to BUSINESS wEElx, An- derson notes that "the Loews peoplee are really trying to turn the compa, ny around!" And another Bulova . .._•.t ... _,~~,.r:.-. manager who was forced out' in the shuffle: recalls that "Henshel and Bourquin had - not visited the service department in three years, yet Andy and Bob [Tisch] visited' it right after they took over." The Loews team is aiming to give Sr .. ,.` Bulova a management stability it has ';'lacked during, most of the 1970s, when ,` the company changed, owners and presi-; 'dents almost as frequently as executives. "' change suits, prompting, one Bulbval wag, to refer to, the company s leadership as : "perpetual motion management."' In 1973, the Bulova family sold a control-: ling, interest to Gulf' & Western Indus- tries Inc., which, sold' its Bulova stock in Loews' style at' Bulova: A strong emphasis on Interdepartmental linkups ' . 1976 to Hong Kong-based' Stelux Mfg. I Co. Stelux then controlled the company) until January, when it sold its holdin igs to Loews. Loews rapidly purchased more shares and finally increased its holdings to more than 90% this March, through aa tender offer at $10, a share, about 35% above the market price. Since 1976, the aEO post has been filled by Henshel, ' C:. P. Wong of Stelux, and Flick. Bulova : also lias had three presidents since. 1974'-John Rutledge, who came from,' Xerox Corp: and lasted less than two ' years; Kenneth Yarbroughy a General ' Electric Co. veteran who stayed only five months; and Bourquin, a former Bulova' distributor i'n_ Hong Kong who was handpicked by Wong in 1976. ~ Revolving,management was as much a' .symptom, as a cause of Bulova's prob-, lems. When the exchange value of the Swiss franc escalated t'o, 40q in .1975': from 23d five years prior, it wreaked ; havoc with Bulova's overseas manufac- i turing and inventory, costs, since most of : the company's manufacturing facilities ~
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sre located m Switzerlandi Those trou bles were compounded by the seemingly. ' self-destructive overseas distributionn plans of' Henshel, wtio~ insisted' on' ':. ' : expanding, the company's direct market-- r ing, territory. in the late 1960s and early ! 1970s to more than 100 ~ countries, even ; though Bulova continued to show profits .;' only in the Ul S., Canada, and Italy. ~ According to Sheinberg, Btrlova also erred in aggressively marketing its. rather than concen-, entire product line, trating, the company's efforts on the: ' Accutron, the first watch to replace the ! balance wheel with a tuning fork. Aceu-1' tron was easily Bulova's strongest' and ;' most profitable product. The overseas ' expansion "chewed up $40 million in totally unproductive capital," Sheinberg; says. 11. Digital watches. To make matters worse, :. . Bulova totally misread signs showing a' strong consumer interest in~ digital watches. Although companies such as. - Fairchild Camera & Instrument Corpl. and' Texas Instruments Inc. lost a great i deal of money on digitals just after they- e were introdtrced' ini 1972, the new : watches have since become high-profit, :' fast-growing, items for T1, Timex, and';'. Seiko-the leaders in the digital watch market. "Our customers wanted [di'gi- tals]J and we should have made them," _ admits a Bulova vice-president. F Unly in 1975 did Bulova make it's: bel'ated entry into the digital watch lbusi- ; ness, but by then the damage resulting, from, its tardiness had already been, done. Tod'ay, digital products account for 1090 of Bulova's sales, but the company ! has never regained the market share itt lost through its late start. As a result6 Bulova's share of the total U: S: watch market now stands at 10%, down from 15% in 1974. Worst of all, Bulova's late entry in digitals, combined with the energy it was wasting on overseas marketing, only, served as further encouragement to a~ new nemesis: Seiko Corp: of' America,,, now a major force in the watch industry. Today, Seiko has an almost virtualI lock on the middle-price watch market in the U. S., the market that had always been, Bulova's lifeblood. V0I'•. W. i1n. 8. ha2F 22.'1979.. Part of the problem is that' Bulova's>' quality has slid badly in recent years::'- "When Seiko ships out 30 watches, they' all work-wit'h Bulova,,maybe 20 work;' . admits a former Bulova manager. Seiko ` ' has also run circles around Bulova's '.marketing. While Bulova is still a lead- ing,name among independent jewelers, it, has never achieved Seiko's penetration in department and discount store chains. > "We'.ve been willing to fertilize the grass„ create consumer demand,"' says: Robert Pliskinj Seiko president. •. I. ` Seiko's encroachment into~ Bulova''s: markets is continuing. The two compa-: nies remain head-to-head on their mid-, dle-price quartz watches, with Bulova's: ' Accuquartz -a line that increases the. Accutron's accuracy by adding quartz. ;crystals to the movement-pittedi against' Seiko's brand. But last year Seiko purchased the rights to the name Pulsar, once associated with high-quali- ty digital watches, and is using the brand on its low-end quartz analog, or : dial watches. It recently formed Pulsar' ~, . Time Inc. to market the new Pulsar line, ' which many expect will give Bulova's . low-priced Caravelle rough competition' in the market Consolidation. Yet, in trying to recapture some of the market' share lost to Seiko, Loews is taking over a Bulova that is in~, much stronger financial' shape than just.. a few years ago. The company has : consolid'ated' its Swiss manufacturing facilities, and it has walked away from its di'stribution networks in all countries except the U. S., Italy, Canada, and Mexico. It has also made the needed adjustments t'o reftect fluctuations in' currency exchange rates, taking a~ $20, million inventory write-down in 1976:'. And the company has chopped its debt't from a record $146:5' million in 1975 to $99.7 million last December. As a result' of such moves, Bulova report'ed, a$10:11 'million profit on sales of' $171.5 million' for fiscal 1979's first nine months, which' ended last Dec. 31'. Although Flick,`' before he left„predicted a fourth~quarter ~ loss for Bulova, financial downturns in Q " the post'-Christmas period' are not ~, unusual for the highly seasonal watch i,A industry. In the prior three years, the C,,1 ' company suffered losses totaling $48' -.1 million. I ~ (Z)
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.:. w S BRiEF ..~ _. those v the Tisches will t to car Nb ry ~ ry . ' improvements much further. "They will; continue the tight budgeting and aggres-; sive marketing we started," maintains Yarbrough, the former Bulov& president. : Lorillard"s Spears is more detailed about the plans: "I"m going to bring Lorillard ~[management] technology to Bulova-' product development,, long-range plan- ning, ~`ming, communications struct'ures,, quality ="control." Both he and Waterwash admit. ' that quality control' has become sl'ipshod'' at best and that the company has too! ~ ' _ often accepted from suppliers materials that did not meet specifications. "~Ve're i l going to try to create more awareness of ~ our needs among vendors, but we ie also going to focus on awareness of quality in-house," Spears says. I .Trying to recapture the market share lost to Seiko irai digutai' watches Part of the plan is to bring quality.. engineers in as troubleshooters. Spears also plans to visit Swiss research facili- ties to see whether communications between design and market research teams can be improved. And he is taking, a hard look at product mix. "Bulova just has not been the kind' of consumer- oriented' marketing organization Loril- lard is, with brand managers, market analysts, market researchers, and' thee like," Spears complains: "There must be considerably more input.from the mar- ketplace."' : Apparently, the Loews hatchet has been put away; at least for now. "Bulova has a lot of untapped middle-manage-. b I hd~.. ll now e un eas e; ment talent that wi insists Waterwash. But observers ques- tion tion whether the company can quickly recover from its management' drain-in~ addition to those let go by Loews, a; number of Bulova's rising management~ stars, including two top marketing and', sales executives, have recently moved, over to Seiko: Still, as one Wall Street' analyst concludes, "The company could. have a good future, if for no other reason. than there's room for more than Seiko in the marketplace." .Greensboro Daily News J'une 17, 197'9' : p. D3 p: .OFFICIALS' SAY PLOW . UNDER T'AINTED~ ~ .. c.: LEAF RALEIGH (AP) -~Tobacco ware'1 : house officials said Saturday that the' sale of herbicide-contaminated tobacco ' " could hurt this year's sales, and they ;. agreed that the tainted leaf should be plowed under. .<.; . Officials of I 100 warehouses in five of 12 : counties where the damage was discov-' ered said they thought the contaminated'' tobacco should be destroyed • l -:,.`,`We should definitely keep it out of the channels of' our market this year,"' said B.A. Powell, a partner in Powell's ' .°' Tobacco Warehouse in, Fair Bluff' and ' president of the Fair B1uff. TobaccolMar-I ket -,.. n '"It needs to be controlled and not put, on the floor," he said. "It appears to me it' could have an. effect on this year's crop, and I'm sure it would hurt' ex- ports ". - - A'n estimated! 3,000 acres of tobaceo, about 1 percent of' North Carolina's crop, have been damaged by a herbicide: khown commercially as Tbrdon. ~ The herbicide found its way into ship- ments of three grades of tobacco 1ertiliz- I er produced by Smith Douglass Inc at its Kinston plant: ~~ . - ;•Anothei 3',0a0,acres;'S ercent of South Carolina's tobacco crop, have been damaged,,.South Carolina officials . . Said1 The Greensbo.ro Record' 'June 18 , 19'79 ' p. B3 I ~ .~ RICI-IARD F. ' r. BUNDURANT' ,~ ``Joins L,orillard~'-::-'{~ 7~. "` ... . as chemist . .s~ ; :1 S •, ~ e!o 1 ° ' . ~a h ~ }4t~ .a .. . _ • ,,. .. ' 1 Richardl F. Bondurant has joined I.orillard Corp.'s; local product development department as a chemist. He, was previously employed by Nobility Homes of North Carolina Inc. Jur~E 12r"1~7 ; i 4
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. L11L_ L Greensboro Daily News- June 17, 1979 G2'~ STOP THE SMUGGLERS `: North Carolina state government should be shame-faced over its laggardly efforts to control cigarette smuggling. The point was dramati'cally brought home last week "`,:when federal indictments were handed •:'down in Philadelphia against North Caroli- ' - na's largest cigarette distributor; which is accusedi of selling four million cartons of', cigarettes to an out-of-state smuggiing; nng: > .ut. ;_ A key question is how did the Goldsboro' -based cigarette distributor allegedly pull' it off? The answer is abundantly simple: , . Our state government, which is given to ! pious murmurings about law and order 'ur ~ all other matters, makes only the feeblest' : effort to thwart the contraband e;fgarette'; trade. ~ 1I: a For years cigarette`smuggling, known as . ,, "buttlegging," has been a flourishing busi-', ness - indeed, a booming, $1'.5 billion 1 business. Tobacco-rich North Caroiina, with its tvv"ents-per-pack cigarette, tax (the cheapest in tlie nation), is the starting point on the smuggiers"Map. Trucks are , loaded' with Tar Heeli cheapies„ head north '' and unload' their cargo on~ the black mar- ket in states where'' steep taxes make a' pack of smokes an expensive eornmodity. !. The tax loss to these hapless states is enor- j mous, According to the indictment in the , ; Goldsboro distributor's case, Pennsylvania ; was allegedlycheated out of $7.5. million ' in cigarette taxes by that operation alone. f , ..,:. ,....... .:.~, °'Last year, Congress enacted an anti-~ ' smuggling law making it a criminal of'- : fense to buy, sell and transport contra~ j band cigarettes. But catching, the culprits ; is the key deterrent!, and North Carolina~ Vnii •: (1. .iln. :R. ...IrIPJF a'?.' 1979 ~f- has barely gonee through the motions `on t that front. Our state's attitude, in fact, has been something, akin to benign neglect. Soo long as we were selling, our cigarettes and collecting our taxes never mind that other !Cf`,Cl ~i h.' tijkr.T~i{, ~:xlit > rtt .< S V ~, a+,af ~~, ~~+.' ;. In M .<># 1r1 ",r;9 A in M 7 states were suffering. Nonth Carolina , fact, had assigned only tHVO ~O state revenue agents'to fight the war against smuggling. We might as well have equipped them with sling shots and, bicycles: BuY last'week's federal indictmen~s' against the Goldsboro.distributor appear finally to have embarrassed Raleigh (pos-: sibly, because the four million cartons of. smuggled 'cigarettes that turned-up in` Pennsylvania di& not bear our state's tax seal). Governor Hunt last'~ week 'ordered the state Revenue Department to oiT.its guns for heavier warfare. Under consideration are plans for closer monitoring of the state's more than 150 cigarette distribu~ tors, requiring, them to give more informa- tion about their supply of cigarettes, when they are tax-stamped, and where they are 'sent:. Also under discussion is a plani re-_ quiring truckers hauling, big quantities of cigarettes ~ to receive a permit' from the De- partment of' Revenue. Implicit in these plans is an increase in the number of state agents overseeing the cigarette trade. :I The Governor's new' anti=sniuggling , campaign i is something, of a, Johnny-come- 'lately response to a time-worn problem. BUt at least it's a step, if a belated one, - in the right direction: And it''s a move that will polish, our tarnished image in the eyes -. ..: 'of our sister states who'vee been shaking, their heads in frustration over our tepid . effortsi to curb the 'contraband cigarette . ' business4 , : !
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'•.Greensboro Daily News ;'; June 15 1979 :•: g. Dl , . .:.InTAR' ON SMUGGLING VITAL •..OF TOBACCO: HUNT RALEIGH (AP) =-A crackdown "onl :: the smuggling of cigarettes from North; Carolina is vital to the welfare of thej state's tobacco prog;am, Gov. .I'un Hunt. said Thursday. ~ The governor Monday ordered.the. Revenue Department to give. a higher~ priority to halting the smuggling'of ciga•1 rettes from North Carolina into other. states. " -, ., -Also Thursday the manager of a Ra- ' leigh ~ cigarette distributorship~ who had i li i i ar t ng; e smugg cted on c g et been ind charges was found dead at his home..;~ Raleigh police said Ollie Ray Davis„ 56, manager of Atlantic Tobacco,Co.,,: died from a bullet wound in the head'•. Police said Davis apparently killed him-; self:. According to court documents, Davis allegedly acted as a go-between, for the' Pennsylvania operators and the South-'; ern Wholesale Co: in Goldsboro. He al+ i legedly received a $2 fee on each of' the'. more than 66,000 cases of unstamped;, cigarettes obtained' by the smugglers: :] ' While Hunt was promising, to step up !' effprts against cigarette smuggling,, a; former revenue official said the state : Department of Revenue has known for years that cigarette distributors licensed by the state are selling unstamped ciga-; . r rettes to smugglers. ; jEioll'and' C: Gaines of Raleigh, formec head of the revenue division that' collects cigarette taxes, said in an interview with the News and! Observer of' Raleigh that the department frequently had received reports that state distributors were sell-; 1. ~.~ Ing cigarettes to smugglers. Gaines worked for the Revenue De-: partment from 1974' to' 19T7, when be was fired after a change in adirunistra-~ tions: .~ Revenue Secretary Mark G. Lynch has said his department made substantial et-: forts to discover unstamped cigarettes but found fewer than 20'cartons in more. than, two years: - ';;.;•; i ~ xrn: I "We knew without a shadow of a doubt that unstamped cigarettes'were being shipped' out of North Carolina," Gaines saidi "It's just that we did'n't' have the resources, nor could we get' cooperation from, other departrnents to ove i i , North Cirolina s 2 e ts-a+pack tax'ls the lowest' in the nation„ and cigarette smuggling is a thriving business..•.: rt: j "I'm a little concerned that some! North Carolinians don't seem to under-i stand' how important this program is,"; Hunt said during his weekly news con,' lerence. "Everyone should understand that cigarette smuggling,is a threat to his livelihood. It's a threat to the tobacco program andi we need the tobacco pro-. Ilxam•.. . . • ... .. .. I Hunt'said the tobacco program is ' doomed without the support of the rest' of the country "and'~ the rest of the coun+ • Iry, is very upset about smuggling"' be- cause of the loss of tax revenue to states f,hat have a higher cigarette tax. :.. The governor said other states are~ partly to blame for the smuggling be- cause their taxes are so high but that; North Carolina must' do its part to cut off the smuggling of cigarettes at the.e source. • : t Another problem with the smuggling, Hunt said, is the likelihood that organ- ized crime is involvedi "We're not sure of the extent of the lnvolsement," Hunt said, "but we don'6 need that kind of money in North Caroli- na and we don't need those kind of' peo- !' ple in North Carohna:~` , •-A federal grand jury im Philadelphial last week returned indictments accusing 10 men~ including four from North Caro- lina, of'smuggling,cigarettes to Pennsyl vania. Among,those indicted were Davis and Charles Nelson Snipes, 38, William Ellis Seymour, 46, and Edward Lee Bryan, 32;, all of Goldsboro.:
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: The Greensboro Record' .=:Jt1ne 18, '1979 ':; :p. •Bl , SCRAPPY CHEWING' TOi3rlCCO PLUGS .,ALONG 'S'chlosser, Jim 1: Joyce Busick Jr., says it helps him feel relaxed and'to.con=d tros! tiis weiglit .. > ~ _ . y i' t.;Busick sounds like a jogger. •- No, he's a tobacco chewer. He's been chewing for 25 to 30 years. He says, "It's a, nerve calmer, and it helps me control : My eating. When I' am chewing -tobacco„ I am not eating: ' -Not only does Busick chew, but as owner of' Farmlands •: General! Store near Ossipee in northeast Guilford County, he sells the stuff. ~. - =.,.; And business has never been better because tobacco chew- ing seems to be a national fadl >.' ~" Switch on the television at night and you will hear cowboys on the range shouting, "You whoo, Chattanooga, Chew," fire- ~ men lauding the delights of Beech-Nut brand and baseball re- ! llef ace Sparky Lyle plugging Levi Garrett, made in nearby i Winston-Salem1 by Taylor Brothers Tobacco' Co. °• One can even buy a pouch of Red Man!chewing tobacco in I the State I.egislative Buiiding, in Raleigh.,. ., . Moreover, tobacco chewing, clubs are springing up on col- lege campuses, including a well~publicized organization at Wa- bash College in Indiana. Y • r= " The present generation of baseball players, after flirting with bubble gum for years, has discovered what an earlier gen- :n eration of players knew well: ehewing, tobacco and'the national pastime are a perfectt match. Tom Romenesko, general manager of the Greensboro Hor. nets, says 10 of the 25 locali club members play with bulging cheeks. Michael (Crip) Briggs, a club employee, makes regulari trips to a local wholesaler to stock up on Levi Garrett and Red! Man for the Hornets. "Mos,t of the guys' who chew are pitch-" ers," says Briggs. "It relaxes their nerves. It's like smoking."; A check of three local'tobacco dealers - Piedmont Whole• ~ salers, Tobacco U.S.A. and Murray Candy Co. - shows thatt the'cigarette is still the sales king by far, but chewing is com- ing on, strong. Sales are up noticeably. ,, .arr-~> "The cigarette scare is responsible for it," says Lewisl, Loveland of Piedmont Wholesalers on Battleground Avenue.: "People want to quit smoking, but they want to continue en-' joying the taste of' tobacco, sothey start chewing ";.: The wholesalers stock a long list of brands, with names; like Red Man, Work Horse, Big Man, Red' Fbx, Brown Mule, , Blood Hound, Black Maria, Red Juice, Bull's Eye :? =~! C.E' Murray of Tobacco U.S.A. also reports an increase, tn sales of spittoons„ although ~ he adds most are used for orna• 4ments rather than for catching tobacco~juice. "Most chewers' use the ground' or a cup,"Jhe said.. "Spit-~ _ _...~• ~' Voi_. 9, i1o «. 8. JUNE 22'. ' 19179 toons are too nice ,~ he ith a d lp t ai o i -r Tob r ea rs say mos c wers are m e, w maj - :° acco ~ I ., ty being blue-collar workers who work out-of-doors and farm-i • ers. There is little evidence to indicate women have taken a faney to the habit, although many females, particularly the el , derly, reportedly dip snuff, a cousin of chewing tobacco. ' "' Most men prefer the scrap" or shredded kind' of tobacco , - , as opposed to the "plug":vanety which many oldltimers still d -I emand. '" While it may be a fad today, chewing tobacco has never. : really gone out of style, particularly in the rural areas of the. South. But until now, chewing tobacco has been in the shadow of the cigarette and has had' the reputationn of being a some-; .what disgusting habit ., r~~. But no more. Woody Cothren, an executive with Conwood. . Inc., a Tennessee company which owns Taylor Brothers, says' sales of scrap chewing tobacco has jumped 6'percent annually.? every year for the past 10 years. Plug,tobacco and snuff'sales: also are on the rise, he adds f: , . ":. -He says the new generation of.:tobacco chewers wantswa sweet, juicy taste and' for that reason his company started the Levi Garrett brand in 1976. Already it has climbed to the N'or 2 spot on the sales chart second only to the legendary Red Mpn..:: ~ .~ ~`•: "The college clubs have helped us a, lot;" explains Cothren. "The young fellows are getting togther~, chewing, holding,spit-'ting contests, and helping destroy some of' the (social) barrien: that have built up through the years regarding chewing tobao-i „ co. He believes the best days are ~ahead. As the boys in college graduate and become doctors and business executives, I'believe they will keep on chewing. Pret- ty soon~ you will be seeing spittoons in the board rooms,"' hg says confidently...; . . - .... . . g .. Tabak-Journal International April 1979 p. '151 U.S.A.: Liggett Group sell their domestic ciigatret business ' According to a statement made by the Liggett Group, they have agre to the sale in principle of their domestic cigarette business in the U:S. to the C and'O Development Company and Systems Cantrol.' T company taking over the business are fully in possession of Dol Overton in Kenly (North, Carolina). An announcement'by Raymo J: Mulligan, President of the Liggett Group. states thatathe sale rela, to the company's cigarette business in the U.S:A., but' not to t smoking and chewing tobacco business of the Pinkerton Tobcco,C or to the overseas raw tobacco business of Liggett & Myers do Br~ Cigarros Ltda. in Brazil. . . . ., (vw © 40 N W Eb N
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.The Greensboro Record June 7, 1979 :: p. B8 ^: BEINGIA WOhlAN DOESN' T PROTECT AGAINST TOBACCO Dear Dr. Solomon: My daughter is 18!' years old and already smokes a pack of ~, :'cigarettes a day. She says there's nothing;, ..•to be concerned about because lung can-:' -::ter is rare among women, and that" 'breast cancer is the one women have to -: watch out for: Are women smokers as, susceptible to lung cancer as men who'' smol.e? Mrs. E D~ , Dear Mrs' D.: Being female does not; ~erve as a protection against smoking-in-' duced, lung cancer, and! unfortunately; there are statistics tolprove this. ' In a new report onismoking,and healthi released by the Department of Health„ Education and Welfare, the surgeon gen-i eral' predicts that within five years - or! about 1983 - lung cancer, rather than- breast cancer, will be the leading cause of'death due to malignancy among wom- en in the United States. The increased use of cigarettes is blamed for the, change. When the first report by the sur-i geon general was released 15 years ago, a clear cause-and-effect relationship be- tween smoking and lung cancer in wom-; en had' not been establl'shedl Today, the relationship is obvious. ' The effects, of smoking on women' areapparent from the statistics. In 1964;: lung cancer was the fifth-leading cause of death from cancer in1 women; in1 1967',,;, It was the fourth-l'eading cause; and', in~' 1969, the third. Now, indications are that,, lung cancer is approaching cancer of the!' colon and rectum as the second leading i' . cause of malignant death in women: ,' t = This prediction is supported by dttta, published by the American Cancer So-i'. ciety. They show that the incidence of ; lung cancer, in women has been increas-;; ing,10 times faster than the incidence of i breast cancer. `'yJ$utfiRures alone do,not tell the wh~le Vni : tli. i1n. fl)...titt,F 22.'1J7§1 sto •ry;, from a medical standpoint' lung,; cancer is a much more difficult disease ~ to control. While about one-third of the " women who get breast cancer die as a' result, the disease is fatal in 85 percent' • of' those with lung cancer. The one bright spot in this grim plea: ture is-that some of the adverse effects of'smoking,can, be reversed once the 'person stops. After a period of' 15' years; ! mortality rates for former cigarette; smokers are similar to those for persons ; who.never smoked. Particularly for someone as young as your daughter this,' should provide a good incentive to quiti. now and beat the statistics _ The Greensboro Record June 14, 1979 p. A8 CIGARE^_'TE..HEAD ENTERS GUiILT'Y' PLEAj ""PHILADELPI3IA (AP) = The presi i dent of North Carolina's largest cigarette: wholesale company has pleaded guilty in federal' court to conspiring to smuggle, cigarettes from North Carolina to Penrn• syhrarua ~ . ,; . ~ ., '.> > . '. .4 .'r ' a.•.... ~ Edward! Lee Bryan was one of' 10 per• sons indicted by a federall grand jury, last; week on charges of participating in a,' $7.5 million smuggling ring. He pleaded'! guilty Wednesday to a•single count of' conspiracy as part of an agreement with, federal prosecutors y; plea bargain calls for Bryan, presi'-i dent of Southern Wholesale Cb. ofl Goldsboro to testify in the trials of, oth- ers indicted r' : iiS, District Court Judge John Fullam deferred sentencing Bryan, who face a maximuin penalty of up to five years in prison and $10;000 in fines. ~~ ~ O. C ~. w. ob 0 w
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0 vs BRIEF ;; Greensboro Daily News J!une 18, 1979 p. B1 ;.. HOPES HIGH FOR LEAF CROP DESPITE' :MOLD ` ' RALEIGH (AP) = A3 farniers make!' ~' ready to harvest their 1979 flue-cured to- s baecro crop, state agriculture officials sayl they are hopeful for a second straight ° billion-dollar crop But their optimism has been tempered, •by gloomy' reports from county eYten-1 sion agents and'grawers of'unfavorable `• weather, herbicide-contaminated leaf and the spreadiof blue mold disease. f.,. ~"It"s like being in the third' inning of 'a baseball game and trying to figure how, it wi1come out," said Joe E. Perry; Edl ' ` :gecombe County agricultural' extension !' chairman. "It's too early to really tell: :;anything. Everybody hasnit batted yet.":1 "Ild say the prospects aren+t as good as last year,"' Perry added, echoing the ; opinions of'some other county agents surveyed. Last year, North Carolina growers re- :' ceived $1•069' billion for their flue-cured , ' tobacco. This was a state record I and a I, strong comeback from the below-aver- • age 1977 crop. ., ;,.... '.'~-Boosting chanees of anotherbillion- dollar harvest will be an increase from $121 to $129.30 per.hundred pounds in the average support price, but agricul- ~ ture officials expect the average price 'for this year's crop to be higher than. tilat. ': "The average market price has been : 10 to 12 (dollars) over the support for' tbe past several years," said John H. Cy-:, rus, chief of the Tobacco Affairs Section of the N.C',,Department of,AgTiculture.j {{' >.. ~ lt' fzt r ;.4y tt. 4 ~ 4T+i t ,1 J / `f1 ~ : `For example, tfie 1978 eiop brought~ an averagel" ' pri.ce of $133,45 ' when the support level averaged $121," per hundred' pounds "With good i quality tobacco, I'd say we could have ~. M a. , V u : another billion-dollar year," Cyrus said, "I'm fairly op- '' tinustic now, and we'll be able to tell for sure m about " ' four weeks Farmers have been ¢onfronted with three ma jor , problems as they' went about cultivating the 1979 crop 1,.~ l^ Persistent' rains during the early weeks of the growing " season caused some plants to dtown in the field; others' were stunt'ed by the uneven, often' cool growing season: { •:;; •Some nitrogen aplied to the soil before tobacco. was; ' transplanted I was leached away by the rain, making it' necessary for many farmers to apply more of the nu-i trient. Rainy spells also hurt the root systems of many plants and could leave them vulnerablie to the hot, dry'' : weather of late summer. "Our whole crop is far from being what•it was last" . year'; said Leon Allen, Martin County extension chair-{ man: ."It's been a very, frustrating spring up to this' point. The farmers are not' encouraged so far." In D'uplin County,: extension agent J. M'ichaeli 'Moore said, 'It's going to be a late crop, and it's, proba- y bly: not going to' be a real good crop."' Blue moid' also has been a problem for many farm-! ers„ and Fitrney A. Todd, plant pathologist at N.C. State• TJniversity, described the outbreak as "the worst I'vel seen since I came to the university, i'n.1943 Tabak-Journal International' April 1979 p. • 151 ; .. ;... U.S.A.: Philip Miorris are successfulli'rttheiR f cigarette tradingi During 1978' Philip Morris increased their sales of cigarettes in United States by 5:3 percent to 168;000'million cigarettes. The mar share o! Philip Morris U.S:A: was approximately 28 percent compa "with 26.5 percent in ~ 1577; ln a comparison of the years 1977/78'sa of'Philip Morris International rose by 7.8 percent'to 201,000'milli, According to George VVeissman, who has been Chairman of the Bo;, and Chief' Executive Officer of Philip Morris Incorporated sir 1st November. 1978, during 1979 th'e company will' start on n construction of a new cigarette factory in North Carolina. U.S.A. a ~' also bring its manufacturing plants in Richmond and Lovisvillo up the latest technological level. Likewise in the internaiional'field, • company intends to expand and modernise its production establi: ments in various countries.
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:.Tabak-Journal'International" April 1979 g. 152 U.S.A.:i 'ilaarmann' & Reimer CmbH organise am`. .'international symposium i ll k la d fl Th f t a auour nownmanu rc essences an ngs e we - cturers o aroma `.' Messrs. Haarmann & Reimer GmbH, of Ho/zminden, federal'Republic. :. of Germany; are organising an intemational'symposium at the A.meri- eana Hotel in New York on the 24th and 25th September 1979, the subject being "aromatic essences and flavourings". The lecturers.. "aspects of product safety";. are American and European scientists whose papers will deal with "new products andpiocesses"'as well as from universities and industry. This symposium will be under the guidance of Professor Dr. Rodney Croteau of the Washington State University. The proceedings of the Congress w/l be conducted inm English. People interested in this event' are invited to send in their lequests for application forms and the provisional programme of lectures to the following address: K"ongressburo Symposium Haar-, mann &' Reimer GmbH, Postfach 1253, D-3450'Holzminden 1. (F1)i Greensboro Daily News June 8:, 1979 p. D2' ' TOBACCO CONTAM'INATED ~ RALEIGH (AP)' - At least 200 acres and possibly as many as 3,0001 acres of flue-cured tobacco in North, Carolina and SouthiCarolina have been damaged by fer:; '0lizer contaminated with a potent herbicide, agriculturei officials said! Thursday. Officials estimated the extent of'damage to be less, than! 1 percent of'the total acreage 'tn North, Carolina,, where an estimated 346,000 acres wil1 be in iproduction ' this seasom State officials said!the contaminated crops probably~ could not be harvested. : ~ . •"It appears that the farmers that have the problem, will not have much, if any, marketable tobacco; ` said' William Wilder Jr, assistant commissioner of' agncuh~ ture: Wilder saidl investigators are trying to determine the cause and extent of the contamination. He said eon-: tamination has been confirmed on about 200 acres in; Brunswick, Columbus and Craven counties He said oth, j er fields are being ~ tested Farmers in the Southeast complained last week, that some of their tobacco looked unhealthy, withs drooping and' curling leaves. Wilder said' laboratory analysis Indicated that the contaminant, a ehemical caIIed picioram,,was contained'; In one and' possibly two batches of Jamaican Tobacco ~ Fertilizer, manufactured by Smith Douglass lnc., a divi- sion sion of Borden Chemicals Inc. : I Each batch contained 100 tons to 150 tons of ferti'- lizer. : . Carl Richgels, ehemicali manager for Smith-Doug-I lass, said the company does not produce picloram and'; was puzzled about how its fertilizes could become con- taminated by the chemicai ~.; Voo.: J. . fab. ~. Jr'JrrE 22,'1979! '..The Greensboro Record!; - June 8', 1979 p. Al `° .~:,. GRAND'. JURY: SMOKES LEAVING N.C. SANS STAMPS ~ ,, RALEIGH (AP) --~A Phil'adelphta grand jury, has I `' ~, char d th t l illi t f a tt ge a severa on car ons o gare es m are : leaving North CaroIuta without the state's re uired two- ?" q ' cent' tax stamp. The grand jury charged that Southern Wholesalei : Co. in Goldsboro had shipped 4 million cartons of'un-~ un- stamped cigarettes into Pennsylvania since 1972. ..;-4 ;••. But North Carolina revenue agents say they have; found less than 20 cartons of uastamped!cigarettes over. ~ the past 2% years. .There have been several reports published in The Charlotte Observer and the News and Observer of Ra- leigh of northern lawmen seizing loads of unstamped cigarettes from North Carolina, although the sources of' the loads were not identified; I t_a, ;; :-_, r:. Southern Wholesale, the largest distributor in the state in 1974, according, to company President E. Lee Bryan~ has beeniselling cigarettes to smugglers at least. li id tift d n e 19 , wh n N r h Ca l e am n en e c 73 e o t ro na Jacked load of smuggled cigarettes as coming from the~ company: jti~ the indictments Southern i~Vholesale ' : Accordm g ; paid l the North Carolina tax, but did l not put the tax! stamps on the cigarettes. s~ ;~~:* ~ ed cigarettes were then shi ed to t : Th u ~ ns amp pp e Pennsylvaniai where counterfeit Pennsylvania stamps; were attached, according to the indictments : f .~. The scheme cost Pennsylvania an estunated #7:5 iivllion in lost,cigarette tax revenue, the grand jury Wd ~ ~>. Revenue Secretary Mark G. Lynch said his agencp,l has made examinations of cigarette distributors at the uest'~ of'other states in order to assist those itates in~' le q their enforcement. ,~' , t` Neverttieless, the departraent~ has not used ste. ldws and regulations to revoke the licenses of distribu,! fors who sell to smugglers:While it is not illegal to sell t.o smugglers, North Carolina law does ban~ for exam-~ ple, sale of unstamped cigarettes to out-0f state distri•buters and falsification of records
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;.Greensboro Daily News cJune 14, 1979' -:.•:p. D6 XPERTS TESTING.TOBACCO TO SEEi .,." '7[F DAMAGED LEAF CAN BE SAVED :;: h:'RALEIGH (AP) -State agriculture of[i-; i.,' dals have begun testing tobaccoAamaged by! ,`.a fertilizer containing a potent herbicide to' .' determine whether any of the lea( ean be `.. ~ saivagea , . .. • William A. Wilder, assistant state agricul-: ture commissioner, said undamaged leaves' from stalks in fields affected by the herbicide ,. , were sent to a state laboratory at Whiteville ; for tests to determine whether the tobacco I may be used. ` "" s " Some fieltls are a totai lo Wilder said., -• s, "North Carolina State University has assem-~ bled all!its experts to check the level in the fertilizer so they can decide whether any of; the leaf may, tibe harvested and decide what to do with the soil."' `' Officials reported earlier this week that' pi ? elbram, a herbicide used to ~ make soil barrew .for long periods of time, had showed up in three grades of tobacco fertilizer manufac-s tured by Smith~Douglass Inc. 'at its Kinston ! plant. Wilder said officials had not been able toi determine how the substance got into the fer-- tiTuer, which was manufactured last summer. ~ Two of the grades involved, Orange 4,&12 and Orange 3-9-9, were bagged at the Smith-Doug-' . lass facility at Wilmington and the other, Ja-.. maica 4-8-12, was bagged at Kinston, he said. ~ Picloram was thoueht bv staCe officials to ! be a ~ long-lasting herbieide, but Wilder, said of-' ficials of Dow Chemicali Co. said its effects l would' last only a few months. `~:_ l He said the tests would I show whether ap-I parently healthy leaves on damaged stalks ' : showed' dangerous concentrations of picloram and' whether concentrations of the substance In the soil would likely have long range ef-' tects: Wilder.saidiresults of,the tests are expectedi'. to be available by the end of next week. y The problem has been detected in 12 coun-', ties and involves moree than 1,000 acres, Wild- er er said. _____----- ufll'', .~i. .~U('J'E 22. -1.t.~~~ G9
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industrial Research/b'evelopment!' May 1979 ;p. 11 . inen, it's time to ad . . ~ . .. YOU WERE'CHALLENGED in this space last month to right a wrong - to engage in an active campaign for equality of salaries in the R&D industry. Our survey and article about salaries for women in R3Dl in the April issue; showed clearly that salary discrimination is widespread and differences are large. We stated then, and restate now our belief'that there should be equal pay'for women and men for equal, experience. education, stabi!ity„skill, and performance. When we issued the challenge, we had no ideaftw soon'the opportunitywould •. appear for all men in R&D to take appropriate action to end this problem. Right now is the time to act. Senator Edward Kennedy, has introduced'the "Women in Science and Technology Equal Opportunit'yAct." andlhearings are being held by the Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research~ where the bill can expect sympathetic attention since the chairman is Senator Kennedy, Says the Senator, "For 50 years educational', institutional, and cultural barriers have stood in the way of the participation of women in careers in science and technology. For 50 years we have systematically shut the doors on scientific careers for women by the time they are 17'years old. For 50 years women have beertdenied equal educational and employment opportunities in scientific and technical fields. As a result: we have a scientific workforce which is dangerously clbse to beingian all male club." _, Hold it, man! The Senator hasn't done your job for you. The challenge stands: You are challenged to engage inian active campaign to - - I 1. Learn all you can about the Kennedy bill. Will it do what is needed? Will the rate of improvement be Last enough? Will it result in over-reaclion which will so damage the industry as to harm women more than!it helps them?` 2. Write; call, or wire your representatives in Congress. Tellithem you like the bill as it is„or you believe it should be changedlto such and such, I 3. Discuss it with your colleagues. Encourage them to get involved. Senator Kennedy has forced our hands. It no longer is up to us to decide to act or not to act. The question that remains is whether or not we willl be part ofi the solution, or continue to be a part of the problem. , `l~,1~379 . 11a~~: ~~, I'~o. 8, JUNE
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:.. .~ . t .,, Print 13/2/1-5_S DIALOG Fito4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soc.) CA09022176967T Alkaloids as Corrosion Inhlbitors for ztnt In acid solutions Author:' J_ _a_in, B. L., Gaur. J. N. ' --- LOCation: D0p._Chem., Univ. Ra/astan_, Jaipur. India Section: CA072004, CA03tXxX -- Puul-Class: JOURNAL Juurnai: - J. Electrochew. Soc. India GoOeni JESIAS P_ ubl : 70 Scries: 27 - Issues 3----Paµes: 165-6 --Identifiers: alkaloid cor_roslon Inhibitor zint, papaverine COrrOsion inhlbitor zinC,. nicotine Corroslotl Inhlbltor Zinc. _ _ . _ qulnine ear_roslo_n Inhibitor z/nc, spl{cylato quinine corrosion inh,bitor-zinc,-sulfato qulnine corrosion Inhibitor ilnc-- C_A_09022170435M .. . .. , Filters for-tObaOCo smoke Audnor:1 Sawaaa, Mldeo, Sato, Koji, Senno, Akira Location: Japan - - Section: CA043003 Publ Class: PAT Juurnal: Jpn. Kokal Tokkyo KohO Codan: JKXXAf Publt 7_90123 Pages: 5pP. - -- -lcirntiflors: cigaret filter cotton flbcr, bleachin9 Cotton Clgprel filter, Chlorln@ bleaching agent Cotton---Paten_t No: 79 00800 Applfc No: 77/71624 0ate: 770617 Class: A2401106 • - - Assignee: Oaieel Ltd. CA090211681S7P • flivoring with a trlcyallo alcohol I Author: - Liynt, Kenneth-K.,- Shuster, E_d_wa_rd_ J_., Vlnals, Joaquin P., %ock,-Na__nfred H,_ --- - - Location: USA - - S•ctton: CA024010, CA011XXX, CA017XXX. CA062XXX Publ Cla.s: PAT - J.urnal: U.S. Coden: USXXAM Publ: 790213 Pages: 12 pp. Iuentlflers: trlcyCloduennol prepn flavoring food, tobacco flcvorinq- trieyclodecanol prepn, cosmetics trieyclod_ecan_o_I prepn, pc_rfume tricyclodecanolpcepn Patent tioi 4139G59 AppI1C No: 465554 Date: 740703 Class: 426-538, A231f/226 Assignee: Internatlonal Flavors and Fragrances Inc. CA090211672298 --Activityof nitrate reductase_ in plants with C3 and C4 type of photosynthesis grown -under- different nitrogen nutrition COnditioni----- - -- ---- Author:-Tlshcnanko, N. N.., Sokolova, E. N. Locationt Lab. Fotoslnt., Leningr. Gos, Univ., Leningrad. USSR . Section: CA019013 Pub) Class: JOURNAL g03EIQQU _ 0 r (Item ' I of 55) User1906 4Jun79 Journal: Tr, PeterOof. 810_1. Inst., Leningr. Gos. Univ. Coden: TPBIAS Publt 70 Series: 27, Pages: .166-80 Language:~Russ ~ ~ •~~lyontlfiers: nitrate reduetass Plant, ~nltrogen~ plant nutrilion..- ------- CA09021167217Y_ - ~ Effects of nitrogen fortllla•ation and leaf populatlon On y/eld and quality of-Virqinla darM=firetl tobocco - - Author: Jones, J. L., Trmwel, J. L., Jr. -Locatlon: Suutharn Piedmont Res._ Contlnuinp Eduo. Cent.. 8lachapno, Va,- Sectio.i: CAOt9004 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Tob. Scl. Eoyqn7-TOSCAV Publt. 79 Serlest -- - ~ 23----lssue:-18-22 Pa4e•: 18-20 Journal: Tobacco 181(4) -57-9 Ipontifiors: nitrogen fertilizer leaf population tobacco CA0902/ 1(i7202N Aiqlyuuenu-n-an0 aulfur Intl!ractlon effects on Orowth, yleld, and gCl¢etcu cllemlcOi constituents of uurlOy tobacc0--- Author: Sim,, J. L. Leqyett, J. E.. Pal. U. R. Location:-Arp•ic, Exp. Stn „ Univ. KentucNy, Loxington, Ky. •Section: CAOIcJ004 Puol ClasstJUURNAL - - Journal: Agron._J. Coc/en: AGJOAT Publ: 79 Series: 71 Issue:-1 Pagos:.75-8.. Identifiers: molybdenum sulfur growth tobacco . CA09021167156A Effect of the •supersynthosls' of nitrogenous Compounds on light in plants of-dlfferent ecological groulisOrown under Conclitions of specific nitrogen deficieney-- - Author: Tishchmtko, N. N. Loc.ation: Lab. Fotosint-., LenlnQr. Gns. Unlv., lenlnqrad, USSR Section: CA0I9004 Pubt Class: JOURNAL ' Journil: Tr. Petergof. 0101. Inst., Lenlnor. Gos. Univ, Cod.n: TP81A5 Publ: 78 5eries: 27, Pagest 147-65 Language: Russ -luontiflers: nitrogen Compd supersynthesls plrnt nltrogen • oefici0nay, protR{n supersynthesis plant nitrogen deficiency, enzyme ptant nitrogen dofiCiuncy, emino acid plant nltrogen defioiency i
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• DIALOG F1Ie4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr. Am. Chem.'SoC.) (item 0 of 55) User1906 4Jun79 CA09021165649P Ef(oCts o f nicotln e o n brain 1-phusphAtidyllnositol-4-pnosp- hate ano 1- pnospnatl Jyi ihositol -3,•f-bisPhosphatc syntnesis and . mclaholisn Possihl c r elation to nipotrn0-rnlfuceJ behaviors _ Autnorv H ltz¢r.;nin, Ro ucrt J., NatsuMi, R.lho, Loh, Horaee 1/. Location: LanqlCy Portcr Neuropsyehiatr. lnst., Unlv. -- -- California. San-Francisco, Calif. - Soction: CA013013, CAOOIXXX- Pubi Class: JOURNA_L_ ., Journal: Biocnem. Pn.lrmaCol. Cod.n: BCPCAG Put3l: 76 Series: 27 1;',sus: 21 Papes: 2519-23 ---Identifiers: brain micro60me phoaphOlnOsltldOS metab nicotine CA090211653868 Salivaryperoxldase activity and thloCyanate concentration In nln:.n subject_s with genetic variants of salivary peroxidase AuU or^ Axen, E.A. - Location: Dep. Med.. Univ. Wisponsln, Madison. Wis. Scctron: CA013001. CA004XXX Pub1 Class: JOURNAL Journal: Arch. Oral OE_ol. COden: AOOIAR Pub1: 78 Seria•s: 23 Issue: 9 PaOes: 001=5ldenti(iers: saliva peroxidase'thiocyanate age smoking CA09021165132R Hurmonal control of epidermal detachment_ during the final fectlinQ stage of the tobaceo hurnvornt larva AutnorP RiCOi/orU-, Lynn M•. Curtis, Anna T. Lncation: Dop. Zou_1., Univ. tla.hington, Seattle, Wash. Soctiort: CA012002 -Pub1 Class: JOUHNAL_ Jour_na_t: J__. Insect Physiol. Codon: JIPHAF Pu_blt 76 Series: 24 Issue: 6-7 Paqas: 561-0 Identifiers: uanduCa epidermis detachment ecdysone CA__04021165062T Improvin0 tne smoking propertie!_ of tobacco produets AuthorP Brooks,J011n G/'anvl l le - U.Catlon: Section: Juurnal: USA CA011007 _ Publ Cia6s: PAT . Ger. Offen. Codenl ¢WX%0X Publf - 790315 Paqes: 12.pp• Ioenti_f'iers: tobacco smoking product el0aret Patent No:- 2036658 Applic 110: 831955 Date: 770909 Cla:e: A2tiB15/00 Country: US AssiOnceg American Brands, Inc. CA09021165061S Ren,oval of nitrogen w'onoxltle and Carbon monoxide from tobaCCO SDOhe and tobacco material. and smoke filters and 6Ov CLQUO cl0aret paper for performing these methods Author: Seehofur. Frleuliab, KauSCh. Erwin Lucat lunc~ Ger.~ - ~~--- Soction: CA_011007 Publ Class: PAT 'Journal: Gor. Offcn. Cadon: GWXXOX Pubtf 790308. Paqes: 7 pa. 1Jentlfiers: rutr.enium tobacco. e'aoke CtOarot. carbon monoMi00 tobaCCO-fersoke ruthQnitxa, , nitric Oxide tobaCCo smokf ruth9nium Patent t1o: 2740011 Applie No: 2740011 Oatat 770906 Classt A24015/00 A,siqnc•e:-O.A.T. ClOaretten-Fabriken G.m.b.H. . . .. CA090211G50G0R Ciqarot-muke filtering materlal' - Autllur: S.i1+a[1a. 11adc0, Kutani.AfotOharu. SatO, KOJ1, 12ara. ToicQiro, Suuimorl,Kenicniro, Katanosaka. AN/sato Lncatlan: Japan --------- - Scctrun: CA011006 Puol Class: PAT Journal: Gor. Offen. Coden: GWXXBX Publt 790308 Pages: 17 pp. zventifiers:_ ei0aret tOb7CCO sntoMe filter wlCa Patcnt No:2/1300,_19Applic NJ: 77/fi5L69 Oate: 770719 Class: A2:01_5/033 Country: Japan. - - A3si9rve: DaiCel Ltd., Gosel MaOaku KenkyuShO Issue: 2 PaOes: 199-203 Iucntifiers7-potysouio protoplast tobeCCo CA09021165055T Polyriuusomos In protoplasts tsolated from tobat:Co leaves Autnor: f1uzlCska,~~.P., Llettrie, R.. Dorokhov, Y. L.., PremoCt. G.. Olah, T., Farkas, G.~-L.-- - - ~ ~ Location: lnst. Plant Pnyslol., Hung. Acad. ~SC1., Szaped, Hung. Section: Cf.011013 Punl CIas3: JOURNAL Journal: PlantaCoaen: PLANAB Publ: 79 ~ Series: 145 . . . . _.. ... . .---~ - - CA090211650300 1970 Official tobacco varlety test Autnnr: AlilCS. Jamos 0.. JohnSton. 9. C. Locatront USDA. Tifton, Ga. Section: CA011007 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Ga. Tou. Res.-Ext. Rep. CodOn: GTRRDy Publt 78 PaOes: 22-7 Identificrs: tobacco variety official test, alkaloid tobacco variety tcst, nitro0entobacco-varlety test- sugar tobacco variety tes[- - 0
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a DIALOG f11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/y0L 90(22) (Copr, Am. Chem. SoC.) (Item 18 of 55) User1908 4Jun79 324 CA09021165037P Tohocco analytical laboratory report 1 1978 Auttor:'Gaincs, T. Porell Locdtion: Coastal Plains Exp. Stn., Univ. Georpla, Tifton, Ga Section: CA011007 PuDI Class: JOURNAL Journal: Ga. Tob. Res•-Ext. Rep. COden: GTRROY Publ: 78 Pages: 3-5 Identif_iers: tobacco ehom analysls, alkaloid analysis tobacco, Sugar analysis tobacco CA00021165036N . Ga:.-I,q.,idghromatoqraphiC determlttatlon Of nlCotlne containrd on Cambridqu filtcr pads: coliaboratlve etudy -Author:' Naqnr.r, Junn R., Tharspard, Nell A. Lucation: LorillarJ-Ras. Cqnl., Greensboro. N. C. Section: CA011007, CA009XXX Pul)l Class_: JOURNAL Juurnul: J. Assoc. Dff. Anal. Cho.n. Cnucn: J_ANC_A2_ Puh1:-79 Serie_s: 62 Is6Ye: 2 Pagost 220-30.luenl'iflers= to0acco nicdtine detn. Chromatop tobacco nicotine . . . .... .. ._. . _ .. •.. CA09021165035M • PltysiCal mechanssms of smoke filtration Aulhorc•-Keith, C. H. Location: Celanese Fibers Co.. Charlotte, N. C. Secticn: CA011007 PuUI Class: JOURNAL Jburnal: Recent Adv.Toti, Sei,--Ccdan: RATSDZ Publ: 78 Serics: 4, Pages: 25-45 - - Identifiers: tobacco smoke filtration theory, ei0aret smo_pe_ filtratlon theory • ' CA09021165034_K Selection of htqn nlcotine-produelntt ce11 lines of toboeoo -- -- - - • callus by slnOte-cell cloning Author:1Oqinu, TaMio! Hiraoka, Noboru, Fa_bata, Mamoru Location: FaC. Pharm. SGI„ Kyoto Urliv., Kyoto, Japan Ser.t,onf CA011007 Publ Class: JOURNAL - Juurro,a_1: P_nytochemistry ---Coden: PYTCAS Pub•It 70 .Seriest 17 tssuo: 11 -PaOes: 1907-10 . - culture nicotine identifiers: tobaceo CA000211650316 Starce synthesls from exo0enous sugars In tobacco leaf discs ' Author:- -HCro1d,-A. -- - - Location: Oop. Dot., Univ. Sheftleld, Sheffield. En01. Seetion: CA01f006 Pub) Class: JOURNAL Journal: J. €xp. Oot. Codan: 'JEBOA6 Publt' 78 0I?CTUUO 0 Series: 29 Issue: 113 PaOes: 1391-401 Ideotiflors: tobacoo loaf starch photosynthesis .. CA09021165_010H Stuclies of some•toba00o mutant photosynthetlE eQtiVltlesand --------- ' plas.tid differentiation Author: N3to,A.-, f.tathisu. Y. , Location; Lab. Pr.ysiol.-Cell. VeD,,,Unlv. Parlse6ud,Orsay, ' Fr. Sqctlon: CAOt1006* Pubi Class: JOURNAL Journal: Dev. Plnnt Blol. Coden:--DPt1ID2 Pub1t 78 Series: 2 Issue: Chloroplast Dev. Pa4es: 733-6 Identifiers: tobacco Ixutant• photosynthesis_. plastid . diffcrenlialion tubacco mutant. Chlorophyll development tobacco mutant r ' CA09021164992J Ocvelnpment of the'photosystems In qreen/npalpa_e Atrtnurt Senqer, Horst, Strassberper, Gernot LuCatlon: FachbCr. Dio1.-Oot'•, Univ. LLtrburD, Marbur9. Ger. _ _ • Seetion: Ca011006 Pubi Class:JOURNA~_ Juur,,.it: 0ev.Plant Ulol. Code_h: DPOID2 Publ: 78 Serles: 2 Iaa ue:Chioruplast Oov. PaOcs: 3G7-70 --ldentifiers: photosyntnesis'systcn, developmentSeenedasmus. chlorophyli photu•.ynthesis systen developmont SC4noesmus, carotenoid pholosyrllhesiS sy3tem deyelopmentSconedesmus CA09021164906K Polypc•ptide Composltlon of the ehlorophyit protein oomplex I from several plants --- Autlior: Herrmann, Falko_ H. ~ Locatson: Dep• Grnet., Mnrtln-Luther-Univ., Ha11e-Mlttenberp , E. Ger. Section: CAOII006 Pub1 Class: JOURNAL Journa_I: Oev. Plant Bio1. CoCen: 0PB102 Publt 78 Seriest 2 lssue: Chlorcplast Dev. PaOes: 221-7 Identifiers: chlorophyll protein Complea peptl_de compn, antibody Chlorophyll protein complex ' ,
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.:~ 0 . DIALOG F11e4i CA SEARCf/ 77-79/y0L 90(22) (Copr.'Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item 24 of 55) U.er1906 4jun79 32S .. .. .... ... .. - - ---- ~ ~ - - , CA09021164922A1 Biucnemical Characterixation and Interspecifl_c.variation of Nlcutiana"cFiloropla.t nnd Cytoplasmie rihosomal proteins -Aulnor:l Oourriue, Don P. - - Location: Don. Nutr, FoOd SCi. Grad. Co~ms. Olochem „ Univ. A_rizona, Tuc,on, Arii. Section: CAOIt004, CA006XX1{ Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Colloo. Inl. C. N. R. S. Cuoon: COINAV Publf 77 -Seriest 261Issue:-Ao-iuasNUClciFlues Synth. Protolnes Veg• Piqes: 2_ 05-9 nfeet inq Date: 76 --IdCntifierst ribosomc protein N_Icotlana_ chl_oropla_s_t_ Cytuplasm. evolution Nicotlana ribosome protein CA0902116491414 - Restriction end_onuGleasa nnalysis ef enloroplast anQ -- mituchonClriol DNAs of higher plnnts Autnorv Vedcl, F.. Ou.tior, F., Dayen. Il. Lo..atiun: Lab, 0101. f.tql. Veo., Univ.-Parls S.clion: CAtitt004 Pulal Classf JDURNIL Sud. Orsay. Fr. . Journal: Cufloq. inl. C. N. N, S. COdani COINAV Publi 77 Series: 261 Isaiie:ACI[145 NuCl@iqueS Synth. ProtainOi Veg. PaCes: 71-6- f'eetinq Date: 76 -------- IU,e.nlfiers: Parthenoeissus mito_efnu_ndria DNA erown gall. DNA Chla,•upla_t;t mitoChondril hi0herpiant, spinach ch/oroplast DNA ,--fea cnloroplast DN_A, tobacco chloroplast DNA, corn cnloropiast DAA, rh.+at ChlorOplastUNA, Odt chloroplaSt DNA, lettuce ehlornpla,t 0/4A - CA0021164@1150 , • uatake qenavior of tobacco lenf protoplasts In oulture Aulhor:'61ayo, M. A., Rubinson, 0. J. -- ~ Lacation:-Scot.Hortic. Re>:.. Inst., Dundee, Scot. Section: CAD11003 PUbI Clas.•.: JOUt:NAL. Journal: Collop. lnt. C. N.-R. S. CudOn: COINAY Publ: 77 Series: 261 Issu!: ACitles NUC1eICUPS Synth. PrOt_eines Veq. -- Pages: 699-703 Meeting Date: 76_ - Id^ntifiers: tobs.co prutoplastRNA uptake, protein precursor uptake tobar.co proloplast CA09021164074X t:ultlple-arop-array (tIDA). tochnlouo for the large-scale testing of culture -media- variations In hanging miCn,.drop eulturosof-sinqle cell systems. 11. Determination of phytOhormo_ne combinationsfor on-timal aivision- response in Nicotiana tobacum protoplast cultures Autnor:'H_arms, C. T., Loer=, H., Potrykus, 1. Loca.lon:-FriCdrich uicsch•r Inat., OSsol, S_wit_2. Sc•Ction: CA011003 Pubi-ClagstJOW1NAL Journal: Plont SC1, L_ott. Codent PTSLAF Pupl: 79 Series: 14 Issue: 3 Pages: 237-44 '~ T-3*4IUQU N Identiflersi auxin tobacco-Culture growth. Cytokln/n tobacco eulture Orowth,phytOhurn:one tobacco Cell division -' 'CA090211640625 Etf..cl of ouxin on the elonqatlon growth of 1solated --~- protuplasts Author:~Pavlenko, A. 0. Lucntlon: USSR ~ Section: CA0ft003 Pubi Classi JOURNAL I Journal: Dopov. Akad. NdukUk~. RSR, Ser. 01 Geoi., Nhls1. Blot. Nauki - Coden: DANNOS Publ: 79 .tssue: 2, Paqest - 150-3 L6nguaqp: Uhrain ldentlfiers: prutoplast elongation aualn osmotic pressure. IAA protoplast elongation osmotic pressure CA09021164037N The affect of IfltJo!eacetle acid on RNA synthesls In tobaCCO pith Oxplant5 Author: Coyers, R. J., 9ulnt, A.. Ledaboer, A. Y. Location:0ot, Lab „ Rijkcunlv. Leidon,--Lelden, Neth. Section: CA011002 Pubi Classf J_OUNNAL Journal: Cotloq. Int. C. N. R. S. Codce: COINAV Publt 77 Series: 261 Issue: AeldCs NuCleiques Synth. Proteines Veq. -- Paqos:560-74-- Meeti_nq Date: 7S_ identlfiers: IAA RNA synthe3is tou5CC0 esplOnt CA09021164704T Amino acid analysis of In vivo,and andro0enle anthers of Nicot inna~ teoacum ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ --- --- - - - ' - - ~ Authur: Horner, M., Pratt, M. L. Locntion:-Dot-. Lab., Univ. Lelcester, LelGester, E_ng!._ Sactiun: CA01100/ Publ Class: JOURNAL ~ Journal: vrotoplasma ~ Coilan: PR0TA5 Publi 79 Series: 98 __ issue: 3 - Pages: 279-02. ~- Identifiers: amino acid anther tobacco. glutamine anther . ._.. _.._ ._-_._._.._ . ..--- t _ tobacco, serine anther tobacco CA09021164603J Effect of tobacco reconstitution and expansion processes on smohe canpnSitioA ------ - - - - - Author:Halter, Howard M., Ito. Thomas 1. LOtation: A61F Inc., Sduth Nindsor, Conn. Section: CA0t1000 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Rccent Ayv, Tob. Sci. Coden: RATSOZ Publ: 70 Series: 4, Pages: 113-31 Identifiers: review tooacco reconstitution expansion smoke Compn t 11
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OIALOO,FIlo4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr, Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item 32 of CA0502116460214 R:,le of Cigaret physical ,characterlstlcs on Smoke eouN)usltlon ~ . .. ----- -- • - . Autt.ur: DaBardolebcn, Ltarian Z., Claflin, Warren E., Gannon, . Waltor F.- ~location: Philip Morris Res. Cent„ Philip Morris U.S.A., R_icnmund, Va. Section: CA01t000 Publ Class: JOURNAL Jwrnat: Recent~-A_dv. Tob. SCi. Coden: RATS02 ' Publt 78" ~ Series: 4. -~ ~ Pa_qes: 85-~1~11 tuentifiers: review ci0aret phys property Smoke Compn,~ - _- tobacco Smoke cop.pn review CA09021164C8tG Ventilated filters and thelr effeet an smoke oomposltlon Authqr:'Kiefer, J. E. Locationc /enncsSCe Eastman Co. Div.. Ninr,sport. Tenn. Section: CA011000 Publ Class: JOURNAL Eastman Kodak Co.. Juurnal: Recent Adv. Tob._ SCI. Coden: RATSDZ Publ: 79 Series: 4, Papes9 G9-83_ - Iucntlfiers: - revle.e--tonaeeo smoke f-/lter vent/latlon. CiOarct filter ventilation review ----~ -- CA09021164680F • 1nfluenCC of filter additives on'smoke COAiposttlon Autnor:' _Rcynolds_, M. L......... Locationd Orown and Willlamson Tob. Corp., Loulsv111e_, Section: CA011000 PublCiass: JOURYAL - - Ky Journal: Recent Adr. Tob. Sci. Couen: RATSDZ Publo 78 Serios: 4, PaOes; 47-G7- --- - - --- -- Ioentifiers: review tobacco filter smoke eonpn CA09021164579N . Effect ofciqaret paper ot1 Smoke yield and composition AuthorN 0_w_ens, Wi I I lam F„ Jr. -- - Locotion: toch.Dep., Olin__ Corp., Pisgah Forest. Section: CA011000 PuL)I Clausi JDUR:IAL N. C. Journal: Recent Adv. Tob. Scl, Cotlun•. RATSOZ Publ: 78 Series: 4. Pages: 3-24_. Iuentifiers: revie• CiOaret paper tobacco Smoke CA0902116467811 Influence of tobacco type oit smoke composition -- Author:'Griest, W, H., Guerin, M. R. Location: Anal. Cnem. Div., 0bk Ridge Natl, Letp.. Oak Ridoe, Ter.n. Scctlon: CA011000 Publ Class: JOURNAL aracTUUQ 55) Usec1906 4)un79 326 Journal : Rec,rnt Adv, Tob, So__ I. Codent RATSOZ i, ;.Publ t_. 77 • Sorics: 3. Pages: 121-44 Id•:ntlflcrs: ruvicx tobacco type smoke com_pn, cl0aret tobaccu type smoke compn roviow .- . ., ..,.. - CA_ 09021184G77N -~-Noutral~ oryqenated eompounCs In ol0arat Smoke and their - poscsUlo precursors - Authort GrCen, Charles R. Location: Res. Dep•, R. J. Reynolds Tob, Co., Minston-Salem, N. C. Section: CA011000 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Recont--AW. lob. Sci. Codon: RATSD2 ~ Publt 77 Series: 3. P:ges: 94-120 iclentifiers:tunacco smuke neutral o.ypenated Compd roview,, el0ar.:t smokeneutral o.yuenated c_ompd review, pyrolys_is CiOarot tob.lcco smoke compn review CA09021104676J Nitrogenous compounds In gloarrt Smoke and their possible prccurours ~ ........ . . . . ... . .__ . . . Author: Hecht, Stephcn S., Scnmoltz, Irwin, Hoffmann, Dietrich Locationl Naylor Oana Inst. Dis. Prev., Health Found.. Valhaiia,~N. y._ _ Seetion: CA011000 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Recent Adv. Tuo. Sei. ~ Coden: RATSOZ Publi 77 Ser i es: 3. PaOes~.~~ 59-93 Identifiers: review tobacco smoke nitrogen compd. pyrolysis tobacco smohe-n}truqen~~compu review, cigaret smoke nitrogen Compd review . • - ....... ..- - . . . - . _. - CA09021164675H An ovcrvico of the vapor pha_s_e, semlvolatllp and n_o_nvotatlle -- Componrnt5_ of ci0arat smoke Author: NormJn. Vel lo Location: Res. De-p.,-Li00ett and Myers Tob. Co., C. Section: CA01f000 PUbI Clsss:,JOURNAL Durham, Journal: Recent Adv. Tob. Sei. Coden: RATSOZ Publi 77 Seriesl 3. - Pages, 20-50 - Iacntifiers: -review cigaret smoke analysis, vopor phase ciparotcmokc analysis review, semivolatile eiOJret Smoke analysis review, nonvolatile cigaret Smoke analysis review . r
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0 © DIALOG FIle4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22)' (Copr. Am. Chem, Soc.) (Item , 40 of 55) User1906 4Jun79 3Z7','; CA090211648740 - - ' Th0 pyroqenesls and pnyslCOehemle_al nature qf tobacco Msoke authur:' Johnson• W. R. Lucation: Pnilip Morris Res, Cent., Richmond, Xa. Section: CA0,1000 Publ Class: JOURNAL Jjurnal: Recent Adv. Tob. Sei, CoJcn: RATSD2 Publt 77 Series: 3. Pa -- .. qes: 1-27 -Identifiers: revica ciparct smoke formatlon, pyroqonesls elqaret tobacco,smoke formatioh~review-- CA09021164510A S.•quential encapsidation of heteroloqous ANAS with papaya mos„C virus protein - Author:•Abouhaldar, Nounlr, Bnncroft, J. B. Locatior:L Dcp. Plant 5ci „ Univ. Western Ontario, London, Ont. Section: CA010003 Pu51 Class: JOURNAL Journal: Viroioqy Coden: VIRLAX Publt 79 Serles: 93 Issue: 1 Paqest 253-5 Identlficrs: papaya nwsale virus RNA eneaps/datlon C_A09021164300G ' Enzyme cytuchemlcal method for lden.t/flCatlon of Cueumber mosaic virus partlcles In Infectod colls . Aulhor:!Ha_tta, i., Francki, R. I. B. , Location:-waTte Aqric. Rps. Inst., Lnlv. Adelaide, S. Atr, 'Seetion: CA00900G; C_AOIOXXX, CAOIIX_X_X_ Pubi Class: JOURH_AL Jwrnal: Virology 'Codmn:VIRLAX- PuDIt 'l8-- Series: 93 Issue: I Pages: ZG_5-0 ' loentifiers: eucun,)er mosaic virus detection cell, plant cell cucunber mosalc virus detectlon. R:lase cucumber mosaic . .. . . py Cutumb.r mosaic viruy- virus detection, electron mierosco - -- CA09031t63831U Eviuence for the ex/stenee of ineta and pars directing G-methyltransferases in tobacco eell cultures . Autnorc• Tsanq-,Yun-fuk,-Ibraf,im,RagaiK.Location: Drp• Ciol. Scl., Concordia Univ., Montreal, Gue. Section: CAO07002- Publ ClassoJOURHAI- --•---. Journal: j. Natur/orsCh., C: Bio_s_cl. Cooen: EHCODA , -Publ: 79 Serles: 34C Issue: !-~ Paqes: 4G=50 --- Ident/flers:catechol methyltransferase multiple form tobacco •CA09021t63446X -A1lalfa Tosa16 virus polysomel. [ Rutqcrs, T/neke, Bakhulzen, Cor E. 0. C., 1101. John 1000 M Locatlon: Oep• Biochem „ State Univ. Lelden. Lelden, Neth;'' Sectiou CAOOo001; CAOIOXXX Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Col~loq~• tnt. C. /4. R, S~.~ ~~CoAqn: ~~CO UiAV Publi ~. 77 Scrlc.s: 2G1 Issuo: Acidas Nuelclques Synth. Protelnes Va0• ~PoOCS:~~6115-9 f.foptinq Date: 76 - ~ Identifiers: alfalfa w.>saic virus po_lysome, mossenqer RN_A alfalfa mosalc vlrus, ribonuclooprotola atfalfa mosaic virus~ CA__090211631910 - Studios_ onthe culture condition of higher plant eellsln . suspension cult_ure. Part 10. Effects of au_xlrls on the : /ormatinn Of ubl - - - - - - - -- - qulnone by tobacco plant eells In suspension culturo-.. Author: Ikeda; Tsutomu, btatsumoto, Takashl, No0uehl, Masao Locationt--Ccnt.Nes. Inst., Japan Tobacco Salt Publie Corp „ Yokor.ama, Japan Soctlon: CAOOS003 Publ Class: JOuRNA_L Journalc Phytochemistry Coden: PYTCAS Publ: 70 , Series: 17 Issuo:-Il-- Ppqes: sU79-03 - - - - - ---Ieentitiers: tobacco cell uuiQufnone formation ausin . CA090211G31532 Studics on poly(aeryllc aeld) and nnnviral plantpathoqans-- - Indueed resistance to viral Author: Cassells, Alan C., Flynn, Theresa ' Location: Dep. Plant Scl., wye Coll., Wye/Kent, Enql, SoCtion: CA005002 Publ Class: JOURNAL ~ Journal: Pcstic. Scl• Coalon: PSSCBG Publi 79 Series: 9 Issue: 4 Paqes: 3f,5-71 Identifiers: polyacrylate plant proteetlon vlrus, fungus polyacrylate~plant protection ----------- -------- ------- CA0902116'070D Effect of tobacco smoke on the metabolism of rat lung Author: lia_mosh_, Margit. SheChtor, Yaal, Hamosh,Paul- Location: Scn. Med. Dent•, GeorQeto.n Un/v., Nasninpton, 0. C. Section: CAqq9013, CAOIIXXX Pubi Class: JOURNAL Journal: Arch. Environ. ticalth Coucn: AEHLAU Publt ,79 Series: 34 Issue: I Paqcs: 17-23 Itlontffiers: tcbacc_o smokinq lung matab, lipid formation lung smoMinq, protein formation lun0 smokinq, carbohydrate formation-iunq smokinq ' - -------- 0
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~ ~ w DI'ALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr. Am. Che/s. Soc.) (ltem 40 of 55) User1906 4Jun79 CA090211630768 Nitrogen fertilization and henotype effocts on selected --- ------_.--- const,tueots of s:eoko from a1l-burley-eigarottes Avthur:V -Sims. J.--L., Atkinson. W. 0..Benner, F. Location: Tub. Health Rti. Inst., Unlv. Kbntuchy. Lexington. Ky. Section: CA004013. CAtIItXXX, CA019X%%- . Publ Class:_ JOURNAL Journil: Tob. Sel. Codent TOSCAV Publ: 79 Scries:- 23 Issue:11-17 Pages: 11-13----- - Journal: lobacco 181(3). G8-70 Identifiers: tobacco smoke nitrogen fertlllzer CA09021163061T Effects of vitamin C supplenientatlon upon bloehemleal and phyS,oloqical responses to_ exerclse In untra/nedsmokinp and nonsmukinV malesuuJects- Author:- Keitn, 9obcrt E1lington, t1r, Location:-Virginia Polytech. Inst. and State Un/v „ BI_ark•.burg• Va. Scction: CA004013, CAOOtXXX Publ Class: 01SS . Cuuan: DA60UA- Puyl-c--7B---- Pages: 125 pp. ' Citation: D,ss. Abstr. Int. B 1979. 3'3(f:) 37G7 , Avail: Un,v.Aticrofilms.lnt., OrtJCr No. 7903190 . . Identifiers: vitamin C exercise tobacco snoking Series: 14• ~ Paqest 217-23 LanOuage: Fr ~- Identifiers: butralin residue tobacco-~ ~~ CAOi'021162936V Rosiauesleft by butralln used 'es a sucker Inhibitor Author: Tancogne, Jacques, Chouteau, Jacques, CazamaJour, Franr.u.,s-I . Locatlon: Fr. Scction: CA004004, CAOOSXXX. CA011XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Ann. Tab., Sect. 2 Codeni ATSED2 Publ: 77 ' CA090211629030 Effocts-` of lov levets_ of carbon monoxide on vislons of Smcxcrs and nonsmokers -- --AuthorV Luria• S. fd., fAcKay, Christine L. . Location: Uav. Subnklr. N2d. Res. Lnb., Groton, Conn. Section: CA004003 Publ Cla.s: JOURN.:L Journal: Ardh. Environ. Nealtn . Coden: AEHLAU Publ: 79 - Series: 34 Issue: I Pages: 38-44 Identifiers: carbon monoxide vislon smoking PLQ E_ ir000 CA09021162631S tffect of 5-broendeoxyurldlnq* (BrdUrd) on chloroplast differentlation9n toqacco cell cultures -- - Authur: Soyer, P„ t.escure, w. m. Location: Lao. Oiocnim. Fonct, Plantes, Marse/lle, Fr. SectionfCR003003Publ l:lass: JO_UIiNAL J_uui.ndl: Collu4. Int. C. N. Ii,S. Codon: COINAV Publi77 -----Seriei: 2u1_ l,su_o: AciUVs Nucleiques Synth. Proteines •V_c0. . P''7?s: 4G7-71 --fdceting Oate: 76Identlflcrs: bromou0uxyuridinr chloroplast differentiation tobacc0 -- - CA09021162120H Tupoqrnphy of the resplratory and c/rCulatory resp_«lses_ to acetylchuline and nicotine On theventral- surface Of the modulla ublongala ----Author: Oor, N. B., LDeschCke, H. H. location: Inst. Physiol.. Runr-Univ•, Boenuis. GOr. Section: CA001005. CA002AXX Publ Class: JOURNAL .Journa,: Pflucryors_ Arc_h. COdenc PFLAOK Publi 79 Series: 379 Issue: I Pages: 19-27 --ldcl.tlficrs: acet_ylcholine circulation respiration xedulla_ oblonUatn,niCotinu circulation respirat/on medulla -nblonq3ta, elrculotion paraSyMalhomlmatiC medulla-oblal0ata, respiralion parosympathomimctio mcdulla oblongata,_ Parasympatnum,m_otle circulatlonrespirotion-brain - CA090211621158 - I ttecamyiiminc blockade of nleotlne enhanced noradrenallne turnover in rat brain Authr,r: t.lorgan, Wllllam W., Pfeil, Karla A. Location: HcaItA Sci. Cent_:, Univ: Texas, San Antonio. Tox." Section: CA001005 Publ ClasY: JOl1RNALJournal: Life Sci. Cocien: LIFSAK Publ: 79 Serles! 24 Issue: 5 Pagea: 4t7-20 l dentlfiors: nicotine brain noradrenallne meeamylomine CA09021161008A Plasma nicotine pharmacohinetlcs in dogs after Intravenous administra_tion: tlete_rmination by radio'Immunoassny Author: Ltonji, t1., Castro. A. Locition:Scn: f.ted_., Univ. tllami, fAiaml, Fla. s:-JOURNAL Soction: CA001002 Pub1 Clas _ Journal: Res. Commun. Chrm.--Pathol. Pharmaeol.Coden. RCOC00 Publ: 79 Series: 23 tssue:7 Paqest 267-77 laentlfiers:nicotine pnarmacokineties species diffarence . v cf) 0 10
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Print 6/2/1-G5 . D1.t1.0. Oilc4: CA SEARCH 77-79/y0L 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item CA090201541871: 6•_i.:.vior of lonie brine eoncOntrates in evaporation .tulhur: t,urakam_1, ti.Sayosh{------- -- --- lc.catlon: D4~p,-ProJ., J;tpan Tobacco entl Salt Publlc Corp., Jau,u, Soction: CA0•19009 PuUI class: JOURNAL J+urnr.7c Nippon Itaisui GakkaiShi Coden: NNAGBU Publ:77 Scries: 31. Pauc5. 191-201 Laaquaqe: Japan Identificrsp brine evapn, sodium chlorid.^ prepn CA09020153G490 Effoct of the kind and quantlty of phonols on the eiectrorlmatic potootial of Cellulose flbers intended for prudu:tion of-ciyarot-Filter paper • Autnor:NCJrlcheva, 51., Ivanuva, N., Lason, Lucyna Lucation:_-ili~jncr-Inst. Chym.-TCchnol., Sofla, 000. Secticn: CA043007. CAO04XXX Pubi Class: JOURUAL Juurn_j_1: Pr2cq1. Papicr. CodCntPR2PaE Pubt: 78 Sericis: 34 ls.ue: S Piqeta 1G1-A Lanquaa•1: Pol I(t•ntifiers: ciparet flller paper ppenol,-qlectrokinotle potcntial paper pnenol, tubacco tmuke phenol-sorption --- CA00019152463Z analyticat or clinical derlvatlves, taqpod derivatives and meti,oss of analysls using such dcnivutlvqs Author5 Eisenhurdt. William Anthony. Jr., HoOaya, Eddie, T_heuuureiluloS.' S_ Pyro, L0r.2t icic USA -- - -- - bz lic•n:CA032_0_05, CA009XXX, CA033XXX Publ Class: PAT Juurnal: U.S. Code~nc USXXAM Publt 780919 Paqes: 20 pp. :uantificrs: Isocyanate hydroxyphenytethyl addn ale, tyrut.ine Isoc/anate adtin amine. hydroky storoiu addg tyranine isucyanata. glycosldc steroid rddn isocyanate, nicotinC a_cttl_n is^ctonatc, radiolmlunoaa_s_a•y iociutyrosiue car•Uamate - Pahrnt ela: 4115.:J9 APp1iCNo;G07149 Date; 760517 Clas4:-4Zi-1. AGIIt43/00 ' - -- Ass{Qnae: Union Carbide Corp. CAO!+0191524562 - c%i,sspectral determination of ketosterolds from tobacco Icif - - Aulllor: Ser. Np Anp, Van Duren, 8. L. Locntion: D^.p. Chem., N,tnyanq Univ., SinOapore, Sinq_aporc Scc iyn: C%+J3200G, CA011XxX, CA.022XXX Publ Class: JOUItNAL Juur/utl: Dcc;.s. Pap. 'tlrutyanq Univ., Coll. Grad. Stud., Inst. Nat. Sci, . Couen: DNUSUU -Publ:77 Srriest 31, Papea:..17 Pp... ... . Idantifiors: keto sterold toDacco, mass spectra kato steroid sTaCzooo 0 I of 65) U;<er1906 21may79 Pages: 46 CAO')010150Q0Stf ~ .. Developn..:nt of Nicotlana rustloa L. ' leaves undoreond/tions of nit. u.,wn aqf ieienr.y - - Aulhu/.Yosil'ev, D. R., 2vunt50va, N. A. Location: Leninqr. Gos.-Un{v., Lc_ulnttrad, USSR • Sectiun: CA019013 Publ-Class:JSURNaL - Juurni,l: Tr.PelerOuf. 0101. IrtSt., LeninOr: 6os: Cod:+n: IrUTAS Publ: 78 • Suries: 27,- --Pa]es: Linyuaq : Itust:- Iuentiliers:nl'tro0cn deficiency tobacco leaf morphol 517 Univ. 22-37 CA09019150460F --Ff:+vorinb with terpenyl et_hers_ - Authur_: ttus_sinan; Cynthla J.-, MookherJoc, Ora)a 0., Vosk, ManfreJ tt.,- Schini~tt, FredCrieN ~L.. Shuster, ~~ Eclaa_rd J., Sinders, J.1mcs :A., Light. Oette M., GranJa, -Coward J. Location: USA-- Siictiono CA017002, CA0G2XXX P_ub1 Class: PAT Jo_urnal: U.S. -- Codon:--U5xXA51 -Publ: 701720 pp. . - Identif/ers: torpenyl other flavor, odor terpenyl ether Patent H•a: 4131G(17 Applic No: 872937 Oate: 700127 Cl.ag: 4?li-3, A2]L1;22G -- ---- -Assi4noc: International Fliivors and FraOrances Inc. CA09019140046J Off-response in frog taste nerve and tell_ af_ter otielulation of the tunque with bitter solutions - - -- Author: Sato, Tushihide 0 Location: Sch. Dent.. Tokyo Rtad. Dent. Unlv., Tokyo, Japan Scclion: CA0120_13- Pubt Claos: JOURYAL ~ - Journal: Con.p. 0iochCm. Physiol. A Cod.•n: C8Pa05 ---- 70 Sr.rJes: GlA - Issuo: 2 Pactes: 3J9-5] ~---Idontifi4rs: taste off response quinine Ringer . ~ _.. ... . ._.- . . . . .. . CA09019140035E Aliozymc variation vire8cOn5- in natural populations of Publt Heliotpls Author: Sluss, T. P., Graham, n. U. Location: Dep. Entomol., Univ. Ar/:ona, Tucson, Ariz. Scction: CA012004 'Publ CIaSS: JOURNAL Juurnal: Ann. Entupol. Soc. Am. Coion: AESAAI Series: 72 Issue: 2 PaOe_s: 317-22 Identifiers: eniymo- qonsttes Hetiothis, -- - genetics - s Publt 79 budWorm enzyme A
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DIALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Coor. Am. Chem. Soe.) (Item 9 of CA0:-019140772. Ar0 juvcnils norxune binding proteinln the hamolymph of -.. ..- _GI_anduCa e.eatt AulhOr: Guochnan. Walter Gregg LOcation:_ N..rthwentern Univ., Evanslon, 111. ScCtion: CA01?00/ Putil Class: DISS ~ CaUrn: OAGCCA Publ: 78 f•,l9cs: 276 pp. .~ Citation: Dis_s. Ablar. 1nt• 0 1979. 39(0), 3643 Avoil: Unlv. tElcrofilnrs Int.~,~ Ordqr Nu. 790 3260 _ Itl.l:ltifierOE juvenile hormone binding proteln Manduca, hemulyrnph Juvnn/le hormone binding protein- CA090191<8700R Filter for t4baCCO snwk_e Autner: Ncukr.m:n. SlrOd . LOC.ltion: S,yit2. Sec:tlon: CA011007 Publ Class: PAT. - Journali Swiss Coden: SNXXAS --Publt 790228 Pages: 3 Pp• ldentlffers: tobacco smoke f/lter Nb.. - tetrapyrrole IrOn - ---- • cigaret filter Palent No: 600217 Appllo No: 75/12901 Oate: 750929 e Class: A24015/027 CA090191447070 ' cl..~rr:e cffCCtlve for eonVerslon and detedtlon moni. iUC Tt:lix.rt Scheinborg, Israel Herbert , Loc:.ti.cn:~US.1 007XX P 1 Cla ' PAT i 1 CA 0 of carbon on• CAU % ub f 07, Scct Journa t: U.S. Coden: USXXA:d Pub_1_: 770131 Pages:- 0 - - ~- pp C•J~nt.-in-.plrt of U.S. 3.981,897. It:ant i f i ers: carWn rnor.ox ianse tobacco Smoke f t 1 ter,. gas strc,un C._.rCa:t mnnoxiUO oonversion--- ~~ Patent Uo: 4071037~- Apr) I I c Ilo: 86307 Date: 701029 ~ - -- ~~-~- -~ ~ -266. A24015/027~- 131 Class: CA09019148706P Sr.ke.blo VroduCts Ar,u,ur: E cn^r, TileoUald, Muel ler, Freldamann L,r3tion. G•-r. , Srction: CA01t00_7 Putil Cla..-:. PAT Juurnal: G^r. Offen. Cud.on: GMXgBX Publ: 790118 Pa9-s:. 25 pp. Iucntlf/ers: tobacco smoking . product. Clgaret smoking prw'-rct, --nfcottne-ciparet smoking produot, carbon monoxidc Cig.rret smokinq product P.,tent tlo' 2720759 App1I6 No: 2729759 Date: 770701 Cla:.: A24015/GO - . A,si4ncuc Oqyer A.-G.. 91BC10d0 © CA090191•107031t N-:w Dictiuniry of Technoloqy and Applied Chemistry. Vol,~ 71 TuUaCC.I Su•;.lr; Nuuvo DiaiC.n3r1o xli AtorcRologla -a ChimlCa ~ ~ TaUacto-Zuc_chcrv Ahpllr..,t+. , Vol. 7: ~~Authur: VIIIaveCchia* G. V., ElgunMadn, 6., et al. Locntlon: Italy - Suctiun: CA011007 Publ Class: 000K Corlnn: 003kA7 Pub1: 77 Pages: 3031-402 PI.Ll-i~shur:~- (Ulrlcu floopl i AJJresss -1h liln, Italy) . ~-- -._._ . .. .. Pricc: Lit 10000- ------ -- IUentlfters: buok tobacco sugar CA090191486740 D•_termiiratton and charaeterisatlon of peetic substances In tob.lccu Author: Kr:.ChpnOv, Nh,. NirChev. N. LoGation6 liiqhcr 1_nst:~~FouU ind.,~Plovdiv, Dul9. -~ SCCtion: C•101100'., CA009%%% Publ CIasS: JOURNAL ~ Juurrlat: Ock1. Dolg. AkaU. Nauk Conont gOdiI4D~ Pubti 78' ~ ~~ Scries: 31 I:.suet 11- -~-Pa{les:~1~a2!;-7 - .; Identitlersc pectin tuU.u co, Clgarut tobaceo pectin CA09019140673A . ,-Correiation studles among and between agronom/c,' Chemleal, phy;iical and SnrOke CharaGter/stlCS In fluo-CUred tobacco (NicotiSnatibacu_m L.) A,rtnor: Khit" F.-11., Pendgya, R. 5., Olrks_, V. A._ . Location: Rqs. Sln.,-Apric_."CSnad_.f. Oelni, Ont. . SeCtion: CA011007 Putil ClaW JOURNAL Jo_urn_n_1: Cnn,d. Plant Sci. Codon: CPLSAYPublt sericsc 53 lssuc: 1 Pag.is: 111-20-- IUentlflers: tobacco property smoke charaeterlstles CA09G191•:0629R - '. . 79 Fluurorcenco emisslon a_peetra of chloroplastsand subchloroplast prcpiration at low tempCrature Author:R_ijqersbur0. C. P., An,esx, J., Thlolen, A. P. 0. M., Swagrr,-J. A. Locatlon: Dep. gluphys., RlJksunlv. Leide_n__, Lelden, Noth. S..•ct iori: CAt11100G Putil Class: -JOUftN.1L Journil: Rrochim. Diophys. Acta Coount OOACAG Publf 79 Svries: 545 Issue: 3 Pages: 473-92 idontlfiers: fluorescenca Chloroplast Cold i 0
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OIAIOG i11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr.'Ael. Chem. Soc.) (Item 17 of 65) Usor1906 21may79 CAOn0191486020 In vitru bin.lin0 of Agrobacterluw tumefaeiens to plant culis fru" suspension culture Author: ~ Dhyama• Nanji, PalCher, LOwrOnce E.. Schaefer. A_n_guliha --LocptTon: Prairie Reg. Lab.. Natl. Res. Counc. Canada, Saskatoon. Sask. Section: CA_011005 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Plant Physiol. Coden: PLPHAY Publ: 79 - Series: 63 Issuc: 2 Paqes: 392-7 Identifiers: AqrobrCterium binding plant call. Datura eell wall Aqrouacterlum binding - - - -~~ - -~-- ---- ----- ---- .. ....... ...._ ... _ ._... ~. CA090191405800 Cnluroptast DNA variation in /sonucloar alale-sterlle lines of Nicotiana Author: Frankel, Rafael, SCOworoft, William R., Whltfolg, Paul R. Location: Div. Plant lnd., CSIRO, Canberra, Aust. Section: CAOi1004 Pu61 Claus: JOURiIaL Journal: stu1. Gen. Genet. Couen: fAGG£AE Publ: 79 Series: 169 Issue: 2 Papes: 129-35 Idvntifiers: chloroplast OftA oytoplasmle male sterll/ty toba[CO ---- - -- --- -- CAOL`019/4J50G2 Plant r.r.Teneratlon from nlesophyll protoplasts of several' Nicotiana species - --- -Author: Douraln, Jean Pierre, Chupeau, Yves, Missonier, Claucline Lucation: Dep. Physiol, Veq., Inst. Natl. Agron „ Versailleb . Fr. Section: CA011004 Pubt Clnss JOUR:lAL JuJrnal: Pilysiol. Plaut. Lo L•n: PHPLAI Publ: 79 Scr,•s: 45 Issue: 2 Paoes: 98n-92 Id.ntifierst mesophyll prutoplust Nicottana CA09019140•109P Asurvqv for Isoenzymes Of qluCOSQphosPhate Isampase,~, phosphu[tlucnwutase, qlucnse-G-phcs_ptw_t0 d_uhydr_o0e_nase and n i = - - G-p11n~t.IW[JIUCQnalo Uclrydroryon. d so in C1-, C4 a cra;:Su1aC.T:41-:1Cicl-nletabOllSiu 1)1i1111s, ant) greell algae - Author: 11._!ruert• i1., Ourhhard, Ch.,' Schnarranborger, C.Luc:,tion: F.lchbOr, . 0101., Univ. Kaiserslautern, Nalsersl:outorn, Gee. - Section: CA011001 Publ Class: JOURNAL ' Juurnal: Planta Coclon: PLANAOPubst 79 3erlesi 145 -- lssuu: I Pages: 95-104' Iur,ntlflers:~- ~enzyme Isomor photosyn_th_e_sf pathway.~. glucosvphnsphsto isamorar.e Isuoniy16e pnotosVntheais, phuutlhu(Ilucuwhutasa isoCnXyme pnOlO.Synlhe+i;, ph4+.phoylucOnJte delly,lra/l^na5e Isuenzymd ~phutoAynth.Tbie. dehydrOqCOa3e plueo8epn.l5pllat0 isoenzymo photusyntr,eslS~~~~~ CA090191470272 Simple-g.lc.-IlQUId ehromatographle method for the measurement of mn.ilot_ino anu Iignocaine in blood-plasma or aeruler Auth..rc t6o1t,OavidN.,-Ftan,iil:in,RWCrt-J.,Haylur, Angela M._, Luiluu, ;.tilry , Location: Paisuns Unit, Guy's I/osp., London. Cn01. Sectiun:Cn009_G02 Pubi Clays; JOURNAL - Journal: J. Ctlrcxeatoqr. Coden: JOCRAK Publ: 79 Series; 169. P_aclcs: 29"a-301 Iclentifiers: ptasmaIlVnuw Ino mexllatine detn, serua Ilgnuc;line mexiletlne cletn, lipnncalne dvtn blood, w;exlletina (Jetn Uioud, gas chromatog Ilgnucaine moxiletina CA090191460600 Oo.aryu-mortality studles of Synthetic pyrethrolGS and methyl para:hion ou th0 tobacco b_u[Irorm In central Arizona Authar: Crow ler, l. A„ Tottatfson, tt, 5., Watson, T• F. Locotiun: Oep. Ent_o_an_o__1:• Univ. Ar_izona, Tucson. Ariz_. Sectiun: CA005004 PuGI Class: JOURtLtL ' Journal: J. Econ. Entomul. Coden: JEENAt Publt 79 Serics: 72 lssue: 1---Pagps: 1<3----- --- Idgntlflers: tuhacco budwor.x Inseetielde pyrethrold, CA09ot91405494 Py,'uphu.:phatase, peroxlda,e and polyphenoloxldase activities d_uring tcaf o•rtelope-it and sen-seqnce Author: Patra, Hr.manta N., fGishra, Dinabondhu Locition: Ocp. 8ot., R:Ivenshaw Coll., Cuttach, India Section: CA011003 Publ Class: JOURt1AL - Journal: Plant Pnysiol. Coden: PLPHAY Publ:. 79 Series: 63 Issue: 2 Pages: 310-23 Identifiers: leaf senescence peroxidaso pyrophosphatase polypnenoloxfdase l.1`19(. i.000 41 Heliottlls pyrethroid methyl parathion 40
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DIALOG FIle4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am.-Chem• Soo.) (Item 24 of G5) Usert906 21may79 CA09019146790W Thr inlluonCe of nicotine nnd marijuana on eondltfoned allmentary r.wl4r refloxes f11 cats ~- A.itltor: Lteoek, A.. Ilavratil, J., Hrbek. J., Ko:nendJ, S.. XrajCi. Z.---. Lucntioe: Ros. Inst. Higher Nerv. Aet., Rolacky Univ „ OlcxnouG, CFech.-_. Section: CA004013, CA1101XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL .journal: ~~-Agrossoluqie - Coden: AGS34_6 Pu_b_I: 78 Serics: 19 Ispue: D Paqes; 193-5 ~~-I.ientifiers: motor reflex nicotlne marlhuana CA000191 4GS26F Elgctroohyt•,iotoQleal, behavioral. 'and Chemloal evidence for a nuncnolinerqi0, atereospeclfiC site for nicotine In rat brain Author: Ab00d, L. G•, Lowy, K., Tometako, A.. Booth, H. Location: Cent. Oraln Res., Univ. Roehesterfaed. Cent., RochosteR, N. Y.-- -- ---- Suction: CA004003 PUbI Class: JOURYAL Jouwinal: J. Ncurascl. Res. Coden:, JNREDK Pub1: 70 Series: 3 Issue: 5-6 Pages: 327-33 luontiffers: nicotine stercospecifie nonchollnorOiC sita brain CA09019146504X ' Identification of dru0s- by high-pressure liquid ehrnmatur,ronn,p with dual w_avefenVth ultraviolet detectionAuthur: CnY.er, John N„-Skaltnn, Ronald E., Ma. ChenqeVu Location: SrJh. Pharm.,-Ilniv. fAissi09ipPi, University, tAiss. SoCtion: CA004002. CAOOIXXX Publ Cla,ac: JOUR:lAL Journa_1: J._ChroR•Itogr.Cotlen: JUC R%•:/-------- Publ: 79 Series: tGB IssuE: 2 Pages: 417-27 Iocntifiers_: drug liq ohromato0 UV a5sorbanCe, forensiC druy detectlon CA0°019146306J €ffect ofcorpyeepin triphosphate on In vitro RNA synthesls by plant viral rc_plicases - - Author: White. Jnmes l., Dawson,.W1111am 0. Location: Ocp. Plant Pathol.. Unlv.--Californla, Riverside. Catif. •_ Seet/on: CA003002 Pub1 Clasa: JOURNAL Journal: J. Virol. Coden: JOVIArA Publf 79 Serles: 29 Issue: 2 Paqes: 811-14 ' Identifiers: RNA formation eordyeepin triphosphate, repficase RTIA eoruycepin triphosphate, plant virus roplicase cordycepin - . CA09019146175R -Cardinvascular' and rosnlratory Chemoraflexes front r.the hindi Ilni/ SCI1:.Ory receptors OvokcJ by intra-arlerial InjeCtion of bra•lykiniin and ulhur-Che,nical at)enta In tlle raboft_ Author: Iallaritla, G., O.Ilttpnl, i., Poruall, G., BrlnQisl, F.,-Rainwndi, G-.,-SnncAiorryi, 14. - Location: 1st. I C1in, fAM., Univ. RwnA, Roqe, Italy Section: C_A002005 _PU_bl CI_a^.s: JOURNAL - Journa-t: .1,--Pn,:rmacol.€.p. lhor. CoJon: JPETAB Publf 79 Serles: 200 .... Issuc: 2 /'a0es:-319-02 ---- ---- Identif-Hers:--breathin0 sensory- reoeptor muscle. sonsory rocCptol• mtlscle circul,itlon, bratlylylnin cardiovascular ChemorCflex, resplydtory cht•moreflex brJdykinln CA090t9146049C flypothal.mie peptldes and pituitary hormone secretion Authur:~K.ito, Yuauru. Location: Sch. l:cd_._, Kyoto Unlv., Kyoto. Japan Sectinn: CA002091 ,PUbI_Class:~JUU1tt1AL ~ _ Journal: Murun,on to RinshoCOJen1 MORIAE Publt 79 Series: 27 l^>sua: I Paq.:_s_: 29-36 lan0ua0ei Japan~~ Id•3ntfflers: ~ hy{IothalamiC hormune secretion machanlsm, pltuitary rormone satretion meChalti;.m CA09019145834T •_-- A choliner0le mechanism , involved in the respiratory Chemnsen4.itivlty of themef/ulla obtOnOata In the Cat - Author: D w, N. b., Loesch_cke, H. Loc,itlon:tnst. Phy;inl., Runr-Univ., Boehum, Ger. Soation: CA00t005,C_A002XXX, CA013KXX Puyi Classt JOURNAL Juurn.1 l: -Pfiueq•irsArc6. Cod4•n: PFLABN Publ: 79 Se_ r i e.: 379 1 s_5ue: I PaOe;<: .^9-36 --- - --tUCntlfiers: --parasynlpathomimetlc cireulation respiration medulla oblon0ata - . CA00923194140K Use of 11-methyl-7-oxatetracyelo-(6.3.t.0.1,60.4,t1)ItOdeqan- ..s es as avom_a inyrutlicnt - AutJwr:Oemole, Euouard Paul Location: S:+itz.- . . SoctionsCA011007 Publ Classt PAT • Jaurnal: Swiss Codun: S1fXXAS Publt 700630 Pages: 2 pp. --Identlflers_: tohaec_o_ s_nake flavor dodeeano deriv Patent No: 600000 Applic No: 75/i5706 Dale: 751203 Class: A23L1/22G As.lynee: Firmenich S. A.
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E r . 0 (C DIALOG Fitea: CA SEARCH 77-79/vOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. Sot.) (Item 32 of. 65) Usor1906 21may79 CA009231937_01Z Atto•r.;ats to Identify S-pcnotypes from generative pnd ve(l4lJtive parts of Lycopersir,onperuvianum and Nlcotlana alata - - -_ _. ....... .... .. . . , Author: BredcmolJer, G. M• M. Locat ion:_ EuRATCt•t,Na{lbnlnqon, Neth. Scction: CA011000 Publ Class: TECH REP •Juurnal: Comn, Eur. Con_r.nunitir.s, (hop.) EUR Codent CCCE09 Publ: 78 - Issue: EUR 5015, Proc. Workshop Use lonis. Radiat. Agric.. 1976, Paprst 535-4G--- L1-:etinQ Date: 77 ldontifiersd review S genotypn, plant tissue CA00923192225J CharactJrizatfon of Catechols. . resorefnots, and hydrorlu/nonc_s in an aC1diC fraction ofCiparet smoke CondarLdtC - - -- Ruturor: Schlotznauer, William S.. Walters, Douglas 8., Snoui+. Gaurice E., tliqnan, Howard C. -locatiun:Tc.bncco Lab., SCi. EJuc_. Adm., Athons, Ga. • Scr,[ion: C_AG_04013 Publ_Cina:: JOUR1.Al ---- Juurnil: J. Agric. FoodChe_m. Cudon: JAFCAU ' Publ: 78 Series: 2G Issue: G Pages: t277-Ot Id.+ntificrs:ciyaret smu:.e cnndWlsate Co7q)onent, Catechol Cig,lrt•t sir.oke_ canrJensate, resorcinol ciqaret smokecond¢nsatee hydruquinone ti0aretanrokecunUensate - CA004211790510 ~ 2-Cyano 11-suhst/tuted heterocyclit Compounds Author: O::u_ne, Thonas S.,-SaniJers,~Edr,arC~B. . Locat ion: USA Sectiun: CA027010. CA005XXX Publ Class: PAT _.._.. Journal: U.S. Coucn: USXXAM Publ: 700G06 Paoes: 4 • - - -----.. .. ___ - pp. Identifiers: pyrrolidinecarbonltrile pyridyl propn Insr.ctielde. pyrl_dylpyrrolidinecnrbonitrife prepn~inseetlciuo~, pyrrolldonc~rCdn reaa ion Cy.mide~~~ Patent No: <093Z:0 Applle NO: 694687 Date: 7GOGt0 Class: 250-291, C07J113j57 Assignee: Llorris. Philip, Inc. CA00919159027Y Purification and Characterization of a' Juyenfle hormone binuin0 protcin from, the- hemolymph of the fourth tnstar tobacco horn;rorm, M.llliluca Saxta --- --Autnor: GoocLnan, Y:atter, p'Hern, P. A., Z_au_qp, Robert H., Evanston, Journal: Nul. Ce-I1. Enpoerinol. Cotan: fACEND6 Publ: 78 Gilbert. La.renco 1. • Lycation: Dcp.-- Biol. Scl., Northwestern Unlv., Ill. Section: CA006003. CA012XX% . Publ Classt JOURNAL StR£T000 ie S l : 1 cr es 1 tssue: 2 PaOast 225-.12 r. _ Identlficrs: Juvu~iile hqrmrn1eOintlinp proteln,~Manduea Juvenilahurmone binding protein - - - CA089171417329 ...._._. . . _... . .. - ~ . A»70 1610 elfeCts et1 (ntorpora_t_fon of 14C-UYA and 1AC-acetate -- - - Into stcrols Nicoti.5na in and Digitalis c011-frc•Q prrparations from NiCOliana - Authr,r: Douqlas, I.J., PalcO, L.G. 521 seedlings and Locatiun:-aailo Agric. Res.- Inst., Unlv, Adelalde. Glen 04w,inu. Au::t. Section: CA005003 Pubi Class: JOURNAL Jourri.fl: Pnytuchewistry Coden: PYTCAS Publi 78 Ser i es: 17 I ssurt: 4 Pages: 71:1-10 -Idontlfiers: Amo1618 sterol fonnation tobaCto. Digitalis sterol formation Ana 1610 - --- - ------ CA_00915126313K . Dctc~~nin,cion of nonvolatile organlC and fatty acids In flue-eureJ tobaeco-by gas-Iiquid ehronutogrpphy Autthur: Court. William A.. Ihn.lol, JohnG.- Lncatlon: Ras. Stn., Rne. Dransh, Uo-Ihi,Gnt, c SOCtion: CA011007 Pub_1 Class:JOURN_AL Journal: J. Cnro.natogr. Sci. Cnd.+nt JCHSOZ Publ: 78 Ser i Ss t-f 6 I t::.ue: 7 314-17 - Identifirrs: tobacco nonvnlntilo acid ootn, fatty acid detn tobacco, C•trboxyYiC acid d4ln tobacco -. CA0119131010550 Dosinietr•y-of cigarette smoke In laboratory animals Author: Pullin4l^:', 0.-H., Hau.eman,--T. H. Location: H,rru{iate, Engl• ,. Section: CA00d00t -publ Class: JOURNAL Jouriijil7 Pr•oc.Eur, Soc. Toxicol•Cod_e_n:_ PESTOS Pu_b__1_i_ 7_7_ Series: 1_8 Issu+s: Clin. Toxlcol. - Pag%ss: 29S-f1 Identifiers: ci0arot sn.uke doSimetry dlChloropheno.yatetat_e, particulate tobacco smoke retention analysls -- CA00911084554G i Renct/vity of isolated human cerebral arterles to bioqonlg amincs Author: ShlUata, ShoJl, Chong, John D., fAurakaml, Wilson Location: Sch.taod., Unlv. Hawall, Honolulu. Hawall Section: CA00100A, CA002XXX Publ Class:-JOURNAL Journal: Olood Vo4sels . Coaen: OLVSAD Publ: 77 Sorics: 14 Issue: 6 Pages: 356-65 . ldontlfiers: artery brain b{o9onic a-e/ns 0
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0 0 0 DlALOG Fise4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr.'Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item CACO^05019623T In vitro Cytoklnin binding to a particulate fraction of tobacco cells_ Author: Sussn•an, Micnael R„ Kende, Hans Locitiott: Plant Res. Lab., Michigan State Unlv., East lenein0. 0.fich. Section: CA011013 Pub1 Class: JOURNAL ~ Journal: lit~cnta~~ Codant PLAI4AB ~~ Puul~t 78 ~ Serlesf 140 Issuc: 3 Pages: 251-9 Iaentifierst cytokinin binding site tobacco cell CA009010032_05U Auerrv(it s,rntheses /n higher plants. 3. Synthesis of 4-r-rthylnicotine and an examination of Its possible biosynlhr.is from 4-n*thylnicotinicacid in Nicotinna tabacum- .. Aulhor: Lcet., Eu.urd, Leete. Sheila A. S. lor.;tion: Sch: Chcm.,-Univ. Minnesota. llinneapolls, Minn. ScCllon: CA011002 Dubl Class: JCUNN,IL Juurnal: J. Org. Chem. Cod.n: JOCEAH P-ubl: 78 Serios: 43 tssue: 11 PaQes: 2122-5 Icrnlifiers: n:ethylnicotine formation tobacco, nicotine /net.lb tobacco CAOC981081184N - Cudmium-induced fetal growth retardation In the mouse Authur: Weti,ter, tlilllnm S. ' Location: UcR. Anat.. Univ. Sydney, Sydney, Aust. Section: CA004003 Pubi Clazs: JOURNAL -- --....--- - -- ---- -- - ---- --- - J:,urnal: A_rc'i. [nvlrun. Health CoUen: AEHLAU Publ: 78 Series: 33 Issue: I Paqes: 36-42 Ittentifiers:- cad•elum~ prognancy fetus toxicity. smoking Cadmium health hdzar.t-~~ CA01102518G070T Cu.rparison of carbonyls and nltro0onous compounds during ---- - - air curing Of burtoy tobncco bulk vcr+us Author: Andr,rsCtn, R. A„ KasperbauCr, M. J.. Lowe, Smiley. J. H. - - - LocAtion: AaS, USJA, LevlnOton, Ky. Section: CA011000 Publ Clar.d: CONF PROC R. H., Journal: Recent Adv. Ct+em, Ccqnp., Tob. Tob. Smoke, Symp. COCCn: 31fA.:AT Puol: 77 Paryrs' 1U4-216_Pub119r.cr: R. J. Roynolds ' Too. Co. Yinston-Salem, N. C Iuentifiersq review oarbonyl nitrogen burley tobacco ozaetooo CA00025154324E Address: A possible ahemlCal basis for the hlDher mutagenlclty of 010 40 of 65) Usorl906 21may79 522 marlJuana smoke as CorN3arcd to tobacco smoke .. . . ._ ....-.-. .._. .. .. .._ ........ ...... ,.. . Author: N.:vutny, Lt,, Leo, M. L. , Dort le, K. 0. . ~ Lucatiun:~ U.:u. ~Ct,;vn., India,ta Univ., Dloomingto_n, Indlana Soclion: CA00:1013 Pubi Class: JOURNAL '~~ ~ - . Jotu•nnl: LKrivr_iontla ~-~Couon:EXPEt,M Publ: 76 Sariost '32 Issue: 3 Pagost 2U0-.2 td9ntiliors: xwrihuana cmoKe mutagenosls arom hydrooarbon, tobacco mwrihuatla smOke mutagenesis -- ~ ~ CA00025104191J fAs•tauul ism of oxamyl In pla_nts ~ Author: Narvey~,~-JUhn, dr.,-It.in, Jerry~C. Y~., Rolser,-~'Robert•~ . ~ .. .. - . W. Location: Res. Div., E. 1. du Pont do Nomours and Co.. Inc.. Mlimingtun, Del. Section:~~CA004004 Publ Class: JOURHAL Journa 1 c J, -~Aqr i c. For.q ~Chbn~.~~ CuFiQn: ~ JAFCAU Publ : 70 Serica: 26 Issue: 3 Pa_5ies: 529-36 ---Identifiers: O.amyl metaU plant--- C_AOB1123 t GG_ 91 GV Stullioc on Cellulose cl<tarette smoke. Part IV. Carbonyl compuunu cu~opo,itlan of Ccfl_uluce Cigarette smokc canderl5ale- ..- --- - -- ~---- --- --- -- -- - - -- - - - Au[hor: $akuma, HIrOhINO, ShimuJima, NOrlkO, SugOw.lra, $hir0 Locatlon: Cent. R•a. Insl., Japan Too, and Salt-Public Corp. , 'Yoit[Jhama, JApAn .... .. .. -- - ~ - -- - - - ~ Sectiun: CAO11007 Publ Class:. JOURNAL Journal: Agrit:, Olol, Cdpin. Cuden: AOCHAB Publ: 78 Sertes: 42 Issue: 2 1'ages: 359-63 idJntitiers: -~czilulose ~ cigaret -smoko product, furan_ cellulose ciqaret r:moMe, ketone celluloso cigaret SROka,~ lactone cellulose Cigaret smoke, alttenyue cellulose Cigaret smoko. CA000211474522 ttiral RiGG A 1223 -- a ncx soll lesect/clde with a broad Spectrum a_ction and anematueidc with systomatic action Aulhor: Rachm;,nn, Fritz, i/antlschin, G. --- Location: Ciba-Geigy A.-G., D.ir•cl,Switt. Scclron: CA00500A- Pu01Class: CONF PROCJuui n:al o Dow 1. S,.ubahc_h. - f.taz_huunar._ kongr. 2ashCh. Rast_., Dth Cnucn 3761VAD Putt l: 75 Seriost _3 Issue: I PaOes: 50-7I LanVuage: Russ Publisher: Orgkcmn. VIII Mozhdunar. Kongr. Addres9: [aoscow, USSR Identlfiers: Miral Insecticide nematoolde Zashch. Rast.
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DIALOG FIle4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soe.) (Itepl CA00021147299E Sttnwlat_ion of plant protein_ metabolism with trlazines_ Authurc GraesCr, H. -~~- -~~ Lucatlon: In;t. Edu_c. Erfurt. E._ Gur. Saction: CA.005003 Publ Clnse: CONF PROC J~urnal6 L1;•kn. Ueistviya Getmits. Sint.ReOUI. Rosta Rast'. Ikh Suu'ba Biusfere. t.t:,ler, L•.ahduo.,r. Sim3. Stran-Chl.•nov SEV. 10th CoJcn: 37\SA7 Publ: 75 Series: 1, P:rOes: 17-21 Lau0ar.0c: R_uss - Publi$hQr: Aka:. ~Ilauk SSSR. NauChn, Tspntr 0101. Iselcd. Addve5s: PushChino, USSR - Avail: Sokoluv, M. S lucntifi~ars:~-protein corn wheat SKV 1110 CA0U020140915U E.plusibility tests for Industrlal Justf Putnor: Raf:2ry, Nnrtic__a 61.-- Lucatic:nc 8oila. Res. Establ., Dep. Envlron., London, Enpt. Scctimn: CA059001, CA047XXX - Publ CIA.;:: JOURNAL - Juurnal: FireRCS. TuCh. Pap, tU. K., Jt. Fire R.rs. Oroan.) Co_dcn: FRTPCD Publ: 75 Series: 21. Pa0g7C 14 pp-.--2.hntifiers: metal dust oxplosiblllty,Oraln_ dust explOsibility, saFety Industr/al du.;t explualOn - - CA00813094102S - L-ASCOr:ric acid in altoholts_m and Smoking: protection, - a0aunct acetalcionyde toxf.-ityan en exporim.+ntal model Authnr: S_princo, If., Parkef•, Clarente L1., Smith. G. G. Lucationo vAlfqsp.. Caatesville,-Pa.-- - --- Soction: C;004J03 P-ubl Class: JOuRtI!1L Journal: Int. J. V1tam. Nutr. ftes.. 5¢ih. Codon: IVEODN Publ: 77_ Serics: 16 Issue: Re-eva1.Vitam. C-- Pi,Onsc 185-217 -Id~ntiflers: aCetaldehydi toxicity ascorbate protoction• CA0R01309401SN 0 lqcn-CCpcn!lcnt eh@mieal t_u4iorl0enosls In a NiCOtlana hyqr,cl:-- innjUltion by a6CorbIC acid and dinltrophenol Autno_r: A ui.r a•n, R. A.. Linney, T. L. ---- location: Alca, Unlv. xontucky,Ltrxinqton, Ny. Section: CA003003, CAOO5XXX Publ Cla*s: JOURNAL Juurnal: Chtm.-Oiul. Interact. CoJen: COINAO P-ubl: 77 Series: 19 Issue: 3 P,,yqs: 317-25 -Id.n•ifiors: tumori0onesis nicotiana oxy0cn, dinitrophenol _- tumori0^nosis Nieo_tiana oxygen. &,eoruato tumoriucnasis NfColiana--osy0on, pyro0allolturoorlpanesis NlCotiana oxYOen, araurocil tumoriqanesis Nicotiana ox0en 40 of 65) User1906 2tawy79 S29 CA0001 101i9U77A ' Lioniturinq puenolics In ciparette smoke eondonsaW fractions - ~ ~~-~~- --~ -- - ~~ hy ~ by n,tcru-polyamlrla thin-Iayer cnromato(jrap ~Authurl- 7_:allrrS tluu!i1a9-0. - LoCaliun: fi,'u-,~ LAi.., USUA,-Athens, Gi. Suclion: CA004001 Pubi Closs; JOtIRNAL J.+urnal: J. An51. Toxicol. CutMn: - JAT003 ,, Publi 77 ..._ _._...._ ., --- -- 70 Serie::7 1 Issue: 5 Paggs: ?10-Idantifiers: pnpnol detettiOn ci0aret smoke, chruma toV ptienu I thin layer CAODOIIOGU954M Etinancemenl- byphysalaom/n of the eontraetlons Indueed by Cholin.unim_OtICs in the puinorr piq Ile_us -Authar: Fontaine, Jeanino,--Fasiraey, Joan Plorre, Reuse, Jaan Location: Lab. Ph.rrm.rcol., Univ. Bru,,sols,Urussels,8olp.- Scction: CA001004 Publ Class: JOt:RaAL - - -- Journal: J. Pharm, Pharm:rcol.- Cacen: JPPLIAB PuDI: 77 .'' Series: 79 Issuei 7 P_ages: 449-E0 ldsntifiers: pnysalagurln iieum contraction chollnOr.imetie ca ~ CA000090G2479P ~ ~ n n The structure of a novel torpcnold aCid 0 -hyoroxy=4-;xi 9E-dudceadlenedioic x1 9-dimethyl-6E •3 acid• 1 , . ., . ----'. _ .__._ _..-- ----------- -- U f T i h t 1 - rum at•7 urk OUaccO i50 S Author: Chuman, Tatsuji, No9uchl, 1lasao, Ohkubo, ' Aklra, : Z Todi. 5huxa Lucallun: Cent. R.s. Inst., Japan Tob. Public Corp.. ~ Yokuhcnna, Japan -~ ... S,rotion: C_A030015, CA01txxX Publ CIa3s: JOURNAL Juurnal: Tatroim-dron Lett. Coden: TELEAY Publi 77 Issue: 35 Paqes: 30•15-8 ~~-Identitlers:-Uudocadienedioato tobacco structure CA080090591180 Tho oc.urronce and orlyln of DOT tn human milk Author: Vuori, Erkkl, Tyllinen, Hllkka, Kuitunen. Pekka, Paq.nus, Aila Location: Ocp. Public Health Sol., Univ. HelsinNl, Helsinki, FlnlanU - -- --- - - Sc,:tion: CA004004 Publ Classi JOURNAL Journal: Acta Pa:dlatr. Seand. Coden: APSVAht Publ: 77 Series: CO lssue: 6 Pagust 761-5 • Identifier•s: DOT human mllk, dleldrln human mtlk, chlorinated biphenyl human milk ---- -- - ie TZ`''. EIUQO
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0 524 OtAIOG f11o4t CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (COpe, Am. Chem. Sog.)• (Itear 56 of G5) U.er1906 21way79 CA00007047674E - Cit,nrrttcfilter , . Author: GrOsaman, Harold . Lu.ation: USA Section: CA011007 Publ Class_: PAT Journal: U.S.. CoJen: USXXAt.t Publt 771122 PaOcs: 5 pP --ldcrttlfiers: tobacco product f/ltcr, alumina fiber tot)acco filtcr, 2irconla fibar tobacco ftlter, silica alumina tobacco filtcr Patont No: 4059t-19 ARp11C NO: •479104 Date: 740613 Class: 131-9. A24u1570o Assiqnoo:.t'untctair ecsearch Corp. . CA00007047524F' 4-Dosdretnytsterols In the seeds of Solanaeese_ Autt)or: It_on, T., -Tamura, T„ Llatswno_to, T. Locationt Coll. SC1, TCChnol_., Nihon Univ.. Tokyo. J_apa_n_ Section: CA011001, CACG2XXX Publ Classi JOURNAL __ _ Juurn•:1: SterOirys ~ Cuoon: STEDA:1 Publt 77 Scr/es: 30 ~ lesuot 3 PaOOS:' 495-33 Itlrntiflers: cJCmthylst¢r01 SolanacOae, steroid Solanaeoaa - CA08005034710P ~. Rer:unstitut.:d tobnCCO ' _ . Auttwrt-D_s:yCk, Edward J. - Location: U5%. -- - • Secti6n: CA0i1007 Publ Class: PAT Juurnal: G°r. Offen. Coden: GNXA3X Publt 771013 Paq_s: 13 pp. Ufvlsionnf Ger. Offen. 2,200,_eUO. . -Idantificrs_: to1m.:CU rcconnt/tuted atar•onium Ca_rbOnylate Patant No: 92¢5372 Apolic f_:_o: 10445] Date:7t0106 Class: A24J15i05 Country: US ~ Aasiq:.cc: Ar:~r•ris, Phi 1 ip, Inc. CAODUO'_034G94ra 160- aJler-Lriluble fraCtlon Of c/qorlt Smoke Cofldenaat_e. Identificatia_n of the principal componCnts - Authorc Do Saltes do liy;, Loui_s, Renare, L1. L., Goy, J. , LoC~tion: Serv. E'+ploit, - ind. Lab. - Allu_mettOS, -F_1_turyrIesrduhrais, Fr.Sectiun: Ca011007 Publ Classt JOURMAL J~urna_I:.Ann. Tao., Sect.t CoUcn: ATOCAA Publ: 76 Series: 14. -PaOes: 119-24 Lanqoa0e: Fr- ---- lOent/fiers: tobacco sn•oke CpnLensate COmpn CA0Ge0S034692J Tne ncutral-Carbonyl fractlon of C19arot smoNe eondensste. U6E/r000 Idontificatlon of the Princlpal Com_tuxtcnts Authnr. Porce-lcsta, Paulette. De Salles de Hys, Louls,' Aubo.rt, C.. Guy, ,). Locitiun: Serv. E+ploft. Ind. Lab. Alltnnottes, Paris, fr: -- - Socliwr: CA011007 --Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: A_nn. T:rU•, Sect. I Cuclen:AiOCAA Publ: 76 Seric.•.,...14. Paucs: 40=9 Lanqua~je:Fr • .. Idw,tiflers: tobacco smoke_cyclio Curbonyl Compd, CyClOp4tltanOne tOb,lcc0 Smuke' aqCtophe_nOne tobacco smoh8, ' Ind.lnone tUbdCCO srrokY, levul inate metltyl estfr tOb.1CC0 imOko CAOUO05033000V Infl•.cnca of certain soil fusinants In a heavy olay soil on the populptionof t'lrytophtnora rlicotiana0 var nicot-lanae, th_e_ crusal urqnnisnt of black snnnk ot tubacco Author: f•rinsloo, G. C., Da_ Villiers, 0. A. Locotion:lob. Res. Indt., Rustonburq, S. Afr. Sectiun: CAo04002- IRUDI Class: JUURNAL __ Journnlt t•hytuunylactica _ - Cott.•ntPPPSIA9 ' Publ: 77 Se_rfen: 9 Issue: I Pa,us: 25-6 Idrntlfiers: soil fumlqint b1oCk shank tobaceo. Phyto:3hthora tobacco soi 1 furnlqant - --- - - - -- CA00005032611N -lsulntion of Indoles ond Carbarolcs from cl0arotte smoke conJ,•nLat.• Authurc Snrwk, L1. E., Arrcndalo, R, F.. HlOman, H, C., ChOrtyk. 0. T. Locntion: Tob. Lab_., ARS, Athens, Ga. SeCtiun: CA004001 Pupl Class: JOURNAL J_our n.it : Anal, Chem. Cooan: ANCI:.tr6 Publ l 70 Serles: s0- ts9uo: I Pagost Ci/-90 - Identifiers: CIDyet srnokc eundensate Indyle CarbafolO C_AOR803019129H Eloctr.-pntiretic and SpeetrnphotOmO.trlC studles of chloru7t,yl1-1)rotoln Complcre5 froln tObaCCo Chloroplapts. Isolation af a IIUht harvestin0 piOment protein eomplon with a mOleCUl•lr uni011t of 70•000-- - - - - -- Author: lremy, R.• Hoarau, J„ Lcclcrc, J. C. Loct,tion: Lab. Ptiysiol..-Co11. vnq., Univ. Paris-Sud. Orsay,Fr. SoCtion: CA011006 Pubi Class: JOUaNAL '' Journal: Pnotochorn. Photobiol. Codcn: PHCOAP Publt 77 Series: 26 ltauc: 2 Paqca: 151-8 Identifiers: chlorophyllprotcin conpleK Chloroplast I
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DIALOG F/1e4t CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am, Chem. Soc,) (ltem _- , CA00003017547Y ---y-.cutinam+dc nuelootldo analo0s of nieotino and ootlnine._ - - En:V ~nic stuaiay - Au Uior: Shen, kei-Chianq, Fronke, Jakob, Van Vunnkis, Helen Location: Defi. Oiocilam., BranOeis Univ., 'rlalthom, Mass, Section: CA00G002, CA004%?lx Pubi Class: JOUIt14ALJournal: Biocht•m. PhdrnNCOI. Co.lon: 6CPCAG Publ: 77 Series: 28 Issue: 20 Pages: tB35-40 lJ3ntifiers: nicotine cotiaine nucleotide analo0, liver _ _ - nicotine c_otinine nucieotide, smoking nicotine eotinine nucivotiuc CAOUOOt00f205A Hqn.,)qan,ies of pre0nnnt ivt and /etal tissues metaboll:e carcinoycns to muta0ens detected by Salmoneila-typhimurium TA9U and TA100 Author: Schyal, C. B., Nutton, John J. Location: storl. Serv._, VA Nosp•. L_oxlnOton, KY. • Section: CA00A007-- Publ Ciiss: JOUIUTAL • J_o_u_r_nnl: 61u_ta_t. nes, Copen: MUH€AV-- Publ: 77 Serles: _46 lssuo: 5 Pages: 325-44 ioentifiers: carcinogen metaD preOnanCy, fetus Carcinoyen metaU,mutaqcnlelty enrcino0en motabolitn - CUCI000 40 0
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, Pr~lnt 16/2/1-39 DIALOG Fi1e•7: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr. Am. Chem. SOC.) (Item CA090221796568 Reten_tion indlces for proprammed-temperature Caplllary-OOlu- mn p1S enromatopraphy Of pOlyCycllC aromatie hydrocarbons Author: Lee, Milton L., Vassilaros,-Daniel L., white• Curt M. .-._.-. -, --- - - - Location: Oep. Chem.,'8rlgnaq. Young Unlv., Provo, Utah Sectlon: CA000004 Publ Class: JOURNAL J_ournal: Anal, Chem. CqUen:-ANCHA:A Publf 79 Seriesi 51 Issue: 6 Payes: 768-73 Itlentifier¢: retention In[:ex pOlyeyCllC arOm hydrocarbon. gas chrorato0 polycyCllC arom hytlrocarbon,cap111ary column 93s ehroinatu9 hydrocarbo_n, pro0rammed temp Oas-ehranatoq hydrucarbon CA0902217rs500A lnfluence of the vaeuunl on the separatlon efflCleney In Coa.oietf- IGC)2=/•tS - - ~-- Author v vinV..ever, F.. Sandra, P., Verzele, M. - Loc'ttion:_ Loa. OrO. C_ham., State Univ• Gent, Ghent, -e-9r Scttlon: CA0790C4 ~~ Publ Cla..: JOURNAL Journal: Chromato0rapnia , Codent-~ CHRG87 Publt 79 Seri.•s: 12 Issue: 3 PaOes: 153-4 lUentif-iers:_ gas chromato0 mass spectroseopy analysls, vacuum effect Capillary column-efficLenCy, glass caplilary-Qas CnrcicatGp - - CA09022174556N Citr,c acid Autnor:1 Ocucnard, E. F., /.t;rritt, E.•G. , . . Location: Pfizer-Inc_.. New York, N. Y.- - Soction: CAf6J000. CA017XXX, CA062XXX Publ Class: CONF PROC_ Jjurnal': Itirk-Otnmer Enoyel. Chem. Teehnol., 3rd Ed. Coden: 37ASAA Publ: 79 Sprlr+qF 6. Papes: 150-79 PvUliSher: Wiley Atltlress: Now YorF, N,_ Y Avail: Grayson, fAartin: Ecyrotn. David 1Ccntlfiers: review citric acid pharmaetutieal, cosmetl0 Cltric acid r4vlew,food citric acid revier CA09022174499T Puplar buJs as raw material for preparing a carbon'dloxide extL'act Author: Mach_ulenko, L. N„ Plenklna,~6. E.. Syuzevs, Z. F.. Chesnukovb. L. V. - Location: USSR Section: CA062002 Pubi Class: JOURNAL Journal: Naucnn. Tr. - Permsk. Gos, Farm. Inst.. Coden: NPFIAR Putil: 76 Series: 10, PaOes: 65-7 Lan9uaq3: Russ PzBEtooa ~ 1 of • 39) User1908 4jun79 ' identlfiers: Poplar oll Carbon diOxlde f i. - . CA09022174490S ' Gas-chrwnatuqraphie determination_ of le_do_1'In essential oil, leaveo and_ herbs of Lec/um palustre • Author: Koban,iv, V. S., Evstrat0va. R. I. Location: vsvs. Nauchno-lssleo. Inst. Lak. Rast., Moscov, USSR Seetiai: CA062002, CA06AXXX Pub1 Class: JOURNAL Journal: Khim. Prir. Soedin; Codenc KPSUAR Publf 78 Issue: 6 Paties: 715-10 LanOuaae: Russ -- -- - Identifiers:--ledol gas ehromato0 Ledum--- . . CA09022179497P In(lexes of tno quality of coriander oll L. L1., SlUirtseva, V. E., Zotova, S. I' Autnrml Silnuva , Locatiun: VScs. N.wchno-Isslptt-lnst. Slnt. Nat. Oushishtykh Veshr.hestv. Selo Vnro_n_tsov, U4SR Si:ctioi): CA0C2007- Punl Class: JOURNAL_ Journal flx.lo-Znfr. Proan-st-.-Cuaen: MZPYAE Issue: 3 Pa,jcs: 20-9 Lan0ua0e: Russ Identiflers: corianUer oil quality linalool Publf 79 CA090221744960 ---Grosso lavandin Author: Zola, An0!i, Le Vanda. Jean Plerre ._ Location: Lau. Anal. Controle. Soc. Aurian, Fr. .~ Sectinn: C60G2007Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Parfwn5, Cosmst., Aroiuas Codent PCAROV Publt 79 Pages: G0-3--Lanqua0e: Fr Itlentlfiers: lavandin Grosso Conipi} CA09022174495P ~ • Tne constituents of the essential oil frofs Plantago astatlCa L , Hiromu, Wang, Chi-Pao, Yokoyama. Kyotatsu - Author: Kameoka __ Locatlon• Fac. Sci• Enq:, Kiiihl Univ „ OsaNa, Japan Sectlon. CA0G2002 Pub1 Class: JOURNAL Journal: Yanuqahu ZaSShl Coc/.;n: YKKZAJ Publt 79 Series: 99 lssuep 1- Pages: 95-7 Lan0ua0e: Japan - loentifiers: Planta00 oil compn, terpene Planta0o oil , .
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. DIALOG flls4: CA SEARCH 77-70/VOL 90(22) (Copr. Am, Chem. Soe,) (Itom 9 of CA_09022174494N F,lty acia~compnsltion of earbon aloxide extraction of plant rar Aul~hur: Snisnkov, C. Z.. Kas'yanov, G. I.. Artom'eva, T. V., Lami,tiua, N. V., Kupriyanova, L. A. LoCttton: Xrasnuuar. NauChno-ISSlotl. Inst. P-ishehov0l Prom „ N_rti75nudar,~~USSR Svction: CA042002, CA011XXX PuUl Class: JOURNAL Juurnal: fdaslo-2tlir. Prom-st. ~~ Cod2n: s7ZPYAC Publt 78 Issuc: 6 Pages: 25-7 Lar,qtnqe: Russ ~loontifiersg carbon dioxide pl:,nt ext olt, fatty acid plant Caruun dioxide ext CA0902217370SW Determination of sulfur-eonta/ninp gases by a deactlvated_ qr7ngenic--Onrichment _r_.nd e_aplllary gas Chromato9raphiC System Author: Farwell. S• 0., Gluch, S. J., Can,esberncr, W. L., SChulte. T. tA., Ad:..n., 0. F. -- ------ Lucation: D!•u• Chem., Univ. Io.lho, fdOSCOW, Idaho SC•Ction: CA0S9002, CA079Xx% Publ C18.sc JOURaAL JuurnSt: Anal. Ch^m. CuJen: ANCHAtd Puul:79 Series: 5_I 1:ue: 6 Paclns: G09-IS -Identlfie_rs: sulfur gas oetn air chromatog, gas chromatoq sulfur detn air, air analysis'sulfur canptl gas chromatOg CA09021160157P , Flavoring with a trieysllC alcohol Autnorc~ Liqht, Nminetn N., Shuster. Edward J., Joaquin F., Vock, :fanlreo-~H,--~ -~-------~ ~~ - ~~Lucation: USA - Vtnals, Section: CA029010, CAOIIXXX, CAOIZXXX, CADG2XXX Publ Class: PAT Journal; U.S. Coden: USXXALI Puol: 790213 Pages: 12 - pp• locntiflers: trle,clodccanol prepn_ flcs•orinp fooo, to0agco flavoring tricyClouaCannl prepn,-- cosmetics triCYelodec_a_no_1_ preon. perfume trICyC1OdCCan01 pCepn Patent No: C139Ca52 App11G f1o:- 485554 Date: 740703 -- Class:42G=538, A23L1/22G Assiqnee: /nternational Flavors and Fragrances Inc. CA09021167393A RoOiosolcct/Ve oxygenation of tertlary7-butylated phenols and tts Sy:tlhetiC appli0alions - - '' Author: Nisninaga, Akira Location: Dep. Syntn. Cr,e•x., Kyoto Univ „ Kyoto, Japan Seetion:,C_AG22000, CA017XXX, CA037XXX, CA030XXX, CA062XXX, CAOG]1lXX- Publ C1a6s: JDURtIAL Journat: Yuki Co.ef Kaqal.u Nyokalshl Codenl YGKKAE Pubta 78 Series: 37 Issue: I Papcsf 1-13 Lanqu.lqe: szeetooo 0 , . . 0 0 . Japan . Idontlfiers: review re9loselcctive oxygenation bulylphenol,oxiJ,t reqior•eluctive-butVlhhon,il review, solvenl effect oxidn rovicw, Calalyat Oxidn bulylphon•3i review, meehanls-m oxidn butylpnonot review, quiuol rcvlew. CyctoNenlaJionone review, Uen;ottuinunereview, antioxiWtnt muChanism butylphonul revfow 39) Usor190(l 4Jun7tl . 335 , CA09021166723tf Ethylideno pyronlltrtn and N-methyl-N-formylhydraiine In eon:mercially available dried false morels. Gyromltra esculenta Fr. ex Pqrs - ------ - - • - - Author: StlJve. T. Locatiun: Nestle Prod.. Teeh, Assist. Co. ' Ltd.. La Tour-dc-Pcilx, Switt. Seotibn: CA017004, CA004XXX, CA011XXK Publ Class: JOURNAL - Journot: - b.litt, Get)• Lcuensmiltr,lunters. Hy9•Cotlent M_GL/IAE Puhl: 70_ Serlesc 69 Issue. 4 PaOest 492-504 IUOntifiers: o.ethylhyUraiine ~wsnroom. Cyromitrine etnyliuene- n.ushroom CA090211GrG53Y otten:ivc-udor of flsh of the ttaqara River, Japan. VIII. Idunlificat:nn and quanlitative analysis ofTctralin In fish by hiqh-rcSOluliun y'f+ Ohrum•ttu9idphY emasS spCetrOmetry Author: Fwtl,;.ka Ryu:u, lan:uf•l, h:,7uO, Itaqaki, Yasuhiro, Ose, YuuH, S..to. Takaniho - Locatinn: Gifu Cull. Ph;:rn,., Gifu, Japan Scction• CA017002, CA00•7XX__X, CAOIiOXXX Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: €isei Hayaku CO.1Cn: ESKGA2 Publ: 78 Series: 24 Issue: 3 Paqes: 139-a2 Language: Japan Identifiers: tetralfn flsh ocior, carp te U•alln odor CA09021166645X - Outterlat adulte_ratlon with bcef tallow and lard. Part !I: G.L.C. of uterols antl U.V. sp••clrophotomelriC analysis Author: ColomUini, At.,A~uotulti, G., Vanwol, Al. C. Localion: Isl. Chim. Artrar., Univ. t.tilano, Milan, Italy Seetiun: CA017001 Puhi Clas.s: JOURNAL Journal: Riv. Ital. Sostante Grasse Coden: RISGAD Publ:78 - Sericst55 -- Issue: 11 Paqes: 356-61 Lanquaqe: Ital Identifiers: butter tallow lard datn. Oas ehromatoo butter, UV speclrometry butter, sterolbutter lard tallow
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DIALOG FIle4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item 16 of 39) User1906 4jun79 336 CA09021166640S laycutoins In foods. VI11. Analytical procedure of trichutnecena myCOto_.ins in C_ercols AuthOr: Kanlimul~a, NiSa5h1, Nishljima, L10tOhlrO, Saito, Ka7.U0 , Takah_ashi, Shyoko, Ibe, Akittir0,OChla{, -Setsuko,Naui, Yasula location: Tokyo Metrop. Res. Latl. Public Health, Tokyo.. Sectlon: CA017091, CA004X%X Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: ShokuhinE_isei0aku Zesshi Coden: SKEZAP Publi 76 Series: 19 Issue: 5 PaOOs: 443-8 Language: Japan Identiflersf cereal triChothecene mycotoxin detn, gas chromatoq mycotoxln CA09021166636V Concurrent determination of resldues of tho eoecldiostats 2-Cnfuro-4+nitrobenzamide (aklomide) and 3,5-oinltro-o-toluam= id_e (zoalenr.) in poultry meat -Author: winchester, R. V. , Location: Chem.Div..-OSIR, Petone, N. Z. • Section: CA01_7001, CA001XXX Puot Class: JOURNAL Journal: li. 2. J. Sei. Codcn: NZJSA8 Publi 78 Series: 21 Issue: 4 Papesf 553-5 ioentifiers: Cn(Cken aklomiae zoalene detn, gas chronatop -- Cocciaiostat CA09021166633S ' . tlathods of purifleatlon of samples of hlph-fat-COntent proaucts before the determination of pesticide residuos us.in0 gas chroirato0r.,phy - -- Author: Lipo~..ska, Teresa. Kuback_1, Stanislaw Location: Inst. PrTCm. Ferment., warsaw, Po1. Svction: CA017001, CA004XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL Journ_al: f,Wter. Say, Nauk. Inst. Ochr, Rosl, (Poznan) Cone1i: -1ASNRD5 Publ: 77 Series: 17, Paqes: 575-07 La_nqua0e: Pol laentifiers: pesticide extn lard pork margarine .CA0902116G632R Delermination of toaopherols In human mllk by hiqh-perfo_rmanee Ilquid ehromatnqraph_y •• ----- -Author: f•faisawa, ShuniChi. Loeati0n: Dep. Pediatr., lwate L1cd. Univ., ttorloka, Japan Section: CA017001 Publ Class: JOURNAL--Journal: BitaminCodon: BTR1aA7 Pub1: 79 Ser(es: 53 'Issue: 2 Pa9es: 69-75 Lanqua qs: Japan Iaentlflers: toCapherol' tletn mi1k, chransto0 toeopherol, - human milk toCopherol, oolOstrum tocopherol . . . .. . . .. .. . _ _ - . . . , szgEtooo CA090211GGG29V Ool•.rmination of trltllycerlde In ve0etable olls by high -- -- -- - pres::ure liqulU Chrnmatoprahhy Author: Ka.mhata, Shuzo, Uewi, Mitsuo ~ Loc,~liOn: Cent, Customs Lab:, (tlinist. Japan Finance. Matsud0, Sqction: CA017C01, CA0•15XXX Pubi Class: JOURNAL - Jou_rnal: Nanzei Chuu Ounsuklshoho CotlOn: KCOS01 Publi 78 -- Series: 18, Pagns: 45-52 Lanqua9a: Janan . Identifi rs: Olyeer/do Geln-oll, Chro:naloq Olyeunide • CA09021166020U Ouantltattvc gas chromato0raphy of monosodlum Otutamste In sea urch,n as trl,nclhylsilyl derivative ------- Authur: TatsuHa, Kiyo:+ki, Ltakila, Kanemasa, Asano. Sh/quko stOm;: Lnb., Osaka. Jnuan LOcatiun: O.akaCu _ OUNNAL • Ser.tiun: CA017001 Publ Cla:s: J _ Jo_u_rn:,l: Kanzei Chuo Bun3CklShOhO Coucn: KCBSOI Publi. 76 - Sories: 19, Paqcs: 9S-8 Lanquapet Jopon - ldentifiera:Olutomate rlotn sea urchin, gas Chromatop Olutanate, sodium0lutaeate detn - --- CA09021166627T Octerm,nation of Islxed sugars by high pressure liquid chromatuqr,apny -- -- - - - Author: tAiyaql, Yoshlhiro, 0eNi, 4itsuO location: Cent, Customs-Lab..' Ltinlst. Finance. Matsud0, Ja_pan Sectlon: CA01700/ Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Kanzoi Chuo Dunseylshoho-- Cuden: KC0S01 Pu_blt 78 Series: 19. Pages: 65-70 Language: Japan Idcntifiers: sugar mixt chromatop CA090211006240 CC analysis of tha. fatty acid eompesltlon of an oll eontalning short-ehaln fatty aCias:* Preparation of propyl e_sters w,th trifluoroUOrano-l-prot2in01 rca(1ont Author: Isobe, Tsuqio, _Sei_no, Hajimo, Natan,1be, Shoichiro Location: Fac. Myq• SC1., Kltasal0 Un{v., 5_aaamihara, Japan Section; CA017001, CA045XXX P-uul Class: JOURN_•1L Journral: yuhaUaku Coilan: YKGKALI Publ: 79 Series: 28 Issue: 2 -Paqes: 109-14 LanOuaqet-Japan ' Identifiers: fatty acid gas ehroma_to0, esteriflcatlon fatty aCld, propyl aster fatty acid i 0
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DI'ALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH`77-79/vOL 90(22) '(Copr. As. Chem. Soe.) (itole 24 of 39) User19C0 4jun79 C_A09021166619S Sinwltaneous hyqiani0 studleS on~toltic cheslOala in foods. Part +1.~ Si_multanc_ous dotermin..tiun of~~ o~-Vhcnylphcnol and bi]phenyl In citrus fruits ~ ~~ ~ ~~ ------- - ~- Author: KenmOtSu, Kalashi, Rtatsunaga, KazuyOshl, ISiI/da,~. Tatauu-~- Location: Okayama-ben Res. Cant. Environ. Publle Health, Okayan,a, Japan ~ .. ..... . . __ .. Sactlon: CA017001, CA005XXX Publ Class: JO_URNAL Juurnal: Ohaya.na_-b.•n Kankyo Huken ~Senta Nempa Codent OKI•::OV Put>1: 78 Series: 2, PaCes: 187-92 LanOuaQei Jap:,n ... . -.. .- --~ -- . .. ~Ipcntifiers: citrus fungicide detn, blphenyl detn C_It__r_u_s, phtnylphen0l dctn Cltrus, Qas Chromato0 fuhgiclde -~ ~ CA0002116G618R Hyqcnic studies on toxleants in foods. Part_ 3. Analytical meuiuCsfor :oalene In ehlcken and egy; - -Author: Lranaka, (AasAqki, f.fatsunaga, Ka2uyash/, Isnida. Tatsuu Lccptidtt Qkayama-ken Ros, Cent~ Environ. PuDiIO~HCalth, Okayama, Japan 5rction: C..Ot7001, CA001XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL Juurnal_: Oitayama-Men Kat16y0 Hoken Son_t_a Nei4puCoOen: OKH:,oy Puu1: 70 Soriey: 2, Pages: 102-G LanguaUa: Japan luentlflers: zoalene dotn chicken egg, gas Chromatog zoalene CA090211666170 ~ ~ Gas chrc,matogranhtc deterwlnatlon of butYlated. hyc1, ~0ytoluuno In butter -Autlror: Ito. YOshio, Toyoda, tlasatake, Ogawa, Shunjiro, Iwaida, tlosatlir0 Location: Osaka Bran_ch, N_a_tl. Inst. Hyg• Scl., Osaka. Jap_a_n Section: CA017001 ---Publ Class:~-JOU+_NAL Juurnal: Eisei Kagaku Coden3 ESKGA2 Publ: 76 ~~ - Serics: 24 Issue: 4~ Pages: 330-9 Idrntlfiers: OHT tletn butter, gas Chromatog DHT, phenollc antiuridant butter CA09021166595F Applica_tions of hlgh-perFormance Ilquld c,hromato0raphy to beverage analy0lS Author: Dricout.:J, Location: Inst.Reeh. Appl_. 9oissons, Croteil, Fr. Section: CA017000 - Puot Clas.t-JOUR_N__A_L Journalt Ofos (Nancy) Coden: 005SBI Publ: 79 Series: 9-10 issuo: f2-1 Pages: 19-22 Languape: Fr Idvntiflers: review liq chrometog beverage ZlzeEZOOo 0 937 CA000211GG5710 • Au:,lyais by c+p/llary chrolnAtoqraphy sf the aron.atle constiluonts of winas and w'apost----Poaslblo uso in tne: identificWttltn Of cultivars , --- ' Authar: R_.ipp. A„ 1/iStrich, 1/., Enpel, L. Locatiunc Ound•asforschunOsanst. Rouenzueeht. Qollwellerhof, Sleueluin~en, Ger. Sectiunc-LAOIGOOt Publ Ctasst CONF PROC Juurn,tl: Genet. An'•ellor. Vig_ne, S_yrp. Int., 2n0' Codeni lanGuage: Fr Meeting 4011PAy Publ: 78 Pages: 4t7-2B _ Date: 77 - Puuli.her: INRA Addrosst Versallles, Fr Itlcntifiersc gus Chro,nalug grape wlno aroma . ,.. CA_090211G57020 ACatylcholine and Choline In h,af.an plasma and red blood C011L: a gas chron,itoh)raph-eaSS spuCtrOteetric evaluqtiun- Author: Nanin, 1., K4;1f), U., ZunniSCr, N. R.,Shih, T. M., Spikrr,0. G.,->,larikanyae„ J. R., Kupfcr, l).-J.,Foster, F. G. --Localiun: Scn. Ids~a., U,~Iv, Pittsuurgh,Pitteburgh, Pa. - ....__ ---- $ucliun: CA013013, CAOOIXAX Puhl CIasS: JOURt/Al Journai: Aov, 0•IWv. 0,01, Ci.uvn: A0GUI1•1- -Publt 70 Serlc,.: 24 I.•.ue: ChullnOrgle Mech. Psychophurmac0i. Page: 101-95 Identifiers: blood acetylchollne chollnc dcanol, erythrocyte ac_ot_ylcholinoChoiine deanol, CAJ11no blood erythroayte deanol , ocelylCtmlin,.• blood erythrucyte deanol, doanol b7oyld erythrocyte- acetylchol ine Chol ino --- C_A0902_1165410E Gas chromatographle/maSs sheetrometrlC evidence for the Identlflcatlon ot_ 1,2,3,4-tetr~hyJro-.bola.-ca__cbo_Iine as an in vivo contitituent of ratbra_in - -Authc,r: D:url.er, 5. A„ IWrrlson, R. E., Brown, tj. 8., Christi.n, S. T. - ' . -- Locntiun: Dcn. Psychiatry, Unlv. Alabm0a, Olrmingha., Ala. Seetion: Ca013001 Publ Clasi: JOURNAL - Journal: 9locnem. Blo_phys. Res. Ccenmun. Codan: OBRCA9 P_ubl: 79 Series: 87 Issue: I Paqcs: 146-54 Identlflers: tetrarjyaroCgirboline bra/n. Carboline tltrahydro brain
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f DIALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Cbpr, Am. Chea, Spq.) (Item 31 of 39) Usert9o6 4Jun79 338 CA09021164417K . Calurn,ination of Catechotam_Inus and their 3-O-met_hylaled met.uulites in urine hy- d.iss fregmenlogrzpny w~ith~- use -of deulcratetf~inlr,rnal st_nnitards ---~--~--- ~ - ~ ~~~~ ~~ Author_: fAUS.N{et,~ Frits A. J., Thomasson, Corneli_s_ G., ..._ Gcrdinp, Alie It., Freuwuw-Ottevanqers, Dineke C_., Nagel, ~GI)s T., wutthcrs. tfert G. Location: Cent. Lao, Clin. Chcin., Univ. Hosp•, Gronlnpon, Neth. ..,_ ..- -- - .-.-.... _ . ..... Section: CA009004, CA002XXX, CA014XXX Publ Class: JOU/iNAL Journal: Clin. Chem. (Winston-:.aiem,--N. C.) Codun:~CLCItAU Publ: 79 Series: 25 -s,.uo: 3 Pages: 453-GO Identifiers: urine catechotomine -metabolit_e dotn, mass fraonCntog qateCholamine, cJAa cnroniatQO -cateCholamine. Cnrom,ll0q gas Cat.'Chul,Lnine, sp.)ctro£COUy n!ass CaIeCh4la.nine~, cancer~catetdolamine detn, nervo..3~system cancer catechoiumine , pheuchrojMCytOma~tatecholan,ine, Parkinsoni~He catecholamine ...._..-- .- C_A09021164205E Mi.od pontafluoroproplonyl-trlmethylsilyl derivatives of 5-hydrorylryptup_han for m.,c.; fraqmentographlc datoctlon. Devolulm,ent of a-retcotion Index mo_clol for substftuted_ Indoles Authorc ttartine:, Etuill'o,-Golpi, Emlllo -Location: Inst. Oiutis. Ncurcbiol.,Darcelona, Spa_In_ Section: CA009004 Pubi Class: JOURNAL_ Journal: J.Chromatogr._ Coaan: JOCRAfA Pub1: 76 Series: 167, Pages: -77-90 Identifiers: hydrorytryptophan,mass fragmentog, Indole mass fragn.ontog muuel, gas chromatog retention Index indole, spectroscopy mass Indole modul,--Novats rutention incox liulole deriv - ---- CA090211642001 Sclected metastable peay mnnltorinOt a new, specific tecnniquc In quantltative_ gas_ chromatography mass s_pectromotry ~~autnor: Gaskcll, S1mon~J.• Llillington, Davicf-S. - - location: Tenovus Inst. Cancer~Res., Welsn Natl, Sch, Atetl., Caruiff, wales-~ S4ction: CA009004, CA022XXX, CA032XXX Publ Class: JOURN_AL Journal: Diometl.~taass Spec__t_rom,~ Coden: PaaSYAL PubId-JO ~ --- - _... ... ~~Ser~ics: 5 Issue: 9~ Paqcs: 557-6 ~.Identtflers:: blood analysis te:.tostcrono mass spectra Jourual: Re_p_ _ ort . Coden: 03REP3 Publt 70 . Issue: CO_~:F-7it0C~J9-1, Pngas: 22 pp. Cilalion: Energy Res. Abstr. 1979, 4(1), Abstr. No. 1138. Availc-NTIS .. . _._._ ... .... . ., .... 1d,._nlifigrs: bile acld datn liver dtsease,. cholcstasls bile acid aetn, gas chroloatoqblte acid_, mass spsctroscopy bile acid, co4cputorapplication-Ulle actd CA090211G4165S Sunaitiv,t detectlon of 5rmethylcytoslne and quantltation of., tho----5-molhylcylosina/cytosine~ ratio in DNA--~-by gas Ohrpn,aluqraphy-mjss spectrometry using multiple specific lon monitorilig . . . .. .. _ _ ~ . ..... _ '~ Autiion:-Singer, Judith, Schnuto, William C.. Jr „ Snively, John E., Touri, cnarlOS_W., RigUs_. Arthur 0,~~~ - , Lucation: Dlv. Diul., City of Nupe Natl. Glatl. Cent., Ouarte, Calif. ~~ Section: CA000002, CA0I2XXX, CA013XXX Publ Class: JOUR__f1AL Journal: ~- Aial. DioChem, -Cuclen: ANOCA2 Publ: 79 Seriea: 94 lsr,uc: 2 Pdnes: 297-301 ~~IclentiFiors: ONA methylcytosine dctn, gas ehromatog InalhylCytC,slne, mass spectf•oscopy, mothylCytos111e. Cyto~lne . ~ methylcytoslnc-ONA -- - ~~ CA090211G414,F Trenbolone acetate and trenbolone: trace analysis In animal chow, wpstewotcr-and humnn urine byhlqn pressure liquld chromituqrnpny nnd_ cleetron eapturc gas C__hromatography Author: tiolder,-Claude L., Blakemore, Wllliare M.,- Oowman, Ma1CUIm C. - --- - Location: Dep, Health, Etluo., Welfare, Natl. Cent. Toxleol. Res., Jcffcrsun, Ark.-- -- -- Section: CA009002, C_A002XXX, CA004XXX. CA017XXX, CAO60XXX Pu_bl Class: JOURNAL - - Journal: J. Chronmtogr. Scl. Codcnt. JCHS02 Publ: 79 Serics: 11 •/ssuac 2 Pagos: 91-7 -- Idcntlfiers: feed trenbolc-aeotate dctn, water trenbolone lw aeetatedotne urine trcnbolone acetate(Jetn, . trcnbolonedC_tn chromatog, acetate trenbolone detn, wastewater trenbolone detn CA09021164180T Detection oF atypll:al1 bile acltls In dlsease states antl their Idenllflcatlon by gas c_hromatography-mass spe_ol_rometry-comput- ertechnlques - - •- Author; Szcaepanl_k_-Van leouwen,.P. A., Stellaard, F. tocat ion: A+• ,onne lial 1. Lab.,• Argonne, I I1 ,-- - Section: CA009002, CA014XxX' Pub1 Class: TECH REP gz8Ctooo r 0
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0- \ ~ DIALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VGL 90(27)_ (Copr. Am. Chem. SoC.) (Item 37 of " 39) User/906 4jun79 CA09021163142V - -' -' ' Fio.lu ocsorptlon mass spectromQtrlO analysis of orOaniC Coupuuno residuea in the environnrnt. ,I. Orpanochlorine 1ns•clI cioqs - Aulhor: .uZuki, A1„ Yamato, Y., KoOae M. . Location: Kltakyushu Gluni6, Inst. Environ: 'Health SC1., Kltiki,u.hu Ci ty, Jap•__ui S.cti.:n: CA005001 CA022XXX Publ Classt JOURNAL Journal: BiumcU. wass Spec_trom. CoCen: Br.)SYAL- ubli - -- Series: 5----Issuoc 9Pa9=s: 518-23 Iaen_tif/ers: oielorin soll m;,ss spectral enalysis. DOT soll mass spectral analysls, Insecticioe soil mass spectral analysis CAO°0211616G0D Superiorlty oE ehemical /onlsatlon on'electron Impaet for ioentification of Uruqs by pas-cnromato0raph-mass sPet:trometer Aulhor: Cailleux. A., Allain,--P.- t.ocatioh_7 L.ib. Ptiarma_ool.,ool., CMR, Anqers, Fr. Scclion: C:.OOIODI_ - _iublClass: JDURtIAL_ Journal: J. Anal, Toxicol. CocUCh: JATOD3 . Pubi: 79 Serios: 3 Issue: I PaOes: 39-41 ioantifiers: drug qas-ChrwnatoVmass spectrosaopy CA090211618460 The quantitative analysis of 1-.alpha,-ar.etylmethatlot antl -- -- Its prInClPal metabolites in 'blologiCai sp_e_cilne_ns by qas chrumatography-ChomiCal ionlZatlon-muttiple lon monitorin9 mass speetromqtry Autdor: Jennison, Thomas A., Flnkle, Bryan S., Chinn, Dcn/tis • M.. Crouch, DpnnisJ. - - - - Location: Dcp. Pharmacol., Univ. Uta„. Salt Lake C_Itye Utah 5ection: CA001001 PublCla_ss:_ JOURNAL Journ.^.1: J. ChromatoOr.Sci. CbUCn: JCHSBZ Publ: 79 Series: 17 Issue: 2 PaOes: 64-74 Identlfiers: aeetylmethapol qetn.blal_ ma_te_rial, ehromato9 mass spectroeetry acetylmetnatlol ootn •
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iv . Print 7/2/1-65 DIALOG Filc4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90120) '(Copr, Aei. Chem. SOC.) (Item f,of 65) User1906 11may79 CA0902015G394W St.~ote pqucous or aqueous-alcohol(o solutlons of fat-soluble parl„n,c oi Is. --~kutnor: Scncuormann, Fanny. Heldrich, Jochenr~ Biachoff, .- ktactin ~---Location: Ger. Section: CAOG2005 Publ Class: PAT Journil: Cer. Offen• COCJen: GwXXBX' Pu)llf 790201 Pa,,a: 14 pp. ~~ ..... _ • . _-.- Ic:•+ntificru: perfu:ea ot_1_ solvent polyoxyothylene ether Patsnt No: 2731210 AppliC No: 2731218 Date: 770711 Clac.s: -,151147/46- . . . .... _ - - - ~ -- ASSiunnv: Nenkel K,-G,a.A. CA09020156408x td•,nugr_aoh; nn Fragrance Raw Materfals; ' In: Food and Cosn.etjc. Toxieoloqy, Vo1. 16 (Suppl; 1), 1978 author: Optlyke,_0. L. J, . .. ~ .- Lor,ation:_~ Enql, . Scctio:le CA052005. CA017XxK Publ Classt BOOK Co:i: n: 5U:711A7 Puhl i 70 PaOO.: 637~ pp.- --- - ~~ Puul~ishqr: (PerOamai Addres~s:~-Oxfortl,n01.) lucnti_ficrs: ~book fragrance matcrisl mono0raph, food COSlnqtic tOxYcol bool CA090201569035 Dctermin.tlon of saturated vapor pressure of penfume matbrfals u.:inq Oqs cltro-.jtudraphy - -- Autnor: Voitkcvich_, S_._ A., Slrchedrlna, It. I'A., Podberezina. A• S•, RuU01'fi, T• A•r Prilepst.aya, K. K.---LoC3tioiic-V,^s, N.tuChno-Isslcd.lnst. Sint. Nat. Oushlstyk_h Vennchcstv, Srlo Voripitsuvo, USSR S^ction: CA0G206L. CA069XxX-- Pubi Class: JOURNAL Juurnal: G;i•,:lu-Zlrir• Prom-St, Cod_nt -K1ZPYAE Publi 79 - T_ssue: I Paryes: 27-0l•inqua,e: Itu_ss IJentiflcrs:----veti_n0_1 ester vapor pressu_re, eyelohextrnol estcr vapor pres.ure.--(rliol ester vaporpressure, vapar presbure vgter-perfu.n0 CA0!)0201536?7R AulunratiC suqar IlquefactlOn/In+(art system provides Corryllete batch- sitc, blend floxitillity: accuracytO.r.. .I.Uc•Oru~, Brix Authort Flana0an, Thonas E., Stahl. G_ray, Levinc, Keith F. Location: Am. 5wcet-lncrs, Ine., USA S¢ction: CA0440_0_1, CADI7XXX -Puhl C_lass: JOURNAL_ Journal: tood Proccss. Cotlcn: FOPRA9 Publf 70 Series: 39 Issue: 12 Pt.9ey: 12_6c9 ldentl(lers:lnvert syrup sucrose liquefact/on OEQ4rOUat C_A09019152414J Cyclic oxa.o derlvatlvcs Autht,r•: Schre!ber, Wl l llam l., StanO, Jalses N., Hall, John "' .. . _ _ . . . . . . . _ .. _. - , B. ~ Lucation_ :_ USA . ~ ~ Soctlonf CA030040 Publ Class: PAT Journat: U•S. Codon: USXXAM Publ: 761212 PaOest 11 I,p. - Idcntlflere: hyclroionone perfume prepn, lonone d!hydro perfufnc prenn, cyclic--uxazo !ntCrmadiate dih__ydrolo_none, CxazolitlinJ int_ermeJiato Uihydr01011Jne - - Patcnt NJ: 412!/5C9 Appl_iC NOp 807057 Da_te: 770616 Clastc: 2G0-307FA, C070263/04-- - Aeslyn-": International Flavors and Fraprances Inc. , C_A00019152410E Un atur,,tod alCohols Author: Onlshi, Takash/, FuJi_ta__, YoshlJl, .ishi0u_ro_;'Michihiru, NishtUa, Tapashi - - -LOcat ion: Jap•,n ---- - Sectiuli: CA03oot0 Pub1 Clas9t PAT Journu_1: Jnn. Kokal Tohkyo ttoho Codcn: JKXXAF Publ: ; 781221 PaOCr,: 3 I-4). Idantifiers: tlitem•pone alc perfume, recln unsatd ketone Patent Nn: 701•17015 At?plie No: 77/G2031) Date: 770525 Class: CJ7GJ3/02 -Asslqnur: Kuraray Co.. Ltd. CA09019152373V PronLrntion of hydroxycltronellal from a derivative of citronvlinlanu ulethan_o1a,eina - -- - -- autl,ur: DiUlChuva, A. /.,Golov_in_ a, Z, P., Kudryavtse_va, G. P„ Sitnikova,--R.-F., Kuznetsov, V. V,,Kharat, A. V., Dratus, I._ N. Locatlon:.Vsee. NluChnO-Issled. Inst. Sint. Nat. Oushistyk_h_ Veshcheslv, Sc1o Vrrontsovo, USSR S.^ct ionE CA0s0010 Pub/ Cl.iss: JOURNAL Journal; M•,.Io-Znir. Prom-st• Co.lcntMZPYAE . Pub1:' 79 IsEuu: 2 PaOes: 27-8 Lanqua0o: Ru__ss Idcntlflers-t hydroxycitronellal -- prepn eitronellal tllethanolmnine, perfwne hyOrOxycitronellal . .... .. .... r a
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e 17 ~.: *J TE8E1000 DIALOG i11c4: CA SEARCN 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am.'Chem. Soc.) (Item 0 of G5) User1906 21may79 CA0O0191522574 14-i.tothylCna-11-ox_9hexadecanollde Author:~llnai:umi, Funitake,~~Gotoh, Kohel, Soklne, Kazuo ~ Location: JoPan ~~ - . . .. ---- -- - ' ~ Section: CA020025, CA0G2XXX Pubi Classt PAT Journal: JPn, Kokaf Tokl.yo Koho~~ ~~Codcn: JKXXAF Publt 780922 ._P.9i,i 3 pp. ~ . .. . ..... - lCbotlfiers: metnylenaonahexadecanollds perfume iM•epn, oxahvaaCe:ai:olide n.ethylene, musk pcrfume, -polymn depolymn _ hyOroxyhutoYyd?CanOate, occanuate hydroxtbutoxy --Pulyu:n ocpulymn_.- ~ ----- -_. . Patent No: 70100093 Applic No: 77/23318 Oatet 77030S Clat.st~~C070321/00 AssiOnee:~~Jppan Synthetic Rubber Co., Ltd. C_A0901915215uD EPOxysultone - -Author: r:an0, Patricia C„ MlnOard, Robert E., Jr. .. lacation: USA - Section: CA028005, CA017XXX Publ Class: PAT ------ Journal: U.S-.- Coden: USXXAM Publ: 790206 ~ PaOes: 3 PP. Inentifiers: epoxy sultone. Olycldylpropane sultona, epoxypropyloxat'11oleUloxiCe, dihydroxyhexylOxybgnioylethylp_h- enol, s.cc•tener Oi nyUrexyhexyloxybenzoylv tnylpnenolPaton__t No: 4130409 Applic Nu: 8GJ117-Date: 771222 C_lass: 260-327S. C070327/04 --- A,siOneC: Dyanpol CA_09019151990G t,7a)tyl 2-nethylpentcnoates rlth or0anoleptle uses Authpr: t.lussinan, Cyn_thla. J„- Mookherjee, Brajo D., Goossens. Alfred E., Vocl., Y.tanfred H.. --Locatian:"5.4- --- Section: CA027012. CA017XXX,'CA062XXX Publ Classt PAT J_uurnal: U.S. Coden: USXXAM Publ: 790213 • PaOcsc 18 PP. Identifiers: maltyl methylpentenoate, flavor maltyl methylpentenoste --- - - Patent No: 4139541 Appllc No: 884302 Datet .780308 Class: 2G0-a45.8R, C07D309/23 Assignee: Internatlonai Flavors and Fragrances Inc. Suqs, Tadam/, Isaga, Toshlyukl, Section: C.t02G002, C_AOG2XXX : Pub) Class: PAT Journal: Jpn, Kokai To:<kyo Koho Coden: -JKXXAF Publ: ~M_urakami, Tauateru Locatton: Jaoan Aulnor: Niro.e, Noriyukl, CA09019151873M • Acctylpolyalkylfndans M 701221 Pages: 6 pp. • Ioentlfiers: acotylalkyllndan, perfume,, sCetylstyreneCycloayliln alkene Patent No:71t147052 Applic Not 77/60996 ..Date: 770527 Class: C07C:9/GI AssiOnoe: Atltsul Petrochemieal Industrles, Ltd., NaseOawa, T., Co.. Ltd. CA09019151005A Formald•1hy,fq aryt acetals as perfume compositions ~~ locntiun: Gcr,- Soctical: CA0?5010, CA062XXX Publ Class: PAT Jnu,+ndl: Jpn,- N_nkai Tukkyo Koho-- Coden: JKXXAF ~, Pubit 701221 Pagea: 4~I:P.- Iclpnlilicr,: purf.mne formalUr•hyde ar_yl acct_al_ ~ P.tlcnt Ioc 711Y47037 APpI ic No: Z723G37 Datet 770525 C1a;t,: C07C•13/30 Country: Ccr. AssiUncoc bragoto Gcrberuin0 Und Co. G.m.b.N, CA09019151750N Prqp-3rntion-of phetWl esters of propionie acid , Authr,r: Cazhulina, V. I., Polyakova, S. G., Andreev, V, M, Locotlonh Vsos. Nauchno-Isslcd. Inst, Sint. Na_t. Dushlstykh Ve5hCheStv, $^lo VCPOIIt::OVO, USSR Sectioni CA025010, CAOG2XXX--Publ Class: JOJRNAL Juurnal: fAUSlo-Znir.-Prow-st, Coden: MZPYAE Publ: 79 •PaOex: 25-7 Lan0ua0o: Russ - lacntiflers: pu-iacol propionateprepn perfume, Phenol ester propn Purfume --- CA09019151G91K. 2-ttcthylenu- and 2,12-b_is(methylelw)CyClododecanone Author: Von Fraunberq, Kar1 LOcation: GCr. • Seetion: CA024006, CA030X_XX, CA062XXX Publ Class: PAT Journ_al:_ G_cr, -Offen. ~ Coden: GMXXOX Publ: -790125 Pages: 11 pp. ._ .. _ .. , . ... ..___ .. . Identifiers: perfume methyloneeyelododecanon0 prepn, cyclodoUecanone methylene. perfume, mothylenation cyclododecan- on_e Patent No: 2730269 Appllc No: 2730269 Date: 770705 Class: C07C:9/45 Assignee: OASF A.-G. i r
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DIALOG f11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Oopr. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Itom CA09019151670C 3-OxocyclCup°ntenes Autnort Szckoly, Istvan. Lovasz, ttrs. Pal, Itovacs. Gabor Loc;itlon: Hung. --~-- ------ ... Suction: C_A024004, CA062XXX Pub) Class: PAT Journ3l: Hung. Te,lJas Coden: IIUXXOU Publi 701020 . . .... , . ._ .. . . Pages: 29 pp. Iu6ntificrs: perfu~ne )asmona, oxo_eyclopontone, eteavage a_yclupcntafuranone, ayclopentenone -- - Patent flo: 15574 Applic No: 1636 Date: 760130 Class: C07C Assignae: Chinoin GyoOys=or es VeOyeszotl Termakek Gyara Rt. C_A09010151073K Odor and chewlstry Authoro Hau, T26-LI LuCatlon: Pr,np. R. China Srction: CA020013 Publ Classt JOURNAL Journal: K'0 Hsuch Shih Yen Codon: KHSYAH Pubtt 79 Issue: I Pages: 30-40 Languap.:Ch Identifiers: ohem-oonipd odor,environment pollution odor CA09019150502N Amino actd additives for dog food Loc.1tion: USA Srctiono CA017005 Publ Class: PAT Ju6rnal: Neth. Appl. Cutfenc NAXXAN Publ: 701180 Pa9ce.: 22 pp,_._.._ lu:ntifiecs: lyslne dog feed flavor. appetite dog lysine Pitent tlu: 70 04375 AppllO Not 756954 Datc: 770516 Claa : A23K1/16 Counlry: US Aasignce: Ralston Purina Co. CA09019150494:A Inprovc-nent of the flavor and texture of Chinese noodles Author: 12n:.a, Yoshitoshi Location: J.pan--~~ Section; CA017004 Pub1 Class: PAT Journal: Jpn: Kokal Tokkyo Koho CoCen: JKXXAF Publ: 790109 Pagcs: 3 pp... ..- Identiflers: pasta propylene OlyCol Olutamate, noodle. texture flavor . Patent I±o: 79 02354 App11C No: 77/67072 Date: 770607 Class: A230/16 ------ ~~ ~~ CA090191S040714 Cheese substltute Authur: KuDOta, Hayato; Naksyama. Sadao, Totsulehl', TelJiro zeeEl:QOO ~ 15 of65) User1900 31&ay79 Location: Jhpan Scctiun: CA017003 Publ Class: PAT JuLmnal: Jpn. TokkyO KOho Coden:JAXXAO Pa_OO.: 4 pn. 10.41tifierS: fat 1aCtate CheeSe PatentHu:7001704Appllc Not' 70/75972 Clas.: A23C19/00 - - - Assignest FuJ( Selyu K. K. CA09019150495J Snukr.d fian flavor and taxturo ImprOVemont Autl,ur: fwtohiro, Terushipo, 6tatcumura, Sollchi Locat iun: Japan Section: CAO17003 Puh1 Class: PAT . ..._ ~ ... ....._..._ .... Journal: J;m. Koka1 TokKyo,Koho 790109 Pnges: 3 pp. luontlflors: fish smoked sorbltol, bicarUdnalo Umoked flsh r 520 Pu61e 790129 pate: 700901 Codent JKXXAF Publ: phosphate smoked flsh, Patent No: 79 02360 App11O Not 77/66469 Classa A23L1/325 CA090191504700 x-Glycosylstevloslde sweetner Aulhur:tAiyake, Toshlo --- ~ LoCatiun: Jipan Scction: CA017002 Publ C-ass: PAT Journal: Jp,l. Kokal Tokkyo Koho •'790116---Pa0es: 20 pp. Date: 770606 JKXXAF Publt Idcntlficrs: stuviosltle waltoduxtrln sweetener Patent Nb: 79 05070 Applic NO: 77/49551 Clac.s: A23L1/226 Datai 770613' Assigneec Hayashibara 61oChemlcal Laboratories. Inc. CA09019150494E StCvia Uvl•:e hler taste ImprOVemOnt Au UiM•: Dchf, Takashl, Shimi2u, TakaahlQe Location: Japan -- - S•:ction: CA017002 Publ Clasit PAT Journal: Jpn, KOkal TokkyO KohO 790109 P,OCS: 3 pp. ldcntifiers: Stevia swcetencr Patent Not 79 02381 Class7--A23L1/22 ----- Codcn: JKXXAF Publ: swectener sodium malate, tasta Stevla Applic No: 77/65100 Date: 770601 Asslgnce: San-EI Chenilcal Industrles, Ltd. i
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E 0 r 0 L C M OIALOG FIle4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr, Aai.•Chem• Soc.) (ltem 23 ol 65) Usert906 21may79 '! CA0^019/50472C Slevia S•raelaner taste (mprOvnment Aulhor: Oc:.i, TakasUi, Shimi=u, TakashlgeLOCatIOn: J,'.pAn - - - Scction• Cf.013002 Publ Class: PAT Jalurnat: Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho 781225 Pa;est 2 pp. IJrntificrs: Stevla St.^via taste Patent No: 70140575 Class:A231//22 Coden: JKXXAF Pultl i sweeteneP aletapllosphate, phosphate Applic Not 77/65179 Date: 770601 assignqe: San-El Chemical lndustrles, Ltd. CA020191504710 Stevia sr:cetener Ipnrove,Pent . Ault,or: Snimlzu, Tukashlge, OChI, Takashi Locat lono -Jiain -- - -- Szction: CA017002 Puol Csass: PAT Journal: -J(,n. -KOka/ Tohkyo Ko1fo Codent 701225 Paa^5: 2 p?. luontifiera: Stavla sweetcner amino acid. swcc:tencr Patent No: 7014U573 Class:~ A?3lt/22- ----- AppI1C NO: 77/62030 Asstgnee: San-E/ Chemical Industr/es, Ltd. CA09019150460F JKXXAF Publt' tryptophan Stevla Date: 770526 Flavoring with terpenyl others • ~ Aulnoe• /•iu_ssinan, Cynthia J.,- MookhorJ00, Bra)a D., V_o_ek, , 1~anfrecl H., SCh:nitt, Frederick L., Snuster,. -~Edward J., Sind.•rs. James Lt•, Light, Dette Pd., Granaa, Ed:,ard J. Locatio,i: U51 - - ~ ~ ~ ~ - St•ction:~Crt017002, CA0G2XXX Pubi Class: PAT - Juunnal: U.S. Corlen: USXXA0.1 Publ: 781220 _agos: 4 pp. -Idrntifiers: terpenyl ether flavor, odor terpenyl other Patent i7o: 41316y7 APplfo NO: 872937 Date: 7410127 Class: 426-3. A2311/2'6 Assigneo: Internatinnal Flavors and Fragrances Inc. .. .. .. ._-~ . - -_._ _ ._ _ CA09019150451V Differencos /n flavor eharaeterlstles_ and .chemical Constit-uon_ts between spring and su:rynqr 0,centeas - AulhOr: t:nwaryawa.,M~meyu:~l, Anan. Toya uSa, Iyasa. Klyoshl Location:_ N:,ll. Ro_s_. In,t. Tea. Kannyt,,Japan - SoCtiOn: CAp17004 Puul CIasS:_ JOUfiNAL Journal: Cnaqyo lSiJutsu Kenkyu Gotlcn: CHGKAV Publ: 77 Issue: 53- PagesF 74-81 Langua0e: Japan Idcntif/ers: tca cas-pn palatability ., CA09019150445M Elfuat of conthing on the flavor of dark s001-si+Nt .. . . . . ... _ . _ ~ ~ ChoColato -- Authar: ti:ullere, FranCols Yves LOPdtil/n: PCn113yiVa1lia-State UnJv.,,Un_Ivorsltv Park, -- --- SoCtic.n: CA0170_04 kubl Class: DISS CaJOn: oanl.DA- Publ: 7U P_enrs:' 06 pp. Citntlon: Diss• Abstr• Int. B t971J, 39(8), 3742 Avail: Univ. Mlcrofilms Int„ Ortler No. 7002623 ld¢ntifier`: Chacolate oUorOOnChing Pa. CA09019150306C ' • Studies on organic eonstituents of the snovw crab (Chionuccetes opllio). II. Free amino aeids In estraets - Aulhurc MiyaOaaa,- LtasayOSlli, Nakamot_O_, Sattayukl,-Yamane. Kpyuko, Shinlin, Aoi, Ueiu,.Sndawo, Yanikozawa, Ma_sashl, Kurmwchl, Hisao, UmaZu, 6:aLahiro -- location: fnc. Edue „ Tuttorl Wllv., Tottor , Japan - Svction: CA017007 -PuU1 Cla.S: JOURNAL Jouannl: Nipyon Sulsen G.,Lkaishi COOOnt NSUGAF Pubit 79 Series: 45 Issus: I Pagest 115-20 Language: Japan Iclentiflers: crabROat flavor amino acid CA090191503GSV Analytical Characterizatl0n of Palatlnlt Auti.orc --Gau,liolfqanp, Kurt, Juergon, Mueller, Lut;, Fls_ller, Egon. Stoinle, Geurg, Grupp, Uta, Siebert, Guenther Loc;.tlon:Pharma-Forsehungszent•-, Oayer A.-G., Nuppertal, G_er. Sectfon: CA017001 Publ Clasat JOURNAL Journal6 1• Lebcnsm.-Unters• forscn, Codent ZLUFAR Publ: 79 Serics: 160 • Issuo: 2 P;+Ges: . 125-30 la_ n0uag,>; Gcr IUcntlGiers: Palatinit dctn sweotener, chromatog yalat/nit, enzymic octn Palatlnlt-- - - - CA09019150337N FIavo,• cun;lderatlons of soy protein products Author: Sessi,0. J.- • Locatlon:HRRC,USDA, Peorla, 11(. Seetiun: CA017000 Puu1 Class: JOURNAL Journal: -Focd Prod.- Dcv• Cudon: FPRDAI Publi 79• Serics: 13 Ist;uo: 2 Paqcs: 62-4 lacntifiers:revicr-soybcan protein flavor , .
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DIALOG f11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copn. Am. Chem. Soc•) (Item 31 of GS) User1900 2tmayl9 CA09019150330E - f•litro,ry.m-Cuntalr11n0 heterOcycllC COepounds as food flavors. PrepYlratiun bV reactiuns'ofprQtonated imines - Autaur: Su_yama, Ryoto .......... LucntionaToi,uku--Univ., Sertd.tl, Japan Section: CA017000 P-ubl Class: .IOUFtlAL Journat: Kagaku to Seibut.u Coden: KASEAA Publ: 79 Serios: 17 Issue: I Papes: 19-21 Lan0ua0e: Japan Idontifiers: review nitrogen ho_teroeyclic flavor, udor nitrogen hetereeyCtic revicw - CA090191503250 Presorvation of ready-to-serve foods and eieals by thermal, trcat.rIonts Autswr: flowak, I„ Pnulus, K. to,.atron: lnst. -Ll•benamlttelChet.., 8undefforsChunpeanst. E_ rnwnr. .--1tar l•.ruher Gcr. - Seetion: CA017000 Publ CInSs: JOURNAL Journal: OFE-fer: Cooen: BFEBGG Pub17 78 Issue: 3 PaOoz: 50 pp. LanOtkapob-Gar- --- Identifiers: review food nutr/ent processin0, ' flavor food processing revlew--- ' . CA090191502679 Conqener sut,stonees in German and forei0n beers - - kol f0ang ' Oonta, Autnor•: Location: lnst. Ret.htsmed,, Univ. Goettln0en, Ger. Set:tion: CA016003 Publ Class: JOURNaL Goettin0on, Journal: Olutalkohal CCJen: BLALAL Publ: 79 Series: 16 Is*.ue: 2 Caqes: 108-24 Lanryuage: Gar --- -- Identifiers7 ethanol beer. congener beer CA0^019150249K Rcd wlne rtuatlty: correlations between color, aroma and flavor and_ piWncnt and other parameters of young 0_eaujolais Author: Jackson, Ltichael G., Timborlake, CoYin F., Bridle, Peter. Valli„ Lloytl---- -- -l.ocatjon: Stowells of Chelsea Ltd., Hatfleld, En01) c Section: CAO1G003 Publ Class: JOUItNAL Juurnal: J. Sci. Food Agric. Codon: JSFAAE Pub1i 78 Series: 29 Issue: U PaO.,s: 715-27 Identifierst wfnu Deaujolaisquallty ohem parameter 'CA0092521S597Y Ditcrnene Chenilstry. VIII..' Synthesis of perfumery Co-npcunds from labda-0(17),14-dtcn-l3-ol (m3nool) ~ Author: Grant. Peter-K „ lai, Chee K. ' ~ Location: Dnp. Chem., Univ. 0taan, Dunedln, N. i.''';'* - Publ C1__ase:: JGJRHAL Sm7tiond CA030020 Jouriurl: Aust. J. Chc.q. Cod•'-n: AJCHAS 9 Serieu: 31 tesuo: 8 L'a0est 1705 ld~`rltifiel•s: purf'~u ditcrperie aCetal Publt . 79 CA00923197620U - Mecrucyclic ethylonodloates ' '- Autrwr: K,7rabe, Norio, Nishldo(, Masaru ` Locat u,n: Japan Sectl_un: CA0a0025, CA023%X%, CA035XXX, CA062XXX' Pubi Clascs: PAT Jour_na1: Japan. Kokai . Codont JKXXAF Publ: .'•'7805?3 Pages: 5 Pp. IUentifiers: perfume ethylene•e brassylate dodeeanedioate, ethyleuC brassylate, dodeCanedioate othytene. dopolymn oycli7atiun pulycthyleno hrassylate. macroCyclic porfume -- Pat4_nt No:78 5GLU1 Appi'io No:7G/1293UG Datli: 761029 Clarst- C07U321/04 - - - - Assinnee; Toi•ay Industries, Inc. CA08923194148K - ' U$c of I1-methyl-7-oxatetracy0lo-(8.3.1.0.1,G0.4.11)dodoCAn- e_s as arorca ingrcJlent . Authnr:0crnole• Edouard Paul . . Location: S'NItZ. . ...• . - j!t Sectiui. CAbtt007 Publ Classi PAT Juurnal: Swiss Coden: SWXXAS Publt 700630 Papest pp• ~ -Identifle_ra_: tobacco srnoPe flavor dodecone der/J Patent-Na:G00fi00 Appllc No: 75/15706 Date: Class: A23LI/22G Assignee: Firmonich S. A. CA0097.2105931H Solid fragranCe preparations taka Author: Marui, Y u _ _ Location:Japin - Seetion: CAOG2005, Jotirnal: Japan. Pages: 4 pp. Idontifiors: polyethyleno Applic No: 77/5295 Assignee: Takabishi KaOahu N. CAOOSXXX Kokai 751203 Publ Ctasst PAT Coden: JKXRAF Publt 780810 solid fragrance polyethylene, perfume solid Patent No: 78 91149 ClossE AGIK7/4G K. Date: 770120 .
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39 of 65) User1906 21may79 5311' Location: Mashinpton, 0. C. Sectlon:~CA017o00 Pub1 Class:-TECH REP . ~ Journ_al: U. S. NTIS, PO R_.p. Coocn: XPBRCA .Publi 78~~ Issue: PC-2iQ377,~~ ~ ~~Pag.^s:-~lt pp. - --~- -.~- Citation: Guv.~Rep. Announee. Inder•(U.• S.)~ 1970, 70(14). ~101 -- Avall: NTIS Iuentifiers: flavor food revlew CA08915127701X " --Flavor of fntty acids In relation to thelr physical atate in sulut/un , Authur: Roberts. R. T.. Clappertnn, J. F. LucStfonf Or,Iw. R_as. Founo., NuttlOltl/Redhlll/Surrey, Enql. Section: CA016003 Puol Clasa: JDuR:IAL Jourvu,l: J. Inst. Orer. Couen: JINDAL Publt 70 Seriv..: 114 Issue: 3 Puqos: t57 Identifiers: bear fatty acid flavur CA0891512GI0tQ Flavor bio^„_cnesls. Partial purification and properties of a fatty acid hyoropcroxiuo cleavlnQenzymt--from fruits of cucwubar Author: Phillips, David R., Galliard, Terence Location: Food ReS. Inst.,ARC, NurwlCh. E4101, Section:-Ca0~1100~1, CA0077ftX, CA017XXX-~~ Publ~~Class: JDURNAL Journal: Phytn,:hemistry Couon: PYTCAS Publ: 78' Scries7-t7 Issuec 3 ~~- PaOes:-355-8 ~ - tu_c•ntlfiers: fatty aeid- hydroperon/de Cleavlnp enzywe, eucumt,er Ilivor enFyme ---- ~~ - - - - ~~ ~ - CA009131058330 Conccntratial and IdentlFieatlon of trace constituents In alcuholic bevcrn0e_S Au117or: Tor Ncicle, R., De Valols, P. J., Visser, J., Jae+)ors, P. P., Tiumwr, R. - Locationt Nnartlqn Int. N. V.., Naarden-Oussum, Neth_. S.:ction: C_A01600_1 PubI Class: COMF PROC Journal: An;,t, Foocls Cevuraqas, (Proc. Symp.) Cod_oni 30CVA2 Pub1: 78 PaOes: 2g9-Ut Ateetln0 Qatoi 77 ---- PubliShcr: Acndomic AdUr059: New York. N. Y Avall: Charalan:nous, Gcorpo - ---- --- ld.ntifiers: alc bevera0a flavor compd analysls. brandy f i avor co,bjw s 0 DIALOG Fise4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chera.rSoc.) (Iten CA00421180191G O+tornene chemistry. VII. Sulfur-containing derivatives of louu.,-0(17).14-dien-13-ot (inanool) - Aut.lwr: Grant. Peter K_.,liau. Henry T. L. Lotatio,r: D^p. Cnem.,-Unlv.-OtaOo, Dunedln, N. T. Section: CA030020 -Pub1 Classt JOURNAL Journa_ 1: Aust. J. Cnee. Coucri•. AJCIIAS Publ: 78 Series: 31 IS_sue: B. Pages: 1777-83 -IJc•ntifiers: -p.rftrne dlnurlabdan6, -diterpene sulfur contp, manuul sulfur neriv - - CA00921179604N Ja.muno and Analops Author: Ya.pato.Takcshl, Kosh/calzu, ShlOeru, Hayashf, Kazuo l.ocatlund J:q.,n .... . . .. ... ... .. ... . . . Section: Cd024004 Publ Class: PAT Journal: Japan. Cot(pnc JA%XAO Pu'J1: 780718 Pages: 4 pp. laent/flers: perfuse jasmone, alkylation cyclopentanone Patent No: 70 24062 Applic No: 74/)2287 Data: 740814 Class: C07C49/46 AssiOnee: HaseOawa, 7., Co., Ltd. CA009211781710 Artvfact formation during the elCtractlon of bacon.vosatlles In a lfkons-N,Ckerson apparatV3~ Author; tGOttram. Donald S., Puckey, David J. _ .. __ _.-- ~ -- - - - - ~ Wcation: f.teat Res. Inst., ARC, Bristol. En01. ' SaCtion: CAOI7001 Pua1~~Cla_sS_: JOURIJAL_ - Juurna~lt Cnem.~)nd. (London)~ CoUCn: CHINAG Publ: 78 IsSue7 11 Pages: 305-6 lurntifiers-:~ ~bacon analysls nltrobutanol artefact, flavor bacon CA009191G1700A Review ono study on Ouava fruits flavor ....- ~ Author: Sct,ota, HaruyaSu Locatiou:_ Japan ~ ~ Section: CA01700_4 Publ ClasSt JOURI4AL . Journal: Y.oryo Coden: KORYAR Publ: 78 Ser/esS 121, Pa9es: 23-30 1an0uac,e: Japmi )ocntificrs: guava aroma Carpn, odor guava scieeIOOo CA0(19171450G5X Stientllic literature review of aliphatic primary altohols, aluanydcs, esters and acids In flavor usage. Supplement-3--. Flavor.nO E-traCt manufacturers' Associatiunof the Unit9d States
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. 0 . ..~-~ (T~ DIALOG Fllea: CA SEARCH 77-78/VOL 90(20) (COpr.'Am. Chem. Soe.) (Item 47 of 65) Usert906 21may79 532 CA00409074453J F.-ui t f I.rGor in0 Ie.orovement Aulhor: isun.rya, Yirnuyukl-, Shlbai, Teruhlko, ShlOo, Minoru Luc.et ron: Jat1an- -- Soctlone CA017002 Publ Class: PAT Journal: Japan. Coden: JAX,iAO Publt 700411 Pages: 2 PP,..... -Identtfiers: fruit flavorin0 phenylaeetate, plneappleflavorin•1 phonylaceta_te, ethylid,tneptlenylacetate fiavorinp, v_inylphcnylacetate flavorinq- -- Patent tJo: 78 10138 Applic t:o: 73/142773 Oatet 731210 Cla.u: A61K7/4('. AssiOnee: Sniono Kuryo Kaisha, Ltd. CA00909074200J• Vanilla and products with a vanilla teste.. A new develupn4nt syatem-for thln-layer ehromatonrams Author: Courcelles, C.,Rqy, S.,Corbunel, F., VanGsurn. fA., Zelbstvin. P. - Dupont. A., Lucation: Uru. Cent. ffcpress. Fraudos. Ma_ssy, Fr. .'. Section: C6_01700_1 Publ C1a51: JOUI.UAI -- -Journai7 Ai;n. Falsif. Expcrt. Chim. Codent AFECAT Publ: 70 Series: 71 Issue: --763 Paqes: 121-8 LanJuaCc: Fr Idontlflers: vanilla thin.layer ehromato0 CA00904030502W -Oiaor tonacily of perfumery materials Author: Hu^..r.ka.ya,Mayato, Shib;rmoto. TakayUk/ , Locat ion: 04-~wa and Co., Ltd.. Tokyo. ~Iapan -- Section:-CAc62COS - Publ-CIasS:_ JOURNAL_- . Journal: Prrfum. Flavor. Go~Qn: PEFLOI Pubt: 78 Series: 2 I..uu: 7 Paqas: 29-30. 32 -Identifiers• perfuue odor tenacity oil odor tenacity perfume terpene, aldenyde CA00901004079D Fat prcduct sultable for the Dreparatlon of gravy Author: Van tlc,n Our.1sand, -Godofridus Antonius M._ir_ la_ , Stcennock, Aric, Van de hestelaken, Hendricus Cornelius -- LuCation: fleth. Section: CA017013 Pubi Class: PAT ' Jou_rnal: IJetn, Appl.--Coden: NAXXAN Pubi: 700117 PaOcs: 14 pp. 10.•ntifiers: fat emulslon Oravy, browning fla_vorln0 gravy Patent No: 77 075•14 Appllc Not 76/29340 Oate: 760714 Class: A23D5/02 countryc Orit. AssiOnce: Unilever N. V. CA00025190040V - I 4 Dlo.an s subst/tutod by one~ or more alkyl groups and : .-__ ._ ... ..__.. thorr~ u ~ r .COnt+ LoCalion. hqr. . 5aCtiun CA020012, CAOG__2_X_XX Publ Classt PAT Juurnal. Noth. Appl, Coden: NAXXAN Publt~ ~'771230 P'+9es: 14 pp. . Idcntifiers: tlioaano, perfume dlo>tane Patcnt No: 77 06255 Appftc-Not 2629000 Date: 760620 Classc C070319/10 Country: Gor. Assiynce: Ilenhol K.-G.a.A. CA0110251002460 SLparatiun of polyeyellearomatle hydrocarbons and datermination of ben_xo(a)p_yrene /n liquid smoho-proparat/ons -Authorc Radocki, A., Lau.parc[yk, - H., Grs_ybo•.•ski, J., HalNiewiCZ, J. - - . Locptiull: Den. Phya. Chom.. M_e_d. ACad., Gdansk, P01: Section: CA017001, CA004XXX -- Publ Class: JOURN_AL_ Journal: - J. Clmomatoqr. CoAcn: JOCRAfA Publ: 76 Serie9:ISO Iscuc-.2--Papn6: 527-32 Identifiers: benzapyrene datn smonc flavoring, gas eh_romatoq benzopyf•une-,potycyclichydr•ocaruon Chromato0 - CA000241770170 . Thefoamin0 behavior of detergents - determined by an impact fonm metlwd Author: Rochl. Ernst Ludwig Localinn:_ Naardon, Neth. Scction CA0G200S, CA04GXXX~ . Puht Class_t JOURNAL ''JUUrrw_I: Pilrfucm. 8osulet. Cu'urn:-- PAKOAL Publt - 77 SCrre:t: 50 losud: 9 PnOes: 2•15-50 Langua0e: Gur Idcntlfiors: shan,poo componentsurfactant foamin0, perfume sna~npbosurfactantfoamin0, conditioner shampoo surfaelant foaminq CA0802715829nE Cwnho6itions for applying a flavoring agent to the oral cavity Author: Pirhs, Lawrence ROy LU6atio,l: USA- Sactlot: CAOG2007 Publ Class: PAT the teeth and Journal: Orit. Codan: ORXXAA Publt 771Z2t PaOos: 11 pp. identlflers: d_entlfrie_e flavoring agent mcthacrylate Patent Noc 1495605 Applic No: 448776 Date: 740306 Class: A61K7_/16 Country: US : AssiQneec Proctor and Gamble Co. . f
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• i•-: DIALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/vOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chets, Soe.) (Item 55 of CA01In21 150657A Npturnlly occurrin;j chemicals In foods Author: LarrnnCe, Orian Lt,---LLcation: Stnn;e Canaoa ltd., .'.lalton, Ont. - Section: CA017000 Publ Class: JOURNAL--Juurnel: Parfum, Flavyr, Cotd.n: PEFLDI Publ: 77 Series: 1 lssue: 6 Pac;es: 4, 6 - - Inrntiflers: revic:r odor fruit, watermelon odor reYlew, tnushmelonodor revicw, orange ettsenee odor revlew, cssence oranga odor rcview 65) User1906 21say79 533 CA0001107_2950Z Study un tlle components distillates of wine using gas Chru,n,l taXJr lnhy . . M,thor: Ulkfatvl, Rtrs. Islvan, Pasrtor, Mr;. Lasslo Locatiun:-S.e;<7lpnri Kut. Inl4z., ltunq: Sectiun: CAO1G003 Publ ClacseJOURNaL ' Journal: Sra,,iipir CoLlen; -SlE5A7-Publi 77 ~ Ser/as: 25 lssue: 3 Pagest 9ur.100 Langua0e: I/un0 - Identifiors: winsUisti.llate Caq)ntaste,altlehyde wine distillatc. Alc wino d/stilla:c, fusel-oil wine distillate CA0110201421120 Selectivity of ioa-ext:hpnge properties of sunflower pectic pcid~during the exchange of potassiun(1+) and ammonlum(I+) ions in n.ethanol ~ Author.Pbpova, -M, Lucatlon: Highor Inst. Food Flavor. ind., Plovd/v, 8ulp, Sectiqn: CA0GG004 Publ Class: JOURNAL Jeurnal: 2_il. Fi_=._ Khi,n. Cod.:n__:_ IFKHA9 Publ: 78 Serics:-52 Issue: i, PnUec:. 219-t3 Lanouu0et Russ~~ ~ Idontlfiers: exq,ange salcctivity potasslum ammonium, pectic aCid Cation exChanger selectivity- C_A_00013087610N . Fta.or GuUSt2nCes fn distilled spirits Autnor: Postnl, W., Dra.ert. F., Adam, L. Locatial: Inst. Lebensmitteltecnnul. Anal, Chem., Tech. Univ. t.luenchcn, Frelsing-FJeihcnstephan, C2r. -- Section: CA01G003 Puol Class: CO/lF PiqC . ' Jnurnal: Gcrucn- Geschmar_kstoffe, Int. Symp. . Codon: • - - - - --- - - ----- -.. _ ._.. .. 371FAi Punlc 75 Pages: --99-1t1- Language:- -Ger ~7;eting Date: 74 - - Puulisner: Verlag Hans Carl ACOress: Nuernborg, Gar - As•nil: F loontifiers: volatile flnvor Compd alt beverage, ester volatile alc bcverage, terpene volatile alc be_verage, Carbo_nyl volatile alc beverage- - - CAOtfOt1072939X Ricc-.pirits yith roasted cereal flavor Author: YOda, Rlkue , Locat ion:_ J+jt.an Section: CAOIG003 Publ Class: PAT Journal: Japan. Kokal Codin: JKXXAF Pubt: 771121 Pagas: 3 pp. . . -.. -.;... . ... . .. . It1.•ntifiorsi alt beverage Cereal flavor, rlte flavor alc bevcra0a . . .. .... .. . ~ . - Patent No: 77139795 Applle No: 76/56060 Datet 760518 Class: C1ZG3/04~~ -- ~~ CA_00C070510420 ThU)upsClnC isomer epexides Author: Naqa:.ura, Akira,Tsuruta, Naruki, Yoshida, Toshio . Locat icrn: J.ipan - - - Seetiun: CA030015 Pub.l Class:.PAT Journat: Japan, Kokal Coden: JKXXAF Pubht 770112 Pa_ges: 0 pp. Ictnntii'icrs:- thuJopsene epo,cidn IsomeriZatlon, ' epqxidesesllulterpene, p_erFu/ne se;qutterpena epo.ldo - P.ttont No: 77 03077 App liC No: 75/79680 Date: 750620 Class: ALIK7/46 Assignce: Tnkasago Perfunery Co., Ltd. CA00006041563W •Co.metics Author: Hdyashl, Katsutake, Yomoglta, Katsuyuki, Satto, Chikara, Saito, i/irotada----- ---- ---- ~--- Location: Japan Sectiont CA062005 Publ Classt PAT Juurnatc Japan, KOkalCodcn: JKXXAF Publi 771015 Paoos: 7 pp. lelclit i f icrs: pigment chclator perfume cosmet_ IC_ Patent Na: 77122639 Applie No: 76/90i,o0 Date: 760406 Cla,sc A61K7/bG Assignee: Shlseido Co., Ltd. m m m Z m .~ D - . Co 0
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. ~ • s94 DIALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Asl. Chem. Soc.) (Item 62 of 65) Usort906 21may79 CAOUR050_3G116y - - T:.f.te imu,•uvamcnt of 0lyeyrrhetlnate swastenor Autnur: Itorita. Toyoshiqo,Fujita, Alasao, 0.:urlta, EtsuO .... tocntiw,: Jopah Seotion: CA017J02 Puol Class: PAT Juurnal: Jopan. Kpkai Coden: JKXXAF Publs 770924 Pay.a... 4 pp. It:.•ntificrs: Olycyrrhetinate sweetener qlucoside, terpcnoid plycyrrhrtinate sweetcner - Patcnt No: 77114055 Applie No: 76/3[590 Date: 760323 Clas.c -A23L-1/22G AssiOnc,t: Gurita KaQaku KoOyo Co., Ltd. ' CA0p0030234009A 2 -Asr:art7lamino-alkanol fatty acid esters . Author: CnibatL. Ichirp. MiyO5h1, H.uneteuQu. Fujil, -- - - - - ToShiyuki. Ilirasltima. Keisuke Locat ion:_ J'j,%an S:ction: Ca0J4002 Publ Class: PAT Juurnal: Jnuan. Kobal CoUOn: JKXXAF Paqou: 9 pp. • Publt -770002 Ioentifiers: aspartylaminoalkanol aster Rrepn sweeteners. aSpurtiC acid am1n0311kanol am1dC ester P,,tent tlo: 77 91022 Applic No: 76/8169 Date: 760127 Class: C07C103/50 AssiOnee: Tanabo Seiyaku Co., Ltd. CA00803022193J Thc formation of eyclopcntadeCane-1.S-dione derlvatlv_es_ by an oKir.nylmcthyl fragmentatibn. A Synthesi5 of muSCOnC Author:Gray• pr.berlW-.. Oreidin0,l,ndra S. Lotption orq.'Cnce:. Inst.. Univ. Zu_riCh, Zurich. Switz. Scction: C_t.G?•10Ub, CAOG2XXX -- Pubi Clans: JOURNAL Jaurnal: Hclv. Cn__in,. Acts CoJen: HCACAV-----Publ: 77 Serica: GO Issued 0 Papes: 19G9-79 W__mgua0c: Ga!r ld~ii:ifiern: CyClopentpUCCOnedione iNuskfra0rance prOpn, muscone prepn,- - epoAybicyclopentadecenol, hydraFone Cyclopentad9Canedione --- CA0U00t00G431€ ' Foods and flavor u.e of 1-(3,3-dlmethyl-2-norbornY))-2eprop-. anonr , Author: SChreiber. NIIIIam L:., Siano, James N., VoCk, M_a_nfrcd Hugo. Shugter, Edrard J. ;;- - Location: USA ` Scction: CA024007, CA017XXX, CA062XXX Pub) Class: PAT ' Journal: U.S. Coden: UiXXAt.t-Pu01t 771011 PaOcs: 11 pp_• Identitiers: norbarnylacetone prepn food parfums, flavoring focd aCetonytdimethylnorbornane prepn, perfumo acetonyldiineth- ..._ Rea£Tooo. w ylnorbornana prepn, norbornano acotonyl prepn flavoring Patent Nu: 40_53G57 Applic Noc- 747306 Date: - 761203, Class: 426-530, A23L1/226 AssiOnuc:lnturnationat Flavors and Fragrances Inc. i
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r Print 8/2/1-6 S3S ' DLALDG Filv4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20)' (Copn. Am.. Chem. Soc.) (Item I of 6) User1908 21may79 C_A00019146709UEnn,,nccu matnbollsm and fnutapenesls of nltrosopyrrolidlne in livor tractic.ns isolatetl frum ahronic otnaitol-COnsuming -- -- -- - -- - - haiayt.'rs Author: L'.cCoy, G. David, Chen, Chi Hong B., Hecht, Stcphon S.. ntuCuy, Elona C. Location: Naylor Dana Inst. Dis. Prev., Anerlcan Health FounJ., Valhalla, N. y. ---- Section: CA004007 Pub1 Class:.JOURNAI Jour•nal: Cancer Res. Codon: CNREAO Publ: 79 Series: --- - 39 lscua: 3 Paycs: 793-6 Identifiers: ethanol n/trusopyrrolldlno motab mutagenesis CA09019145679t/ Nu., anal_orJ+ of streptozotaeln i.ul..or: uuru=zl, Aurel io, tiontoro,. Jean Louis, Imhach, Joan Louls - Luc:+tionc W!S. Chim, 111o-Org., Univ. Sci. L1o_ntpell:Er, Fr. --~-Sucticn: CA001005, CA033XXX • Journal: €ur. J. MeJ. Chcn,, - Publt 71) _ - Scries: 13 Lanquagc:..Fr Tech. Oiry, Joel. Languccloc, Pubi Class: J_OU_RNAL Chim. Ther. CoCen: EJIdCAS Issue: 5 Pagcs: •11t-4 1d_•utifi.rsi streptozoqpcln analog leukemia neoplasminhtGitorstraptozotocln analog Inhibition,. CA0U9191G3555M 1,4 5 6 T,•trlhy(/r0- nU.-tCtraZlne dorlvotlvos Aut:w r SurUacn JI te.r-, Cacti. Rolf, Eno4rs, Dieter. Rengor, Berncl, Jun+an, ttart-in, OraChtol, Gi,rold - - Location: L::b. Org. Chcm„ €fH, Zurich, Swltz. Saction: CAO2L'022,CA075XxX Puhl Class: JOURNAL J.u_r_na_ I: llclv. Chim, ACt;+ Cooer.:HCACAV Publ: 78 Serie;t-61 Issuc: 5 Par.les: 1622-47 Language:Gcr- Ic:enlifiers_: tetrazine prcpn reaction. Crystat stru,:turo tetratine, Ox ion letraz-Ine, redU tutrazl~le, photolysis tetrazine, dimRrizatiun l.trazlne-- -- CA0t!U12079t79P ' Chemilu:ninesCOnee_ method for selecting antloxldizing agents foroinlnx:ntOllses - Author: lontsova, A. I., Go1'denber0, V. I., Gryaduhova, G. P., S.a.palova. L. K. LoCttion: UiSR ' Section: CA064003 Publ Clas a JOURNAL Journal: Sovrem, Aspckty Isstofl. v Oul. F.trmatsll Coden: ' OaJQU5 Puol: 77 Paqes: 167-0 lanpu.+)C: RU§a Citation:Rof.2h., Khrm. 1977, Abstr. qo. 210207 loontifiers: antiuxidant ointment Dasc chemilw.1inesCenee CA006070450011C Protectiun- by antlorildants against the torielty of,osono to m_Icrouial Systeins -'- ---- Author: Ep.toin, Samuel S., Bishop, yvonne Location: Sch. Public Hqalth, Unlv, Illinols qed, Cent., . ChiC:..c1u, 111. Section: CA004003 Publ Classl JOURNAL Journal: Environ. Res. Couon: ENVRAI - Publt 77•. Serle:::1a lssuo:2 Pages: 107-93 Identifiers: ozone toMicity microorganism ant/oxldant CA00005032100Z Enh..ncow.nt of a_nticancer elfect-oFCyelophosphemlde by - inhiGiturs-uf lipid peroxidatlon - -Author: Ohira, Ln.lao, d:~osewa, Sakae, Natanabo. Kazuhiro, Klta•.1a, Kazuniro, Sakuma, Rlasayoeni, fAatsuoka, Shigeru, Salto, Talsuo Location: Inst. Acld-Fast Bact, Dis „ Tohoku Unlv., Senda/, Japan Section: C_A001005 Publ Class: JOURNAL .1ourna1: Saishin Igaku Codon: SAIGA1t Pub1: 77 Series: 32 Issue: 9 Pages: iZ57-G4 Language: Japan Iclentifiers:-cyclophosphai6idC tumar inhibition antio.idant,•^vitamin€cytlulihospn=°rI0< tumor, innibiticn, EDTA CyclophosFhamirle tu_irx:r -innioit/on, gluathlonecyclopnosphamide tumor-inhrbitton, lipid perox/dn innibltor antitumor sy3eTOOO ~ .
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Print 0/2/1-72 DIALOG-File4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 00(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item 1 of 72) Usort908 21tnry79 CA09020161718P .aeatto.i of thermoslablo, phenyl silicone Coatpd, glass Prci, Capil-lary culunins fur scparation ofpJlyarOm..)tiC hyUrocarhuns Autlior7 Dlon,berq, L., Ouijten. J.,-Gawc/zik, J., W3i1nman, T. LOCatinn: Jop. A1191. Cheni.,Univ.- Stoekholin, Stoekholm,. ..-. . .. _ - -. . . Sw.r.:. ~ ~ ~Soction: CCnnaoon Publ Class: JDURNAL burnal: c.nromatoqraphia Codon: CHRG07 Serivst-il Icsue: 9 Pages: 521-5_ ' ld.~nt_Ifier;: polyarom hyurucarbon gas phe,lyl silicohe stationary phasc chromatoq. CA09020161713H Gas chron:,toqrdphy - wass spo6tromotry Autnor Ehrs%on, Hans - -- --'- LocationK,vvolinsY._a_ Pharm., Stockhnlm, Swod. Saction: Ct.0ua000- Publ-Class: CONF PROC . Publt 70 s:e thy l Jc,urn_al: t.:0_tl._ Meth:,d01, 1501. Identif. Ouantlfleation Drugs Pe1at. Subst.-, Collcct.. Pap. Semin. Coden: 40GOAQVubl: 77 Pac .>;: 12S-8 Puwisilyr: EFTA Sucr. Address: Geneva, Switz Ic0.•nt:fi0rs: rttvlrw gas ChrnmJtOg m_a;s sPOCtroscopy, anaiySis cilr0.97toq m:.£s apectrflGCOpy t•eview CA0°0201_61590R of anions by ion-exehen_qe Ch_ro_matoqraphy Author Lau^c•nt, A., OourcWn, R. - Locaticn L:1.. Chinn. Anil., Wiiv. Rene D+scartes, Prris', Fr. Se_ction. C.1079004, CAC17X%%, CA06IXXX P,:UI Class: JOURNAL J_-jrnjl: Ann Ph+u•m. Fr. CoUen. Api'Rd0 - Pun1: • 78 Sc es: 36 1s..ue. 9-10 Pages: 453-60 Languaqc•: Fr - I.L.ntIfiors: inm•g anion ial cxchanq4 Chruns:tcg.sul/ate detn W•i.,kin; r.pter Gtromatog, nltrato-datn dr-inkina wate,+ iiim drinkint:- water, au.+lys-iR sutfate nitrato, ham analys13 nitrite, _fluurido lun excha_n;E chr na t „ chloriUe Ion exchrng^ Chrumatog, iu,tltM ion c4cnang^ ch,cr.:6:og, bran,de ion exchanOq chrom.utog, acvthte ion exchan7e chrom.,loy, iot/.ltu inn exCh_ango Chronmytoq, pnOSpllato fon axCh;nqe a:hrC •.lOg, Uro;n.lte ion c.cnrnqe chrumataq, chlorate ion axchar.q•: Chromaloj, sulfata ion Cxchant)J chromatog, perchlorale- lon exChqnqY .cnru~u5tog, tartratc s°pn citrate chroiuatog CA090201569810 €csentlnl oil from Cymoopoqon citratus (D.C.) Step growing -- in tne PhilippinCs Au:hor: Oloverus-9elardo, lu_z, Aureus, Elsie Location: Pnilippinek:dnenis Univ., tdanlla, Phlllpplnos Sce: ion: C.LOo2002 Puol C_ Iass: JOURN.,L Journal: Aslan J, Fnarm. Coden: ASJPCG PJbI: 76 Os` 8c .000 41 Srries: 3 ls..uo: 4 Pages: 14-17 Ido1itl/iers: Cymuop0gon oil cltral, Citral 1enoon Ora;s pil 0 536 luaon arass oil eitral, CA0902015f,90oP . Cen1pusition of pine essontial oil Autlior: Go~hostaCVa, L. I. . Lucatlon: Sib. fuhhnol. Inst.. Krasnoyarsk, USSR ,. - S.ctlun: C_AOG2002 Pubi ClasstCD?IFPROC- - Journal: I.sloil. t7o1. Kh1m. Drev., Tczisy L)okl., KonF. M_o_lodylh Uch 2,10 ' CoCOn: 400wAZ Publ: 78Paqes: 41-2 Llml ary Russ Pub,, h-r Izd. Zinatne Addresst RlOa, USSR Avail: Karlivnn, V. P --- --- ld.:ntificrscpine-oll Compn, torpone pino oll ;. CA0902015_6979V Effor,t of-storage of Irls rhi:cxeus on the Composltlon of" Iri's essentlal oil or eoneroto ana "no-now eonstitucnt_s - Authur:--Garnero, Joan, Joula/n. Danicl, Dull. Pierre LoCatiun: L:±1). Rech., Et:1b1. P. RuhcrtOt. Grosse. Fr. S..Ction: CA062002 Publ Class: JGJRtIAI -- Journal: Riv. Ital. Esaeiite. Prufumi, i'lattte Off„ Arolnat.. Syndcls. Saponi. C_o_rn+t., Aerusols Coclan: RIEADU Pu_b_It 78 S.ri..: GO - Issue: 10 Paqos: 560-90 Languaget Fr identificrs: ir/s ebs concrete Conpn CA09020152897u Dctcr_m_ination of oarboxyl-terminatod-butatliaee-.nltri_le poly.cr in cuqur.er¢ial CreSol-novalae epoxy resin systemsby pyrulysls capillary gas chron,atoqriptly and mass SpectroTe_t_ry Authur: i.faynarC, J. 8., Twicholl. J. E., Walker, J. 0. Location: Mater. Lab., McDonnell-Douglas Corp., St. Louis. Mo. Section: CA036004 PuCI Class: JOURNAL Journal: J. Chromato9r. Sci. Codan:JCHS82 Publ: 79 - Serios: 17 Issue: 2 Paqes: 82•-G --Idontltiers: epoxy rosin nitrllc rubber tlotn, pyrolysis gas Ohrompto0 ruuber,paschromatog pyrolytic rubber . . I 1 .
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DIALOG FIlo4: CA SEARCH 77-79/y0L 90(20) (Cupr. Am. Chem. Soa.) (ttem 0 of 72) User1906 21nay79 537 CA0901915250411 Idontification of acety) derivative isomers of /.5-.1nhydro-0-xylltol by pas Chroaato0r,:phy and "nss apectr4.netry - - - - - Author7S;afranek, Janusz. Wlsnle9kl, AndrzeJ, GaJOus, Jcr2y , Nur.miorz, Jozef Lucatlon: 1.7o,g Spectron.. Lab „ Univ. Gdansk. Gdansk, Pol, Section: CA0330_04 4ub1 Class: JOURNAL - - Jo,'r,ial: J, Chromatoqr. CoUon: JOCRAtA Publ: 79 Series: IGO Issue: 2 -PaUes: 445-b3 -ldentitiers: anhytL•orylltol--pas chromatog mass spectra,xyl i tut anhydro gas chr4matoq - - ---- CA00019151990G f,+altyt 2-mcthylpentenoatos with organoloptic uses Au Unor: Ltussinan, Cynthia J.,Mookherjee, OraJa D., Ooossens, Alfred E., Vock, Manfred H. Locationi USA - Scctioni CA0771112, CA017XXX, CA062XXX Pubi Class: PAT . Journal: U.S. Codenl USXXA:A Pubit 790213 Pages: t0 PP..._ - Idcntiflers: maltyl methylpentenoate, flavor atiilty) mothylyentenoate - - -- -- -- - Patent No: 4139541 Applic Not 004382 Date: 780308 Class: 2/i0-.345.8R, C07D309/21 A.fiOnee: Internotio/,a1Flavors and Fragrances Inc. CA09019150468F Fl worin0 with terpenyl ethers' Author: Llus.inan, Cynthla J., Mookher)ee, OraJa tt., Vock, Manfred H.. Sehmltt. Frederick L., Shu.ter,-EUward -J,, Sandars. James 1.1.. LiOht, Dctte U., Granua, Edward J. - Location: -US\-- Section: CA0170_02, CA062XXX Pub1 Classt PAT Journal: U.S.- CoCent USXXAM -- Publc 781226 PaOest 46 PP• -lot•ntifierst torpenyl ether flavor, odor terpenyl ether Patent Nw: 4131607 Appllc No: 072937 Date. 700127 C_lassd-425-3, A2lL1/226 AssiOnce: International Flavors and Fragrances Inc. CA09019150462Z Studies wlt4 Irra_dlatod and heated fats, olls and model aubSt:uncn; using gas chromatoqraphy-pia,s spectromQtry. IV. HydrocarUOns trom nadel suu::tdnces; dose relateJ-formation Iro.n lard and cnaln Icnqtheninps Author: Orewcrt, Friedrich, 0eck, Bertold, Hammerstin0i,. Heinrich ' - Location: Inst. Leuensmitteltechnol• Anal. Chom., Tech. Uni... Ltuenchen, FrelsinO-Weihanstephan, Car. tVeCLOOo Soction: CA017013, CA000XXX Pubi Class: JOURNAL . J(Put-nal: Z. LCn4n;.m.-Unters, Forsch. ~~6ooon: ZLUFAR Publ: 79 Series; 1GU , Isuue: 2 PaQest 99-101 Lannua0^: Gee luentifiers: hydrocarbon fat heat irradn, ~ radlolysis --~--- plycurittu ' . CA00019150377A Con,partson of Isolation procedurQs for essentlil oils. It. ~ AJowan, c_ araway,-coriander~ and cumi_n_' Aulhon:~Kocdam,~Arthur, $cheffee, Johannes J.' -C..,. Baerhe/nl Svencisen, And4•r5 ~- ~Locatlon: Dut). PharmaGoyn., State Univ. Leloen, Le/den, Neth. ss: JOURNAL Section: CA0I7002. CA062XXX Publ Cla _ Journpt: Z, Lebensm.-Untors. -Forscn.--- -Coden: ZLUPAR Pu_bI: 79 Series: 1G0 Issuea 2 Pages: 10G-11-'. --ttl.ntifiersc extn steam distn oil, essential oil distn 'CA090191503702 tnfluonce of distillation Conditions on composltlon and taste or t_hc volatile oil from ground eloves -AUth-.r: Ko11er,Wolf-DietriCh - - 'Locatiun: Inst. Lebensmilteleheel., Oundesforschunpsanst. Ernaahr., Karlsruhe, G4ir. Scctiori:CA017002, CA062XXX Pubi Class: JOURNAL " Journal: Z. L6bcnvn.-Untors. Forsch. Couen: xLUFAR Publ: 79 Sorios: 160 Issuo: 2 PaGes: 102-5 Lanounqe: Gcr . Identifiers: olovo oil distn CA090191503664 Simplc and direct method for quantitatlve q!ps Chrom.11to0raphic determination of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate-ln e_aiule-oils Author: Andersen, Karsten Stip, Lam. JoerOon Locationi-~Dep. 6hein.~, Univ. Aarhus, Aarhus,~Den. Section: C_A017001, CA037XXX_ Publ C_la_ss: JOURNAL ~ Journal: J. Ciirqmatoqr. Copen: ~ JOCRAtA Publt 79 Serics: 169, Paycs: 101-6 Identlfierst phthalate plasticizer detn o(1, qas chromato0 phtnalatc~~ ~ ~ - ~ -~ ~~--- -~ 11
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R DIALOG FIle4: CA SEARCH 77r79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item 15 of 721 User1908 2/msy79 530 CA00019150363T 4-:.,!tnylimid_at_ole In caramol and caramel-colored fuuds. oetprmination by gas-liquid --- Chromatograpny with ~ nitro0on-speClfic JctRCtors . Autnar: Cerny, Wilan, Dlumonthal, Artur lucntion: 2ent. Lao., 41IQrus-Gl2noss.-0undcs, 2ur/ch, Switz. Section: CA017001- Publ Cinss:-JOUIUTAL--- ----- Juurnal: Z. Lebdnsm.-Untar_s. Forsan• Coden: 2Ld1FARPubl: 79 Scries: 1611 Issue: 2 Paqust U7-.90 Lai.6un0ed Gcr luontifiars: methyllm/dazole deto caramel, Imidazole Qas_ C hrCma t OQ CA09019150362S Gas ChroniatuQraphlC' determination of free fatty acids 1n vegetable oils by a nxldlfled esterlflCation procedure Aulnor: Chilmon, G. M., Jr. Location: Richard B• Russell AQric. Res. Cent., Sel. €due. Adm.. Athens. Gd. -- Section:CA0t7001, CA009XXX Publ Clsas: JOURNAL '• Journal: J. Am. O1l Chem. Soc. Cc_dan: JAOCA7 P-ublt 79 Serirs. 56 Issuai 2 Pages: 77-9 _ Identifiers: fntty acid detn o_11. gas chromatog fatty acid. ester-ificatlon fatty acld CA090191503530 Cylindricai Splral of mpon0y platlnum (for food analysis) - Au hor: Ricnz/, RCnzo Location: Lab.Anal., 6nlo0na, Italy Section: CA01700I. CAOO5XXx Publ Cla;s: JOURNAL deteetor In the analysis of alcohollc bevera9es by OLC moJ P P De S t P A h lddt A _ . •, _ , . f ; or. L ut . e, •. . Loc~tion: Lab Reah „ Martini et Roasi, Saint-Ouen, Fr. Scctiun: CA0IG001 Pubi Class: JUURNAL ~ _ Journatc Ann,Nutr. AIim3nt. _ - Ccaun: ANAIAF Publs 78 Series: 32 Issue: 5 PaUes: 931-9 LanquaQOt Fr . Identifiers: alc bevera9e0as ChromatoQ mas.s spectrometry CA09019149353H Gas chromato0rnph{e and1'mass speotrometrle' studles on estro;lens in bile. 2.+' L1on and non-pro0nant women . Authur•t IUlprcreutz, H.,.Ltartin, F., LinJstroa,, B. Location: Dep. Clln. Chem., Unly. Ilolsinki, Helstnkl, Finland Scction: CA013013 Publ Class: JOURNAL - uournal: J. Storoid Biochom. Codcn: JSTBOK , Publi 78 ~ ~~~ -~-- ---~ L 05 Series 9 Issue: 12 Paryos: 1197-2° Identifiers: estrogen bile menopause sex.•i. CA090191479760 Identlfication of lower terpenuids from QaseChromato9raphy-- mass-spoctral-data by on-Iine-COanputer method ---- • Author: Adams, R. P., Granat, fA., HoQQe, L. R.. Von Rudloff, E. Location: Prarle Re9. Lab., Natl.' Res. Counc. Canada, Sackntoon Snskatcncwan --Sectjon: CAOOL00•/, Ca0R2%X% Publ Class: JOURN_A_L ~# Journal• J. ChrunatoQr. Sti. Cocen: JC//SD2 Publt 79 ( y Serics: 17 Is.ue: 2 Pages: 75-01 Z Idantitiers: te_rpone eorvputcr chromatoQ spoctroseopy, gas I D t n i) ter ene detn d r Journal:_ Ind. Aliwont. (Pinerolo, Italy) Coden: INALBB Pubi. 7U Series: 17-- -lssue: -1.6 Pa'cs: -95t=4 LanOunge: Ital Iaantifiersc gas chromatog insecticide datector, platinum flame ionization detector - CA09019150351N The life span of saxe paeked columns for Qas ehromato0raphy Author: S72aki._ KiyuShl.. -- Lucation: oop. Food Chem. Nutr., Osaka City Inst, Public Health Environ.Sci., Osawa, Jeipan- Section: CA017001 Publ CI•.ss: JOUR`1AL Journat: --Scikatsu Eisel -Codoni SEEIAY Publ: 78_ Serics: 22 Issue: 4 P-a0es: 127-31 Langua0et. Japan ICentifiers:-gaschromatoQ food preservative CA090191S0232i Use of the mass, speetrometer as a substanco-selectlve p erpe Chromato0 teryene, rwss t..pe troocopy e, o , f ir~ tcrpene detn,juniper terpene detn ~--~~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ -- - ~- ~--~ - - CA090191479690 Identilieation of 1,4-bonzoxazln-3-ones In malze extracts by Qas-liquid enronataqraphy and mass speCLrom_etry - A thor• W00d~ • 1 -fsI • h- I D CorCUeri Luis J SChnoes u i C ae .v rC. ., ., .. , Heinrich K., Holycs-.n,-John P., Uppar, Christen 0_. - ~ 0 Lucatlon: Dep Plant Pa[hol., Univ. Hisconsln, Madison, Wis. 1/ Section: CA009004 Pub1 Class: JOURNAL `I • Juurnal: Plant Physiol. Codciic PLPHAY Publ: 79 M Series: 63 Issue: t Pages: 9-13 r -Idontifiera:corn bensoxazinone detn. gas ch_romatoQ benzoxazinone eorn, mass spectrosccpy benzoxazinona aorn, _ benzoxazolinone dotn Corn s
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9 DIALOG Ftlc4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. SoC.) (Item 23 of 72) User1908 21may79 CA090t9147931W 0oiarn,lnation_ of bile aclds In serum by eaplllary gas-liquid chroa..atOyrAphy Author: Karlaganis, Gcorg, Paumgartner, Gustav Location: 0cp. Clin. Pharmneol., Univ. 6erno, 8arn, Swltz. Section: C_A009002, CA014XXXPub1 Class~: JOURr:AL - Journal: Clin. Chim. Acta Cooen: CCATAR Puql: 79 Se_rics: 92 Issue: I Pagas: 19-26 -- Ioantlfiers: serum b/le acid detn, Vas ehromatog bile acid C_A090/9146512Y Oatermination of Codelne by mass chromatography Autnor: Ocki-, Witsko-~~- - --- - ~ ~~ ~ Location: Cent. Customs Lab., Minist. Finance, Matsudo, Jappn.. 5.ction: CA004002, CA004XXX Publ Classi JOURNAL JOurnal: Kan.ci Cn_uo 6unsckishoho_ Codan: KC9SOI Publ: 78 Scrlcs: 18. Pag.s: 37-4A Lanquaga: Japan - ldontifiers: Codeine mass spectrometry forensic Masahlko, Akimori, Norlml Locatiun.F:,c. Agric., Kobo Univ „ Kobo, Japan ._„ - Sd tiun: CAOJJ005 CA022XXX, CA02UXXX PubiClasstJOURNAL" Jounna i: Car6oiryJr.---I:c::. Cuuan: CRURAT Pubi: 78 Sericn: 67 I_sr.uc: 2 VAgcs: 5,19-G3 ---'- IAOntifirrs: pnlyhydroxyalKylpyrazina Oas. ehromatog auss spectra, pyraiine poiyhydroxyalkyl chromatog mass spectra CA0892S213661R Analysis of free fatty ac/ds of the battlc sal_mon Salmo_ aa-lar u0iny packed and capillary tlas-chromalo9raphiC eolufr.ns- AuthortGalovnya, R. V., Kui'mcukb, T. E., Uralets, V. P., Sa,nu,onko, A• L... Location; Inst. Elem.-GrO. Ccmpd., Moscow. USSR Section: CA017001 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: Prikl, Di0_hh1_m__._ 4likrobiol. Codent POlAIAK Publ: 711 Scrles: 14 Issue: 4 Pa_ge_s: 609-14 L"dnlluaqe: RULs Identificry: salmort fatty acid gas chromatog CA090191454a34 Asraysfur chloramphenlcol •compa_red: radlOen=yAliC, gas chron,atograunlc with electron capture, a_nd_ gas GhromJtographiC-maSS Spectrometric Author: P,cMering, L. N.-, HoocMen, J. L.,' Kramer, W. G., Llenr, J. G.• Caprloli, R. i.t. ---- - -- Location: t.tea. Scn „ Univ. Te.as, Houston, Tex. Section: CA001001 Pubi Clnss: JOUftNAI-Jaurnal: Clfn. Cnon:• (:+linston Salem, H_. C.) Coden: CLCHAU --Publ: 79 Ser•IC3::5 I,sue.-2 -- Puges:J00-5 . Iuentlfiers: ohlortin,phonicot dctn blooy urine CA09019145430/1 - Gas chromntographlc-maSs SpeCtrometrlC determination of etorphlne with stable iSO.Opa labeled internal standard Autnor: JIIWaI, 6etyn P„Lutz, Theresa, Vc_stc_rgaartl, Per Location: ROckl;,nd Res. Inst., Oranqoburg, N. Y. Soction: C!•00100t Publ Class: JOURI•:A l_- ,St Jour_nal: Arwl. Issue: 2 lfi : Chen. Pajes: n,ne etor Coocn: 2E9-71 pas- ANCHNA CproRatog Publ: mass 79 Serlosi speetrometry, ers ido_n_t urine etorpnlne p analysis - - - CA009252156068 . Gas-liouid Chromatography and mass speetrometry of tr/metnylsjlyl ethors and butancboronatu-trimethylsilyl dcrivativcs_ of polyhyproxyalkyipyraslnes Author: Tsuchlda, HirOnobu, Kitamura,' Kazunr/, Ko,noto, N . cbecTo©Q s CA0092319GG13G Relative rbte constants for reactlons of CHS+ and C2H5+ wlth hytlroC.1rDnns by g:rS ehrumqtography-ehemteal /oni2Jt /otl mass spectrome~lry -- - Author: n:itch, Frank, t,lunson, tturnaby Locatiun: Ocp. Chein.. Univ. Delaware, Newark, Del. . Section: CA022004 Publ ClasS: JOURNAL JOurnal: J. Phys. Chem. CoU,:n: JPCNAX Publt 78 Soric.:: 132 Issue: 22--Pagest 23ri2-9 --Ic.antifiers: ion mol re3_c_tion gas klneties. CarboCation hydrocarbon reactlon kinetlcs- CA00923193339161 t1,,.s suectrometry of slalic aclds Aulnor: Kamerling, J. P.. IlJVCPkamp, J., VIIeOenthart,.J. f. G_., Vcrsluis, C„ SChauer, R.---- - Location: Univ. Utrc_cht, U_lreCht,'Neth. Scctioa-.: CA009004 --PUDl Class: CUNF PROC Juurnal: RCCOnt oev A'.a96 SpCctrom.6iOChem• Med., (PrOC. int 5yn.p.), 4th COUCh: 3UXPAL Publ: 76 SerleS: 1, ~~~----- -- - - ~~ Dato: 77 Pc_qus. 503-20 Mocting Publisher: Ptenum Address: New York, N. Y Avail:-~Frig~erio Alberto - ~ , Itlentlliors: sialic acid chromato0 apeetrometry, gas chromatog sialic aciU, mass--spectronetry sia1/C acid . w 0
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.'s , 0 DIALOG F1104: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. SoC.) (Item 31 of 72),U6or1906 2tmay79, S40 b CA009201653SGY Q.,ick soltlnf) plug for f:at.lllary column making AulhOr: CucmSn, IA: Kent. Hurlcy, Rupcrt B., Jr. Luca:ion: Inst. f.Wr. Sci., Coll. William and Ctary, Gluucestar Point, Va. - - Section: CA047001, CA079XXX, CA0®OXXX Publ Class: JDURNAL Journal: IiI.C CC. J. High Rosoiut• Chromatu0r. Chromato0r. Co,m-uun. Cod•:n: HCJCDD Puol: 78 Series: 1 lssua:- 2 PaOas: 92 Identifiers: gas chromato9 capillary eolumn CoatlnQ CA0P910149099J Nippon Oil and. Fat Co., Ltd. syntnclic lubrlcant base flulds Nrppon Ulls anU Fats Co., Ltd. Location: JaNan - munufaeturer of istor Section: CA051008, CA017XXX, CA0G2XXX, CA0G3XXX Publ Clans: -JOURN?.L-.. Jouitnat: Cn^.m.'Eeon, Eng. Rev. Coden: CECE07 ' Publ: 78 Series: 10 Issue: 5-G PaQOSS 50-1 Identlficrs: frtty oc~iq ester synthetic tubrlcant, neopontyl pClyul ester lubricatin0 oll, grease polyol ostcr, triqlycerldl fatty acid food oll, cosmatic oil tri0lyeerida fatty acid, pharmaceutical oil triplyccrida fatty acid ~ - CA00917143320M Chomical examination of the seeds of Prosopis splClOera Author; 11,10. C. S. C., Niaaro, S. S. Location O:p. Cham.. Univ. SauOar, SaOar, India Section: CA011001, CA017XXX, CA0G2XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL Juurnal: Proc. fWtl. Acad. Sci., India, Sect. A Cucwn: PAIAA3--Publc 76-----Sories:4GIs:uo: 1-f+:r0es: 36-40-- IU•.ntlflers: oil eompn seed Prosupis, fatty- acid seed Prasopis, amino ae tl secd Pnosopls, sugar seed Piwspis CAOf916135G.500 Ch.,nnel thin layer Chromato0raphy of complex mixtures Author: Goratti. Giancarlo,~~Layana, Alyo-, ttaasi, t:arCe(lo, Retrcnio. Cianca Marla Location: Ist. Chim. Anal „ Univ. Ro,rri, Rome, Italy Section: CAOG2002 Puu1-Classi~JOURVAL Journal: Ar,n. Chlm. (Rome) Cod,:n: ANCRAI Publ: 78 Series: 67 Issue:_ 7-0~ P.ades: 541-6 tA^ctin0 Datc:_ 77 - Id4ntifiars: thin layer Chromatoq oil componqnt - CA00915127845X Gas-liquid chromatoqraph(o_ determination of volatile organic acids as oenzylQstons with app(icatfons to tun,i,-shrimp,-and trPVULQQQ c90s Author: StarustklowlC><, Walter F., Jr.., Fernandez-Flores, Enrittu., Oond, Juhn f._ - - - - --Locatlqn: Div.-Focq Tet:hnol., Food Drug Adm „ Washington, 0. C. Section: CA017001 Pub( Class: JGJRNAL Jour•nalt J. ASSOC. Off. Anal._ Chcm. ' Coden: JANCA2 Publt 70 Serlest 81 lssue: 4 Paqos: 973'81 l,tqntiflorst tuna fatty acid u.ltn, it,rimp fatty acid detn, egg fatty acid dotn, fatty acid gas Chromatop --- 'CA0091S127012J • .. Artelact peaksitl' ths " preparation - an_d_ - pas-11qu1_d_ - - - chrouiatoCraphiGtieternlination of M,ithyl asters. , Author: Ti_rMn3, R. E. - . Locationt Dairy Res. Lab., CS1R0, Hiqhott, Aust,~' Section: CA017001 Publ Cls.s: JOURNAL Journal: Aust.J. Dairy Tochnol. Coclont AJDTA2 Publf 78 Scriesl 33 Issue: I Paqes: 4-6 Identifiors: fatty acid esterlficatlon gas Chromato0, butter OI fatty acid chrrwnato9 t ' ' CA009151270030 . - " - " ' - APption p lic.lofcontrolletl porelass Chromato9raphy to milk protcins Author: Kearnoy, Robert D., McGann, Thomas C. A. Localio,v Agric. Inst., tdoorapark/CCUnIy Cork, Ire, Seetion: CA0f7001 -Pub1 C(aos: CONF PROC JournalE Cnrorwt_otlr. Synth. 0ru1. Polym., (Lect. Chem. Soe. Int. Symp.) Coden: 300(AX Pub(: 78 Series: 1, Pages: 2ii9-74 Rleutin;I DatC: 7G-Puhll,ncr: Ellis tiorwuod Ltd. Address: Chlchester, Enp( --- Avail: Epton, Roger Idantifie:•s:-cascln mlCelle permeation chromatog CA08915126155K Vit:unin_ s from the 0112 of Hippophae rhamnoldes fruit Author: Inmyrko, T. G.. Glqi4nova, E.1.. Umarov. A. U. Location: In,t.Khlm. Rastit. Veshchestv, Ta,hkent, USSR - Section: CA011001, CA017XX%, CAOG2xXX puDl Class: JOLIRNAL Journal: Khim. Prlr. Soco_In. Codant K?_SU_AR Publ: 78_ Issue: 3 Pages: 313-17-- --Lan0un9..•dFuss-- - - - IdentlfiCrs:Hippopha0 Oil vitamin Cortpn, Carotene HippOphae juice seed, scaxanthln Hlppupnau- juicCseod, toeopnorol Hlppophae juice seeU, fatty acitlHippopha0 juice seed
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. OIALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/yDl 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Ite!s 39 of 72) User1908 21may79 541 CA009151261101% nilVais of the fixed oil and the unsaponlfiable matter from the secds Of Fnronia--liwonia linn • Author: Danur)ec, Anup, Niqam, S. S. Luc.ation: t:hr,•m. Dep., Unlv.-5auqtr-,Saqar. India SaCtion: CAC11001, CA017XXX, CA0G2XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL J3.wnal: Proc.Natl. Acatl. Sci., -India. Sect. A Cucton: PAIAA3 Pual: 76 Soe.ieu: 46 Issue: 3 Paqes: 163-0 Icucnt-ifiers: oil Compn secd Feronla, fatty acid scad Ferunla sterol sced~~Feronta-.. CA0091310_G9030 - Thc ftirmation of Cyellied sllyl derivatives Of .bet5.-hydroxyumines and their analysec by meuns Of gas ChromalO.p•.tph[ mJSs SJ7c•CtrCmgtry -- Authpr: Hun.nlar, Care Gustaf Location: Re+;. Dap., AO Kabi, Stockholm. Sued. Scction: CA022002. CAO3-1XxX, Ca001XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: OiF.nicd. f.'3ss Spectrom. Cod¢nt B::SYAL Publ: 70 Series: 5 1ssue: I Paqes: 25-0 Idcntiflurs: drug hydroxy am_ine mnss sp_¢ctra, mass spectra - - sllyl aminoal6, phenylal,anina Yilyl mas.s spectra CA0091209211011 Co.r.Uin¢d qa4 ChromaloqraphlC-qass speCtrom2triC analysPS Of nitro9en uasv, In li0ht oil Irom a coal liqucfaation product Aulhor' Whit¢ C. I.t.. SCho,ei.,lh,lrtlt, F. It., Shultz, J. L. Location: Pittsburtitl Energy Res. Cent.. E170A,--PittSburqh,• Pa. Scction: CA0S1029 Publ Class.: JOUItt•:AL Journpl:. Fuel ProcQ'%s. Technol. Cuaon:_ F_PTEOY Pubi: 78 Series: I l.su¢: 3Pnc,iti•s: 209-15 . -- Incntrfi¢r : Conl liqu•ifactlun amim: dc•tn, aniline detn coal IiGurfa tron pzridinc clatn coal Iiqu,efactiOn, gas Chroanatoq amrrnu, ma...; sp¢CtrOmetry amine CA_00O0L`074257y ' Ccuptn,J column Chromato0raphy omploylnq exclusion nntl a revarC.ed pha6e. _ A putential qQ.,eral approach to sQqueiltial anJly4.~s Autnur: Johnson, E. L., Gloor. R., Ltajora. Ron.110 E. loc.etion:--yarian ABruOraph. Walnut Cr¢cls, Calif. Section: CA017001, C1.005XXX, Cl.030XXX Puul Class: JOURNAL ,lournal: J. Chrum_ilo0r.- Codcn: JUCRAAI Publ: 78 Serr s: 149. Pages: 571-US ldntifi¢rs: exclusion Column ChromatOq, reversed phase chrcnl:o7. malathion Column chrowJtoO, limonin colun,n ch.u.rato0, rubuer analysl,% Chromatoq CA00007054531E . 2 t r-Trrclsforophenoxyac¢tio aold: Synthesis and thin-layer ehrcn.lo:)raphy prupertios of amino aeid_ Conjuqates and q.is-liiiuid chromatuqraphy and n.ass speelra of--m.ethyl aster darivntives Authur: Arjmand, tJasood, Hamilton. Robert N.;:. Mumma,Ralph , O Uj. location: Grad. Study Cent., Pennsylvanla..Statenlv.,:,,: University ParN,~~Pa,-~-~-- SeCtion: CA005001. CA009XXX PubI Classt JOURNAL Jourcidl: J. Agric. Food Chom. •Coden: JAFCAU-- -Publt .7B ~ ------ Series: 26 isuue: 4 Paqpst 8D0-502 - Identifiersi trichlorophenoxy¢cetate aw•Ino acid ConJuOate ~ ___prepn, q:rs ChrumStoq -lrrChlurGphenoxyacetale am(no acid COnjuqate. mas3 t.l+¢CtrfAn¢lry triChlOrophCnOxyaCetate amino aciocuiljuqate, ci:rumdtoq trlehlorophenoxyacqtate amino acid CunjuOlt¢- -Lpuctranclry triqhlornphoi,oxyacalato amino acid -- cunju[J.lt¢, amino ac{d-trlChlOruph¢nuxyat¢tJtt conjugate mass speCtra CA0490G052!112F Gas rJmu,,,at.oqrapny-mass sp4ctroaetry of a series of fatty aCicl a•elhyl ester Chlorohydr_Ins and- tflelr, trimdthyl3ifYl da_rivative: Aulhur: Slartin_, J. ft.. Gilbert. J., L1CWeany, 0. J. Lucation:Food Sci. Div., Min. AqrIC. Fish. Fooo.Norrlch; €nql... Section: CA000_005 Publ Class: JOURNAL ' Juurn5l: J Choomatogr. Cuden: JOCRAM Publ: 70 Sor, s 152 !_s:;u¢: 2 Paqes: q95-9 .-li/cnlifi¢,s. --fatty acict ester chlorohydrin Idont/flcation, pas ChroonatoQ fatty aCid Chlorohydrln,m]ss spaCtroscopy fatty acid chlurohytlrin, methylsilyl ether fatty acid id¢ntification CA00904030572T The o~.scnt+ol oll of CannaUls sativa L Autlror: Ifeudriks, i/., fAalinqre. 1. Gi., Batterman, S.,. 8os, R. Locatlon: Lah. Pharmaco0n., State Unlv., GroniAq¢n, Ntth. SOCtion: CA01i7002, CA011XXX Publ Cla_sst JOURNAL Journal: Pnarm. W¢ckbl. Coden: PNWEAW Publ: 78 Series: :13 Issuo: 17 Pages: 413-24 Identifiers: Cannabis oll Co-M?n . 0
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f DIALOG FIte4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item - 46 of 721 Userl908 21may79 , 542 bonzppyrene, polycyclie hydrocarbon Chromato0 . . CAOU901002404X -- -- --- , . . ~ Evaluition of PUIy- 5-1799 as a stntlona_r_y phase for the Oa5-.liquid ohranato0raphy-ma s speetrometry of bile acid methyl.•stLr aCelatC:i CA000251054962 _ rlvatlves for the l d l t d ll Author: 5zczcpanik, Patrleia A.. Hachey, David L., KlOin, e tu e s y Conp,trison of fourteen subst ids by nd cannatjin Petct-. 0. ' o eharucterization of Aloohols, steruids a ometry d t l r ~ Location: Div. lliol. Ned. Res., A rgonne Nati. Lab., Arqonne, r aphy arl mass spee comuinnd qa•.-IYqulu Chror• atup ~. _--. . .._-- . - - -- Aulhor:-HarveY. U. J. ll . 11 1 Section: CA009002 Pub) Class: JOURNAL Lucatfon: Univ. 0ep. PharmaCO1., O.ford, Enpl. - ~ Journal: J. Lipid Res . Cod•:n:- JLPRAW Publ:' 70 Section: CA009002 PuDI ClasS: JOURNAL , . - . ~ Seriesc 19 Issue: '. Pages: 280-3 JOCRAGI . CodenD . __ Journal: J. Chromatoor ' - Publ: -~78 Nj I:lentifiers: bile acid gas ChromStocJ stationary phase, . - - mass --- Sertus•157, PJuost 2J1-8 nabinoid a i t id as • - ' spcctro.COpy bi Ic acid - - , e n c s ero tdcntlfierst silyl u4riv. s Chromatoy atc steroid cannabinoid, mass speetroscopy ---- --- - - o a-Ig / , . steroid CannubinoiU CA000262026030 Sume factors affecting the properties of thin fihns of Carhuuar 20~•1 intendeU for deactivation of glass capillaryy coluu,ns . . . .._ ~ ...- Aa,thor: 8lanberq, Lars, Mannman_, Thomas Location: Arrheilu_f Lab., Univ. Stnchholm,-StoCkholm, S•rad. S4ction: CA080004 Publ Class: JOURNAL_ - ' J+iurnal: J. Chr01nolo0r. Coaien: JOCRALt Publ: 78 Serios.-140 Issue: 2 Pages: 379-07 - Ide_ntlfiers: dEactivationsurface010ss Chromato0 eolumn, pas- chru:u_ato0 crpillary column deactivation, Carbowax 20fA capillary column <leactivatlon, pulycyelic arom hydrOCarpon pas cnro:naloU CAOn02_5[e'J4748 tt,o new n:ethods of dobitter/n0 protein hydrolysates and a fraction of hyarolysates wlthoxceptionblly high Content, of e.CCr.tinl ami,io acid•, - -- - - Author Lala.idi5, G¢or(lius, SjOberp, Lars Borje . Local,ur,_ :~trr Nutr. A7, :,loln:ial, Swed. - ----- - - Section: CA017013--- Pobl Class: JOUI.NAL Journal: J. Agrit. Food Chem, CoclanpJAFCAU' Publ: 78 Series: 26 IssuoE 3 Pages: 742-9 Idcntifiers: protein hydrolyzatc debittorlnp, amino acid.~ high proteinfractio/l • - - -- CAOD9251002460 Separation of pr)lyeyylio aromatic hydrocarbons and dcte-mination of tienzo(a)pyren0 in liquid smoke preparatloau AuV;Or: RadocMl, A., LampArCZyk,- H., GrZ/buwski, J., ' Journal: -J. Cnrwnat0_Or. CouCn:JOCIiAM- Publ: 70 Series: 150 Issue.c 2 PaOos: 527-32 Idantiflers: benzopyrene detn smoke flavoring, gas chromato0 HalkiawiCZ, J. LucatiCn: Dep. Phys. Chom., Iued. Aced., GdanSk, Po1. - SoCliOt: CA017001 CA004XXk Puul Clas3: JOURf1AL ® CA011025183994L1 Th,i id,•nliFicatlon of Impurlt/es in Illlclt methamphOtamine exhibits by 9as-chranatuQrA0hy/ma_ss spe9trometry and--nuelear' maGnctic riaonance spoctroscopy Autn'.r: Nram, T. C., krueJOl, A, V, . Luca tion: Spec. test, Res. lab., Drug Enforeement Adm „ MCLe„n, Va. Section: CA004002 Publ Class:_ JODURNA_L_ . Journal: J. Forensic Scl,--Codon:JFSCAS . Publi 77 Seriv.: 22 Issue: I Paqes: 40-52 ----- lucntifiers: nwthaa,photanitne Impurity Identlfilcatlon forensic, gas ehromato0 methamphetamine Impurity, mass spectroacopy methamphetamine Impurlty, nuclear swpnotic resonance inetnamphetamine Impurity -- CA_ 0002_31GRb2:}% • • . . . . - . . .. Ga, chrum_ato0raphlc-mass spectral analysis of aroma compountli of bread -- Author: 0_hretenov, Ts., Khadthieva, P. - -- - Location: PlovUiv, 6619. Section: CA017004- Publ Class: JOURNAL -Juurnat: Z. tcucnsm.-Untcrs. Forsch. Coden: ZLUFAR Publ: 77 ' Series: 165 Issue: 4 PaOes: 195-9 Laiiqua9a: Gcn _ _. • .. . . _ _ Identifiers: bread aroma Compd 0
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O . IL- OIALOG File4t CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chom. Soc.) (Itom 53 of 72) User1906 21may79 CA00023165205X Fl.irine storuls. VI. Use of the thernnastable liquid phase PZ-17G for-the g5s etu•omatoqraphlc=mass spectromotric analysis of n:nrine slerols Author: Callantino. James A., Williams, Kevin • location: Inst. t,iar. Sci., Univ. Coll. Swansea,. Swansea, Wa1CS . Section: CA0C9004, CA012XXX Publ Classt JOURIeAL Jutu"n_ al: J. Chromato0r. Codcn: JOCRAN Puttlt 70 Scrios: 140 Issue: 2 Pages: 504-0 ldantificrs: chraeatug marine sterol. Aseldia sterol sepn. Cerastodern.asterol selln, Q.11 chromdtoQ Ster171 deriv, nytSs speclrcr..etry sterol lleriy- C_A000711S1616Y Ittcntification of hydroxyhaloblphenyls as_ thelr melhyl ether5 by gas Chromato0raphy mass speCtronetry Author: Tulp. M. Th. f.t., Olie. K., Iiutzinger, 0. Lucation:_ Lab. Envi_ron.; Univ. Amsterda_m_,Amsterdam, Neth, SeCtion: CA022002, CA0t3X%x, CA01iXXX Puul Class: JOUIiNAL Juu.•nal: 0_iu_mc_d. R1ass Spectcom.' Cuacn: OLtSYAL P-ubl: 77 -5-^ric:::4- Issue: 5 Pages: 310-1G -- --- Fdcntifier•s: pas chrwnatoQ mass spectra halomethoxyblphcnyl, fluuri,Uipr_renyl metab, Chlorubiphenyi n,etub, mOteb halobiphmtyl , brumobiplrenyl mRtat), pipltenyl halo metab, metho.yUipGenyl halo m359 speCtra CAOOD17117170P Sensitive determination of su0nrs utlllsinQ packed eaplllary Cotunnl5 .?nd Ci4ctron c.'.pture detect ion -- Authc+r: Nrunn NrGhO¢I LI., Tod;l, Ch.trles H. ~ . Locotion: Div. In.uunot„ City of Hope t:atl. Med. Cont., Duartc. Calif. Scotion: CA000002 Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: J. Chrcmkatonr. Codon: JOCRAM Publt 78 Seriee;r 147. .. Paqes:..J09-16 luentificrs: ornsomutoid Carbohydrate tletn, fetuin -- - ----- ---- --- --- - - CarUUrrydratR iletn, cnrcinC/en:uryonic antigen earuohydrate oetn. QlyCoyroteln cerbohy:lralC Qa5 Chrornatog CAO0o171t71c9V L1lcrooetorminatlon of molecular speel_e_s of ollqo- and polyunsaturated' diacylQlyCOrols by gas -chromatogrophy-ma.s speclrumetry of theirtert-butyldimethyiSilyl ethors Author. A!yher, J.-J.. Kuksis. A.,-tdarai, L, YcunQ, S. K. F. Lucation:-CantlnQ and Ocst Dcp Lted. Ras., Univ. Toronto, Toronlo. Ont. Scction: CA0a9002 Puui Class:. JOURNAL Journal: Aaal.-Chem. Coden: ANCHAM Publ: 78 Series: - SO Issue: '4 Paqcs:• 557-61 [.iirR4 irQ00 i. .Sa3 Identifiers: diacyl Qlycerol 001 assoen fatty aci.d. Qas chrurucitu0 piacyl qlycerol ,dorlv,' mass spectrometry diacyl Qlycor•ol duriv CAOOO1S102291E Cumparison of urinary or0anio acid beteeen neonate and adult - - ~ Chrun;rt.iQropthy-mass spectrometry by gas Autttor: H._,ra0uchi,~~S_hinicltl - - Location: pJp. 1440. Ulochem., Kurunm Unlv. Seh. Med., Kurume . J'ppn.. Section: C_A013003 Publ Cla_Ss_: JOURNAL ~~ - -- Coden: KRMJAC.s. Publi 77 - Journil: Nurume Med. J. Series: 24 Issue: 4 PaOest 241-50 - lduntifiers:urine carbo.ylic acid newborn CA00011072922S Tha quantitativo changes of ethanol oontent in sake_ during Coultinp. P.rt 1. A Oas-_tiquld chrtrmato0rapnie method fprthe deter/nitldtion of-elhanol content in suMe Authur:~ Tcrasaki. Kciko ~ -~-~ ~ --~ -~~- -~,---~ LoCalion_ : J:rpan .. . . Sc•c:tion: CA0LG001, CA017XX% Publ Classt JOURNAL Journal: Ichimu_r_a 4akuen Tanki DaiOaNu Snizen Kagaku KenMyukai Kaisni-Codcn: IGTKDLt Puul: 76 Serles:10 Issua: ..(-2. . . Paqes; 1-4 .. Lanqu:~0e: Jppan IuCntificrs: ethanol dctn sake, brandy-ethilnol detn, CA000090G2520V Ev.luuti oi of allyldlwethylsllyl others as sterold dertv,tives for gas ehrorr.]lo0ranhy-mass speetrometry ---Author:-Blair,-1. A.,--Phillipou. G. - -- 1.ocJ•.ion: Dep. Obstet. Gynaeco/., Queen Eli=abetn Hosp „ WoocJVllle, Aust.- - Soction: CA032005. CA022XXX, CA000X%X Punl Class: JOURNAL Journal: J. Chrunmatoqr. Scl. Conan: JCHSOZ PubI: 77 Sertesc 15 Issue: 10 Pages: 470-9 Ict.ntlfiers: allyldimeth_yisl-lyl ether aterol_d_ gas ehromat_o_Q, mass spcctra storoid allyldln.ethylsilyl other - r 11
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DIALOG f11e4t CA SEARCit 77-70/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chom. Soe.) (Item 60 of 72) User1906 21may79 CA00800CS40700 The Cun9titUents• Of th& staam volatile oil from the flower of Cordylina auslralls Hook. fil. Author: K_amooMa_, Hiromu, tlanq. C_hi-Pao Lucation: Fnc. Sci. Eng., Kinkl Unlv., Hlqashiosaka, Japan -~------ S:ction: CA0td2002 Puul Class: JOURNAL Journnt: -Nippon Nagci ItaqaAu Kalshl Coden: Ni1KKAA Puul: 77 Series: 51 Issue: 4 Paqes: 111J-94 L.+nrtuaqo: - Janan - , IU~ntifierst-Cordyline oll eompn CAOOU00051703G Louuratory study of fibQr fracture using the scanninq electron miCroscope Autnor: Causi,-.ltfredo G. LoCatic_n: Tire Te+t. O.Tv. Oap., Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. , Akron. OhiO- - ---- - - Section: CA036013, CA039XXX Publ Class: CONF PROC Jhurn3l: Cnaract. Gle t. Polym. Surf.. (;ymp.) CodQnt- 370:.tA7 Pubtt77Sories:-2, Pages: 267-88 Meeting Da_te: 76 Publisher: ACademiC Address: New York. N. Y _Avail: Lce,..L icng-Huanq...... ldentificrs: scanninq_ electron microscopy tire cord, fractura p.crGholtire- cord,aramid tire cord fraCture, polycstcr tire curd fracture, nylon tire cord fracture, polyamido tire cordfractura -- - CACU00704_9059G An lysis of autoxidlXed fats by 935 ChrOmAtOqrephy-mas3 spectrc.i^try: I. Not_hy1 oloate - ,luthor: FrhnY.el, C. N., Heff, W. E.,Rohwedder_, Kha~au.ry. tl. P. S., Gar•r:ood, R. F., WeCdon, 9. C.' L. Lo ation: IiRRC. ARS. Peoria, ii). Section: CA017001 Publ Class: JOURNAL M. Juurn.,lc Lipids Cod.n: LPDSAP Publ: 77 Series: 12 -- issua: 11 P4OCS: 90Y-7 ~lucntifiors: olcate autoxidn product a_nalysls, gas Chromatoq tat oxitln. mass spectromgtry~fat~oxidn, computcr fat autuxidn analysis -- CA000o6040944J Gas cnromatographlC-mass speetrometrlc detcrminatlon of volatile o_rr,anic col+pounusln an urbanatmosphcro AuLnor: loffe. B. V.. Isidorov. V. A., 2ankevith, I. G. Location: Chom. Ocp., leninOrad State Univ.. Leningrad, USSR Section: CA059001, CA00J_XX_X__- Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: J. Chromatoq^. Codun: JOCRAiA Publ: 77 Serics: 142. PaqCs: 707-95 ld>'ntiftrrs: org corpd.' air pollution Leninqrad, gas r000 44 ., 544 chromatoq air pollutlon monitorinq, miss_ speetrometryair pollutiuri nwniloring, olef-in air pollution Leningrad CA00005034061C - Scrccning by gas ch_rOmatoqraphy-mass_ spectrometry for metauulile, of five commonly usad anabolic storold_ dru0s-~ Authar; W.u>d, R. J., La:+.u_n_, A. 41., Shhtkleton, C. H. L. Luca tion:01v. Clin.Chem., Clin. ROS. Cent.. -- - Sat:tiun: CA00'J004.~CAOOIX_XX •. Pu,bl Class: CONf PROC ~ Journalt ~tin~•;s~~51,t•Ctrom.---Druq Meteb., (Proc. Lit._ Symp.) Codon: 37AU1E ~- Pub_1_: 77 Pa0'?s:~~465-74 i.loetinq Datec--76 -~--Publishor:-Plenum Address:~NCw Yo_r_k, N. Y - Avail: Frigeri_o, Alberto; GnisalUerti, Emillo L It6:ntifierst urine anauolic steroid -detn, gas chromatoq anabolic steroid. ChrumatOg tulabolic~~ sterold, mass spcctroscopy anauulic strroid, spectro5copy anaboliC ~steroiC ~~ CA00p050339906 -Separation of prosta_qlandins and thromboXanes by gas chrom.to9raphy with glass capillary columns Aulhor: F-it:patrick, F. A. Locat iuft: lies. Lnb.. Upjunn Co., Kalamazoo. Ltich. ..., ,. . Section: CT009002, cA002XXX PunY Classt JOURNAL JoCu+nal: Anal. Cham. Coden: ANCHAM Publ: 70 . Seriesp.. 50 Issuc:1 Paqesi 47-52 . - Identifiers: gas chromatoq prostnqlandln thromboxafte .. . CA00005033481C - ' Anilysis -of hexosaminltol-COnta_In_Inq disaccharide alditols from rat brain glycoprotelns - and -qan011osldcs as 0-trimclhyl3llyl derlvatives by qas Chro:natography mass Speetrometry- - -- -- Author: F_i_nno, Jukka_, Monomen, 11kka, Narkkalnen, Jorma Location: Dop. G:cd. Chem., Univ. Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Section: CA006004, CAG33XXX Pubi Class: JOURNAL Journal: tiiomeo. Ltass Spcctrom. Codon: BA'•$YAL Publ: 77 Series: 4 Issuo: 5 Pages: 291-3 ------- - Identifiers: brain glycoprotein -.qan011osida disaccharlda analysts r
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r V ~ 0 . DIALOG PIle4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(20) (Copr. Am. Chem. SoO.) (Item 67 of 72) Usor1906 21s+ay79 CA00fi030/ BAGGM Dorivitives for Chareclert=ation of pnosphoserinA and phoLhMuthrrunine by gas Chromatnqraphy-ma3s SpCctrNnetry - Author: SIIiCh, Jenc)-Jonq Ucsidorio, Oominic 61, LoEation: In,t. Lioi_d_ Rcs Oaylor Coll. t1oJ., Houston, Tox. Se'tion. CA009002 PublClist:: JOURt1AL ---- --- ' - - Juurnal: Anal. Lett. Coucn: ANALBP PWIt 77 Series: --- -- -- -- - 10tssue: 11 Papes: 831-4 Identifiers: phtie:plwsorine chromatog spectroseopy, pnosphothreonine chr0n.atoq---speCtroBCOpy,gas chrlNnatoQ pnoLpnoserine phosphuthrconine, mass spoctrometry phosphoscri- ne phosphothrConlnQ CAC0002000930R - ., Polymrr-lined capillary aolumn Autnur: Taylor, Paui J., Harris, Frank W. Locition:-USA - - Section: CA047001, CA079XXX, CA080XXX Publ Class: PAT Journal: U.S. C xlen: USXXA'.t Publt 771018 PaOes:~ 7 pp. Identifiers: chrly.atog gas capillary column,• coating capillary qolumn---~Chro,uatog, - polyphchylono rasln Chraaatog oo_ luvn Patent No: 4054432 _A_ppliG NO: 695018 Date: 760611 Class: 55-306, D01D15/00 -~ Assignee: Wright State Unlverslty CA0000COOG43_1E 'Founs--and flavor use of'1-(3,3-dimethyl-2-norbornyl)-2-prop- anone Author: Schreiber, William L., Sla_no_, James N., Vock, Y..an/red Hugo, Shustcr, Ed%.ardJ. -- Locatiun USA ScCtiun C..02p007, CA017XXX, CA062XXX Publ Clas_s: PAT Journal. U•S• COu:•n: USXXA1d Publ: 771011 Pagesd 11 p_p. Identifiers: norbOrnylaoetone prepn food perfume, flavoring food acClonylUimethylnorburO;lne prCpn, pQrfume_ acetonyldimeth- ylnoruor_nana p••epn, nnrburnane acetunyl prcpn fl.voring Patent f:oc 4053657 ApNlic No: 747309 - Date: 761203 Class: 42G-53U, A27L1[22G Assignee: lnternatlunal Flavors and Fragrances Inc. Ca00001004840P A sia,plifiad gas-1lquid Chromatographlo d_ete_r_minatiOn for vltamin E in vegetable oils_ Author: Hartman, Kenneth T. Loca:ion: Frito-Lay Res. -Lab., Irving, Tox. Sectlon7 CA0t7001-Publ Class: JOURNAL Journal: J. Am. 0/1 Chem. Soc. CoJCn: JAOCA7 Publ: 77 6Peetooo . 545 Series: 54 Issue: 10 Pages: 421-3 Identifiers: vitamin E potn Vcgetable ofl, gas ehromatoq vltamin E - ~ --- CA00B01002544W ~--Gas-Ilyuicl chromatograpny-mass speetrometry of`thromboxans . 02 and Its cletection In sen,en and human-rorta by-solected Ion -- Authpr: Smith. Andrew G., Harland, W. Arthur. Brooks,. Charlea J. W. ~ , ~ . ._ .. ..._ _ . Lucatiun: Dcp, Chem „ Univ. Glasgow. Glasgor, Scnt. Scction:~CAi>09002 PuU1~Class: JOuRNAL-~- ~ - Journal: J.--Cllromatoyr. Codent JOCRAGI Publ: 77 ............_ ... .......__.._._.. ---- , . Serics: 142. P-aryes: 53]-47 -- Identifiers: scmr.n_ tnrombO.nne 02 detn, aorta thromboxane 62 detrt, ~ ~ tt,rt.mbuxano - 112- chromatoq spaCtrometry, gas Chrotnato9 thramboxane 02, mass spectrometry thrombox5ua 82 CAg0001002543V pu_,intitatiun ot troutorated and non-deuterated phonylalanlne and tyro:.ine inhumnnplasma using the selcctive ion monlturin~ method with cowbinsd gas Chromntoqraphy-mass spcctrlwu.`try. -Apl)Ileation to the in ViVO measuremont of phenylalanine-4-monooxyyennsoacliwity ' - A_uthor: ZaOala_k_, 1•laria Jolanta, Curtius, H. - RJCl.eiN, W., U. _ Location: Univ. Paedlatr. Oep., Kinderspital Zurleh, Zurich. --- Swit:-. - - Section: CA009002. CA007XXX Publ Class: JOURNAL ' Journal: J. Cnro•natogr. Coden: JOCRAtA --Publi 77 Series: 142, PaOcs: 523-31 --- - Iocntlfi_crs: pticnyla_1_a_n_ine tyro_sine detn gas chromatog. plasma - pnenylalsnin5-tyrosine detn, --mo_no_oxygenase phenylalan-ine detn, oxygenase phenylalanlne detn C.. leimbachor. 0
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If Print 14/2/1-30' DIALOG Filo4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) CA09022174527A C.,r.,position of fragranees' (Cope. Am. Chem. Soe.) (Item I of 30) User1900 4Jun79 Series: I issue: I Pages: 1-15 329 ldentifiers: perfume solubll,zalion anionic surfastant, qlycoisolubilizationporfum,l,-odor perfume surfaetant ' Au uhnr: Voitkevich, S. A., Laskina. E. 0.. Oevitskeya. T.~A. . Andreev. V. M., Frosin, V. N., Nihitioa, M. A., Onkunina, 0. 0. 1 Location: US'R Sec~tion: CApli2005 ~Publ Clnssi PAT ~ JournA_I': U.S.S.R. Coden: URXXAF Pu_b_li 790115 Citation: Othrytlya, ~lzubret., Prom. Obruztsy, Znani 1979, (2). 100... Tovarnye luentifi_ers: Citrus fragrance eompn, etnylhydrocinnamaldehy- decitrus'fruqrance,perfumacitrus ethylhydroelnnamaldehyde Patont No: -642359 App1iC No: 2025076 Datc: 740516 Claasc C1:Cy/00 ----- - -- - -- --- - AsslOnee: A11-Unlon SclentlfiC-Research Instltute of Synthetio and Natural Perftunes CA09022174526Z Acylcyclohcaenes and their use in perfumery eompositlons Authorv 1•/aqner, NorstRfchard, Webb, Oav1A, Reinsch, Rudoif Location:_ Enql. - - SeCtion: CA0u2005 PUbI Class: PAT Journal: Urit. Coden: BRXXAA PuUli 78/025 PaOes: 4 PP.-- IdentiFiers: dr.mascone perfumo compn Patent No: 1530113 Applic No: 74/31039 Oatat 740712 ' Cltss; C07C49/GI ---- Assiqnca: Ou_'n OoaNe Allen Ltd. ~ CA09022174525Y Suutimablc composltions for molded bodies Au ulor: Sato. Haruhito, Ichikawa. Hiroshi. Hayashl, Hiroshi. Kur i sah i .' Konumu - - - - Local ion: J..pnn Sc•ction: CAOG2005 Pub) Class: PAT Journal:' Ger. Aften, Codon: GWXXBX Publi 700706 Paqc•s: 01 pP. Identifiers: suhllmable moldod article, perfume solid suulimablc, d_eodorant_ solid suUliu,ab_le ---Patunt No: 2756953 Applic Nu: 76/155G50 Date: 7G1225 Class: C09K3/00 Country: Jap.,n. ---- - ' Assignee: Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. CA09022174506T ' ' StuUies of perfume solubtlizatlon Auchor:' 61ahe•ray, J. '.1.,6 Douruun, P., Scu, M. Location: Rourc Cortrand Ouponl, Arrycntcull, Fr. Soction: CA0G2005 . Publ Class: JOUNI;AL Journal: int. J. Cosmet: Sci. Coden: IJCMDW Publ: 79 CA09022174491J Cinn:unie aeid, cinnamaldohyde, and elnnamyl.aleohot Author: R,ngk, W. F. - - Locatiun: USA Sectiun: C_AOG2000, CA06_3_71XX • Publ Classi CONF PROC Journal: dirk=0thmcr Encyel. Chem._ TeChnol., 3rd Ed. -- C_odun: 37ASAA Publ: 79 Series: 6, Pages: 1.2-9 Publi.h_er: Wiley- Atldreaa: New York. N. y-- Avai1:Grayson, Martin;Eckroth, David --- Identlfiers: cinnamate review CA09022174490H Perfumery products of natura) origin Author: Ran.6.S. R. Subba--- - " . Lucetion: India - Sectiun: CAOG?000 Publ Clsssi JOURNAL Journ;il t EaSt,Pharm. Codan:-~ EAPHA6 pes: 53-4 , Series: 21 Issuo: 250 Pa _ Idvntifiors: review pcrfumm oil CA090221744E6t1 Syntheais of new perfusie substances Publ t , 78 • Authurt Voitkevlch, S. A. ', - Location: Vses.Nauchno-lssled. 1nst..Slnt. Nat.i Ous_h_istyA_h Vesnchestv, Sel Varontsdv, USSR Sectionc CAOG2000,-CA023%X% Publ Class: JOURNAL Juurnal: ttislo-Zhir. Pr_om-st. Coden: MZPrAE Publ: 79 Issue: 3 Piyesc 33-6 Lao0ua0e: Russ lacntifiers: review perfumo material synthesls, odorous substance synthesis review CA09022174405K. '~ ..- -.. Synthetic assential oil tn modern perfumery Author: Dol'ter, A. G. - Location: Vses. N.aucnno-Issled. Inst. Sint. Nat: Dushlstykh ~ ~~~~~ --- ~~~~ ----~~~~ --- ---~ Vesh hestv, S-'!lo Varontsov, USSR Section:~CA0G2000 Puul Classt JOURNAL Journal~: Nasl~o-Znir, Drom-st. Cod.n:- MZPYAE Publ: 79 tssue: 3 PaOvs: 30-3 LanOu_a0e: Russ i:donttflers: review synthetic perfume material, OdorOus O11 syntnetio review --- t OStRE'rOOQ "
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. DIALOG F11e4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr, Am. Chem. Soc.) (Item 9 of 30) User1906 4jun79 CA09022174490E Perfumes and eaux-dercolopne for vomon and Isen Aulhor:l Anthony, Cerard, 61oy,1Cwar, Jaap W. Location: Naardan lnt., Gr.asse, Fr. Sectiont CAOi:2000 Pubt-C1ags:JOURNAL Journal: T_luszcze, Sroclki Piorace, Kosmat. Coden_:_ TSPKDZ _ Publ: •70 5erfes:- --22- -~-lssue:10~ PaOe#t~ 1~16-50 Lanqua0e: Pol - lorntiflers: review perfume - ..._..... ......_ .. . ....... ...... .... .. ' ~ C_A09022170100H Spray oranules containing perfumes and solid paraffin Author: Eibi, Johanncs, Schellmann, Erhard, Wolf, Karlhelns, Lahrs. Ju:rq^h_ LOeation: Ger, Section: CA039007, CA062XXX Publ Class: PAT ..-.. Juurnal: Ger. Offen. Coden: GW%XBX PuDI: 790201 Pa_pes: 17 pp. Iacntifiers: perfvne printing textile granule. speckled printing textile perfure,~~wax Oranule_ perfume textile Patent not 2731310 APplie No: 2731310 Date: 770712 Class: D01J2/02 AssiOuee: tlayer A,-G. CAC9022169005fA POr fur e:: plastlCs Al thor Ono, t•tasamoto . Locitron:_ Japan Ssction: CA037003 Publ Class: PAT Journal: Jpn. _Kahal Tokkyo Koho Coden: JKXXAF 79011.1.- .- Payes:~ 3.pp; Pub1:4 IrtuntiP_sers_: p_erfu.ne_d_ plastie, molded perfumed plastle Patcrit No: 79 03154 ApptlcNO: 77/6U258 _ - Date: 770609 Class: MC24/e0 - AssiOneed Kadama, Osamw CA09021168796W ~~ ~-~G 6,7-Trimethyl-tplCyClo(3.2.2.01,5)undoe-8-en-2-one ~ Author:'Oueehl, GeOrqe H•, Hauser, Arnold .. • LOcation: Swlt2. Section: CA030015 Publ Class: PAT Jaurnat: U•S. CodenE US%%Aat Publ: 781107 PaOes: 6 pp. -ldentlflersi trltycloundecenone perfume additive, khusimone synthesi5 Patent No: 4124C42 APp11C Not 034777 Date: 770919 'Cla.s: 260-5OCG. C07C40/54 ~ Assignee: Firmenicn S. A,- rsecTOOo M CA09021168157P ~ .. . ~ ,., ~•. - . • Flavorin0 with a trICYC1IC alcohol - -- --- ---. _ . _.. _--- -- ~. Author: LiGiit, Nenneth N., SAustet•, Edward J.. Joaquin F., Vock, ManfreJ tf. Lucntion: USA --~~--- ~ ~ - - ~ ~ Seetiun: CA024010, CA011XXX,~-CA017XXX, 'CA062XXX CIa3sE PAT Journal: U.S. pp. Idontlfiers: tricyclodecanol prepn flavoring food, tobacco flavoring trlcyclodecanol prepn, eosmeticstricyeloCecanol - prepu, purfumetric%cloduCanol prepn Patcnt no: 4139650 AppIic No: 485554 Data: Cla,s: 42G-530, A23L1/226 AssiOnee:lnternationat Flavors and FraOrancas Inc. CA090211601SGN -4-encly-Hydroxy-4-homolsotr/;tane Authpr: FuJihura, YOShiaki, InamOto. Yoshlahl, Motutuya, Tahdishi, Naotahe ' Lncatlon: Jauan ~~ Soctign: C102-4010, CA062%XX Publ Class: PAT 740703 Nakajlma. Journal: Jp,1• hokai TokkyO NuhO Coden: JKX%AF 78092U Pages: 4-pp-. - Publt Iclentificrs: homolsotMlstane hydroxy, perfumel:omoisotw/sta- ne hydroxy - -- , Petent ua: 70111052 Applle No: 77/26401 Data: 770309 Class: C07C35/22 AssiOnee: Koo Soap Co.. Ltd. CA090211G8153J . . . Norborn.ne and norbornene compounds 'Authnr: Koba,rashl, Toyohiko, Tsuruta, Haruki, -- Tosniu Location: Japan Section: CA024007, CA062XX% Publ Class: PAT Yosnlda, Juuroal: Gcr._ Offen. Coden: G9X%OX Publi 790208 Pages: 24 pp. • tdentifiers: norbornylpcntenol sandalwood aroma. norborneylpentenol SandJlr•Ood aComa, sandalwood anoma norbOrnpnp noi•oornene, cyclopcntauiene OIe1s-Alder acrol0in- Patvn: No: 2833283 Apalic No: 77/90_846 Data: 770728 - - Class:C07C31/13 CountrytJqpJn. AssiOnee: Takasago PerfumeryCo., Ltd. r V
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. DIALOG Filed: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr.'Am. Chem. Soe.) (Item CA090211600060 --Hyuro.y fattY acid ester . Auulor:' Inouc, ShiO•w, MlyamKlto, Nor/oki location9 Japan - S,rCtion: CA023017, CA033XXX, CA0G2XXX Pubi Class: PAT Juurnil: Ger. Offcn. Couon: GMXXBX Publ: Y)02/S Pages; 0+`s: 13 pp• iucntifiers: 'sophorolipid reaction allph ala, glycerol hyoruxypalint tate, hyproMypropyl hydPorypalmitate, hydrn_xyethyl hycirox_ypalmitale, hydroxypalmllato ester,_ p_almitate hYOroxy oster, h@k.1dOCanOlide muskaroma_ - Patent No: 2834117 App-11o No: 77/92427 Date:_ 770801 Class: C07C89/67 Country: Jnpan._ •• Assi0ncu7 Kao Soap Co., Ltd. CA09021166781P - ' Salt substitute foP a dlet' Authort1Rakauskas, A., Sudzlone, S. Localion: USSR Section: CA_017002 Publ Classi PAT dnurnat: U S.S.R. Coden: URXXAF P 1t 790225' ub _ _ Citation: OtNrytlya, Izobrel., Prom. Obrartsy, Tovarnye Znaty i 1979. (7); 15-14 - - Iacntiflers: salt substitute taste, sodium Chlorlde suostitute Patent No: 640196 Applle No: 2540150 Date: 771103 Class: A23L1/22 AssiOnee: Kaunas Polytechnic Institute CA090211GG641414 Swiss cneosce flavort 1. Chemical analysls Author: 3:ed,1, S. L., Nammond, E. G. Lo.-ation: Deli, Food Technol., loha State ' SeCtion: CA017003 Putil Class: JDURNAL Journal: - J. Dairy Sti. Cuaen: JDSCAE• Publl 79 Series: 62 Issuv: 2 Pages: 227-37 luentlfiers: Emmental choese aroma, tlevor Cheese compn, CA09021f66600E ,- Sutue ubservat/ons on__ the flavor of acid whey Author: L1CGuqan, M. A., Larmo_nd, E., Emmons; 0. B. . Location: Fes. Branch, A9rlc. Canada, Ottawa, Ont. , Sectionc CA0t7003 Publ Class: JOURNAL Jour_nal: Can. Inst. Food Sc1. Tccnn0l. J. Codenl Publ: 79 Series: 12 Issue: 1 PaQes: 32-5 YdEntiflers: acid wney Ilavor, diacetyl whey flavor CFST03 CA09021166ES90 Safety of stevloslde with rec-assay and revers/on test Author: 0kuulura, Masaya, FuJlta,' Yoko,Imamura, Mihiro, ._ . Klyosh i Ail.aua - Lucation: Omiya Res. Lab., Nikhen Chem, Co., Ltd., Omiya, Japnn------ Section: CA017002, CA004XXX Pub1_ Class; JOURNAL Journal: Shukuhin Elseiqahu Zasshi Codcnt SKEIAP Publf 70 Serles: 19 Issue: 5 Pa9es: 406c90 LanOuaQet Japan ldentlflers: stev/os10e muta9enlclty CA09021166689Q Stauility of L-eseorbic acid added to rhole, chocolate, and 10. fat milks- --- ~- At:tnor:' Head, Mary K., Hansen. Arthur P. tocation: Dep. Food-Sti., -f/orth Carolina State Urt1v.. RaloiOh. p. C. Section: CA017003 Putil Cla_ss: JOURNAL Journal: J. Dairy Sol. - Codon: JOSCAE Publi 79 Series: 62 Issue: 2 Paqes: 35?-4 luentifiers: as5oruate milik stabllity, vitamin milk pasteurization CA0902i166687N S.+iss checse flavor: It. OrO+noleptle analysis Autnor:' 6icuq,S,-l., Hamxond, E. G. - Location:_ Ocp. Food Technol., Io.a5tate Univ.. Ames, lova SectioncCAO17003- Publ-Classc_ JOURNAL_ Juurnal: J. Dairy Sci. Codan: JDSCAE Publ: 79 Serics. 62 Issuet 2' Pages: 230-48 - ldentifiers: Emmental cheese aroma, flavor Cneese Eompn M CA090211666471 Xyluse: a modifier OF animal Cell phenotype Author: Demetrakopoul_os_, George €., Rannr,s, M1Chaet S., Am_os. Harold Location: D¢p. Microbiol. Mol. Genet., Harvard Med. Sch.. B_ostun. tlass... Section: CA017002, CA004XXX Publ Class: COYF PROC Journal: -Sweeteners- D•nt: Carles, Proc. workshop Evol. Available Potential Ncw Sw2ot@nersSuOar--$ubstttutes Dev. Non-Cfario0znic Foods Oovera0es Coden: 400UAJ Pub1: 78 P_._.qos: 177-03 Rieetin0 Date: 77 Publisher: Inf. Rotr.'Address:. Arlinqton, Va Avail: Snaw, James H.; Roussos, Garassimos G Identlfiers: xylose xylitol metab. sHeetener xylose xylttol ly
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DIALOG FI/e4t CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr. Am. Choqt. SoC,) (Item CA00021166620K Arema ' Stuuy of estences Inn non-alCoholiC soft drinks. Isolation and Concentrltion o/ aromas Author: Oeernaert, la.. Gosselc, J.- Lucation: Foop~9iv.~, Inst. Hyy. E_pidenliol~., Br_ussels, BelO. Section: CAOt7001 Puol Claeai JOURt1AL Jburna7: ttitt,Geb.- letlknsm~ittal~unters. NyO. Coden: fAGLHAE Publ: 78 Series: G9 Issue:_4 Pages_: 516=35 luvntiflcrs: flavoring --Uatn beverape, essential oYi~~uatn beverp0e CA09021166611N' fond ou a f lavor Industr_ y . AuthOr: KolOr,-MiCUOCI G.. Loc.rtion: Cent. Res. Lab., Gen. Foods.Tech. Cent., Tarrytown , N. Y. Section: CARt7000 Pu:tl Classf JOURNAL Juurna7: Pract. Spec U•osc. Couen: PSPED9 Publ: 79 Series: 3 Issue: Mass Spoctro/m., Part APaqes: 67-117 laentiflers: revlor flavmr mass spectroscopy CA09021166609P iiitural flavorin0 substances • Author: Yamaineto, Alsushl--" ' Loc.ition. T.:ikoku tialnen's Junlon Coll., LlorlOueM, Japan Section: CA017000 Pubi Ctnsct JOURNAC - --- -- Journ3l: tcikoku Gahuen Kiyo Coaen: TGKIDO P-ubl: 77 Serics: 3. PaquB: 13-21 LanOuapoi Japan- - Iucntifiers:reviewflavo,+ food CA09021160604H Chc,culate flavored coatings for the confectionery Industry. A stuay Of the whole range and different types of fats Authur: Jones. Lloyd - LucationE _Potro Chocolate Co. Ltd.. Engi. Section: CA017000 Publ C_1_e_G__5: JOUHNAL JournSl: Confect. Protl. Copoiic-CkFPAF Publ: .79 Series: 45 Issue: I Pages: 35-0, 43 Iucntifiers: review confectlonery coating fat, Cocoa butter substitute candy review CA0902116G5930 Ouality aspects (of heat ster/1lzatlon_) - 'Autnor: Von Syllow, Erik - - Location: Svcnska L_ivsmedelsin.t., SIK. G_oet_ebor0, Swed. Section: CA017000 Publ-Clas.^.:JOURNAL - - Journal: StK-_Rapp. ' Codon: SIKRDKPubl: 77 Serles: 421, PaOes: Gi-Gl9 Lat0ua0c6 Swed .4 of 30) User1906 !IJun79 022 Iuentiflers: revlew food sterllizatlon CA090211G6539R 8ner flavor terminology - ~ -~ Author: C1oil0aar0 M. C., Dalpllesh, C. E., Clapporton, , F. - Locntlon: Stroh Brew. Co.. Detroit. Mleh. . _ .... _. _ .. . .. . .... .. ..... _. .. ~ . Section: CA016003 Publ.Closs: JOURNAL ~ . J. Journos: bios (kancy) Cotto.n: B0550f Publi 79 Series: 10 )ssue. 2 PaOost 23-31 lanpuagei Fr fucntlfiers: boer flavor terwinol, nomenclature beer flavor CA09021/G6S36N • • 8.cr flavorterminolo0y Author: ueil0aard-,-R1.C., Dalqllesh, C. E., Clapperton,J. F. -Location:_ Stroh 8rew. Co.. Detroit, Mleh. Section:CA01G003 Puo1 Class:JDUR.yALJaurn:tl: J. Inot. Brew. Coden: JINBAL Publi 79 Series: 85 Issue: I Pages: 38-42 ,_.... . Identifiers: nomenclature beer flavor esQ ET00o
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0 Prlnt 15/2/1-S 333 DIALOG F1IC4: CA SEARCH 77-79/VOL 90(22) (Copr.. Am. Chem. Soc.) (Itenl I of 5) Usenr1906 4jun79. Serles: 44 Tssue: 2 Pages; 429'34 lu.ntitiVrsi o.yqon eucu«d>er pickling CA09022179G371t -~ Slaulo~SUlflde sOlutlOns ~ ~ Au ul.u•: Oahmc, Frlodricn, Nltsehe, Joorp lacatia)c Switz.- - ~ - ~--~-- -~~ -- ~ ~ ' ~ Section: CA079003 Puul Clas,^.: PAT Journal: Swiss Codun: StyXXAS Pubti 760929 PaOOs: S ,PP.. .... ~ lucntifiers: sulfide selectls•e electrodo sta_ndardization rea!tunt,~ ---~- sOdium thloantia:onate sulfidu clceU`udo• s_tah,t.irJi:atlont ascorbic aaid antio_xidbnt su_tfid.• rea0onl Pptenl Noc 605402 - ~ Appiie Noc~ 74/14<41 Date: ~ 741020 Class: C01Di7/20 AssiOnee: 2ellwe0er Uster A.-G. ~ . CA0902217934Sz Oenitrosation of platlnuro(IV) eomplexes with N-nltrosated ethylqnediimine. Author: Adrianova, 0. N.. Glaclkaya, A. Sn., Shehelokov, R. N. Location: USSR Inst. Obshch. Neorg. KhiM. Im. Kurnakova, ttoscow, Section: CA070007 Puol Class: JOURNAL Juurnal: Kou^d.. Khim. Coden: - KOKHOC Publt 79 Series: 5 /ssue: 2 Pages: 255-G2 Laiiouoqo: Rusa Iclentifiers: denitrosation platinum nltrosoethylenediamine CA0002116G920H In/luence - of dietary vitamin E on salon_dlaldehydo levels_ In liver and aUipose tis-sue anA-on qiutathiono peroMidat.e-and . recuctace activities in liver' and erythrocytes of Iean and obe5c• (Oo/Ob) mice - Aulhor:~~TroSller, Nawni, Brady. Lcvei I I., C~i~ll,+!rt~ A,~~--~-~ Paul S., Romses. Oalo R., Location: Oc•p. Food Sol., MlcniOan State Unlv., East lansin0 ~ Seetion: CAOt0002. CA014XXX P-ubl Class: JOURNAL ~ Journal: J-. tiutr. Codon: dOhUAI ~Publ: 79 - Scrles: ~ 1o_o ~ Issue: 2 ~ Pages: 34S-5a ~ Idcntlf/ers: vitamin E nutrition obesity, peroKlde adipose ' vitamin E. ..- CA09021166744D . . Chnnqes In dissolved o.yqen and /sleroPlora dunln0 formc•nt:jtion of acrated, hrlned cucumbers Author: Po_t_ts. E_. A., Flemin0, H. P. - Location: Dep. Food Scl., ,North Carolina State 113101011. N._ C. ScEtioni CA017004 Publ C1pss: JOURNAL Unlv., Journal: J. Food Scl. Cod,:n: 'JF05A2 Pu01: 79 VS&Ct0Ue. = CA09021161025J Ass.iy of 055 test shomloats In ten tester strains using a ' now moJifiCation of the Auq)s tJit for baCtCrial lnutayens - Auti,OP: MCMphOn. Robert E.. CI In,t-# - JQhn-C.. Tho.tTpson, Chriatlna Z. Location: Lilly Ros. Lab.. Indianaoolls, Indiana .: ` Section:-CA004007, CA005x%A,CA0G3X%XPutal Classt JOUR12At, . Jourual: Canccr lte.. Con;n:_ CNNEAO Publ: 79 Series: 39 I s.suo: 3 P. gos: 6U2-93 IdeutiFicrs: Escnerlchia Salmonella swta0enie/ty test. /nutagensCrueninQ Ames modification - ---- - --- r
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ABSTRACTSJ I Organic Mass Spectrometry May 1979 p. 281 THE DETERMINATION OF STERIC' PURITY OF AMINESIAND AMINO ACIDS' BY GAS':CHROrrIATOGRAPHY AND' MASS SPECTROMETRY Wiecek, C. et al : To date, in mass spectral ~ studies of esters; a single reference to ~ loss of water from 1 the molecular ions has ,~ been noted. A series of' aromatic esters~ which ehibit' that' sparsely observed phenomenon are reported liercin. Throngh a combination of synthetie and deuterium labeling studies„support for a unique fragmenta+ tion route for the loss of water from these ester molecular ions has been obtained., Organic Mass Spectrometry May 19 7 9' p. 289 9 ~! MASS SPECTRA OF TRANSITION METAL 77-COMPLEXES VI'--THE METASTABLE ION MASS ; SPECTRUM OF ('r11-TOLUENE') - TRICARBONYLCHROMIUM I Davis, R. et al First field! free region metastable fragmentations of: (-q6=PhCI'Iy)1Cr(CO)y have been examined by means of the linked scan teehniqpe:'11tr molecular ion is shown to fragment excl'usively.by single and, multiple CO 1'oss. The ion [C,HgCi(CO)=J;' also fragments directly to [C,1IaCrJ". I I Archives of Environmental Health j March/April 1979 p. 76 ' ETIOLOGY OF PLEURAL CALCIFICATION:, A STUDY OF QUEBEC CH'RYSOTZLEI ASBESTOS MINERS AND' M'ILLE'RS' Gibbs, Graham W. A review of 15;689 chest radio_e.raphs of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers, representing the 1'atesf film prior to November 1; 1966, ' for all such persons ever x-rayed, identified 206 men with pleural calcification. Of these, 198 hadl worked in the Thetford hfines area, 6'` at Asbestos, and! 2 at,St. Remi dt Tingwick; 2.5`70, 0.089'a, and 19a of the films from these areas, respectively. A series of'case~eontrol studies revealed that pleural,calcification was concentrated.in men employed at,a small group of mines in Thetford Mines and!occurred more often among miners and! maintenance personnel than among millers. Calcification was not related'.to past history of illness or injury,, s place of :esid'ence, or employment in other industries. The distribution of pleural calcification in this Quebec,industry suggests that it is related to some characteristic of airborne dust or mineral closely associated with the chrysotile that is encountered during mining in ` Thetford 6tines but not'in other mining areas. Possible minerals include mica, talc, and breunnerite, i _ -. Medical 1-3ypotb'-ieses Ahstracts in l•:nglish VOL. 5 NO. 4 A'PRIL 1979 The mechanism of',coronary artery spasm: roles of oxygen, prostaglandins; sex hormones 447 and smoking;, M. Karma:yn,1Ll;S. Afanky and D.F.' 1lorrobin
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• `, , , ... . . . ! i .. 1 ABSTRAcTSJ Science May 11, 1979 ' v. 204, no. 4393, p.' 587 IDENTIFYING ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS! * CAUSING MUTATIONS AND CANCER' I Ames, Bruce N. Summary. Damage to DNA appears to be the major cause of most cancer and i genetic birth defects and' may, contribute to agjng and' heart disease as well. The'.' .~ agents that cause this damage must be identified. Many of these agents are natt:ral' chemicals present.in the human diet as complex mixtures. The tens of thousands 01 ! man-made chemicals that have been introducted into the environment in the last few! ;' decades must also ~ be tested for their ability to damage DNA. Exi'sting, animal tests, and' human epidemiology albne are inadequate for this task because of time, ex- pense, and the difficulty of dealing with complex mixtures. Newly deveibped short- ~, term tests, most of them assaying for mutagenicity; are discussed as key tools in I identifying environmental mutagens and carcinogens. Archives of Environmental Health March/April 1979' p. 111 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING'AS'A MEANS OF REDUCING NICOTINE ABSORPTION IN TOBACCO HARVESTERS . Gehlbach, S. H. et al Green tobacco sickness is an occupational illness of'tobacco illness of tobacco harvesters that is thought to be eause& by dermat" absorption of nicotine from contact with green tobacco leaf. Wearing of rubberized,nylon rainsuits effectively prevented nicotine absorption in volunteers who picked wet tobacco. Nicotine absorptioni was demonstrated in workers who wore clothing that was not waterproof. .. . ( Archaves of'Environmental Health •March/April 1979' p. 69 A STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATZONSHIP' OF'SOME CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS Partition coefficients of water/air; blood/air„oil/aa, and o7/water for twenty chlorinated,hydrocarbons„which were determinediby means of a vial-equilibration method, were examined' in relation to their chemical structures and threshold limit, values (TLVs) recom- mended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. The TLV' was correlated closely with the blioodJaik partition coefficient and with the product of the water/air and,the oilJai>• partition coefficient except for carbon tetrachlbride and o-dichlorobem zene- A relation between,partition coefficients and toxicity of these hydrocarbons is also diescribed! I Sato, Akio I Nakajima, Tamie T}iE InEDICiCL JOURNAL OF AUS'PRAi.IA Ab.tracts in English VOL. 1 NO. 8 APRI'L 211. 1979 sage. by J. Blizard _ - 344 Print R.adership and Cigarette U _ _ RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY- Lung, Function in an Australian Populatione 2. Spirometric Per- H' ~ • tbrmance and cigaretterSmokingi Habits. by JJ, Gibson. 354' Gauagher.,A. Johansen and I1. Webster .. .. .• -• s
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. ABSTRACTS Nature! May 24, 1979' v. 279, p~. 286 ' I ANOTHER CANCER SCARE . . . OR' IS'~ IT HYPOCHONDRIA? Weinberg, Al'vin NI. I I~ WHERE willl the search for environ-•' mental carcinogens end? A recent article (Commoner, Vithayathil; Dolora: Nair,, Madyastha, Cuca„ Science 201, 9173; 1978) implicates: extract of cooked hamburgers; another,; (Bruyninckx, Mason,, htorse,, Nature' 274, 606';, 1978)' oxygen at physio-~ logical concentrations. Both~ were found to be mutagens in the Ames test.; Mutagenicity in this case is usually,. though not, always, associated with: carcinogenicity in mammals. Commoner et al'. found that groundd beef cooked in a home hamburger cooking appliance containedi a sub-;, stance that induced mutations (rever-; ', sion from histidine dependence to~ histidine independence) i inn some stratns of' Salmonella typhimurium. In the: Science article the authors are properly cautious: "If . . . these mutagens-,, once purifted' and tested' on laboratory . animal§-are foutid to be carcinogens,j their apparent concentration in some, foods may represent an appreciable risk; to certain populations." But the media! were less restrained: these cautious: claims were blown up in the United; States into the Great Hamburger Scare~ of Fall 1978. Professor Commoner was widely quoted in: the press and on TV,i and MacDonald hamburgers' stock, ' prospects were re- examined by alert Wall Street analysts. .I l The Bruyninckx er al. findings are even more startling, It has been known, for 25 years that hyperbaric oxygen is a mutagen-but mammals are generally. not exposed to hyperbaric oxygen. Bruyninckx foundl that: exposure of certain mutants of S. typ,liimurium to ~ S^'D-5CO_-90C„N, induced as much as a fiftyfold increase in reversion to histidine independence compared to controls kept under anaerobic eon- ditions. In speculating on the signifi- cance of their findings, Bruyninckx: et a!' say; "According to Fridovich Oxygen toxicity is normally held in check by a balance among rates of formation and destruction of reactive forms of' oxygen. This may mean that V'ol . t#i. Iln. .:. .rIIrJF Z1, oxygen mutagenicity is improbabl'e, but' not impossible, in normal aerobic mam-) - malian! cells; but higher rates of for-: mation of reactive forms of oxygen ori lower rates of their destruction, . could lead to significant' rates of mutagenesis along with the molecular' pathologies arising from mut:ltion:"4 .Thus Bruyninckx et al. do not quite ~ say that oxygen„ in the form of' the ' Dy radical, may be implicated' in carcinogenesisT-but others, notably J: i Totter, former Director of the Division. of' Biology and Medicine of' the ZZS' v Atomi Enar mmi C io ) h gy c o ss n~ a e sug- gested' just this. (' American Laboratory II ' May 1979 p. 77 QUANTITATIVE THIN LAYER'' CHROMATOGRAPHY I Rogers, Dexter T ! ''~'' HIN LAYER chromato-~ T graphy is maturing as an, / . analytical technique in, bothl methodology and instru-_ rnentation. This consensus de- rives from the contributors and participants in a recent sympo- sium" and, from the experience of suppliers in the field. ~ The symposium emphasizedd the state of development of an or- ganized' body of knowledge. In, addition to several now-estab-! lished journals of the chromato-1 graphilc science, compilations of' information have been pre-~ paredL='` Perhaps a better indication of the maturity of TLC is its success, in reducing theory to practice in ! 'simple terms and in demonstrat-~ ing the controli an investigator: has over this: methodology when. applying TLC to real problems. 1 0 Ivlost noteworthy is Ptactice of' O' Thin Layer Chromatography; by: 0 J.C. Touchstone and M.F. Dob-~ w' bins, published by Wiley-lntersci- OD ence: i y . ~ .1
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41 4 ABSTRACTS Archives of Environmental Healthj March/April 1979, p. 97 CIGARETTE SMOKE COMPONENTS AND, .. ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE PROTEIN : : . SYNTHESIS' s t rl ,,;. : t:--Leffingwell,'Craig M'. Low, Robert B. .U A comparison was made of'the effects of acrolein and aqueous cigarette smoke extracts onamino acid incorporation into protein byy rabbit pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Studies were on cells maintainedn in vitro as adherent monolayers. Freshly prepamd' acrolein inhibited aminoiacid incorporation by significant amounts after approximately 30 miimand' aqueous smoke extracts after approximately 15 min oG incubationi Fifty percent inhibition by acrolpin oecurred,with a dose of 5.5 Ng acrolbin/ml, an amountfour times that in the • amount of aqueous smoke extract required for 50`70' inhibition according,to previously reported Gndings. Analysis by aidual-isotope teeh-~ nique and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophorasis showed the inhibitory effect'of' acrolein toibe:nonspecific, as had' previously been found for aqueous smoke extracts. The presence of'the sulfhydryl rea¢entcysteine, reduced the inhibitory effect of'acro-, lein by 57.5%, but reduced!iinhibi6on induced' by aqueous smoke extracts by only 12.2%. These resultssuggest:the effects of acroleiniare: both quantitatively and qualitatively different than those of aqueous smoke extracts. . i . Archives of Environmental Health! j March/April 1979 p. 92 MONITORING EXPOSURE OF BREWERY WORKERS TO C02: A STUDY OF _ CELLAR WORKERS AND CONTROLS Riley, Richard L. Bromberger-Barnea, Baruch Carbon dioxide, exposure of nineteen cellar workers and twenty nonexposed controls in a medium size brewery was assessed byll determining base excess and standard bicarbonate of the plasma before work on Monday and after work on Monday andi Friday.I. Standard, bicarbonate averaged 0.6mEq/L higher in the ccllar workers than the controls when sanlples taken at'the same time were com-i , pared. This difference was not, statistically significant. Standard bicarbonate and hemoglobin concentration declined significantly in i' „both groups between Monday before work and Friday after work, suggesting that hemodilution had occurred. This may have been;' related to the consumption of large amounts of beer or other fluid. The air breathed by three cellar workers was monitored' contin-: uously during working hours for one wk. Carbon dioxide concentrations varied widely, but yielded a time-weighted average of' 1.0895 carbon dioxide. The time-weighted average was inordinately difficult to establish under the working conditions in the:brewery and was irrelevant with respect toacutely hazardous:exposures. Journal of'Agricultural and Food Chemistry May/June 1979' v. 27, no. 3, p. 609 DETERMINP.TIONi OF TOBACCO' CAROTENOIDS BY RESONANCE RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY Forrest, Gary I Vilcins, Gunars Quantitative analysis of (3-carotene and lutein~ in, tobacco by resonance Raman spectroscopy reveals significant differences in Raman intensity enhancements for the two carotenoids. As a result' the carotenoids must be separated fromleach other for, quantitative analysis. Tobacco extracts and'Kround tobacco in aihlaTti'O31matrix have been examined quantitatively usin„ the matrix bands for normalization. The standardideviation of the method is less than 5%. Carotenoid levels in the nanomole/gram range have been measured for tobacco at all1stages of processing, including green leaves, freshly cured' leaves, aged tobaccos, and processed cigarettes. The greatest decrease in carotenoids is found during the curing process. Vnl : 9. flo. 8. JurjE 22)'. '1J7J -:
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0 RAS AftSIcI.i 79-4286 nG LV-•71Ja:t,j Y. , United States: National Institutes of Health. Calling it, quits :,.. the latcst advice on~ how to give up tigarettes. -['Bethesda~ Md'.] : Dept. of Health„ Education, l and Welfare. Public Health Service. National' Instituucs oGll Health. [National Cancer Institute, Office of Cancer Commu, nications, 1978?]', 20014 (37]' p. : illi ; 10 x 20 cm:- (DHEW publication ; no. (NIH) 78-1824) flt'em 507-G-6 .. .: i pbk l. Smoking. 2. Cigarette habit. 3. Tobacco-Physiolog- ieal' effect. 1. United States. National Cancer Institute. Of- fice of Cancer Communications. 11. Title• Itl. Series: United States. Dept• of Health,. Education, and Welfare. DHEW publication;,no. (NIH) 78-1!823. OCLC 4407780, t329 I 79- HE 20.361472:78-24 . Pothier„P E Cadium and'threnvironment': January 1976 through Au+ gust 1978, citations / prepared by P.E. Pothier - (Bethesda, Md.]I : DeptL of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health,Service, National Institutes of Health, National Libra+ ry of Medicine, 1'978. • . 20014' . 21 p. ; 27 cm. - (Literature search : no. 78-24), . Oltem 508-H.1 pbk. 1• Cadmium - Environmental aspects - Bibliography:, 1. United States. National' Library of Medicine. 11'. lfitle. IiII. _ Series:, United States. National Library, of Medicine. Litera- i ture search„ no• 78-24. OCLC' 4391327 t 79-3992' E 1'.28:UCRL-52310 Keller„P R, Chartit : a computer program that constructs bar graphs in r, color, / P. R. Keller. -(WashingtonJ : Dept. of Encrgy ;. Springfield, Va. : for sale by the National' Technical (nforma- tion Servicc, 1978. 221611 v, 50 p. : ill. ;,28 cm. -(UCRL ; 523I0) Work performed by, UCLLL under contract no. V1/-7405-i ENG'-48: April 1'8, 1977. Ottcm 429-T-4 (microfiche) pbk. 1. Computer graphics. 2: Computer programs. 11 United Statcs., Dept. of Energy. IL Lawrence Livermore Laborato• ry. Ill. Titlc. (I OCLC 4446236' • I Vnrn ..(). t1o. 8. Jurm 22. 1979 1 79-4291 HE 20.3159/2:98 United States. National Cancer Institute. Division of Cancer Cause and I Preventioni - - ~ Bioassay, of' dl-menthol for possible carcinogenicity:- ' Bethesda, Md. : Dept. of Health, Education, and Vl/elfare; Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. Division of Cancer Cause and Preventioni Carcinogenesis Testing Program+ 1978. ±i 20014 xii', 112 p. : ill. ; 27 cm. - (Carcinogenesis technical' re+ / port series ;, no. 98)' (DHEW' publication ; no. (NIH) 79- 1348) i "CAS no. 89-78-1'•" Bibliography: p. 33-35. 611em iS07-G-12 pbk. 1'. Menthol-Toxicology: 2. Carcinogens. l. Title. 111. , Series: United States. National Cancer Institute. Careinogene- sis technical report series ; no. 98. 111. Series: United States. ' Dept. of'Health, Education„and Welfare. DHEW publication ; no. (NIH) 79-1348. I OCLC 4266653 79-f829 T 70•7/2:977 United'Stntcs. Bureau of Alcohol-,Tobacco, and Firearms. Cumulative bulletin - Bureau of, Alcohol, Tobacco dt : Firearms. [Washington] Treasury Depti, Bureau of',Alcuhol', - Tobacco and Firearms; for sale by, the Supt: of Doe., U.S. : Govt. Print, Off.. 20402 v. 24 cm: II $4.00 !' Cbver titlc:, Altohol; tobacco and firearms cumulative bul- Ietin 1977- Spine title: ATF cumulative bulletin 1977- 1977. i OI'tem 961-BI S/N 048'-011-00031'-1 ISSN'0141-24841 , Continues: Alcohol, Ittin ISSN 0094-59'l9 tobacco and' firearms cumulative bul- li. Alcohol - Law and legislrtio n- United Statcs -~' Periodicals., 2. Tobacco- Law and legislat'ion- United' States - Periodicals. 3. Firearms - Laws and regulations - t United Statcs - Pcriodicals. 4. Ilntcrnal' revenue law - ~ Unitcd Statcs-Periodicals. - , Key TitIL•: Cumulativc bulletin - Department of the Trcasu- ry. Bureau of Altohol, Tobacco & Firearms I. Title. ~ KF39I9.A34 344/:73/053' OCLC 3860574
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« , NL ABSTRACTS 79-1286 HE20:3158:Q'4 United States: Nationalillnstitutes of Health. l Calling, it quits :.,the latest advice on how to give up cigarcttes. -[Bethesda„ Md.] : Dept. of Health, Ed'ucation, ~, and Welfare. Public Health, Service, National Institutcs of i Health, (N'ational Cancer Instituto, Office of Cancer Commu~ nications; 1978?] 20014 (37]i p. t i1L ; 10 x 20 cm.- (DHEW publication ; no. . (NIH)', 78'-1824) Oltem 507-G-6 .. - - , _ ': -_ pbk• 11. Smoking. 2. Cigarette habit: 3. Tobacco - Physiolbg- ical effect. li United States. National Cancer Institute. Of'- ftcc of Cancer Communications: Il. Title. Iil. Series: Unitcd! States. Dept. of' Health, Education, and Wclfare. DHEW publication ; no. (NIH) 78-1823. OCLC 44077801 79-4291 H E 20.3159/2:98 ~ United States. National Cancer Institute. Division of Cancer Cause,and'Ptevention. r...,....,..r...: _ t Bioassay of di-mentholl for possible earcinogenieity.- ' Bethesda, Mdl : Dept. of Health„ Edueation+ and' Welfare„ Public Health Service,, National Institutes of H'ealth,,Nationall Cancer Institute. Division of Cancer Cause and Prevention, Carcinogenesis Testing Program, 1978: 200t4 •. [ xii, 112 p. : illl ; 27 cm. - (Carcinogenesis technical re- port series ; no. 98) (DHEW publication, ; no. (NIH) 79- 1i348), ' • - i no "CAS 89 - 78 - .,. "' " ' 1 Bibliography: p4 33-35'. Oltem 507-G-1i2 pbk. 1. Menthol-Toxicology. 2. Carcinogens. 1. Title. II: , Series: United States. Ntttional,Cancer Institute. Carcinogene- sis technical report series ; no. 981 Ill. Series: United States: ' Dept. of Health„Education, and Welfare. DHEW pubiicationi ;,no: (NIH) 79-1348L 794329 1 HE 20s36114/2:78-24 ' I OCLC 4266653 Pothier„P E • Cadium and, the environment : January, 1976 through Au- ' gust 1978, ,citations / prepared by P.E. Pothier- [Bethesda„' Md.)1 : Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public. Health Service,, National Institutes of'Health; National Libra- ' ry,of Medicine, 1978. 20014 21 p. ; 27 cmi -(Literature search : no. 78-24) . 01tem 508'-H-1' pbk., 1. Cadmium - Environmental aspects- Bibliography. 1.1 United States. National Library of'Medicine: 11. Title. IIl:: Series: United States. National Library of Medicine. Litera- ~ ture search ; no. 78-24. - oCLC 4391327 I 79-3992' E 1.28:UCRL•52310 Kellcr; P R' Chartit': a computer program that constructs bar graphs in; color / P. R. Kellcr. - (Washington )' : Dcpt: of Energy ; SpringRcld„ Va. : for sale by the National Technical Informa- tion Service. 1978. 22161 v, 50 p. : ill. ; 2$'.- (UCRL ; 52310) Work performed by UCLLL under contract, no. W-7405'-i ENG-48: April 18, 1977. 6'Itcmi429-T-4 (microRche) pbk. 1. Computer graphics. 2': Computer programs. 1: United States. Dept. of Energy. II. Lawrence Livermore Laborato- ry. Ill. Title. OCLC 4446236 . Vn[ 8. .I[tm: 22'. 19791 79-4829 .. '-i=. ... . .. T 70.7/2:977 - :. " '; United Statcs. Burcauiof A1coholl Tobaceo, and Firearms. j'. Cumulative bulletin - Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms. [',Washington] Treasury Dept., Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms; for sale by, the Supt. of Doc.,, U:S. . Govt. Print. Off. 20402 v~ 24' cm. $4.00 t. C,over title: Alcohol'„ tobacco and firearms cumulative bul'- ' letin 1977- I' Spinc titlc:,ATF cumulative bulletin 1977- 1977. 01'tem 961'-8' S/N 048'-012-00031-1' ISSN 0161-2484 Continues: Alcohol; tobacco andlfirearms cumulatige bul- ~ letin ISSN 0094-5919 j 11. A lcohol - Law and legislation - United Statcs - Pcriodicals., 2. Tobacco - Law and l legislation - United' States - Pcriodicals. 3. Firearms - Laws and regulations -~' Unitcd States-Pcriodicals. 4. Internal revenue law-, ii United I Stutes - Pcriod icals, Key Title: Cumulative bullutin - Department of the Treasu- ry, Bureau of Alcohol+ Tohacco &, Fircarms 1. Title. ~ KF3919.A3a 344/:73/053 OCLC 3a60574
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t J Industrial Research/Development! .' I May 1979 p. 123 BRIDGING THE GAP U1vTIL RECENTLY the laboratory sci entist and i" the industrial measurement and control en-, gineer with a need for both, data acquisition :, and comprehensive computational eapabil-" ity have faced a serious dilemma. Generally speaking they have been forced to settle for . too little or too much computing capaliility;, when selecting appropriate solutions to data; acquisition and reduction requirements. Ati' the low end of the spectrum,* a rwiderange of1 data loggers is available, but despite vast! improvement in recent years, the loggers''I ability to manipulate, remember, store and process data is still' quite limited. In many cases the user has been forced to turn to off-line, centralized minicomputer instai- lati'ons to overcome these limitations. The minicomputer provides increased processing power but often at the sacrifice ofl convenience and!iinmediate human interaa. tion. The user has not had the option of put-" ting computer-power and data acquisition at' his fingertips, on the test bench or on-line in; the reaf world where he can personall'y; interact as measurements changet,trends oC cur, and processes must be modiiied'. A new class of' instrumentation is now available to fill the gap - microcomputer ` based data acquisition andl control systems' (AAS) that use streamlined versions of.' BASIC that are exceptionally versatile andi' fast. These new high-level' languages can be: learned'and competently applied in a matter of days, even by users who have little or no~ prior knowledge of programming languages, and techniques. These systems provide on-' line ability not only to collect data, but also to!, monitor, store, display, control and perform high-level data reduction on the spot. The', interaction available between the user and the system has to be seen to be appreciated.`, Let's simply say that'the list of what cannot I be accomplished with a DAS would be far easier to compile. I 11 0 1 1 ' 1(170. V01 :' (1 ! ' 2 c . , 0~ U1a,E , , ..r .. Cleaning our environment a cttemical' perspective ~ A report by the Committee on environment s Improvement Washington: American Chem Soc 1978 ~ Pp ix + 457, $9.50 (paperback) ,' _.,.,, °In the vast shantytown of shoddy publications about environmental pollution ai few books stand out as authoritative, judi'cial' and trustworthy. One of'these was the report of the environmental pollution panel' of the President's Science Advisory Committee which came out in 1965 under the title Restoring the Quality of'our En- vironment. Another was the Report on the • Study Study of Critical Environmental Problems (the SCEP' Report) sponsored by MIT,, which came out in 1970'» A third book of' this high quality was & report from the American Chemical Society published in 1969, entitle& Cleaning our Environment. i', Now,, nine years later, the American• Chemical Society has published what they modestly call a second edition of their 19699 report. It is much more than that; it is a totally fresh examination of' the state-of-' the-art in pollution control4 from the perspectiKe of chemists. The book does not, except incidentally, enter into economic orr political issues; on this account it is all' the more valuable for economists and politiy cians, for it sets out in a sober and' detached way the 'hard' facts, so far as they are'.' known, about substances which con- taminate air, land, and water; the techni- ques for monitoring these substances; some. eautious assessment of the balance of risks and' benefits; and no fewer than 110 recom_ tnendations for consideration by those responsible for environmental policy. It does not attempt to solve the value judgements which administrators and' politicians have to make; it does give them,. in a style easily intelligible, to anyone who' has the rudiments of science, the technical =• input for decision-making. The book is (' written for American readers and it is elear from the extensive references that it takes ( noaccount of the great mass of'work done in Britain and on the Continent; wisely, F think, for this would have doubled its size and turned it' into a handbook instead I of a~'a report. Q N W IPA I s
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r Nature May 31, 1979 ; v. 2'79. p. 4'3L DIFFERENTIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE AXILLA AND GROIN OF THE MOUSE TO CHEMICAL ONCOGENESIS i' INCIDENTAL to investigations of' chemical oncogenesis, we l have observed! that 3-methyicholanthrene (3-MC)-induce 'd subcutaneous sarcogenesis occurred more rapidly in the axillary than in the inguinal region of the mouse Recently Auerbach er • aC have described''what may be a similar phenomenon-a marked'tendency for tumour transplants to grow better cephal- i icallyt.:. . _. . . .. , . .. . . The basic method in our studies was to implant carcinogen- containing wafers subcutaneously: The wafers were made from Millipore filter materiaL usually, but not necessarily, of 0.45-µm . porosity. Strips of filter were dipped' in solutions of molten. embedding, paraffin (Paraplast) which contained various concentrations of 3-MC. Temperature was carefully controlled' by an oil bath~to prevent overheating,and consequent de-; composition of the 3-MC'. After cooling, disks of 6-mm diameter were cut with a paper punch and stored!in the dark in a refrigerator for up to I month. Implantation of the disks was done through small skin incisions while the animals were anaes- thetisedlwith a Nembutal alcoholisolution: Each animal'received four disks, one in each axilla and! one in each groin: After' implantation of the disks, the animals were observed for tumour production. The resulting tumours are designated! 'pre- excision'. Journal of the National Cancer' Institute May 1979 v. 62, no. 5, p. 1209 . COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF SOME EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS FOR USE'INiCARCINOGEN SCREENING' E1.ashoff, Robert M. et a1. ABSTRACT-The development' and' evaluation of experimental'. designs for routine Ih vivo screening of chemicals for potentlal carcinogenic activity were considered. Such designs have piayed en Important role In the Carcihogenesis Bloassay Program of the Natlonal! Cancer Institute (NCI). In particular, the current one- stage 50-animal/group screen used by the NCI was considered. A'~ specific two-stage alternative was proposed ln, which 35 animals/; group were used; this alternative allowed for retesting of equivo-' cal compounds. The proposed designs were evaluated In terms of sensltivity, specificity, and throughput. Despite the large number of tests made for each compound, the falae-positive ratee was found to be less than 0.07 for the current screen and less then 0.05 for the proposed two-stage alternative. The power of, the one-stage and two-stage screens was comparable. The two- stage screen war shown to make about' 30% more decisions per test perlodI with a savings of around 28% In the expected number of anlmats needed per cornpound~ testedL-JNCI' 62: 1209-1219, 1979. i R Vou: '1J7(1 JUrrE 91 J ilo , . , . . ., .,.z., Nature : ._.: May 24, 1979 W , v. 2791, p. 278' US' FOREIGNiRESEARCH RISE S TO $1.5 BILLION . -; _ :,.~, 1 TwE vast majority of' research carried out by US private corporations in' foreign countries is concerned with. developing products for local' market conditions, rather than 'with longer term basic or applied research goals,; according to a survey conductediby the National l Science Foundation. i Research and development carried out abroad by US corporations in- creased by 41'?;, between 1974 and 1977, to a total of S'1.5 billion, the survey reports. This represents 'about 7' ; of' the total expenditure on R&D by pri-; vate companies, which increased by- 32 ":, over this period. The most substantial increase in overseas R&D occurred in the phar- maceutical industry; with many com- panies conducting trials of new drugs abroad in order to take advantage of more liberal conditions on foreign testing introduced by the Foodi and Drug Administration in 1975. Thusl between 1974 and 1977, the amount of, R&D conducted by pharmaceutical' companies abroad more than doubledl' compared to an increase of only 34',.1, in the funds spent at home over this' period (although the report adds that foreign and' domestic R&D are now increasing, at about the same rate). Tobacco Reporter May 1979 p. 12 Record high chewing • \ tobacco output and sales i In the fourth quarter of 1978, chewing, tobacco output and! sales continued to advance, as they have since the mid-1960's. The fourth quarter gains brought the year's output to al- most 95 million pounds, an~ in- crease of 5.1 percent over the previous year, whil'e sales ex- ceeded 92.3 million pounds, 4'.1i percent greater than in 1977.' These totals •represent the lar- gest since 1948. :e7 s
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Y BSRAS 1AIcI.J Journal of Chromatography ' March 2]1, 1979 v. 165, no. 1 GRADIENT ELUTION IN'HIGH- PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY 1. THEORETICAL BASIS FOR REVERSED-PHASE SYSTEMS Snyder, L. R. et al 'L CONTENTS . ~ " 1.Introduction . . ,.• - ,. s s .... . . . : , . . . . . : . . . . . . 4 : 2. Experimentali. . 3. Gradient elution . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . : . ' . ." . . S A. Linear solvent strength separations. . . . . . . . : . . . . ., .. : ~ . . . 9, 'B. Retention time, band width, and resolution in LSS'gradient elution ....:.:.. 10 a. Retention time: . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 b. Band width'. .. . . . . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11i c. Resolution . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . 13 d1 Detection sensitivity . . . . ... . . ... . ., . . . . ... . ... . . . . . . . 151 e. Separation selectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . 17 4. SoK+ent strength versus composition in reversed-phase liquid chromatography ..... ..17 A. Optimal gradients for reversed-phase LC. . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' 18 a. Exceptions to eqns. 12' and 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., , 18 B. The strength, S, of'other solvents B' in reversed-phase LC . ... .. .. 19 I a. Optimal value of ~D' in, reversed-phasc LC systems ... ... . 191 54 Miscellaneous otherconsiderations . . . . . . . . . . ., . . . ., . „ . . . . ., . 20 A. Design of isoeratirseparations on the basis of initial gradient elution separation ... 20'' B. Calculation of column plate number in gradient elution. ........ .•20'! 6: Conclusidns . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . . : . : . . 21 ~ 7. Symbols. . . , . . u I 8. Appendix I. Derivation of retention time,t., and'capaciiy factor at time of elution, kl, in LSS gradient elution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 . 9. Appendix 11. Optimalivalue of b in gradient elution for eolumndcngth L, fixed and variable separation time. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241! 10. Appendix 1111. Derivations of sensitivity equations for isocratic and gradient elution. ... 27 ; 11. Appendix IV. Changes in separation selectivity with change in V (reversed-phase LC). .: 27 ; 12'. Appendix V. Deviations from eqn. 12' and their effect on separations in reversed-phase gradient elution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 I 13. Acknowledgements . . . ... . . 14. Summary .. . . . . W .:
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ABSTRACTS I Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry May/June 197'9~ ' v. 27, no. 3, p. 547' I SYNTHESIS'AND SYNERGISTIC ACTIVITYi OF DILLAPIOLE BASE'D~ PYRETHRUM SYNERGISTS Tomar, S. S. et al Twelve compounds were synthesized by chemical transformation of dillapiole (2,3'-dimethosy-4,5-' methylenediosyaltyibenzene), one of the chief constituents of A'nethum sorva Roxb. (Indian dill) seed ' otll Al!11 of'these compounds exhibit'synergism~better than piperonyl~butoside toward pyrethrum against flour beetles (Tribolium castanr.um Herbst.). Isolation of dillapiole, its conversion to the above, compounds, andi their infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra~ Rk values, and factors of'' synergism are reported in this paper. , [ Organic Mass Spectrometry I May 19'791 p. 286 !!!I WATER LOSS FROM ESTER MOLECULAR IONS UPON ELECTRON IMPACT ~ Folk, Theodore et al Amines and amino, acids have been condensed with a mixture of N'-TFA-R-prolyl chloride and n-TFA-Sq1-; =H]-prolyl chloride and the resulting four diastereoisomers have been separated by gas chromatography into' two peaks. The amount of I each diastereoisomer formed was then determined by chemical ionization mass spectrometly. The steric purity of'the enantiomerie mixture can be calculatedlf>•om these values. The method' is not dependent on the diastereoisomer formation going to completion. Archives'of Environmental Health! March/April 1979' p. 103 .ENZYME INHIBITION BY TOBACCO' I SMOKE'c A COMPARISON OF THE I EFFECTS OF FOUR'FILTERS I Evans, David J'. et al .1 The effects of four typerof cigarette filters on the ilnhibitionof gl'ycerald'ehyde-3'-pNosphate dehydrogenase by aqueous solutionsafs the free gas phase of tobacco smoke have been studied. Commercial cellUlose acetate-chascoal filters or experimental wool filters con- t2ining a polyethylenciminaquternary ammonium additive were particularly effective in removing the inhibitor(.-) from smoke:under prescribed experimental conditions. Inhibition was dependent iw all cases on both the age and the amount of frergas phase solutionas welt as eontaet time. Transient enzyme activation was observed. It is suggested'that hydrogen sulfide is the main inhibitor present in the gas phase of cigarette smoke. eZN,yb..oLat* lefters. Abstracts in English VOL. 6 NO. 4-5 Nilotine.nd cotinino in breatt ftuid I. Hill and E.L. Wyndar ' APRIL 1979 VrYt . : rl~~. a1n~. : S.'.:4.Illra~r ~ ?9'., ~1()'I9~, f.
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0 OCLC 4477453 IL .- it , 1 ?1r 1c17t) i' SR _ABIAcTsJ 79+S9 t5 EP' 1.5:In 7/978 United States. Environmental Protection Agency. The Federal insecticide, fungicide,.andi rodenticide act as III amend'ed1: Public law 92-51',6, October 21, 1972, as amended~ OCLC 4482658 Includes bibliographical references. I OI'tem 1008-A pbk. I. Cigarette manufacture and trade - United States. 2. : Racketeering - United States. 11 Title. 11. Series: United' : States. 95th Congress, 2disession, 1978. House. Report ; no• ~ 95-1629. sion ; no. 95-11629J, Caption title. Sept. 26, 1978. i by Pubtic law 94-140. November 28. 1975; and' Public law 'i .95.396, September 30, 1978. - Washington : U.S. Environ- mental mental I Protection Agpncy, 1978. 20460 ' 37p:;28cm. Oltem 431-G2' pbk., " L Pesticides- L.aw and legislation - United States. Title. 1 79-6846 95-2zH.rp:1629' United States: Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary. Racketeering in the sale and distribution of cigaretter: re, port to accompany H.R. 8853'. - (Washington :', U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 19781 22 p. ; 24 cmj - (House report - 95th Congress, 2d I ses- m e c Public Public Liaison Subcommittee of the Interagency Toxic Sub.- I stances Data Committee. - Washington-: Environmental Pro- tection Agency. InteragencyTo!cic Substances Data Commit- tee„Subcommitteeof the Interagency'Toxic Substances Data Committee, 1978. ,' ali subuances information network / by the . Th i h Public Liaison Subcommittee. • ' Dau Cbmmittee. United States., Interagency Toxic Substances 79-5913 ' EP 1.2:C 42/9' 22161 95 p. in various pagings :, ill. ; 28 cm. Issued' Nov. 1978. lltem 431'-1+i pbk. 1. Information storage and retrieval systems-Chemistry 2. Information networks - United States• 1. Title. I 79:6074 ~. '. HE,20.7108:Sa 4Jsupp. National Institute for Occupational Safety and' Health. Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering k NIOSH' manual,of sampling data sheets : supplement toTthe "'1977' edicion. - Cincinnatiy, Ohio : Dept. of Health,, Educa, T- tion; and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control„ National' 1'nstitute for Occupational Safety and Healthi Division of Physical, Sciences and Engineering ;. Washington : for'sale by'the Supt. of Docs.,,U.S: Govt. Print. Off:, 1978. i 20402 - ~ (,12611 p: in various pagings ; 28!cm.- (DHEW publica- tion ; no. (NIOSH) 78-189) • , August 1978. S/N'017-033-00319-0 pbk. : $3.00 1. Environmental l monitoring. 2. Pollution - Measure- ' ment! I: Title. II. Series: United States. Dept: of Health„ Education, and Welfare. DHEW publication ;,no. (NIOSH) 78-189: ~ 79-6597; Y 4.Ag 8/,1:Sm 7 United States. Congress. House: Committee on Agriculture. Subcommittee on Tobacco. l Effect ofsmoking on nonsmokers • hearing before the Sub. committee on Tobacco of the, Committee ow Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-fifth Congress„second ses- sion, September 7,, 1978! - Washington : U.S. Govt. Print. Off.. 1978. •, 20402 ~ I iv, 345' p. : ill. ; 24I cm. - (Serial - House, Committee, on : Agriculture ; no. 95-000)', Includes bibliograhical,references. O1tem 1010 S/N 052-070104755-1 pbk. : $4.50 1. Tobacco - Physiological effect 2. Cigarette smoke. I• Title: 11. Series: United States. Congress. House. Commit4 tee on Agriculture. Serial, 95th Congress ;,no. 95'•ODO. l OCLC 4532060 -s . . rr ~. . . . ~nI '.. . . ...1Jn~. ~ /~S . S& ~ ('.(rs F' .~/..5.
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APSIPP'CTSJ J!ournal of Chromatography April 21, 1979 17'2, p. 493 > ,. HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID _-CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF'THE -: PUNGENT PRINCIPLES OF' PEP'PER AND PEPPER EXTRACTS Verzele, M. et al "" Piperine (1), first isoltited from black pepper in 1820, was later also isolated from other pepper varieties'. The alkaline hydrolysis of piperine yields piperinic, „_; acid' (II) and' piperidine. II' 0H' The traits configuration of piperine was proved by DoebnerZ' and Ladenburg and Scholtz'. It was soon postulated that the geometrical isomers of'piperine could also exist in pepper extracts. When stilill unknowny these were given the names cha~-, vicine (cis-cis isomer), isochavicine (trans-cis) and isopiperine (cis-trans). In thi's; nomenclature, assignment of the confiauration to the double bonds starts from thee amide function in pilperine (trans-trcnrs); ~ Journal of Chromatography April 21, 1979 ~ v. 17'2'. p. 453' DETERMINATION'OF GEOSMIN IN WATER'. BY COMPUTER-CONTROLLED MASS ~ FRAGMENTOGRAPHY . ,.... , , , .., Yasuhara, Akio t Ftawa, Keiichiro " Geosmin (trans-l',10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol) is a compound with a musty, odour that is a metabolite of some kinds of actinomyces'-'. A musty odour occurs in~ wtaer from polluted rivers and lakes in Japan, and Kikuchi and .co-workcrss•b isolated actinomyces from some lakes and, after cultivation, detected geosmin, ini the culture. nacdium by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Quantification by means of gas chromatography, however, is very difficult, because the concentration of geosmin in' water is extremely low in comparison with other organic compounds. The odour threshold of geosmin in water is ca: 1'0 ppt`. As the amount of geosmin producinga musty odour in water can be used to indicate the'extent of'water pollution, the' establishment of an accurate trace method for the detcrmilnation of geosinin is very important. 1Gas chromatography-mass fraemcntography is a very selective andi sensitive method for detecting geosmin without interfering with other components. This paper describes a quantitative method for the determination of geosmin in water using, computcr-controlled mass fragmentography: Vni : (li..l1n. (11. IiujF 22.'1JT~' . . l., .:~,.,.. .; -9 .
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. .. _ ABSTRACTS] Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry May/June 197'9 v. 27, no. 3, p. 602, CHEMTCAL STUDIES ON TOBACCO SMOKE. 63. ONi THEI FATE OF NICOTINE' DURING PYROLYSIS AND IN A BURNING ='= i CIGARETTE Schmeltz, Irwin et al .' . _. .`i~.•. i . , vz.-. .. . ~. .. ~ ..:~ . ,f Products obtained from the thermalI degradation of ["CJnicotine in1 a combustion1 tube (under pyrolytic' conditions) and in a cigarette (undergoin~,machine smoking) were examined by gas-li~quid chromatography (GLC), by G'LC-mass spectrometry, and by radiochromatography. Under pyrolytic conditions in a combustion tube, nicotine underwent' extensive degradation to pyridines, quinolines, arylnitriles, and aromatic hydrocarbons. In contrast, in a burning cigarette, a substantial portionof nicotine remained intact (=4'1'%a),12:5% underwent oxidation to C02, up to 11 % was degraded to volatile pyridine bases, and negligible amounts were converted to neutral or acidic particulate components. A major portion of nicotine and its degradation products was also diverted to sidestream smoke. These results suggest . to us that pyrolysis experiments may be of limited value for establishingthe fate of'nicotine and possibly other tobacco components in a burning, cigarette. Journal of'Chromatography April 21, 1979 v. 172, p. 67' DOUBLE-COLUMN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY USING PACKED PRE-COLUMNS'AND GLASS CAPILLARY MAIN COLUMNS Blass, W. et al Methods of'column switching are described that make possible back-flushing,' heart cutting and trapping. C.onventional' packed columns are employed as pre-' columns for their high sampxe capacity, and glass capillary columns are used, as the! main columns for their high separation efficiency. j Some typical examples of the application of double-column gas ehromato-; graphy are presented: (L) solvent cutting for identification and exact quantitative determination of a phosphorus ester impurity in a, sample of wheat flour (including trapping);, (2) separation of trace amounts of inetliyl esters of fatty acids by means of back-flushing and trapping; (3) enrichment technique using trapping of'trace elements`s in the front section of the capillary (plus solvent cutting, multiple injection and back-~ flushing); and' (4), coupling a nitrogen-selectilve detector to the capillary main column ! to gain additional i'nformation. To illustrate the trapping effect, the separationi'' number was determinedl with and without trapping. I I . .. .,. 'rN- - ~ ....~.~,1'.. ~:. ~ . ~r. . . .,..~ , ... . s
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ABSThAcTSJ Archives of Environmental Health' March/April 1979 p. 83' ` COLLAGEN BREAKDOWN AND AMMONIA I ~ INHALATION' Hatton, Dorothy V.. : Leach, Carolyn S'. Measurement or several urinary metabolites of hydroxylysine indicates that considerable collagen degradation occurred in foui individ- Yals immediately after they had inhaled,concentrated ammonia vapors. Since clinical andVor radiological evidenoe of intense upper respir- atory and pulmonary inflammation were evident; it is likely that colla;en degradation occuned at the level' of the respiratory system: .C~ ._ .. . . z ..>~ ' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry May/June 1979 v. 27, no. 3, p. 631 NITROSAMINES IN'AGRICULTURAL AND' I HOME-USE PESTICIDES Bontoyan, Warren R. et al Over 90 technical and commercial pesticide formulations used in acriculture, hospitals, and' homes weree screened for presence of N'-nitroso compounds. Twenty4 i.•.e were found to contain ni'trosamines at or above 1 ppm. The methodology and' instrumentation used are discussed in detail. In addition, the. formntion of N-nitrosod'imet'hylamine in an~amine salt herbicide formulation after addition of sodium nitrite is demonstrated. I Journal of Chromatography April 2'1,, 1979' v. 172', p. 362 PRESSURIZABLE PACKER FOR'GAS, CHROMATOGRAPHIC COLUMNS I Pastorino, A. M. When a, gas chromatographic column is packed by suction and vibration, the permeability of'the bed decreases during its growth. Therefore, the gas flow~rate' produced by the vacuum decreases and a long period is required to complete the: packing.. To overcome this difficulty, the packing can be carried *out under pressure, so ! ' keepFng the gas flow-rate at reasonable levels. Commercially available appliances forl i pressurized filling, usually inject the packing into the column almost instantaneously. Although the results are reproducible, the efficiency of the columns obtained wasi found to be less than that achieved with conventional hand-packina, mctliodsi. In this paper isdescribed'a device designed for pouring slowly and continuously, the stationary phase under a a:u pressure into the column, so assuring a homogeneousi andl tiaht packing. Vnl ;__ci...Ho. 8. :IuriF 22'.'1JJ'J~... ~ ,
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0 .• ABSTRACTS~ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry May/June 1979 v. 27, no. ''3'. P'• 4'6'7 SUPPRESSION OF THE SWEETNESS OF 2 r' , 3-DIHYDROXY-4-METHOXY- DIHYDROCHALCONE BY.a-HYDROXYLATIONI .Sweeny, James G. Z'he introditctionof an a-hyd'roxygroup to 2',3-dihydro:v-4-niethoxydihydrochalcone (1) has•been found to eliminate its sweet taste. This finding has been rationalized following current idleas on the struc- ~ ture-activit3. relationships of sweet-tasting compounds. .. •..,,- • • _ . , . _ , . _ . , i Iacobucci, Guillermo A. ~' Journal of Chromatography. April 21, 1979 v. 172, p. 107 ADSORPTIONiLIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY ~I ON COLUMNS' i A RATIONAL METHOD OF'MOBSLE'PHASE'. OPTIMIZATION BASED ON THE USE OF I ISOHYDRIC SOLVENTS I Thomas, Jean-Pierre et al In order to facilitate the use andlautomation of liquidlcolumn chromatography in control laboratories, we have made a classification and a rational combination, of solvents. By usino an experimental determination of polarity, based on the water; content of previously defined isohydric solvents, we have elaborated a, method for the • optimization of separations that considerably reduces the operating time, gives a,' more accurate description of processes and greatly limits the number of systems able ~ to solve mosc of the problems. ' f Practical separations of drug, formulations,, bar~biturates„ aromatic bases and,~ phenothiazines are considered. ; ~ Journal of Chromatography April 21, 1979 v. 172, p. 31 STATIC COATING OF CAPILLARY COLUMNS: SOME PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS Goodwin, Brian L.. Some of the practical problems involved'in, the preparation of wail-coatedlopeni' tubular (WCOT) glass columns have been examined, and precautions are describedl to overcome or minimize these problems when non-polar silicone gums are used' as the stationary phase. hiodifications have been made that simplify the preparation of WCOT columns. The labour involved in cleaning ani old column andl recoating it' amounts to about, 2 hi work, plus monitoring those steps that proceedi automatically. ~ About half this time is spent in cleaning the old' column. • Wol_: . 9.>~:.flb1. & ;JUriE 2", '1J7 s.
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M A Journal of Chromatography April 21,1979v. 172, p. 249 MISE AU POINT D'UNE METHODE D'ANALYSE D'ES OXYDES D'AZOTE DANS LES FUMEES ZNDUSTRIELLESI I. bTUDE DE L'ACTIONDU DIOXYDE D'AZOTEI SUR L'ANILINE PAR CHROMATOGRAPHIE EN PHASE'GAZEUSE: Mortimore, -•J. C. et al ~ bletllod for the analysis of oxides of nitrogen in industrialsnmkes. I. Study ofthe action of nitrogen dioxide on aniline by gas cltromatograpliy _. ~ The action ofan excess of aniline on nitrogen dioxide leads principally to a diazoaminobenzene solution in anailine, which has been studied by gas chromato- graphy. The same mixture of compounds was observed as was obtained from a synthetic diazoaminobenzene solution. These compounds (benzene, o-aminodiphenyl„ , diphenylamine and azobenzene) were identified by coupling of gas chromatography. with mass spectrometry. They result from the thermal decomposition of diazoaml benzene, a mechanism for which is proposed. It Tobacco Reporter May 1979, : p. 36 NO MORE CARRYOVER. Beginning with, the 1979 crops, marketing agents are no longer; permitted to store carryover tobacco under the burley and; flue-cured tobacco prograrns of the U.S: Department of Agricul-~ ture (USDA). Ray Fitzgerald, administrator of t'he department's Agricultur-p all Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS), said the previous carryover program may have stimulated excess tobacco . prodnction and could have some effect on the price support!' program. Journal of Chromatography April 21, 1979 v. 172. P. 2'61 GLASS CAPILLARY COLUMNi GAS' 'v CHROMATOGRAPHY OF PHTHALATE ESTERS Friocourt, M. P. et al Kovdts retention indices of phthalate esters (ortho, nrrta and para isomers)~ were determined by alass capillary column gas chromatography for identification of the esters in biological fluids. The behaviour of homogeneous and heterogeneous diesters of the same molecular weight is discussed. Diastereoisomers of di-(3,3,5*tri- methylcyclohexyl) phtalate were resolved on~an SE-30 capillary column. r.
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B ~ ASIllAcTs.. CROSLAND, Maurice P. 540'.1'4'. Historical studies in the language of chemistry / •by Maurice P. Croslind. New York : Doven Publications, 1978: xxiv, 406 p•, (11 Ieaf of l plates : ilL ; 21 cm. 'U'nabridged I repubGcatton of the work originally publtshed' by, Heinemann Educational Books, Ltd., London in 1962. The: author has made corrections and written a newl preface to this edition.' Includes' indexes.i :' Bibtiography: p. ~3551-379., [QD7•C7' 1978] 7611 . `, 55246 ISBN 0-48 -63702,6 : 6.00 I ; li Chemistry-Nomenclatrtra L Tatla ` rs] "DENSITOME7RYin thid ..~". S44'•92 t.. 6yer chromatography :, practice and applications h J '_ =• Includes bibliographical references and' tndex• ' 0-471-88031-& : ~D79.C8Dd6]! 78-9900 ISBN 9.95 1-' 77u•n layer ch'romatography: 2-~ Drnsitometry•-. Z Touchstone, Joseph' C!l• Sherma, Joseph. MISKELL. lack T: - 338:4'7'68176 , Air pollution monitoring & ' abatementequipment A 7ack, T. Miskell. Stamford, Conn. : Business Communications Co., 1978. viii, 1132 leaves ; 29 em• (Business op ortunitv report' • GB!042) (HD9999:~#563Li56~ 78-106208 600.00 ; 1. Air paUurion eontrol industries-United States• 1. .Narket surr•eys=United States. L Title. , /L Scries i L Trade-K•orks-United States. 2- Business, names-United States L Wood, Donna, 1949-i asslstant editors, Jennifct Mossman, Helen Sheppard. 2d ed: Dctroit : Gale RLseatch Co., ; c1979: p. cm. ~'223'•V4A22I 4479] 79-12685I ISBN 0•8103-069d-8 : 85.00 Crowley, editor„ Donna Wood, associate editor, fROt<'LEY, Ellcn T. 602'.75 Trade names dictionary : a guide to consumer- oriented trade names, brand! names, product. names, coined names, model names, and , design ; tumes, with' addresses of their manufacturers,, importers, marketers, or distributors / Ellen T. i jotnrauthor• 1'1• Tit1e., osep I editedd by Joseph, C Touchstone, : "' Sherma: New York : R'iley, c1979. xv. 747' p. ' BI- ; 24 cm. 'A Wiley-interscience publication:" HARVARD business review-on • 658.4' human relations. tst ed. New York : Nlarper & Row, 6979, p. cm.,Articles originally, ppublished in the Harvard business review. Includes index. I HD58:7:H37J, 78-20166 ISBN' 0-06-011789-3 :, 5:00 , I 1: Organizational ' behsrior-Addtesses, essa^ lectures• 1• ;Lfameament-Addresses, essays. kctures• I. Ilarv.rrd businessreview. 11. Title: On human relations' VOL; 9, 110, 8, JUNE 221. '1 .)~79 MANUAL of ind'usttisl "" 658! 8'3' marketrng research : prepared'under the auspicies (sic) of the Industrial Marketing Research Association I edited by AIIan Rawnsley. Chichester ; New York : Wiley, c1978. 196 6 p. : )' 11J ; 24 cm. 'A Wiley-Intersctence publieatien•' 1~ Includes biblio¢raphical references and mdez: (HF5315.2.1r1295J',77-7272 ISBN 0W71-99537-1 38.25 • ISBN 0-471-99536-3 pbk:: 13.50 1: Marketing raearchrHandbooks, mmualx etc L ROµnsle3; Al1an. 11' 1'ndustnal Marketing ~' "" Research A'ssociatiom • I MA,if:tfAL1AN 599'.0l'92a r M coproteins. glycolipid~, and prote.gtycans / ed by Martin lL Horowttz. Ward Ptrman.; w York : Academic Ptcss, 1978: xvi, 464 p. :' i1L : 24 cm. ((he Glycoconjugates ;, v. 2)' Includes bibliographies . and index. i I QP552:G59G59 vol. 2]i599'.01'924 78:17279 0- 2 39.50 1. Glycoproteins: ?.Clycolipida ?~' Protenelycans 4. Mammals-Physiology: C Horowitz. Atartin 1• ll. Pigman, tiilliam {lerd,' 1.910- lll• Tirle. IV. Series. FERBER. Robert, 1922• ' 1 658.8'3'I Readings in survey research !' Robert Ferber. 1' Chica o : American Marketing Association,, [1978t p. cm. Bibliography: p., (HF5415.2.F425)~' 78-14428' ISBN 0•$7757+L13-9 : Write for information i 1. Marketing raeareh-Addresses, essays„ lectures. 2- Sampling (Staristics)-Addresses, essays, lectures• 3• Gjuestionnaires-Addresses, essays, lectures. 4. Mail surveys Addresses essays, lectures. S- Telephone surveys - Addresses,essays„ lectures. L Amencan Marketing Association. ll. TitIG ~ CHOL1'NERGIG - " - ' - - -599'.01'88' 1 - MONOA:Lf64ERGICinteractions in the broin Lj edited' by Larry L Butcher. New Yor fk Academic Press, 1978. xiii, 402 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.' (Behavioral biology series) Includes, bibliographies andl index, rQP376.C488] 78- 14964 14963 ISBN 0-12-147850•5 : 26.00 f 1. Brain chemistry. 1.Adrenergic mechanisms• 3. I Cholinergic receptotz 4. N eural transmiarion. L I Butcher, Larry L ll• Series. . C C I~A ALLEN, Thomas Harrell- . • 658:•t'S W 27e'e bottom Gne : eommunicating' in the CID organization / T. Hartell Allen. Chicago :' Nelson -t :. Hall, [19791 p. cm. Includes index. ~ [HD30.3.A.•t3] 78-24521' ISBN 0-88229-405-9 . 15.95 1. Communication'in managemenG I• Titla I
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, . ABETRACTS~ Tobacco '. _ May 18, 197'9~ . v. 181, no. 10,'p. 100 FARM LABOR-AND COST COMPARISONSI FOR THREE METHODS OF PREPARING CURED BURLEY TOBACCO FOR MARKET' Diuncan, George A. et al Farm trials and cooperative studies have been conducted on preparing and handling air-cured burley tobacco by two alternative untied' methods ("sheets" and "bales"): compared with the. conventional hand-tied method. The sheet~method:Involved a burlap wrap with preparation and handling techniques similar to the United States flue-cured method. The bale method invotvedl a specially developed 30- x 91- x 56-61'-cm eompressed bate tied with three heavy cotton twine and averaging,34-36!kg in weight: A time study and producer survey data showed that farm labor requirements were reduced by the! alternative untied methods of preparation and handling.. These labor savings for the main work activity-the stripping, process-amounted to 1.211 to 1.67 man+hours per 45.4 kg for the sheet method and 1.14 to 1.62 man+hours for the bale method, or34"a to 43% reduction inciusively'for the two methods. Additional labor savings were determined for loading the tobacco onto the vehicle at the farm and unloading al the warehouse:, Deducting the difference in the costs of the equipment and materials t between the alternative methods,and the conventional method from the gross labor savings resulted in a~net financial savings of 54.38 to $4,58 per 45.4 kgifor various sized'producers using the sheet' methodland $3.96 to $4.26 per 45:4 kg for the bale method. Responses to a questionnaire sent to the participating producers were favorable for the alternative untiedi methods with a general preference for sheets over bales. Tobacco May 1&, 1979 ' v. 181, no~. 10, p. 97 STEM AND FOLIAR RE'SPONSE'OF TOBACCO INOCULATED,WITH PHYTOPHTHORA SPP. AND PYTHIUM. MYRIOTYLUM I 'Csiinos, Alexander S. I 'Burdey 21' and'NC 2326' tobacco plants were grown impartial!shade andl fuil sunlight and stem inoculated with isolates of; Phytophthora parasitica var.,nicolianae„P. parasitica, P. cinnamomi, P. cryptogea„P. drechslerl, PS, erythroseptica, P., megasperma and Pythium myrioty- tum. Three of' four isolates of P., parasitica var. nicotianae caused' typical black shank symptoms and killed plants; but one isolate, originally isolated from Monterey pine, did not cause black shank symptoms or kill piants; Incubating plants in the sun or shade didinot alter the ability of the other isolates of P. parasitica var: nitotSanae to kill plants. None of' the P. parasitica var. niootianae isolates; aaused foliar necrosis. One of two P. myriolylum isolates caused moderate stem necrosis, but these isolates did notcause:foliar necrosis. Isolates of P. parasitica caused light stem necrosis, but no foliar necrosis. Phyt'ophthorai cryptogea„ P. drechsleri, P. erythroseplica and P. megasperma caused severe foliar necrosis on plants, but caused little stem necrosis. Foliar necrosis was greater on shaded plants than oni plants grown in full sunlight: Phytophthora parasitica var. nicolianaee was detected growing in stems of inoculated plants; but P. drechsleri andiP. megasperma isolates, which caused severe foliar injury on plants, were not detected in the stems. This method of examining Phytophthora, spp: separates, by means ot' specific symptoms on tobacco transplants, isolates which produce a tobacM lamina toxin. Isolates which are parasitic to tobacco stems and are lethal to tobacco, andlnon+pathogenic isolates. Tobacco - May 4, 1979 v. 181, no. 9, g. 27 TOBACCO SEED EMERGENCE RELATED~TO D'IFFERENCESINTERMINA'L VELOCITY,,Cundiff, John S. Tobacco seed (22lcultivars) from124 commercialllots were segregated In an etutriationcotumn based on differences in their terminal veloeity (TV). The various TV'grades were seeded!on filter paper, maintained iat, 12C', andl day of' emergence was recorded. The objective was to corretate emergence with, seedi terminal velocity, and define the optimum cleaning velocity for each lot to obtain seed with, the most: uniform emergence. Individual cultivar grades were eompared with each other, andithe grades with the highest! total emergence and the lowest percentage of late emerging, plants were selected. The percentage of' seed eliminated with the optimum cleaning velocity rangedifrom 0 to 73°.'. with a mean of' 8%. All but six:of'the graded samples yielded >' 70% acceptable plants for seeded spaces. Plants whichlemerged late were judged unacceptable. Tobacco May 4, 1979 .v. 181, no. 9, p. 25 SUCKER-PRODUCING CHARACTERISTICS OF CERTAIN FLUE'-CURED TOBACCO VARIETIES Gwynn, G. R. Number and weight ofleaf'axil suckers per, plant of I15 varieties and one breeding line were studied in plantings at two locations and over 2 years. The range of performance and consistency across srvironments were measured!in an effort to characterize the suckering eharacteristics of'the varieties'and to determine if'genetic variation existed. Among the varieties tested, sucker weight varied 60% and sucker number 53'/<.:Coker 319 appeared to produce more,suckers: than certain other varieties in numberandlweight; whereas Speight~G-23 and Virginia 1115 produced less..
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.. u ABSTRACTS~ Chemical Senses andiFlavour April 1979' v. 4, no. 1, p. 21 OLFACTORY PERCEPTUAL SPACE MODELS COMPARED BY'QUANTITATIVE METHODS'II 'Davis, Richard' G. Abstract. The long, time constants of'the olfactory system associated with the numerous judgements -required by paired comparisondesigns produce expensive experiments in terms of time and manpower. Hence, whcn odor quality perception studies are reportedi they tend to receive extendedlscrutiny. This report applies newer mcthodrof multidimensional scaling,to~data reportedlby M. Woskow in 1964. The analysis includes quantitative methods which compare the results of'the scaling, methods used. The INDSCAL algorithim by D. Carroll, and' J', Chang and the POLYCON algorithm by F. Young were. compared together with tiVoskow's original factor analysis. The INDSCAL solution was not remarkably; differenct from IVoskow's original results. The POLYCON solution agreed closely with (NDSCAL ont.vo of'threedimensions in the three dimensional solution.'hhe INDSCAL method offers aldescription of: individual differences in perception, and indicated that four of \Voskow's 20 subjects may have been • substantially anomalous perceivers of the odorants used. The quantitative methods used to compare different solutions based on the same data,can be extended to solutions based on different sets of'data.., This report proposes a method whereby perceptual models may be combined to generate a composite perceptual space based on, several different data, sources, be they experiments„ laboratories, or' replications. Chemical Senses and Flavour April 1979 -v. 4, no. 1, p..3S. CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND SWEET TASTEI OF ISOCOUMARINS AND RELATED COMPOUNDS Yamato, Masatoshi I Hashigaki, Kuniko Abstract. The relationship between sweetness and chemical strucure of 3,4',dihydioisocoumarins was studied because of the interest in the structure of phyllodulcin, the only sweet tasting,eompound among' , the naturally occurring 3„4-dihydroisocoumarins. It was found by structural modification of phyllodulcin. and the syntheses of various derivatives that p-(3-hydroxy4-methoxypltenyl) ethylbenzene (XiII)' is thel essentiaf part of sweet tasting 3,4-dihydroissocoumarins. Further studies on the structural modification, of XIII were undertaken to make the relationship between structure and sweet taste clearer. 71te, . application of the information obtained from the structure-sweetness relationship of `3',4:dihydroisoeoumarins to the design of other series of sweet compounds warattempted: The resulting chroman (LXXXVII), isochroman (LXXXVI);, flavanone (LXXXIX)l and dihydrochalconc (XCV) derivatives are potently sweet, as was predicted. From these results, it may be concluded that the' relationship between sweetness and structure of'5-hydroxyflavanones or dihydrochalcones lacking a~ glycoside moiety is similar to that of the 3,4Ldihydroisocoumarins. I Chemical Senses and'Flavour April 1979' , v. 4', no. 1, p. 89 OLFACTION!AND SENSORY'ASYMMETRY;, Koelega, H. S'. (' Abstrrct. Eighty years ago it was demonstrated that odours presented to the left side of the nose are much better perceived than odours presented to the right side. This finding could,not be corroborated in our experiment. Some possible explanations are offered to account for thediffercnt results. It also turned out that olfactory sensitivity whcn smelling,with both, nostril9 open is hardly higher than with one nostril open: It was furthermore suggested that differences between the two sides of the nose might play a role in' studies where verbal' and emotional l processes are involved, as in olfactory recognition, memory and preference.
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. %k ABSTRACTS1 CLINICAL AND ! EXFEREMENTAL', IMMUNOLOGY _ Abstracts in English i `VOL. 36 NO. 2' MAY 1979 R. PAGS~cel.r, D. RitstAotis;,L. LAxw/ueD, B. A: 2;t. HARvev &J. F.,SoorHasa Maternal!smokin;and' cord blood immunity function ' BULLETIN EUROPeEN' DE II PHIYSIOPATHOLOGIE RESPIRATOIRE Articles in English or French-Each Abstract in English and' French VOL. 15 NO. 3, MAY.-JUN. 1979 ~ A.F. Gelb. R. Lugliani. {81 Site of airway, obstructton after acute cigarettet P. Schiffman, E. Klein, smoking and mild smoke inhalation and N., 2amel I ACTA CHEMIICA SCANDIPIAVYCA. Series B Organic C}iemietry and' Biochemi6try , Multilingual Journal I( Largety English)-Abstncts in English VOL. 33 NO. 3 1979 S-~atrthesis: Stttxture and Si.ability of Nicotine A "ta'I Irniniuas Ion, an Intermediary ! Metabolite of: Nicotine ~ Svante Brand"ango and Lars Lindblom ................................ .1&Z' i" ~ BRITISH JOUR'N'.AL OF P HARMACO!! OG7 i Abstracts in EngGsh VOL. 66'NO. 1 MAY 1979i rOtP' BERRY. C.N_ HOULT, 1.R.5'i'LITTLETON. l.Ml MOORE PM: A UMNEY, N.D: Nicotine causes ` OrottaglandineMua from isolated ~perfused Irat Iunj ~ lLV1d/aTIPJ.S ki7L~ V/aT'~ . . . AE"r3f .^L~I7 Rdtivi nloscammi'Dm: RIEI9m Abstracts in Engtish VOL. 9' NO. 2 1979 Cerebral Uptake of Nicotine antd of'A'roino A~nids HlenrySershenand Abel Lajlha ....................................... . ,1''1n.. St. JIIIf1F' 701.:;1 ('IT) 1 . 85I;
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.• ACTS 1NTERNAT[ONAL Union "!47'.001'4 of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Commission on the Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry. ~ Nomenclature of organie chemistry / p!epared for publication by J. Rigaudy and 5. P. Klesney. 4th ed. Oxford ; New York : Petgamon Press, ,_19799 p. cm. Firstxd•,issued by the International Clnion of Pure and i Applied I Chemistry. Contains 1979 ed. of Sections A. B;, C, D, E, F, and H. Bibliography: p. (QD2911157 19791 79-40358 ISBN i 0-08-022369-9 : 50.00 I: Chemist Orginic-A'omenclature. I. " Rigaudy, !. l~ Klesney. S' P. I'll. International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. .JKomenclature of or,eaaic chemtstry. IV. 7<tla 1' • . .., . ,' . . ~ ._ . ECKHOUSE, Richard H•, " O0L6'4'04'. 1930- Miniconrputer systems organization, programmtng and applications (PDP-11) I , Richard H. Eekhouse; Jr., L Robert Morris. 2d , i ed Engtewood Cliffs, NJ. : Prentice-Hall, c1979. p- cra. Includes index. Biblio¢raphy; p [Qa,6:8.P2E26 • 1979] 79-267 198N 0-13- 383914-9 : 20:50 i L PDP-l1 (Computer)-Programming. 2. ! ' 'Minicomputers-Programming. L' .4forri; L i , _ ' Robert joint author-,11. Tide. . ; ( -,... J_ _ . ' • .. ~ BETT~tA:~1, James R., • 658:8'34:I An Informstion procecting theory ot' consumer choice / James: R: Bettman. Reading. Mass. :: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co:,,c1979, xiv, 402 p. : ill. ~ 25 cm: (Advances in marketing series) Includes tndexes: Biblio¢raphv: p. 355-382. [HC79.C6B36] 78-52496 lSB\ 0-261-00831,3 : 14.95' L Consumers. 2. Consumers-United Statex I.. Title. ll Series t . • CHEESfiMAN, Gl W. H:, 547'.593 1927- i Condensedl pyrazines /G: W. H. Cheeseman, R; F. Cookson: New York : Wiley, [1978], p. cta ; (ne Chemistry of heterocyclic compounds, ;, v. ; 35) 'An Interscienee publication:" Includes indexes. (QD30I.C493J, 78.17533 ISBN' 0-411i 38204-3 : 115.00 ! 1. Pyridazine. 2' Quinoxaline 3. Condensation products (C7iemistry) 1-' Cookson, Ronald Frederick, 1943= joint author. 11. Title. ~ KOCHI', Jay K. 547'.05'. Organornetallic mechanisms and eatalysis : the role of reactive intermediates in or nic processes /' Jay K. Kochi. New' York : Academic Press.197 9. xvii, 623 p. : ill. ;, 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. [QD4II.K57j 784803 ISBN 0-12-418250-X : 59.50 TitlGrganometallic eompound.t Z Citalysiz I Voi.: J, _IJa. v. JUME 12), '197y .' INDUSTRIAL' and • 628'.445'' 6azardous wastes impoundment' / Nicholas P.r Cheremisinoff ,,. (et al.]. Ann ~ Arbor, Mich. :' Ann Arbor Science Publishers, c1979. ix, 475 p. : t71.i ; 24 cm. 'he Resource conservation andd recovery act': p. 321467. Includes - b•ubliographical references [TiD811.5.I53] 78•; 7142a ISBN 0.250-40280-7 : 29:50 . L Hazardous substances 1.' Factory and' tnde waste.-Environmental'aspectt J-1 {t!aste disposal' ia the grouad. 4. Refuse and'refuse disposal-• - Lw and legislation-United States 1-'. Cheremisinolf,' •11'ich'olao P. !I. United States Laws, statutes,etc. Resource conservation and' zeco eery act of 1976. 1979•, __ V SYa1POSIUMion Survey 001.4'22': Sampling, 2d;, University of North Carolina, j 1977. Survey sampling and measurement /' edited' by ` N. Krishnan Namboodiri. New York : Academic : Press, 1978. xxi, 364 p. : i1L ;, 24' cm. ! (Quantitative studies in social= relations) Papers + presentcd at the 2d Symposium on Survey . Sampling held!at the Chapel Hill campus of the University of North Carolina, Apr, 14-17;,1977. Includes biblioeraphies and index. [HA'31.2•S97 1977]'i78'<33451SBN' 0-12-513350-2 : 23:00 1 1. Sampling (Statistics)-Congresses. 2. Sociall surv-evs-Congresses l Krishnan A'amboodin;' N. ~ Il Tu/a - . . BURROW„Martha G: - 658.4 Developing women mana¢ers : what needs to be : done? /' Martha G. Surrow. New York AMACOM, c1978: vii, 32 p. ; 28 cm. (An AStA survey report) Bibliographyc p. 32. [HF5500:2.B857] 78•10334 ISBN 0-8134L3135-6' : 10.00 ; 1: Women ezecutives., I•' Tttle I1 Seties: American Management Associations. An A:ifA Survey report. t C7fEYf1STRY snd biology 574 I'924!: of' nucle•osidrs and nuclc•otides /' ediled byr Robert E. Harmon. Roland K. Robins. Leroy B.' Townsend. New York : Acadcrnic Press, 1978.' xxi, 468 p. tll, ; 241 cm. Papers presented at a; symposium held in San Francisco, Aug. 30-Sept. 11. 1976. Includes bibliographical refcrences and index. (QP625:N88C43] 78-113653' ISBN 0-12•+ 326140-6 : 22.00 L ,Vucleosidcs-Congresses: S. Nucleorides- Congresses. 1-' Harmon, Robert E. ll- Robins,, Roland K. !Il Townsend, Leroy B• l CHEddfISTRY of the envirnninent ' " 1540 /' R. A. Bailey ._ (et al']; New York : Academic Ptess, 1919. x, 573 ' p. i0- - 24 em: Includes biblio raphies. [QD3].2:C4313] 78• 11293 ISBN 0.1s-073050-2 : 26.00 l Pneironmentai chemistry. L Bailcy Ronald Alber4,1933- -a
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0 . Cancer Research June 1979 v. 39, p. 2026 =`' EFFECT OF'2'-NITROFLUORENE, 1,2'-DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE', AND' AZOXYMETHANE ON SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM MUTANTS IN THE.. GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF ' GNOTOBIOTIC RATS I Carter, John H. et al Gnotobiotic Sprague-Dawley rats, associated with Salmo-!: nella typhimurium strain TA1538; may also be associated with either LactobaciflrJs plantarum or Bacteroides vulgatus as well as with both of these strains. After the ingestion of 2-nitroflu- orene (3:4 mg), the fecal concentration of his" revertants is greatly elevated in all groups of rats except those associated with strain TA1 538 and B: vulgatus. The concentrations of the various bacteria were measured at eight sites in the gastroin- testinal tract: B: vulgatus achieved high concentrations in the, stomach when it' was associated' with strain TA1538„ but itsi concentration was not as high when iCwas associatedlwithi L.;, plantarum together with strain TA1538. The concentration ofI 8: vulgatus in individual rats correlated negatively with their!I response to 2-nitrofluorene. B; vulgatus readily reduces 2-1' nitrofluorene to 2-aminofluorene, a reaction which is negtigible :' in cultures of L. plantarum and! strain TA15381 Since 2-ami-; nofluorene is less mutagenic than, 2-nitrotluorene, B. vulgatus appears to diminish the revertant response by removing the more potenUmutagen from within the gastrointestinal tractl ~ Other Ames Salmonella tester strains (TA11535; TA100, and TA98), can also be maintained in association with otherwise' germ-free rats. The feces of animals associated with strains~ TA] 535 and TA100; however, show a variable increase in the; concentration of'his' revertants in response to the Ingestion of : experimentaCeoton carcinogens, e.g.., 1,2-dimethylhyd'razinei .(21 mg/kg) and azoxymethane (19 mg/kg). 79-0756. Bishuni N.; Smith+ N.; Williams, D. (Tissue Cult: ~ & Cytogenet. Unit, Res. Dept, Marie Curie Mem: Found.,) Surrey, England) Mutations, chromosome aberrations and- eancer. ChnOncoL 4(3) 251 263; 1978. (18'references) A review is presented, covering the correlation be- tween mutagenesis, clastogenesis: and carcinogenesis pro-1 duced by many commonly usedidrugs; cosmetics, pesticides,~ food preservatives, pollutants and oral contraceptives. Muta-~~, genic pesticides include ethylene oxide,'captan, ethylene di-;', bromide, and chlordane; the latter three have also been',' shown to be earcinogenic in rats. No data were presented oni safe levels of pesticides or doses nr,cessary, to elicit mutagenic. or carcinogenic responses: I Cancer Research, June 1979' v. 39, p. 2132 EFFECT'OF HEPATOCARCINOGENS ON:ITHE ADENINE PURINE NUCLEOTIDE CYCLE. DURING' THE' INITIATION PHASE' OF , CARCINOGENESIS Smith, Larry D. 1 Activities of'the adenine purine nucleotide cycle enzymes. i.e., adenylosuccinate (SAMP)-synthetase; SAMP Iyase, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase; were-determined in hepatic tissue of rats fed and/or given injections ofi 3`-methyl- 4'-dimethylaminoazobenzene„ 4'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazo- benzene, thioacetamide, ethionine, or 2-acetylaminofluorene.. SAMP lyase activity showed an early increase in all regimens containing hepatocarcinogens. Adenosine 5'-monophospfiatEe deaminase showed increases with 3'-methyl-4-dimethytami- noazobenzene and thioacetamide but not with ethionine or 2- acetytaminofluorene. SAMP synthetase either was nonrespon- sive or else showed inhibition to the carcinogens. Increase in SAMP lyase activity was noted as early as 48'tc 72 hr following i.p, injections of these carcinogens. The re- sponse of' SAM'P Iyase was not duplicated by analogs o: carcinogens such as 4"-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene or methionine. These data imply interaction of active carcinogens witt SAMP lyase and to some extent adenosine 5'-monophosphatE deaminase or to some mechanism responsible for their synthe sis and/or release. This interaction may be a significant com ponent of the initiation phase of carcinogenesis. Nature ~ May 17, 1979 f v. 279, p. 18'0; 000138'76 Women scientists paid 20% less than, tnen: Despite con- siderable growth in the number of women on US science faculties between 1'973' and 1977„ women's salaries still ingg significantly behind those of men, according to a report presented' to the Office of Science and Technoldgy Policy by the National Research Council. The NRC says that thee difference in salaries betweem the sexes was estimated to be about 20^.'ovcrall in 1977 and remains a serious problem. The proportion of women faculty who received tenure alsoo lags behind the proportion of men. At professorial level, the discrepancy between the salaries of men and womem was at least 52;500 The highest difference appeared in chemistry, where male professors were paid an average of S6;'_00 more than female proPessors: The report reeommend's offering career d'evelopment awards to help increase the number of' women on science faculties. It also says that all public and private institutions should be required to include comparisons of salary and tenure in their official report.
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AB1SThAQTS_~ 79-0932. • Swietlinska,'Z.; Zuk, J. (Tnst. Biochem. & Bio-. phys., Polish Acad. Sci;, P-02532 Warsaw, P'oland),Cyto-' toxic effects of maleic hydrazide. Mutat. Res. 55(1): 15-30; 1979. (120 references) ': . • A review of'Rndings on maleic hydrazidt (MH) is presented. In early works the inhibitory effects of'MHi on plant growth, were mainlyconsidered to result from the sup- presion of plant metabolism (inhibiton of enzymic activity) l and interference of the compound with plant hormones and I growthi regulators. Mbre recently, numerous experiments! performed with various plant species have shown that MH : acts as an inhibitor of'the synthesis of nucleic acids and pro•I teins. Similar results have been obtained with animal tumorl cells. The chromosome-breaking effect of MH on plant chromosomes resembles very closely the chromosome-break. 1 ing properties of alkylating agents and other mutagenic com- pounds such as mitomycin C. MH-induced chromosomal ~ aberrations have also been recorded in grasshoppers, fish and'; mice, although tests with some mammalian cell lines gave : negative results. Among higher plants„selective sensitivity to : the toxic effects of MH is well' proved. This phenomenon : seems to be due to the differential ability of various plant ! species to detoxicate the chemical. Plants can break down: MH1 into several products, one of' which, hydrazine, is a~ wellLknown mutagen and carcinogen. MH does not seem to be toxic to bacteria and fungi. The compound is degraded by soil microflora and hence canibe utilized as a source of ni'tro.! gen, MH' proved to be of low toxicity to mammal's,, but in' some instances it d'ecreasedit'he fertility of rats. The reported' carcinogenic effects of MH in mice and rats raise the question': of its risks to man. (Author abstract by permission, abridged); 79-0931. Yoshikawa, K. ; Uchino, H.; Kurata, H. (Dep. ; Microbiol., Natl: InstL Hyg. Sci.,,Tokyo, Japan) Differential ; mutagenicity of N-methyl- 14=nitrosocarbamate insecticides In Escherichia coli'strains having different DNA repair capa- ~ eities. Muta1: Res 54(3); 283-288; 1978. (7 references)'. Four isogenic strains of Escherichia co/i'wi'th the same auxotrophic marker (arg,Fam - namely wild-type, uvr A-, p,olA-, and recA-) were used for testing the lethalitics and mutagenicities of 1-naphthyl N-methyl- N-nitrosocarbamate (nitroso-NAC), 3'-methylphenyl N-methyl- Nrnitrosocarba. 11, mate (nitroso-MTMC), and 3.4-dimethylphenyl N-methyl-~ N-nitrosocarbamate (nitroso-blPNiC)., The strains recA- andld polA- showed a similarly higher sensitivity to killing than,1 wild-type and uvrA- after treatments wi'th each of the three+ ehemicals, whereas. the strains wild-type, uvrA-, and polA-~' were equally mutable by these compounds at equal doses. The strain recA- was hardly mutable by nitroso-NAC, but signifi- cant levels of Agr+ mutations were observed, after treat-~ ments with nitroso-MTMC and nitroso-MPMC. These and previous results suggest that both nitroso-MTMC and ni- troso-MPMC are similar in their mutagenicity pattern to, N-methyl- N'-nitro- N-nitrosoguanidine whereas nitroso-NAC is similar to methyl methanesulfonate or x-rays, and that the major damage to DNA of the three agents is nott excisable by the uvrA#- dependent excision repair, probably; methylation in DNA. (Author abstract by permission) . . . `l (I7(t . .. ~: 79-4623 ~ - . L 2.3:2004! [, . t)nitcd,States: Bureau of Labor Statistics. National survey of profcssional„ administrative, techntcal; and clerical pay. [iWashingtonl Dept: of Labor, Bureau, of, Labor Statistics; for sale by the Supt. of Docs.,, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., ! ill. 28 cm. (Blrlletin - Bureau of Labor Statistics :I2004). • 52.40 t9S9/60- March 1978, Oltem 768-A,1 SIN 029-00'1-02243-3' ISSN' 0501'-7041 Main series: Bulletin - Bureau of Labor Statistics - ! 1,. White collarworkers-Salarics„pensions;etc.-United . States - Periodicals. 2,: Wages - United States - Periodi- eals. 3. Clerks-Sal'arics; pensions, etc. - United States'- j pertodicals: I: Title. 11., Series: United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin - Bureau of'Labor Statistics ; 2004. OCLC 1604150 7910885. Greenlee, W. F.; Poland, A. (Dep. Pharmacol. ~ & Toxicol., Sch. Med. & Dent., Univ. Rochester, • Rochester, NY) TCDD: A molecular probe for investigating the induction of'aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase. In: Dioxinxi Toxicologrcal and Chemical itspects. Cattabeni, F., Cavallaro, A.{ Galli, G., eds: (Spectrum Publ., Inc.: NY) Chapter 11: I 113-122; 1978. (13 references) ' • The ability of TCDD to induce S-aminolevulinic acid I synthetase (ALAS) and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase '' (AHH) are investigated. ALAS and AHH induction~ by. TCDD is closely linked with its lethal, teratogenic, and!acne-~ genic potency. A macromolecular hepatic cytosol species: which binds TCDD reversibly, stereospeeifically, and' wtth high affinity has been identifiedl from rats and mice. This cytosol species has many of the properties predicted for the hypothesized receptor for the iinductioniof AHH, including,• the capacity of dibenzo- p-dioxin inducers of AHH activity to displace specifically bound '[H]-TCDD in vitro.. % 79-0763. Gosalvez, M.;, •Diaz-Gil, J. J. (Bioquinl!Exp.,' Clin. Puerta Hierro, Univ. Autonoma, Madrid, Spain) Rote-: none: A possible environmental carcinogen? Eur. J. Cancer: 14(12): 1403-1404; 1978. (9'references), Information is reported oni the use of rotenoneas an insecticide, pesticide, and piscicide. Since this compound has been previously reported to be carcinogenic in rats„ the au- thors propose that rotenone be considered an environmental carcinogen. A brief literature review is presented on levels of rotenone used' in the United' States, the routes by which itt enters drinking water, and the routes by which it is ingestedl by humans. . ~ . 000138'7'7 . _ .- r I
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.`' > J Cancer Research ' ._: June 1979 : 2'149 ,,.: , ' 3 9 v. ' , p. OZONATION OF MUTAGENIC ANDIII .CARCINOGENIC POLYAROMATIC AMINES AND POLYAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN WATER' Bttrleson, Gary R. et al The Salmone!la-microsorne'as'say for mutagenesis was use& to determine the eff.ect of'ozone on the mutagenesis of selected: carcinogens andlmutagens inwater: Short periods of ozonation were shown to completely inactivate the mutagenicity of several: polyaromatic amine mutagens including acriflgvine; proflavine„I and /3.naphthylamine. Selected polyaromatic hydroc.arbonsi were also sensitive to ozonation. Kinetic studies revealed thatithe mutagenicity of benzo(a)pyrene. 3-methylcholanthrene, and 7,1I2-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene was destroyed after short ` periods of' ozonation. To correlate loss of mutagenicity with loss*of carcinogenicity, two polyaromatic hydrocarbons were, treatedl with, ozone: extracted from water with hexane. and testedl for carcinogenicity in mice: When 7,1i7-dimethyl- benz(a)anthracene and 3-methyt-cholanthrene were treated ; with ozone, there was a substantial'redtaction in carcinogenicity compared to control groups treatedl with oxygen alone. How- ' 'ever, a small number of tumors developed in the group of animals receiving' a hexane extract of ozonated 7,12-dimeth- ' ylbenz(a)anthracene: This activity may be due to breakdown products of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene that are not mu- tag ernc. .Journal of'Chromatog,raphy May 11, 1979 '.: rv. 173, no. 1,'p. 109 . GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF " POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONSI Beernaert, H. The use of high-resolution,capillary columns for, the separation of polynuclear! aromatic hydrocarbons. (PAHs) by gas chromatography is described.. With the ex-1 « ption of'1l2-benzla]anthracene and chryscne, the other l'AHs„with 2-7 rings, are atkast 50•J,',resolved. (' Theretention,indices of 70 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in temperature-'; programmed gas chromatography have been calculated by improved' linear inter-' polution. The efBciency of the gas chromatographic separation of PAHs was evaluated during these investigations. The accuracy and the reproducibility of the caleullted, retention indices and also the influence of several chromatographic parameters on the retention indices have been investigptedl • i The cas chromatographic detection of 5 ng of 101 PAHs indicated that the, jlass capillary, column,(1G m, 2.'5% SE-52) allows a limit of detection of0.5'ng.., i VOt'_; 9.. .1161- . 8, JUNE 22), -191' Flavour technologyc profiles, products, applications Henry B Heath, Connecticut: AVI Publishing 1978 Pp vii + 542, ISBN' 0187055 258 9' The broad content of' this very;' interesting book is succinctly included in; its title. The text is dividedi into threee sections. In' the first is set out in ordered, sequence the aroma profiles of the main natural flavouring materials widely used' in foods, beverages and confectionery. Within this section the !' chapters devoted to herbs (47'pages) and! spices (94 pages) are particularly goodo and! they provide a most informative; eompilation for basic reference. The! second section deais with the nature and'": preparation of flavouring materials and; productsforr use in, food processing. Itl details their characteristics and thei considerations necessary for the correct' ,selection of flavourings for specific prod'uct groups.. The final section is a' review of' the technology and use of flavourings in the main branches of'the industries concerned. The book is well written, welll proditced and clearly printed' with many excellent photographs. However, it is a' shame that an informed chemist, did not' check the manuscript before publication. and readers would be well' advised to adopt some healthy cynicism with regard to some of the chemistry. There is a terrible mixture of chemical' nomenclature (much incorrect) and such few typographical errors that there are within the book are centred on, the chemical' structures. It also seemed. rather odd that it was tacitly assumed' that a pure single organic compound: should have a single aromatic profile. (page 300). . Throughout the book the references; Indicate the author's own selective: reading which is not necessarily to be: criticised as such; but the bibliographies must in, no way be considered as . comprehensive. Despite this somewhat to be expccted deficiency - the literature in this field! is so extensive - the book is thoroughly to be recommended. ! A MacLeod r s
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r , ABSTRACTS ~ INTERNATIONAL Symposium on, 6649 Nitrite , in ~ Meat Products, 2d, Zeist, ! Netherlands, 1976. •' I Aroceedings of the Second lntemational Sy mposium on Nitrire in Meat Products, Central Instttute tor Nutrition and 'Food Research TNO,' 2eisr, the Netherlands September 7-1Q 1976 l' editors, B. J. Tinbergen and B. KtoL Wageningcn (Nbtherlands]I • Centre for Agricultural Publishing and Documentation, 1978. 326,p: : ilL. 23 cm. Spine title: Nitrite in meat products: ~ponsored by CommoditY Board for Livestock, and 41eat, Rijswijk, Mintstry of Public Health and Environmcntal Hygiene, Leidschendam, and! Or$anisation for Nutrition and, Food Rtosearch' TRO; The Hague. Stamped on t:p.e Exclusive distributor, ISBS; Forest Grove, Or. Bibliographt ~~. ; 303-3201 I&BN 9-03 100607s7 3. g3I0507 1976j' 78-316605 I 1. Food additives-Coneresser. ?' Nitrites-! Congresses. .L h-feat-Congresses L Frnbergen, B, 1. 11. %rol, B• fI!• Netherlands (1Gngdom,l 1'815- ). , Ministerie van V'olks¢ezondherd en' Milieuhygiene. IV Nederlandse dtganisatie voor Toegepast-NatuurwetenschappelifF Onderzoek tea Behoeve van de Voeding. V Productschap roor Vee en V/ees, VL Trtle: Nittite in meat producLS. HASLETT, John W:, 1912• 658'.05'4! Business systems handbook • strategies for I, administrative control l John W., Haslett: Newi York : hlcGraw•Hill. c1979. p: cm. Includes:' biblioeraphicai references and index. ' [IHF5'548.2:H394] 78-18361' ISBN 0-07-02698(-71i • 25.00 1. Btuincss-Data processing-Handbooks,; manuals, etc. 1. Titk• I' COAC'. Eli P. .. 658:8'3 g Marketing research : information for decision making,/ Eli P. Cox. New York : Harper dt. Row,i e1979: p: cm. Includes bibligraphies and tndex.' (HF5415.2.C646j! 78-25737 ISBN 0=912212-14-4 • 15:95 i ' 1' Maiketing research. 2.' ' Marketing management. 3: Marketing management-Case; studies. L T~itle. I CARBOHYDR:1TEsulfates ""'S47'.76I a symposium sponsored by the ACS Division of Carbohydrate,Chemistry at the 174'th ~ meeting of the American, Chemical Society, l Chicago, Illinois, August 30-31; 1977' 1 Richard !' G. Schweiger, editor. Washington : American;' Chemical Society, 1978. ix, 294 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. ; '. (ACS symposium series ; 77 ISSN 0097.1 d1561)llncludes bibltographies and tndex. ! (QD320jC31] 78,17918' ISBN 0-8412-0426'. 8: i 24.00 L Carbohydrates-Congresses: ?. Sulphates-• rr •ongresses, 3. Org.rnosulphur compounds- Congresses. L Schw•eiger, Richard G., 1928- 11. Ahterican Chemical Society. Division of' Carbohydrate Chemistryc 111. Serier American Chemical Society. ACS symposium series ; 77. 1 FROST & 338.4'7'6641160973 Sullivam Food additives market• New York : Frost & Sullivan: 1978. v, 243 p:,;; 29'cm. (HD9005:F76 79781 78•108268 775.00 1 Food'additivex 2. Food industry and', trade: ' United States. 3. Market surveys-United States.. L Tit1e I LQU1D chromatographic 664'.07 analysu of food and beverages /' edited by George Charalambous. New York • Academic Press. 1',979: p. ('CP372:5.I1561 7g-27595 ISBN 0-12-16900146 : 1&00 1. Food Analysis-Congresses 2' BDverages- Analysis-Congresses. 1 Liquid ehromatography-Congresses 1.~ CharaLtmbous , 6'ieorge, 1912- .. . . . . . `I BOYCE, Jefferson C. -` 001 6'4'04 1 Microprocessor and microcomputer basics /~ Jefferson C. Boyce:, Englewood CIiITs, N.J. Prentice-Hall, e1979. p. cm. (Prentice-Hall series ~ in electronic technology ) Includes index. I Bibliography: p. [QA76.5.B671 78:26455' 14.95' 1. Microprocessors• 1• Microcomputetx L Title. , RESEARCHin " 658'.007'2' aganirations : issues and controversies / edited by Richard T. Mowday, Richard M. Steers. Santa, Monica Go d P b 1979 Co ATCHISON; 7ltomas J: 658AManagcment today • managing work in : o year u . „ c . p M (H',D30.4.R47] 78-25809 ISBN, 0~87620=760- . oreanizations / Thomas J. Atchison„ R`inston W:; O. 3 : 13.95 1 Hill. New York • Harcourr Brace Jovanovich.' ~. 1 Organizational research-Addressex essays, lectures.' 1. Management researehy-Addrecscs, essays lectures L Moa•day Richard Ii 11, Stcerr, Richard ,LL I c1978'. xiii, 575, 18' p ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. (HD31.A78]' 78-57251 ISBN 0-15-554780-1,: 15.93 L Management. 2. Or¢anization• l flill, Winston' W, joint author•1G , Title. I Q W a ~ ~ Vnl' ': I 1n. S:. -:Ilor);: 9, . >.'.: U
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. Cancer Research June 1979~ v. 39, p. 2051 . METABOLISM AND EXCRETION OF BENiZO (A) PYRENE 4, 5-OXIDE' BY THE ISOLATED' PERFUSED RAT' LIVER' Smith, Brian R. Bend, John R. ~. z (3enzo(a)pyrene 4,5-oxide was metabolized in the isolated' perfused rat liver b.y epoxide hydrase and glirtathione S-trans- ferases to the correspondingidihydrodiol and to thioether con- iugates (derivatives of glutathiane); respectively. Epoxide hy- drase was more important relative to, the glutathione S-trans-, ferases in, the biotransformation of this oxide by the intact' organ than was indicated, by the results from earlier studies with subcetlutar fractions. The dihydrodiol Iwas rapidly released i, into the circulation or conjugated with glucuronic acid: sulfurici acid esters were not found. All conjugated metabolites were; rapidly excreted in the tlile but some were: also released into the circulation. The enzymatic systems responsible for the, metabolism and excretion of' benzo(a)pyrene 4.5-oxide re-( mained viable in the isolated perfused liver for at least 60' min.i The toxicological significance of, the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites from the liver into the vas- . culgr circulation and the possible significance of UDP:glucu- I car- ronyltransferase activity impreventing chemically induced'car-I' cinogenesis are discussed. Computer-Aided Experimentation~ Interfacing to Minicomputers, Jules F'inkel-Jbhn Wiley & Sons, New York, NY; 422' pages; $30. An illustration of'the use of a minicomputer to save hours previously spent on tasks such as data taking,and parameter adjusti~ent, this reference covers 325 different aspects of computer-aided exper-imentation. The author reveals how to encode and repro-' duee data, how to keep input clear, and how to~select', equipment. Itrdi'scussing,all major topics needed in inter-j face specification and design, no~ background in elec-i tronics or computers is assumed: Laboratory Safety, Second Editiony Norman V. Steere- CF{C'Press, WestPalkn Beach, FL; 854 pages; $42.95. This:'" edition incorporates 17 new and important chapters, andd revises and enlarges chapters from the firstedition. Chap:— ters cover protective eq,uipment, ventilation, Gre,,toxic and radiation hazard's„water supply, and'laboratory design~and equipment. EighLadditional color pages on accidents and safety hazards in the laboratory illustrate the book. Vnr : 4. i1n. .8)~. J~~u01F ~ 2~~2~~,~' 197~9; 1 Science May 25, 1i979 p. 811 HOG+1' T0 ASS'ESS CANCER RISKS, Federal decision-making in the controll : ofcarcinogens is a hot subject that seems to invite more controversy all the time. • Disagreement exists within the govern- ment itself over "cancer policy"' and es- pecially over whether the science of quantifying cancer risks is far enough ad- vanced' for it to be safely used!by regula- tory agencies inrn setting standttrds for hu- i' man exposure to carcinogens. xyUto[ Edited! by J N' Counsell London: Applied Science 1978 I Pp xiv + 191, £12, ISBN 0 85334 78b 7! The search for . alternatives to sucrose has been, intensifying in, the last 20 years; many have been proposed but few have survived. One of' the remaining contenders is xylitol. It occurs naturally, is about as sweet as sucrose and is crystalline. The commercial manufacture and use of' xyGtoll has been pioneered by the Finnish Sugar Company, who have now joined' with Roche to further this irtteresting sugar alcoholl. i At a symposium in London in 1977, the leading authorities on xylitol discussed their work with a, large gathering of interested scientists and technologists. The book is a record of those proceedings including the valuable discussions which followed the papers. . It is undoubtedly, the most comprehensive volume on xylitol' to ~ date, covering occurrence, manufacture and properties through to applications in; t+. food; on, to the biochemistry and human: tolerance to, probably the most significant effect -- its non-or even, anti-cariogenic property. In this context a welGknown Turku study is referred to many times throughout thee discussions. It is ironic that in spite of Q all the work with human volunteers who :> showed no ill effects, doubt is now Q being cast on the compound because of }.1 its apparent adverse effects of animals. GJ Whatever the outcome of this C70 dichotomy, no earbohydrate library shelf'QD should be without this volume. . P W M I+Jicol ti
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Carbon dioxide, climate and'society IIASA Proceedings Series-Environment Edited by J Williams " Oxtord: Pergamon 1978 -` In the past, mankind has been power- less in the face of the vagaries of cli- I . :~. '' mate. While it is possible to overstatei :1:: the importance of climatic change ini de-1 termining the course of history, a !' number of events in recent years (theil droughts in the Sahel, Western Europe~ and California; the failure of' the Rus-! sian wheat harvest ini 1972; and the': severe winters in the United States ini 1976'-77 and I977-78) have underlined' the fact that at times climatic fluctua-[ tions„ and particularly climatic ex-~l tremes, can have a major effect on the~~ _l well being, of' society. In addition, a fur-~ .L thec shift in the balance of man"s 'reta-~ tionship to his environment may be; about to occur; firstly due to the in-i creasing population, and secondl~+ to an*I thropogenic interference with the chemi-. cal composition of the atmosphere andthe biosphere. It is believed, that the chemical com-' position of' the atmosphere has played' an important part in determining the global temperature regime of' the Earth's climate over a variety of time. scales. It - i's only with respect to the scale and character of this influence that opinions still differ. The most abundant constituent gases in, the at- mosphere are nitrogen, and oxygen, ac- counting for more than 99 per cent of the bulk of the gaseous atmosphere: ~ There are also small traces of' optically. active minor constituents, such as water vapour, carbon dioxide, ozone and aerosols, which determine the rad'iation' balance of, the atmosphere. They are ca,; pable of changing the Earth's surfaeetemperature through the 'greenhouse' ; effect; they ten& to absorb terrestrial ra-: diation peaking in the infra-red, but not solar radiation peaking in the visiblea Over very long time scales of about; 1000M years, the chemical evolution of; the atmosphere has probably been im-i portant in sustaining, the climatic regime; conducive toi the evolution of life by; counterbalancing the luminosity deficit', of the younger Sun predicted by most, solar models. On shorter time scales, natural phenomena, such as volcanic ac- tivity, large-scale changes in ocean tem- perature or climatic shifts, could' have caused i variations in, the chemical com- Position of the atmosphere, which could in turn, have been responsible for fur- iher climatic fluctuations. VoL-: 9. ; Ho. 8, JUNE 2'Z'.. '-1979 : . Adhesive andi sealant compounds andl their formulations by Ernest W Flick ' New Jersey: Noyes Data Corp 1978' " Pp xxii' + 402, 536,, ISBN 0 8155 0 7135 :I This book is nothing more (or, lless) than a compilation of over S00i formulations of adhesives and' related' compounds, selected from the technical literature of US manufacturers of raw materials. There is strong emphasis on avoidance of solvent based systems (the book claims that none is listed although, in • fact, a, number are given) and' most of' the formulations in the first three sections' (ind'ustrial' and packaging adhesives, and coatings for eoncrete, fabrics and fibres), are water based. The remainder of the book comprises sections on hot melt adhesives and i' coatings and miscellaneous plastisols;!', including caulking and sealing!' compounds of many kinds. In the USA this book wili' offer some, ' value to formulators who have only limited access to manufacturers'.. literature: outside the US' it seems to have li~ttlemore thancuriosilty value. ;I C A Finch Alkaloid biology and metabolism in plants G R' Wallcr andi E K Nowacki New York: Plenum Press 1978' Pp xvii + 294, f27:S0r ISBN'01306 309815. Although this book is not intended'primari'-' , ly for chemists; it will be of considerable in- terest to, all interested in the chemistry of alkaloids. The first chapter deals with chemotaxonomic relationships and how. alkaloids of the same chemical group may; be produced' by different biosynthctic' pathways in completely unrelated tax-! onomic groups. Chapter two, on genetic' control of' alkaloid I production, is concern-; ed with the inhcritance of factors that inter-°; rupt the biosynthctic route at d'ifferent, i .ti points and with the rcl'ationship between: al'kaloidLrich and alkaloid.poor varieties of Q thesamespccies as well artheinheritance of: 0 the ability to store alkaloids at different ox- H idationilcvcls or in different states of Q or NC-1 tnethyl'ation; Orj ~ I
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r ABSTRACTS~ 7g-t407 HE'20:8216:20 fiational Institute on Drug Abuse. Research Division. Self-administratiow of abused substances : methods for study I editor: Norman A. Krasnegor. - Rockville, Md. : Dept. of Health+ Education, and Welfare. Public Health iSer- vice, Alcohol. Drug, Abuse, and Mental Health Adeninistra- tion, National Institute on Drug,Abuse„Division of Research, ; Washington : for sale by the Supt: of Docs•, U.S. Govt. Print: Off., l'97820402 i3, 245 p. :, ill. ; 23 cm. - (National Institute on Drug Abuse research monograph series ; no. 20) (DHEW' pubica. tion ; no. (ADM)78.727) July 1978. Includes bibliographies. eltem 831-C-8' SIN 017-024-00794-3' pbk. : $3.75 ll Drug abuse - Research - United States., 2. Drug abuse. I. Krasnegor, Norman A II. Title• Ill. Series. IV. Series: United States. Dept. of' Health; Education„and Wel- fare. DHIEW publication •,no. (ADM) 78:727. 7y-4sta i HE 20:36' 14/2:78-23 ~ Smoking and reproduction, pregnancy„or the newborn • Janua- : ry 1972'through July, 1978, 241 citations in English. French,. Spanish, or German, / prepared by Charlotte Kenton. - [Bethesda; M'd:]', : Dept. of 'Health, Education, and Welfare. Public Health Service, National institutes of' Health, National' Library, of Medicine, (197811 20014 16 p. ; 27'cm.- (Literature search rno: 78'-23)1 lltem,508-H-1 ._ .. ., 2 pbk. 1, Smoking - Bibliography.. 2. Tobacco - Physiological . effect - Bibliography. I., United States. National Library of Medicine. Il. Title. lil., Series: United States. National Library of >w'ledtcine. Literature search ; no 78-23 , OCLC 4391095 • I Fermentation, and Enzyme Techinolbgy' by D.I.C. Wang. C.L. Cooney and A.L. Demain., all of the Massachusetts lnstitute of Technology,~ P. Dunnill; University College, London; A.E. Httmphrey. University of Pennsylvania ~ and M.D. Lilly; University College, London, ' I This outlines the fundamental microbiological, biochemicaljd yeneric and engjneering aspects of fermentation, presenttng advancedl methods of fermentation and control. It covers the isolation of enzymes; especially those found' in intracellular contents of microorganisms. Enzyme immobilization and the factors influencing the use of enzymes in reactors are. examinedi (Series: Techniques in Pure and Applied'M'icro- biology) {' April 1979 • 384 pages 0471 91945 4 $33.00/f 16:65' f b 79-4351 • .,. . _. . . ' . . __. .... ... -- HE 20.7111/2e:V 69 . - Fortner; Ronnie L A report on the performance of' personal' noise dosimetets. I Ronnie L. Fortner, Nick Blaskovich. - Morgantown, W. f Va. : Dept. of Health. Education4 and Welfare. Public Health I, Service, Center for, Disease Control, National! Institute for ~ Occupational Safety and I Health, Appalachian Laboratory for • Occupational,Safety, and Health, Division of Safety Research; ! , 1978. . . ! .. _ . ~ 26505' ~ , xiii; 1150 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. -(NIOSH! technical report) (DHEW publication ; no. (NIOSH) 78-186), . { September 1978. 611tem 4991F-6 'E pbk. ' 1. Noise - Measurement. 1. Blaskovich, Nick, joint i author. IL Appalachian Laboratory for Occupational, Safety ; and Health. Division of Safety Research. Ill. Title. IV. Se- : riesc United States. Dept. of Health. Education, and Welfare: i DHEW publication ; no. (NIOSH),78.186.' ( OCLC 44'A 7510 79-4376 HE 20,7108:An 1/977/v:4 II National Institute for Occupational Safety and' Health. NIOSH manual of analytical methodf.-2nd. ed.-Cin•i, cinnati„ Ohio : Dept. of Hcalth, Education, and Welfare,`' Public Health Scrvicc, Center for Disease Control; Nat'ional Institute for Occupational Safcty and Hcalth ; Washington :, for,salc by the Supt:,of Docs., U.S. Govt. Printi Off:,,1977- I. v. : ill. ;,28 cm.- (DHEW publication,; no. (NIOSH) 78- I 175) Authors: John V. Crablc, David G. Taylor. August' 1978. Includes bibliographical'rcfcrenccs: Oltem 499-F-3 S/N1017-033-00317-3 .pbk: : $7.25 I., Chemititry, Analytic - Laboratory manuals. 1'. Crablc, John V' 11. Taylor. David G IiL Title. IV. Scries: United , States. DcptL of Hcalth, Education, and Welfurc: Dl-IEtV i publication ; no. (NIOSH) 78-175. -f OCLC 3442481
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C w ABSI?cTSA~ SIMS, J:L.' • LEGGETT, J.E.; PAL,, U.R.; • ATKINSON',, W.O: blolybdenum and sulfur interaction effects on' growth, yieldl and selected chemical constituentd ~ 0, of' burley tobacco, Ky. Agric. Exp. Stn.,, Lexington. =• Annu. Rep. 90t•18-49, 1977. Molybdenum accumulation by plants is decreased by high levels of ' S02 ~ in the rooting media. This relation, E ship is of interest since Mo is deficient in some soils, i and certain fertilizers contain large amounts of, SO='-.., 'The present study was conducted to determine the effect of' NIbO=", and SO=-4 interaction on growth, yield, and selected chemica)' constituents of burley tobacco (,Nico-;: tiana tabacum). Tobacco (CV Ky+14) was grown in a field 1 experiment during, 2 years. Treatments consisted of four ! rates of N'a. \IoO4 (A, 0:56,,1.12, and 2.24 kg/ha), applied; annually in all combinations with four rates of SO= 4(0;, 112, 22;I'. and 448 kg;ha)i to Maury silt loam soil (Typic Paleudalfs): Plant samples were taken at varying dates; during the growing season. Adding, Na. INioO, inereased! average plant Mo concentration over the control (about three-fold), nitrate reductase activity (35%), total N'con- tent (5' to 10°a), and cured leaf'yields (7%). Adding SO2-, ' fertilizers deereased! NIo: concentration (33 to 55%) but increased total NI content (5 to 10%) and cured' leaf yields (7%). Sulfate had, no effect on S concentration at any sampling date, but a trend existed for SO= 4 to lower NR' activity. Significant 1io rate %' SO=' 4 rate, in- teractions existedl for Mo concentrations, total N' con- tent, and, cured leaf yields. These interactions suggest that adding SOz-;, fertilizer will have detrimental' effects an plant growth, nitrate, reduction, andl leaf yields at low-soil-,NIo levels but positive, effects at high-soil-Mo levels. 861 WHITE, F.H.; PANDEYA, R.S.; DIRKS„V.A. Correlation studies among andi between, agronomic,! chemicall physical' and' smoke characteristics in, flue -cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)., Can.,J. Plhnt Sci. 59(1'):111-120, Jan. 1979. ('F'r~, Engl. sum.). Coefficients of correlation among, 23' characteristics were ' determined for several flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana~;l tabacum) cultivars and advanced generation breeding lines„~' representing a wide range of'variabiiity for each character- ! Istic. The variables were grouped into agronomic, chemical l and i physical characteristics of the leaf and' smoke proper- ties ties of cigarettes. Most of the traits studied in these indi- ~ vidual groups couldi be classed into two main categories iniI terms of their relationship to yield„leaf alkaloids; smoke ; total particulate matter (TPM) and! wet tar (WT). Those + agronomic characteristics positively associated with yield, were negatively correlated with leaf total alkaloids, lamina weight and smoke TPNi, S'VT and alkaloids on a per ciga• rette basis. Conversely, grade index and the average length:' of the three top leaves„which were in negative association' with yield, showed a positive relationship with leaff total alkaloids and smoke characteristics. Leaf total alkaloids and l lamina weight, in, positive association with each other, were positively correlated with smoke,TPM, WT, and alka- loids. However, both of'these traits were negativelynorre-y corre- lated with yield. 1043' Vn[ : 2?.'1J79!. 11 WHIDBY, J.F.; EDSFi1RDS,W.8:: PITNER„T:P. " Isomeric nicotines. Their solution conformation an& proton, deuterium+ carbon-13, and nitrogen-15' nuclear magnetic resonance. J', Otg. Chem. 44(5): 794L798, Mar. 2', 1979: ) Complete I H 1 3 C, and I isNi assignments are presented for 2!nicotine (2) and 4-nicotine (4) as well as - H assign- ments of, selectively deuterated' 2 and 4 derivatives. The 2H chemical shifts of the deuterated derivatives allow: assignment of' I H resonances to specific protons and pro- vide vide starting chemical shifts for analysis of l the severely overlapping pyrrolidine IH resonances. The three-, four-, and' five-spin pyrrolidine IH spectra of these analogues are less complex to analyze than the corresponding seven -spin spectra of' 2' and' 4. The Karplus parameters obtained from the 1'H' analyses indicate an,envelope conformation for both 2' and! 4. Analysis of, the long-range coupling constants between H(2') and the pyridine,protons suggests a perpendicular spatial! arrangement of the pyridine, and pyrrolidine rings for both 2 and 4. A comparison is made between the solution conformations of 2 and 4 and, the conformation of 3-nicotine (3). i' 865„ aNDERSENi R.A.; VAUGHN, T.H. 1 Separation and quantitative determination of lignin : precursors related to hydroxycinnamic and aldehydes by high-speedl liquid chromatography. Ky. Agric. Exp. Stn., Lexingt'on, Annu. Rep: 90:39;19776 . l Congeners of hydroxycinnamic acids are believed' to be I precursors of:lignin in all higher plants [tobaccoj'. The carboxylic acids were separated on a reversed-phase pBondapak Cj,a column as paired ionic compounds with a methanollwater mobile phase containing 0.005\Ii tetra• butylammonium phosphate at pH 7:5. A 254Lnm detector was used. The carboxylic acids were also separated and determined as free acidton the same column. Nanogram . to microgram amounts of p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic,' cinnamic and trintethoxycinnamic acids were analyzed ; by either of the two procedures in less than 35I minutes i : However„mixtures of ion-pairedlacids were separated,with : more resolution than, the free acids. Similar amounts of aldehy,des corresponding to the, pheny,lpropanoid' acids were also separated and determined on the reversed -phase, column with a methanol/water mobile phase and a 254-nm detector in less than 20 minutes. The order ofl ehition of carbonyl compounds analyzed was p-cou-; maraldehyde, coniferaldehyde, sinapaidehyde„ cinna- j maldehyde, trimethoxycinnamaldehyde„ and p-acetyl-I ainapaldehyde. 845 ~ .a. ELLIOT, J.St. Survey of flue-cured tobacco~ grown in Ontario inl 1978. I., Sugars, alkaloids, nitrogen and lamina weight. Lighter 49(1):9-11, Winter 1979. In 1978',, levels of reducing sugars and total,alkaloids were lower in leaves from all stalk positions than the 8-year average for IIue-cured' tobacco grown on representative farms in Ontario; the, ratio of sugars/alkaloids was slightlyy lower for each stalk position in, 1978., Total nitrogen values for all! stalk positions were similar to the Jbng+term average , except for the tips:which were slightly lower.,The lamina, weight values were higher for leaves of allistalk:positions than the 8-year averaBe. 852
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ABSTRACTS J 79-0958. Reinke,, h.. A.; Stohs; Si J.; Rosenberg, H. (Dep. j I Biomed. Chem., Co1l. Pharm.,, Medi Cent., Univ. Nebraska, l; Omahal NE'68105) Increased aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase ' activity inihepatic microsomes from streptozotocin-diabetic female rats. xenobiottca 8(12): 769-778; 1978. (43 references) .. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats, hepatic `. microsomal' aryl hydrocarbon, hydroxylase (AHH) activity ~ was depressed to less than control values, but was increased in microsomes from diabetic female rats. Insulin treatment l of diabetic animals returned the altered AHH activity to con- ! ' trol values in, both sexes of rats. Hepatic microsomal AHH ' activity was increased over controll values in both sexes of I I diabetic mice. Protection of female rats from the diabetogenic l effects of streptozotocin by nicotinamide pretreatment alao, I prevented the increase in AHH activity observed in un- l l protected animals. Treatment of control and diabetic female ; i rats with 3-methylcholanthrene resulted in larger increases . in hepatic AHH activity in control animals, but similar in- ; creases in cytochrome P448' content occurred in, both treat- I ment groups. Differential stimulatory or inhibitory effects on ~ AHH activity were observed after the addition of SKF j 525-A, metyrapone, and rotenone to hepatic microsomes in vitro from control an diabetic female rats. Howevery similarli stimulatory responses in AHH activity were observed after: additon of a-naphthoflavone to microsomes from both treat- ment groups. • " 79-6342 PrEx 14.2:C 42 ~ United States. Council on Environmental Quality. The feasibility of a standard chemical! classification, system : and a standard chemical substances information system : a; report to the Congress prepared pursuant to Section 25(b) of j the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (1 SI U.S.C. 2601)., ; -lWashingtonl : Council on Environmental Quality : for sale by the Supt. of Docs:, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1978. 20402 . i ' j 77p.:ill1;,26 cm. July 1978. Includes bibliographical references. O1tem 856-E ~ S1N 041~0111-000394 pbk. : $'2:50 1. Hazardous substancer.- Data processing. 2. Chemistry, -Classifications. 3. Information storage andl retrieval systems - Chemistry., 1. Title. I OCLC'42'63447 I 22- r' 19791, KASPERBAUER, ril'J.; ANDERSE.IT, R.A., ~ Characteristics of burley tobacco from variousl "' populations. Ky. Agric. Exp. Stn., Lexington. Annu. • Rep. 90`.3:r,1977. j Plant spacing arrangements that may facilitate innovative I production, harvest and curing, systems were studied to determine effects on the tobacco before curing. Leaves . of close-spaced plants were,short, narrow and thin, where-` as„ leaves of wide-spaced plants were long, wide and thick relative 'to those of normal-spaced plants. The ratio of .lamina to mid-vein, at time of harvest was lowest, in-e termediate andi highest for the close, normal and wide spacing, respectively. Close spacing resulted in early senescenee and loss,of lower leaves. Alkaloid content of' leaf lamina at time of harvest was 3.2, 4.3 and 5.2%, respectively„ for the close, normal and wide-spaced plants. Close spacing, of plants within wide rows caused many leaves to orient,between the rows, which~would facilitate mechanical leaf' priming; however; leaves that remainedl within rows were thinner than those of normal=spacedi plants., ~ 853' DAVIS, D'.L.; SONG, B.H. Flavor-related ionone derivatives from, burley tobac- co. Ky. Agric. Exp., Stn., Lexington. Annu. Rep:. 90`.39,,1977. A burley tobacco variety of the future may be one that Is higher in alkaloids„ higher im flavor and aroma constituents and lower in tar. This project is directed' toward, the identification and characterization of' flavorl and aroma compounds. Presently we, have investigated. the dehydration product of 1,3,3-trimethyl-2(a,hydroxy! -ar-butenyl):-cy,clohexene (Q-ionol), a compound derived: from ,7-ionone which was previously identified in the terpene fraction of the volatile tobacco disttllate 13.ionol,ll upon mild treatment with para-toluenesuifonie acid, gave predominantly one produeG identified as megastigmai -a+7E,9-triene, on the basis of elemental analysis, ir„nmr,1 uv and I mass spectra data. This new compound has been! successfully isolated by preparative ggc and identified from oil of burley tobacco condensate. I 847' TANCOGNE„Ji ~ Presence of ergosta-4;6,8a (14), 22 tetraene-3-one and ergosterol in mold I infested tobaccos. Ann. Tab. Seet, • 2. (14):197.204, 1977: (Fr., Engl. sum.) ' -ti" Ergosta•tetraene-3-one has been isolated' in extracts of'f some dark air-cured tobaccos. Identification has been ob-' tained by thin layer chromatography, gas-liquid chroma-7 tography„ ultra-.violet absorption spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry. Ergosterol has also been identified in non-fermented tobaccos. These twosubstancescome,from the molds which sometimes develop at the base oflthe mid'+ ribs during the last stage of curing,or when the conditions of'storage are defective. Ergosta-tetraene.3-one seems3o be a valuable indicator of the presence of molds on tobaccos. a 862' 1
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. w ABSTRACTS~ An Introduetion to Chemical Noznenclature Fifth Edit'ton ' R. S. Cahn and! 0. C. Dermer ' Thts fifth edition has been complbtely revised and considerably enltirged'. The specific purpose of previous editions - to explain the methods of IUPAC nomenclature rather than just to provide rules - has been retciined„but in the present edition the exposition of IUPAC nomenclature is supplemented by step-by-step contrasting of the recent changes in ChetriicalAbstract's iindex practices. These changes involve inipart choice between alternatives, and in part new methods designed to facilitate computer use. Such names must be more systematic andisince they arc easier to learn and to teach, they have a wide .al?peaL 0408106085 ' '216 x 138tnrn 20$' pagcs F9.S0 USpl:50._ . Buttcnvorth & Co (1'ublishers):Ltd., Borouglr Crcan, ~ Sevenoaks, (~n KenCTNt5'8Pf1 u`I Tellephonc: (0732) 384567' , .. , . :•S '-'Yes, I Do Mind' . - Joseph S. Pachman & Lee W. Frederiksen (Virginia Polytechnic, Institute 8' Stote Univ.) in Addictive Behaviors 4(1):75?81. 1979 IRd 242od1 ..."5ocial skills training was used with two i, non>smokers. The goal was feaching them :, skillz to effectively alter the disturbing behavior of smokers in their immediate environments.... For both subjects; the training procedure changed the targeted behaviors in the desired-directions: during role•pl'ayed interactions. Further; training effects generalized to scenes on which the ; subjects received no troining.... Both sub- jects (also] showed'high levels of perfor- monce on all target behaviors in o six- month follow=up. Perhaps most important- ly, though. the effects of' training generalized to the immediate natural en- vironmenes of the subjects." i Vr11 •: tl. I1!(1. (`), J1.)NE 22'r''1979 ._.F; G11.c. and h.p.l.c. determination of therapeutic agents 1 , ;... . P art Edited by Kiyoshi Fsuji and Walter Morozowlctt New York: Marcel'Dekk'er 1978 Pp xiv, + 415, SFr98, ISBNiO 8247 6641 S~ Chromatographic methods areof major im- portance for determining the purity and potency of drug preparations, and they are freely used' in projects developing new therapeutic agents and' inistudies on their: metabolism. Thus, a mass spectrometer tsl unable to measure low levels of a drug and of its metabolites in biological fluids unless~ interfering materials are first separated' by; either gas-liquid chromatography (g.l:c.)ior; high-performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.)1 , . . • This volume, which is the first parG of'aI three-part compendium on g.l.c. and, hi.p.1.c. analyses of therapeutic agents„con-' tains 13 specialist articles on practical aspects of chromatography. Topics such ass instrumentation, column selection,; derivatisation; mass spectrometer interfac-i ing; sample preparation„ preparative-scalee separations„ automation, quality control.~. computer, interfacing and data processing are discussed. Experimental details for the `procedure of choice' for determinations of individual drugs are to be included in Parts, 2~and! 31 ~~ / Srstolting In Classrooms Ronald'E. ShorB Daniel C.1Nilliams (Univ. New Hampshire)iin Psychological Reports 43(3):1047-50; Dec 78 [pd 241'9d] ...°It is clear that within the context of this! ' questionnaire study, sizable percentoges ' of'coUege students [at'Univ. New Hbmpr shire) believe that new and residual tobacco smoke pollution irn classrooms can Interfere with, intellectual!performance especially unden stressful conditions. Not surprisingly„ smokers report considerably. less belief' in isuch effects than ido l nonsmokers. A striking finding is that ma-' [orifies of'both nonsmokers and smokers believe that nonsmoking students with k ov r s i di i h ffe mo e. e s ve an caps are su r ng i discriminatory treatment because of smoke pollutionl°',
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BSRS A.T,AcT.i Journal of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists May 1979 v. 62, no..3, p. 527 HIGH PRESSURE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF SACCHARIDES IN'CORN SIRUPS': COLLABORATIVE STUDY Ehgel, C. Earl Olinger,Phili!pM.~ A' liquid chromatographic method for quanti- tative analysis of saccharides in corn sirup was. Investigated. Fructose, glucose, and related sae- eharides are separated on aw Aminex 30W-X-1,,, ealhium form,, cation, exchange column or4 al-~ tern•rtivel,v, on an A'min~ax Q15-S, caleiurn form, cation exchange column. Water is the solbent. i All carbohydrate components in the sirup elut e' from the column,, permitting normalized corn-I putation vs. ayntheticallly prepared' standards.' The corn sirup satuples are diluted to an, ap--I proximate dry substance and injected' directly: Into the chrotnato„ratih. When requiired, inter-' fering ionic material is reinoved with the aid of a mixedl strong acid-weak base ion exchange resiin.. The reprodtrcibilit)•d and repeatability co-; ef6cients of variation for fructose (on samples ' ranging from, 15 to 90% fructose)', are 0.9 and 0.3%b, respectively. The reproducibility and re- peatability coefTicients of variation, for glucose (on samplies ran„ing, front 8 to 30% glucose)) are 1.4 and 0'.S'%, respectivelx. The method has beeniadopted as official first action. Nature May 24, 1979 v. 279', p. 352 MUTAGENIC EFFECT OF AROMATIC` EPOXY RESINS . . I. ANDERSEN EF' AL.tI state that, 'the' demonstration of a, mutagenic effect of' aromatic epoxy resins (that is„those based on bisphenol acetone, BPA) indicater a genetic hazard, including a cancer risk, for humans exposed to these compounds'. We challenge the rationale for this rather definite conclusion, Epoxides as a class are reactive chemicals andl in general' are alkylating agents. However, in the extrapolation from direct alkylation of DNA to defining the risk of I mammalian mutagenicity or carcinogenicity, other major factors must be considered, in particular the dose reaching target tissues/molecules and the importance of the detoxication or intoxication mechanisms which are only properly developed in the in vivo situation. American Laboratory ~ ~ May 1979 p. 84 ~ THERMAL ENERGY ANALYSIS FOR N~-NITROSO COMPOUNDS Krull, I., S. Wolf, M. H. ~ S ~ EVERAL CLASSES of organic compounds are ~ known to formi a nitroso derivative under a variety of experimentall conditions. These reactions can leadl to the formation of 0-nitroso (alkyl nitrites), C-nitroso, S-nitroso, and N-nitroso derivatives, depending on the nature of the precur-. sors i'nvolved.',= Of these four classes of nitroso derivatives, Eonsiderable chemical and biological~: interest has recently centered'on'theN-nitroso com-~' pounds, including nitrosamines. Table I illustrates : some typical N=nitroso compounds: World-wide in-" terest in instrumental methods of' analysis for ni-" Arosamines has'arisen within, the past 10 to 1'S years' ' for several reasons. It is now generally accepted tliat' a large number of N-nitroso compounds are mu2a- ~' genic and/or carcinogenic under a variety of condi-; tions ''' This would be of academic interest alone i'f' not for the demonstrated! occurrence of many dif-; ferent N-nitroso compounds' in the environment ! (air, water, soil), as well as within a wide variety of': commercial and, consumer products (herbicides, ; cutting fluids, foodstuffs, cosmetics, and drugs).•" The distribution of both volatile andlnonvolatileN- ` nitroso compounds in various matrices has been discussed in recent pubiications." There is no con- clusive evidence to date which proves that human exposure to N-nitroso compounds in the environ- ment or in consumer, products leads to the develop- ' ment of cancer in humans. There is a substantial amount of indirect evidence, which taken together, is suggestive that nitrosamines indeed' may be car- cinogenic to humans.
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ABSTRACTS-1 Industrial Research/D'evelopment' May 1979 ..: p. 196 j NO CHANGE TO' METRIC - ; THE' CHkNCE to the metric or SI systems does not eitist in the R&D industry when the emphasis is om .,change: While there is indfcation~ that between half' and two thirds of R&D scientists and engineers use ~-'metricLSI regularly in their work, the numbers are: `virtuallv unchangedd frozn~ two years ago whem we? : polled our readers, andi 85% indicate that'theirmea;' surement system has not changedin the past 101„ : years. • _ i Interest in the subject would seem to be at a low. level. The number of responses to our po11', fewer: than, 1,000' of them, is down substantially from our~ -' ,usually level. It was less than half as many responses': as we received 11 two years ago, and even at that tirne; this subject attracted a below-normal return from our; readers. Many readers apparently feel as does Dr. john,D:j BuItman, research chemist at the Naval Researchi ' Laboratory in,Washington,,DC, who wrote, "I see noi I useful purpose in forcing the general public to buy; its gas bythe liter,,its steak by the kilo, measure itsi distances in kilometers, or its velocity t'nI ~ kilometers/hour. _ Chemistry and Industry I April 7, 1979' p. 241 ENZYMIC AND NON ENZYMIC' OXIDATION~ ...OF POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS I Vliegenthart, Johannes F. G. In the context, of this paper it is appropriate to mention that Professor Hilditch and his coworkers carriedi out some outstanding investigationi into the mechanism of lipid oxidation. 1;zi Lipid oxidation covers a wide area of enzymic andl non- enzymic reactions, many of which have an impact on daily 1I life. For instance, one might think of oxidation of fatty acids as an energy source for the organism, or the' tonversion, of polyunsaturated fatty acids into i prostaglandin-like compounds, or the role of lipid oxidation ~ in food dt:terioration, as well as in the ageing process of the ~ organism. W'nii•: (I. 1!h. AL .ftlm: 27.1979. i Nature . May 17 1979 , v. 279, p. 1!77 LIBRARY REPORT CALLS FOR A~ NATIONAL PERIODICALS CENTRE THE setting up of a 'national perio-1 dicals centre' to compensate for the ' increasing number and price of academic journalS-particularly im scientific and' technica[ subjects-has' been recommended by the National Enquiry on Scholarly Communication, s In a three-year, 5600,000 study of research libraries published in~ h6ew York last week, the national enquiry . says that further growth in the number':' of scholarly journals should be dis- • couraged~ and concludes that major. research libraries cannot expect major, budget increases over :the next decade. The report says that if this con-1 clusion is valid, "research libraries can! no longer function as autonomous!, cntities". And given, the growing re-t. sistance to interlibrary loan, it recom-, mends a national periodicals centre to ` provide libraries with, a reliable source.., of copies of articles from journals too, se(dom used to warrant library sub-~ scription. . J Tobacco Reporter; May 1979 p. 12; Cenarts Bureau report According to a preliminary" report of the 197,7 Census of j Manufacturers released by the Bureau of the Census, American ` cigarette manufacturers pro-': duced 67,9' billion cigarettes in' 1977 - 13 percent more than 197,2. The value of these cigar=l ettes increased from $3.6 to $6.1', billion during the same period. I
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ABSTRACTSI Journal of the American Oil Chemistst Society . 1 May 19!7'9' 2 v. 56, no. 5, p. 55 NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR' THRANALYSIS'. OF VOLATILES IN AQUEOUS AND~ NONAQUEOUS SYSTEMS Legendre, M. G. "t et al A simple, efficient, external inlet assembly isl described for analyzing volatile components in rawl andl processed foods by direct gas chromatographyi and mass spectrometry. The device comprises three: sections: a sample inlet, a condenser, and a six-port ! rotary valve. The versatility and effectiveness of thiss assembly is demonstrated by the analysis and' identification of volatiles from diverse food products as salad oils, vinegar, and eorn-soy food, blends. The procedure is rapid, efficient, and offers the following; desirable features: it is compatible with all commonl'y; used chromatographs and can aecomodtite samples of'; different size; sample volatiles are obtained withoutl use of prior enrichment techniques, at~ ambient or elevated temperatures; uniform heating enhances i volatiles elution, thereby improving sensitivity;i moisture and air are removed, to facilitate mass i spectrall analysis; the closed, nature of' the system l minimizes loss of low molecular weight vol'atilesI during elution, thus producing a highly reliable pro- fde of volatiles. I . Tobacco Reporter ~ May 1979 p. 40 DOWNSTALK TOBACCO,• ANIECONOMIC ANALYSIS' I Loyd, Max I. he tobacco supplyr controI-price support U program has been envied by most other: commodity groups. This program has sur-i vived primarily because of effective supply con.-~ trol, which has kept government costs at an insignificant level. However, the accumulation of P and N grades in flue-cured loan stockshas been' excessive in recent years. Potential costs in dis- posing of these stocks are a serious threat to the tobacco program. 1 This article presents a simplified analysis of some of the demand and supply aspects of the' flue-cured low-stalk problem. I. Vnt': (I. iln. S:. Jhur'iF ??'. American Laboratory May 1979 p. 49 ~. / 7/1 ; ACCURACY ANUREP'RODUCIBSLITY ~ IN A TWO-PUMP' GRADIENT HPLCj Savage, G Mick RADIENT ELUTION. or solvent programming, ~' in high performance liquid chromatography: (HPt,C)1 has been used in an increasing num- ber of applications in recent years. In an operation using the gradient' mode, the composi'tioni of the mobile phase is gradually changed in such a way. that the solvent strength increases throughout the • separation, thereby aftecting the retentivity of the stationary phase. Using, a property, programmed and designed mobile phase gradient, compoundfr with either widely different or similar chemical structures can be separated in a relatively short pe-- riod of time. This feature makes the technique use-' ful when dealing with mixtures of unknown compo- sitionor mixtures containing,chemicals with a large variation in retentivity under isocratic conditions. The technique has found application in all types of: interactive liquid chromatography including ad-' . sorption, partition, and ion exchange separations. At the present time, its most popular use is in par-; tition chromatography using, chemically bonded re-, verse-phase columns. j. Tobacco Reporter, May 1979 p. 48 ~ PhilipMorri'sadopt's new name for Parliament brand j Philip Morris U.&A. am-' nounced that the 48 year old Parliament cigarette brand name has changed to Par- liament Lights. The low-t'ar; cigarette, characterized by its' recessed filter, will, not change+' The packaging, however, has a brighter look and the word, "Lights" has been add'ed' to the pack. 1' According to Robert Roper,' Parliament Lights Brand 141an- ager, "these changes will enable the brand to maximize its po-: ' tential within the low-tar growth, segment of the in- dustry." • ii
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. a. ABSTRACTS] Industrial Research/Develapment! May 1979 p. 15 f ARSENIC - AN OLD CASE Jueneman, Frederic B. . Throughout history arsenicals ` have been in the pharmacopeia of~ the medical profession, at least until s more recently, what with tlie: reemergence of what Douglas V.' Frost~,an inde p~ endent'consultant i~nj nutrition biochemistry, calls arse- nophobia.' Present day attitudes: toward! arsenic are an echo of the . British Beer Poisoning of 1900,, where As was found in trace' amounts in the beverage which af-: fected 6,000 people and killed many, ; Arsenic was foreordained the cul- j prit, despite the finding that 6 ppm i selenium was also present, includ-,! ing the fact that the sulfuric acidr used, to invert' the brewing, sugarI contained 1.2 J8 Se. And, before; this, the association of arsenic with cancer had its origin in 1820, doc- umented by ]. A. Paris through an, analytical error, and' we are presently inheriting this menda- ~ cious legaey. In point' of fact, clinical' evidence appears to, favor, arsenic (and selenium) compounds as antitumor agents, which carries an altogether different message. Too many doom- saving references app ear to copy. from eaeh other in what might be ; termed incestuous footnote-:. scholarship. ~ Frost notes that the prevention of such chronic disorders as cancer and cardiovascular disease must involve' many nutrients„and that'vitHmins A' (retinoicacid); C' (ascorbic acid)„and E (tocopherol) are "clearly involved in cancer prevention, but so are cer- tain tain trace elements, notably, selhnium."'Also, there is "growing evidence for the nutrient need for' arsenic and cad'mium."' / Industrial Research/Development May 1979 p. 89 :a DNA RISKS'OVERSTATED--NIH THE DEGREE OF RISK' involved, in recombinant DNA research appar- ently is far less than previously feared, according to results of a major experiment conducted by the ~ National' Institutes of Health, The study was designed to evalu- ` ate the possibilities that common, harmless bacteria could be changed into dangerous and possibly lethal forms as a result of geneticengineer- ing', or "gene spl'icing." There hass been concern that if virulently,-; endowed bacteria should become widespread they might become major sources of infectionand; in the worst cases, agents of previously-` unknown epidemics in man and in' . animals. This worry has led to stringent I rules governingi recombinant' DNA -experiments, including a recent proposal that all such research bee regulated by federal agencies (see IR113, February 1979, 81). ~ . ~ Industriial Research/Development ; May 1J97'9~ p, 54 i EARTHQUAKE WARN!INGS MINIMIZE' LAB' EQUIPMENT LOSSES THE USE OF EARTHQUAKE "early warning" systems literally could be the difference between economic survivall or fail'ure for many firms if large seismic event occur, says Dr. Wilfred D. Iwan, professor of applied mechanics at Caltech . ~ (California Institute of Technology, s Pasadena, CA)+ . t The combination of such networks rlus proper preliminary safety steps or valuable equipment and in- ventories, he states, could go a long, way to minimizing business and in dustry losses during moderate or severe quakes.
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ABSTRACTS Carbohydrate chemistry- 8 Edited' by K Onodera Oxford: Pergamon Press 1977' Pp 171~ £1S„ISBN'008 022001 0' Publicatiow of the Plenary Lectures delivered at the Eighth International. Symposium on Carbohydrate Chemis-try, held in Kyoto, adds an intresting set, of reviews to the chemical literatureal The articles, written by eminentli resear& workers in this branch ofl' chemistry, will be weltomed by a wider. audience than those who were able to , participate in the symposium. , . A wide spectrum of carbohydrate chemistry is covered in the chapters in the book, but there is considerablei emphasis on macromolecular aspects;; this reflects the current interest _ and volume of work ow complex oligo-andl poly.saccharides. Topics dealt with iny i chtd'e the selective degradation of carbo-~ hydrate polymers (by G: 0. Aspinall), 1 structural studies of' some bacterial ', polysaccharides (by B' Lindberg), struc-~, tural' features of' the Bordetella pertussis endotoxin (by L. Szabo) and conforma- tions of polysaccharides containing uronic acidl units (by E. D. T. Atkins).. There are surveys of' glycosphingolipids with blood group A, H' and I activity .and their changes associated with ontogenesis and' oncogenesis (by S.-I_ Hakomori, K. Watanabe and' R. A.' Laine) andl of lectins as carbohydrate- binding proteins (by 1. J. Goldstein, L. A. Murphy and S. Ebisu). - ,,. / Are Contaminants, Not Toeacco, the Cui'prit? - John Elliot in Journal of'fhe American . Medicali Association 241(15);1556, 13'Apr 79 lpd 243141 ..."A group of North Carolina researchers has developed an intriguing new theory ' that may help to explain the pathogenesis of various lung diseases. Hal K. Hbwkins, MD, and Peter Ingram, MD; of the Duke • tiniv.:M'edical Center in Durham, have I found that the,overage cigarette is con- I taminated with more than 3 mgiof in- I organic porticles, including siliconi sulfur, potassium, calcium, and aluminum. 'AI'- though there is no definite evidence, we believe that it is likely,thouthose particles mre an important cause of l'ung diseose,' , Hawkins told JAMA Meditof News." W6111 : ()._11h. ..1Ilflr I ('17q High performance liquid chromatography Edited by John H Knox Edinburgh: University Press 1978 Pp viii + 205, £S; ISBNi0 85224 341 3 I Books on h.p.l.c. continue to appear at a somewhat bemusing,rate. This one by Pro- fessor Knox and his disciples derives from a pair of intensive courses held annually at the University of' Edinburgh Chemistry Department. Designed to give guidance in all aspects of the technique to both begin« ners and! experienced operators, it packs a:' truly remarkable amount, of information in- i to the slim space between its covers. It is : true that this makes for a rather dense preliminary theoreticall treatment, and the' initiate wishing fully to understand the in-: tricate kinetics of dispersion in packed co- lutnns will probably, need'to consult earlier: and longer texts. Nevertheless, the larger,; practical part of the book gives a com- prehensive account of the present state of the art andl is admirably suited to the needs of the practising; liquid chromatograaher.. Much of the instruction is imparted' in, heuristic fashion in the illustrative ex- periments of the last and longest chapter, but is none the worse for that. ~ Toxicology I Biochemistry andl pathology of mycotoxins I Edited by K Uraguchi and'M.Yamazakil New York: Wiley 1978' . Pp viii + 288, £19:50. ISBN 047025423 3 ... .: I... Japanese scientists have been at the' forefront of much of the work oni mycotoxins. Unfortunately, not all of their work has been published' in journals readily available to EngGsh language scientists. Recently, at the; fifth International Congress of' Sood~i Science and Technology, it' was' reported that less than one thir& of theJapanese journals in this area were abstracted in, either Chent: Abstracts or' Fd Sci: and' Technology Abstracts. For tltese and many other reasons, this book' should be given, a warm welcome by alll, food scientists and toxicologists.
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.. . S ABSIMcTJ tobacco Rr:porter' May 1979 p. 12. Output of'smo,lcingi tobacco at record low ' In 1978, for the first time on record, United! States output of; smoking tobacco dropped below ~ 40 million pounds. Production i of pipe and roll-your-own tobac-s cos amounted.to 3'6.4 million,pounds for the year, or 10.6 per- cent eent less than in 1977. . ~' Domestic sales showed an,, even more marked decline of ' 12.4 percent totaling 35.2 mil-' lion pounds. Export _ sales, al- though they represent little more than 2 percent of total production, finished the year' with an 8 percent gain over last year's total. Nature May 24, 19;7'9 vo 279, p. 349 ASBESTOS-ENHANCED UPTAKE CARCINOGENS Light, W. G: : THE results of Lakowicz and Hylden`s;, studies' on asbestos-mediated' uptake of ": benzo(a)pyrene(BP) by dipalmitoyl L-a- phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles are more indicative of in vivo transfer of BP' from particulates to lung surfactant (mainly DPPC'and other phospholipids')~. than transfer of' BP' from particulates to' biological membranes (mainly phos-i pholipids and globular proteins'). As a; mnomoleeular layer of surfoctant, containing DPPC exists at the air-liquid" interface im the lung, BP adsorbed onto' inhaled particulates would be at least partially transferred to lung surfactant before transfer to cell membranes would' be initiated., { Vnl '. Q. iln. R.. .I11mF 72'. ' N7y 1 Tobacco Rr:porter .~ May 1979 p. 44 U. S. POS'ITZON' INI WORLD TOBACCO TRADE ,~ latest analysis from the U.S. Department of Agriculture:. The United States is thel world's leading tobacco ex-: porter and the third~ largest im- porter. During 1960-64'„ about 30 percent of the U.S'' tobacco,' crop was exported. . / . : here does the U.S! stand in,. .; the competitive world of, ;< tobacco trade?' Here's the' Vinyl chloride and PVC manufacture Process and environment Marshall Sittig I, New Jersey: Noycs Data 1978 Pp viii' + 350, S45, ISBN 0 81,55 0707 0". The book is organised in two parts Rather more than half is devoted to the manufacture of ethylene dichlorid'e,, vinyl chloride and' the polymer. The restt is concerned with environmental.: problems and control in the industry. It provides a review basedl on a search, through the US patent literature,', but adds little to what is already known and has been described in earlier publications in so far as manufacture is~ concerned. One has the impression that~ the review has been carried otiEl by an author who brings little personal involvement into the subject he describes, and thus there is minimal critical evaluation ofi the extracts of the patents quoted. The treatment of environmental problems of health hazards associated with the monomer does deal with material' that has not been sq well documented so far. But again it does so! in an, uncriticall way. Moreover, it' manages to discuss the diseovery, of the' carcinogcnic effects of the monomer and' the reactions to that discovery as though it was a domcstic issue within the US; another illustration of the limiiation of' basing a book on the US patent literature. I ' M Kaufratan. `I I a.
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0 ABSTRACTS American Laboratory II May 1979 p. 59 A SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE GC/ZRI' Rossiter, Val S Pt CIFI'C DETECTORS for gas! chromatography have been; developed to meen partic-' ular problems of identification, and estimation. S'uchi detectors are, of course, of great impor-; tance in many areas of anaiysis. ' However, a, problem of identifi- cation remains which occurs gen- erally throughout, the many and various application areas of gas chromatography. This problem arises whenever a GC peak occurs; - with an unknown identity: Some-- times the unknown can be identi- fiedl quickly if a list of possible identities exists and! if suitable. reference standards are available. Under these conditions the prob- lem can be satisfactorily solved within the scope of gas chromato- graphy itself. However, if very, little background information is available about the possible iden- tity of the peak, or if the neces- sary reference samples are not readily available, the problem be- comes intractable in terms of GC', as an isolated technique. C &' E News -May 21, 1979' :: v. 57, , no. 21, p~. 12 SACCHARIN ISSUE HANDED BACK TO CONGRESS _ • I NAS committee on food, safetyl tell's Congress that saccharin. is carcinogenic but it is not up to scientisYs-to decide on the compound's continued use I I Tobacco Reporter May 1979, v. 106, no. 5, pi. 34 KEEPING ON TOP OF THE CROPS; iWM;-p~z. .''7 al ~~ , ,l%fw4~ og~ i ~;..~. .- ..~ "Mc~ ~ i .ti ir-41Z~rl . N
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. ABSTRACTS~ 79-0754. Banks, K J.; Desmarchelier, J: M. (Div. En- tomll CSIRO, Canberra, Australia) New chemicaP appro- aches to pest control in stored' grain+ Chern. Aust 45(8): 276-281; 1978. (26 references) A review is presented'of recent chemical and physico- ; chemical research in the area of pest eontrol'1 of stored grain. ~ Malathion, pyrethrum, carbaryl; and dichlorovos are among the pesticides mentioned. The influence of water vapor,,tem-' perature, and moisture content on pesticide breakdown is dis- cussed, along with intergranular phenomena. The current status of control in the Australian grain industry is summa-: rized. BLl`N„J.M:; NICKELL„w.T.; HENSON, W.H.; wALTONi b.R. Evaluation of the potential for measuring the" moisture,content of burley tobacco during marketing. ii Ky. Agric. Exp. Stn., Lexington. Annu. Rep. 90s17j1977. 1 The objective was to determine, through,laboratory tests, how density, density distribution, leaf arrangement,; temperature and quality of, tobacco influence moisture; measurement in loose leaf packages of tobacco, Initial results from electricali measurements at ratio frequencies (10' Khz to 50 mh) indicated that density of l leaf packing - Increases dielectric constant andl loss factor linearly.:; Tests are being conducted to determine effects of tempera- ture. These data will be used in the desigp of a portable: moisture meter which is sensitive to tobacco moisture. content only and, also, will give accurate measurements for a wide range of package density and temperatures which may be,encountered during marketing. 846, Tobacco Reporter May 1979 p. 46 I, CROPQUP:II,ITY--,BY T13E,BOOK, ow, important is U.S. crop`' ~~ qualit'y in maintaining a strong position in world markets? It's everything. And agricultural officials in North Carolina plan to hammer that, point home. ~ . The North Carolina Agricul- tural Extension Service is stressing the importance of quality in, maintaining world markets for the state's billion-` dollar flue-cured tobacco crop, Approximately 30,000 copies of a leaflet, "Quality Sells North, Carolina Tohacco,"' are being, distributed to growers through ~' county extension offices. . Wor_: 91. 110. 8'. JuHE 221, -1979;: Tobacco Reporter.. May 1979 p. 14' Industrial Nucl!eoniics debuts control and inforrnation system Industrial Nuclleonics has in-' troduced the AccuRay 7000 Micro system, a new, microprocessar-based controf and information system,ZJsing digital technology with built•in self diagnostics, the system provides data at the manufac*j' turing machine. i According to John DeWltt,: vice president and general man.-` ager of the Tobacco Industry Division, the AccuRay 700C1I Micro employs several micro-, processors in a shared memory architecture. This enables thee system to perform, control, sequencing and analytical' func+ t'ions effectively. Chemistry and Industry I April 21, 1979' pi. 264 l' METHYLCHLOROFORM MAY ENDANGER THE OZONE LAYER The commercial degreasing and' cleansing' solvent, methylchloroform,,may represent a.. threat to the ozone layer, according to Professor F.Shenvood Rowland! and' his colleagues at the University of California, Irvine. It was work by Professor Rowland and his colleague Mario, Molina that led to the United States and Sweden imposing s bans on the use of certain fluorocarbons as propellants in aerosols. Now Professor Rowland has recommended to the US Environmental Protection, Agency that it should remove mcthyichlbroforms from its Iisr of 'exempt' solvents, and the agency is taking the recommendation seriously.
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41L ABSTJAcTsJ MCDANIEL, Cad D. " ' 65818'00973 ; bfarLcting an iitegrated approarJt l' Carl McDaniel. Jr. New York : Harpcr & Rnw, 0979. uiv, 544 p. : ill: ; 24 cm. Inchides biblioarephical references and tndtxcs HF5415.1.~13J 78-23830 ISBN 0-06-044355•3 : 1 '95 i 1.' alartering-United States. ?. :lfarteting I • llnited States-Case studiet l. Titla BURTpv, Dee. ` " 613:8'S ~ The joy of quitting : how to help youne people stop smoking /' Dee Burton and' Gary V1Fah1: 1st' Collier Books ed. New York : Collier Books. 1979. pc cm. Discusses the reasons why people smokc, the physical effects of smoking, and ways of aiving up the habit. (HY5745:B8 1979bj 19+1 40t6 : 4.95 1. , Smolvn-t and youth: I Cigarette habit. 11 Wohl, Gary joint author. 11. Title Ill. 7itler How to h'elp~ young people stop smoting. ( I - 1GVSTRW.tifF,WTA77ON & 628.8'31 control systems engineering handbook' / by the' '" editors of Instrumentation technology. 1sC ed'.' Blue Ridge Summitt,, PA. : Tab Books, c1978. 432 p. : iIL ; 22 cm. Iticludes bibliographical «ferences and index rr]213.154J1 78-11391 ISBN 0-8306.9867-1 : 19.95 1 1: Automatic control. Z. Measuring instrumentx;'• .6' Systems engineenng 1. lastrumentation: technology. . I DAY, Robert A:, 808'.066'4021 . 1924- ` flow to write and publish a scientifc paper /{ Robert A: Day. Philadelphia : ISI Press, e1979.' p em. Includls index. Bibliography: p. (T11.D33); 79-12467 ISBN 0,89495-008-8 : 15.00. ISBN 0-1 99495-006-1 pbk.: 8!95' 1: Technical writind 1' Trt/a PHYSICAL methodsin modem 543 chemical analysis / edited by Theodore Kuwana. New York : Academtc Press,,1978- v. : ill. ;, 24 cm. lhcludes bibliogra phies and index. JQfl75.2:P39j 77-92242 ISBN 0-12-430801~5 v.l ) : 33.00 G Chcmistry,Analytia 1. Kuwani Theodore. PRYDE, Andrew. 543':08' Applications of hig h performance liqpid chromatography / A. Pryde and! M. T: Gilbert. London : Chapman and i Hall ; New York : Wiley : distributed tn, U.S.A. by Halsted Press, 1979.' xii, 255 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. lneludes biblioara hical' references and indexes. (QD79:C454P79p 79.1[ • 7950 ISBN 0-470-26408-X :, 29.95 I 1. Gquid ' chromstography. L. Gilbert, Mary T.,' joint author. !1. Tida I ? HIGH performance mass 543 .083 spectrometry : chemical applications : a: mpostum / co-sponsored by the University of i gebraska- Lincoln ._ fer al.j I;)+9ichael L Gross, ! editor, Washin_aton : hmerican Chemical Soci, ~ 1978:, ix, 358P.: i11J : 24 cm. (ACS', symposium : series ; 70 ISSN 0097.61561)Ilncludes: bibliographies and index. (QD9b.M3H53J 78-789 i ISBN 0-8412-0422-5 : 28.b0. 1 Mass spectrometry-Coneresses I' Gross,l Michael L.. lL L'nirrrsuv of tiebraska-Lincoln; III. Series: American Chemical Society. AICS' symposium serirs ; 70. ~ GRAL•DEL, TC E. 531.5'1 Chemical compounds in the atmosphere / T. E. Graedd. New York : Academic Press, 1979. p,:, cm. Includes index. Bibliography: p: (QC879.6.G73J 78-12264I ISBN 0-1,2-294480-1 : 19.50, 1. Atmospheric chemistry 1.' Titla j, Y ,
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0 BSR AIACTSJ American~ Review of Respiratory I Disease ! May 1979' ~ .v. 119, no: 5, p. 717' CHANGES IN THE FORCED EXPIRATORY; SPIROGRAM' IN! YOUNG MALE' SMOKERS i Walter, S'. et al I Forced' expiratory spirograms and pcak cxpiratory, flow were mcasured irr 102 resident male ', medical studcnts (G0inonsmokcrs and 42 smokers). Forccdivital capacity; forced expiratory voliime . in 1 sc4 forced cxpirrtory rolume in I sec expressed as a percentage of forced vital ¢apaeity; forced' expiratory , flows between 80 aud, i0-pcr ccnt, bctu•ccn 55 and 45 per cenrt, bett.ecn 30 and 20 pttr, cent, and between 1;i and 5 per cent,of the forced vital capacit?; forced! expiratory time,for the last0!:i litcr of',thc forced vitalicapacity; and maximal mitl1 expiratory flbw-were determined from thc forced expi'ratoryspirogt•am. • i Peak expiratory flotr; all'forcetllexpitatory flows (excoptthe forced expiratory volume in I sec).~ and the ratio of forccd, expiratory volume in li sec to forced vital capacity were significantly lotecr, and for,ced expiratory time for the 1ast0.5 liter of the forced vital capacity was significantly highcn in the heavy smokers (thosc who had smoked a lifetime total of more than 10;000'cigarettcs) than the nonsmokers. The light smokctn (tho.e who had, smoked a lifetime total of fewer than 10,000 cigarettes) i had values bctwcen those of the nonsmokers and the heavy smokers. Thus; r, d'cfinitc dosc-relatcd response to smoking «•as sccn. Flows at lower lung volumes showed greater! percentage changcs thatt flotis at hiii;ltcr 1'ung columes. Thc forccd expiratory flow between 30'and 20 per cent of the forced vital capacity, was the mosn sensitive test for detectiitg abnormality in smokers. Among heavy smokers. 58 per cent had abnormally low forecd' expi'ratory, flow bettreen 30 and 20 per cent of the forcedl%itul capacity, whereas only 47 , per centi had abnormally, low ratio,, of forced expiratory, volume in 1 sec to forced vital capacity, and 32 percent had abnormally low " maximal mid-expiratory, flow. The results show thaoeccn subjects with shorrsmoking histories may, have changes in pulmonary function that, prohabty rcflc~et narrotriiin of small airways. Moreover, these changes can easity, be dctected'bl•, simple tests, such as evaluatiou of a forced expiratory spirogram. American' Revi:ew of Respiratory Disease May 1979, v. 119, no. 5, p. 707 ELASTIC RECOIL OF'THE LUNG IN CIGARETTE SMOKERS: THE EFFECT OF NEBULIZED BRONCHODILATOR AND CESSATION OF SM(jKING' Michaels, Roger et al ~ The mechanical properties of'tlte lung, forccd ritall capacity, llote+vol'ume relationships„lung vol-~ umc„and single-brcatlt N2 curve were dctcrmincd irr 16 nonsmokers and 19 smokers. Pulmonaryi clast'ic rccoil'. Pst, (l)+ was significantly lower at all'hung,eolutncs, as wcrc flow parameters, whercas Iltng,rolumec were higher in smokers of both sexes. The variables dt•rivcd from forced vital capacity' and single-brcath t2 were significantly different front nonsmokcrs' in male, smokcrs;, but not in femalt smokcrs. The inhalation of nebulized brouchodilhtoi: was attended by a significant de- crease in Psc (l) and ut upstreami flow resistance in smokers. After cessation of smoking Pst (l) decreased to calues similar to those seeuI after bronchodilator administration, whereas resumption of smnking led to recersll of'the prussurc-t•oliune curve. The data suggest that the elastic properties of the lunss: are altered in cigarette snuokers, but the extent of the disturbance is masked by con- strictiim of:the alveolar,ditcts or peripheral airways tishiltr smoking;,and,that these arc unmasked by i theadministrationiofncliulizcd bronchocfilatori orby'cessatiorcof smokina:
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ABSTRACTS_j American Review of' Respiratory Disease May 1979 v. 119', no. 5, p, 69'5 CORRELATION BETWEEN THE FUNCTION AND STRUCTURE OF THE LUNG IN SMOKERS Berendi, N. et al To study the relationship~ bett.een morphologic changcs and' alteration of lung function, the excised lobes of 2'1' smokers and one nousmoker who required lobectomy for small peripheral tumors wcre,inFlated,and fixed iu formalirr,and'mcasuremcnts of bronchiolbr narrowing,and de- gree of empltysema were made. All patients had comprehensive pulmonary ' function tests (includ-" ing, diiRusing charactcrist'ics, the single-breath -42 test, measuremcnts of elastic recoil. and flow-; volume measurements with air and hclium) performed before lobectomy;. Eight ofl the lobes excised from the smokets had ctnphysema of giadc 15 or morc; the grcatest being grade 50. Lobes from 11 patients had evidtrncc of airway narrowing. There werrG lobes with both emphysema and airway narrowing, Pulmnnary functiou teas ahnormal imsome aspect in aIl'lobcs except that from: tlie nonsmoker. Whereas the tests of difiusing capacity„ particularly the fractional uptake of CO,,, eorrelatcd a•ith, tlte dcorec of emphpscma: the tests of elastic recoil'w•ere not predictive,of this early dea ce of emphysema. The degree of small-aincay uarrowing correlated with maximal mid:expira-:, tory flow rate and the siuglc,brcath \, test. The maximal flow/static recoil pressure curves s.ere: the mostsensitice indicators ofairx•ay abuormttlity, in the patients with emphysema. 11 American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal June 1979 v. 40, no. 6, p. 504 . I • AGE EFFECT HEARING LEVELS FOR A; ' WHITE NONINDUSTRIAL NOISEIEXPOSED POPULATION (NINEP)~ AND~ THEIR US'E' 1', • IN'IEVALUATING INDUSTR'IAL HEARING~ V CONSERVATION'PROGRAMSI ~ Royster, L. H. et al A'nonindustrial noise exposed population(NINEP) describing age effects for white males and females has been established' that can be used as a reference in evaluating an Industrial noise exposed population (INEP) data base. In making this comparison, it isi desirable to match i the two populations properly with respect to sex, race and age afiaracteristics. Since there presently does not exist an equivalent black NINEP, it is necessary, to first isolate the data representing the black population from the industrial sample. A definite learning curve exists in ind'ustriai'audiometric data bases. with the degree of learning dependent upon the effectiveness of the, hearing conservation program. Therefore. this variation must be considered when attempting to compare the ~I Industrial audiometric testdata with the white NfNEP data base presented herein. WO1:: 9._ 110. &. JUNE' 22LO 0 ~ © ~ wl ~' .
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BSTRACTS~ American Review of Respiratory ' Disease May 1979 .. . :v. 119, no:..5.,,,P. . 741 AN~EP'IDEMIOLOGIC STUDY OF' A GROUP OF TALC WORKERS' ~ Gamble, John F. 'et al Chest roentgcnograms„pulmonary, function assessment by spiromctry, respiratory, symptoms, smok- ,• ing! history, and occupational history by questionnaire were obtaincd'Erom 121 male,talc mincrs and' millers exposed to talc containing tremolitc and anthophyllite asbcstiform fibers. Ninety-three oB the employees had'a•orked in talc only at the plant under study. Symptoms were only sligHtly, more preealcnc in ta16, trorkers when compared to potash miners. ilfcau pulmonary function (forced- expiratoryvolume in one sec, forced vital capacity„and maximal,expiratory flow aa 50 and 75 per cent of vital capacity) of talc workers was significantly decreascd' in comparison to that of' potash, miners. The prevalence of pleuraTcalcification and pucumoconiosis in talc workers with 15 or more years of employment was higher than in potash miners: The prevalence of I pleural thickening was 31 per cent in those who .rorked more than 15 years and was significantly increased as compared to that in potash mincrs. Workersuith plcural, thickenino had dccrcased,pulmouaty fuuction in com- parison tothosrwho did nnn Decreascdione-sec forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity were associated with exposure to respirablc particulate,and asbestiform fibers. ~ American Review of Respiratory Disease May 1979' no 119 5' v 77'9 .. , . R P• ~ ISOELECTRIC'ANALYSIS OF RESP2RATORY' MUCUS FROM NORMAL RATS AND RATS' EXPOSED TO TOBACCO SMOKE Dalhamn, Tore Pirai, Ulla Various functions of the pulmonary defense meehanism, such as ciliary beat and mucous transpor- , tation, and free lung cells have tieen studicd in many experiments. The protein composition of tlu. bronciiiai mucus and its viscosity, however, have beenithe subjects of few investigations. We hace, used au isoclectric Focusing technique for protcin scparation and estimated a total error of mcasurc. ment (variation between animals and residual error) to compare the bronchial mucus of normal control rats and' rats exposed, to tobacco smoke. Significant differences in the composition of the, mucus were found; in addition, the compositiorrof serumidiR~ered in some respects. The isoelectrici focusiiig technique can be useful for:proteinanalysis ofbrouchial mucus. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal June 1979 v. 40, no. 6, p. 512 MONITORING PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO' ETHYLENEDIAMINE IN THE OCCUPATZONAL'I ENIUIRONMENT I . Vincent, W. J. et al A method for monitoring exposure to ethylenediamine (EDAj in -the occupational'', environment is dt3scribed'. The EDA is adsorbed on activated silica gel, desorbed!with 0.5 pereentaqueous cupric chloride, and analyzed by gas chromatography using a 2 percent KOH on a Chromosorb 103' column. The method lis sensitive to 200 µg/mt. EDA and can detect 1.0' ppmv EDA in samplesxollected for 4.5 hours at a 300 cc per minute flow. Th4 method has been evaluated in the laboratory and underplant conditions Other amines do .,. '' . __ . . not interfere with the determination of'EDA.
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.• AESTRAC1S Industrial Research/Development June 1979 p. 105 A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE, WITH IMAGE ANALYSIS AND AN X-RAY SPECTROCHEMICAL ANALYZER, PROVIDES RAPID LOCATION, SIZING, AND' CHEMICAL IDENTIFICATION OF PARTICLES BY ELECTRON-BEAM PARTICULATE ANALYSIS Lee, R. J. et al THE DEVE1.OPttENTofeconomically feasible' strategies. that would permit individual states or local communities to meet National' Ambient Air Quality Standards:.(NAAQS) for, particulate matter (maximum annual' average : < 75' µg/m') has been: hampered by a lack of information. The missing piece of informa-• t'ton was & direct measure of'the effect of individual particulate sources on air quwality. ; The NAAQS are based on measured con-~ centrations~ of total suspended particulates ~_ (the TSP, is the annual' geometric mean con- I centration). Enforcement of these stand'ards';, requires identification and control of spe-~'~ .cific sources of airborne particulates., Both ~. traditional sources, such as smoke! stacks,J' and non-tradit4onal sources, such as road ~. dust, can have a~ significarit impact on air~ quality. Emission inventories, and mathematical; models of particulate transport and deposi-I tion have been widely used to predict source ; contributions to measured TSP values. But until' now, experimental data germitting~ verification of such models have been un-' avdilahle. Numerous researchers have at-' tempted to use electron microscopy for this, purpose. They have only limited success be-. cause of a.lack of automation. Eroiution of the procedure. Now a new technique,,combining;meteor-: ology with automated scanning electron' microscopy permits direct measurement of~ the size, shape, and composition ' of indi-- vid'ual particles collected from ambient-air', samples, as well as, assignment of these I particles to their "most prnbable'" source. `' . Vot_': 9, _.IJo. 8, JOE 2 Nature ' _ June 7', 1979 v. 279, p. 462 : COMPUTERS LOSE ON THE SWINGS AND • THE ROUNDABOUTS Dickson, David NrxT Saturday, half a million~ members' ,f of the Communication Workers of! America~ are holding a national "Job Pressures Day" to protest at the : way, in which automation is dehumanising g working conditions. No one will stop work, the intention is to draw, public; attention to the issue through in-'! formational' picketing and other activi-: „ ties under the general slogan "we are' people: not machines''.i The action is claimed to~ be un-' precedented for a major US union,, most of which keep strictly to~the con- ventional issues of' wages and working hours. But, it heralds a trend within the US labour movement': which, fuelled'; by evidence that automation may; finally be resulting in the unemploy- ment previously predicted' but un- realised,, promises to grow substan3ially over the next few years. i Evenl without these new complaints about working conditions, the man- power implications of computers-a subject of hot debate in the late 1950s' and 1960s, but one that subsided as. economic prosperity cushioned any'; significant impact-are: once, again causing serious concern in policy- making, circles: ' On the one hand, support is declin-'' ing for experimental computer science im US universities, and, attracting good staff and students has become a, prob-; lem. As a! result, there are not enough qualified graduates for industry's needs. ' Many computer companies now face; major difficulties in recruiting staff and have: expressed', their concern to the: Office of' Science and Technology! Policy. / . .1 0
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0 S APThAcTSi Analytical Chemistry June 1979 v. 51, no.-..7. p. 741 A PRACTICABILITY IN REGULATORY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY ..- . , •, ~, ' It will probabNy, eome as a sliock even to veteran bureaucrats that the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act„ ..-R:,: d. 1 i contains a provision requiring that the :, government be practical inlits applica- 'tion of analytical methods. Section '. ''S07; the amendment establishing,the certification of antibiotics, directed theSecretary_to "prescribe only such tests and methods of assay as will pro- -' vide for certification or rejection with- in the shortest time consistent with the purposes of this section." These purposes are safety and efficacy of the, finalldrug preparationi Almost 550 ' pages of the latest' edition of the Code • of Federal Regulations are devoted to certification of about 60 antibiotic • !substances; most of the pages contain : analytical procedures (1). bfanyof the-; assayrequirements are microbiologi- cal, and nowhere in the compilat'ion. has anieffort been made to define "shortest time."'Apparentljr, both government and" industry agree that. they do not yet know how to hasten .11 Nature's timetable. • . . Industrial Research/Development June 1979 p. Cl SPACE PROGRAM PROVIDES POCICET- SIZED GC . Ah+'OTHER' SPIh'-OFF benefit from 1 the space age soon to becoir'ne avail- ~ able is a pocket size gas chromato- f graph that can "sniff' the air for po- ~, tentially dangerous vapors. Stanford University electronic I~ engineers expect to deliver half ailll dozen prototypes of the deviee l,within a year to the National'i Insti- i, tute for Occupationali Safety and ; Health, (NIOSH). After thorough ' testing of the prototypes, the way wilLbe clear for final miniaturization and mass production of'the device. Vnl : 4. I'Jni. (81. .IumiF 22 , .1J79, Analytical Chemistry I June 1979 ~ :.:v. 51, no. 7. p. 682 A, -. LC/MS COUPLING' i Arpino, Patrick J. Guiochon, Georges Unlike the wellLestablished tech. ~ ' nique of combined gas chromatogca- phy/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), combined liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/1V1S) is still in infancy. Widelydiffering,methods are , currently being,suggested'to achieve the coupling,of'the two methods (1-4). A fewexperimental prototypes were, assembled I in the early 1960's in Stock-I hol'tn, Eindhoven, and Moscow, but the technological problems could not be entirely overcome at that time. Thus, no results were reported in the literature. LC/MS had an effective be- ginning in 1973-74 with publication I of the results obtained in the laborato«s ries of E. C. Horning, F. W. MeLaff- II erty, and R.P.W. Scott. Recently,, ~' other groups have investigated this j ; costly and difficult'researeh topic and have suggested improved devices or I new interfacing methods. At least four instrument companies (VG, Finnigan, : Hewlett-Packard, and Ribermag) offer commercial LC/MS accessories. i LC/MS is now a reality, and promising', developments are expected to appear j very shortly. In this REPORT a review ; of the technology currently available i' is presented'~al'ong with some of'the new trends being aetivelyy investigated'`' byseveral'research groups in different; countries. C & E News June 4, 1979 v. 57, no. 23', p. 24 I .5 RESEARCH SOLVING BODY''S DETOXIF'S.'ING SYSTEM I Fox, Jeffrey L. P-450' enzymes rival the ~ I ~. immune system of the body in N comple xity and may explain ' Cj h t h i dio i ~~ ns suc ow ox as x n i`° exert~ their effects
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a ABSTRACTS] Industrial Research/Development!' June 1979 p. 129, . ~ TROUBLESHOOTING LABORATORY FUME' HOODS' I II Graham, James D. RANDOM SA`fPLINC.and evaluation, of in='' stalled laboratory fume hoods has revealed; that' about 75% of the tested units are operat-' ing,with face velocities of'less than 0.5 mLs: (1'00 fp m)Ta generally accepted standard ' Andi almost half of these-~-about 35% of the' hoods tested-wouldicreate hazardous work-~ ing conditions when used for anything.but: the most innocuous flsmes and gases. I ' Government rules and- recently-issued standlyds have caused a, new awareness of proper fume hood function. OSHA, the: American Conference of Governmental In-' dustrial Hygienists, the National Fire Pro-tectionAssociation,,and others all have made statements relative to laboratory fume hood - design and performance. Fume hood users are expressing concern over safety and are requesting, testing and certification of safe: and proper performance. I Analytical Chemistry June 1979 I v. 51, no.7, p. 967 I NEGATIVE ION ' CHEMICAL IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY IN THE ~I DETERMINATION OF'COMPONENTS IN ~' ! • ES'SENT IAL OILS Bruins, A. P. ( The OH- Ion generated from, a mixture ot N20 and CH, in a CI source abstracts a protonfrom oxygenated terpenes. With some exceptions, the [M - H]` ion is sufficientiy, sstable and observed withia high relative abundance. Nucl'eophiiic dis-' placement by the OW ion produces carboxytate Ions from terpene esters, giving Information about the acid part of the ester. The relative amounts of loss of water from the [M -. ll Ions of carveol stereoisomers are rationalized in view of their stereochemical eonfigurations: The spectra of unsatu- rated terpene hydrocarbons are complicated by'ion-moiecuie reactions of their [M - H J,- Ions with N2O. Analytical Chemistry ' June 1979 v. 51, no. 7, p. 1085 SEMI-MICRO TUBE METHOD FOR CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND Himebaugh, Ronald R. Smith, Michael J. Through chemical and biological oxidation, organic material' released to receiving,waters can greatly reduce or deplete dissolved oxygen. There have been several methods developed to measure this oxygen demand' and two, the Biochemical' Oxygen Demand (BOD) test and the Chemical Oxygen De- mand (COD) test, have emerged as the most popular, (1, 2)1 While the BOD determination closely approximates the actual oxygenidemand present' under sample conditions, the COD determination measures that portion of organic matter present' that can, be oxidized by a strong chemical oxidant. Iliicroprocessors•and Microcomputers,, Branko Soucek-; john Wiley and Sons, New York; 607 pages; $25.95. This ; volume is written as a guidebook to the application, pro-l gramming„ and interfacing techniques common to all mi- ~ croprocessors. It concentrates om detailed descriptions of' representative microprocessor families and, includes ex- planation planation of digital codes, logicali systems, and micropro- ' cessor organization. The basics for design, and' use of l microprocessor-oriented systems are surveyed, and new. microprocessors and special purpose microsystems are ' covered. Illustrations, programs, interfacing examples,:, and problems for exercises support the author 's treatment. ~ The Minicomputer in the Laboratory With Examples Using the PDP-11, Jlames W. Cooper. John Wiley and Sons,, New York; 365 pages; $20.95. Detailing the use of the minicomputer for the acquisition and analysis of labo- ratory data, this book describes the prograrQming of minicomputers in language understandable to the begin-: ner. Examples and' problems take you through each phase l, of the programming language: The book also covers the~ use of the computer as a tool for data acquisition andl processing, and' includes a thorough discussion of signal averaging, spectrum display, plotting, and peak picking. A full description of the Fourier transform as implemented in a minicomputer is featured. 0 • ~ O F+ W GD O C Wnl : tl. _Iln. ~~. a1lw'lF 2".'1~~~ '
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0 . 0 ABSTRACTS~ Cancer Research June 19'7 9' - v. 39, p. 2155 OZONATION OF MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC ALKYLATING'AGENTS, PESTICIDES', AFLATOXIN Bl, AND BENZID'INE IN WATER' Caulfield, Michael J. et al selected The effect of' ozonation on the mutagenicity ofd chemicals in water was determined. The use of the Salmonella-; microsome assay for mutagenesis allowed kinetic studies to be performed on the ozonation of all chemicals tested. The results~ - Indicate that the mutagenicity of' certain i pesticides, including' captan and'Oexon„was inactivated by short periods of ozona- tion. tion. The mutagenicity of certain alkylating agents including bis(2-chloroethyl)amine and sodium azide was rapidly inacti-: vated' by ozonation while other alkylating agents such as /3-; propiolactone„ propanesultone. and N-methyl-Nf-nitro-N-nilro-~ soguanidine were unaffected by treatment with ozone. The ' mutagenicity of aflatoxin B, was rapidly inactivated by treat-; ment with ozone. Three chemicals were shown to be converted; to direct mutagens by ozone treatment. Under certain condi-, tions; dimethylhydrazine could be converted to a mutagen, that was stable for 3 weeks. A similar chemical;, 2-hydroxyethylhy-" drazine. was converted to'an unstable mutagen!that~ was inac-~, ; tive after 24 hr at 'room temperature. When benzidine wasr. treated'with ozone, there was a transient increase in mutagen-I icity which was lost after Ibnger treatment with ozone. Journal of Chromatography -May 11 1979 , 173 no 1 127 I , P. ,, ANALYSIS OF NICOTZNE,AS A TRICHLOROETHYL~CARBAMATE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ELECTRON-CAPTURE ~ " DETECTION Hartvig, Per et al - I Nicotine was subjected to reaction at 90' with trichi'oroethyl chloroformate in the,presencrof pyridinc to form a carbamte in which the pyrrolidine ring was opened. Upon heat treatment, this carbamate partially formed I the corresponding okfin. A:boun 10 pg could be detected' with an clectron-capture detector and' 60 pg with an,alkali llame-ionization detector. i The extraction was studiedlwith"C-labellcdinicotine: Alethylenc chloride was' suitable for extraction from dilutcd plasma, whereas toluenc containing 5, of hepta- fluorobutanol was used!in a retxtraction step and also as the chloroformate reaction medium. i I Due to a nicotine blank the limit for quantitative determinations was 10 ng/ml'' in plhsma (sample volume I ml). N-n-Propylnornicotine was uscd as an internal ~ standard. The precision at the 30 ng(tnl'levcl was f 8.8 %(n = 7). Ur7i fl(1. 8. JUtJE 22'. * 19791 Journal of' the Association~ of .. O'fficial Analytical Chemists ~. May 1979 v. 62, no. 3, p.. _58'6 ..'. :~., HIGH PRESSURE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHI :'DETERMINATI=OF AFLATOXINS' IN CORN' Pons Jr., Walter A. ` A high pressure liquid chromaiographic' (HPLC) method' is proposcd for determining, aflatoxins in corn. The sample is extracted with mcthanol!-10% t\aCl (4+1), pigments arc prc.:d eipitatcd with zinc acetate, and the extract is cleaned up on a small (2 g) silica, gel column. Aflatoxins in the purified extract are resolved by normal phase HPLC' on a, tnicroparticulate (10 µm), silica gel column with, water-saturated ehlloroform-c.•elohexane-aeetonitriie solvent,,and detected by fluorescence on a silica gel-packed flowcell. The method was compared, with chlbroform•water extraction of' the olTiicial CB method, on, 15 samples off' contaminated corn. ' In 5 of the 6 samples containing aflatoxins B1t B'Z„ G1, and G:,, inethanol-10i'a 1NaCl extracted more aflatoxin than did cloroform-water, as measured both by HPLC and by thin layer chra* matogr•rphy^., In samples containing only Bl and BZ: the 2 extraction sol!venta were virtually equivalent. Agreement was good between HPLC, I and TLC for each extraction solvent. Average; recovery of aflatoxins Bl, B_, Gy, and' Gz, added to Xellow, cornmcaliat 3 levels was 190%. Tobacco Reporter May 1979 _p. 12'i RJRsells. Aromatics International -)J- R. J. R'eynoldsIndustries,'.! Inc. has agreed to sell the assets of Aromatics International, Inc:'' to Universal! Frabrance Corp. ; Aromatics President Kim Keiser pointed out the sale of the flavor and fragrance com- pany located in Marietta, Geor- gia, did not include the* com. pany's Avoca Division, an' agricultural and processing operation in North Carolina. I
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Cancer Research June 1979 v. 39, p. 1980' COMPARATIVE METABOLISM OF ' -BENZO WPYRENE' INi ORGAN AND CELL ~ CULTURES DERIVED FROM RAT TRACHEAS Cohen, Gerald M. et al ~-• I Primary cuitures from tracheal explants and a nontumori- genic tracheal' epithelial cell line (2CI), derived from 1,2~-0- •tetradecanoyiphorbol-13-acetate+exposed tracheal explants, metabolized benzo(a)pyrene to qtralitatively similar organicsol- vent«soiubie and water-soluble metabolites. Similar metabolites were formed by short-term organ cultures of tracheas. In con- trast, a tumorigenic tracheal epithelial cell line (1I000' W) did . not metabolize benzo(a)pyrene to any significant extent. The major metabolites formed by these different tracheal systems were 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyreneI withismaller amounts, mainly as their giucuronide conjugates,; of 7',8-dihydro-7,8~dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, 3-hydroxy- benzo(a)pyrene, and 9-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene. The higher formation of dihydrodiois, precursors of' highiy reactive diol- epoxides, relative to monohydroxybenzo(a)pyrenes, together; with low rates of d'etoxification of the dihydrodiols by eonju-i gation, may in part explain the high susceptibility of the trachea. to carcinogenesis. This study indicates that nontumorigenic respiratory epithe-'; lium at different levels of organization possesses similar acti-, vating and detoxifying enzymes. Since it is the balance of these oxidative and conjugating enzymes whichi determines how much, of a metabolite is availabie for reaction with critical cellular macromolecules, these systems appear to be suitable for metabolic studies of factors affecting initiation and transfor, - mation of respiratory, tract epithelium. Cancer Research June 1979 v. 39, p. 1934 - POTENT TUMOR-INITIATING ACTIVITY' OF' THE 3, 4-DIHYDRODIOL of' 7,12'- DZMETHYLBENZ(A)ANTHRACENE IN MOUSE SKIN Slaga, T. J. et al I', The abilities of the racemic trans-3,4-, 5,6-„and 8,9-dihydro-'s diois of1 7,12=dimethyibenz(a)anthracene to initiate skintumors In mice were determined by using a two-stage system of'f tumarigenesis. The 7,12-dimethyibenz(a)anthracene trans-~ 3;4-dihydrodiol was found'to be much more active as a tumor, initiator thamthe parent hydrocarbon The 7,12-dimethyibenz-' 2-dimethylbenz- (a)anthracene trans-5;6 and &9-dihydrodiol's were essentially Inactive as skin tumor initiators. Our results suggest that the 3;4-dihydrodiot of 7,1'2-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene is a proxi- mal carcinogen and that the "bay region" diot-epoxide may be the ultimate carcinogenic form of'DMBA. Disease caused by asbestos - 4 ...:~:; Asbestos and Disease. By 1. J: Selikoff ~: and D. H. K. Lee. Pp. 549. (Academic: :. New York, San ff rancisco and London. 1973.) 531.50; €20.45, Dn SEnxor•r• and Dr Lee have at- tempted to provide a comprehensive review of disease caused by asbestos dust "to provide non-specialists with, easily, ccomprehensible and meaningful'. data". With helplfrom many colleagues; at the Mount Sinai School of Medi-: cine, the text ranges widely over asbestos and its production, disease' effects (asbestosis, cancer, pathogenic: mechanisms), and' prevention and con-: trol. "As individuals we naturally have; come to our own conclusions but wec have tried to present the evidence for~ and against the various interpretations so that readers can attempt their owni; interpretations if' they wish." This is a laudable aim, but in at least one most important aspect it does not; seem to have been attempted. Asbestos may be di'vided' into two quite distinct groups: the amphiholes and chrysotile. _ lhdeed the excellent chapter on the nature, occurrence and' properties of asbcstos minerals considers the distinc-' tion in detail. Yet the epidemiological evidence for there being differing bio- logical' effects is largely ignored or skipped over. This epidemiological. evidence was already extensive enough in 1!970 for the UK asbestos regulations to be ten times stricter for crocidolite than for chrysotile. Selikoff and! Lee comment that this is characteristic of' the British evaluation-implying their disagreement-but they do not provide any contrary argument. Tobacco Reporter May 1979 p. 48,, - _ Camel Lights 100's 1 introduced by Reynolds ; R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. introduced a 1i00mm version of Cameli Lights last month. Camel Lights 100's will be the newest member of the Camel family. I s,
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0 ' 0 ABSiAc]is. R ~ Nature. May 17, 1979 • `. v. 27'9, p. '241 CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES DAMAGE DNA INiHUMAN LYMPHOCYTES: THE carcinogenicity of'tobacco tars and smoke in laboratory animals''2 together with epidemiological evid'ence from mann have clearly suggested'that smokingeauses most lung cancer"s. However, other inte T reoations of the epidemiological ievidence : have been proposed and the carcinogens known to occur in' cigarette smoke are present in only minute quantities'. There is: increasing evidence that one prerequisite in the initiation of malignant transformation is an alteration in cellular DNA, andi the findings that most carcinogens react with DNA", that this: reaction necessarily precedes transformation° and, that most' carcinogens are mutagens'n, support the importance of somatic mutation. Two types of visible chromosome changes that result froll damage are gross aberrations and symmetrical sister: chromatid exchanges (SCE)"'1Q, and'. the induction of SCEs. provides a very sensitive indicator of mutagen/carcinogen exposure at concentrations below those whichinormally result in the production, of' chromosomal aberrations"'t''. Cytogenetic Table L Cigarette condensate yields Average " dimensions ot' Tar .. ' cigarette category ot' Length Weight cigarette (mm) (mg) High 70 1.008 Middle, 70 '988 t.ow 83 1,012 (induding -22'-mm filter) Weight of condensate (wet in mg) Butt collected from length 24 cigarettes (mm) smoked together' 20 1~020 20 330 25 270 (including filter) • Each cigarette received, in turn, pulfs of 35'ml lasting z sst a frequeney of once per minute until the desired Ibutt length was reached. studies1b'rb have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in blood lymphocytes of heavy smokers relatiYe to non-smokers; but little"'or not°''" increase in SCEs. Furthermore, produetss mutagenic to bacteria have been isolatedi from the urine of;inhaling smokerst'', and also smokers have a higher incidence of sperm abnormalities than non-smokers20. These studies imply that there may be higher levels of'mutagens in body cells and fluids of smokers than, in, ttiose of' non-smokers, but little is known about the_reaction of cigarette smoke with the DNA of','; exposed human cells, and even ]bss aboucthepossible mutagenic) effeets. Here we report that exposure of human lymphocytes to small quantities of' tobacco smoke condensate leads to thei formation of many DNA lesions that result in sister chromatidi exchanges. Laboratory Handbook of Chromatographic and Alliedi Method's edited by O.Mikes. Czechoslovak'AcademyolSciences, Ptague February 1979 764 pages 0853120803 3 683.95/f38.50 Ellis Horwood V0f •. 91. lJb. 81. JuIriE 221'01' 19791 Nature May 31, 197'9~ v. 279 r p. 360 { SCIENTISTS DEBATE SAFETY OF' T: RESEARCH ON E' COLI STRAIN A szROVC bidl is being made to exempt a, large body of recombinant DNA' experiments using ai disabled strain of Escherichia cali from te iu b h ~ r ac r m e t " the research guidelines laidl down by: the National Institutes of Health. " l ' to the Exemption has been proposed DNA Advaso ~' b ry: tnant NIH's Recom Committee (RAC) 'by Dr Wallace; Rowe, head of the Laboratory of Vitall Diseases at the National' Institute of' Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Dr Allan Campbell, Professor of. Biology at Stanford University The two scientists base their recom- mendation on new information which has recently emerged' on the potential risks of recombinant DNA researeh. ' This evidence, they claimi makes it un-;' reasonable to apply restrictions on most' experiments involving, the cloning of: plasmids inside the 'disabled' E. coli: K-12 strain, over an& above what would normally be considered as safe / laboratory practice. 'Chem2stry and,Industry i April 7, 1979 p. 219 i DON'T SAY BROWN, SAY CANCER,, US SCIENTISTS TELL ACS/CSJ ! MEETING If offered a pizzai with a wery brown, crust,I IIeturn it and ask for another serving!. prepared, under more moderate conditions, I delegates to a major chemicall congress tn, Hawaii were advised earlier this week. ' Reporting their research at a joint American Chemical Society/Chemical' Society of Japan meeting, Wayne T:;. Iwaoka and Elaine H. Meaker of the University of Washington Institute for Food Science and Technology claimed that'food which turned brown on cooking may contain carcinogens. In, recent months several' papers have been published which have established the presence in food cook- ed' at high temperatures - by broiling or frying, for example - a compound which~ gives positive results in the Ames: mutagenicity test. ~ I (
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.` S A.BThAcTS] Industrial Research/Development June 1979 p. 9'9 , .- . BASIC TOOL FOR THE R & D' LABORATORY Princen, L. -H. ,... . PRACTICAL SCANNING ELECTRON' MICROS=' CoPY (SEM) has been available for research' for about 14 years. Striking SEM micrographs have graced1jou'rnall covers, daily newspaper pages, andlphotography exhibitions, as well as scientific publications. Popular subjects have varied from` close-up views of mooR; dust to grotesque mtagniEications of insects.ll lon Chromatographic Analysis of Environmental Pollu- tants, Eugene Sawicki, J. D. Vlulik, and! E. Wittgenstein -Ann Arbor Science Publishers Inc., Ann Arbor, MI; 210 pages; $28. A new technique that permits direct trace analysis of large classes of compounds previously difficult or impossible to analyze i's' examined in this book. This method combines the separations capabil- ity of ion exchange with the sensitivity and universality ofj conductimetric detection. It is capable of microgram to'~ nanogram detection, and the separation of anions'and1cat- ions with pKa or B' less than 7 in aqueous media. Other. possible applications of ion chromatography are dis/i cussed also. ' • GELBOIN, Harry V:,,and TS'O, Paul O. P. (edited by). Polycyclic Hydrocarbons .nd C.ncer, Vol. 2: Molecular anu Cell Biology. Pp:x:i+462. )SBN-0~12-279'02-5'. r.ly...(ne.r York..and London: AcademicPress; rSubsi3iary of'Harcourt-.Brace. Soranovich, Publishers. 1978.) 542; L27.30. .... 1 . BIRCH, Gi G., and PARKER. K. J'. (edited by). Sugar: Science and Technoloa,y. ; Pp:xii+473: ISBN-0-83334-805•7. (London: ADp(ied'Science Publishers, Ltd.,J979.) 1.32. i - 9374 CLAYTON J.K., ANOERSONJ.A., Mac.licoL G,p, Effect of cigarette smoking on sub- I sequent postoperative thromboelnbolicc disease in aynaecologicali patients. Brit. )ned: J., 1978, 2-6134, p. 402. According to a statistical study; cigarette ~ smoking, appears to have aa protective action on postoperative thrombosis of the deep ceins in women operatedl for gynecolo- gicat il'Inesses. Obesity had the opposite effect. Resistance to veinous thrombost's may be a constitutional factor. VoL, 9, 110. 8. JUNE 2'('-,=19~y Coresta 1978', no. 3-4, p. 67; REPORT ON THE COLLABORATIVE EXPERIMENT : ON' THE DETERMINATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE AND' NITRIC OXIDE .t C. JOIGNY INTROOUCTIOi!P e In 1978, 18' laboratories participated in the experiments conducted by the R Gas P!)ase * saib,groc)p: They were divided' into three groups all 'usuig the same type of cigctrette. (85 mm cigarette made of dark tobacco with an acetate filter). . ~ ~ . Erperitnenc A: The influence of the relative hu)nidity (r.h.) of conditionning room atmosphere on carbon monoxide (CO) yield, smoking, being effected' i)r accordance with CORESTA' standards. . Experiment t3 : Tne tnrmence or pulri conditions (duration and volitme, the pe-± riod being maintained at 60 seconds) on, CO yield. . Experiment C' : Comparison of' the results obtained for the determination of nitric oxide (NO) by laboratories each using its own method ; smoking being effected in accordance with CORESTA standards, i N.B, - A given laboratory retains the same code number in the various tables. It may, however, have used two dif ferent machines for determining, !'ilO and CO. 9174 .HowES R.1i1., STEELE R.H. Chemiluminescence of eiparette smoke. s P'hysiol: chcn). phys., 1976, 8-5, p. 417- 28. I The chemilurninescence of' cigarette smoke in the form of aerosols and extracts' of smoke in suspension~ is described. These emissions from aqueous and organic sus-: pensions persist for about 1 hour, are pro-1 ' portional to the oxygcn di'ssolved; have ani energy of at least 1.8' eV and have charac-t teristics . suggesting partial sensibili-r.ation by sin~ulet oxygen.
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0 ABSTRACTSJ z ,.f ..,..1. . I 1978, no. 3-4, p. 50 TECHNOLOGY STUDY GROU;p' MEETING IN'SOFIA -•BULGARIA 1 OCTOBER 2-4 1978 i' Oyt monday October 2, tl:e' meering of the Technology Group was opened under the Chairmanship of J: KttUSZY.SKI. He greered' the >>ery numerous delegates' .` (in fact rnore than 120 delegates were! participating in this meeting) and thankedi our Bidgµrian hosts for all the facilities they had prepared to ensure the meeting ef f icacy. . I During, all the paper presentations, sinuilta- neous translations inm French, English, Bul-i garian and Recssian were operated. i PAPERS' ~ ~ ~ 1 S. Gt:ORGIEV,, S. TODGRI\ov (Bttl,aria),; lblethodi for composing cigarette; blends. W. WocEtNowSKI (Hauni - FRG), iii Improvement of filling, power of cut' tobacco and cigarette firmness by dif-'i ferent processes: I'I 3 N. BASxE.'ITCH, W.A. SELKE (P. Schweit- zer - USA). • l Controli of the burning, rate of tobac-!', co through reconstitution ` 4 A Bo`EVA(Plovdiv - Bulgaria). New indices for cigarette static burn, ing rate. 5, J. FLESSELLES, M. MoRtx (SEITA - Fran- ce). Observations on a continuously operat-~ ing electrical moisture meter in a range of high, moisture levels. 61 S.M. TAYLOR (Imperial Tobacco Some correlations among the results of' different moisture tests. 91r15 I7Da B,, MaTSCZxkI T., S'aNo M. & all (In Japanese) Chemical components of burley tobacco produced by a new. curing process. Sci. Pap: centr. Res. lnst, ylap. Tob.. pub. Co., 1977, 119, p. 1-10 I In the new curing process; the tobacco" leaves which have been yellowed and withered are subjected to mechanicali bruis- ;,.: ing (rolling treatment) and thereby the T browning, reaction of! whole leaves is uni- , formliy promoted. Nicotine content in the "'• leaves from, the new curing process was l almost the same as that in conventionally! air-cured' leaves. Total sugar content in the former was hi'gher than that in the latter. There was no appreciable difference in .. contents of higher fatty acids between the two curing ; systems. Citric acid content ' was lbwer in the leaves from the new pro-• cess, but there was no significant difference: in content of the other non-volatile organic• acids. The contents of' total amino acid+ j' and amides are hi2her in the leaves from ~' the new, process. Itigher contents of'serine; in the leaves from the new, process were i observed. The neutral fraction constituted i about 90 W of the ether extract from theI leaves in both curing systems. There was' no significant difference in amounts of tha I other fractions, except for slightl'y lower amount of acidic fraction in the new pro-I cess. In the acidic fraction of the ether~ extract from the leaves in both processes,l azelaic and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acids were! major components. Most of components; in the acidic fraction were higher with the ;1 conventional process, except for a~ few, com-` ponents such as 4-hydroxybenzoic and 4:oxo+ nonanoic acids which, were lower. Amonq the compounds identified, 10 acids were newly found in, tobacco. They were methoxy- acetic, a-hydroxy-a-methylpropionic; 3.meth- oxypropionic, a-hydroxy-a.-methylbutyric, R- hydroxyisovaleric, dichloroacetic, a-hydroxy- butyric, methylsuccinic, 2methylglutaric and indole-3-carborylic acids The new curing process offered the possibility of producing burley aroma in a short period. ~' From Auu?tors" Englisli Sunrmary.: T H. BRADLEY, C.H. KEITH,, JA. PARICER' f (Celanese - USA). A method for the design of', ventilated cellulose aeetate tow filter-cigarettes.
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. ABSTRACTS] 9191 TAtiCOG\E J., CHOUTEaU L, CAZAaL1J0UR ' F. (In French) Residues left by ' butralinl used as a sucker inhibitor. - I Ann. Tabac, Sect. 2, 1977, 14;, p. 217-231; I Using a method desi;ned' for the rapid quantitative determination of organoch)orinei insecticides in~ tobacco, the authors have• determined the residues left by butralin emplbyedi as a sucker inhibitor, and applied using, various methods. DistAbuted on each: plant, one after the other, in local sprayings restricted to the top of the plant (about, 3,000 g, a.i./ha) butralin is found' in air-cured tobaccos only in slight amount of residues averaging about'I ppm, with higher values for the lower leaves, than for the middle and upper leaves. Butralin, applied' through a spra~~ing boom at rates of 5;000, and 10,000 g. of active matter per ha., results in much more important residues ; they may reach i 30 ppm in the lower leaves. -. ,.~. 9190 TxxcocxE J. (In French) Presence of ergosta•46,& (14) 22=tetraen-3-one and ergosterol in mold infested' tobaccos. ; Ann. Tabac, Sect. 2„ 1977, 14, p:~ 197-204: ErQosta-tetraen-3-one has been isolated in extracts of some dark air-cured tobaccos:' Identification has been obtained by thin, layer chromatography, gas.liquid chromlto-; graphy, ultra-violet absorption spectrophoto.: metry and mass spectrometry. Ergosteroli' has also been identified' in non-fermentcdll tobaccos. These two substances come from. the moulds which sometimes develop at thee base of the midribs during the last staQe, of curing or when the conditions of storage: are defective. Ergosta-tetraen+3-one seems; to be a valuable indicator of the presence, of moulds on tobacco. a 9376 GROENEX ' PJ. Anewtype of N-niltrosadion inhibitor. Proc. 2nd i1,t. Symp. Nitrite Meat. Prod,„ 1976, p. 171-2: 1 ~_P:. 9383 ToLA S., NoRUMa.c C.H. Smoking and blood lead conEen- tt'ations in lead-exposed workers andl an unexposed populationi Environ. Res., 1977, 13-2; p. 2505., _ No correlation was found' between lead concentrations and the fact of smoking in most men in the 4, general population », but a significant increase was established in the case of smokers exposed to Pb at their place of work. This is attributed more to contamination of the hands and ciga; rettes by Pb rather than to the level off this element in smoke. Reduced Pb elimi- nation from the lungs of' smokers is also considered: 9385' V.19I' C.4INTFORT J., GtELM J. ~ (In French) Induction by cigarette smoke of' aromatic hydrocarbon hy- droxylase in the lungs and kidneys. Arch: int. Physiol. Biocl:im., 1976, 84: 2, p. 414-5. This is a review of experiments showing that' the induction of benzopyrene hydroxylase in the lungs and, kidneys of rats and mice by the inhalation of cigarette smoke requires de novo synthesis of' RNA and proteins. Ho.vr ever, two hours after inhalation only protein synthesis is required to maintain the enzyme at the increased levell 9183 SaKU\t8 H:, SH'I\tOJI\lA N.,, SUGAWARA S. (In Japanese) Method for the rapidi determination of formic and acetic acids in cigarette smoke. Sci. Pap: centr. Res. Inst. lap. Tob. pub. Co:, 1977, 119, p. 107,9. ~ ~ s The smoke condensate of 5 cigarettes col: lectedl in a cold trap cooled' with dr ^ ice- acetonc is extracted with 5 mli of 2.5 ?o sodium, bicarbanate, and the extract is' washed with ether and dichloromethane and then dried up under reduced pressure. Twoo mi n_f n.htltnnnl nl_77 ml rsf cnnrNn.rr=.~.al_ •-W I
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r SS _APT!ACT.i 9371 Bbu-rI\ C., CASrAic`E J.P. . • i (In French) Doctors and smoking, { , Rev. Praticien, 1978, 28-19, p. 1479-84. i In France, doctors appear, to smoke as much as the rest of the population, whereas ; in many other countries the smoking, rate of the medical profession has decreased much more than for the rest of the popu- ~ lation. An enquiry carried out in the. Bouches-du-Rhone department of France~ showedi that 76 % of doctors were, or; had been, smokers (50 % active smokers,~ 26 % former smokers) and 24 °io had' never. smoked. One third' of the smokers smoked More than 20 cigarettes per day. The rate varied according to the speciality : hearti specialists smoked' the least, followed by:, lung , specialists, general practitioners and,,, . psychiatrists. Doctors advised their patients; •to stop smokin- in reverse order of force-I fullness - hearl specialists gave firm nol smoking, ad+~ice in 4 cases out of 5, lungi specialists in 3 cases out of 4', general! prac-~ tttioners in 2 cases in 3' and psychiatrtstsl in one case in four. 9217 SaXGl1'.1.,; R.S., CaStEFURT HL „ • Nicotiana tabacum. (In French) Effect of a thermal shock on amino acid content of anthers and pollen grains from Datura metel and, I C.R. Acad. Sci., 1978, 287D, p. 471-4! : . . .: I Followtng a cold, treatment (48 hr at 3°CY of florals buds the total free amino acids: content increased while total bound aminoi acids decreased showing a modification inl the pollen metabolism. The variations in' particular amino acids (threonine-serine combination, glutamic acid; proline and'' Y-A'BA acid) and' their role in androgenesisl are discussed. I' 9187 S'x.t%rntct MLB., DIGr:His G.A., BErthER ~ TLF. & al. ~ ~ Functionalized macroreticular resiim as effective and selective traps for gaseous tobacco smoke constituents.: l: inncromol: Sci:-Clrern., 1977, A111-12, p. 2393-9. Chloromethylated macroreticul'ated! polysty-. rene resins modified by triethy.Ienetriaminee and! chelated with Cu selectively heldi back HCjX (at 80 "o) and volatile aldchydcs (at 44 0io) in cigarette smoke, with greater cf- ficiency than their equivalents in solvent- soluble t pop.corn, •. I . 4' ' 1J7y . V • n , IJ!o Jura 2 L U,,, _0.tj I 93611 MAEDA K., IrlITADORI T., AvzAI Y. & al.l, ~s., . (In Japanese) Studies onithe filter for cigarette smoke. XII: The character- istic of' the non-ionic high porous. polymer. . ~ Sci. Pap. centr. Res. Inst. Iap. Tob:; pub. Co., 1977, 1'19, p. 39-43. Four kinds of' the nonaonic high porous polymers were made from : 1) divinyll benz ene and acrvionitrile : 2) ethvlene slvcol " dimethacryla2e and acryloniltrile ; 3) ethylene ,. Rlycol dimethacrylate and vinyl' acetate • ; 4) ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and methyl - methacrylate. Micro pore volume, micro pore distribution and specific surface area of' those polymers were measured' an& the: adsorption performance of vapour comFo-. nents in cigarette smoke was studiedl using trial triple filters made from those poly- mers. As a result, it was found that the poly- mers provide a specific selectivity in ad- sportion performance of ' vapour com- ponents. 9367 REIF H. I (In German) Firmness of hot-melt glue seani by filter rod. Fachl. Mitteil., 1978, 18; p. 38S>94. To~ elucidate the influences which lead to,1 an opening of the seam, of filter rods, aging tests at different extreme climates as welll as in triacetine atmosphere were perform•I ed. Wrapping, papers were tested for theii absorptive properties for hotmelt glue and the influence of the glue temperature dur- ing application was determined. Also, the mutual solubility of triacetine and hotmelt glue was investigated. The results show that a bad fixation of! the glue on the paper has a decisive influence on the fi'rmnesss of the seam. This fixation can be improved by an, increase of the glue temperature during, the covering and by an alteration of the paper surface towards increased' rusged: ness and absorptive capacity. A mi.-ration of triacetine into the glue seems to exert only s al modest influence, provided that the glue seam is not fixed insufficiently on the pa{ per from, the beginnin„ I
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0 RS ABSIAcTi 9384 Tt:ItNER J.A. McM., TAYLOR D.M., Sit.-: IsETr RAV. & al. The effects of' supplementary nicotine In regular eigarette smokers. ; Fostgrad'. ined:1., 1977, 53'.625; p:683-6:. .,. . ... i " Blood nicotine levels were measured in' eight subjects over a 5' week period', while smoking normally, while smoking and chew, ing gum containing 2 mg , nicotine, and' while smoking and chewing placebo gum, Desvite : a small but significant rise in blood nic- otine l'evels during the period of the nic- otine gum chewing (mean, 35,3 ng/ntl) com-: pared withpl'acebo(mean 28.T ng/,mi) and!;, control (mean 26.3 ng/ml), cigarette con•~I sumption, butt lengths, filter nicotine and ' blood carboxyhemoglbbin levels did not,' change, indicating that there had been no~ significant changes in smoking patterns. i 9173 HttzosE T., So Y. ! (In Japanese) Scanning electron mi- croscopic observation of' tobacco leaf tissues. Sci. Pap. centr. Res. Inst. Iap. Tob: pub. Coi, 1977. 119, p. 93-3. Fresh leaf tissues were fixed with Qlutarali d'ehvde; dehydrated in . a graded' alcohol„! embedded in the alcohol by freezing in Ii-l quid nitrogen and subsequently fracturcd, in pieces. After the critical step of drying; by liquid carbon, dioxvde, each piece was' coated with gold in an ion sputtering ap- paratus. The above procedure preserved well the orieinal structure of the fresh leaff tissues and much informational micrographs, could be obtained by scanning electron microscope. ~ 9372 CAt.nWELt. G.Y. I Natural' curing, of' tobacco andl luno; cancer. l Brit. med: 1:, 1977, 1, p. 580. ~ Members of the Semai tribe, in, Mal'asia,, start smoking at the age of 2• this is a method of weaning. At the a,e of 22' they have therefore becn smoking for 20 years, and at 42 for 40' years. A systematic X-ray examination of' the entire tribe (12000 persons) did' not revcali al single case of lung cancer. The rural environment certainly hclped~ but also pcrhaps thc fact that they smoke a local' tobacco which has only undergone natural! treatment. VoL•: 9. I1!'o„ cc'. JuNE 14,''197J. 9380 LAeAVIE J.C.. 1 i (In French) Smoking cessation tech-: nique. f Rev. Praticien, 1978, 2&19, p. 1433:-8. ~ t. Many experiments which were tried to make cigarette smokers stop smoking are reported. Medicinal techniques, mainly using products containing lobeline and used ass a substitute were first used. Later, many psychological methods, both individual and group techniques, were tried. On the whole, positive long term results are no higher than~ 30 to 40. °io and the most important- elemenU for cessation success appears to be the smoker's profound desire to stop smoking, . . , 9195 YasvslATSu N., KAwABAia M., ISEDA J. & al. (In Japanese) Determination~ of men- thol thol In cigarettes and mainstream smoke condensate. ' ~ Sci. Pap. "cerztr. Res. Inst. 1ap. Tob., pub. Co., 1977, 119, p. 23-8. A method, for gas chromatoQraphic deter-!, mination is presentedi Menthol in acetate filter tips or smoke condensate trapped on. glass fiber filters was extracted completely with ethanol by mechanical shaking for 2 hours. In the case of tobacco shreds, however, it required an additional time of more than 20 hours after the termination of mechanical shaking for complete extraction of' menthol. Menthol in the ethanol extracts could be determined accurately by using ; a 10, % 1,4-butanediol adipate column (3'3 x 2,000' mm), column temperature at 160°C, N: flow at 60 ml/min and naphthalene as an internal standard. 9370 BExNs A.S. . ; Potential liazards of rapidi smoking. (i 9 N. Pngi: l: Nled,, 1977, 297-23; p. 1295:. Lactic acidosis is a potentially harmful ef-' Q. fect resulting from rapid' smoking, An ~ alkaline pH combined with carboxyhemoglo- 0. bin (COHb) induced hypoxia stimulates an ~ accumulation of excess lactic acid. Lactic acid coiuentrations of 5.1-9.3 mcq/1 have CJ bceni found' in patients with COHb level's C~ of 13•37 %. Elevated lhctic acid levels can O induce respiratoryy ventilation whichiin turn, (bD causes hypocapnia and respiratory alkal'osis; andi the toxic cycle is repeated. Lactic acidi accumulation helps to explhin the clinical symptoms associatcdi with rapid smoking and points out otentiaU risks involvedi in rapid' smoking (~versive) therapy.
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s ABSTRACTS 9164 DeNtot:E E., E%GGIST P. Chemical study of VRrginia tobacco flavor (1\'icotiana tabacuin I..). H. Isolation and synthesis of cis-2-iso- propenyl-8-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro -1- naphthalenol (A) and 34sopropenyl-5- methyl-1,2-d'ihydronaphthalene (B). Hefv. Chin:. Acta, 1978, 61-4; p. 1335-41. Gas liquid chromatography allowed isolation of the (A) compound and its dehydration ; product, ($), from two small subfractions' of Virginia tobacco condensate. Both thesel norsesquiterpenes were identified ot} spec-, tral grounds and synthesized from 1~methyl-I naphthalene in a way (9 steps) that also, afforded the non-natural, trans-alcohol ()L').I The possible biogenesis of A and' B inI tobacco is briefly outlined. 93811 Lt`\DH B., OHLIX P., WESTLI\G H. (In Swedish) Strong or mild cigarettes -withi or without filters. I:aekartidrtinge-r, 1977, 74:24, p. 2356-8. Two groups of subjects were studiedi in a! specialised clinique. 41 of them smoked, normally on the day of the examination; while 106 had smoked at least Y cigarettes• the previous day, 'the last being smoked 2; hours before the blood sample was taken.. Blood CO was higher in patients smoking filter cigarettes than, in those smoking non-filter brands. The amounts of CO' and nicotine did not depend on the strength; of the cigarette smoked. ''' 9178 KUSx\f_3 M., ISHIGURO', S., SUGAWARA S. - (In Japanese) Comparison of vapor phase components of. the smokes from lamina and midrib cigarettes of flue- cured tobacco leaves. Sci. Pap. cei:tr: Res. Inst. lap: Tob. pub. Co., 1977, 119, p. 103-6. ( The cigarettes smoke was introduced di- rectly into a gas chromatograph equipped with a glass capillary column through a gas sampler, and various components in thc vapon phase were semiquantitatively deter- mined. Isoprene and dipentenc were more abundant in lamina~ smoke than in midrib smoke. Other smoke components including nitriles did' not show, appreciable diffcrence, in quantity between the two smokes. 9194 YAMAZAKI 1N1., SAITO &:, UEHARA M. ! (In Japanese) Effect of physical pro- perties of cigarette on the content of carbonyl' compounds in the ma3n- stream, smoke. I. Effect of cigarette weight and cigarette lengM Sci: Pap. centr. Res. Inst. lap. Tob: piib. Co., 1977, 1119; p. 29138, . • ,~.,.. . ...._. . . .. . . . .. . ..... ~ i ~:.,, •. .. . : With increasing weight of cigarette, the amount of formaldehyde in the mainstream smoke per cigarette slightly decreased ; on the contrary, total carbonyl compounds, acetaldehyde and acetone increased. The amount of each carbonyl compound per puff decreased, with increasing the cigarette, wetsht. CiQarettes of 70, 80; 90 and 100 mm length were prepared from the shreds of' flue-curedi tobacco. When these cigarette were smoked 40' mm long, the carbonyli compounds in the mainstream smoke per, cigarette decreased with increasing length. When these ciQarettes were smoked to a 30' mm butt length, the amount of carbonyl compounds in the mainstream smoke per cigarette increased with increas- ing length cigarette. The amount of each carbonyl compound per puff decreased with increase of cigarette lengthi This result is consistent with the fact that smoking eva- luation become milder as the amount of. carbonyl compounds per puff decreased. 9191 YxMaa[o-ro T., t1i:HARx M. ('In~ Japanese) Gas chromatographic determination of moisture in tobacco shreds. Sci. Pap; certtr. Res. Inst: .Iap. Tob, pub. Co., 1977, 119, p. 99402. I The moisture content of the shreds of flue-i cured, burley, and domestic (Matsukawa) tobaccos was determined using a' gas chro- matographic technique and employing the ethanolic solution of methanol (internal standard)as a moisture absorbing solvent!. The value obtained by this method was almost equall to that obtained by oven dry,-! ing methodl Some data showing the amount of moisture retained by butts after smok- ing are presented. 1 0
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O ABSTRACTS] Tabak-Journal International (I April 1979 p. 116 i' TOBACCO EXPORT BUSINESS'PROFITS FROM CONTAINERIZATION Neuber, Dieter Tobacco shippers turning to containerization for substantial savings in cost and time. The cargo moves in single sea/ed container unitsJrom point of origin to final destination ~ without multiple handling, increasing the security against theft and damage: Today a ready inventory of clean containers including dry vans, liquid bulk tanks and refrigerated containers stand teady to handle cases, corrugated cartons and bales as well as the commonly used wooden hogsheads. The corrugated cart'on is proving to be extremely popular among tobacco shippers. Lightweight and disposable these cartons allow for maximum use of the 40 foot containers. In addition, they, are cheaper to manufacture than the wooden hogsheads and handling of cartons is easier resulting in a more efficient loading and unloading process. ~ I Tabak-Journal International' April 1979 p. 98 ~ SMOKING, LUNG CANCER AND i SCIENTIFIC DEBATE j Burch, P. R. J I. The Royal Statistical Society convenes some of its Ordinary Meetings in London to an elaborate protocol. Professor Sir Richard Doll addressed one in December, 1970 and /'addiessed another In May, 1978. Both papers dealt with the problem of smoking and'lung cancel and Doll pre- sented a theory of how smoking causes lung cancer, Logical'inconsistencies in the theory were pointed'outby ProfessorAfmitage and / showed that some of its predictions conflict with the empirical evidence. My analysis demonstrated that'the evidence does not allow us to inferhow smoking causes lung cancer or, indeed, whether it does. . j Tabak-Journal International (', April 1979 p. 132 '• .DILUTION ZONES: HAUNI`S LAS'ER~, PERFO'RATION SYSTEM . 1. For the manufacture of filter cigarettes with dilution zones the filter assembler MAkI S of HAUNI-WERKE can be equipped'with a reliable and controllable Laser-Perforation system. ' After completing the filter cigarettes, using standard materials they are exactly perforated by means of a pulsed laser beam. The ventilation zones of these mild-cigarettes are featured through uniform and precise contours. Standard deviation of cigarette dilution is controlled to within tight limits by means of the accuracy of the laser process, in combination with the new measuring and control device. ; Tabak-Journal International ' April 1979 p. 85 i V, , HAUNI TAKE OVER ARENCO-DECOUFLE'' As from the 1st of January,, 1979 the Hauni-Werke,of Hamburg-8ergedorf have taken over the range of cigarette machines manufactured by Arenco-Decoufle who have up to now been members of the Swedish Match Group. This arrangement is subject to some permits still'to be granted'b'y the French authorities. fn future Arenco-Decoufle will be trading under the flame ol Decouflg S:A,R.L.. 6+ Boulevard Jourdan. 75 014 Paris. WoL-, J, 1!o, 8, JUTiE 22,~~19 7 9 , .y
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0 • BTRACTS AS] Journal of the National Cancer I Institute June 19' 7 9' v. 62, no.-6', p. 1397 USE OF ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS BY,, CANCER PATIENTS Morrison, Alan S. ABSTRACT-Current daily use of artificl'aI sweeteners (AS) an&" diet drinks was evaluated for 11,862 ' patients hospitalized for . cancer andi for 10,874 "Cont'rol" patients hospitalized for other; conditions belleved' not to be associated with use of these ~ substances. The data were derive& from an ongoing survey in seven countries. For cancer of' most sites, the age-standardized ' proportion of users of AS was somewhat less than that for ! controls. A greater proportion of, users among cancer patients than among controls was noted only for cancer of the stomachh among women. Little Information on urinary tract cancer was. 9382 SCHERRER *lUl.,, ZELI:ER , C.,, ZWEIFEL: 1. (In German) Distribution, of occu- pations among lung cancer patients as compared to patients with chronic bronchial obstruction, bronchiaL asth+ ma or sarcoidosis in the region of Bern. :, . . available; there were no users of AS among 13 patlents with, cancer of the bladder, 5 with cancer of' the renal peivis, and 2 I with cancer of the ureter. There were 455 cancer patients known ~ to have been interviewed during their Initlat hospitalization for f the disease. Based on these cases, aniage-sex+country=standard- ' Ized estimate of' cancer Incidenee for users of AS, relative to nonusers, was 1.0. Only a very small proportion ofi patient's reported dally'use of diet drinks, and the proportion of users did not differ substantially betWeen cancer patients and controls. The present data provide virtually no support for an overall positive association, of AS wtth cancer.-J'NCI 62: 1397-1399, 1979. ~ Journal of the National Cancer' Institute June 1979 v. 62, no. 6, p. 14'3g VITAI~+IIht A AND LUNG CANCER' Mettlini, Curtis et al ABSTRACT-Retrospective dietary and smoking data were gath- ; sred'by Intervlew of 292 white male patients with lung cancenandl 801i control patients with nonrespiratory, nonneoplastic diseases at Roswell Park Memorial Instftute,, Buffalo, New York. A comr puted' Index of vitamin A Intake was used to differentiate lung cancer patients from eontrols. Lung cancer patients had tower values than did controls. The reduced' relative risk (RR) of'tung cancer associated with vitamin A was most evident among men who smoked heavily. For, them, a d'ose-response relationship Increasing to an RR of' 2.4 for low values of the Index was observed. Frequency, of daily milk drinking was lower among patients with lung cancer. Lower RR' was found among the men who, smoked heavily and frequently, consumed carrots. These findings are eonsistent with evidence from animal! studies on Inhibitlon of' tumor incidence by retinoids and with, previous fdndings Im prospective and retrospective epidemiologlb stud- tbs.-JNC1 62: 1435.1438, 1979. . 0 -.. , . ' The occupational history and smoking ha- bits of 4,802 patients with lung diseases have been stored in a Stairs-IBM data base. Patients were divided into 1i1 occupational.. groups, according, to the extent of manual work and inhalative and climatic influences' at work. Statistical analysis of' the establish- ed profession, pattern showed a clear pre- valence of indoor workers among patients with sarcoidosis and with asthma. In con- trast, chronic obstructive lung; disease andl especially lung cancer seem to occur pre- dominantly in outdoor workers, such as construction workers andi farmers. This last findfng may be explained by the wide+ spread motorization in the building trade andi in agriculture and by the fact that, being almost, continuously physically exert- ed, their breathing is deep and high in frequency and the effect of hazardous air pollution on lungs may thus be considerably, increased. 9165 DRtvIEGA f., KUTER E'.. (In Polish) The use of gas chromato- graphy for determination of tobacco solltblp carbohydrates. I B'iul: lnf; centr. Lab. Przem. Tyfbn., 1978; 1-2, p, 75-84. ~' 'The quantitative determination of solublc .. carbohydrates in native bright and dark ~'. tobaccos was carried out by comparing; relative retention times (calculated in rela•; tion to internal standard) of carbohydrates! obtained from the testedi samplcs„ with ' relative retention times from the standard solution of' carbohydrates. Glucose, fructose and saccharose were identified: Prior to chromatography, carbohydrates were trans- formed to silyl ethers with the use of a reaction mixture composed of pyridine, hexamethyldisilhzane and' trimetliyIctiloro- silane. Schweiz. med, W'vchenschr., 1977, 107, 46, p. 1656-61. s
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0 ABSTRACTS Tabak-Journal International April 1979~ -p. 112 : .PHILIP MORRIS INC. FORECASTS FIVE-YEAR CAPZTAL EXPENDITURES TO EXCEED' 3 BILLION DdLLARS. The Board of Directors of Philip Morris Ine., New Nork; announced that its capital expenditure programme will be somewhat in excess of 3Nllion dollars during the next 5 years. Over 90 per- cent of the cap;tal expenditure forecast will'be used'to increase capacity of prodbction: In f979'Philip Morris will begin the construction of'a new cigarette manufacturing plant in Cabarrus County, N. C. Internationally, the company will expand and modernise its cigarette / k ' production facilities on severa mar ets. ~ Tabak-Journal International April 1979 -p. 129' THE PAPER-MAKER'S CONTRIBUTION TO THE MAIIUFACTURE OF LOW-TAR CIGARETTE'BRANDS It is possible to effect a reduction of the harmful substances in cigarette smoke by increasing' the porosity of the cigarette paper. This may be done either naturally or by means of electrical perforation. It is also possible to reduce the harmful substances by ventilation at the filter. For this purpose it is necessary to utilise tipping paper which is permeable to air together with porous filter paper. For reasons of cost' it is recommended to make use of naturally porous' tippingandfilterpaperswhich have been harmonised with each oth'er, and whose porosity can be precisely controlled, so that processing may be carried out without any probiems arising.; Schoeller &' Hoesch Gmb'H, paper makers, of Gernsbach, Germany; have played a leading, part not only in the development of'porous cigarette paper but'also in respect of'porousl' filter paper and tipping base paper. Tabak-Journal International I April 1979 p. 108 ~ VAN DER MOLEN ACHIEVES AUTOMATIC'~ PRODUCTION OF CIGARS I The present programme in operation at the RitmeestercigaiJactory is, quote Mr. C. G: van der` ~ Mo/en "the only operational fully-automatic system to produce cigars in the entire world". This system consists ofYwo parts„one being the van derMolen bobbin maker which processes the leaf in such a way thatl six bobbins, each containing approximately 400 metres of'tobacco in ta,oelorm, are produced.' The other part is the conventional overrolling machine, such as the MID from Arenco. which has been adapted with an unwinding device, thus making it ani automatic machine without an operator. , I Tabak-Journal International April 1979 p° 89' ! NEW COR32UGATED PLASTIC PACKAGING~ MATERIAL, Kampers, Wolfgang. i Packaging made from the new corrugated plastic material (copolymer polypropylene) now costs less than packaging material made from impregnated paper or corrugated board. The weight of the new corrugated plastic packaging is distinctly less than that'of other comparable materials. This new material is obtainable not only in various shades but also natural-coloured and'transparent: lt is resistant to chemicals and is unp/asticised so that it can also be utilised' for the packing, of foodstuffs and semi-luxuries (coffee;,alcohol, tobacco, etc.). The temperature angeia which it'may be employed is given as between -15° C and +90° ~. V~r : ~J'' .'. 110. '. .~Ur~E 22'. '1JJ9 , ;:y,:;;....4-..,i 4 w .
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. .. AB STh ACTS~ Tabak-Journal International i April 1979 ;; :p. 121 t , :.,, : . ~ CIGARETTE'SMOKE FILTRATION AND VENTILATION Brinkmann,! Gnnther Substances contained in the tob'acco smokei n the fosm of particles can be reduced by means of filtration. The gaseous constituents aUow'themselves to be affected only by the admixture of additives to the filtermaterial.' /n the smoke flow, ventilation reduces not onlytheproportion of particulate but also of gaseous constituents. Filter retention can be considerably increased ~ by the use of special'materials. Filtration capacity is maximized when using various forms of filters. Selective filtration is obtainable by means of additives to the filter material. Higher 7etentions are possible by the use of multiple filters:-with comparable pressure drop. Further- more, improved' constancy of the condensate values in the smoke may be obtained with ventilation by means of diversified pressure drop of the filter components. I' Tabak-Journal International April 1979 -p. 114 A NEW CHAPTER'IN CIGAR MAKING Neuber, Dieter •. ~. Utilizing the resources of various subsidiaries, including' its Consolidated Cigar Company, the U.S. conglomerate Gulf + Western has developed a high-speed cigar manufacturing system. Natural wrapper leaves are mechanically'stretched, electronically scanned for size,: position and deficiencrs. A small computer programmed for up to two wrapper die sizes and' desired restrictions such as holes, hole location, veins, etc., optimizes the leaf utilization.: Abtomatically positioned'die knives cut the wrapper leaf. The die cuts are stored'in bobb'ins. ; The system is complemented' with a high-speed overrolling machine for up to 400, individual cigars, rolled with natural wrapper. • ~ American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal " June 19' 7 9 v. 40, no. 6, p. 4'43 THE CLEARANCE OF CADMIUM AEROSOLS, 'AFTER INHALATION EXPOSURE Oberdoerster, G. ~°et al - I Airborne cadmium particles, which may t1e released' Into tNe environment by various. industrial processes, are well within the rangeof respirable particle sizes. Forty to seventy percent of them are below a gedmetrie diameter of 2'pm.~"' and thus, when inhaledJ penetrate deeply into the lung and can be deposited'in the alveolar area. Here they act . upon the lung, cells and alter both, ventilatory and nonventilatory lunglfunctions. The degree of'these effects depends on the local concentration and the biological' half-life of the Cd containing, particles in the lung. , . ., ~ 0 0 Tabak-Journal International f. O April 1979 p. 127 1 IJ INCREASING' TH'ED'ILUTIIC)N OF SMOKE! `. . tC BY ANCILSARY AIR.-FLOW, THE MAIN N' PROBLEM OF THE CIGARETTE INDUSTRY 6j Using different filter types and producing highly porous filter wrappers and mouthpiece papers to be processed without'problem on cigarette machines has been the goal of research carried out'by the Wattens Paper Company. Cigarette paper of high porosity (,I00 to 200 ml/rrrin) will become more important because a reduction of almost 25 percent of CO1 tar and nicotine can be achieved. 0 ~ a (I:(1 V 1~'1~37~~ n : I ...._. .... : n iir» .a
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M ABSTRACTS~ Journal of the National Cancer'' Institute June 1979 V. 62', no~. 6, p. 1329 N-NITRO'S0 ALKYLATING AGENTS : FORMATTON' AND PERSISTENCE OF ALKYL DERIVATIVES IN' NJPiI4IdALIAN' NUCLEIC ACIDS AS'CONT'RIBUTING FACTORS IN CARCINOGENESIS Singer, B. Many alkylating agenu, either directly acting,or only? able to alkylate upon metabolic activation, show vary-" ing,activity as cardnogens: The same agents alloshow: varying, activity as mutagens: Inasmuch ar mutagenic l reactions of DNA are likely to lead to genetic changes that could cause neoplastic transformation, the ques- tion arose as to whether, the differences in reported car- einoqenicity of alkylating, agents could be due to. differences in their chemical reactions with nucleic acids: Other types of carcinogens that are only reactive x^hen, metabolically activated differ from 'simple a1- kyl4ting, agents in both the sixe and positiom otU substituents on nucleic acids. Some comparisons are, made of the biologic, effects of' bulky substituents as: oompared' to small, alkyi' groups. 9377 HaRKE H.P. (In German), The problem of' passive : smoking. I. Effect of' smoking on the carbon monoxide concentration In of- fice rooms. I; Int. Arch. ArbeLtsn:ed., 1974,, 33-3; p., 199-206. I' CO was measured continuously over several' days in offices where smokers and non- smokers worked. In both, air-conditioned and naturally ventilated buildin~s no aver-, age level of~ CO 1 higher than S ppm was: observed (over a 30 minute period)L How.i ever, for short lengths of' time in naturallivi ventilated buildings, concentrations of' CO 4 7 ppm and 4 9 ppm were recorded. The latter figure was obtained in a room with a volume of 783 m' occupied by 3i, smokers. Itt, this room the CO concentration, reached 4 15.6: ppm for very brief periods~ of time. . V01 •: 9. 116. & .J UNE 22 ,~1J79 9181 PELOSI P., CiaLOPPI\I' C., FIORENTINI R. ~ (In Italian) Mercury In tobacco smoke: Agric. itaL, 1976, 105-5/6 p 3059' _ . ' . + . . Samples containing, 2,120; 680 and 55 ppm mercury (Hg) were burnt under various "' conditions and H- concentrations were determined in ashes, smoke and butt. All the Hg linked in tobacco with cysteine residues was reduced', to metal and! trans- ferred into smoke. Coresta ° 1978, no. 3-4, p. 79~ IZARD C. i.... ' Smoking without danger : utopia or reality ? This is a 41page offprint (p. 1459 to 1462) of' the • Revue du Praticien a, Volume XXVIII; n' 19 of' the lst April 78. • The author, who was a member of the CORESTA' Scientific Commission, briefly stimmarizes the work undertaken by the SEITA, starting, in 1954, to ptu at the dist posal of smokers a wide range of products with tar and' nicotine levels as low as 10 mg and 0:5' mg, respectively,, while hoping to obtain even lower levels:. TRANSLATIONS 79-10742-06J, Koaietzko, H. ; ,Haberlandt, W. ; Heilbrooner, H'. OYTOGENETIC STUDIES ON TRICHLOROETHY- LENE WORKERS. Archiv fuer To)dcologle. Y. 40, p. 201'-206„ 1978. Order from NTC as 79-10742-061: HC $10.50. 0
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of said receiving,means independently of said'ifust conveyor uttans. i v01 8. .11,HE 22). -i979'. . a:. s ryVpri?Mc s•,? 4,155.201 ' ME'PNODAND APPARATUS FOR DETERMININC'THE ; PRESSURE DROP' AND' CIRCUMFEREN'iCE' OF FILTER a; Jehn R. Wagner, Creensboro;,N.C.; James R. Knighton, Mary~ ; +:Ester, Fla:,, and, Werner P. Kirschstein, Greensboro, N.C., ~ assignors to Lorillard-A Divisioniof Loew's Theatres, Inc., *CiKew York, N Y `* ;. w; ~atAdtsq w ti s1b~'~Yi~,kA ~ r'~tt}~'ht S , Filed Jit117, 1978, Ser No. 922,570 ~~ps~~~~}~l :`"`17 ' Int C1= GO1M 3/l6 ~.~ .~~~ .~p 7J~J0 \!^ 1ML `xE Il`ar .U.J. \.I. f . f ; .. . . ~ _ . :L~,EY;'i~. .. . ~ 0 _ ~ _. ~ t•at.R~ ~ '!~ f L.,LfI ~ytei: '7rJ•t.G~:lleD~ ::.. l4h,A:':1)1171 4 1. Apparatus for measuring the pressure drop through a filrer rod for cigarette filters or the like comprising,a pressure drop$auge including a chamberopen,atone end!to receive filter rod and adapted to be closed at the other end to contam a gas under pressure in communication with one endiof a filter rod reeeived in the chamber and! having a diaphragm selec. ~ tively engageable with the peripheral surface of a filter rod I received therein, a calibration standard, a source of gas at a: substantially constant flow rate, means for conducting gas from the source to the calibration standard,and the pressure ' ;" dtop gauge sequentially in a selected order, pressure trans ' dticer means for producing an electrical signal' indicative of a means for selectively conneaing the pressure gas pressure, transducer means to the gas source, and' control means includ ing means for automatically controlling the conduction of gas from the source to the calibrationatandltrd, the pressure drop gauge and the transducer means to provide sequentially m a ~~ felected order (a) a signal indicative of the pressure:dtop across : the standard and (b) a signal indicative of'the pressure drop , across a filter rod,in the pressure drop gauge. 'l: ~. . ^.L', `. .. .. . ., L. S_ .. W ~ 4/. ., ,. ~•
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. _PATENTS 4,156,662 1.(3-(NIETHYLTHIO)BCPR'YRl'L)-2,6,6 -TRIMETHYL- CYCLOHEXENE AND THE 1,3-CYCLOHEXADIENE ANALOG IN PERFUMERY Richard A. SVilfon, Westfield; Braja D. Mookherjee; Holmdel; Anne S. Hruza, Brick Tonn; lf•lanfred H. Vock, Locust; Louis S. Frederick, Holmdel, and Joaquin~F. Vinals, Red Bank, all of N:J., assignors to International Flavors & Fragrances Inc., New York, N:Y. Di.ision of Ser. No. 774,053,Mar. 3,1977, Pat- No. 4;107,209. This application Jun. 214 1978, Ser. No. 917,661 Int. CL2 CTIB 9/00 US. Cl: 252-522 ' S' Claims' l. A process for augmenting or enhancing the aroma of'a perfume composition which comprises adding to said perfume composition a small but' effective amount of a substantially pure, synthetically produced, 1-(3-(methylthio)buryryl)-2,6,6- trimethyl:-cyclbhexene or the 1,3-cyclbhexadicne analog de- i fined by the structure:: wherein the dashed linris a earbon-carbon singie bond,or a I carbon-carbondouble bond. 4,156,431! SMOKE PROCESSING Samuel S. Epstein, 880 Ni Lakeshore,Dr:, Chicago. I11. 60612„ and! William Lijinsky4 P.O. Box B, Frederick, Md.,21701 Continuation-in-part oESer, No4 160,786, Jul. 8, 1971, 4 abandoned, and' a continuatiomin-part of Ser. No. 281,292, Aug. : 17, 1972,,abandoned, which is a eontlnuation-in+part of Ser. No. 51,777, Jul. 2,,1970,,abandoned'. This application Mar. 29,1977, Ser. No. 782,423 Int. CL° A24B 15102. BO1D S3/02 U.S: Cl. 131-10.7. 9'Claims ~ : ~ --- - - - . _ . 1. In combination with a container of tobacco to be smoked ~ having lit,and lunlit ends when the container is lit at the lit end a tobacco smokr6lter atthe unlit end!of the container compris- ing, first means for removing essentially allinitrosamines from tobacco smoke passing through said smoke filter, for inha- f lition by a smoker, ~ and' second means for removing essentially all secondary amines from said tobacco smoke, whereby the smoke inhaled'. by a smoker when drawing through said filter with said lit end! ignited is essentially free from nitrosamines and secondary amines. 4,156,843: - MICRO<VAVE MOISTURE INDICATOR AND CONTROL Charles:F: Strandberg, Jt, High Point,,and Robert C. Strand- berg, Greensboro, both of N.C-, assignors to Strandberg Engi- neering Laboratories, Inc„ Greensboro. N.C. i Filed.hlar. 13, 1978, Ser. No. 886,097 lot. C1.2 G01R 27/04 U.S. Cl: 324-58:5 B' 12 Ciaims 4 . M Q L] , YWT,f'.~.t e° I I 11 A microwave moisture meter for measuring the moisture content of a moving web of,moisture absorbent material com+ prising a microwave transmitter means for transmitting an a-c modulated microwave signal of a selected frequency' and en+' ergy level toward, the moving web, a microwave receiver means for receiving microwaves reflected from the moving , web, said microwave transmitter means including a directional transmitter, antenna horn whose axis is directed toward the web at the angle of incidence of the transmitted' microwaves, said microwave receiver means including a directional re- ceiver antenna horn on the same side of the web as the trans- mitter antenna horn and' whose axis is directed toward the,web at the angle of reflectance of the transmitted microwaves - which are reflected from the web and a microwave detector, means for detecting the reflected microwave signal'and pro- ducing,an a-c output signal whose amplitude is directly pro- portional to the amount'of moisture,in the web, an adjustable gain amplifier means for amplifying the a-c outputsignal from said detectormeans,,a signal'eonversion means fornonvertingr the amplified a-c signal to a d-c output signal' which is equal to . the average value of the a-c signal input to ~ the conversion means, zero offsetting means for offsetting the,signal detected I by'said detector when no material' is in front of thrtransmitter and receiver horn, said zero setting means being adjustable to produce a d-c output signal equal to and of opposite polarity too the d-c signal produced Iby said signal conversion means when no material is over the microwave transmitter and receiv;r horn~ invertor amplifier means having,asumming input node for summing,the output signals of'said conversion means and said offsetting,means and' for, amplifying the summation signal ; and producing a d-c moisture indicating signal which is di- ', rectly proportional to,the moisture content of said moving web '.' of materiall and indicatot means responsive,to said d-c mois- I ture indicating signal for,indicating a quantity which is'a.func- i tion of the moisture content of said webi ~
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s PATENTSj 4,156,695 PROCESS FOR PREPARING SUBSPITUTED ACEIOi`tAPH'THONFS William L Schreiberj Jackson; James N: Siano, Keyport, both of P1.J:, and Edward Jl Shuster; 8rooklyn, N.Y., assignors to International Flavon & Fragrances Incr, New, Y'ork, N.Y. Division of Ser, No. 819,956. Ju1128,,1977; PBt. No: 4,108,899. This application Mar. 7, 1978, Ser. No. 884,205 nfnt. CL- C07C 45/00 U.S: CL 260 -586 C 1l' Claim 6L , r. t trrtrl0a'.rOt' n..rtt ncu rtAttlta. r a+utn: ory ~ F Attr rttrR!NM.... ~ Y e a 1.. A,process for producing a substituted!acetonaphthone having the structure: 0C ~ comprising the steps of: I (i) reacting chlorine with mesityl oxide in, the presence of' " dimethylYormamide solvent and in the presence of a base ., selected from the group consisting of sodium carbonate ;, !' and sodium acetate, the mole ratio of' chlorine:mesityl oxide being greater than 1 and the mole ratio of base:chlo- i tnne, being abour 1:1 whereby, a compound having the structure: ~ is formed: (ii) dehydrohalogenating,the dichloro derivative by means of heating the reaction mixture at a temperature in the range of 901-i20' C. thereby. forming, 3-chloromesityl'l oxide; (iii) reacting the 3-chloromesityl oxide with~myreene in the presence of a Friedel Crafts catalyst selected from the, ` group eonsisting,of stannic chloride and ethyl aluminum, i, dichloride, the mole ratio of myrcene:3-chloromesityl ~ oxide being,in the range of from 10:1 up to 1:10;,the mole : ratio of Friedel Crafts catalyst:3-chlbromesityl, oxidt being between 0.01:1 and 1:1; the reaction being carried l out at a temperature of between 45" and! 55" C: in, the : presence of an inert solvent selected!from the group con- ~ sisting,of benzene, toluene, xylene, methyl dichloride and l chloroform thereby forming a chlorinated Diels-Aldtr ~ adduct having the structure•. CI II i (iv) cyclizing said chlorine containing Diels Alfler adduct with an acid cyclization agent selected l from the group ; consisting,of phosphoricacid, diluted sulfuric acid,,boron trifluoride and boron trifluorideetherate in the presence of •. . a: solvent, the amount of'acid cyclization agent varying from 10 up to: 100 weight percent based on~the weight of ; compound to be cyclized; the sdvent having, a boiling ! poinrof,between 70' C:,and 100' C., the reaction taking place at a temperature of between 70' C. and 100` C.'„the . amount of solvent in the reaction mass being;from.25 up to 50 weight percent; , thereby forming a chlorinated' acetyl I octahydronaphthalene derivative having the structure: 00 11 (v)',then, dehydrohalogenating,the said chlorinated acetyll octahydronaphthalene derivative in the presence of'a polar„ aprotic solvent selected from the group consisting of dimethyl formamide, dimethyl! acetamide, N-methyl1 pyrrolidinone, hexamethyl phosphoramide and'pyrrole+ N+carboxaldehyde. said reaction taking place in the pres+ I ence of a base selected from the group consisting of'cal= eium carbonate, lithium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, ~ calcium oxide, lithium oxide and magnesium oxide, the ~ temperature of reaction being between, 120'=250' C:;,the mole ratio of base:chlorinated acetyl octahydronaphtha- lene derivative being between: 0.5:1! and.5:1 thereby prCV ducing,a compound having the structure: C1'
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PATENTSI 4,156,029 I ALPHA-SUBSTITUTTED,ALKYLIDENE MEPI{IONALS AND USES THEREOF IN FOODSTUFFS'AND: FLAVORS ? FOR' FOODSTUFFS i Donald' A. Withycombe, Lincroft; Anne Hruza, Bricktown; 111anfred H. Vock, Locust;, Christopher Giacino, C>Vlifon; Brajit D. :1lookherjee,, HalYndel; Alan Q Pittet, Atlantie Highlands, and,William I» Schreiber, Jackson, all of N:J1, assignors to International Flavors & Fragrances Iitc., New York, N.Y; Continuation,in-part of Ser. No. 827,265, Aug. 24,1977, which is a division ofSer. No. 753,462;,Dee. 22, 1976,,Pat. No. 4,064,279. This application Afay 3, 1978, Ser. No. 902,389 The portion of'the term of this patent subsequent to Jan.30, 1996, has been disclaimed. ' Int. Cl.r'A23L 1/236 ' U:S. CL 426-535 6'Claims ~ 1. A mixture of substantially pure,synthetically proditced Icis ~ and trans isomers of 2-((methylthio)methyl]-3.phenyl-2?prope- I tul,having the structures the ruioof cis to trans isomer being, from 7:3'up to 9.5.0.5: 3> A process for augmenting or enhancing the aroma or taste of a foodstuff comprising adding to said foodstuff from about 0.02 parts per million, up to about' 50 ~ parts per million by weightbased,on the total quantity of foodstuff of thrmi:ture of cl'aim l. 4,156.030', COCOA SHELL EXTR:ACT i Ingmar B. Eggen, New Milford, Conn., assignor to Societe d'As• i sistance Technique pour Ptoduits Nestle S.A:, Lausanne,. Switzerland Filed Dec. 29, 1977, Ser. No. 865,622 htt: Cli= A23G 1/00, A23ia/221. 1/27 U.Si Ci: 426~-540 8'Claims 1. A process for preparing a berry-like flavorant and!color- ant cocoa shell extract, which eomprisesextracting, cocoa shells with an acidiiled ethanol solution and! separating the resulting,extract from the,eocoa shell residue. VOL:~' 9, IJO. ~, ;~UtlE c~~,'I979 ~ '~'}.rk. ~.. - . s... ,..-.. _.. >..~ .... . . ..... . :,155,867 - ~ SUBSTITUTED DIt1ETHYL DIHYDROXY BENZENE AND CYCLOHEXADIENE COMPOUNDS'AND USES THEREOF FOR AUGMENTING OR ENHANCING'THE TASTE AND/OR'AROMA',OF CONSUMABLE MATERIALS INCLUDING TOBACCOS',PERFUMES AND. • PERFUMED ARTICLES John B. Hall, Ritmson; Mark A. Sprecker, Sea Bright,,both of . N.J;, Edward J. Shuster, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Frederick L. Schmitt, Holmdel, and Joaquin F. Vinals, Red'Bank, both of N:J:,, ausignors to International Flavors & Fragrances Inc., New York,,N.Y: Division ofiSer. No,800;889, May 26, 1977, Pat. No. 4,115,431: This application~Jun. 8, 1978, Ser, No:,913,716' i Int. Cl.2'CLID 3/3Q. EI1D 9144 ' ULS. CI. 252-89 R 1 Claim i 1. A process for augmenting or enhancing,the organoleptic properties of a consumable material,selected from,tihe group consisting of soaps and detergents eomprising,the step of inti- mately admixing an organoleptic property modifying quantity of a substituted dimethyl dihydroxy benzene,or cyclo-hexadi= ene,represented by the equilibrium mixture of a,constituent . thereofi HO wherein Rt is selected from the group consisting of acetyl having,the structure: and nitrilt having the structure:. -fC~N]I !'. and wherein the dashed linrrepresents a carbon-carbon single bond,or a carbon•carbon double bond with the priviso that when the dashed line represents a carbon,carbon single bond R't is onlil nitrile with a material selected'.from the group con- „ sisting,of a soap base and a detergent base. ! .a , «
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0 PATENTS1 . 4,155,368 I SMOKING PIPE SEASONER Santo Bellinghieri,,75 N: UnioniSt.,,Arlington, Mass.,02174 Filed May 26j,1977,,Ser: No.:800,922 Iot. CLz A24F 11/00 + US::CL,131-172 2 Claitm' 1. A mount including,support,means forsupporting a smok-• ing pipe therefrom ofthe type including an ~upwardly opening bowl and! aatem opening and projecting outwardly of the bowl deGning,asmoke outlet,in the outer end'of said stem, vacuum. generating means supported from said mount and including an I inlet and an outlet, passage means including, inlet and outlet + end portions, said inlet end portion including means for remov- able able sealed communicatiomwith1 said smoke outlet, said!outlet i end portion being in sealed communication with said inlet, said passage means including filter means disposed therein and' • ambient air inlet means for admitting,ambient air into said ; passage means, said ambient air inlet means including adjust- : able valve means operatively, associated therewith for variably ; throttling the admission of ambient air into said passage means through said air inlet means, said passage means defining,an ; enlarged diameter elongated Ichamber interposed intermediate ; said inlet and outlet end portions and establishing communica- . tion therebetween, saidiinlet end portion opening into one end' .. portion of said chamber, said filter means including filter mate- ~ dal' disposed within said chamber intermediate the opposite end portions thereof,,and said outlet end! portion of said pas- sage means opening laterally into ~the other end portion of said . chamber, said other;end portion of said chamber being open;,a , removable : closure for said , other end' of said chamber, said ' I filter material being replaceable through said open other end!, portion of said chamber upon removal of said closure, saidi ~' outlerend portion of'said passage means'opening laterally intoo said'other end portion of said chamber inwardly of said remov .' able closure, said closure including a threadd:dibore formed therethrough opending inwardly into said chamber, an adjust• : able shank threaded through said'bore:and including an inner end within said chamber, said valve means including a diamet- rically enlarged head,carried by the inner end of said shank, said ambient air inlet means comprising at' least one air inlet ~ port formed through said closure sgaced from said threaded bore, said head being shiftable, upon outward and inward I threaded movement:of said shank through said bore, toward and away fromia position in covering registry with the,inner , end of said port in order to variably ciosrand optn said port: ~ Vn~I : ()~. Iln_ .`~: ~2*11~. '~ll(179ii ~ 4,155,909 2•ALKYL NICOTINOIDS AND PROCESSESIFOR TH'EIR PRODUC'TIOri 1 Edward B. Sanders, Richmond; Henry, V. Secor, Midlothian, and ~ Jeffrey L Seeman, Richmond, all of'Va., assignors to Philip Morris Incorporated, New York„N.Y. Filed Jun. 13a,1977,,Ser: No. 805,689 Int. CL2 C07D C01/01 U.S. CL 546-193 6 Claims 1. A compound represented by the formula: ~ wherein Rt is hydrogen, lower alkyl, phenylaikyllor,aralkyL• j R2 is lower alkyl or phenylalkyG and Rs is lower alkyl. I 4,157,386' I SOFT, CHEWABLE LOZErGE'FORMI°`G A S'ITCKY' COATING'O;+i TEETH WHEN COMBINED WI'1rHSALIVA IN THE MOUTH WHICH IS REMOVABLE ONLY BY ~I BRUSHING '! Paul J. La Rochelle, 427 Beech St., Holyoke, Mass. 01040, Filed May 18„1978a,Ser:,No: 907,167 I Ini: CL2 A61K 7118 U:S, CI! 424-52' 9 Claims 1. A soft, chewable3ozenge delivering to the,mouth, a com- position forming,a sticky coating on the teeth when combined! with saliva and completely removable from the teeth only by brushing, said' composition comprising: ~'a water-containing; non-cariogenic sweetener, in an amount ; of'about 20% to: 36% by weight selected from the group j consisting of xylitol, lycasin, mixtures of xylitol and sorbi- ~ tol and mixtures of lycasin andisorbitol'serving,as the sole i sweetening agent; a eleaner-polisher for the teeth in aniamounuof from about 30% to 60% by weight, which is greater than the amount ! i of said sweetener; +I, a starch adhesive in an amount of about 5% to 10% by I weight;, and a a viscosity builder and!softening agent comprising an unsatu- rated!vegetable oil which physically softens the mixture of ' cleaner-polisher and sweetener while interacting physi- cally with the starch adhesive to thicken the composition, • and enhance,adhesion to the teeth. ~
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PATENTS1 4,157,451 PROCESS FOR'THE'PREPARATION OF IPSDIENOL G'dnther Oh'loff; and Wolfgang K. Giersch, both of Bernex/- Genera, Switzerland, assignors to Firmenich, S.A., Geneva, Switzerland Filed D1ov.,7, 1977. Ser. No. 849,269 Claims priority, application Switzerland, Nov. 12;: 1976, 14263/76 Int. C1.x C07C 33/02 US. Cl. 569-875 S Claims 11 Process for the preparation of enantiomers of 2-methyl-6- methyltnerocta4,7-dien-4-ol which comprises the following steps: (a) isomerizing, the cyclic double bond of an unsaturated ketone of,formulae S' (ilb) by means of'a basic isomerizing agent to obtain a com• pound,of formulae (111a) respectively; and (IIIb)', (b) reducing the thus obtained: compound to obtain (+) or ( -)-cis-isoverbenol or (+) or ( -);trans-isoverbenol' re- spectively; and (c) heating the thus obtained (-)+cis-and(-)-trans- or (+):eis-and.(+)-trans-isoverbenol!products at a tempera- ture of from i about 400` to 700' C. for a period of time sufficient to produce respectively the S(+) or R(-)'enan- tiomers of 2?methyl;6.methylene octa-2;7-dien-4-ol; said reditction of'the formulae i:Ila and IIIb compound'being by means of an alkali' metal I borohydride or aluminohy- dride to obtain the (+)+ and (-)-cis-isoverbenol and,said reduction of the formulae IIIa and IIib compound being by means of' aluminum isopropoxide in isopropanol or an alkali metal in liquid ammonia to obtain the (-)- and (+}trans-isoverbenol respectively. 4,157;402' _ CEi•."fFR:FILLED CHEWING GUM Koichi Ogawa, Tokyo; Shichigoro Tezuka, I:awasaki; !lfasatoshi I Terasawa, Tokorozawa, and Shizuo Iwata. Tama, all of Japan, assignors to Lotte Co.. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan Filed Feb. 6, 1978, Sen No. 875.205 Claims priority„application Japan, Nuv., 22, 1977, 52;1'40418 Iht. CL='A23G 3/10 U.S. CI1426-5' 15 Claims 1. In a method of'making chewing gum having a gum base ~ and,a ftavored, liquidieenter fill, the improvement,comprising, the steps of adding, an emultiGer having, an HLB value in the rangrof 3'-IS to the center fill in an amount by weight of from 0.01-0.50k''o by weight of the center fill, and thereafter 'tncorpo- rating the center fill!with the emulsifier into the base. .VoL, J, 1101. 0". JwrsE 22, `1979 ` . 4,157;38i - COMPOSITIONS HAVING A PHYSIOLOGICAL COOLING EFFECT Hugh R. Watson4 Wargrave; David G. Rowsell, Staines. and John H. D., Browning, V1`okingHam, 211 of England„assignors F to 11'ilkinson,Sword Limited, London, England Division of Ser. No. 486,675,,Jul. 8,:1974, abandoned„which is a eontinuation-in-part of Ser.No: 221,753„Jan. 28, 1'972; abandoned. This application Sep. 29, 1977, Ser. No. $37,900 Int. CL?' A61K 7/16. 31/19 U.S. Cl. 424-55~ 15 C14ims 1. In a consumer product for application to or consumption by the human~body eomprising a consumer product base and, as adjuvants in said , base: (i) at' leasr one , of the following: aa flavourattt; colburant; perfuming, agent, surface active, agent, antiseptic or pharmaceutically active agent, and (ii) an ingredi- ent,capable of'stimulating,the cold,receptors of the nervous system;ofthe surface tissues of the body in those parts of the: human body with1which the product comes in contact during use„the improvement which comprises using as the cold recep- tor stimulating ingredientan effective amount of a cold recep- tor stimulating compound of 'the formula: COOR' where R' is Hor an aliphatic radical lof up to 10 ~carbon atoms selected from: mono- and: poly-hydrocyalkyl and cycloalkyl radicals containing from 2 to 10 carbon atoms and having a hydroxyl group in one or more of the 2- and 3-positions and'.a hydrogen atomiin the I-position; (2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4- yl)methyl; an acylated dtrivative of a mono- or poly-hydrocy- alkyl radical of 2-9 carbon atoms and having a hydroxyl lgroup in a 2- or 3-position and a hydrogen atom in the 1-position with a, lower alkanoic acid; aryl hydrocarbon radicals of up to 10 carbon atoms and containing a hydroxyl substitueat in a 2- or. 3+position relative to the ester grouping; carboxyalkyl Iradicals containing a carboxyl group in the l-, 2- or 3-position; an alkali metal, alkaline earth metalJ ammonium or ethanolamine salt of' suchi a carboxyalkyl, radical;, and lower alkyll esters of such carboxyalkyl radicals. -- - ---- °---- 4,157;350 - PROCESS FOR PREPARING 1-(2,6,6-TRINIETI I'S`L-1,3-CYCLOH EXADIEN-1-YL)-1,3# BUTANEDIONE AND: INTERMEDIATES' I Richard A. Wilsoni Westfield; Braja:D. Mookherjee, Holindtl, and William I.:Taylor, Summit, 211 of N1J., assignors to Inter- " national'.Flavors & Fragrances Inc., New York. N:Y., i Filed Mar. 17, 1978, Ser. No. 887,628'. '~ Inti C1.- C07C 49/61 I U.S.:CI. 260-586' R 2 Claims 1. An organomctallic compound having the structure: ~ Qs coil ~ . ~" 0 wherein X is selected from the group consisting ofl chloro, bromo and iodo.
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PATENTSJ 4,156,974COMBINATION ~ PLArT'SEEDLItiG-BULK'TOBACCO SUPPORT'STR'UCI'URE' Barney K.,Huang, 2008'Varnell Ave., Raleigh'y,N.C. Continuation-in-part of'Ser. No. 698,462, Jun. 21~ 1976, abandoned. This application,Mar. 24, 1978, Ser. No. 889,746 Int. Chz'A2iB.1/06. F26B 25/06' : U.S. CI. 34-236' 9 C7sims 1: A,combination plant seedling and' bulk tobacco support structure adapted!to support plant seedlings in.one mode of' operation and to support a volume oftobacco in another mode of operation, said combination plant seedling;and'bulk tobacco supportstructurrin said plant'seedling support mode oflopera- tioncomprising; an upstanding frame,structure;,screen means operatively associated with said!frame structureand'including, a plurality of independent screens normally vertically spacedd within said' frame,structure for supporting plant seedlings at several levels within said frame structure; means associated! ; with said frame structurrof said!combination supportstructure for supporting,said screens at selected levels within said frame structure such that in the plant seedling support mode, said I frame structure is adapted to support multi-layers of plant seedlings; and wherein as used as a bulk tobacco support struc- ture and!disposed in a filling position, said screen means of'said' combination support structure being movable from an,open position to a closed position; in said open positionsaid,screenn means being positioned such that tobacco may be filled below the normal level occupied by a respective screen of said screen I means when said respective screen is disposed in said closed' position. and wherein in said closed position said screen means i is adapted to be positioned over a layerof tobacco filled within i said combination support structure and inisaid closed position said screen means functions to overlay that layer of tobacco : underlying said screen means when in the normal filling,posi--i tion; mounting means associated with saidiscreen means for , mounting said screen,means in said support structure xuch that ' respective screens can be moved' rectilinear in said suppoct I! structure, when used as a tobacco support structure; and ~ wherein said support structure includes biasing means adapted ~ to be connected to said screen means for biasing, individual ~ screens of said'screen means in one direction during,the curing and drying operation in order to provide a more uniform body of tobacco : materiaU and i wherein said screen means extends generally transversely across said combination support strue- ture in said closed position when said combination support strueture is disposed in said fillinft,position and wherein said Vnn : ~T.;..IIn. ::.. .IiimF combination support structure is rotated approximately 90 degrees from said filling position to a curingand' dtying,posi- tionsuch that in said curing and drying position said combina- tioni support structure includes a plurality of side-by-side col- umns of tobacco leaves separated by the then vertically, ddis. , posed and' spring biased screen means. . , 4,158,006' REFINING SACCHARiN'SODIUII' Rhlf Deininger, Cologne, and Erich Wolf, 1<farialinden,,both of' Fed. Rep. of Germany, assignors toCbimicasa GmbH, Chur,, Switzerland Filed Jul. 27, 1977, Ser. No. 819,255 Claims priority, application Luxembourg„A'ug. 2, 1976, 75518' Int. Cl.='C07D 175/06 S: CI. 260-301 SClaims : U . ., . . I 1. A process for refining, saccharin sodium soluted in, an aqueous sohition, said, solution having been obtained by the process of Fahlberg-Rensen, and being, contaminated, with about 5fl00ippm of o-toluenesulphonamide and containing,30 to 60 percent by crystal weight of saccharin sodium, which comprises; adjusting the contaminated!soltition to obtain a pH'.of from 4.5 to 6.Q'and a temperature of from.l5' to 22' C.; extracting the o.toluenesulphonamide with methy,lene chlo- ride at a temperature of from 15' to 22' C. passed counter- currently to a flow, of said contaminated solution and emulsified with the contaminated solution as they pass countereurrently by, intermittently passing them through,, flow bafflt plates; said flow of'methylene chloride bei substantially vertical in orientation whereby the meth~ lene chloride is directed downwards; evaporating the methylene chloride residues from the ex- tracted aqueous solution;,and crystallizing the saccharin sodium from the evaporatedi solution; wherein the countercurrent extraction is continued,until the saccharin sodium crystallizable from the aqueous solution has a content of less than 1 ppm o-toluenesulphonamide. I © N ~. ~ !"b'
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PATENTS[ . 4,157,721 CIGA'RE1?TE PIPE HAVING A TAR CARTRIDGE Marcelo M. Balodl 129-14th Ave., Cubao, Quezon City, Philip+ pWnes Filed Nov, 22, 1976, Ser. No. 743,756 Int. CI.- A24F 13/01: 1104 U.S. Cl. 131-187' 1 Claim 1. A cigarette pipe having a taocartridge comprising;, j' (a)~ a hollow body member defined by a mounting:bore at . one end and a mouthpiece at the other end; ! (b) I an elongated cigarette holder, mounted in a press-fit, engagement in said mounting bore, said holder being, defined by a cigarette the rear end of which is tapered!and' ! joined to a short bore which in turn is imcommunication with receiving,bore, an extension bore oflreduced diame- . ter contiguous to and in axial alignment with said receiv- ing bore and!terminating,at a smoke outlet orifice; , (c) an,annular plate integrally formed as a one-piece struc-, lure on said,extension bore disposed,proximate the up- ! stream portion thereof said annular plate having diametri- cally disposed ismoke outlet orifices passing therethrough; , and (d) a tar cartridge defined by a closed bottom,wall and'an open top end tosnugly6t on said cigarette holder and!said annular plate whereby encompassing said extension bore, said cartridge defining, therein a low pressure chamber whereby the high velocity stream of smoke is expanded. ; eooledl and liquefied and said, cartridge having smoke . outlet openings disposed proximate its open end above • said annular plate and'communieating to the mouthpiece end through an annular chamber defined between said hollow body member and said cartridge. 4,L5T381 i 1-(2;6,6-TRIJtETI IYL-1,3-CYCLOHEXADIEN-I-YL)-1,3'- BUTANEDIONE AND ORGANOLEPTIC USES THEREOF' I Braja D. Mookherjee, Holhtdel;,Richard' A. Wilton, Westfield; : Frederick L Schmitt, Holmdel; Joaquin F. Vinals, RediBank, ' all of N.J„ and Jacob Kinala, Brooklyn,,N.Y., assignors to International Flavors & Fragrances Inc„ New York, N:Y. i Filed Mar. 17,1978, Ser. No. 887;630' ~ Iot. CL='C07C 49/61 U.S. a. 260a-586 R 2 Claims 1. Substantially pure 1-(1,6;6-Trimethyl-1',3-cyclohexadien- 1-yl)-1,3-butanedione. having,the structure: ~ A.hUfJ1F' 22 r -19 79 ~ i I ;v . 4,1.57,401 ` CHEWING GUM HAVING IMPROVED FLAVOR DURATION AND SHELF-LIFE JohnJ: Stroz, 14fonroe,,Conn.;,Abraham I. B'akal, Panippany,. N.J.; Frank Witzel, Spring Valley, and Donald A. M. MacKay, Pleasantville, both ofN:Y:, assignors to Life Savers, Inc., New York. N.Y. Filed Apr. 24; 1978, Ser. No. 899,122 Int. CI? A23G 3/30 U.S. Cl. 426;-3 8 Claims 11 A chewing,gum product having improved shelf-life and flavor duration comprising gum base, sweetenerq and a mixture of one or more flavors and a limonene derivative, said mixture being substantially uniformly dispersed' throughout' said gum base, said one or more flavors being present in an amount, within range of from about 0.3 to about 2% by weight of the . chewing,gum, and said limonene derivative being present in an amount within the range of from about 0. 11 to about 1.5% by weight of the chewing gum, said'I'imonene derivative,inhibit- ing or minimizing migration ofl said one or more flavors from said gum base thereby enhancing flavor duration and preserv- ing flexibility of the chewing gum during storage. 4,157,370' APPARATUS AND \lETHOD FOR,COVIPACTING M1IULTI-SECI1IOrAL PARTICULATE CONTAINING FII:TERS. Floyd Van Hall;,Durham, N1C:, assignor to Liggett Group Inc:, t Durham, N.C. j Division ofSer. No4 887,564, Mar. 16, 1978, Pat: No. 4,116,602: This application Jul. 17, 1978, Ser. No.925,3;3' lnti CI.T B28D' 1148 U.S. CI. 264-113 2 Claims i I ID t 53~ 51} `53. i ' I 1. A method!of compacting,mutti;sectional filterassemblies " containing a pair of spaced particulate adsorption-type,filter sections and alternate sections of entrainment-type filter mate- i rial, said'method comprising the step of .1t moving a punch into each of the opposite ends of'a filter assembly to force a,portion of'the entrainment-type filter material at each end of the assembly into an adjacent interior particulate filter section to displace and!compact the, particulate filter material! in said filter section while forming a recess in each oflthe opposite ends of the filter, j assembly. Q 0 C) W ~. ~ N'
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*) h>•' •' PATENTS~ 4,158.068 . I SWEETENER t1iIXTl6RE' Gert+H°olthard' Von,Rymon Lipinski, and' Erich L'tick, both of Frankfurt am Main, Fed. Rep. of Germany, assignors to Ho- echst Aktiengesellsch'aft, Nrankfurt am Main, Fed. Rep,. of Germany I Filed Jun. 22,,1977' Ser. No. 808;987 Claims priority„application Fed. Rep: of Germany„Jun. 24, ; 1976,2628294 int. Ch2:A23L 1/236 • US: CL 426-S•t'8 5 Claims 1. A sweetener mixture having an improved saceharose+likr ' taste and consisting,of' (a) the potassium salt of 3i4-dihydto-6-methyl-I,2,3-oxathia, zine-4-one-212=dioxide andl (b) a further sweetener selected from the group consistingaf • r (i) aspartyl pheny,l-aloninemethyl lester, (ii) thrsodium salt ofc clohex Ilsulfatnic acid y . i y ' I (iii) the sodium salt of (v) neohesperidin-dihydrochalcone, ' wherein1 the ratio by weight of (a) to (b) in such a mixture is ~ from 1t10to 10:11forsweetener(b)i(i),3i1 to 1l12forsweetener I (b) (ii), 1:2 to 10:1 for sweetener (b) (iii), and StI to 20:1 for sweetener, (b) (iv). 4,158,364 I TOBACCO SMOKE FILTER' Enrique Ligeti, Plessanton, Cnlil., assignor to Albert P. Marinko,,Pleasanton, CaliL, a part interest Filed Sep. 22, 1977, Ser., No. 835,696 ~ lat. C7? A24F 13/02,13/04 ~ US..Q. 131-187 5 Claims 44 41 t, ,zf,~$a;lSr 1 48 14 I(), . 8~715.: ~ .9.47/'/ I0+"T. S2 ' ~ 5;~. - , ~ .48 J +~4 r. 3~4t 10 5® I I I 1. A tobacco smoke filter comprising an assembly of a plural- ' ity of detachably connected!sections; said assembly consisting '. of a first section fonholdingp burning cigarette and for passing inhaled tobacco smoke, said first seetion comprising a u-shaped structure having a pair of inturned slanting,flanges arranged' in : confronting,relationship to define an inclined restricted bore through which i inhaled tobacco smoke : is drawn from a re- stricted openingdeading from, an expanded smoke inlet to said', restricted'bore which terminates adjacent,a side wallI of said first section; to open into a second expanded chamber of said first section, a second section i removably attached to said first section; said second!section comprising two parts of which'one ! part consists of a transverse web having a restricted passage- ' way therethrough adjacent to one side thereof and communi, eating,at its one end with said second expanded chamber of said first section, and the otherpart of section two consists of a connected tapering element having a tapering bore there- through forconducdng,thrinhaled smoke, said second section having an annular flange thereon, having,an opening therein Itading,to the exterior thereof to admit air into the interior V0n ; fl. ,IJo1. B._ ,ltrr,~E 22, '1979F thereof,,a third section detachably and rotatably connected to l said second section; said third section having an annular inner ; " shoulder having a series of'spaced apart,radially extending, " passages of different cross-sections therein which are adapted' to be selectiveNy plaeed incottununicationwith said opening;of' said annular flange of said second section to conduct air from the exterior to the tapering bore of said tapering eltrment of said,second section; said third section having an expanded compartment for gathering inhaled smoke led through ~ said second~section; a reduced hollow member on the outer end of' saidi third! section having its defined sligtitly expanded: bore communicating with, said tapering bore of said tapering ele- ment of,said!second section, and a mouth-piece section tele- scopically fitted to said reduced hollow member of said third section. t?
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PATENTS (731 (73)I v (211. (Z21 (s+l (7s), (731 United States Patent (I91 Roselias et al. PROCESS FOR THE EaTRACTION OF NICOTINE FROM TOBACCO Inventors: Wilhelm Roselius, Magnus;,Otto Vitzthum, Bremen; Peter H'nbert+. Bremen-Lesum. all!of Fed. Rep. ofi Germany Assignee•. Studiengesellschaft Kohle mbH, MUlheim, Ruhr, Fed., Rep: of Germany Appl. No.: 390.967 Ft7ed: Aug. 23, 1973 Related US. Application Data (63) Continuation of Ser; No. 177,'.20. Sep. 2. 197f. abandoned. (301 Foreign Application Priority Data Sep.2, 1970(DE) Fed..Rep. ofGermany._.»..2013337' Aug. 23: 1971, (DE) Fed. Rep. of Germany...._.. 2142205 (S1j' fnt. Cl.t .. . .. ._ _ ... . -»-»...». A24B 3/14 (s21, Us.CI »».,131/143;131/17R;, 131/144, (581, FielldofSearch... 131/1?/;,1i3:144;,135, 131/1110 C;, 260/291, (361 References Cited, U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 3,424;171! 111969 Rooker.._.._-.._...__.._-...- 131/143 Osborne; d'r. et a1L . (4s) Apr. 24, 1979 ' (IIl 4,153,061 (4s) May 8, 1979 FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS ~ 1512060 0 12/1967' France _.__.__ .._-. 1311141 1'111422' 7/1969i United Kingdom:_ _». 131/143 1057911 2/1967' United Kingdom ..__._»....M. 131/133 OTHER PUBLICATIONS "D•mgerousi Ptoperties of'Industrial Materials,^ Sax, 3rd'.edition. 1969, Reinhold Publishing Co.,,N.Y:, pp. 962„968; 730. 1129, I Luganskaja: L. N: et al.,, "On the Aromatization of ; Tobacco" and "Use of Tobacco Dust Extract for Aro- . ttutizing,Purposes:'; pub.-from "Tobaceo Abstractsl". ! vol! 12, ft Jun. 1968, pp. 394 and 393, abstracts 1258 ' and'1259. I Primary Examinrr-Robert W: Michell Assistant'Eiaminer-V. Millin Attorney. Agent. or Firm-Sprung, Felfe. Horn. Lynch & Kramer I i (S7) ABSTRACT Ptocess' for' extracting nicotine is disclosed in which J tobacco is exposed !o an ~ extracting sol4ent ini eith'erl, liquid'or gaseous state at temperatures below about 100"' C. and, avhigh pressures. The aroma generating sub.ll stances can be removed by conducting,the extraction l with the tobacco in dry condition. Thereafter Ih'e to, bacco can be moistened: and on furthcr contacting the nicotine is removed. The aroma generating substances pn:then be recombined with nicotine free tobacco. 32 Claims, 6IDra..ing Figures United States Patent p9r (nr 4,150;677'. (211 Appl. No.: 761,732 TREATtIENT! OF TOBACCO' Inventors: J. Scott Osb'orne, Jr.; Homer A. Hertung; Joseph F. Bebbs, Jr., all of RichmondJ Va. Assignee: Philip Morris Inearporated; New York. N.Y. • (221 Filed: Jan, 24, 19TJ (311 Int. Cl.t ..»» .... A24B:3/III: A24D 1/00 (921 US. Ct. ..... 131/g R;,.131/17 R; 171/143; 131/14c. (98) Field of Searcb ..._.... ........ L31/8 R, 2, 9, 17, 143, 131/1rt4; 142, 140 iRL 140 C;,260/290'A', 291, 292 (!61 References Cited U'.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS'. 3.174.495 1 1/1963. Griffithet al. 131/143 3.424;171 1/1969. Rooter........ ...»...___..-.. 131'/143 OTHER' PUBLICATIONS J: Org. Ch'em.. Vol. 30. 1965, pp. 29 18492 1. Pn•mary Eraminer-Robert W. Michell Asuttant £zamuer_V. Millin I Attorney. AgenL or fiirm-Susan A. Hutcheson; Arthur I. Palmer. Jr.; George E. Inskeep i I (S7), . ABSTRACT A process is provided for the treatmenn of tobacco which comprises the steps of:' (1)'contacting tobacco ! which contains relatively high quantities of desirable t flavorants,and wh'ich may also contain relatively high I quantities of'materials wwhich'may produce tar and'nico- i tine in the tobacco smoke, for example, a flavorful brighOtobaeeo. with a stream of non-reactive gas' under ;condiuons whereby the togacco is heated in a tempera ; ture range from about 140 to about 180' C., and iprefera-' bly from about 160 to about 170'C., for a period of time sufficient to: result in a weight loss of the tobacco of from about 3 to about 10% in excess of the,weight loss represented by oven: voiatiles as defined herein, (2) condensing volatileconstituents of the resulting gaseous stream, for exampler by passing the g4seous stream in contact with rsurfice, maintained at a temperature of from about -78' C. or lower to about 30' C., for suffi- ` eient time to form a condtnsate•, ,and (3)' colla•ctin g;said oondensata The condensate may be,uaed subsequently to flavor a smoking material in order to enhance the,: organoleptic properties of,its smoke. I 6 Claiins,~ 7 Drawing: Figures'. Vni Ji(('rjF:?.?. '1 Wy 1 I;
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r>t .t *' • PATENTS United States Patent (i9]i Bharucha et al. [iq 4,153,613! [;sl May 8, 1979 . (S41I ACETA1S A\D KETAI'S OF ASCORBIC [58J Field of Search .....__ 260/340.9 R' ACID AND A'.rTi-NITROSAw1I\E COS1POSiTIO\S IA,fiD Af ETHODS'USi\G' SA:1tE ~ [561, References Cited' I U.S. PATE:v'T DOCUMENTS ~ [t31 Inventors: Kekhusroo:R. Bharucha, Toronto: 2.190.I67, 2/1M 2ama _. : 260/330.9'R'X, . Charles K. Cross. Resdale; Leon J: 2.26Y,1211 12/194I Reichuaa __....„ 260/31t 1731 Rubin, 'I'oronto, all of Canada Assignee: Canada Packers 1.imited. Toronto. Prhrrary Examiner-Ethel G. Love 4 Attornry, Agent, or Firm-Bacon & Thomas Canada ~ [371' 4BSTRA CL [211 App1. No:: g71,S10 I Novel acetal and ketal derivatives of ascorbic acid hav- [221 Filed: Jae. 23.,197g ing utility, in controlling, the formation of undesirable laitrosamines in cooked, nitrite cured meat products are : RNrted US. Application Data (B2] I Division of.5er. No::799,093, May :0.~ 1977. ('SIJI inkCL-_ ........._C07D317/10 (52]! U5. CIJ _ _. 260/340.9 R; 426/332 disclosed: Meat treating compositions containing these eompounds, methods of treaung meats w'rth' same and meat,products containing same are alYo disclosed. 16 Claims„\o Drawings m United States Patent (19i (t11 4,129,134 Hind et a!. [4si Dec. 12;1978' (541 SMOKING ARTICLE .. Q731 Inventoes: Ioha D: Htnd; tWtUiam C. Hopkins, both of,Richtnond. Va. (731 Asrignee: Pb1Up Morris Incorporated. New York. N.Y. (211 [221. AppL' No.: 616`609 Filed: May 14, 1976 Related US. Application Data ° [63] Coatinu.tioaofSer: No., 367;76i..Apr. 1e.,1976t abandone4 which is a oontinuauon of'Ser. No. 172.4118, luo..22.'. 1973. abandoned. [3iJ InE CL= .~ _ _ ._. _.. _.... _. A2Z3D11/1g (!2)US. CL 131/2; 131/1s C; ~ 1a1/140 C: [38] 1 FkldofSearc! _ ~ 131/110'C.2.17•;40 6 (S6J Referenees Cited' U.S. PATE'YT DOCUMENTS I,s29.tA29/1970 . Hind et :&l...... .r. 131 /2 ),{12s64. S/1971. Qartwnebt 131/2 FOREIGN'PATEhT DOCUMENTS 617907 3/1967. Belgium .~.. _...~. 131/2 frieear,v Examiner-Stephen C. Pellegrino lsistant;£:arriner-V: Millin Attorney. AgenA' or Firm-Watson, Leavenworth. K,elton:R Taggart (371 ABSTRACr, This invention relates to smoking articles, such as ciga- rettes,,httle cigars and the like, having,a novel wrapper or outer, covering and to a method for producing the same. More particularly, the invention relates to smoF- ing articles comprising tobacco and a novel wrapperr comprising a film having certain specified properties. The film preferably comprises a natural polysaccharide component which is preferably combined with an alka- line earth metal component. The,wrapper possesses a unique appearance and other physical characteristics which are distinct from those of conventional wrappers for tobaeco products, such as cigarette papers and to- baecoleaves, as well as being-0istinetiromthervarious modified tobacco products which have been uught as wrappers for smoking products. S Claima, No Drawings .Y
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.h _ PATENTS] 90: 69347 u Tobacco smoke filters. Green, John David;' Harris. Ian Richard (British-american Tobacco Co: Ltd.) S.' African 77' 07,0II0 (CI. A24C), 08 Aug 1978, Brit. Appli: 76J,46,a9°_. 09 Nov 1976; 9'pp: A filter for tobacco smoke contg.; granules of porous activated'' C to which the nitroxide 4Loxo-? 2,=; 6,6'-tetramethvlpiperidino-oxy (I) and/or 1-nitronyl-3'-oxy1-4,=t 4,5:5-tetramet-hvl-2~-phetn•ldih},droimidazole (II) has been applied; was manufd.; such a filter or material displayed high filtration: efficiency: for NO. Thus, activated C (1 g) in porous granular. form was added: to a soln. of'100 mg, of T in s mL of EtOH: The solvent was allow•ed' to evap: at room temp. until! the granular C, was dry and free-tlowing, this gave a loading level of - 10%. A: triple filter contg. a bed of' 100: mg of' this treated C disposed' between 2 sections of cellulose acetate, each & mm long,, wasr attached to a eigret' filled with flue-cured tobacco. On smokinq the: cigaret through this filter. 72 % (by, wt.), NO was removed'. from; the tobacco smoke. Similarly, when Id app lied to C: granules; but with~ a loadin- level of 5%, a NO filtration: efficiency of 4'49e was obtaineS. An addhl. example is presented' iwwhich NO filtration efficiency was further, enhanced by filter;l ventilation. ' United States Patent ng)i Kulka et aL hs1 [731 l21I TOBACCO CO1tPOSITIONS'COr'rA INING lETH OX Y-&HY D RO:t Y B E\ 7.A LDEH YDE' 2,2-D1AtETHYL PROPANCEDIOL A[EPAI: Inventon: Kurt Kulka, New York. N.Y.; Frank , Mild. Westwood. NJ.; Fraek Flschettij Jr., Flushing., N.Y. Arslgnee: Fritsxhe Dodge & Oleott Iac., New Yorfc, N.Y. AppL No.: 797,508 I221 Filed: Mey, z0, 1977 (sl) IoL C1? ._... ........ A248 3/12 (92) USS: CL ... 1L31/17 R; 426/538; 260/340A (]81 Fleld of SearcY .. 131/17, I4t; 426/538; 260/3af1.7. 11l1, 4,123,1011 (4s), Dec. 5, 19?8' [361 Refereneea Clted I N.S. PATENT'DOCUMENTS 3,991.214. 11/1976'. SlanBan et.1.. 111'/17R Primary E:amieer-Robert W! Michell AQisgaeuEzaminer-V: Mi11in Anoraey. Agen; or Finn-Frank M. Nolan 1.571 ABSTRACT 3-Ethoxy.4+hydroxybenvldehyde 2.2-0imethyl- : propanediol acetal has a unique /lavor and aroma which . markedly enhance the flavor and aroma of tobacco products and comestibles: , Unlike ethyl vanillin, from which; it is derived, the acaul has a less pronounced vanilla or ethyl vanlllin,odor and taste and a more in-I tuue chocolate by.note: i Cl.im., No Dnwingr VOL-9 9,~ -110. 8, JUrJ!E 22, ''I979,!:. .>I
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a - Dalo of' rcqpast: Not noed'cd alter: Reqpestcr s order no. Call No. usRAr,v LOZILLAP,D RESEARCH CENTER POJ 21683 G'I:EEt;SL'Of;O, t':C 27420. For use of' Status Book author: OR: pericdical titte, vot. and date ID Book titla, edition,* ptace, yeari series: OR: periodical article author„ title, pages. Verified in: CR: item cited in I'SBN; or ISSN, or LC card, or OCLG, or other number it' known It non-circulating. & cost does not exceed S , please supply r Request complics with D~t08(r~) (2) Guidelines (CCG)' A'UTHORIZEDBY:. Title C]'othcrprovisions of copyright: tatiy (CCL) (FULL NAME) i?ate of request:. Call No. Dept. 0 A REQUEST This editionionty: Ulicrotilm jHard copy - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Not needed Requester's aftec order no. LIBRARY LOi:f LLAP:D: I:ES'cit`.^ CH , CENTER P03 21688, G['.EEIISBORO, NC 27420 For use of, Status Book author: OR: periodical titte;,vol. and date Dept.. A REQUEST Book title, edition, ptacc, year, series: OR: periodical articteauthor„title; pagcs.OThis edition only: Verified in: OR: item cited in ISBN, or ISSN„ or LC card, or OCLC, or other number it known It non-circutating, F& cost does noE exceed $„ please supplyatAicrotilm a Hard copy ftcq}ict:.t~ comhties %vith AUTt40ft1?_[O [lY: r l7i1i~27 to tu CCC) 2 i? ()) ( ~ c ivs ( ~ 1 (FULL r~nra[i) 0 otlrer provrs+orrs of caj+~•rnghG luw (CCL) Ti itle ~ VoL ; J, iao, 08. )uNE 22, '197911 .ti
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LORILLARD AWARENESS BULLETIN DISTRIBUTION LIST RnBarnes, Winston Bell, J. Hi. R-Tucker, C. L.. Wagner, J. R.. Bingaman, D. P.. Williams,, Davidi Bledsoe, Quincy B D H Wu, Dr. E'" Chun g . ogue, . Bohlken, J. H. M. Crouse, Bill Deaton_, Bill M"hdebahr, H. F. Block, M. S. Bowes, Major Dumas, Glenda Duncan, Brenda Efird, Heath Bullock, J. Edwards, R. Falvey, T. S. P. C. Forte, Melissa Fowler, William Goolsby, Ron Goettman, A. T. Hudson, A. B. : Jessup, Joyce Ihrig, Dr. A. M. Ireland, Sue Jessup, Terry Jones, Dr. Lewis, Dr. McGee, Sarn S'. T. C. I. Johnson, Lynn Kirschstein, Wi. Kraus, Bob Larson, Tom Meadows, C. Pearman, H. Spears, Dr. Tedder, D. E'. R. A. R. W,. Lassiter, C. Wi.. Lewis, Jane Long, W. A. McGeady, Ja Thompson, A Tiliman, W. Welborn, C. Young, R. C . W. M'. B. . McGeady, John Marmor, Dr. R. S. Middleton, Bobby Mills, Ken LrBrislin, L. Didelot, J. Feige, Jr., E. A. . Minnemeyer, Dr- H; J. Gutermuth, L. N. Morganj J..P. Moss, Burma Murphy, Donna: Nichols, Bill Hetsch, Hottell, McNeil, Norris, J. P. S. J. E.. A. G. P. Patterson, Dr. R. B. Perini, Dr. Florian Redmond, Don Rains, E. D. Rayburn, Pat Richardson, J. L. Reid, Dr. Jack Schichedantz, Dr. P. D. Schultz, Dr. F'. J., D-Blair, Bobby Cowan, Scott Shoffner, Rose: ' Moorefield, F. M. Skladanowsl:i, Slaven, Dr. R. NY-Gol.dbrenner, R. .~ Smart, Dave Sausa, R. J. Smith, Ed Smith, Dennis Smith, Howard, Stevens, A. J. ThaggardyNeil Tong, Dr. H. S.. "The more extensive a man's knowledge of what has been done, the greater will be his power of knowing what to do."

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