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Document 32442

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March 9, 1970 SUGGESTIONS FOR COORDINATION OF RESEARCH AMONGST THE RESEARCH CENTRES OF BRITISH AMERICAN TOBACCO AND ASSOCIATED COMPANIES Since the total number of scientists in the entire BAT organization is probably greater than that of any other tobacco company in the world, there is every reason to expect the BAT group to be at the technological forefront of the world's tobacco industry. One can question whether the total effort is currently achieving the output expected and whether better coordination of research and development would enhance the output. The coordination of research activities within the BAT group has been discussed and attempted to some degree by the research people several times in the past. The development of PCL is an example of the potential of coordination. This project which involved BAT, General Cigar Inc., B & W and our- selves was the first and perhaps the only major mroject to be closely coordinated. Experience has shown that it was technically %uccessful. The subject of coordination of research has been discussed at the various Group Research Meetings held during the past two and a half years. The current philosophy on coordination was recorded in Minute No. 37 of the Krpnberg Conference "The aim is for each laboratory to control its own work in such a way that it integrates into a total effort so that the laboratory gets the maximum advantage". The present degree of coordination, albeit fairly loose, has no doubt been stimulated by the research conferences held during the past couple of years. It is also aided by a reasonably good information exchange in the form of formal reports and correspondence supplemented by rather BAT Industries document for Province of British Columbia 9 November 2000 BAT INDUSTRIES 00290389
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-2- infrequent visits, together with the inherent desires of scientists not to duplicate that which has already been done. Nevertheless, one cannot help but feel that some more formal method of coordination would result in improved effectiveness of a total BAT research program and better use of skills, equipra~nt and money than currently. Of course, not a11 projects are amenable to coordination insofar as each country has proDlems which are unique to that particular location and can best be solved by them. Nevertheless, there are a number of specific areas such as the development of a cigarette with less bio- logically active' smoke condensate, improvement of filling power, and development of a better reconstituted tobacco, which are of mutual interest to most of the group laboratories. These subjects involve lengthy and difficult programs and I believe would lend themselves very suitably to greater coordinated approaches. Any laboratory in undertaking a role in coordinated research would, of course, be committed to satisfactorily fulfilling its obligations yet, at the same time, would have to be able to cope with local problems which may at times be of very high priority. The establishment in October 1968 of a Research Planning Section at Southampton, headed by Dr. Felton, indicates the intention of ultimately achieving some degree of coordination amongst research centFes, but so far due to other major responsibilities they have been unable to devote sufficient time to activities in the associated laboratories. The following sections of this memorandum set forth suggestions of achievinq coordination through group planning and cooperation to complement the central planning function. BAT Industries document for Province of British Columbia 9 November 2000 BAT INDUSTRIES 00290390
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-3- I. The research managers at regular meetings should define major problems in the industry, explore new research areas and ideas, review major progress, decide on future action, and up-date each other on the special skills and potentials in the members' laboratories. Agreement should be achieved on programs to be coordinated, the general scooe of these programs, the identifying of the participating laboratories and the degrees of participation. 2. Once the overall program involving coordinated projects has been agreed upon, then a meeting of the scientists from the different laboratories who will be directing the different phases of the project should be held, in order to po0| ideas and discuss methods of approach, staff, facilities, schedules, etc., so that a suitably detailed program, designed to meet the objectives of the participating groups, can be formulated. It may be desirable for the research managers to also attend this meeting but this will depend upon the size and complexity of the individual project under discussion. It is not inconceivab|e that on some occasions one laboratory would carry out all the experimental ~.~ork but that individuals from the other partlcipatinq laboratories would cooperate in the direction and monitoring of the project in order to ensure that objectives of all participating groups are being met. The contributions to each project by individual organizations should be so planned as to maintain the ~otivating forces v~ithin those organizations. In other vtords, a balance of BAT Industries document for Province of British Columbia 9 November 2000 BAT INDUSTRIES 00290391
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-4- the in~ortance and quality of the contributions should be kept, and unreasonable distribution of the more mundane tasks avoided. 3. At various stages throughout the life of the project, the scientific leaders of the project from the various laboratories should convene to review the project to date and plan the future directions to be followed. Written progress reports at suitable intervals should, of course, be circulated between meetings and, in addition, frequent co~unication via letters and short notes should be encouraged. A project leader should be appointed for each project so that he can act as the coordinator for that particular project. 5. The role of the Research Planning Section would be that of overall coordination of the joint projects and to act as chairman of the Research Managers' meetings when projects are reviewed, formulated, etc. It should also encourage and develop the proper atmosphere for coordination to occur. In addition, it should have a responsibility to alert the group to new areas requiring attention for ultimate discussion by the research managers as to action required. The research managers should be equally responsible for identifying future problem areas of the industry. Research Planning should probably not act as a clearing house for all information on an individual project; rather this should be a responbibility BAT Industries document for Province of British Columbia 9 November 2000 BAT INDUSTRIES 00290392
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-5- of the project leader to keep all concerned informed. BAT Industries document for Province of British Columbia 9 November 2000 BAT INDUSTRIES 00290393
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APPENDIX A SUGGESTED LIST OF PROJECTS WHICH LEND THEHSELVES TO COORDINATION I. Improvement of filling power. Development of reconstituted tobacco having lowered biological activity of the condensate relative to that of lamina and which can be used at substantially higher percentages of ~he total blend than presently, without adverse effects on taste, burn rate, etc. Methods of reducing the biological activity of tobacco condensates such as through treat~nt of the tobacco or development of inert materials to act as diluents. 4. Methods of Biological Assay of smoke. 5. Development of techniaues to make high filtration cigarettes more acceptable to the smoking public. Development of filters having selectivity for particular components of the smoke. Improved methods of subjective evaluation of tobaccos and the development of relationships between subjective and objective parameters such as leaf and smoke components and/or physiological responses, as aids in leaf blending and product development. o BAT Industries document for Province of British Columbia 9 November 2000 BAT INDUSTRIES 00290394
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-2- The development of blends and processes to produce products which will compete with the Dutch type pipe tobaccos, in particular Amphora. The evaluation of all types of machinery for the processing and manufactur~ of tobacco products and filters. In the latter would be included evaluation of tow processing equip- ment and equipment for multiple filters with and without additives or granular chambers. BAT Industries document for Province of British Columbia 9 November 2000 BAT INDUSTRIES 00290395

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