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Radio Continuity, Lucky Strike, the Fbi in War and Peace, Summer Replacement Jack Benny, June - Sept. 1952

Date: 1952
Length: 655 pages
ATX01 0182208-ATX01 0182861
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v~J d~ r~
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t~ ~'~ .~'- "~ - ,:~ F: ,' ~'~'T~~ "BRASS I~SIUO tCL~ S" , ~oduoed and Direo%ed by: Bstty ~devill¢ Sorip% by: k~ tb RT~01 0182209
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-1- .... ~ A~NOgNC~: O,, ' j Tonight '~ ~tary...~~. MUSIC: THE~ AND U OUOUOUOUOUO~. ~O~D: PHONE. WALTZ: Oh, eYening, Mr. Ydles. No sir, he% (;~DDLE 81XTIE8) City Club. not here, they all went home after the meeting. Ft. Hsgarty's upstaire in the card room, would you w~,t him, sir? Oh I see... _(~OUND: DOOR DPE~I OFF A LITTLE) Just a minute, sir, somebody's coming in, I'ii see if it's him,..(A BEAT)...no sir, it's not him, it's Mr. Gordon. You're welcome, Mr. Miles, good night, sir. ~.~O~_~Good evening, Mr. Gordon. NIO~: Hello, Walter. Is George M~gerty here? WALT~q: Yes, sir, he is, upstairs in the card room. HICK~ Okay, boys, go up and t~ke care of him. (SqU~/~: FpQTS~EPS UPST4[Bg/ Walter... Yes. sir? WALTER: tb FIT ~0"1 0'182210
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-2- ~IOK: In a couple of ~/nutea you're going to hear a little noise upstaire, don't pay any attention te it. AIso there are going to be people asking questions about who eame to see Hagerty tonight. Yeu don% know who o~me to see him. There were three guy~ and they were i ~ask~..~E S~OPS AS:) I ~-IZ: ! e~ ~' S'E~U S "HELP: WALTER. HE,~~ l ', ~ ~ ..... NICK: <CONTIi'~ES) You ~ider~tand, Walter, three guys who wore m~ks, you oeul&n 't identify them, (A-~zA~-~-Wa&t, er,.-- , _~ t~ ~ WALT~q: (TERRIFIED) Yss, sir, I understand. NICK: You better, Walter...because wharfs happening to N~gerty happen~ to anybody who doesn't do ~bat he's toldo Always do what you're told, Walter...it'll keep you out of trouble. tb ~T~01 0182211
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-3- SHEPpARD: On the night of September twelfth, 1949, t~cee men entered the City Club of Gifford, Ohio, and brutally essaulted George Hegerty, a minor ~litician on the City Council. H~erty died as a result of this beating and the newly formed Citizens Orime Co~nlissian asked your FB[ to conduct an investigation inbo the crindnal organization which h'~d g~ined control of the city. Our investigation began when ~geht Bailey and I called at the home of Walter Lewis, steward of the City Club. B~ILEY: ~Id you ~ay the men wore handkerchiefs over their faces, ~. Lewie. WALT~: (V~y SU~DU£~) Yes, sir, they did, SHEPpARD: /:~ they asked for George Negerty. W;~LTER: YesI sir. & ~HEp~ p~2D: You couldn't recognize any of their voices? WALTER: No, sir I...I...(HE STARTS COUGHI~G)-~.. (OFF A LITTL~)~Yesr dear. tb MARTHA: BTH01 0";1~22";2 I
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-4- wgtT~: ° MARTHA: -. WALTER: - l d . (TO SHZPP~D) l~-~oi~i~,l just h~ven D been ~yself since.,. since this happened. BAILEY: We understand George H~erby was a good friend of yours, ~. Lewis, WALTI~R: ~de grew up on this block together. He was the best friend I hed. , , SHEPPI~D: i That-s-ell-~ight~-owelr~o% going to,keep ~eu.long, Er. Lewis~.l~ { one of these i~,en held you at gun point while the other two went upstairs to the oard room. i~i~t d~d you do when thoy came down and left, ~r. Lewis? W~ITER: I...I rushed upstairs to George. He.,.he was u~oonsoious then, I ca/led the polioe ~id I,,,well...I guess that!s all. The polloe oeme for Oeor~e,..he was bleeding some%hin~ terrible end...(}~ STOPS AS HE AU¢OST BREAKS UP) tb R~'HO'I 0182213
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SHF2pARD: Well, I think that's enough for today, Yu. Lewis. We'll come back 'Borne other time. WALTFR: (DOW~) I 'm sorry, really I ~J~. ] 'd llke to help, but.,. BAILL~: Thet's all right, we'll get in touch with you if we need you. yo~ returning to work soon, ~. Lewis? W}iT~ : No, the doctor says my heart...he Bays I'll have to rest quite a long while. BAILEY: I see~ (SOU~_~.L_]~) Well thanks for helpi~,g us anyway. ~rs. Lewis, we'll phone first if we're coming back ~ain. "- " " MARTHA: i~my ~ime you want, gentlemen. SF~YPPARD: Oh, uh, ½". LewiS;.. "'" { ; • i Yes, sir, . ~ ,,~. BHEPPf~D: ~" " dust one thing b~fore we go. ~qat time was it when these men came into the club? tb Goodbye, A 1"~40 1 0182214 ii
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-6- WALTER: About elevbn lhlrty, I d say. The meetlng br, oke.up at eleven, it ~as just about a h~f~ho~ ~t~P"the m~eting. .... • 8HEPPARD: OKay, thanks, Mr. Lewis. We'll be in touch with you. and Aw, M~r tha... M~RTHA: I can't help it. hhat's going to happen to us, Walter, you can't go on lying this way forevor. WALTZ: Yet tha... Maybe you should're told them the %rath. You saw what happened to George. ~hey'd k~ll me, one day after I talked. I wouldn't llve (MIS~qABLy) I know, I know. But there must be some way... tb Arao o 822 5
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-7- WALTk3h There isn't, ]~artha, believe me, they run everything in this town, George told me. He knew they were coming for him. N~RTHA: lie knew? WALTER: Everybody knew it. They told George they wanted this bill passed in the ceuncil, they wonted to legalize their slat zaohineao George tried, he tried to get the bill passed, but he ~ou!dn't. mld that's what they did te him, just because he promised to Get the bill passed and he eouldn%. ~A~THA: But you c~n:t keep up like this, Walter, the doctor said... MARTHA: Don't answer it, ' Walter...it e him again, W~LTER: :ii have to ans~ver, Nartha..,he knows I 'm hero. Hello. NICK~ (FILTER) Hello, Walter, you know ~he this iso (DRY-r'OUTHED) Yc~. Yes, tb RT 01 0182216 W
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-8- hICK: (FILTh) I'm calling from a phone booth down the corner, Valter. I just saw those men leave your house. You didn't have any trouble with them,did you? ho...no sir, I didz~'t. NICK: (FILTh) Okay, just checking up, You stick to your story, Valter, and you won't be sorry. I'ii call you later. Was that him? YeB. ~at did he say? MARTHA: "~ WALTER I "k NARTHA~ "~'~ WALTER: ha said I ehould atick to ~ 8tory..,he eald I ~on't be sorry, that'e \ ~-. all. tb Ar}~01 018221?
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9 SHEPpARD: Aud as our investigation proceeded the Citizens' Grime Co~deslon supplied uB with the political baskgrotmd of the assault on George H~g~rty. As is often the ease in a criminally dominated city, it was an open seoret that a racketeer naraed Nick Gordon was running the town ~id that GordonCs lawyer wrote the wording of bills offered to the City Coumcil. Theoretically it was possible to link Gerdon to the assault on H~gerty.°.but only theoretically. JD~y~ (~J~0UT T~fENIY-FIVE) Don t you see, Yrs. Lewis, if I could locate that memorsnd~ that Nick Gordon sent to Dad it would establish a possible motive. (A BEAT) Don"t you see? (w ILY) ~q head. M~RTHA: I suppose so. Ji~y, but all of these polities ere over Imll tell W~lter you=re here...(PROJECT) Walter... VALTE~: {OFF) Yes, fleer. Ji~y H~gerty is here. (OFF) I ~ii be there in a ~inute. JIFfy: (LOW~,ED VOICE) How'e he fealingnow, Yrs. Lewis? tb R T.-~O 1 01B221~
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i0 MT~RTHA: (LOk:EBED VOICE) I donVt know, he doesn't seem to pick up any. He was so fond of your father and alI.°°(LETS IT HANG) I knowo JI~Y: He juet sits in that chair in the sun parlor. He won't even read or take a weJk, (COMING IN) Hello, Ji~y. WALT~: J[ffff: (WARJ~LY) Hello. Yr. Lewis, how Me you. WALTER: Oh I'm ~iI right. ~ow:s your mother, Jimmy? JIF~[f: Pretty good, thanks. You tell hsr I mean to come over as soon ~ I ~m feeling better. J I ~NTf: I will. ~alter. Yes? tb Yd~RTHA: WALTER : 19TH01 0"1822 '19
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ii MARTHA: About a memor[~ndu~n th~t...mayb@ youVd Jimmy W~LtS to talk to you. better tell hi~l, Jimmy. Will it bother you to talk about what happened, Fr, Lewis? WALT~: No, go ahead, Jimmy. JIM~IY: DO you remember, Nr. Lewis, about two months ago, when Dad introduoad that slot machine bill to the Council? Wt~T~: Yes, I remedy, bar. JI~NY: Before he introduced it, Nick Gordon sent him a memo giving the exact wor~ng of the bill. Gordon signed the memo, I saw it. W.~LT~: Yss. I remember, your father to~d me about it. He didn't want to introduce the billo Jl~: I've looked all through hi~ papers, Ya'o Lewis. If I could find that memo. if we could show that Gordon w~s putting pressure on him... W~T~: Yes? JI~Y: tb A T;~O 1 0~82220
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12 Don't look for it, pleaee. Forget the whote thing, JD~Y: huh? WALTI~q: Nobody can protect you from Gordon, Jirray. Nobbdy. JI~Y: (~ B~AT) I...I didn't think ycu:d feel that way, Y~. I~wie. (IuLMOST ~ BREAKING, J!~y, I'm telli~ you, for your o~n good, keep out of this. You've got e nice law business, you're doing well in the city. If Gordon knew whet you were trying to... JIFFY: You beli~i~ hoodlume beat up Dad, don't you? ($LO'~LY) I...I only ~3~ow what I;s~w~ Ji~y. All: right, th~'~en were ma~k~ bu~,~hey were $ i Oorool% 8 m~,, i e~erybody in towel kn~vs' that, ~.. / • 7 WALTKR ~ " Forget it, Jimmy, pleaee~ for your own eake. JI~Y: tb RI"~01 0182221
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(I~DIATELY CONTRITE) 13 MARTHA: JII~NY: I~m sorry, I didn% mean that. Ft. Lewis, I... WALTE~: (DOWI~) That's all right, Ji~y, I know you didn't mean it. We're all upset lately. J[~ef: Maybe ITd bether get back to the house. ~THA: I was hoping youtd stay here for dir~er. No thanks, I:d behter go along. Mr. Lewis, please believe me... WALT~Iq: It's all right, Jirrmy, it's not your fault, So many bad things have been happsnlng...it:s not pcq~;oody's fault acting the way they do. S HEPpARD: And as Agent Bailey and I assembled the me~ger evldenclce~in the assault on Geo.ge~ Hsgerty, the testimony offered by the citynsteward, Walter Lewis, seemed to offer a small inconsistency. A chance remark by an employee of the club ~ucevered this inconsistency and Agent Bailey went to work on it i,~ediately. ~IT~. KNOCK ON O~TYP~ T~. tb RTH01 0182222
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Come in. (SO~D: DOOR OPEN) 14 SHEPP~/~D: BAILEY= Hiya Shop, i.~_OjJ~ "~9~.8~/ you still b~nging out that report? S}iEpPARD: Yeah, I want to get it on the teletype this afternoon. Any luck? BAILEY: Uh huh, looks protty intereeti~g. Where's that transcript of Lewis' statement? I want to read the e~act wording. SHE?PARD: I've got it in the desk hers, What sort of man was his doctor? BAILEY: Very nice. He wrote dosn a complete medical history on Lewis' he~rt. he's been treating him for the past ten years. SF~PPARD: Uh huh. Here's the traqscript. (~.9~I,Z~_F~] BAILEr: /fOb~ .~] Thanks. Here's the section I want. "¢?.,estlon by ~gent $heppard: Now one of these men held you at gun point while the other two went upstairs to the esrd rosa. What did you do when they came down and left, ~. Lewis? Answer: I rushed upstairs to George.He wa~ uacsnscious then. I called the police. SHEPPARD: So what did his doctor say? tb ATMOI 0182223
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15 BAILEY: ~he doctor said that Lewi~ hadn't been able ~olimb stair~ for the past five years. And that's what the janitor said, Lewis never left his desk at the front door ~nd never went upto the second floor, $REPpARD: So he didn't rash upstairs. ~r~ unconscious wish,°. Of course hu could have been expressing BAILEY: Or he could have been lying. ~HEppAED: Uh huh. BAILEY: And if he could tell one small lie he might be capable of telli~ a few bigger ones. SHEPPARD: Very possible. BAILEY: Well? SHEPPAED: We~l...let s look over that transcript ~afn. Naybe Y~. Lewis wasn't so much of an innocent byst~qder as he wants us to believe. BAILEY: Maybe not, Let's look ~t over, ~D_U~ '~iO~. - tb A1"~01 011~2224
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16 WALTER: Hello. NICK: (FILT}~) Hello, Walter, this i8 your friend ~galn, know who I mean~ NICK: (IILTER) W~,I want to talk to you privately. Oome over to my office in an hour, will you. WALTZ: Well I... I don't feel awfully well today... NICK: (FILT~q) You'll feel better when you hear what I'm going to tell you. WALT~: All right l...I~ll be there in an hour. Kick, I tell you, itls a crazy idea, he's a e~ok man, he could never m~ke e campaign. HICK: Look, Chsrley, as a lawyer you're all right, for politioa you etink. Just get his name on the ballot, I'll take care of the rest. (RESIGNED) Okay, tb LAWYk~: but I don't eee the sense of it. A I',WO 1 0102225
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17 NICK: You don't. Look, th8 guy knows what I did to Hsgerty, doesn't he? LAWYER: But he won't t~lk. hICK: Of course he won't talk., he's scared stiff,z That's why I want him in H~gerty's place on the City 0ounoil. A guy who's soared will do what he's told. All right, Nick, speeches and... LAWYI~: I'ii get his name on the ballot. But how can he m~ke ~ICK: Speeches. Who says he's going to make speeches? I've got enough votes in that district to elect anybody I want. All he has to do is sit home and wait for the resultB. You~e sure of that. NICK: . Of course I'r, sure, ~Aud.looE'~at the angle we've got for !oublioity. H~erty was h~<~St frxend. ~s~'~. running to koep up the fine record of hls friend. .... ~ . LAWYER: (BI~ILING) All right, all right, maybe you know what you're dolng. / NICK: ~f I dldn% you'd he out of a job.don't ever forget that. Ft]'HO 1 0182226
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18 JOE: / / J / , ' NICK: J¢ / : Oke~', ~-Joei'~t~l~ hlrn to corse .in. ...... / .................. . .......... JOE:,," // Come o~ iD,.,Vs~ 'Lewis. /" §~~90TST.~_S. .. NICK: (CORDI~LLY) Hello, Walter, come on in. Bow are you feeling. WINTER: ~ k. U I" r i$OUN~.' ~_ I~m all right thsnks, ~. Gordon, NICK: You know my attorney, i~r. Baker. Member of th~ City Club. WALTk~: Yes. How do you do, Nr. Baker. And JOe Petelli. • ..... ...,~,.~_W~R ~,..i'> Yes. ' • ~. , ......... NICK: ~e i1 ~o ~,~la, ~p ~tr-~'~N~ ~o~v~.~'~-.~r for tb ATHO? 0~102222
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:" JOE$ • 1 - ! ; WALTKq: ¥ou~youlre looking pretty good, Walter. Nnoh better than the &ast tirqe I saw you. WALTER: I...I feel a little better thanks. NIOK: Anxious to get back to woyk at the club, huh. WALTER: Well yes...ye~, I'm getting a little re~tlese at home. NIOK: Sure, it's no good sitting around juet doing nothing. to have ~ job to keep him alive. A guy's got WALTER: Yes...l gues~ that's right. NIObe: How old are you. Walter? WALTER: Sixty-four next birthday. tb A'rH01 0182228
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2O NICK: Uh huh. How would you like a job that took up two, maybe three days a week? Easy work and nice pay. WAL.~: Whll, I sort of line it at the club, Mr. Gordon. NIOK: Uh huh, but a full week's work ~e too much ~or a man in your condition, Valter. l'm going to get you C~erge Hagerty:s vat.icy on the City Council. What? NICK: Mr. D~ker is drawlug up a petition to put your name on the ballot this afternoon. WALTZ: (FRIG~TENED) No...no, ~° Gordon. I.o.l donft want that. NICK: Sure you de. 8alary:e eight hundred r~ore than you're making now and any smart eourleilm~ can pick up a few grand in loose change... YALT~R: No. please, ~r. Gordon, I'd rather not. NICK: Walter,..I didn't ask you over here to find out what you'd rather do. You're here to find out what youmre going to de. tb ATNO'I 0182229
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21 _ -- WALTZ. " Ft, Gofd:6~i--3istcn, I don't know anything about the City Oounoil, I wouldn't know"hQw to act ' - -... NICK: Don't worry, Mr, Bakerill tel'l.~ou how to a~L,~< I~!o, ~r. Gordon, please, take G~wrgeis place under the olrcu~tauoes, I just ~ NICK: ~+ / (SMILING) ~Ye~, you could, Walter, you could take his place very easilyy~.you just wait mad see. (OOF~OIAL) tb R]'~01 0182230
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-22- ANNOR: And now hank to the "FBI In Peace and ]Jar" and toniEht's story.,. SHEPPARD: ~nd, as youl" F~I slowly uncovered fragments of evldenoe 8~alnst the ori~inal roaching that d~iu~ted the city of Oi~ferd, Ohio, a special election was ar~e, lnocd to fill the vasaany 1oft by Oounoi~man George Hagertyo When the name of Walter Lewis was put on the b~llct we felt strongly, in the lIEht of our investigation, that a crude and vie'cue pollt~cal pay-off was in the ms-king. ~E~) You've gO~ to withdraw your name from the ballot, Hr. Lewis. It'e not too late, they can get somebody else. WALTER: (WEARILY) No, Jj~y, I'm ~cing to run. J~Y: ~t dontt you know what111 happen after you're elected? You wontt be si~tlng in the Oou~cil, itSll res/ly be Nick Gordon. HelII tell you every word ycu~ll say, every move you~ll make.
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WASTER: l'm goin~ to try to be IndepenQent, Jimmy. JI~Y: In4ependent. ~at's what Dad said fifteen years a~o, HeTd r,m on their ticket b,~t he wouldn)t take orders. Ye~ know how it turned out, he was nothing but an errand boy till the day they murdered him. WALTER: Ji~2~y, ~vhat a way to talk about your father. He was 8o crazy about you and all... JI~TL: How do you think I felt about him? WALTEq: I always tho~t..o JI~Tf: He was the n~eest ~y I ever knew, one of ~he best. ~t after they ~ot hold of him, what ~eod Was he? Sure, he wanted to be a decent 1~ub~ie eervant, at firet. He the,~ht he o~uld make ~ deal to ~et in office an~ then...(STOpS) Dontt let them use you, Mr. Lewis, get out now while there's time. WALTZ: I...I can't, Ji~y. I've already ~iven my word. tab RTH01 0182232
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This whole thin~ JN~Y~ And maybe it won't this time. (A BEAT) l...I fo,md that memerand,~ abou~ the slot machines, Mr. Lewis. Wh~t. WALT~q: rRB FITMO 1 0182233 H
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JIM~Y: It was in Dad's leoker at the City Club. his thin~s this morning. In his locker. WALTER: JI~UTf: Yes. And it was just as I remembered, WALTER: Vnat.o.What did you de with it, Jin~y? JI~Y: No~hin~ yet° ~t I'm ~oir~ to use it. know. WALTER: I see, I went there to oiok uw signed by Nick Gordon. I tho,~ht you ~ght to Please? JILTS: Won't you chan£e your mind about rLmnlng, Mr. Lewis. WALTER: I...l can't, Ji~yo I think I would if I were able but there are things.., oirm~stanee s,. ~ (D~ STOPS) // A'FH01 0182234
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~ / WALTEr: ~k~'aho~ %ham, Jl,w~. I wish I oould...but I just oan't that ' s all. SHEPp~RD: And then, a~ %his po!iti~a! deal shaped up and we were oonvlneed that Walter Lewis w~ bBirg paid off for some kind of favor, we questioned Lewis oJ~Eg_~in an attest to find more holes in his BAILEY: And what were you do'~ng just before these men entered the cl,~b, Mr. Lewis? WALTEr: Well I.,oI was on the telephone. I thi~. YOU think~ BAILEY: ~ALTER: No, Itm s*a-e I wae. One of the members was calling, ~. ~16s, end h~ asked if Bill Darne!l was there. BAILEY: Mr, Miles. ATH01 01B2235 ,,T
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Yes, sir, Mr. David Miles. positive. -27- WALTER: I was on the phone with him, 8hep., o ~\ YesJ \ \ BAILEY: " SHEPp~RD: c J ~AILEY: Herb here, \ / \ '/:¥~E S}~PPARD: [ Oh good. (LOWERED ) Did you tell him ~nythin£ yet? BAILEY: / No, no% yeto/. \ ; PARD: ; / Okay. i~n__m~F~ I~o: Miles, this is A~ent Sheppard. ra8 i1m r ! / AT){O 1 01B2236
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. SI~pp~RD: . . .. , AC~(NO~LEDGING), Hr, Niles, (?~EN) ~ Sorry we had ¢o interrupt your offloe hours b~t we th~nk this is i.~portant. HILES~ SHEPP~IRD: Yo~ know, of oo~r~et about the ~urrent ~nvosti~a~.on yo~r Citizens Crime Oo~i~s£on is ~ak~n~ in olty polltios~ HILES: Yest of course, e';e.~ybody knows that. About time too, mos~ of us think. SHEPPARD: krell, we're glad you feel that way beoaus$ you may be able to help. H][LES~ S~pP~RD: Yes. We're tryin~ to verify osr~aln information tha~ h~s been given to ~s in oonneotlon with the death of George Ha~erty. RIH01 018223P
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~or~e Hs~er ty. MILES: That sure was a terrible thin~, believe me. BAILEY: You knew Haderty. MILES: Sure, one of the b~st liked men in the olub~ How anyon~ oo~:Id do a thing like that to Geor~e...l just eanlt figure it. SHEPPARD: Well we're ~ein~ to try to fiEure it, Mr. Miles, that you answer our questions earefully. so it's important MILES: Be glad to, SHEPPA~D: 6r I J '~' I The niKht that, Ha~erty was attacked wa~x S~ptember twelfth, Mr. I~TP~OI 0~82238
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-(S~ILING)=~re d~n't sus~'eot y~u o~.~Ayt;?~:~; ~lr. ~iles, We jnsb / .. - ......... ] ....... . want you to recall ~at nigh5, to remember i= you phoned %he / . . ; , ....... ....... . , . 8h~PPABD: Old-~.-oa~l--~he~ol~b~sn~,ask the ~tewa~d if B'~Xl Darnell was "-- "/+< l'~'J") tho,,o! ~ /"J-'7'' N " i ~ , i~. I donlt ramem, her if it was September twelfth, but I dO remember oal!~ng for Bfll one night our because his wife was a~/house and she Was looking for h~i. It could have b~sn on a Friday, %hatis when she and my wife play hridge. BAILEY: Then you dc remember the aall. MILES: Sure, I asked if Bill was there and Walter said no, only George Ha~erty w~s there and then somebody came in, Nick Gordon I think i~ Was.,, SI~PA~: ('J ~-,",~A,.-" -/io ~.--.-~, R ]'~401 01,,~2239
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-31- MILES: I think so. I remember Walter said 'somebody'a oomlug in now' end I think he said it was Gordon and,..well..,that's all I remember, That's plenty, Mr, Miles, Was that any help? It certainly was. MILES: B~L~: MILES: NOW mind you, llm not sure it was September twalfth, b~t like I said the girls play brid4~e on Fridays and if Septemb@r twelfth was Friday, well it might have been. Is that all you wanted to ask me? SHEPPA~D: That's all, Hr. Miles, Frank,..4rive Hr. Miles back to hie offioe, will you, I'm ~oiug to put through a teletype to Mr, Andrews .in Washington. r~s FIFNO' 011 224-0
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S}~ppARDj Au4 altho~i~h this testimony plaoes ~or~on at the Oity Olub on the night of the asssult, we s~rea with oounssl for the Orime Oon~mission that insuffloient evidsnoe is on hand to Dress for an indictment at this time, In reply to your q,~ry as to motivationt James Ha~erty oall~d this offioe requestln~ interview in re~ard to thi~ sub.ject~ Viii notify yo,~ cf results iume~iately. Sign it ShepDard, A~ent in Ohar~e~ JOE: Hello, Jim~y, o~e over to Mr, Gordon:e car, he wants to talk to you, JI~: Sorry, 'IIve ~ot an appointment dewntown~ I~.~ ~L~_~%~.~,~_ Hr. Gordon wants to talk to yeuo.,oame on. ~OU~I~ 8_~OP. 2.AK~D~I Get in, Listen, y@~ can't,., r~8 JI~Y: RTN01 01.82241
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JO~: (SHOVING HIM) Get in~ i~///l_,~_9L.O_S2~l NICK: Okay, ~like, get ~oin~, i~AQJ/~:.-Q~_ST~ JI~Y: Look here, ~ro Gordon~ I don:t know what you've got in mind, but whatever it is, I'm not pl~ving along° Thke the road out through Mountain Avenue, Mike~ ~r. Gordon,, o JOE: Why den~t you shut up~ Mister. he ~ant~, he~ll te~.! you, NICK~ Thanks, Joe° When he's ready to tell you What JI~: Mr. Gordon, I~ve Eot an appointment down%-own at three o~olock°o. Ittll keep, Ji~% And don~t get ~e exolted. That was one thing I never liked about your old man, he go~ excited. A~'~01 018224-2 , ,,, ,,
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JI~Y: Listen you~.o NI (Z~ -' " " " Joe. JOE: Sit still, Mister, or you:re going to wi~h up with a broken a~m. JIMMY: (WINOII~G IN PAIN) Let ~Oo.oplease' NI(~<: That'e enoch, Joe. He under~tande~ (PAUSE) All right now, Jim~y, letls ~,et dow~ to b~iness. Where's that memo that I wrote to your father about the s!ot maohlno bill? JI~IMY: What memo? NIOK: Maybe I was w~on~, Joe, he doesn't ~nderstand. Ji~IY: (QUIOKLY) Li~ten~ I donlt know what you're talkin~ aho~t, Y¢. Gor~on, what memo? TN01 0182249
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-35 NI(~<: Ths one that ~aB in your old man's looker at the olub, J~my. JIP~Y: Huh7 JOE: T~ne j~nitor told Nfok about it, Niotorp so donVt pl%v d,~b. Jl~.: What? NI£~: The jardtor of the ~.~ub~ J~1~y. Remer, lber, he watohed yon em~y ths 3ooker and you Gave him z reooipt for the oontents? Remember you dropped a pile of papers out of the looker and tha ~&nitor handed them baok to you° One of the pagers h&d my sianature, he thought I cu~ht to know about it. Jll~Cf: I told you I ~ven~t ~ot may memo like that. He w&s suo~ed,~6~rn it up, tha~s what we're ~o~n~ to do now. RTNO'i 01~224~4
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I.,.I h~venlt got it~ NIOK: Uh huh, Hike.o.~ull over onto that side road there so Ji,my and I can talk quietly. JIN~Y: I tell you I havsn~t ~ot any memo~ Hr~ Gordono NICK: Yeah, I hear you, Your old man was s~bhorn ~ust like that, Be@ms to run in the family~ ~9~D:GAR P~i~_~ ,~_/~Q~ O~)(~/?TE~ A P~USE) Joe° Yeah~ JOE: I'm going to try and convince J~m~y just by talkiz~, b~t in case that doesnTt work, show him what elBe l~ve got in min~. (PAUSE) You see those~ Ji~ny~.othay're brass knuckles, just in ease you get stubborn, (A BEAT) All right nOWo,.where's that memo~ r~8 RTH01 0782245 I
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-3?- Nurse,.oOan I see Mr. Hag~r~y now? IS b@ oonsOiouS? NORSE: ~;~4 Yes, hs is, ~t thm two men from the FHI arc ~ now and I've jI~85 bseD ~Iven ordSrs.~, (O£~'IIhD IN) Thanks, n~rse, w~11 t~e os~e of 563s g~nt, lamsn. NURSE: Yes, Hr° 8heppardo (GOING OFF) Rir~ if yo,l wan~ me. WALTZER: I.~I oame as soon as I ~ot your phone oall, Mr. She~pard. Can I s~e Jitany no~? SI~pPARD: Yes, we want yoL~ to see him. Come in. WALTZ: (SHOGqED) Ji~y~ (W~AKLY) Hello, Mr. Lewis, WALTZ: Jin~y.. °your faoe ...what happened? r&s FIl" NO 1 0 18224t6
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BAILEY: He had a talk with Nick Gordon aboL~t politics° ~lth bra~s knuGkles~ WALTZ: They went over him JIMMY: (WEAKLY) Don't...don't let them u~ you, Mr. LeWi~oo.they..othey..° WALTER: Jimmy, you better not talk too much, I°ooI~ll just sit hero, JIMMY: Don~t.°.let them, Er, Lewis, ~remiee me. SHEpPA~D: Mr. L~wis* Yes, WALTER: Sh~PPARD: You can stay with Mr, Hagerty a few minutes. Agent Bailey and I would like to talk to you, WALTER: (GOING OFF) Yes, sir. ras men yo~ come OUt~ RTH01 0'18224?
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-39- SHE@PARD: (SUBDUED) I think we'll get the truth out of him now, Frank. BAILEY: Uh huh, looks that way. And ~f we do? $~PPARD: If wo do there:s just one more thinz I want to try ~nd then we'll pick uo Nick Oor~on~ Hello. NICZ~: JOE: (FILTER)(EXCI~D) Hello, Niok~ th~s is Joe. Listen, I'm down at the Federal Ndldin~, I just ~ot it straight from our friend down here. Walter Lewis is spillin~ his whole story to the FBI. NIC~: What, ra~ RTH01 018224.8
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-40- JOE: (FILTER) I'm tellir~ you, Nick, he's giving them the whole story, NI~Kt All right, Joe. Get hold of Mike and we~ll take care of ~t. RTNO? 01~22,4.9
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-4I- Yes. ,, ~THAI .''\ verb\busy day, the do or aaye he should rest. t NI=/ ', 4e won'fi keep h~.m ~onK, Mre, L6~sie. MARTHA: I~ll he baok early, Walt~r~ ' .......... WALT'~'R i • " ~'~'~ Bit AI4-~m'V--. ~2~_~E&~J/ • ~o~, Mr, G=rdcn~ llm sorry I haven't Kot ar$, drinks to offer you°°. NICK: That'B all riKht, we ~idn~t oome here to be 8ooial, Walter. you this afternoon? WALTER: ~Ii Io,,I ha4 ec,~e appointments downtown. JOE: At the Federal E~i~di~, huh. NI~: Joe. r&e IgTH01 01B2250 li
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-42- JOE: Whatle the use of stalling, tell him we know, the whole th~. WALTER: ~re!l I did drop in on Jim Wel!er to talk about the rally°°. NICK: You al~o drop-~s~ in on the Federal N~reeu of Investigation to talk about me. didn't you~ klalter, JOE: The FBI, you to3d them that the three of us here were at the City Olnb the n~ht tha~ Ha~erty get ~at n~ WALTER: ~,ho sa~d I told them that~ Didnlt you, W~!tor? NICK: WALTER: How oould I, Hr. Gordon, yon told me never to aay anything... NICK: You ~id see the~. ~aB ....... AT~O! 01B2251
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-43- WAL~: %%11 ~ure, you knew they talked to me lets of times. aianlt give ~hem ar~%h~ news JOE: Youlre lying. H~'s !yinE, Nick. Sure he is, NIOZ: I 8wear, ~rl Gordon,,, WALTER: They've been trying Walter, do you remember the night We o~le for Ha~erty, I told you if you ever cp~ne~ your meuth it would be the last time,,. W~L~R t Listen, you've get to believe msp ~r~ Get, one to break down my story~ they even had me over to eee Jirc~y H~erty this morning hoping t:d feel sorry for Jim~y.o~ Y~ talked, I Eot a re!igble frien4 that says co. ra~ RT:KO 1 0'182252 II
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Nick, that. Uh huh, What? -44- WALT~: it isn't so I don't want to lose this election, you know know° NICK: But you're not going to be around for the election. WALTER: NIC£: You're going to be in a sanitarium with a bad heart, Walter. A friend of mine runs it. ~. Gordon... WALTZ: NICK: You think I 'm going to let you hang 8round town and keep on blabbing? You're a material witness, Walter, only you're going to be some pla0e where you won't be doing any witnessing for a long while. Come on, get up off that couch, I got n~l car outside. WALT~: No, Yr. Gordon, I,.. JOE: (ROUGNLY) Get up, he said, you're going for a ride in the oar. But my wife, what'!l she,.. tb A 1")"(0 'i 0182253 II
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NICK: I ql ezplain the ~hole thing to her when she comes bask, ~qalter. You got a sudden attack while we were talking and I had the boye rush you off to ~ personal physician. Okay, Joe...get him up. O DA OR 9PKG 8F~PP~D: Never ndnd, Gee, we~ll t~k.e osre of that. Nice work, Mr. we've got the whole thing on t~pe. Frank... 8t6nd facing thatwall, this is an ~rrest. ~AILEY: Lewies all three ef you, put your hands in the air NICK: Now wait a minute, boys, my name'e Nick Gordon, the force... if you're new on BH~PARD: We're Federal Officers, Gordon. Put your hands in the air ~d de what you're told. Better frisk them, Frank. NICK: (TO WALTER) So you did spill to the FBI, you little louse. WALTKR: You g~t all of it, Mr. 8heppard? Was it enough? 8HEPPARD: Plenty, Mr. Lewie. tb F~TNO 10~t8 2 2 54.
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-46- BAILEY: BHEPPARD: BAILEY: One pair of br~ee knuckles on this one. S}{EPPARB: That's all? B~ILEY: That's e/l, 8HEPP~RD: Okay, beys...letls go. 8HE~pARD: With Walter Lewi~ as state's witness, oouz~sel for the Citizens' 0~ime Commission of /%ord, Ohio, pr6sented the whole story of n~lioipal corruption tg/a Fe~er'al Grand , Nick Gordon, Joe Pstelll end ~ke Stevens w?~/e indloteh% ~or brought to trial and prisg~/l for long terms, i wa~/put on probatien+~/S three ; fr~ed its town fr? the terror of.. TB R 1"~401 0182255
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-~7- T~E FB[ IN FF,.~.CE A~D WIR I~NE 12, 1952 CLOSING C0~£ROI~L (UP TO CORT~I~) TICE: BAF~CH: In Just a moment, Agent Sheppard will tell you what happened %0 the people in tonight's story. Frien4s, ~hx ~on't ~ try %hat ~gsret%e ~mpa rlson we toil you shout tonlgh% and see yi%b your own eyes that Luckles ~re m~e h~t%~r to %ast~ ~ ... all you have %0 do $~ o.. T~ ~D 00~pARE. ~ou'll ~cover ~oa% %he heart of your Lucky S~rlke is perfect c~Ir~er ~f flre, m11d ~ha~¢o. ~ou111 see how round and firm add fully Peok~ It i~ ... with long stn~ds of f~esh, clea~ ~oo~-tast~n~ t~e~. NO~ I% stands %o reason h~aus~ Lu~kles ar~ madQ this w~ %h~ draw freely °. ° s~oke smoothly an~ evenly . °. al~a~s %ast~ fresh and clean and mil~. So for your o~n real deep-dow~ sm~k~ug enJo~ent, Make your ~% car%0~ Lucky Strike. (FANFARE) I~TR01 0~82256
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oL,~- OT O~oT~w ~o~ p~ ~ u~ s~ ~ m~dXk~L~ ~Tt~ tO • ~G4~L~ RTH01 01B225P
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- h9 - THE FBI IN PKAOE ~D WAR ~B 12, 195~ CLO~I~G CO~gBOIAL (CO~TI~D) TISE: All n~mes a~d characters used on this program are fictltlous, ~y s~)~rd~ ta persons livlag or dead Is ~r~2y cotn~ldent~l. This program 18 based on Frederick L- Collinsl coyprl~hted hook, "T~LE FBI IN PEACE A~D WAR" .,. and Is not an officlal program Of the FBI. (AFTER PAOS~) In t~ightts story Ed Be~ley played ~ick Gordom Bill Smith was Walte~ Le~Is. Tae r~dio dramatlzation for "T~E Y~I I~ P:/AC~ ~D WAR" is written by Loula Pelletier and Jack Fl~ke. These programs are produced and dlrectnd by Betty ~andevllle. Be ~ure %0 llsteu to next Thursday's story, "T~[~ FALSE STEP" On "T~Z FSI IN PZAOE AND WAR" . Same time -- same station. ~TK~ FSl IN P~Cg AND WAR" ~a~ ~en selecta~ as ome of the pragr~s to heard by o~r g~ed Forces overse~s t~ougb the facilities of the g~mnd Forces K~dio Se~vlce. MUSIC: TH~ UP ARD V~DER BAtCh: This i~ ~4re ~ach saying gocd~Ight for Lucky S~r~ke, pro4uet of Th~ American Toba~so Compa~ -- ~merica~ leadlng man~faoturer of cl~arettez. T~CN~ (SHOW ~ -H~ME ~P A~D OUT) THIS IS T~E C~ RADIO NDIV4G~K. FI I"XO 1 0182258
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Produced ~ud Dix'eoted by: Script by: o~L~-~ tb BTHO1 01S2259 li
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-A- THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WARIr OPENING CO~,~£RCIAL ~5_22 THURSDAY TICE: LUCKY STRIKE presents ... "THE FBI IN REAC~ AND WAR!" MUSIC: (FANFARE) TICE: Another ~re~t story bas~d on Fr~d~rlck L. ColllnsI copyrighted book, "T}~ FBI IN PEAC~ AND WAR". Drams .., thrills ,,, sctlon! But first -- Andr~ Bsrach. BARUCH: Frlends, l~m sure youTll agree that taste makes ths bi~ dlffa~ence in ~ cigarette and Lucktas tsst~ better, They taste bett~r for t~o important reasons: First, Luckles are mad% of fls__~,..~mil~ tobacco. Everybady knows LS/MFT ... Lucky Strike means fine tobacco .... fin~, mli~, gaod-tsstln~ tobacco. Second, Luekles ar~ ma~e better to taste better ... s~ways round, firm an~ ful~y p~cked to ~ive you a cigarette thatls mild and smooth and fresh -- with b~tter tast~ in every puff! You~ll reall~ Be Happy when you Go LucMy -- because Luckles taste better! So tomorrow why don~t start the day off wlth Lucky Strike! ~IUSIC : (SHOW THE~g UP AND UNDBR) RFNO1 0~B2260
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-2- TICE: Toni~htTs story~..The False t~. AND OUT , _ STANLEY: All right, I admit that's my gun, but you've sot to believe me, I didnTt shoot him, 8HEPPARD: Allison's etaba~..ent says you did, ~r. Bonnet. STAI\LEY: He lies, he did it himself, th~t:e why he come up to my apartment, that's why. ~. SH~oPARD: 8TAN!@Y: SHEPP~RD: ~hy did you hide this gun before the police oaf.e? ST~ILEY: I told you, I wee in ~ p~,ie. Someon~ wa~ ringing the doorbell, Fisher was lyin~ on the livirg room floor, I didn't want ~ gur~ to be found in my apartment° tb RTN01 0182261
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-3- SHE?pARD: Your neighbor in the apartment across the court heard you arguing with someone severs/ days before the shooting. You were telling this person that you'd see him dead before you gave him mothar cent. STANLEY: I ad~r~.t all that° Fisher wa~ bleeding me for every penny he could got. SHEPPA~D: And you w~rs ~ngry enot~h to shoot him that nlght.,.if your gun had been handy~ STANLEY: No, No, I never would have done a thio~ like that. SH~PPAND: I don~t believe you would, Nz. Bonnet. ~i~-~ you. STANLEY: SHEPPARD: Look, why don't you tell ue the whole story? I know you've tried %o ke~p Nrs. Bonnet's n~me out of the papers, but it'll be far worse I if you don t free yourself of this charge. Yes, I guess you're right. STANLEY: 8HEPpK~D: Would you like to tell it in the form of a etstement~ I can have a stenographer t~ke it down. th A])40~ 0182262
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-4- 8TANLEY: ~lell, no, not yet if you don't mind. Maybe you'd better ask me questions, that would be easier right now. SHEPp~RD: All right, shy way you want. Would you like a oigaret? Yes, please. Here you are. ST/~'LEY: SHEpp22D~' STANLk~." SH~wP/~D: You &nd your wife met Aiiison on the boat comlngbask from Eorope, didn't you. STA~ILEY: Yss, SHEPPA~D: ~ho introduced you? STANL~.Y: Well no one exe~tly. He sat at our tsble asd we became f~'dendly llke you do on shipboard. Hg!en.o~S. Bonnero..liked him i~edlately. He was very good company ~id -~s. Bonn8r was fond of dancing. I wasn'~ and...well... tb FtTH01 0182263
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Allison was. BHEPPARD: STANLEY: Yes. Oh there was nothing wrong with it. In fast I was rather proud that a yo'~ger and quite h~ndseme man found F~. Bonnet attraotive. BHEPPA~D: %~nen did he first mention the diamond bracelet? ~%11, that wasn't ~qtll our last night on board. There was a big party ~n the ma~ lmunge mud he and Frs, Boner danced till qu~te l~%e. l had gone tO our oabin easl~er and I lay in bed reading. I heard them oomin~ doom the oompanionway. SOU~2".__2.~?I_D__FgO!.~Z~5~S_~ V!O: (LAUGHING) Quiet, you~ll wake u2 the whole ship, HELZ~: (LAUGBII~G) It's not my fault, it's that horrible ohar~p~ne they served. ~_OL~.~: F_~O_~%_~TI'~_P_S.,~T_O~/ I~ this me, one-twelve? VlO: This i~ you. It s ~ " _ tb - ----~ P~T.~.01 018226,4.
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-6- wo~v~'~tin pl~yi~£~ thor~. I~L~: taking sate of rra. l~ T~, DOOi_O.pF~) VIC: i~e it. Goodnlgh~, Vic, See you and S~anley in the aon~in~, STANLEY: EEL~: Yes, dear, I'm saying good night to Vio. STANLEY: (OFF) 'Night, Vic. Th~nkB for t~king her off ~ hands. VIC: (LAUGHS) The pleesure w~ ~Xne, Siren. customs, Helen. rNighb° (OkLLS) Good night, Vic, WITH A SIGH) ~heM1..omy poor feet. ~LEN. azo io &t do , th ~nd thanks for huh, (GOING OFF) See you at the HELEN: f / / f (HELEN SITS DOWN PITH01 0182265
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-7- , , ~ ......... ~.,,~,.-- n~.~,.~¸ Uh huh. Hera nice, isntt ho~ ~'~ I'~V ~: ST~L~: Vic? Uh huh~ Sure, he's okay. the city. HELEN: STId~LEY: W~ ql keep in touch with him when we get back to F~'LFA~: I don% knov~ whether we wilt, $%an, He's got to go, out to the Coast, he'~ hcping to get a ~ob with an ~ cow, any out there. STI~NLEY: Hoping? I though~ he was ~ll-flxed for money. HEL[N: 8o did I, StKn,~.he's dead broke..,he hasn:t got enough money for train fare. ST'~NLE"f: HELEN: He didn:t w~nt to tell me hut we got talking about the fut~re...(aTOPS) SbanSey,~oWe~-~e got to help him. tb ATH01 0182266
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-8- ~%'{g--~. If he needs a couple of h~mdred bucks~,. HELEN: He won't borrow money, I've already asked him. And besides a few h~idred wouldn't help at all. ~ it ~h~i~ve he Is, br eke, Helen, / HELEN : He i~I assure you~ aud if he doesn't have at least a thousand dollars to put up a good appe~rauoe out on the Coast,.. ST;NLEY: Well I couldn't lend him that kind of money, H41en. After all,.. ~LEN: He doesn't want to borrow it, I told you that. He...h8 wants to sell me a dial, end bracelet he bought in ;~7~terdam, He says it would be worth at least three ~housaud in the Statee and he'll let me have it for elevsn hundred, That is, after he gets It past the ouetoms. G~ta it past? STANLEY~ H~LF~: Yes, I suppose It:e not exactly e~h~eal buto°~well he can't very well pay the customs duty on it, ST.~I~LEY: But we couldn't buy a bracelet that was sungglad in, Helen. tb RI'X01 018226P
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-9- HELEN: Stanley, don't be so stuffy. Vie says all of his friends bring in things without declaring them, Itrs done all the time. $TANLEY: Not by me, it ien%. HEL~: (GETTING ANGRY) Of course not by you, silly. Vic will bring i% In and sell it to me later. STANLEY: Oh no he wonlto HELEN: Stanley, the boy has to get to the Coast, he needs money. accept charity. He wont' STANLEY: Welre t buying s~y s~ggled diamonds, Helen, and that settles it. ..... ~'_"~_'h:tt:': oct tc h~-r~ ~" HELEN: .... "' " ". i'nrnot acing, to bed ~nd that doesn't settle it. Vie is a fine boy, Stauley/~nd I'm not going to see him lose a job.juet'~c~aUeeo~- t~,C Let hiv~ ~ell the bracel~t~omev~bere else. HEL~: ...... I ~on't. wants ~ to have it, Stanley. It's a beautiful thing and worth three times what weql pay for it. j/ tb A ]'MO'I 0~82268
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HELF~: Yeu can refuse all you want, I'ii take the money out of r~y o~ aeootmt. I'm going to have that bracelet, Stanley...that% the le~et we can do for Vie. CHIEF: To ~gents Sheppard and Bailey, FBI, confidential. Man answering description Victor Alton believed to have been passenger aboard 8.8. Voldauia docking Wednesday, customs inspector making identification after oles~ing paesengere luggage under name of Victor Allison. Cu~toze inspector will be at this office as soon as you are ready for eenference° Sign ~t, Garner, Chief of D~teetivee, Harbor Section, SHEPpARB: And here's another picture, Inspector, taken when Allison was Berving a ter~ for fraud in 1940. INSPECTOR: Yes, theb's him, all right, BAILEY: • You didn't recognize him i~mediately, did you, Inspector? tb 8FRO1 0182269
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11 INSP~OR: No, I'm eorry about that. Hi8 face seemed familiar when I was goir~ through his luggage, but I couldn't place him all that day. Yesterday morning I thou~ht I'd try those wanted circulars you people sent us ~d ~hat's when I called Ohlef Garner. SHEPPARD: Was there any forwarding address on Alllson's luggage, Inspector? INSPECTOR: Thars probably w~sj but I didn't notice it. BAILEY: Did he declare anything for customs? INSPECTOR: A few things herd bouaht in London, but they were under legal limit and not dutiable. He did have a diamond bracelet, but he bought here in the States, he had a bill of ~ale for it, BAILEY: A diamond bracelet? I~SPECTOR: ¥e~o The bill of sale was from a wholesale house on Maiden Lane. I called them this ~orni~ ~d they looked up their records, he bought it there three months ~go. BHEPPA~D: He bot~ht a bracelet and earr%ed it to Europe with him? INSPEGTOR: Uh hub. tb ~TH01 01822?0 I
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12 BAILEY: INSPEGTOR: I couldn% fig~re it myself. What's his racket, ~. Bailey? BAILEY: ~ny kind of fraud from phoney oil stock6 ta blackmail. . " ff~B%s~e~ Inspsotor, did anyone meet him at customs? A @herr heavy-set ma~? INSPEOTOR: I don t remomber. He did talk with one of the women passengers ~hile I was checki~g his declaration, I think he oalled her Hel~n. H@len. SHEPP~D: INSPEOTOR: Yes, but thstZs alll re~embsro I~m sorry I wasn't quick enough to r~cognize hi~, ~. 8heppard... 8HEPPA~D: The fi~s all right, we're glad you saught it when you did. BAIl/f f: No one but this |Helen' talked to him at the pier. tb B]'~O I 0182221
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As fan as I remember. 13 INSPECTOR: BAILEY: You suppose he's still working with Fisher, Shop? S}V2P~/~D: They always have worked together. INSPECTOR: Fisher? SHEppARD: Hia p~rtner, Harry Fisher, a worse swindler than Allison if that's possible. Oh. INSPECTOR: SH~]PPARD: Well, thanks a lot, Inspector, you've been very helpful. And we'll go to work on this right now. INSPECTOR: Y,~,i haven't got ~aoh to work on, Itm afraid. SHEPP~P~O: Well, not too ~t~ch, but th~ die.end bracelet and Helen are warth investigating. We~ll put the two of them together tem, porarily and see what turns up. With Allison and Fisher anything is possible. TO_An ATH01 01~822 P2 t
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14 VIC: (CHUCKLING) 80 I enid to her, Helen, I want you to t~ke th~s bracelet to a jeweler szgl have it appraised. If it:s not worth twice ~'hat Btauley's paying for It..,~.. k I~/ ' " ~h~ don't let hi~ buy it for you. HARRY: (CHUCKLING APPR~IATIV~LY) I love it. ~at'e he like, Fie, the husband? VIC: Ordinary husband type. ~rorks hie head off to give her anything she wants, probably makes fifty thousand a year. He can afford a bracelet. HARRy: VIC: Sure. ]~atter of fa.~t when she told him the ~eweler's~ppralsal on the thing he kind of f~gured he was putting oFer e~deal, HARRY: (S~LES) They always do, don% they. VIC: Ye~iq. He didn't soy a word about smuggling, j~st wrote out a check and handed it to me. tb ~ 7~HO ~ 01.82273
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You got it with you? HARRY: VIC: The check? Sure, Itm going to cash it this aftgrnoon. HARRY: Don't cash it yet, I think I'll use it in myroutine. Yeah? VIO: HARRY: Vight mske a nice touch. Confront him with the evidsnoe. Holy high do you thi~ we can go on thia one, gic? 010: I'm net Bure, Harry, you'll have to fegl him out. From the way his wife talked he:s pretty proud of hie business reputation. HARRY: Ten thousand? Could be. Maybe more. khat does he do, Vie? tb VIO: HARRY: ATH01 0182274
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16 VIOl PublisheB a trade paper for the woolen business. V! Si ' he's the biggest thing in his field. H~RY: Wouldn't be so hob if a respectable publisher like that was mixed up in 8mu~ling, vlould it. VIO: (SMILING) I'm afraid it wouldntt, Harry. He I '~ ~~'~%~@, ~hen do I move in? IIall, he'e had the bracelet for almost a week, I'd say he's just about ripe. O~ay, I'ii see him at ~his office in the morning. tb AI"HO 1 018222'5 If
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17 VIC: Did you get that phoney identification card? HA~RY: Uh huh. }{ere it is.~.Inspsctor Harry Fisher, United States Customs Service. VIC: (SMILES) OKay, Inspector, this is your racket from here in, let's see what you can do with it, GIRL: Bonnet publications, good morning. Just a moment, I'll connect you. (TO HARRY) Yes, sir? HARRY: Good morning, Miss. Is V~. Bonnet in. GIRL: I'll see, sir. Do you have an appointment.? H.4RRY: No, but I think he might see me. My name is H~rry Fisher, United States Customs Service. t(bI~Y-MOUTHED) United States Customs STANLEY: Servioe. RTHO'! 01822?6 i
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18 HARRY2 (DEFERENTIALLY) That's right, ~, Bonner. STANLEYz Well...uh...what did you want to see me about, N~, Fisher? H~RRY: (19~99hTg"You don't know~ ~.Bonner? STANI~Y: k'ell no.,.I1m afraid I don't. NARHY: I want to see you about a diamond bracelet you bought from a man you met on board the S~8. Voldanla. STANLEY: (STALLING) A branelet~ HARRy: Yes. You bought this bracelet from a man named Victor Alli~on. You paid eleven hundred dollars for it. len't that right? STA~LEY: Someone n~rLed Allison? Wello..I.o. HARRY: ~NIgE~N~. BorJnero.oI guess %here:s no u~e embarraseing you further. E~re is the cheek you gave to Allison, eleven hundred dollars. STANLEY: t DEFEATED ) Oh. tb ATH01 01~222P
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19 HAP, RY~ You knew, ef cc~rse that he brought the bracelet into this country without declaring it. &TANL~-T: Did he? HI/~RY: ~'r. Bormer. STANLEY: (A BEAT) (TH~) Are you going to arrest me? HARRY~ Receiving contraband is just as bad as carrying it. STkNLEY: Have you arrested Allison? HARRY: We~ro detaining him at my office. He doesnlt seem to hsve any record ~ seeing as ~h!s is his first offense... ~TANI~Y: (E~GEqLY) Listen, Mr. Fishe~, th!8 woL,~d be r~,firBt offense too. I dldn't want t0 buy ~~ ~L.,~ ~if~ K~y~ ...... ~-." {~MTfiT'NG~ I know how it is, Ft. Bonnero ~r. Allieon ha~ a very touching story too. He needs money to go West. tb ATHO? 018227B
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20 STANLEY: But that's tha truth, he does. Aud all I want~ to do was help him out. If I~d knovm there was anything wrong... H/~RRY: A crime which could be punished with ~ stiff jail term ~nA ~ "~:^ ~ , i~ certainly something wrong, Yr. Bonnet. Jail term. If you were..conviet~d. STANLEY: HARRY: STANLEY: e . • 7 But...but that's impossible; I'm not a criminal. All I was trying to do...(~TOP8) Listen, Yr. Fisher, isn"t there some way we could fix this up-~ Allison didn'~t mean i%, neither did I. HARRY: Fix it up? STANLEY: SupposinZ I gsve you a oheo~ for your fa-~orite ehBrity. I'd be punished that way arid nobody Y!euld have to know a'oo~%t this. HI.Y: >~r, Benner, the perlalhy for bribir4~ a federal officer i8 even woree th~n sr~ggl~ng. tb PITH01 01822?'9
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21 STANLEY: Bribing. I tm not bribing, all l~m trying to do is s'~ggeBt a remedy that wouldn't involve publicity. If this thing got out it could ruin my ~hole bu~ines~.All l~m saying i8, if I gave you something like a thousand do!l~rs for your favorite charity... ]~r, Boln21er, HARRY: Ycs~ STANLEY: H~PaY: ~uppoeing you gave two thousand to my favorite charity. STANLEY: (A BEAT) (THEE) You,..you might aocept it? HkP~RY: I ~ight. STANLEY: (A SIGH OF RELIEF) ~%mt..owhatts the n~m,e of your favorite charity Yr. Fisher? HARRY: Harry Fisher, Ft. Bonner...only I think you'd better m~ke it out to O~8h, tb (O_ONN~CI~L) 81"R01 0182280 il
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MUSIC: - TICE: BARUCH: @~ FBI IN P~ACE AND WAN JUNE 19, 2952 • MIDDLE COM>~]RCIAL (TO A CURTAIN) IfL.1 (END OF ACT I) B~ek to "The False Step!' in just a moment. FPiends, while all clg~rettss may look the ssm~ on the outside -- there's on important inside difference in Lucky Strike -- an inside difference that proves Luckl~s ore ~ade better t~ taste better. TEAR AND COMPARE and see for :/ourself. From e newly opened pock, take c ciF~r~tte m~de by any other manufacturer. Then, carefully tear e thin strip of paper straight down th~ seam, from end to end, and gently remove the tobacco. In tearing, be careful not to loosen or 0ig int___~e tho tobacco. Now, do the ssme ~ith a Lucky Strike. Then compare, You'll find some cigarettes are ~o loosely packed they fall apart. Others have exsessive air spoees that burn too fast -- taste hat ~nd hprsh and dry, But just look at that Lucky. There y~u see a perfect cylinder of fine, mild t~ba,~co, so round, so flr~, so fully p~okus, so free and ~ssy on the draw, And notice those lacQ" strands of fresh, clean, good-tasting tobacco that s~oke smooth an~ even, that give you a milder, better-ta~ting clgar~tte. (NOB:/) FFr NO 1 0182281
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THE FBI IN PEACE A~TD WAR JUNE 19, 1952 MIDDL£ C0;.~'~RCIAL {CONTID) ~ARUC CO T D) yes, friends, tear and compar~ -- see for yourself thet Luckies arc ma_de better to ]aste better. So, try it yourself -- and for more s~loklng ~njoyment ycu, too, ~lill m~ke ~ n~xt carton Lucky Strike! MUSIC: (SHOW THEMe) AI'NO'I 0182282
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-%- TIOE: And now bask to "The FBI In Peaoe and War" and tonlght'e story.,. S pP D= And so you gave Fisher two thousand dollars to forget abo~t the smuggled bracelet. Yes Bir, I did, STANLEY: SHEPPARD| Bat he wasntt Batisfied with two. STANLEY: No. I gave hlm another three thsusand a month laser. he'd never bother me after that. S~PpARD: And you bsl~eved him. STANLEY: Yes. I did. I ~e~e I should have known bettor, but I was frightene4. I eould see my ]~sinese ruined, a ja~l te~m for ~muggl~n~ ~ebr~bery...l d~dn~t know what to do. He pr~mlsed ATH01 01B22 3 i Jli
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So you kept on payir~. (DOWN) Yes, Go on~ ~16aeo~ -24- SHEppARD; STANLEY~ S}~FP~D: Velloo.the next ~ime he oame to Bee me he asked for five thousand. I reminded him of his prom~.Be but he Baid he~d been losing money on the herse~ and he just had to have five thcueand mere, z, Ill .......... r. Bormer~ vou've~en~ee, ~I paid him the five in cash.,.l j,~st didn't know what else to do, ~ rU~12~. ~ SO~L~AY ~ ~~~_I~ODA_QEF~hA~D_ 2kOAF~ tab RTH01 0182284 ]i
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~ZZS~O L O~.t ~ :DIA :kmlV'H Lu~el ""o~A ~oeu I "qe~o eqq. e~a ~lq.ey, rA~X0 .p'Etlo,~ t~o~C ac:rz~t I (~tCI~I~FIO) :OlA :th'l~C'H ~OR ~0o'~ q.'ettt~ ~'~'C~a'qoE d~o~4 '~,zeB~)ap oqq. uo e~eq~ q.q~(.x %~ue &~a~p ~ q.uoq~ ~OH ~q~uo~q% Gumo eq ~t~i :AH~WH &olu~oqos uo q~Oq% ~oo Xoq 3.uo p~p 'lisa (DNIqIM~ ~I G~I~400) :OIA "o~A ~ol"foq t~eI. (~r~[H~'O~ O~ G~NF~O COON" WJl~R:7,~T~lO 81H) : .LHhWI~I ~-
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-26- HARRY: Yol~r cut of this one only comes to fiftesn ~Mred° get out of him was three thousand~ What? VIC: All I oould HA~RY~ Three. He had the envelope J.l ready for me, He said I oould take the three or hs~d blab the whole story and take his chances, VIE: (O00L) They all say that, Harry. Why did you let hiln get away with it? HARRY: gic)o.yc,~ve~~%s~n ~i~er.,,this one is pushed as far as we oan ~ush h,.'m. We~r~'~O~'~o'~&~a-y~me~@~ vlc BEAT, ~Harry°~,are you holdi~ out on me? HARRY: Huh? VIO: Holding out, ~as A1-HO 1 0182286
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-27- HAP~Y: Yo~ don't mean that, Vie. I asked yo~l tho Ou~tion. VIO: HARRY: Okay, if you thLnk l:m holding out take the whole three thoueand. Here it Is..._~'~_~!~P~F~L~A_~O~ Go on, take bhe whole thh~. VIO.~ I just want my cut of What Bonner I dontt wan5 the whole bhing~ ~.ave yolla HARRY~ He gave me thzee, ¥1O, oobake as ~noh of it as you want, VlO~ (~.~kayoo.I~ll take fifteen h~n~red. HARRY: Okay, Vie. And how about a drink? VIO: I~!l take the% toe~ (~q_OJ~:T_~L~I,~- HA~RY: I tried, Vic, I gave him 8very anglo in the book, b~t he woqlQntt gO for five. tgTH01 0182282-
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VIO: All right, I guess we'd better line up s~ethi~ else whi1~ %he tourist seaeen is still cn,~ HARRY: S~re, there are lots more ~here he o~le from, I was just Iookir~ u1~ the boat sailings, you could get %he Arcadla to 8outh~mpton this week. VIC: Tryi~q to get rid of me, huh. HAP~RY: Vio. VIC: (OHUOELES) Okay~ I'll hit the high se~s again° (RAISING HIS DRIP) Here'e to a ~ood eroesing, H~ thi~ o ash~we~41 ~bot~ :~ e ~o~he ~t e r, ATH01 0182288
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-29- BAILEYI M~mo to ~ent Sheppard~ A~!ison in~ulry,~,intsrvJewsd s~xthpassen~er on ~oldania 1~et wlth firs~ na~s H~len, o.Helen Bonner, w~fe of p~blisher. This snb~set admits friendship wi~h 3!llson but very evasivoj s~est,~ Bai!sy spe~kiz~. BA!LEY~ S~PARD: (FILTER) Hello, Fr~r~ Are you busy7 BAILEY; I~m juSI~ d~ot~t!n~ a memo to you~ Shep, on c:~r "Helen" list. SHEPPARD: (FILTER) ~ell drop it, Frank, m14 meet me at i4 Maiden Lzne, a jeweler n~ed Dermis~ BAILEY: D~nni~, Is he the oue/~-~ ~/~-~ ~ ~/ ~"~JJ~' SHEPPA~D: (FILTER) Uh huh~ " ' _ ...... e%. Allison was in there an hour a~o and bou~h% ~ dismond clips r~e h~TH01 0~82289
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BAILEY: Okey, SheD. I=Ii be there in twenty m~teso 8~PPARD: And you're sure it wa~ the e~e man, M~-. Delmis? DENNIS: Positive. ~ud believe ~s~. I was so nervous when I waited on him jt~ I Oo,~I~ har41y t~d(k~ ! ~'antsd to leave the shc~ to Oall yo~ but he picked o,~t the slid Iv~ediatsly, paid for it and left. BALLET: You have no idea where he might be staying, ~Tr. D~nnis. DE~I8: No~ I remembered when Mr. Shepherd was in here last time he said if this mar. ever Bhowed u~ again I was to try to deliver the item he bought, but really, Eentlemen, he was only in here a matter of ten minutes° S~PPARD: That's all right, Mr. Dennis, you've been very helpfu~, anyway° ~e ~ay be able to trace him if he c~e here or left by taxi. ~d~k~w~r~,-hea~T~~~l~~. (RISING) Thazke a let~ M¢~ And kee~ in to~oh with us, will you, tab ~T~01 01~2290
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"31" ~£NNIS, i oertalnly will, Hr. Sheppard, ~£~l- BAII~Y: GoodOyep Hr. Dennle. DENNISt Goodbye, ~r. Bailey. SI~PP~RD." Well, it's not a plus but life net a m~m~e either, BAILEY: -~ When oan we oheok on the texioab, Shop? Bt~P&RB~ i80 " ~ ~ Not tlll freight, I g~eeeo The drivers hand in their reports at the en~ of the afternoon eblft. What about that memo you wore serglng in, Frank, letJs go hack to the of floe and go over that, BAILEY~ .(BOUND: DOOR OPEN. TR~FIO IN~ Okay, 8}~PPARD: This Helen Bonnet looks interesting, huh. ras P]I'HO1 01822.91 1
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-32- BAILEY: She and her husbarh were quite friendly with Allison on $HEPPARD: Was the husban~ there when yol~ talked to her? BAILEY: No, b~t when I began telling her about D.i!son's record she exo~ssd herself for about fi~e minutes. I think she oaiL~E~ her h~ebandls office. %~en she came back she was very nervous and wouldul% say a thin~ about ATlison. him. Oh huh. It looked as if she was tryir~ to protect S~PPARD: But I still can't figure ~lisen~s ~_ngle on this one, BAILEY~ it's blackmail in som~ fo~ or these p~o~le would talk. S~PARD: Y~h, that's what it must be, Ooze on, there's a cab~o.let's ~o up and see this man Bormoro.~maybe we can get s~ethin£ out of him. STANLEY: And that's why I wouldn't ta!k when you and ~ent Bailey came to see me, I was too frightened. ras RTHO1 0182292
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-33- ~ 1-77J $~PARD: So e~en though/you k~'Allison had a criminal record you Io~ F~.eher continue to blackmail you. STANLEY: I ha~ to, I jnst co~idn'~ face the p~bliolty, end Fi~hor promised • . A that held let me alone if lid ~i%'e h!m ~,~s~ one more Daymont of five thousand. SF~-PARD: You mean one more after th~ ton you"d ~/ready paid? STANLEY: YeBm SHEPP.4P~D: ~hero do you think Allison was at this time ? H~ was in Daropc, he didnlt know that Fisher h~d asked me for five mors~ k~y do yo~ thi~]¢ that° I T " S}EPPA~D: ST&~LEY: Helen~.omy wife hL~ped into Allison at a cocktail loun~e, he told her he'd just come back fr,.m England. r&s 0182293
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-34- . . // STANLEY: (MIS~ABLY) ~. Oh, I knew, ehe should have ~one to the ptliee, turned him in, blot she had some crazy notion about appealing to him, askin~ him what to do abm*t Fisher° S~PPARD: N~Ither you nor~ your wife connected Allison and Fisher Ks partners. STanlEY: How eo1~Id we? Even you people weren't sure what Allison was doing. We thought yo~ w&nted him for smu~_~lin~ GO on~ ple~eGo S,~PARD: STA~LEY: Well, as I Baid, Helen met A~lieen at this eooktail lounge. I guess sh~ was wzetty foolish but after they talked for awhile she told him the whole ste~y about Fieher. Allison, naturally, played her s~Ongo tab AIHO'I 018229~
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-35 HELEN: And then Stanley offered the inspeotor a bribe and the man took it. VIC: H~ knew ell abc~ me, this insweetor. HELEN: Yes he ~id, Vio~ Hel6no,, Yes? VIO: HELEN~ VIO~ Star/ey shoul~~t have ~aid the bribe, you knew that. As~: I know HELEN: VIO: (SOFTLY) And you should go to the headwaiter right now and tel! him to call the vc!ios~ shouldn't youo Yes, I should, HELEN~ VIC: Why don't you. RTN01 0182295; ill
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You know I oai~It, I've sarved time i~ -36- HELEN: VIO: jail, I flid smu~le that braoelet~. HELEN: Please, Vie: don% tell m~ ar~,thinz. gid or what youtve bsen. f donft want to know what y~ VIO: Thark~ ~ /~-~q~, Don~t th~nkme, I s1~pDose yo~ are, There ~s, ~o. rgs HELEN: I~m a fool and ! know it. VIC: But if there's ever mnything I can ~o for yo~, HELEN: BI 01 0182296
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Y88, -37" VIO: HELEN: Hal9 Stanley, This man is going to blackmail him into the Erave, Via. Ho's already got ten thousand out of Stanley and now he wants fi~o more, VIO: (£ BEAT) How much h~s he go~, Helen? HELEN: Ton thousand. And a w~sk ago he came to Stanley an~wanted five more. Vic,,.oau y~u hel~ us, can you de anything to ste9 this? '\'~"' I think I oEn, Helen, Re's o~Jng toni£ht, o~Bh ready~ V!O: VIO: What time iB ho oomin~He~ About siEht, I think, any more of this. He say~ ~tan!oy must have the H~]LEN: Will you halD us, Vie, we just aanrt take ras F~ Y~fO I 0119229?
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-38- VIO: I'll do what I Can, Helen...i donlt like taking any more of %his either, HARRY: BO~2~er. CH~P2L%LY) GOO~ evening, Mr, • ~ 8TA~tEY: %' Good evening, In£peoto~. Come in, ploaeo, i~OU .'~OR.~_ HARRY: I hope I di4n't keep you Waiting. I had a few things to clean up at the off Joe, they're keepinK us bopping wi~h all these tourist boats oemin~ in= STA~%EY: That's qJlito all right, e~ne ID the llv~n~ ros~, HARRY: Thanks. You know, Mr. Bonnet, I denlt like dein~ this sort of thing any more than yea l~ke payin~ me, end once re get our dee/ settled tonight,,, (HE STOPS) STANLEY: You know Mr, All~son, donl~ you, Inspector, (QUlSTLT) TaB A T,~O '~ 0482298
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Hello, Inspector. Uh,..hello, ~r. Allieon, "39- VIO: HARRY: What..,wh~t are you doing here? VIO: I'm hero as z friend of ths family, Ins@eotor. some advio8. Bit down, Inso~otor. I come to give them STANLEY: HARRY: Why is this m~n h~r~, ~r, Bennero VIO: Sit down, In~pee~.o~, HARRY: Look here, Allison, I i~t you Eo on that smuggling oharge h~t ~f you're hero to pull anything crooked... STANLEY: Mr. Allison came to tell me not to pay you any mere money, InSpeotor. HARRy: What? ATH01 01.82299
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VlO: You were oomin~ to aOoBpt a bribe, w~renV~ you, Inspeotor? A five thousand dollar brihe.°.in addition to the ten you already got° Mr° Bonnet, with yo,~r permission I'm goin~ to arrest this man, V~O: He did ask for five thousand a week ~o didn't he, Mr. Bonner? 8 TANLEY: Yss, he did. And I was supposed to have St ready toni~hto V!O: That wasn't very smart, w~ it, Invoootor. HARRY: Listen, I don't know what yo,~ two are talking abo:~t° If this is some sort of ~aE.~, It is, In~eotoro (~\~ATiNG) Mr. Border, bnsiness tonight... riO: And %h~ l~h is on you° H.~RRY: I don:t think youtre in any mood to talk o 82aoo
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-4I- VIO: He len't, but I a~. Harry~ Irm jt~st in the mood to talk business. Stay where you ~r~, Sts~nley~ You tee, Harry. H~YI Vic, p,~ down the g,m, ~e oan talk 6en~ibly° VlO: You've done all the talking y~tre ~oing to do, Harry~ for a long time to Ocrne o STARLLT: ~'~o.®.for the love of heaven$°. VIO: I told yo~ T~d fiz hi~ for ~ec~, didn't I, Stanley~ He won't bother yoE~ any more after tonlght~ HAP~¥: Vie, listen to me, I was goln~ to eat you in on this, honest I waS, VIO: Yeah, jI1st like you cut me in o~ that laat five he gave yo~, Only yon tola me it ~e three. P~8 ~r~01 0~B230~
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Vic++,are you°.°you and,°° -42- ~TAEDEY: VlC: Sure° That's my partner, Honest Harry FiBber whole wrobab!y been chiselin~ on m~ as lon~ aB w~'ve been to,ether. HARRY: No+ Vie, I swear,o°this was the firBt time~°~you%~ Eot to b~liov¢ ~le,+ ¥1O: You were ohiselin~, weren't you, Harry. yea, yes, I admit it. BL~t look, Vic, I've got all the money in the bank, yoIA oan have the who~-e thln~, every oent. (TERRIFIED) Vic, listen to me, I~]! never pull ~nythlr~ l~ke this again, I waa wron~, I adI~it it~ Ploas~, you've Rot to ljston~ I.o. ~TA~LE~f: (P~+R+4LYZED WIT++ FEAR) ¥ie..=Vio.t ~gas fl'l+~O 1 0'1~2302 i
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Good nIEht, Stanley. count on that: -4~= VIO: }b won't bother you a~aln. I think y~n can STANLEY: And then he !sgh and I~oWaS alone with Fisher. to 4o, Then the polloo oa~e, Shop, BAILEY: S~PPA~D: BAILEY: Ye8, The ~a~shall ~USt brought A!lison up to the D.i~'s offloe. S~PPARD: Okay, Frank, we'll be there in a ~!nuteo BAILEY: Riaht. (~O.~b_/o_OIL D ,IDOl ST~/~LIY: M~, Shepp~d~ hew di~ you find~liBon? I didn't know %hat r~8 FITH01 0182~03 II
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- 44- SHEPPARD: He e~le back to a rooming house where he~d stayed before he went to Europe, A t~xi driver gave us the addreeeo We:d been watchin~ the place for a month. I'm Fjlad you foun~ h~m~ STANLEY: S}~PPARD: So are we, Be you think you nan s~e him now? WaJre goin~ to ask you to m~e a formal identifioatlon. STANLEY~ Yes, I e~n see him now~I~m ready. OFATS_ - ~ae AT~O~ 0~82304 'I
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR JUNE 19~ 195~ CLOSING CONr~RCIhL MUSIC: {UP TO CURTAIN) TICE: In Just a moment, Agent Sheppard wlll %ell you BA~UCH: what happened to the psoDls in tontghtls story. Friends, why donlt ~ try that c[~rette comparison w~ told you about ~on[ght sad sea with your Own %yes that Luoklas are made. bette_.~r to tast_.__~ bett~r. Ysurll discover that the heart of your Lucky Strike is s perfect cylinder of f~nc, mild tobacco. Youlll s~e how rownd and firm and fully packed it is ... with lon~ strands of fresh, cl~a~, ~ood-tsstlng tobacco. Now it stands to reason bocaus~ Lucki~s amc made this way they draw freely ... smoke smoothly and ~vcnly ... always taste fresh and class and mild. So for your own r~l deep-down smoking enjoyment, switch to Lucky Strike .., Y~s, Be Happ~ .... Oo I~ckv. Msk~ your ~ext Carton Lucky Strike. MUSIC: (FANPARk) TICE: (CONCLUSION OF CASE) MUSIC: (SNOW THEM£) IMO ) 1:1]':401 0182305
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-46- S~PPARD: %~ith S~a~Lle~ BOD/%~Fas B~tele witnsBS, Vio~or ~-%!Ison was put on trial for the ki!lin~ of Harry Fisher, klthou~h oouneel for the defense attempted to discredit BonnerYe testimony, the jury returned a Bpeedy verdict of guilty° Allison was sentence~ to the chair. No charge was placed ~ainst Bonnet, but hie health and reputation sufferel heavil) as a result of.©.T}~ FALSE STEP. ras ~Oi 0~82306
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~NE 7BI IN PEACE At;n WAR ~g 19, 1952 CLOSING COMMIRCIAL (CONT~D} TICK: MUSIC: BARUCH: -MUSIC: TICE: All names end 3haracters used on this program are fictitious. Any similarity to p~rsons living or dead is purely colncid~ntal, This proFram is based on Yrcder!ck L. Co[llnsI copyrighted book, "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" ... and is not ~n offlolsl pro~r~ of th~ FBI. (AFTER fAUSB) In tonight's story p~sy~d was ; The radlo dr~ffl~tig~tlol] for "TIE FBI IN ~EACE AND WAR" ... is written by Louis Pel!etier end Jack Finks, Thes~ programs are produced and directed by B~tty Mandeville. Be sure to listen to next Thursdayls story, "THE DIVORCE ACTION" on "TM~ FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". Same time -- s~me station. (SHOW THgZME UP AND FADE UgDER FOE) This is Andre Baruch saylna [oodni~ht for Lucky Strike, product sf Th~ Amcrlcaa Tobacco Company -- Americals lesdio~ manufacturer of cigarettes. "THE FBI IN PEACz AND WAR" has been selected as one off the programs to be heard by our Armed Forces ovsrse3s through the facilities of the Arms6 Forces Radio S~rvice. (SHOW THEI,% UP AND OUT) THIS IS THE CBS RADIO NETWORK. m ol o!B2so7
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REVISED JUNE 26, 1992 l~rod~o~d and DAr~6dbv: ~e~by ~itten by: louis Pelletier and TB ARK01 011~2308 Ii
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-A- THE 7.MERIC~N TOBACCO COMPANY "TH~ FPI IN PEACE AND WAR" COMMERCIAL J 26 5! TICE: MUSIC: TICE: BaRUOH: MUSIC: LUC}~ STRIKE presents . . PEACE ;YD WAR!" (FAN~M~E} Another g:~eat utory based copyui~ Z-~ J bDok~ Dran~ .,, Thrills Anal re BaPu~h. THURSDAY • "THE FBI IN on Frederick L. Collins "THE FBI IN PRICE aND WAR". ... Action! But first ,.. ~idendz, i~m sure you'll egree that taste makes the big difference in a clgsrette and Luckle~ better for two importan are made of fine, mild LS/'~.~'T .,. Lucky Strike taste better. They taste reasons: Firsa, Luckies Tobacco. Evorybody knows mea~a fine tobacco ... fine, mild, good-tasting tobacao, Second, Luckles are ma~e better to tast better .,. a]~ays round, firm an~ fully packed to g~ve you a cigarette thatfs mild and smooth an~ fre~ -- w~th better taste in every puff! you~ll really Be Happy when you Go Lu~ -- because Luckles taste better! So tomorrow why don't oZoJ~ start the day off ~ith Lucky Strike! (SHOW TREblE UP AND FADE) RT~01 01~t2309
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__~-- ~-- .............. -2- RNVfCED Tonight's etor~...~o F~SIC: ESTABLISH THE~ AND OUT FORI BOUND: K~ T~INk~) IN LO~K. DELL DOOR OPENJ C4]ARD: Okay, Doo,.,your lav~ar's here. Go right in, F~. Riohards. LANY/~: Thank you. ($0UND: F00TSTEPg) GUARD: (VDVING OFF) I'ii be b~ok in half an hour. LAWY~: That'll be time enough. ~Q~N~! CELL DOOR CLOSE. GUARD'S FOOTSTEPS GO O~F, LAWYEr: (AFT~ A PAUSE) Well, Doe, here we are Rain. DOC: (A DESPONDENT SWINDLe. ABOUT FIFTY) I can't Bay I'm glad to see you, LAWY}~: Z imagine not. ~e~.ax~ How are you, ~r, Rioharde, RT~01 0182310
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/ • -3- Feel like tal~ing? DOC~ To be perfectly honest. I feel like going out and shooting ~eelf. LAWYER: ~ ~ huh. / i ,~ean it, ~. meh~.~'8~o~~L~.~'~-°~t" ! ', ~ ............... LAWYER: Well sinme you can't go out we~d bettor consider something more practical. Oigaret? DOC: Thanks, I could use one. LA~: The desk sergeant told me the charge on the way in. Leroany and conspiracy to defraud. I thought you'd turned over a new leaf, Doe. DOe: I did. Looking me up this way like a common criminal, it's ~ gross mistreatment of juetice. LAWY~: Light? DOC: Thanks. tb 0182311 il
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(SOUND: LIGHTER) -4- LAIJ~: A mistreatment of justice, huh• DCC: putting i$ mildly. (B ' ggent Bheppard and ggent know I'm here in thepokey. Doc [ ~ : You c~n take it from ms, i I spoke to them. Next thing you LAW~: 14~WY~: ~...a gross vistreatment of justice. I know. Doe: Okay, o~ Maybe you'll be able to reason with those guys• tb RT~01 0182312
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/qaybe I w¢21, LAWYER: DOC: The whole matter would never even have come up if it wasn't for that doublecroeDing ekunk Stanley. Stanley? LAWYI~: D00: Eddie Stanley. He and Norma King were my assistants. And if I ever get my hands on either one of them... ., ...... DOC. Well if I Bver do the charge is~ g~61~g:..~o ~ ~der, you have my word for that. ~'~'~'- , ...... LAWYER: .................... ........ ~' Dec. if you don't start from the beginning we'll never ~et auypl~ce. Dec: The beginning. Yeah, I guese you're right. LAWYE~: What were you doing out in Nevada in the first place? DOC: I wa~ working a brand n~w line of action, N~. Richerds. And all strictly legitimate. tb AT,~O 1 01132313 i,i
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-6- LAWYER: Tell me about that, DOC: Well, when I got out the last time I said I'd go g%raight and I meant every word of it. That's why I went to Nevada. e~d-tVo~?~I-~'~'~:~=~g.~iA~,~ They struck it rich with gold in California and oil in Text, But me, I struck it with my divorce ~tion in Nevada. / / Made to order for me, thab's ~hat ~his thing wan. In a divoroa colony there ere plenty of lonely wo~e~ with six weeks' time on thslr hands. So the idea that came to me wan that a lot of these women needed help. psychological help, someone who'd llotan to their troubles for a nominal sum per hour. ~II you had to do was bone up on some psychiatric lingo, get a fancy dil~Ioma from one of thoae correspondence schools, and aoqadre a Hungarian anoent. Do that, purchase an imposing-looking couch, ~nd you're in business. Rr~O? 01823 I~
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Nro. Hewitt... Yes? -7- NORMs: HEVITT: NORNA: Will you come this way, please. Doctor Karel will see you now. PO" 2~ DOC= (HUNGI~I~ ACCENT) And new, Nrs. Hewltt, just lie quietly, relax, allow your thoughts to flow freely. HEWITT: (IN HER LATE THIRTIES} Yee, Doctor. Ydu,,arB feeling better today? _ 4-- "4. .... ~HEWITT. I a~, Doctor. ~hch better. DO0: Good. good. We will continue where we left off on Nonday. You were telling me of a 8tgange dreemyou had. About an anchor you kept seeing on a ship. Has thie dream recurred? H~ITT: Yes, it has. Only last night. ~b ATRO? 0182315 15
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That is significant. sub-conscious emetione do ,minate the reatraining forces of HNWITT: They do? N~at definitely. ~¢~. As I remember, Yes it wee. -8- DOO: ~et significant. Only in dreams de the intellect. DOG: We~hall, analyee~ye~r ea, w~%~w~l,l~ ~e~elasz,~Wm you told me this ship you saw was out of water. IIEVITT: I)00: (SMILES) Doesn't that suggest anything to you? HEWITT: (HESITANT) l...l'mnot sure. DOC: Let year thoughts flow freely. Tell me the first thing that comes into your head. (PAUSE) Well...? HEWITT: A...fish. DO0: O0 on, HEWITT: A fish out of water. tb A"I" XO '1 01823~6
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-9- DCC: (APPROVINGLY) Exactly, Dreams are the manifestations of our cub-conscious thonghta. They come to life while our conscious being HEWITT= I...l think so, Doctor. DOC: A fish out of water easily becomes a chip out ef water. You, Fro. Hewitt, the ship. Aud the anchor, your husband. He ie holding ysu down, keeping you from the s~et water of happiness. (A B AT) Oh. DO0: (8~II~B) The dream ie clear to you now? HEWITT= Yes, very clear. Only... Yes? Well frankly, Doctor Karel, DO~: HEWITT: I...I'~e been thinking abc~t g~ving up thie idea of divorce and ~oing back to ~ husband. tb F/THO "~ 0~823~P i,
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lO ! I kee~ thinkir@.,.m&ybs frye been too hasty, ~ybe Z ~hQ.~id try once ] / more to save ~ marri~e... ,, ..-, ..... , . :=. DOC: Mrs. Hewitt.., HEWITT: Yes? (pATRONIZING HER) Naturally you've been thinking t~s. Regressions to your former ties are founded on guilt. And thiB in turn reverts to year childhood. ~s"~~~"~ ~ITT: I...l ehouldn'~ go back to my husb~id? DOG: Definitely not. Your sub-oon~oiouB has answered that for us. A ship out of water. An anchor. You would only be in for the ssme heartache all over again. HEWITT: But what must I do, Doctor? tb RTHO~I 01B2318
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ii DO0 : De? You must sever the tentacles of the past, ~s. Hewitt. Sever them and enter the sphere of abundant llfe and happiness.You ~Bt seek a no~ eo~oanicn, now, as quickly as possible. A new companion? HEWITT: DOC: Someone who will chenge your entire way of living. t - You're a fortunate women, you've been glven a new opportunity for happiness. You ~/et grasp this opportunity, ~s. Rewitt. You ~t grasp it new...before it is too late. .~gIC: IRONIS E~BY AND UNDO. DOC: (OHUOKLING) A 14~a aoeent, a couch, a vulnerable patient.,.it'e eurprielr~ what you can do. Especially whm~ you have a hendsema 'new companion! around in the person of Eddie Stanley. Eddie was what you might call my insurance for keeping patients on the hook for six profitable weeks. And belleYe me once they mot up with Eddie they never got off. .~ Iq r :qo'l 0182319 i,
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12 EDDIE; (ELABORATELY) I beg your par~on, ~iss, is th~s sun chair taken? HEWITT: khy no, I don't think Be. EDDIE: Thank you. (SMILING) This is n~rfavorlte epot by the peel, it was nice of you to save it. HEWITT: (LAUGHS) Veil I'm afraid I w~n't quite saving it, but you're weloame anyway. EDDIE: (LAUGHS) You're very kind, thanks. in the watar? Now if youql tend me some of a-walter comes around, r / (LAUGHS) G~od, ~nen we cah1~rmauee our~ei~l have might be the beginning of a beautiful friendehip. F~]SIO: LAUGHING OV£~ AND OUTFOB,. an idea thie tq "1" HO '1 01i82320
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-]3- NORMA: (QUIETLY) Dootor Karel is in consultation. If you will just step... (SEES IT'S EDDIE) Oh hello, Eddie, I didn't know it was yoU. EDDIE: (SOFT LAUGH) Maybe you ought to have more light and less atmoephere • 0 in? in this joint. (~ Dec NORMA: yeah, he's here. tb ATH01 0182321
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EDDI~ : (PUTTING HIS ARMS AROUND HER) Well, before we go into consultation, honey. ,. NORMA~ (LOWERED VOICE) Hey, out it out, Eddie. If Doe ever..,(SHE'S STOPPED BY HIS KBS)(THEN HUSKILY, SMILING) I ~ald out it out, you dope, you know what Doe said about Iovey-~ovey. EDDIE: (pLEASED WITH HIH~ELF) Who cares what Doe said. ~TORNA: I doe (WARNING) llm telling you, Eddie,.. DOO: (OFF)(H~GARIAN ACCENT) Hiss King. Who is it please? 4~,,,. NO~A: (PROJEOT)~It's Eddie, DoO, DOS: /¢.~ (NORH~ VOICE)(OFF) Oh, hiya, EEdlo, "~: ................................ EDDIE: Right wi~h-y~, Boo| ........... NOP~IA: LOWERED VOIOE) You see, you ou~htn't ~6%ak~hanoes llke that, you idiet, P~?"NtO 1 0182322
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EDDIE: 30FT.bAUGH~:.For:~y~rr~.ke~y.~. (UP) (JOVI~) Hiya, Dee, teke off those tortolse-shslle, I know you. EOO= ~RDI.AL) ~ Eddie, my boy, sit down, rest yourself, Nor~a, ~o get a nloe oool drink for thiB hard-workir~ ~entler~n. NOP~IA: O01NG OFF) Sure thlr~. So.,,how di~ i% Ee, Eddie? EDDIE: Perfeo%, Doe. One hundred peroont, Itm in the radio businessin New York. -'k~e~t. (LAUGHS) You sho~&Sve seen me in set, on, down to the soap operas. Doe, she ewallowed the yarn right DO0." Good. And you fed her with drinks, like I tel4 yon, E DDI E = Sure. Every time a waiter osme by. At the end of the afternoon we were ~rao~ioelly felli~ in each others az~s. DO0= (LAUGHS) Good. (SOBERING) How~oh did it oost? RI'HO 1 0182323 T~
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......... ~ ....... -16" EDDIE: ways the bueinee~n, eh Doo. ' i "' DOC: SOW ~oh, .... Twenty h~oks. EDDIE: ~t you said it's worth it, didn't you? .~, ~;~k ~ ~ ~ ~~- ," ">:¸~¸ ¸ k . You be't ~bur~llfe it ia, DO0: -. -EDDI~: .. ! (BLYL~i HOw muoh worth, Doo? ~ ZOO: Twentyfive dollars an hour, five days a week, figure it yourself. EDDIE: No 'oontrlbution' for your oharity patlen%et Maybe. That devonde on how h~wy you make her. ~ (GRIN8) If that's all it de~en~s on your-worrle~ are over. : • r .~ • ...... DOO I'd like a four, maybe five thousand oontrlhution out of tb/s, ra~ ~-NO ~ O~ 82324[
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(IMPRESSED) She's got that? All tusked away in bonds. husband. Donlt worry, "17" EDDIEI DO0: Youlvs got to build her confidence in She's been th:~nkJ~ ~bont going hack to her EDDIE: DO0: If she ~oes back to him we won't get a dime. EDDIE: Forget it. It's in the ba~, Doe. Os.n:~ tulsa. NOP~A: (OOHING IN) "What o~n't miss? DDO: The bi~ radio man from New Ysrk, Norma. to ~O, NOR~A: (LAUGHS) Okay, Eddie,ooherets to you. He's on the air and rarlnt ATH01 01 ~2325~
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EDDIE~ T~s, honey, An~ here's ~o the dre~ ~lrls who hee~ ~ ~hle way,,,may they continae llv~g ~nhappily ever after. ~C: (OHU~LLING) Yes sir, ones my ~atlents met up with Eddie they never ~ot off the hook, And believe me the raoket wet~dtve been ~ood for as Ion~ as you ~leese if it hadn't been for one thin~ that leveed Norma King ~ot married, NO* L&WY~: DO0: You ferret yonr ~L'~fdY~aooen%, DO0: Uh-uh. 8o? One of my ~ost~ents went beok to her husband in swite of ms. LAWYER: r~s F~THO'I 01B2326
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-19" DO0: So she told him what happened and he oc~plained to the Psyohistrio Inatih~be. Hew do you like that, those legitimate boys haventt enough to do they have to report ms to the FBI. That's what loused ue ug, S}~PPARD: Sheppard speakln~. GIRL: (FILTER) Er. Sheppard, I h~ve s oall Dootor Meredith. 8~PPA~D: Okay, Miss Gilbert. (~ ~ .~DO0~) Gores in. Oh hello Frank. Bit down, I'ii be with you in a eeoond. GIRL: (FILTER) GO ahead, Doctor Meredith, ~REDITH: (FILTh)Hello, Mr. Bhep~ar~? S}~PPARD: f~o~ the Psyohiatrio Institute. Hello, Dootor, how are you, ras .... A 1~ ~l~O 1 0182322
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-20- MEREDITH: (FILTER) All right, thanks. Mr. Sheppard, I'm calling about that oanoelle4 cheek of Hrs. Alborb's we sent yoq.,, 8HEPPARD: It arrived in the morning mail, Doctor. {FILTER) Oh, gOOd. SHEPPARD: We do, thanks. How's Mrs. Albert? M~REDITH: (FILTER) She's ~oing to be all right. of damage, confused her q~ite a bit. of her hea~, She'll be all right. That's fine news, Doctor. Anythin~ else? (FILTER) Not at the m~ment, here. I'd appreciate that. Itls on my desk now. ~DITH: I knew youtd want to see that, That quack ~id a Rood deal l~t the ~uioidm notionls out SMEPPARD: We'll attend to our end right away, MEREDITH: I'll call a~ain if anything develops SHEPP~RD: Goodbye, 'Doctor,
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-21- MEREDITH: (FIL~) Ooodbye, ~r. Shopper4. 8HEPFARDs HOw are you, Frar~o What do yOU know° BAILEYs All I know ia that Hr. Andrews told me to Bee you abaut this assigr~ent. What are we working on? SI~PPARD: Ever hear of a swindler name~ Dec Carroll? BAILEY: Carroll? Carroll, Earel, Carpenter. No, none of them register. SHEPPk~D: BAILEY: SHEPPARD: They didult with me either, hut hels got a juicy record of oonvlctions datin~ back to X928. BAILEY: What's the etory? ATe01 01~2329
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-22- S]~PPARD: Oldest one in the business, Frank. He gets himself a ¢oush, phoney dlpl~a, and claims he san mend a broken heart in six weeksI easy lessons. BIZ:..~]~ELOPE TORN OPEN. BAILEY: That the diploma? 8~PPARD: No. This is a oansslled cheek made out to the IDoetor' by one of Th4, ~ .... h~r~re~ ~0~I~'~ for ~Ee.~m:,i~.J=h~y~.~ his victims. -'"- ~""~ Himself."~ ,, Oh huh. BAILEY: , nk .... S~PPARD: • ,~ BAILEY: LI Thlrty-five hundredS. Thatls not a bad haul. ;i ....... SI~PPARD: No. ~he funny thin~ is the woman wouldn't believe he was a phoney, after he all bu% ruined her life, BAILEY: .............. Oh, one of those, - i / / / / BI'~01 0182330
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-23- U~r-~--'8~'~r~'t~v~"~'~h~er~'~: If only people didn't rush into an eaoy way out of their diffioultios,-i~--they~d /" " V only oheok-~fthmrcoor~edioal'"suthor~ttes b~fo.~e,A~t~r~ themeel ee f / (j.-: There are exoellent recognized pByohlatristo all over the oountry if they only took the time to investigate. I k~ow, BAILEY: Anyway, I'd like to oateh up with thio 9honey as soon as ~osoible. BAILEY: Okay I e o -~ BAILEY: So what are we waitinE for? RTH01 01B2331
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-24- S}~PPARD: A few papers Mr. Andrews is having made up for us. (GRINS) You may not know it, Frank, but weirs going out to Nevada to get a divoroe. N DOotor K~rel... ~WITT: DO0: (THE AOOENT) Yes, HEWITT: I'll be able to file for my dlvoroa in another week. Do yon still think I should ~o through with it? I)00: .~ Mrs. Hewitt...the eub-oonecioua dos~ lie. Your last dream was of this new oo,~panion you said youtd met. Have faith. Mrs. Hewltt... have faith and all will be well. as RTH01 01~2332 i
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EDDIE: (LAUGHI~ OVER DRINKS) And so she comes to me and she Bsy~, Eddie dear - she'B eallln~ me dear now~ lenWt that cute - Eddie dear, she s~%vs,,. Look out, Eddie, you're sp~llln~ your ~rlnk. EDDIE: (A LITTLE FUZZY) ~hatea differen~e~ it's Doels liql;orj Doele O~:t, who oareo. A~d she e~ys to me, Eddie, I've eared up a little money and there's more oomln~ in the settlement, and if you think television's a good investment... NORN~: She's a~king you to invest for her? EDDIE: I1m telling yet she~s praotieally bs~ing me. Os~rse, the dou~hte all in bonds new, but theytre the eashable kind and,., NORMA: How m~eh does she want to invest. EDDIE: She's ~e~ faith in me, Nor~a, real faith that the Doe put into her, She wants te invest fifteen thouean4. r~8 RT~01 0182333
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Fifteen. Uh h~h, -26- NORMA.' EDDIE: NORMA: Doo'll never ~o for it, Eddie. Yea knew that. EDDIE: (~ROWNS) Doe? Who e~xee what he'll 6o for? NORMA: ~4hat dO you mean, It's you, DOG a~dme, lenlt it? &, 2, EDDIE= ~oo ~me, Nozma. Now =t's ~oln~ to be 3~st you ~d + Eddie, NORMA: EDDIE: l've had enon~h of what Doo'll go for and what he ~on't. Ar~ I'm fed up with hls ~enny-ante twenty five buoke ~ ro~tlne, Wzth fifteen thousand we oan make a pitoh for the big money. NORMAs Don't talk orazy, Eddie. TaB AI'H01 0182334-
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Why not? you? Maybe, but... What18 Doe to you? -27- EDDIE: Yon're fed vO with him too, aren't NORMS: EDDIE: Youtre not fed u~ with me, are you. NORMA: No, b~too. EDDIEJ Look, Norma, Elizabeth Hewitt iB goln~ to e~sh those bonds the minute I give her the word. llm ~ivlnE~ her the word the minute yo,~ tell me you're thresh with Doe. NORMA: NO, Eddie... "" - ~DDIE: ~WA~Y) We donmt need him, Norma. It111 be you s~ me to~ethar the Way wetve wanted it right along... NORNA: Eddie, live ~ot to have time to think... tab AFH01 0182335 r
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-28- EDDIE | (OLOSE TO HER) No time like now, baby, NORNA: Eddie, let KO of me... J~st you and ross Norm&,,, EDDIE: NOBEA: Let me think, FAdle, 9leaoe let me,..(SHE 8TOPS AS }~ KISSES HER) EDDIE: (AFteR PAUSE)(SMILES) Sure, yo~ go ahead and th|nk. Only you better think fast, honey. Sooner or Eater our sucker's bound to winks up...I want to hit this while she's still subooneoious.,, ~IUBIO: TO A OURTEfN (OOi~OIg,) 1"8,B ,'3 ]'.~01 0182335 n& i
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TtIE AMERICLN TOBACCO U~,C~.~CI LUCKY STRIKE THE ~B7 7N P~]ACE AND WAR THURSDAY, JUNE 26, ]952 N 7DD-3E COMM£~CaM, JIUSIO ; T1 OR : BARUCH: (TO A CURTAIN) END OF ACT I Back to "The Trouble Shooter;~ f~ Just a moment. r_en~, while all olgarettea may look the same on the ot~ts!~£-- there's sn important ~.n_sid__e ~ifferense ~n Lecky Strike -- an inside difference that Dr'eves Luckies are m~e b ett:e.~ to tas~ b ett[,~. TEA~ ~ND C0~PIRE and see for yourself. t.u~ a e~aret~e made From a ne[viy opened pack, '--, by any other llianufas~upor, Then, carefully tear a thin strip of paper straight down the seam, from end to end, snd gently remove the tobacco. In tearing, be careful not to loosen or Oig !Tit! the tobacco. Nsw, do the same with a Luet~ Strike. Then compare. Youlll find Some cigarettes are so loosely packed they fall apart. Others have excessive elf spaces that burn too fast -- taste hot and harsh and ~y, Bat just lock at that Lucky, There you see a perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobacco, so round, so flmb so fully packed, as free and easy on the dra~, And notice those loag ~trands of fresh, clean, good-tastlng tobacco that smoke smooth and even, that give you a milder, better-tasting cigarette. (CONTINUED) RTHO1 0182337
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• THE AMERICAN TOB~'.CCO COMPANY LUCKY STRIKE THF. FBI IN PEACE_AND WAR THUHSDAY, JUNE 26, 1952 ..:IDDL~ COHHERCIAL (CO~rT'D) Yes, friends, tear and compare -- see for yourself that Luckies are made better to taste better, o -- and for more .... ~o, try it yourself smo!dn~ enjoyment you, too, will m~ke next c~rt~a L~cky Strike! MUSIC : (SIIOW TIIEHB) FfT~O 1 0~82338
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FBI IN PEA~E AND WAR -30- REVISED JUNE 26, 19~2 ANNOR: And now, back to #The FBI In Peace and War" and toni~htla story,,, LAWYER~ So No~a and Eddie Stanley were arranEin~ to doubleaross you. DO0= That's right, Mr. Richsrds./A~~ [/eY They used W trusting good-nature to knife me in the back, LAWYER: Tell me about that. PAINFULLY) ~st I go thr~ it? H~rts me even to think about Very well, if you insist. At least yo~ill see how an xn~b~ent ~an • beoome involved when hers deallnE with s soo~ndrel like Eddie Stm~ley, RTHO't 01B2339
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-31- LAW~: All right. . ~ ,. . DOC. eveo flatting it in front of me. ]~e. Hewltt had said there was only one more week to go before filing for her divorce, ec the time seemed ripe to set up a eontrlbutlon! for my oharlty patients. ('-~y" 0,. -~ "~r DOO: # ;~t./ ~,7" o~t./" Eddie had come to the office and we were talking the whole thing over between patiente. He let me in on the pro~rees he was making (~JSl0 STETS TO CO~ER) and I told him I though~ the tlme w~s.., 0 EDDLEs 8o you think the time ie ripe, Doe. DO0: I think co, Eddie. At least it will be by the and of the week. (SMILES) Yo~ think you can keep the little lady happy until, say, Friday or Saturday? EDDIEt (RETURNS THE SMILE) You tell me, Doo. What doas the eubconeoioue say? DOC: That you can keep the l~y happy. tb FII'RO 1 0'11~234-0 i
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"32- ~.._~.,~ ~DIE~ ~e And that Bhe'll ~180 come through wi%h thousaud dollar contribution? DOO: That too. Says it clear as crystal. EDDIE: (LAUGHS) ~hat a racket, Dec. I got to hend it to you, you've got the mallarkey down cold. DeC: Thank you, Eddie. You just keep building Elizabeth Hswitt's confidence ~d.,,(EDUND: KNOCK ON.~B~ EDDIE: (LOW) Norms? DO0) (SLIGHTLY OFF) Doctor K~rel... DOgs (HUNGARIAN AOOENT) What is it, ?iie~ King? NOP~ (8LIGIITL¥ OFF) The new Ratlent who phoned, Sheppard. tb Doctor. F~. Willian F~T~o~ 0"1B2341 h
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-33- DOg: Thank you, I'ii he right there. (LOW, TO EDDIE) ~ glasses on straight, Eddie? EDDIE: (LOW) You look elegant, Doc. See you the end of the week. DCC: Uh huh. (GOING OFF) Hies King, ~r. Sheppard end I are not to be diaturbe~ for the next half-hour. NOPJIA: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Yes, Doctor. IX~ (OFF) How do you do, ~. Sheppasd. (OFF) Dootor. 8K~pLRD 2 DO0: (OFF) Come right this way. please.., ~DDIE~ (0HUOKLES) ~nat a phonue. NORMA: (O0MING IN) (N~RVOU8) ~lat did he say, Eddie? tb AI'~OI 01B234-2
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Just what~ fig~l. contribution. -34- EDDIE: The time is ripe for a five thousand dollar ~OPt~: ~nen? EDDIE: For Doe? The end of the week, Friday. week, Wednesday. For uB..,the middle of the tb ~I]'HO 1 0'1B2343
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-35- NO~MA Wednesday. EDDIE Ifn huh. Mrs. Hewitt hands over our fiftean thoueand, up at the hotel, so long Doo. I pick you ..~ ................... ' ° NOBZ~: "EddJo...maybe wa shouldn't try this. EDDIE Maybe we shouldn't. Bu~wa,re going to all the same. It ~ our pitch for the big money, Noyma...there ~.aQ t~nlng back now. / ............ " ...................... ....................... i:-:- ~ ............. ~IU~IO: lqi AND UNDER. D00 CS3[DLY) Right in my own office they were plotting my betrayal, And on top of that. the FBI is doing the very same thing. This Mr. Sheppard is from the Department of Justice and all the time he makes out like he'~ ~ new patient of mine. I tell you if that i~n't enough to make you lose your faith in law and order, what is? jm FI T;~O 1 018234,.f..
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Go on, Shep~ I'm fascinated. -36 BAILEY: SH~PPARD: Well that1~ about it, Frank. According to Doctor Karel the reason for my unhappiness is due to the restraining force8 of intellect dominating my aub-conscious emotions. BAILIA": (LAUGHS) That explains everythinG, Ghep. From now on I'll be kinder to you. SHEPPARD: Thanks. But it i~n't as funny as It sounds. The doctor has a pretty good spiel. BAILEY: He must if people fall for his act. SHEPP~D They do that ell right. I asw a couple of women waiting to eee him. They're so susceptible, Frank. He catches them at toe time they could use legitimate payohiatric help. BAILEY: Apparently. ~hep, what about Eddie Gtanley? SHEPPARD: I dontt know. I didn1~ see him around. BAILEY: You dontt want to take Carroll in without him. ATHO 0182345 h
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No • ~o? -37- SHEPP/~D: If we did ti~at, stanley would oertainly run for it, gAlLEY; ~e'll wait a while, Frank, B~8 h~ul. SHF2PA~D: ~it and get the two of tbe~ in the BAILEY: (~Ol]~) Uh huh, ...... , ....... SHEPPRRD: r~ ..... You don't like taat idea? J~ Well...blrd in tB~and, yOU know, ~-~/ Sure, But Carroll isn t likely~ out on us, not wlth a going. "~raoket: like,."~ this %o ble~d.BA[LEy:~-~.~.~ I sup~se. ~- ........ BHBPP&RD: Anyway, I think I know a way to wing both birds, ATe01 018234,6
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"3B SHEPPARD: Keep a sharp eye on all Carroll's ~atientB, find out which one he'6 building for the big take. (SOFTLY) Elizabeth.., Yes, Eddie. EDDIE: HEWITT~ EDDIE: Let'B go for a drive this afternoon. Tnerets Bomethir~ important I want ue to talk ~bzut. 8T~40 ~ 01B23,~,7
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-39- DOC: Eddie stanley, Norma King, the FBI...everybcdy knifing me in the back. And I raight never hare known a single thing about it if it hadn't been for one lucky break, LAdY,q: Norma King backed down. NO, Eddie Stanley broke his neck. DOC: LAWYER: DO0: No. Elizabeth Hewitt had another dream and came to eee me about it. My old friend the aub-conaciouB came through for me, that wae the lucky break. ~m AI- IO 1 0"1823 8
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-40- H~/ITT: And that w~s my dream, Doctor ]~rel. Maybe I'm overexagger~ting its importance, hut I thooght l~d bettor tell you About it anyhow. EO0: (~N ~OO~[~) The importance of any dream cannot be oversxagger~ted, ;~s. Hewitt. I suppose not° 3ut what o~n ~t m~n, Dootor? [DO: (GEi~YLY) 1;oth~g suggests itself to you a% all? HEWITT: ~,,.~Im not sure. , The "forest of green leaves," that suggests nothing? .... }~qTT: • ~p+ ; + IDO| ...... ...... Yes? HEWITT: Well, I thought porh~ps,..money? sfm / / A]'HO I 018234.9
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~DO0~,~ clover?" The inveBtment perhape? Investment? DO0: }~JITT: Yes. That'B been on ~nind a good deal lately. DOO: (SDIIL~S)# I see. You've been thinking of offering eomeone money. Would I be doing right, Doctor? }~ETT: not for me to deten,~ine. We mast allow I keep I)00: I beg your pardon? Bfm RTH01 0182350
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~2 - }~WITT: I...I'd like to get married a~ain, Doctor. And Eddie...~ Stanley... DO0: ~r. Stanley? HEWITt: ThB...new e~mlmnion I told you about. Edward Stanley. I]00: (SLO~/LY) Just one moment, Mrs. Hcwitt. Am I correct in my interpretation that you've been thinking of off@rin~ thla person money? ~ITT: Of course, Doctor. ~ho els7 / ' j~*~ HEWITT: Hs's Hoing to invest it for rne in television. W~ Do0: How much investment, Hrs. Hewitt? HEWITT: HB thought fifteen thousand dollars would be enough. sfm ATX01 0182351
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DOC: Fifteen thou~nd... (OONTROLLI~G HIMSELF) him this money? Day after tomorrow, Vednesday. H~ITT: DOC: And when ere you to give Wednesday° / H~I~~ / I didn't wan~f:h~l~e'Y~a so ~oh,.. (ST~IYf) tlrB. Hewltt... H~I~T: YeBt DO0: I...I w~Int you to listen s~refully to wh~t I ]~ve to s~y. I'm about to do Bomethi~ I rarely de in my profession, i'm going to offer you advice, ~s. Hewitt. And I w~nt you to take this advice, will you do thet? (Ai~(IOUS) Oh yes, Doctor. Bfm FITHO 1 01~23S2
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DO0: Good, good. Your development has progressed Be splendidly up to now, Mrs, Hewitt, we woul~'t ~nt anything to spoil it,.,not anything in this world. DO0: Tl~t w~s the lucky break - or at least I tho~zht it was at the time, And believe me it was all I oould do to keep myself from gettln~ ~ gun ~nd shDtting Eddie Stanley right between the eyes. Bu~/as I ~al~ed with Mrs. Hewit~a better idea oame to ms. a much better idea. And the day after~. Wednesday+ I proceeded to Barry it out. , I ~r "r (GAILY) Ga~ morning, ~lisaboth, d~y, isn't it. EDDIE: Ho~ ~rs you, my de, re Benutiful sfm RTH01 01B23_~3
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Good mornln~j Eddie, I~WITT: G~s in, won't you. ~D~DI Thank yoa. my dear, ITm oatohlng an afternoonplane for New York. After all, this is the big day, isnet it. EDDIE: thank you. l~t I'm afraid I can't ste~v long. (LAUGHS EASILY) It certainly is. EDDIE: (PRATTLING ON) The big day, Elizabeth. the head man at Oolumbia Broadoaatin~. said to me. Hr. Stanley... I~WITT: Eddie. come in out of the hallway, HEWITT: Just ~nt yot~r hat down over there. EDDIE: I was just on the phone with Invest? Why thls fellow therele s~eone I want y@~ to Mr. Stanleyj he said, you know how your a~enoy stands with us. if you want to invest in T~. Hr. Stanley. we'll roll out the red carpet for...(SWALLOWB HIS VOIOE AS I~ SEES IDO) HEWITT: (AF~ A PAUSE) Eddie. Dr. Karel. r&s I'd like yen to meet my friend and e~visor, Doctor. thls is Yw. Edward Stanley. FJTHO ~ 01 t~2354
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-46- ])00: (THE AOOENT, $HOOTHLY) How do you do. Mr. Stanley. hearin~ a great many tnterestir~ thing~ abo~t you. EDDIE: (NUMB) Uh..,how do you do...Dootor, uho.. Karel. Sit down. Eddie. about my inves~ent. ilve been }~WITT: I want you to have a little ~k with the doctor,., EDDIE: I, uh...llke I said, Elizabeth, I oentt stay lor~t ~OOs You're leaving for New York tod~yo Is %hat It, ~. Stanley? EDDIE: (DESPERATELY) Well you see, Doctor, I wae going to leave later in the week, SaturdaY, hut, uh, certain circumstances oeme up, and I,~ uh, deotde~ to switch to Wednesday and.,.Ellzabeth, eo~L~ I have a drink, ~lease, llm thirsty? tab AIHO~ 01,82355
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Of oourse. Sootoh? ~ny~hinE. Isn't it rather early in the Uhell -47- HEWITT: EDDIE: Dootor. The switch to Wednesday. Ex~otly, Mrs. Hewitt. DO0: dsy to start drinking. Mr. Stanley? EDDIE: Uh,,.your dream? ~EWITT: That's Just what my dream meant, isn't it, ~00: EDDIE: DOO: Yes. That's part of my professlon, Mr. Stanley. EDDIE: Oh. Dream analysis. DO0: Yes, all part of psychiatry. r~s Dream analysis. ATHO1 01132356
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Oh. Psyohlatry, YeBo EB~eoially financial. EDDIE! (FEEBLE LAUGH) Well that's, ,~h, fine.,. EDDIE: that's your profession. DOO: Another part is advlsln~ Hrs. Hewitt on all matters. Here you are, Eddie. Huh? Your drink. HEWITT: EDDIE: HEWITT: EDDIE: Oh thanks, bat I don't think I can stay for it, DOGs Hr. Stanley... EDDIEs (WEAKLY) Yes. IBeo ra~ ATH01 01B2352
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DO0: Due to certaln manifestations of the snb-ooneoious, I am decidedly interested in this shif% of youra from Saturday to Wedne~iay.., EDDIE: ($~ETIN9) Well, ,~. the way I fi~uredw Doctor... I~WITT: Eddie, don't you feel well today? EDDIE: Noj I feel awful. In fact, I think 1111 go eee a doctor. ]DO: llm a doctor. Mr, Stanley, Maybe an aspirin would help? (MISERABLY I don't know, Hr. Stanley. treatment. Huh? HEWITT: EDDIE: I don't think anything will halw. DOC: Perhaps all you need is a little shook EDDIE: r&s A]'~O J 0182358
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Shook treatment? YE, B, DOO: Itlo what we medical men call the do~blo oroes ~reoori~tion. HEWITT~ I donlt ~mderstand~ Doctor, - more - A]-~O] 0~B2359 i
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I believe Hr. Stanley does. aren't you, Mr. Stanley? 51 DOO: You're familiar with the double cross, EDDIE: Elizabeth..,could I speak to the doctor alone for a minute please. DOC~ I'm afraid I'm not in the mood for private consultation right now, Mr. Stanley. But you don't realize, Doctor... DO0: At, but ~ do. Thanks to a piece of luck I realize all the forces which Caused this shift to Wednesday. And upon examining these forces in the light of pyschologioal persuasion, I have advised ~ms. Hewitt not to invest in television this season. EDDIE: What? I'm sorry, Eddie. sub-conscious... hTWITT: It would have been so exciting. But the DOC: The sub-conscious, Mr. Stanley, was definitely against it. FII'140'I 0182360
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S ~2 EDDIE: Elizabeth, you...you're sure... DOC: Fr~. Hewitt is eo sure, Mr. Stanley, that I have persuaded her to give me the fifteen thousand dollars she was going to give you and I am taking it back to the bank for her this afternoon. EDDIE:I . ~ {( (FORLORN) You're.o.yom're taking i~to the bank. DOC: That's right. I'm only sorry that you can't stay so that I could show you the mental processes whereby I convinced ;~e. Hswitt not to ~nveet in your proposition... HEWITT: Must you go. Eddie? EDDIE: (UTTERLY DEFEATED) Yes. Elizabeth. I'm afraid I murat. DOC: Goodbye, Hr~ Stanley. And if we should ever meet again.... HE~qTT: I'll see you %o the door, Eddie. EDDIE: Elizabeth. I... JAN A[MO~ 0~8236~
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Yes1 EDDIE: Nothin~ Goodbye for now, And...and.., DO0: ~re'll be rooting for television, Mr. Stanley, luck in the world, ~DDIE: (BITT~LY) Thanks, Doctor, Thanks a lot, One second more before Come 0~, Fra~Ik, (CONING IN) Uh huh. Hey, what ie this. SHEPpARD: you go, Eddie. EDDIE: SHEPPARD: BAILEY: ~EDIE: We ~ieh you all the jn ATM01 01!B2362
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94 HEWITT: The FBI, Eddie. I let them use the bedroom for the privilege of overhearing your ~nversation, FBI: That's right, Eddie. EDDIE: SHEPPARD: We've been tryin~ to catch up with you and Dr. Karel for quite a while now. [DO: (COMING IN. SHOCKED) N~'. Sheppard: SHEPPARD: Helle, Doctor. Sorry ] wontt be getting a chance to finish up my treatments. [DC: ~at are you saying, sir? You're linking me with thie,..thie Stanley scoundrel~ Mrs. Hewitt, please tell them... " I already did, Doctor. I told them last evening when they first called on me. Then they told_~about your racket and... [DC: (FORGETTING HIS ACCENT) Racket! This is an outrage~ I demand an sxplanation~ I demand tO see a lawyer~ jn TN01 0182363
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I'm a lawyer, Doe, BAILEY= EDDIE: Maybe you'd like an aspirin, Doc.> DO0: (FURIOUS) You shut up you] Don't ~orry, Eddie. headquarters. SH~PPARD: We'll get him all the aspirin he wants at DOC: Headquarters. You're not taking me anyplace, what do you take me for. BAILEY: Well, Doe, as you medical men say, the psychological (SMILES) forces indicate the bitter water of unhappiness in the near future. SHEPPARD: In other words, Doc...we're takingyou for about ten years. (THEN) Come on, let's go, JAN RTH01 0"182364 "11
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'file AMEP.ICAN TOBACCO COMPANY f,UCKY STRIKE THE FBI IN PEACE~.ND W~R TH[RSDIY, JUNE 20, 1952 CLOSING COMMERCI;L MUSIC: (UP TO CURTAIN) TICE: BaRUC}I : -D- In just a moment, Agent Sheppard will tell you whet happened in tonight's story. Frlends, why oon~t ~ou try thor clgsretbe comparison we told you ~bout tonight and see with your own eyes that Luckies are made better to taste better. You'll discover that the heart of Nour Lucky Strike is a perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobacco. YouIll see hew r~und an~ firm and fully packed it is ... with long strands of fresh, cleen, goo@-tasting tobacco. Now it stands to reason because Luekiee are made this way they draw freely ... smoke smoothly ~nd evenly ,.. always taste fresh an~ clean an~ mil~. So for your own real ~eep-~own smoking enjoyment, switch to Lucky Strike ,.. yes, Be H=ppy -- Go Lucky. Make your next carton Luc~ Str~ke! MUSIC ; (FANF ,RE ) All names a~e~.~e~~ram fic~'tious. Any similarity to persona living are ATe01 01~236-~
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57 8HEPPARD: (AFTER A PAUSE) In gpite of his attorney'e best effor~t, Dec Carroll was brought to trial alonG with Eddie Stanley and Norms King. All three were found guilty ae charged, Carroll end Stanley going to prison for terms of mix years each, and Norms King receivin~ a lee~er sentence of two years. Their separate confimment closed cur f~lee on,.. The Divorce Action. ~_S!~ .... __~L~ T_~_ TICK: ~iI names and characters used on this proEram ere fictitious. Any similari'by to persona livln~ or dead is purely coincidental. This program is based on Frederic9 L, Collins' copyrighted book, "THE FBI IN PEAOE AND ~4AB"...and is not an official program of the FBI. In tonight's story%~j ~h~played the pert of /~C~!~_~,-i~ • .es__ , • ...... ....... The radio dramatization for THE ~BI IN PEACE AND WAR is ~ritten by Louis Pelletier and Jack Pinke. These ~rogr~ms ere produced end directed by Betty Nandevil~e. G 8]-MO? 01:82366
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THEAM~RIC,~N~ '~ TOBACCO CO~IP.~NY LUCKY STRIKE • r T THE FBI IN PE~CE ~LD WAR TIIURSDAY, JUNE 26, ]952 CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONTrD) ['ICE: iCont'd) In tgnight ~8 'story .................... .p!aye~ the [ ................. ' . ......... The'radlo dr~matlzat~on of THE FBI~,IN PJ,,-t~Ci,,'.'~ND W~n ~s wrlttel~ oy I~0~is Pelletl, er and J~ck, Fil~d~n~@~'&'~P~idgz~&~f~a~e'~Pro~nd dirs~e~,:~.~F~¢~,~,~l~,-. 2,e sure to listen to next Thursdayls sto"y "THE EIG YAI~N" on THE FBI IN PE~,CE AND WfR. b~;r,e time -- same sbation. MUSIC: SHOW THEME -- UP AND UNDER B~kRUC~I~- -~"~@zYe~e an important message from~he-'4m~r~.can Her~ t age Poundat i°!3,-.-~.*~he'.'r~Nht~~'nd'~l~be~ties... ,. ' ~..~- we ~n~o~ ~ere ~n America were not ]~ghtly ~!on. Now, more than ever, it is important that we make them l_Ive. Everyone can nelp~Ing etlr heritage of lib~r,~-c~e~-O'f~WY~a~i~ conduct. sure you "-,'eg~ste~;.~~ve~'t''~'~ber: Now freed or, l r£~..e~y o u t (C ONTiNUED ) ~Y~01 01~2~62 ,i
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THE AMzRICAN TOB,:OCU CO?,~Z~Mi/ LUCKY STRIKE THE FBI IN PEACE AND WaR THURSDf~Y, JUNE 26, 1952 B.~U~. ,', C o:~t T d ) CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONT~D) Th~s is Andre Baruch sayin~ goodnight for Lucky Strike, product of The American Tobacco Company -- AmerlcaTs leading manufacturer of cigarettes. THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR hss been selected as onc of the programs to be heard by our Armec Forces overseas through the facilities of Toe Armed Forces Radio Service. MUSIC: (SI[OU THEME UP AND OUT) TICE: THIS IS T~ ~B<~ RADIO ~ I,,0,.K. A]'HO I 0!82368 Hi
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---
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".W31 ' I 2 tb Produoed ~nd Direoted by: Betty Mande~ille Script by: Lo~ and f ATMO~ 01~2370
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-A- THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPA~ "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" OPENING COMMERCIAL JU[~ i. 1952 TIOE: LUCKY STRIKE presents PEACE AND WAR!" THURSDAY . . . "THE FBI IN MUSIC: TICE: BaRUCH: MUSIC: (FA~$ARE) Another great story based on Frederick L. Colllnsi eopyrightaJ book, "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". Drama .., Thrills ... Action! Andre Bsruch. Friends, Ilm sure youIll agree But first ... that taste makes the big 61fference in a cigarette and Luckles taste better. They t@ste better for two important reasons: First, Luckles are made of fine, mild Tobacco. Everybody knows LS/MFT ... Lucky Strike means fine tobacco ... fine, mlld, good-tastlng tobacco. Second, Luckies are made better to taste better ... always round, firm and fully packed to give you a cigarette thatLs mlld and smooth and fresh -- with better taste ~n every puff! Youtll really Be Happy when you Go Lucky -- because Luckies taste better! So tomorrow why donlt o~ start the day off with Lucky Strike[ (SHOW THEME UP AND FADE) ATHO'I 0182371
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-l- Tonight's s t o r~... ~j~F~_yJEa~ OUT SOUND: PHONE DIAL. FILTI~ED BUZZ. (FILTh) Hello. (APPREHENSIVELY) fifth race at Belmont? (FILTI~) Not so good, (HOLLOWLY) Tenth? (FILTKq) By a neck. tomorrow? VOICE: MAQTY~ Hello, 8ue...how did Honey Boy make out in the VOICE: Harry. He was tenth by a neck. HARTY: VOICE: Tough luck, Marry. You want anything for NARTY: No thanks, GUs, nothing for tomorrow. V010E: (FILTI~) Okay, Harry, eo long. I'Ii call you sometimes. 800ND: PHONE DOWN. tb 011923?2 =if
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(GLOOFiILY) He dtdn% come in, huh. Sure, he came in°..tenth. 8AM: There were only eleven hareee In the race. N/~TY: I ka~OW, ~TY: SAH: ~h~t does it say on the tzlly-eheet? leer eight weeke? tt~RTY: EiBht thoueand, four hundred and six dollars, not counting Honey Boy. 8A~: How much have you got in your peeker? ~Q~{_~QINS DROPPED ON TABI~. How much have we lost in the tb ATHO~ 01S23,~3 i i
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A dollBr eighty. SAN: MARTY: (A BEAT, THE~ SIGHS) Well...iooks like we got to go back to work again. SAM: Uh huh, It lookB that way, MARTY: It'll take a couple ef weeks, maybe longer, to pull a new deal. SAM: Uh huh. MARTY: We've got to have money for a bolt of cloth and we've got to eat. SAN: Uh huh. ;ZaTY: Okay, I'll toss you for who speaks to ;'~s. Dilly. 8AM: Okay, heads. tb 0182324-
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Heads, you win. -4" FLIRTY= (~) Oh, N~8. Dilly .... SAN: Tell her we'll give her an I.O.U. MARTY= She'll trust us.(LOUDLY) Oh Mrs. Dilly... ~R8. DILLY: (OFF A LITTLE) All right, all right, you don't have to shout the house down, l'm oondng. NARTY: Hello, ;~B. Dilly, how's my sweetheart? (SOl)NO; DOOR OLOSED) ~'~8. DILLY: Never mind that sweetheart business. I~ve got work to +do, whBt do you want? ~aTY: Mr,. D., an unfort~uate set of circumstances has arisen... ~RS. DILLY: What happened to Honey Boy? SAN: He lost. Oh he did, eh. PRS. DILLY: tb RTH01 0'18237=5
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MARTY: Only by a neck, sweetheart. Now look it just so happens... ~RS. DILLY: It just so happens I'm not giving you two any ~re credit. It's bad enough that the cops are looking all over for you, and ms rlsklng my very reputation... SA~: All we need is two hundred bucks, ~'rs. Dilly. We'll pay you back double by the middle of next month. WI~Sr'DrL%Y~. ~u~TY i Three hundred, sweetheart, and we'll pay you back six. You can trust us, you know that, don't you. ~S. DILLY: Sure, I can trust you, but I hays no intention.,. SAM: Three hundred, Fro. D., and we'll give you back seven, ~S. DILLY~ Well... MARTY: You know when we go to work we always pull a good one. tb RrH01 01823?6 I
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-6- mS. DILLY: All right, I'II st~ke you just thie one time more, but if you start betting on the horses ~gain... MAgTY: You've got our solemn promise, never ~gain. (~ You'll get the money out of the bank this morning? MRS. DILLY: I will. Aud it's seven hundred for three, don't you forget. NARTY: We wont,. And we'll never forget your generosity either. See you later, sweetheart. (SOUND: DOOR OLOSED) Okay, that takes oare of the finances. (SOUND: PHONE DIAL) You calling D~ve. L% huh. Tell him you want the best. NARTY: I know. (~UND: FILTERED BUZZ) DAVE: (FILTh) Davidson and Oompany, yard goode, woolens, remasmts. NARTY: Hello, Dave, ,hie ie Marry Willie. tb RI'HO 1 0182322
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-7- DAVE: (FILTh) Oh hello, Mart),. What can I do for you? MAR?/: Dave, I want about ten yards of mcn's clothing material# English import if you've got it. DAVE: (FILTER) I've got just what you vc~nt, Varty. nine dollars a yard, reduced from twelve. MARTY: All right, Dave, Sam and I'll stop by this afternoon. DAVE: (FILTh) I'll be waiting, Marry. e fine ~lish sharkskin, MAR?f: He'e got an English import, nine dollars a yard. We'll pick it up this afternoon N~doii~ i~ 1• t~;{ s~e~p. Okay...get out the sucker list and we'll start this one rolling. ~Slfl: IN AND UNBER: ~ODND: TEL~PYPE. TB RTHO10"~B2 3 7'8
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-8- BAILEY: W~nted by the FBI for fraud and i~ersonetion, Martin Will'is and Sam Dixon with aliases. This pair, opaz,ating in and around New York and Jersey, have swindled manufacturers of men's clothing, wholesale woolen houses and other jobber8. (~SIO: 8TARTS TO OOV~) Willis, the front man for the swindle is described as follows... SOUND: KNOCK ON DOOR. DOOR OPEN. 8E6~Y: (SOFTLY) Y~. Reedar .... REED~: (I~[PATIENTLY) Yeah, yeah, what is it? SECRET/tRY: That Nr. Willis is back ~gain, Mr. Reader, the man who was here yesterday. He says he brought that material for you to see. REEDK~: What material? I didn't order any material, tell him I'm busy, I'm net seeing salesmen today. SECRETARY: Yes sir, but Zr. Willis says... M~RTY: (COMING IN) ~. Willis says he's not a salesman, Nr. Reader, he's a special contractor of imports. Thank you, young lady, you can go flOW* tb A TI~IO'I 01~23?9 ill i
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Now look here, yesterday... -9- REEDER: Mister, you c~n't come barging in here. I told you HARTY: (SOOND: PAPER) You told me youtd look at this material and you gave ms sn appointment for tan o'clock. I'II only keep you a minute. REEDER: (SOURLY) All right, all right. Go on, Myrtle. 8EURETARY: Yes, sir. (~Q~D~ DOOR CLOSED) REEDER: But let me tell you one thing, Mister, if this material Is no good... ~t~TY: Nr. Reeder, it ssys in the trade papers that Reader Manufacturing Company uses only the best in msn~s suite, that's why lira hers. Now supposing we let this material talk for itsalf. Here look at it. Uhhuh. Feel that texture. This is ~n import? REEDER: ~'~TY: And it's only eight ounces. REEDER: tb RI"N01 0182380 i i
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Oanlt you tell? i0 ~RTY: How m~y yards have you got? MART/: Hftoen hundred. B~D~: How much do you want for it? MARTY: (~ BEAT, T}~) Three dollars a yard. REEDK~: ~hat? MARTY: It regularly oells for twelve, you oan have it for throe dollars a yard. REED~: (A BEAT) I don't buy stolen goods,Ft. Willis. Y~TY: Okay, ;~r. Reod~c~ you can't blame me for trying. REED~: It io otolen, isn't it? Sorry I took up your time. tb MARTY: R'THO 1 0182381
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Ii RF~D~ l I ~ked you e simple question, EARTY: I'll give you a simple answer. If you buy this stuff at three dolors youlre saving nine dollars a y~d, thirteen thousand dollars of saving, Mr. Reeder~ ~nd it doesn't even have to ahow on your imoome tax. REED~R: I don't buy stolen goods no matter what the price is. I've got prlnoiples, Mr. Willie. MARTY: Of course you have, so I'll tell you what I'm going to do...I'm going to leave this small bolt here with you over the week end and you think about it. REED~: A beautiful English i~ert at three dollars I don't have to think, it's got to be stolen. MARTY: ~.'~B_OP~ I~Ii be back on ~bnday, Mr. Reader, want this stuff, I know somebody who will jump at it. If you den 't REED~B: Who? I'~TY= Never mind, tb RI'HO 1 01/~2382
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That orook Harry White, 12 REEDK~: M~RTY: (CHF~RILY) I'll see you on Monday, Hr. Reader. Three dollars a yard.. you o~*'t go wrong on that, ~SIO: IN AND UND~ FOR: SOUND: TELETYPE. O~n yotl. 8HEPPARD: To Rent Bailey, FBI, confidential. Eleventh precinct station this city hss poe~ble lead on Martin Willie, Sam Dixon fraud through wholesaler of woolen blankets. Will w~it your arrival to interview ~holesaler, teke next plane. Sign it, 8heppard. .r~JSlO: 01/~ AND OUT. 8H~pARD: And this is Rent Bailey, Hr. Amery, we're working together in this OasS, (N~RVOUSLY) Glad to }mow you, Mr. Bailey. BAIliff: (ACKNOWLEDGES) ~. Amery. 8H~PARD: I'~. Amary, I have the report here of Deteotive Brady of the elevemth ~reolnot. According to this report you went to the station house of he eleventh preoinct on Monday and asked to see a Detective Dixon. tb FJT~40 ~ 0~82383
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Yes...yee, I did. 13 A~Y: SHEPpARD: When you were told that there was no such person as Detective Dixon you were visibly upset and... A~Y: Nx. Sheppard. YBSo SHEPpARD: A~Y: Maybe...maybe I better tell you the whole story. I've been a very foolish man, ~. 8heppard, and...wsll...I'll be glad to get it off my chest. SHEPPARD: We'd llke to hear the whole story, ~. Amery. A~RY: Well, six months ~go a man c~'ne into my office and offered to sell me a thousand top-grade woolen blankets at three dollars apiece, the sample blanket he showed me was easily worth ten dollars. BAILEY: (SOUND: PAPER) Is this the man, in this photograph, N~. ~mery? A~Y: Why yes, yes that's the one. tb RI"HO 1 0182384 Ii
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Go on, please. .............................. ----- --.T 14 BAILEY: A~Y: Well naturally, I had a suspicion that the bl~tket8 mdght be stolen, but they were such a bargain that I couldn't toilet, BAILEY: ~hen the salesman said there was one condition...you had to pick up the bl~nkets in your own truck. AN~Y: Yea, that was the condition. 8HEPPARD: And you were to bring the three thoueand dollars in cash. A~Y: That's right. BAILEY: And then when you arrived at the warehouse this Detective Dixon appeared, arrested the aaleeman and took your three thousand dollars as evidence. ~Y: Yes. Naturally I thought he was going to arreet me too, and when he let me go I was so grateful I didnlt m~d losing the three thousand. Then, a few m~nthe later when I get to thinking about it, I began wondering if maybe I talked with Detective Dixon... (LETS IT HANG) tb RTH01 0182385 Ill
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BAILEY: That's when you found out yoa'd been swindled. ~ ~ .... i~, ~. Jt ~ ~>~, ~ 8HEPpARD: Nr. Amery, do yeu remember the leeation of this warehouse you went to for the blankets. It was some plase in Brooklyn, I donlt remember the address..I'd recognize it if I saw it. It was down by the waterfront. SHEPPARD: Our ear is downstairs, Ft. ~,ery. We'd like to locate that warehouse. Will you help us? I most certainly will. SK~PPARD: Good. We have a lot more questions we'd like to ask you sad we'll talk in the car. Okay, Frank, let's go. ~SlO: IN AND U~ER: (SOFTLY) Nr. Reeder... Yeah, what is it? tb ~T~O~ 0~82L~86 I
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16 SECRETARY: That ~. Willie ie here egain, shall I tell him you're busy? REED~: (~No, no, not at all, tell him to come right in. I've been going over his proposition. ~rtle. and I definitely think he'e get something. ~JSIO: OVER AND OUT. MARTY: (CHUOKLING) And after he beefed around awhile and bried to chisel me fifty cents a yard he finally gave in. SAM: (S~ILING) They always do. H~TY: Yeah, suckers are all alike. Ohleel you out of your eye teeth if you let them. Next right turn? SAN: I guess so. I always get loot in Brooklyn. MA~TY: Me too, but this looks like it anyway. SAM: Merry... tb ATH01 018238? i
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Yeah? 17 MARTY: SAM: You think we ough~ to use some other warehouse besides this one? PIARTY: Why? Charley's a nioe old guy, I like to give him the b~Liness. SAM: I know. But I WaS reading one of those detective mBgazines. It says the trouble with professional people like us is they use the a~e method every time ~d that's what trips them up. ~TY: (SCORNFULLY) Detective magazinesl t~rat~e ~w~L wuL~u ~h~1 ~ ~dlo~ ._~noga~ms~at do they know? SAM: They couldn=t print it if it waBn~t true, eould they? F~RTY: Relax, Sam. The only reason professional people get caught is when they go overboard 8rid try to take a sucker for too much, All you got to do is pull in s few thousand each trip,.. Hey...there it is, across from pier nineteen. (~i~.I_~) MARTY: I almoBt miss this thing every time, All these plaoeB look slike, tb RTHO1 01~23B~
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18 Ther6'e 0hat ley. NARTY: Where? S/~h There, in front of the watohmau's offig~4~CL~LLS) Hey Charley' MARTY: '~CEI~JI~ES) Poor P~d-ggY look at him sit up when he eee8 us eo~dng. ~S~Q~%[D: OAR STOPS. NOTOR IDL s2J~: Hiya, Charley, how ere you? C}~LEY: (CO~-'NG IN) Well~ ~L~. Dixon, how are you. Hello, ;~z, Willis. MARTY: Hello, Ohm~!ey, how;s the watchman business, things looking up? CHARLEY: (LAUGHS) Not since I s~w you last, Mr. Willis. f~TY: Well, we're going to borrow your warehouee for a oouple of hours on Suuday night, Charley. Fifty dollar8 all right with you? CHARLEY: It sate would be weloome, Mr. Willis. ~RTY: Give the m~n fifty buoke, Sam. tb AI~O~ 0~B2389 ii
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19 Here you are, 0harley. We'll use the place between seven and ten on "~-~ 94 Sunday n~ght, r~w-go across the street and have yourself a few beers while we're in there, right? CHARLEY: Sure thing, Mr. Dixon. And thenk8 for the fifty. N~TY: Don't spend it all at once. OHARLEY: So long. (SOUND: CAR STARTS) CHARIEY: (GOItlG OFF) So long: Yr. Willis. Thanks again. NARTY: Well, that t~/ces care of that. How much dough have we got left, Sam? Three dollars. Three? HARTY: 8AM: Well, you paid ninety bucks for that cloth, I bought a genuine detective badge, that was ten more... tb J9 ]'KO I 0182390 ir
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2O ~TY: ~te can't eat from Monday till Sunday on three bucks. S1d1: So what do you s~ogest? K~TY: Wellj I guess we'd better go back to the room end hit Nxs. Dilly for another fifty. SAM: She won % be happy about that. ~TY: I know she won't. SAM: We could put the thre$ bucks on Blue King in the fifth race. HARTY: No, we'll hit ~s. D. After ell we'll be worth forty-flve hundred dollars ~fter Sunday nlght...she can't ignore forty-five hund~ (~3~) ~b RT~O~ 01 L"¢2 3 9 1 ii,
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T~IE AMERICAN TOBACO0 OOMPfLNY LUCKY STEIKE THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR TEUB3DAY, JULY ], 1952 MIDDLE COMMERCIAL Music: END OF ACT I TICE: Back to "The Big Yarn" in Juet'a noment. BARUCH: Friends, while all cigarettes may look the same on the outside -- there's an important inside difference In Lucky Strike -- an inside difference that proves Luckiss ere made better to taste better. TEAR AND COMPARE and see for yourself. P~'om a newly opened pack, take a cigarette made by any other manufacturer. Then: carefully tear thin strip of paper straight down the seem, from end to end, and gently remove the tobacco. In tearing, be careful not to loosen or dig Int.__£o the tobacco. Now, do the same with a Lucky Strike. Then compare. You'll find some cigarettes are so loosely packed they fall apart. Others have excessive air spaces that burn too fast -- taste hot and harsh and dry. But just look at that Lucky. There you see a perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobacco, so roun6, so firm, so fully pocked, so free and easy on the draw. And notice those long strands of freslt, clean, good-testing tobacco that smoke smooth and even, thst give yea a milder, better-tasting cigarette. (CONTINUED) Ftl'~O 1 01:82392 Ili
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THE AME.~ICAN TOBACCO COMPANY LUCKY STRIKE THE FBI IN PEkCE AND WAR THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952 MIDDLE CO[@IERCIAL (CONT'D) ?ARUCH : Cont Id) Yes, friends, tear an6 compare -- see for yourself that Luekies £re made better to test___~e better. So, try it yourself -- and for mere smoking enjoyment you, too, win make oZg_~ next carton Lucky Str~ke! MUSIC: (SHOW T~ME) ATN01 0182399 i ii
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22 MARTY: ~h, the girl with the golden voice. Come in, sweetheart. /~S, DILLY: And don't give me that sweetheart routine, Now how about this deal, what's happening? it always ooets me money. SAM: That's just why we called you, ~s. Dilly, to tell you how it's going MARTY: We're all set for Sunday night, sweetheart. Our sucker is coming over to the warehouse in hie o~m truck with forty-five hundred dollars cash. FaS. DILLY: Red, ember, seven hundred of that ie mine. M~RTY: Of course. Could we ever forget an obligation? ~S. DILLY: Well see that you don't. But why should you get only seven hundred, Wouldnf~be a nice round figure? FaS. DILLY: (SUSPIOIOUSLY) I'll stick to my end of the bargain. MARTY: (CHUCKLING) You Bee what I told you, Sam. Honest a~ the day is lo~g. tb RTH01 0182394
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~S. DILLY: Now look here, Marry, if you're trying to borrow more money.., MARTY: Borrow? Who said anything about borrowing? Sam and I decided that we'd give you one more Bhare in our adventure, that's all. ~hy should we hog the whole thing~ For a measly fifty buoke you double your money in six daye. ~e~~~~ PR8. DILLY: You don't get another dime, Natty Willie. and thatle final. 8A~: We've got to eat, ~rs. Dilly. ~S. DILLY: That's your lookout. MARTY: Forty-five and you get back ninety. ~$. DILLY: No. SA~I: Thirty-five gets you seventy. F~S. DILLY: Now look here... tb RTH01 0182395
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-24- MART'/: Aw come on, awaetheart, thirty buoka and we won't bother you till the deal is over. You woL~ldn't want Sam to be so hungry he oouldn#t pull his aet right, would you? MRS. DILLY: ~ll right, twenty-five 4Qllaxe, but not one penny mere. MARTY: Mrs. D., it pains me to see your lack of faith, ]~it I guess welll have to take the twenty-five. You don~t happen to have it on you? 9~qS. DILLY: I dO, and here it is. ~t let me tell you one thin~, Marry Willie~ if anything slips up on this deal I%111 be out on the street for both of you. MARTZ: Don~'t worry, sweethesrt, when we ~ive & euoker the big ya~n he aees for it a~.l the way, This one won't slip up, I ~u~rante8 it. r , A]'K01 0182396 ii
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-25- 8HEPPARD: Memo to the director, Martin Willis, Ssm Dixon oase. ~ent Bailey and the undersigned oontin,~in~ oanvase of Brooklyn waterfront for warehouse used in swindle, still believe this would prove valuable lead. Study of method used by above pair in~ioates unvarying techniq~%e in each ease and undersigned feels (~_~Le_~ 99~[_ that location of this warehouse would enable us to set up trap for... B~ILEY: (TIRED) How does the ~ndgrsi~ned feel now? SHEPPIL~D: (THE SI~E) Like the end of a hot a~n~er day in Brooklyn, Lette sit down some place, huh. BAILEY: Yeah, my feet aren't happy at all. Over there? 8}~PPARD: Okay. (SLIGHT PROJECT) Mind if we park on your loading platform for a few minutes, Mao? GH~/QLEY: (OFF A LITTLE) Go right ehead, Too hot to be sat in the sun today. FIt"NO J 018239P
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Thamks, Much. Got a oigaret? SHEPPARD: (SITS DOWN) Ahh, that's better. BAILEY: SHEPPARD: BAILEY: here you &~e. SHEPPARD: Now let's h~le that notebook. r It won't do any Kood, P rob~bly not. BAILEY: $HEPPARD: BAILEY: Yon think we ouKht 4o ask Amery to come out here with us a~aln? S~PpARD: We might. Let:s have one more look at the notes. AT~WO ~ 0182398
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pier. so far? -27- BAILEY: Okay, h~t I think I know them by heart. He t~rned right off High Street, ducve do~m to the waterfront, then he thinks he turned left, he thinks the place was opposite a fruit oompar~V shlppin~ How many fruit o~pany shippln~ piers have we been opposite At least six. SHEPP~RD: BAILEY: Then he remembers the wareho,lse smelled like coffee and he's positive there was a sign for a coffee no.party o.t front. SHEPPARD: ThatTs the one thine that bothers me. that coffee sign. why havenlt we t,Irned up a coffee sign so far? BAILEY: You Eot me. Th~re:s aucther fruit ccmpany over there, pier nineteen. B~PPARD: Don't give me fruit ccmpmaies. BAILEYi Okay. Have ye,~ got a match? F~S 8}~PPARD: 91"~01 0182399 i
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Yoah~ here you are. (IRONIC) Thanks. Hu~ ~or the empty box. Oh, sorry. -28- BAILEY; SHEPPARD: BAILEY: S~PPARD: BAILEY: SIEPPARD: Never mind, Itll BE one fr~ the watt.an. match. Captain, wolfe out. 8;~e thin~, Mister. Thanks a lot. (A BEAT, THEN) Got a CHARELY: Keep the box, I've Eot plenty. SHEPPARD: OHAR~Y: Sure is a scorcher today, len"t it. S~PPARD: You nan say that aaain, RTMO1 0182400
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-29- BAILEY: (COMING IN) Hold the light, Shep. (A BEAT) Thanks. SHEPPARD: S~y, Oap#~In, you familiar with this neighborhood aroar~ here? CHARLEY: Ought to be. Been on this job the last fifteen years, 8HNPPARD: My friend is lookin~ for a warehouse that etores coffee, he thinks it's along this section of the waterfront. OHARLEY: What's the name of the company, Mister? BAILEY: I dontt remember. I was doir~ a door-to-door canvass for ins~romeej they said if I come back in a few weeks I could talk to them. Now I canVt find the place. 0HARLEY: Could it have been the Dexter 0offee Company? BAILEy: Could hays been. Where were they? AT~O~ 0~82401 ¢
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-30" CHARLEY: Right here in this l~ildin~, but they went out of b~siness last winter, In this l~ildin~? That's right. Opposite a fruit company, Oh huh. I was looking for, SH~PPARD: CHI~LEY: S}~2PARD: Frank. BAILEY: Well thanks a lot, Captain, that might have been the plaoe O01NG OFF) Y~'re welcome. Thanks, Oaptaln. (OFF) Don't mention it. 0HARLEY: sheppard: OHARLEY: BAILEY: ,- Went @~t of h~siness last winter. tab RTH01 0182402
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This could be it, Frank, Uh ~h. BAILEY: 8HEPPARD: There's a drt~store over there. BAILEY: You going to call Amery? Yeah. SHEppA~D: We'll drive hirrl over here tonight an~ see if he remembers. BAILEY: What about getting in the plaoe~ S~PPARD: I'ii get a warrant from Judge Hollis. BAILEY: Okay. And if this i8 it? SHEPPARD: Then wet11 go to work on the w~teb~an, f~fteen years he m~st know something. ~qOUND: ~AVY DOOR ROLLED OPEN. r~Q If be'e been around DITNO? 0 IB2~tOS
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(ON CUE) Well, Nr. Briery? -32- 8HEPPARD: AMERY: (A BEAT, THEN) This is it all riEht, IIm positive now° I remember there was a checker's office right there, and the freight elevator next to it. I drove my trick into this space here, I remember that distinctly. BAILEY: Was the, re any watchman on duty when ye,~ drove in, Mr. Amery? A~Y: No. Mr, Willis was here at the door waiting for me. SHEPPARD: You're positive this is the place, Mr. ~mary. A~RY: Absolutely. Let me look in this checker's office... (~i~_~l~J~QQ~_ OPEN) this is where Dixon took us when he made that f~ke arrest. Sure, this is it. I cat right ever there, I'll never forget thle office, believe me. BAILEY: All right, Mr. gmery wetll... SHEPPARD: field it a second, Frank. ATe01 0182~0&
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That's right o FBI? a beer. I We're not concerned with your job, questions wB'd like to ask y~l. -34- BAILE)/t OH~RLEY: Well what's the trouble? I was just across ~e street Eet~i~ only left my post a few mi~tes. 8H~PP~RD: Captain, but there are a few CHARLEY: Now look, fel]ahs, if the management ever found ~t I was across the street... RT~01 01824.05R
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-33- BAILEY: 3HEPPARD: Somebody's coming. Lfa0_~.DA_~D.0J!~-X~0-~F~.IN). CHARLEY: (OFF A LITTLE) Hey there, what's goiu~ on here? Hello, Oaptain. SHEPPARD: 0HARLEY: (COMING IN) Hello yourself, and what are you people doing here? BAILEY: We have a warrant to inspect these premJises, Captain, CH~LEY: Warrant? What is this? Areu't you the two that were here this morning? ¥ou~'re the insurance fellow, ~ you? BAILEY: Just for this morning, Captain, Here are my credentials, OH~EY: FBI. TaB A]-~O? 0182405
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-3P ~I~¥: Oaptain, •. CHARLEY: And the name's Oh&r!ey...if we're ~oinE to be friendly. BAILEY: Welre going~ to be friendly, ~larley. Will you take a look at these piob~ree please? Have you ever seen either of these men before? CHARLEY: You see, fellahs, I've been on this job fifteen years and...(P~ STOPS) SHEPPARD: Do you recognize either of these men, Oharley? OHARLEY: This one...what has this one done? SHEPPARD: Martin Willis. Grand larceny. Do you recognize him? He's wanted for fraud, for~ery, and grand larceny. CHARLEY: ~I~Y: reds ATe01 0182406 q
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-36- CHARLEY: Now look, fellahs, I'm an honest, law-abiding citizen. Now it happens the pebple who own this buildln~ are a bunch of skinflints and they ~SHEPPARD: the man, Charley? C tHIRLEY: only pay me,.. Do y~ reoognize They only pay me thirty dollars a week. dollars, omq he? Charley, BAILEY: I recognize the man, A man can't live on thirty GIARLEY: Him and his friend, Mr. Dixon, they give me a tip every once in a while for letting them use the place for a couple of hours. ~en did you see them last? S~V~PPARD: OHARLEY: They're wanted for grand larceny? S}V2pARD: Answer the question, please. tas Rr.',4 o i 018240;,
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Monday o tomorrow night. Sunday. -37- OH~RLEY: 'l~ney were here Monday and ...and they're o~in~ baek BAILEY: CHARLEY: Ye~, sir. Between seven and ten. BHEPpARD: All right, Charley, come along with us, please, we'd like to ask yen e0~e Mere questions, UK~RLEY: Now wait a minute, you oanlt think l:d hays anythi*~ to do with £~and laroeny, or foraary or that other business he was in, do yon? I1m an henest, law-abldlnEo.. SHEPPARD: I thir~ you probably are, Oharley, s.nd ~lis was only using yo~. But come aloha anyway. CHARLEY: Am I under arrest? ras Fl'f HO 1 01,82408
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SHEPP~RD: Letls say you're being detained til tomorrow night, We'll clear up a lot of thin~s by then~ (FILTNR) Hello. MARTY: Hello, Mr. Reeder, Martin Willis calli~, arrangements for tonight. REEDER: (FILTER) You don't have t~ check, I'm ready. NARIY: Yc~:~-I 4r~ve the ~raok yourself? REEDER~ (FILTER) I said I wo~Id, di~nlt I. MARTY: And you'll have the cash ready. REED~: ~ILTEH) Yes, of oo~rae. Oharley. l~m just oheckin~ on the raa A]'HO 1 011924.09
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Okay~ ~r, Reederj will b~ open, just drjvm in. ~ILT~R) I'ii be there° S~ y~ theno -39- N.~RTY: 1111 s6e y~ at seven. The door to the warehouse REEDF~: I%LRTY~ 8~: Yeah? M/LRTY: He:s all set, 8~% seven o'clock. Polish up your badge and we~ll gO tO work, (SOFTLY) Nr. Reeder. MARTY: R~ED~R: (NERVOUSLY) Hollo. Willis, whore~s the otuff, we'll star% lookinR. ATHO1 0!82410
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-40- MART/: It's ell in that roc(n down there, Mr, Resder~ wetll ~et going on it right aW~yo Did yo,~ bring the money? REEDh~: Of course I brouaht the money. MARTY: M~V I see it, please? REEDER= (~RVOUS ANGER) ~at do you mean, see it? hhh! here. I told you... MART/; Don't yell like that. you oanlt tell who mi~.ht ha around £OWERED VOIOE) as my truok is loaded. REEDER: Welll need a hand t~ok, wonlt we. MART/: I've ~ot one. REED~R: I told you I brought it, and you'll see it as somq tab RTH01 01B2411
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~8~0 ~O~IU ~e~eq~ g$ qon~ SOH "~,up:p eq ~eq ::~I • ".u~:o~ s~ ~.~e~ eq~ ~ou~ ~up.~ I°'°I '~oz~;0 'u~.~ "":"'I ()I:~:E8 05 ~flY XT4EW[) • ~ueorei pu~ .~o~ .o~ ~u~ooq ~I i~u~ wo~ ~q~ ~o %r,o ~poo~ u~io%~
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-43- 8g~: Oome on, ~et ~oir~, the beth of you. REEDER: You're arrestin~ me? MARTf: Dixon, ~ive the ~uy a break, Will yon, he j~st thought he was gettir~ a bargain on the st,~ff~ that's allo a break. He's Mot a wife end kidsj Uh huh. Officer, You can book mep but ~ive him Dixon, his record'c clean. REEDER: I've never done anythiu~ like this before°.. MARTf: His kid is just going to school, D!~on, you wo~Idnlt w~nt to break up an innocent family, would you. S~: Well,., M~RTY: Come on, |~%vc a heart for once. Let the guy go. got the woolens, what else do you want? Yo~ got ms, you ra8 FI l')~O 1 0182413 ii
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-44- S~M: Well...seeina as it's Sunday night and maybe thls'll %each yo,l a lesson, Mister... MART/: Dixon, yo~'re a real ~uy, I mean Ire S~h Itm .just a dumb cop, but beat it, Mister...and take ears of those kids in the fut,~re. REEDER: (GRATEFULLY) I will, Officer, believe me, I will. I'll never Ket ~ixed up ~n a~yth::ng !~ke this ~aino GO on, get goi~ before [ ehmk~e my mind, REEDER ~" ~anks, Officers thanks from ~he bottom of my heart. $HEPpARD: (OFF A LITTLE) A very nice 10srformance, boys, we enjoyed the ~hew. And dcntt reach for any poakets, ~ent B~/ley }ms y~ ocwred. MAR?f: Hub? ras RI'NO1 0182~14 5i
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FBI, Willis, FBI? That's right. S}~PPARD." ~rld if it isn't repetltio:~e, youlre all under arrest. SF~PP'~RD: WWll...uh..~how come you boys are here, I was suppose4 to have jurisdiction in this ease. Were you? ~ure. The namets Dixonj SHEPPARD: Bale and left squad, Isve had thle £uy under surveillanoe for weeks. SP~PPARD: That's very interesting. Tell you what, I'll book him down at my headquarters an~ you fellowe can come owr inthe morning.,, S~PPARD: It's no use, Dixon, we've get the Whole ~o~tine on a reeerdin~. You're ~oi~ up for a nice ion~ stretoh this time. RTH01 0182415
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h'e know you didn't. -46- MARTY: ~mtrs the ohar~e, we didn't st~.~ any woolens. SHEPPARD: ThB oharge is fr~id~ Willis, and I ~onlt think you're ~oin~ to work your wsy out of %his one. 8/~-I: Now look here, as an offioer of the lawo., ¥eah. ;~ART/: l'~/d'Y: Lay off, fi~. He~s ~ot ue r~ht behind the eight b.~11~ He has? S~: MARTY: Sure. S~y, Mister, if you took that forty-five hundred bucks... SHEPPARD: Don't yoll think you're lu enc~h trouble wltho~It trylng to bribe a federal officer, Willis? ras AI'RO? 0182416 ~f
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-47- NARTY: Yeah, I gL~s maybe yoq~,.'~ r'~h~, at that° Okay, Zet's go, S~,,, Yeah~ MARTY: I'll toss you fer who OBI~.B MrB, Dilly from the station house. ~AM: Uh-uh, you Eot to call her, M~rtS°,.I aure woul~ntt want to be around when she hearB about thia one. RF~O~ 01B2~12
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THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY LUCKY STRIKE THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR ~URSDAy, JULY -'-~, 1952 CLOSING COMMERCIAL MUSIC: (UP TO CURTAIN) TICE: BaRUCN: In Just a moment, Agent Sheppsrd will tell you what hsppened41n ton~ghtta story. Friends, why don~t ~ try that cigarette comparison we told you about tonight and see with your own eyes that Luckles are mace better ~o taste better. YouIll dlscover that the heart of your Lucky Strike is a perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobacco. Yourll see how round and firm and fully packe~ it is ... with long strands of fresh, clean, good-tasting tobacco. Now it stands to reason because Luckies are made this way they draw freely ... smoke smoothly and evenly ... always taste Fresh and clean and mild. So for your own real deeD-down smoking enjoyment, switch to Lucky Strike ... yes, Be H:ppy -- G£ Luc_~l. Make your next carton Lucky Strike! MUSIC : (FANFARE) T \ 0 fl~Y to persons "IT~Ing or dead is purely eoincl~e~ta'}~ ~CONTINUEDI ~]'~01 0182418
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BMEPPARD: In4ictod for fraud and impersonatlon of an officer, Mart~.n ~Villis and B~m Dixon were sp~'edi!y b~o~nt to trial and oonvloted. Each was ~i.~en a t~rm of five to e!gh~ years in prison. Walter Reader, v~o~m of this swindle, willingly aided the prosecution, b~t the court, in pas~in~ send.nee; took note of Reader's willi~neee to des.l with men of queet~onab!e reputation a~d cautioned the witness never a~ain to be a ~arty to an undercover deal. @it fiZes are now closod Onoo.~ ~_]~ 0 B2 ]9
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THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY LUCKY STRIKE THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1952 All na~es ~Ld characters ~sed en t~s progra~l are fictitious. Any f slmi2ariby to persons 21rAng or dead is purely colncldena~l, ~L This program is based on Frederick L. Collins' copyrI~'hted hook, "THE FBI IN pEACE AND WAR" ... azd is not an official program of the FBI. In to~ightls atory~Z~/ ,~-~,~:~ played the ~ ~_~.~... The radio drarr~ati'zetion of TNA FBI IN PEACE AND WAR is written by Loais Pettetier and Jack Flnke. These programs are produced and directed by Batty Man~eville. Be sure to listen to next Thursdayle story "THE BAIT" co T.~ FBI IN PEACE AND WAR. Same time -- same station. LUoJC SHOW "~ THEF£ -. UP AND UNDER BARUCH: This is Andre Baruch saying goodnight for Lucky Strike, product of The American Tobacco Company - Americals lesOing manufacturer of ci£arettes. TF~ FBI I~ F~ACE AND WAR has been selected as one of the programs to he hear~ by Our Armed Forces overseas through the facilities of The Armed Forces Radio Service. MUSIC: (SHOW THEF~ - UP AND OUT) TIC~;: THIS IS THE CBS RADIO NETWORK. FFI'H01 0182~20
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---
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JULY i0 BRO,LDCA$~ p~_~D BECAUSE OF REPUBLICAN CONVENTION R]-)401 0182422
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f i~ ,f~ • , , - , ~.~ ~ , .... THSRSDAY, JULY 17th, 1952 ra8 AI'H01 0182423 1,
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-A- THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY "TEE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" 8:30 - 9:co PM EDST IL 195Z OPENING COMMERCIAL TICF: LUCKY STRIKE presents WAR" MUSIC: (FANFARE) TICE: BARUCH: MUSIC: THURSDAY ... "THE FBI iN PEACE AND Another ~reat story bassd on Frederick L. Colllns1 copyrighted book, ~ETHE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR", Dra~a ... Thrills .,. Action! But first ,.. Andre B~ruch! Friends, in a cigarette itrs the taste that makes the difference and Luckies taste better - cleaner, fresher, smoother! Herers ~hy: First of all, better taste in a cigarette be-~i~n~ with fine tobacco and Lucky Strike means fine tobacco -- fine, light, naturally ~iild tobacco. Second, Luekles are made better. Every Lucky is round and firm and fqlly packed ... free from loose ends that set in your mouth and spoil the taste. Yes, every Lucky is packed .Just ri~q~ to draw freel~ a~d £ven~iv! So for a smoke that tastes better -- cleaner, fresher, s¢loother, Be Happy - Go Luck][. Make your next carton Lucky Strike! (SHOW THEME UP AND FADE) Ffl"~O 1 01824.24. i'
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-2- ANNC~: Toni~hS~a etory...Tha P~yek~ O~se. f 8~PPARD: Any decielon yet, Lientenant? (SLIGHTLY OFF) Yes, to the defense. LIEUT: just now. Oeurtmartial. S]~PPARD: I've been assigned That's a tough assiEnment. L~UT: (CCt~I~G IN) I know. Hajer Kellc~ ~ave hi6 complete report. cigarette on you, ~. Shepp~I'm beat. S}~PPARD: Sure, here yol~ ~re. Got a LIEUT: Of co, tree, the doe's convinced the boy ~s definltely and I she,~Id conduct his defense on these E~e. Section eight? S}~PPARD: ATe01 01~B2425
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(SMILES) ATmy talk, sorry. a psyche ORes, Uh ~h. Light. -3" LIEUT~ Seotlon eight, mant, ally unbalanced.., 8HEPPARD: defense, I've gst to have basking° it. LIEUT: (BLOWS OUT SMOI~) ~xt if that's to be my basis for Hew do ysu people feel about SHEPPARD: Well, there seems to be every indioatlnn of an unbalanoed mind. LIEUT: There does, SI~PPARD: w Merrick oertainly isn't the ordinary ~ ~t when sc~ethin~ opposes him, stands in his w~y...(LNT'S IT HAN~) LI~JT: Yes, that's what the dec esid. Extreme ~ressive tendenoise~ repressed hostility r~...(~REAK8 OFF) Mr. 8heppard, I'd llke to be bre,~ht up to date on this last episode of hie. ras I'I 1" ~W 0 "I 0 ~824t26 i %
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~uythi~ I can tell you. -4- S}~ppARD: LIEUT: I want to find out hew his mlud works. people completely fooled, didn't he? He had every one of those S~PPARD: ~r eaoh~,~ ~'dle~e ~ ocnten~d ~ ~o Completely. on to the next. LIEUT: Youlre s,~re it was Herrick who was involved in each of these crimes, 8H~PARD: Well, he made n~ point ef conceallng hls identi~y, in fact j,mt the opposite. ~t we dldn~t know that until recently. Remember we were e1~t after an escaped military prisoner, we had no idea what he was up to on the @~tslde. LIEUT: Of course. W~fld you mind ~%ulng thr~$a this last episode. There are some thin~l'm an~s to have~l~d~. SHEPPARD: Sure. Where would yen llke me to ~art? raS ATM01 0182~22
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-p LIEUT: (THINKING IT) Well...let'e ~s~e Nerrt~te somewhere ~lt wast. Hie escape from the de~ b~raoke is four or five months behind him. He's worked this thine successfully on several families and hels about to work it ~aln. Oan you take i% from there? 8~PPARD: I think so. GOod, I'm list~nine. LIEUT: 8}~PPARD: Well first, y~l're familiar wi~h the background for hi~ whale operRtlOno LIEUT: He worked on families of his b~ddies who were killed in Korea. SHEPPARD: Yes. Herd visit each family on the pretext that he was paseine thro,~h. He pretended he'd been honorably discharged from the service and he tho,~ht he'd leek up hie old p~l whoever-it was. LIEUT: Marine no knowledge the pal had been killed. ras FtT~O 1 0182428
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-6- 8HEPPARB: Right, Merriok played it all innocent. park. Yes. As yo~t know= he looks the L]3~UT: $~PPARD: Well let's assume as you m~est that it's about two months ~n now, the middle of Mey, and we're on a train movin~ through the Nidwe st... (G01gG RIGHT ON) The engine f~h~g into the station of E1msford Falls and banders Eddie Merriok steps nut, Therems & texi close by and he gets in, giving the driver an ~dress. A few ~in,~tes after that the taxi is stopping outside a modest home sn Mapls Drive at the south side of town, ~/~ c~_~ TO s UNto T~~L/~_A_~Tg2~ DRIVER: Here ym~ axe, y~,,na fella, 19 Maple Drive../.~iOl~ "D~_~QO~_~ENI Want me to help ysu with that s, dtoase? ras Rl"XO 1 0182429
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No, Imll handle it. One dollar" eve~, Okay, thanks. -7- EDDIE: What do I owe y~? DRIVER: EDDIE: And bhank you, son, BIZ: EDDIE'S F~OTSTEPS T~) ~RONT POROH. P_AUS~ SOREF~ DOOR OPEN. NORA: DRIVER: (SOUNB: BOOR CLOSED. TAXI I~IVES AWAY A~) EDDIE: Is Bill home? Y6s? Morning, Fdss. Bill. NORA: EDDIE: This ie 19 Maple Drive, isn't it? NORA: Why yes, but... ra8 UP STEPS. DOORB~KL. Hubbard? F~T~O? 0182430
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-8- EDDI~: (BIG SMILE Then yau ~et be Nera° J~st tell year brother Eddie's here, Eddie Merrick. Tell him that and watch h~ come ruani~. M OUS Oo NORA: (UNSTEADILY) llr. Merrick...this is my mother. "i~~DJ Oome in, Mother. Y~...y@~Ire Bill's ma? EDDIE: MOTHER: (AT A LOSS) Well...yes, hat... NORA: Mother, this is ~einE to be snmethin~ of a surprise... EDDIE: (UNHAPPILY) Say, look, Miss Hubbard, I never should have came here, if I'd had any idea... NORA: Why, net at all... EDDIE: ~t Dill and me, we said to each other, sa~e d~ when this is 811 ~ver, when we're hack h~me from Korea.°. R/H01 0182431
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Korea? (GENTLY) Yes, dear. (A BEAT) Oh. -9- MOTHER: N~A: Mr. Merriok was in Bill's outfit overseas. MOTHER: EZDIE: (RISING) Mrs. ~bbard, I'm sorry, believe me... NORA: 8it down, ~. Herriek...please. B11boml PleaBe. EDDIE: NORA: ~OT~: (QUESTIONING) You were in Bill's eubfit.,.? EDDIE: That'~ right, ma'am, before I lef~ the service. NORA: Mr. Merriek was discharged last winter, he...he didnlt know about Bill, ATH01 0182432
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-IO- EDDIE: I still oaa't believe Bill io dead. It...well, it just doesn't seem possible. ! (8OFT) He was my beet friend, the squarest guy I ever knaw. I wish it'd been me instead of him. MOTHER: (HER ~LES FILLING) Nsra... NORA: Now, mother.., EDDIE s (APOLOGETIC) Oh s~, I'm sorry, Mrs. l~bbard... That's all right. "~ EDDIE: ..................... Me and my big mouth~-~'~ NORA. .. It's all riEht, really. We jue$...well, we hav~I-t fB!Iy recovered from the shook of it all yet. ras ......... • ....... BTH01 01B2433
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-ll- Ioan imagine. When y~ told ma, .it was like somebody ~t off my right arm. . ..... (CON~OLLING H~SELF) Do you have a handkerohlef, Nora? Right here, ma'am. Thm~k yon. (Bi~a " %t. EDDIE: That' s okay. MOTHER: It's oilly of me to act up I know. son was thought of that way. ~t it's ~co~ to hear my EDD~: (PHONILY) Oh he was~ ma'am. Bill wa~ the most popular noncom in the whole outfit, that's why I still can't take it in. ~.,.(BREAKS) Say, would y@~ llke to see a plcture of him? NORA: ~ou have one? .... f~FM01 0"1B2434
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Yeah, right here in my us to,ether just before I was shipped boor to the states. Here y~ ~ree EDDIE: wal~t. Somebody took it ef the both of (PAUSE) (EAGERLY) Thank you. MOTHER: EDDIE: (SHEEPISH) We posBd that way for laughs, we'd had a few beers, (THEN) You can keep it if y~ want. NC~A: Can we? ~4hy sl~re, (FIGHTING TEARS AGAIN) EDDIE: MOTHER: l..,llm sorry, I~,, N~A: Mother, this has heen-a~diffieult e~ for all of ue. Why don't you go inei(le and rest, I'II show Mr. Merriok to the guest roor~. • • EDDIE: The ~est room? Oh no, no...%hanks, b~t I'm not Koin~ to stay... ras ATH01 01~2,¢35
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Now of c~se yon are. -13" NORA: EDDIE: No, really I...l'll get a room at the hotel... MOTHER: We wouldn't hear of such a thing. Of co,~rse youlre st~inE... Bill w~fldn't have it any other w~. E~IE: (HELPLESS) ~Irs. Hubbard°.° MOTH~: You're staying, Mr° Merrlck...as lone as y~'rc in Eimsford Falls... you're staying right here with us. MUSIO: SENTI~NTAL ~O~IIO STING AND UN~R FOR: LIEUT: And, of course, Marrlok stayed. S~PpARD: Uh huh. He dangled the bait, he hooked his vlctim, the operation had started to roll. LIEOT: But no mention yet of the money. ras AT~OI 0782436 ii
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-14~ SH~PPARD: NOt of the money nor the IOU. Remember we're d~alin~ here with a defied hut olewer mind. Merrlok WaS aware of %he re/he of %be slow B~ild° Meet the fsmily, b~ild eonfJdenoe, slowly let them draw you out. He was aware of this value and that's the way NORA: New Eddie, you dentt have ts do those dlebes. radla with Mother... EDDIE: (GAILY) But I like doing dishes, Nora. ~ng here In the ki+,ehen. ~_/~ That's right. G~ lls~n to the Makes me feel at h~me This ~o ,~p here? ~ORA: Yo,1're not ~arry you stayed, are you. 2DDIE: What do ya~ think? NORA~ (51HPLY) I think mother hasn't been as happy as this sinoe...w~ll... for a lone time, Eddie. tab RI"~O 1 01,,82432'
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-15 EDDIE: I'm £1ad. (THEN) Forks Eo in this drawer? Yes//Eddie... Uh ~h° 1 \]/ Why did y@~ come here? NGqA: EDDIE: NORA: EDDIE: ~hat~ To Elmsferd Falls. NORA: Why did yore really Oome? Well you know why, Nora, EDDIE: NORA: Do I? ~-~ Of course you do. . . NORA: Ne~l~ The only thine I know is you didntt some a~@ here out of any friendship for my brother. RTF(01 01824~38
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NO~&o., You didn't, -16- EDDIE: NORA: did you. You oa~e for some other reason. KDDIE: ~Jhat are you %alkin~ about? Listen to me, Eddie,.. NORA: EDDJE: It was only out of friendship, %here's no other reason. NORA: Eddie, listen. You don't have to keep up this aot for me. ~Otml. EDDIE: NORA: Yes, aot. I know what you're dolr~. of you, and I'll always be grateful. EDDIE: Nora... ras Dhfor mother, it's wonderful ~%t not for me, Eddie. Ar~4ol 0182439
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-17" NORA= I knew the kind of person Bill was as well as you do. He hasn't the most popul~ nen-oem in your outfit, he was probably the most hated. Even he a~itted that Jn his letters. EDDIE: L~~ ~'~ives in here too? NORA: If he hadn't been killed he'd have been thrown out of the service. His record showed every black mark in the book. EDDIE: Nora, we're ~elng to be late for the ~ovies. NORA: ~hy did you cede, F~dle? Was it rover e~ething you w~be4 "to square with Bill, was that it? EDDIE: Nora,.° ras A T,~O 1 0'1824.40 Tr
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Tell meEddie, please. questions, will you.s (SURP~ISDD) Eddie,,. "18- NORA: I wsnt to know. EDDIE: Nora, for the luvva mike stop askin~ NORA: EDDIE: l...I'm sorry. I ~ess my nerves are on edge. NORA: It's ~1 right. EDDIE: Nora...let's not talk about Bill, do you mind. NORA: Not if it's aoing to upset you this ~oh. EDDIE: It's...it's net 6ha~ I don't want to tell you, it's juBt..°(PAUSE) NORA: Yea? RTH01 01B2441 II
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"19" EDDIE: (ALMOST PLEADING) Bill wasn't a bad J~e, Nora, ~amble too muoha that's all. NORA: Gamble... Look, he's dead now. goes dice-crazy... Bill owed yon money. SILENT) It is why, Nora.., EDDIE: Why di~ out the past? NORA: That's why you o~me here. isn't it? It is, isn't it. EDDIE: NORA: He jus~ liked to J,~s~ beoal~se a ~ly (AS EDDIE IS ~ I EDDIE: (A BEAT, T~EN) I have Bill's IOU for cash he borrowed evmr a perind of months. to the states. An IOU, ras He told me he'd make it good when he got baok NORA: RTH01 01824-4-2
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-20- EDDIE: For twelve hundred doll~re. It happened I oould use the money so I got on ~ train and..,(SOUND: EITO~ DOOR HAS OPENED ABRUPTLY) MOTHER: (CH~RFULLY) Well what's going, on in here with yen two? ~ we gain~ to the movies or not? EDDIE: We'll be through in a minute, Mrs. H~hhard. Nora and ] were talkin~ and got eidetraoked. MOTOR: ~idetra~ked? Yes~ mQther. finally got everythiu~ straight. NORA: That's e~otly what happened...1~t I think we've 3 EPPARDI And aooordinE to ~ the~pleode i~ Eddie Merr~ek let Nora H~hbard draw him out ~ led ~-the final step of ~ operation. ~'~ tab FIT~O ~ 0182,~43 Ill
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Hells, Shep. -21- BAILEY: SHEPPARD: Helle, Frank. You know Lieutenant Hellls. BAILEY: Sure. How are you, Lieutenant? Any decision yet? LIEUT: Uh h, hh. There's ~oin~ to be a military trial, Mr. Bailey. 8HEpPARD: Sit down, Frank, l~m .~ust ~ivln~ the lientenant the faote on Merrlck's last ou~in~, ym~ oan help me fill in the details, LIEUT: YOu halpad traok him down, dldntt you, ~Ir. Bailey? BAILEy: YOs, LIEUT: He oovered himself very thor~hly, di4nm% he. BAILEY: Well. he kept on tbemove. We traoed him from family to family, ~thewas always one jump ahead of us, ra8 P~T HO 1 0182444 ,i
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-22- LIEUT: Yor~ df~'% fi£~re an t~ie for~ery an~le. BAILEY: Not at first, no, $H~PARD: Ve formal ar~t abor~ that In Ohio. ~errlok ha4 ~rned over his IOU and these people happened to save it. LIEUT~ Such an elaborate scheme. cf his kind of mind. ~t I suppose it's characteristic BAILEY: Are ye,~ planning an insanity defense, L~eutenant? LIEUTENANT: It looks that Way, Mr. Bailey. AoeordinK to what Mr. Sheppardts told me so far the whole baok~ronnd leadln~ up to the sheetin~ indicates an unbalanced condition. BAILEY: Uh ~uh. LIEUT: We,~ld you mind going ahead, Mr. Shappard. RTH01 018244~
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Certainly, Lientenant. M%y, Frank. -23- 8}~pPKRD: (TO BAILEY) I'm up ~ the last week in BAILEY: Thztts about the time Merriok tried for the money? 8HEPPARn: Yes° B~IL~Y: Mrs. Hubbard fo, md out &b~t the I.O.U. S}~PPARD | Not yet. Her d~)~hter e~4n'% bring herself te tell her mother at first, she was stalling for time. 8~r~PPARD: l~t as the he,roe went by ~ora felt more and more ~dlty in her delay. And finally, the next evenln~, she knew for sure wh~t she wo,fld have to de. Tha~Is when Mrs. }gabber4 fe,~ out. ~IO: TS N~T, ras F~ ]'MO "1 0 ~ ~2~t46
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/ / / -24- MOTOR: (MISERABLY) How oo,~id he, Nora. How oe1~id Billy have done a ~hin~ like that. NORA: I~ sorrym Hother. I wish I didntt have to tell you,., HOTHER: I wish I eidn't, l~tt I o~xldn't le~'~ddle gO aW~V with thie han~jr~ over us. MOTOR: It isn1~ so much the money. If t But to ~ot himsel~ involved like that. When he knew he co, Kid never pay it back. NORA: He ~st have been desperate, Mother. I'm sure he didn't mean to. ras Rl'HO 1 O'l]~ 244 ?
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MOTHER: (WEARILY) He always never meant to. Nora. Ever since I cma remember, Did he lose the money ~ambling? NORA: Listen, Mother, it wasn't all Bill's f~J~It. We've not to understand his side of it. After all, when a person's far away from hems and any mirJ~te he may be steppir~ a ~llet... MO~: Nor~t... NORA: We've ~ot %0 unders~nd hie side, don|t we? MOTOR: (FINALLY) Yes, yes I e~Dpose we de. NORA: It wasn't all his f~It, really. MO~ :- No, I guess nob. H~Tbe~i..if ym~r fa NORA: --. (AFFECTIONATELY) Mother... ~r had lived... AT~O~ 01824~8
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-26- MOTI~RI Well if he~'had, mayb thlnge wo.~d be diffeyent =....maybe... :~ ~ NORA: 1 M012~: Eddiels leavi~ on Friday? NORAI (HESITANT) Well.,. MOIMER: That's what he said, didn't he, Friday? NORA: Yes, that's what he Baid...if he o@lld raise the train fare by then. MOTHER: He'll have the fare, don't worry. I'Ii see to that. ................................. NORA1 ................... Fa~h? That's why you teld me, isnVt it? TO see ~he~w~id. T&8 A'rN01 01,S2~49 i HI
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Aw, Mother,,, -27- NORA." MOTHER: Eddie'll have his train faro and the roBt of the money beeides, I'm Eein~ to make ~hat I.O.U. Eood, Nora. NORA: But, ~rllna, you can't do th~t~_.Where would we get that kind of money? The train fare's enQ~h~ Eddie wentt mind about the rest... MOTHF~R: (GRIMLY) Maybe he wouldn't mind, D~t I w~Id. I'll get that msney for him, Nora. If it means sellin~ this house I'll get it. (AS NORA PROTESTS) l've made up my mind, dear. NORA: (SY~'IPATHETIC) ~II right. MOTHER: W% wo,~l~'t want Eddie te leave with this hanging over our heads. ~u ~aln so @5ur~e~f. NORA: All right. rae F~TH01 0~82~50 11[
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(FALTERING) Nora... Yes? -28-. MOTHER: NORA: MOTH~R: I...I wanted to believe what Eddie told us about Bill. to believe that so much. (QUIETLY) I'lI get, the money, Nora. you wait and see. I dontt ever want good for his debts. I wanted I'll make the l,O.U. Eood, anyone to think my son wasn't I'II t~Re care of this, you'11 see. (O0~RCIAL) ras ATHO? 011B24S1
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR JuLY 17, t952 MIDDLE C 0I~ERCIAL rp ~ _IC~: ~%RUCH : END OF ACT I Back to 'rThe Psycho Case" in just a moment. Friends, Luckies' are made better m" to taste cleane~, fregher, smoo_~thez! And Itls easy to prove this to yourself. Simply do this: Take a Lucky Prom a newly opened pack and carefully remove the paper by tearing down the seam from end to end. Be sure to start on the seam. In tearing, don~t crush or dig into the tobacco. Now look at that perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobacco. See how It holds together -- without annoying loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the taste? This is why Luckles taste clea!]sr! Notics ho;v free Luckies are from air spaces - hot spots that burn too fast - taste harsh, hot and stale. This is why Luc~ies taste fresher. strands of fins, mild, just rl~ht for smooth, Then look at those long ~ood-_~ta~tia~ tobacco, packed even smoking. This is why huckles taste s~oother, Yes, frlends, these are the Important inside reasons that make every Lucky taste batter - cleaner, freshest, smoother. So for your own deep-down smoking enJoyeent, Be Happy-- O~o LucL_q~! Make your ne~___t carton Lucky Strike! yT .UolC : SHOW THE)~ AI-~O 1 01824[52
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And now baok to .The Peyoho O~ne. -29- ANnOUNCeR I "T~e FBI in Peaoe end War" end toni~t'8 story... And then, with the money in eight,~errlok see,z to have deoided suddenly that money wasn't enough, he had enother ebjeotive. LIEUT; Nora Hubbard, SHEPPARD: Yes. I suppose in hls deranged way he thought he w~ irresistible te wo~. LIEUT: That's what the doe said, delusions of grendeur. But all these he tricked, they said he wa~ so modest, unassu.~ing...that wa~ a cover-up, huh? S HgPPK, RD:, Some of the coldest "-~J~are gentle, well-mannared LIEUT: ~. 8heppard. people Yes, I've heard that. Go ahead, tb Rrgo o B2, 53
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-30" 8HEPpARO: Well, as I say, the money was in sight end Merrick could have taken another family in hie etride,.. SH~PARD: B~t the more he saw of Nora the more he liked her, During the two weeks he eteyed at the houee he took her out a ~Teat deal end one night as they were sitting on the porch he told her what he wee thinking. EDDIE: You knew, Nora, Ir~, been thlnking...a girl like you...ement, gcod-looking...it's kind of a shame being stuck in a one-horse tow like thie. NORA: (NOT ENCOURAGING HIM) Eddie, it's getting late and I've got to go to work in the morning. EDDIE: Don't you think it's kind of a shame? NORA: Of course I don't. I llke it here. EDDIE: (DHDDKLING) Elm~ford Falls, population four thousand, elevation twelve hundred feet... %b ATH01 01,~2454
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Eddie... NORA: 31 EDDIE: You never wanted to see Chicle, Nora? NORA: Of course I've wanted to travel, who hasn't. Well, why don't you? Huh? EDDIE: NORA: EDDIE: New York, places like that? Travel. You and me. With this money that Bill owed me we could.., Hey, where you going? NORA: l'm going upstairs to bed. EDDIE: (SUDDENLY LOSING HIS TEmPeR, GRABS H~) You're not going upstairs, I'm talking to you' NORA: (TA~ BY SURPRISE) Eddie, let go of me. EDDIE: You hear what I said, I 'm talking to you' NORA: (QUIETLY) I hear you, Eddie, let go of me, please, tb A7-~01 0'182455
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\ 32 EDDIE: (A BEAT, THEN HE COMES OFF IT) l...l'm merry. That's all right. NO~A: E~)IE: Don't go up, Nora. I...I didn't m~an tC fly off the handle. I...I get spells like thie einee...since I wva overseas. NORA: (UNABLE TO BE ~NGRY IN THE FAOE OF THIE) EDDIE: I..,I didn't mean anything wrong, Nora. end travel, and then come beck here. what do you think of me? NORA: (OARK~ULLy) Well l.,.I t~ink you're very nice, Eddie, That's ell? Well I hardly know you, WOOko o o EDDIE: It'e ~I right, Eddic. I meant we could get married I didn't meen,.(HE STOPS) Nora, NORA: after all it'a only been a little over a EDDIE: You'd like ~ if you knew me better. NORA: Perhaps I would, but.., tb 81"~01 0782456
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33 EDDIE: (SOFTLY) Nora, I'm goLng to stay here in ED~sford till you make up your mind to come with me. NORA: I...l don't think that's a good idea, Eddie. EDDIE: (STILL sOFT) Yes, it is. You'll get to like me after a while, I knew you will. NORA: (BECOMING FRIGHTENED) I 'm going utostairs. EDDIE: (PUTTING HIS ~RM AROUND HER) No...wsit just a minute... NORA: Don't paw me, please, Eddie. - J-il i) • " EDDIE. [~c~, I \ ( ) lira not pawing' Don't use words like thet' I'm telling you I wast you f,o ~ome with me, well1 get married, NORA: Maybe...maybe we better talk about it in the morning. EDDIE: (A BEAT. TH~ SUDDENLY) All right, maybe we better. NORA: (UNO~TAINLY) Good night. tb RTM01 01824~P
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34 EDDIE: NORA: EIDIE: YouJ~Fnot sore at me, are you? NOw of OOL~Se not, NORA: EDDIE: l...I oau't teke it when people don't like me, Nors...it makes me kind of eiok inside. NORA: But I told you I liked you. Do you? Yes= EDDIE: of course, NORA: EDDIE: I'm gl~d. Beceuee if you didn't...(HEPAUSES) Yes, Eddie? NORA: EDDIE: Nothing. (~pUND: RAPID FODTST~°S DOWN POROH) I think I'll take a walk...I 'ii see you in the morning. A l':WO 1 0182,~-58
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35 S~PpARD: ~nd after that night Merrlek was more cautious. He sensed thet he'd handled Nora in the wrong way but he felt sure that the could final] b8 wo~ over, LIEIR: Do you think he really intended to marry her? SRI~PARD: It's hard to say. He had a fixed idea that he was entitled to ~yth|ng he wanted end no scruples as to how he got it. I wouldn't try to guess how a twisted mind like that operated. SOUND: STREET B.G. FOGTST~8 UP POROH. DOOR OPEN AND 0LOSE. MOTH~: Nora? NORA: (OFF i LITTLE) In the kitchen, Mother. ( • " (STOPS AS:) I just wamted to get the things started for supper, you been downtown? MOTHEr: Yes. (LOWED V010E) Is Eddie upstairs? NOP&: No. He's out on ene of those walks of his. I~id you look at that drena like I told you? tb RTH01 0182459
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No, I didn't, Nora, the money to pay F~die. Aw, /~ther.,. 36 MOTh~R: llsten...I e~ Jim Turtle, he's goin~ to lend us NORAs I had to ask him, Nora. He said the bank wouldn't give ~e the loan but he'd take r~ personal note. I'll have the ~ney by the end of the week, ~ORA: (RESIGNED) All right, if that's the way you want it, I guess I oan:'t stop you. MOTHEr: It's the best way, believe me. ~ORA: Did you tell ~. ~ttle why you w~t~ the ~nay? Yes. I had to. It was all right, Nora, be's been such a good frim~d of the family. "I ~" NORA: F~ hundred dnllass is an awful lot on a personal note. tb RTH01 0182460
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37 I know. Jim tried to talk me out sf it. He ~ald I wasn't respsnslble fsr Billy's debts, he sold he didn't llke Eddiels story, it esunded false. I said I didn't care, I wonted to get this sff my mind once end fsr all... NORA: N~. ~uttle didn't believe what Eddie told us? No he...he said we ought tO/~nd out mere ebout him...there here been ca~es whore ewindlers...(gOUND: OFF -- DOOR OPEN AND CLOSE) (~TH~ DROP8 H~ VOIOE) Nora, my way. All right. I waut to pay this off, please let me do it NORA: EDDIE: (COMING IN) Hello, P~s. Hubbard. Hello, Nora. NORA: Hells, Eddie. EDDIE: I brought some ic~ cream for dessert, Ks. Hubbard. Butter pecan. MOTH~: Oh, thank you, Eddie. EDDIE: Want me to set the teble~ Nora? tb ATH01 01824.61 II
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NO, that'e all right,.. NOR/,: NOTH~: I~ii Be5 it, Nora. Eddie... EDDIE: Y~ah? MOTH~R: I...l'm getting the money to pay off Billy's debt, you'll have it by the e~d of the week. Huh? EDDIE: N~THE~: You'll have it by Friday, Eddie. (GOING OFF) I just wanted you to know. (OFF) It's all arranged. EDDIE: (TO NORh) Well Bay, that's darn white of your ~ther, isn't it. Nakes me feel like kind of a heel taking it. (~OOL) I~eB it7 NORA! EDDIE: Sure. If I didn't need that money so bad...(STOPS) What do you r~an, 'does it?I Nothing. th NORA: RTR01 01132462
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39 EDDIE: What d~d you mean? NORA: Nothir~. You'd bettor put that lee ore~ in the freezer oo~ar~ant, Eddie. EDDIE: (OLOSE TO l{~) Don't give me orders. NORA: I just said,.. EDDIE: (TENSE) I heard what you aald. But I got enough orders in the Army. I don't take thorn any mors, I g~ve them, NGt~: Suit yourself. I only meant... EDDIE: You hear that? What. NORA: EDDIE: I give them now, ~e, Eddie ~rriok, 8~y more," NORA: All right, Eddie... tb I dlah it out, I don't t~ke it ~7":~0~ 0~824~63
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4O EDDIE: (TEN3E, ~CITED) When I get that money on Friday, I got some orders Itm going to glve you, Nora.,, NORA: Eaaie, take your hana off me... EDDIE: You better treat me nice, Nora~ or youtll going to be plenty sorry,,, I mean that. 8HEPPARD: /~d then, when ~arriok had only a few days to complete hie operation we ~ot a break through a letter sent to the Bureau by J~r~e Tattle, a b~nk mausger in Elm~ford Falls, ~gent Bailey and I followed up i~madiately. Hello. TU~T~: GIRL: (FILT~q) Lon~ distanoe calli~, ~. Tuttle...~ge~t 8hepperd of the ~ad~ral Buxeau of InveBtigation. tb AI~O'! 0"I 82,~64
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41 TUTTLE: Thonk you, Miss Williams, put him right on, please. TUTTLE: kad thecafter i talked to you on the phone, I followed your eug~estlec e~d thought up an exouse to visit ~s. Hubbard 2ate this afte~oec, I met N~rriek just as he was leaving the house. BAILEY: Good. Desoribe him for us, will you please, ~. T~ttle. TUTTLE: Well. he'a about five feet seven, slight build, eouldnlt weigh ever a humdred ecd forty, reddish blonde hair... 8HEPP~RD: That sounds like our man all right. BAILEY: Did you notice his teeth, ~. Turtle? TUTTLE: Very regular, I notiaed that. BAILEY: The top teeth are fnlse if this ie Nerriok, he lost most of the front ones in a jeep accident. TURTLE: Well they did look a little too perfect to be real. tb BT.~01 07B2~8S h
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42 8HEPpARD: He's still at the Hubbard house now, ;~. Turtle? TUTTLE: Yes. Hut I umderstand ho'e leaving tonight. As I told you over the phone, Mrs. Hubbard gave him the money on Friday and she told me he's leaving tonight, BAILEY: What's the Hubbard sddresB, Mr. Tattle? Feu~ple ~Ive. SHEPpI~D: F~r from here? TUTTL~: About ten mlnutes. SHEPP~D: Could you osll ~re. Hubbard now, F~. Tattle. find out if Merriok is etill there? TVTTLE: • Of course. NELEY: If he is, see if you nan tr~p up some exou~e to keep him there. TUTTLE: I'll try. (~) tb RTHO1 O1~2~66
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(FILT~) Hello. r , +3 PDT~: TUTT~: Hello, ~ora, this is Jim Turtle. (PILT~q) Oh hello, Jim. ] TUTTLE: i~ora, are you goin~ to be home for the next hslf hour or so? I'd like to telk to you. MOTH.s TUTTLE: N~rriok, I~ he still there? He's out in the oar with Nora, Jim..,.theytll be back soon, TUTTLEj All right. I'ii be right over.~Nura7 Wait for me, please. ~DT~: I will, Jim. SOUND+' PHONE DOWN. TOTTLE: Ho'8 still there, but he's out riding in the oar with Nora. tb 0 246,TM
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TheWs, NZ. 44 SHEPPAR~: Turtle. Okay, Frenk...let'e go. NORA= Eddie, let's go in, please. You said if I just took a short ride... EDDIE: (N~VOUSLY) We're going. But we've got something we've got to settle first. Pull into that driveway up there, Nora. NORA= No, I told Nether we'd only be gone a half hour... EDDIE: (SHOUTS IT) Do like I tell you, Nora2 S • • NORA= (AFTER A BEAT) Eddie, lieten... EDDIE: You're going to do the liBtening. In that driveway. NORA: ~11 right, we migh.~ as well have this out. EIIDIE: Shut up, I said you're going to listen. tb RTH01 01S246~
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F~ldie.,, (SOUND: NORA: EDDIE: HE HITS HER AOROSS T}~ PACE) Shut up, I said2 (GABPSIN PAIN) NORA: EDDIE: I'm tired of fooling around with you, tonight, in this oer. I meant that. NORA: l...I'm not going, Eddie. No? We'll see about that. EDDIE: NORA: I said we're going to Ohio~o You e~n't force me, I simply refu~e to...(SHE STOPS DEAD) EDDIE: Yeah. You refuse to what? Go on. tell me. NORA: (PARALYZED WITH FEAR) Eddie...put down that gun. EDDIE: Go on tell me. Maybe if I don't like whab you say, lql use this. NORA: (DRY-MOUTHED) Eddie... th AI"~O 1 01,82469 ~r
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46 EDDIE: We're going to Chicsgo, Nora. Youtll like it when we get there, I guarantee it. ~~ec~haok. But we're going tonight, right now. le that clear? (& BEAT) Nora. NORAt (A BEAT) All Fight, Eddie. Could l...could I stop at the house for my clothes? I...I'ii have to tell Uther something. EDDIE: No, you can't atop. If I don't go home, Eddie, NORA: she'll call the police... EDDIE: All right. We'll go back, but no funny business, understand? I'll go upetalre while you get your clothes and I'ii liBten while you talk to her. Okay, get going. SOUND: CAR STI~TED. IIO~S OFF. NOR~: (ON CUE) Eddie. EDDIE: Yeab? NORA: Please put the gun away. tb FtT~O'I 0"I1324-20
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47 EDDIE: I will.o°wh~ you've got your bsgs paoked ~nd we're on am" way o~t of t owll ° NORA: F~die...you won't frightsn Mother, will you? You'll let m~ handle hsr. EDDIE: Okay, bat make. one phoney move stud you know what's going to happen. NORA: I under~tand, but j~t lot me talk to her. EDDIE: All right. SOUND: OAR FOR A FEW MOIg~NTS° EDDIE: (ON CUE) Who's car is that "in your driveway? NORA: I don't know° EDDIE: Slow down. (~ Pull up to the ourb but don't 8hat off the motor, NORA: It may be Hrs. Tom~klns oar, ahe has a... tb ATH01 0182471
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48 ~DI]IE: Never mind ~no it is, do like ! tell ysu. SOUND.. (ON CUE) paroh? OAR STOPS. MOTOR IDLES. EDDIE: (LOV~ VOICE) %~ao arc thsse two guys coming down tha I don% know, Eddie. EEHE: (IXA4ER~ VOICE) Okay, wo'll see. g Yeah, thet's right. SHEPPI~D: A~o you Edwsz~ Morrick? EDDIE: SHEPPiRD: FBI, I%rrtsk, stop out of the car. EDDt~t Okay. (NOt~SE WHISP~ TO NORA) Oct gs|ng, Nora, or Iql ~hoot2 Tit Nora... (TO $H~pARD) Stay bask you, or you'll ~et it too" Nora, get going, ysu hear me" Nora;l (~ (TO 81~PPA~D) You ~ heard what I said, Miator, stay back or/ysutll get it too. SOUND: OFF A LITTLE. A SNOT. th R'FNO 1 018242'2
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49 (OFF ~ LITTLE) Get do~m, Frsrak2 OTS EPS: EDDIE:, (PANTING AS HE RUNS, YELLS WILDLY) All right...com~ mud get me, Mister, and see what happens %.o you, come on, Ndster...oome and get me' ~OUND: RUNNING FOOTSTEPS. sHOTS UP INTO: ~JSIC: TO A C[[RTAIN. tb A T~O'l 01B2~?3
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TEE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR JULY 17, 1~52 CLOSING coMMERCIAL MUSIC: (UP TO CURTAIN) TICE; In just a moment, Agent Sheppard will tell you what happened in tonlghtfe story. 3ARUCH: Friends, 6iecoeer for yourself why Lucklea taste better -- cleaner, e=9±her, smoother! Lucky from a newly apened pack and carefully remove the paper by tearing down the seam from end to and. Be sure to stazt on the sea__!~. In tearing, doalt crush or dig into the tobacco. Now, examine that perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobacco. See how it holds together -- ~ithout annoying loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the taste. This is why Luckles taste £1eaner. Notice how free your LuckS, is from air spaces - hot spots that burn too fast -- taste hot, harsh and stale. This is why Luckies taste fresher. And look at those long strands of fin_~e, mil___~d, good-tasting tDbaeeo -- packed Just right to 8make freely and evenly. ThatTs why Luckies taste smoother, So, for a cleane__~rr, freshe_rr, smoother, smoke, make your next carton Lucky Strike! MUSIC: (FANFARE) FIT~O 1 0182424 I
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50~ SH~UpARD: Lieutenant Watkine, assigned to the defense of Edward Marriok, offered a plea of insanity to the court martial and, citing the recovery of Nora Hubbard from the gunshot wound Inflicted by N~rriok, put hi8 ease up to the olemeney of the court. Taking into consideration the teBtimony of Arrmy peyehiatriete the court ~ed Merriek~t~--tif~ml~t...thua closing all f~les on...The ~d~lO: TO FINIgH. TB AI'N01 01824-25
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND W&R JULY 17, 1952 CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONTID) TICE: MUSIC: gARDEN: MUSIC: TICE: All names and characters used on this program are fictitious. Any similarity to persons living or dead is purely coincidental. This program Is based on Frederick L, Collln~a copyrighted took, "TEE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" and is not an official program of the FBI. In tonight% story The radio d~amatlzation for THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR is written by Louis Pelletler and Jack Finke. These programs are produoe~ and directed by Betty Mandeville. Be sure to listen to next Thursday's story "The B~It" on THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR. Same time -- same station. (SHOW THENE -- UP AND UND~ZR) This is Sn~re Baruch saying goodnight for Lucky Strike, product of The A~Ler~can Tobacco Company -- America% leadlr~g manufacturer ef cigarettes. THE FBI li,i PE~.CE AND WAR has teen selected as one of the programs to be heard by our Armed Forces overseas througi~ the facilities of the Armed Forces Radlo Service. (SHOW THEME -- UP AND OHT) THIS IS THE CBS RADIO NETWORK. R T~O'I 01B24,P6
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........ , i,,, ~ = ,,,~-- JULY 24, 1952 pRE-EmPTED DESOCRATIC CONV~NTION ATH01 01824-22
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JCIL£ 24, 1952 p RZ-F.~PTED D~OCI~%TI C CONVE~TION ATe01 0182478
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~.~ ~L ~2.~-~- 'THE ENTRY l~El' THURSDAY, JULY 318t, 1952 PRODUOED AND DIREOTED BY ]$_ITI__~P/,v I~l~__ Am rK8 AT:~O 1 01824?9
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-A- THE A~ZRICAN TOBACCO COMPANY "THe ~51 IN PEACE AND WAR" OPENING COMMERCIAL JULY 3], 1952 TICE; MUSIC: TICE: BARUCII : MUSIC: LUCM ST~I~'~ presenVs ... AND WAR~ Another gre~t story based THURSDAY "THE FBI IH PEACE on Frederick L, Colllns~ copy~'i~ht~d reck, 'ITHE FSI IN PriCE AND WART'. Drama .., Thrills .,. Action! But first ,., Andre Baruch[ Friends, ~n a ci[i~rette itls the taste that makes the dlffe~en~e and ~uokies taste better -- cleaner, ~a!!e!,, s::3t]}3~i Herels why: Firet of all, better t~ste in z ci$~arette ~egln_~s ~lth fine tobacco and =scky Strike means fine tobacco -- flne, light, netura]]y nild tobacco. Second, Luckies are made better. Every Lucky is round and flrm and fully packe~ ... without those annoy]nT loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the teste, yes, every Lucky is packed Just right to draw freel~ and evenly! So for e smoke that tastes better -- cleaner, fresher, s~oo~her. Be Happy -- Go Lucky, Make o~ next carton Luck~ Strike! (SHOW THEYE UP ArID FADE) P] T)401 0192480 V
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MUSIC: SOUND: (OFF) Gome in. Captain Jenner. Yes, J~.~NOUNC~: Tonight e etory...on the FBI IN PEAOE AND WAN...The E~trv Fse. THE~ AND OUT FOR: HARBOR B.G. FOOTSTEPS ALONG DE[3K.KNOCK ON DOOR. CAPTAIN~ • 0 8HEPPA~D: CAPTAIN: Come in, gentlemen. (1O~ SHEPPARD: My name is Sheppard, Oaptain, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Thie is ~gent Bailey. CAPTAIN: (AOKNOWLEDGING) Mr. Bailey, ~r. Sheppard. have one of the offioere bring Haneen Up here. in the brig. Thank you. SHEPPAND: GAPTAIN: Will he be given a defense counsel, Mr. 8heppard? SHEPPARD~ Yes. the court assigns counsel. tb Sit do~, please. I'II We've got him looked R'I'HO I 0182481 i
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CAFfAIN: Good. Ee's in a pretty bad epot, isn't he? SH~PP~D: We don't know all the facts yet, Captain. BAILEY: Rave you t~Ike& to him at all, Captain? C~_~TAIN: Oh yes. As I told you ever the phone he surrendered to me voluntarily. He told me the whole story. 8HEPPARD: Do you think he'll ~alk to us? CAPTAIN: I don't know, it's hard to say. I'm his eount~rym~n, he's worked my ships elf aud on for the pa~t ten years... BAILEY: Did he admit the stabbing, Oaptain? CAPTAIN: (SO_~C~) Mister Nieleen. Oh yes, (FILTh) Yes, Oaptain. VOICE: CAPTAIN: Bring Seeman Haueen up to my oabin~ plesae? VOICE: (FILTh) Yes, sir. ~b RT~K01 0182482
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-4- CAPTAIN: (GOING R~T ON) Yes, he edmitted the stabbing. He admitted it was wrong, but...well, he had very strong provocation, didn't he? BAILEY: Do you think sot Oap~ain? CAPTAIN: I think if you Lmderstand Hansel's background, his embitisns...yesp 8HEPP&~ Oap~ain...before we tBlk to H~u~sen maybe it would hell~ if we heard his aide of t~he story fr~n you, gAPTAIN; It might. BAILEY: ~sd Hanesn ever been in troable before, C~ptaLn? ~rRol 0182483 I
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OAI~AIN: No, end I think that's an important point, You see, besio~lly he's a quiet, herdworkir~ man. All he wonted was to quit sailip4~, get himself a little farm end become an Amarioen citizen, That's what hs wsated most, to become a citizen. MUSIC: IN AND UND~R: CAPTAIN: Well, you know hew it is with sailors...he applied for eitleenmhlp once but couldn't maintain the five yesrs residence, the next time his quote was filled, always somethin~ happened, then, a few months ~o when we decked here he went ashore end met up with this longshoremen, Ohanley Wellers. They met, he says, at a bar on Front Street. They did the town together and in a short while they were friends and Hensen was eenfessir~ his life's ambition. MUSIO: 8EGUES TO BAR MUSIO IN B.2 STE : (MIDDLE FIFTIES, SLIGHT 80ANDANA%qAN AOGENT) A llttle farm, Ohariey.. I saw this ad in the paper, five thousand doll~rs only, a small house and t~, aoresp ~@~r*w-oz*~gh-Ce-oa*-9~r-my~be-_ OI.~LEYs (ABOUT THIRTY, HARD) Aw, go on, you|ll never quit kneekhug around the ooeaa, I Imow you guys. STEVE: No, I mass thin, a little farm, tan acres... tb ATH01 0182~84 i
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-6- OHARLEY: ~lyway where would you get five thousand husks? don't grow on trees. STEVE: Never m~r~, 2 oeuld get it, (SLI~T PROJeCt) Ledy,., ALMA: (ABOUT FORTY, HARD) (OFF A LI~'fLE) Yeeh? 8TEVE: ~s more beers for me and my friend, plebe, AL~A: That kind of dough (OFF A LITTLE) Okey° This oneW8 on me~ Steve° No, yo~r money's no good tonight. T~rrow I go back on ship, what good Is money on the ship. CPJRL~Y: (C[WOKLES) So you'll save up, bay the farm. 81~VE: You think I'm jski~, eh. Here look at this, CHARLEY: What. tb AI~H01 01£248S [
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-7- STEVE: Hy book from the savings bank, right here in New York. Look how muoh it aays there. CKARL~Y: (SURPRISED) ~n, you weren't kidding, were you. Fifby-three hundred bucks. STEVE: You bet I 'm not kidding. (COMING IN) Two beers. / (GOING OFF) Thanks ,' OHAF&EY~ You really going to buy the farm? tb RTH01 01824-86
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-8- STEVE: I said what I would like, but now the quota for oitlzsns ie filled. I ha~ to wait a year, maybe more. OP~LEY: Oh. STEVE: 8ome s~dlors, they jursp ship, but sooner or later they get eE~ght~ Without papers I don't buy a~ farm. CHARLEY= You mean papers for oitizenehlp. STEVE: Sure. You got s oigaret, Charley? OH~LEY: No, I'm fresh out. There's e meohine, I'II get come. STEVE: No, your money's no good tonight. (GOING OFF) I'll get them. You wait. AL~A: (COr~MG IN) (LOW~ VOICE) ~no'e the suoker, Charley? CHARLEY: (LOWERED VOICE) Ship's carpenter from the Norseland. Alma, is Eddie Kohler in town? Yesh, he'e here. ~]'NO I 0182487
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-9- Get held of him. Thie equareheadte got five thousaua buok~ in a savings' bank. A~A: (GOING OFF) I'll get Eddie right away. 8TEVEI (COMING I~) Here you are, Oharley, one for yeu, one for me. CHARIAT: Well, eay, thanks, Steve. STEm: Sure, what's money when you have to go baok to ~ho ehJp, GHARLEY: Say, uh, 8teve...when yea ooming back into port 8galn? 3TEVE: Fourteen days, CH~RIXY: Well look. I've got an idea how you might get that farm if you really waut it. STEVE: No, it's no good withoat being a oitizsa. CHA~: I know..,but maybe that could be fixed too. Would you be intereeted. STEVE: You could fix it for me to be a citizen? tb A]-MO I 0!,824.88
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-IO- CHAff I might. Come on, let'B get out Bf herb whore we can talk privately ...I might have juBt the kind Bf propositiBn you've been looking for, iIusIo: IN END I~]~: OAPTAIN: And the proposition that the longshoreman gave to Haneen was the purchase Bf false Bitizanehip papers fBr eight hundred dollare. At rarer Hanean refused, but the more he thought abBut that farm t}~e more he w~B tempted. When we left port Hanean promised to Ball WBllers as Boon ~ our ship returned to New York. 0 . SOUND: PNONE. BAR B.G. PHONE UP. Front Street Bar and Grill. STEVE: (FILTER) Hello...ie Charley Wellere there? ALMA: Yeeh, he'B here. Just a BBBo~Id, (PROJEOT) Charley.I OP~RI~: (OONING IN) Okay, Alma. Who is it? (LOWED VOIOE) So~de like ~hat s~/uarehesd from the Narse~d. tb
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Okay. (INTO PHONE) Hello. Helle, Oharley, itT8 me. 11 OI-L~RLI~Y: STEVE: Steve Hansen. CHARLEY: (WARMLY) Well hello, Steve, when did you get in? How was the trip? STEVE: I just got in now, Charley, and the trip was fine. Listen, can I see you tonlght...ebout that propositien? OH~RLEY: Yeeh, sure, Steve, any time you say. STEVE: Pier nineteen in a half hour, Okay, Steve, That was him. yenh, ~here'll I meet you? OHAP,~: I'll be there. AL~Az OBARLEY: let's go in the back room. (SLIGHT PROJEOT) Eddie...° (OFF A LITTLE) Okay. tb EDDIE: I~1~0~ 011~2,,¢90
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ICnat did he eay, Oharley? He wants to talk to me. 12 ALMA: F~DIE: (COMING IN) What is it, Alma? CHARLEY: Hansen'8 ship just gd~in. He wants to talk about the proposition. You want A1 to bring us something to drink? CHARLB~': • O0 NevBr mind. EDDIE: You think he's going to fall for the dsal, Oharley? OHARLEY: (SMILING) Don't they always. EDDIE: (CHUcKLEs) Yeah, I guess you're right, once a sailor deoldes hers going to get off the ocean there's no stopping him. Say, Alma, while w~'re on the subject, Bid says hers charging s~vanty-fiYe bucks for making up those phoney citizenship papas. AI~: Seventy-five. Trio big crook, where doeB he get that stuff? bb RIH01 0182491
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Inflationp I guess. 13 EDDIE: 8o it's seventy-five, what's the difference. We can hit this HanSon for every dime he's got in that savings bsnk, EDDIE: Five thousand you sold, Uh huh. CHARLEY: ALMA: You want to brir~ hi~ over hero tonight, Charley? OHARLEY: SUre, the sooner we ~et started the bettor. Ho~ is he setup? ALMAI CHARLEY: Just like the rest. I told him you were the one who sold the phoney papers. He'll give you the dough. Eight hundred for e starter. Okay, A/2~A: CHARLEY: If he tries to chisel you on the price, let him. tb FIr ~0"1 0182492
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.... 6" .~ ...... ~=~ -- " " 14 AU~: Uh huh, EDDIE: When do you figure I come in, Charley? CHARLEY: I don't know, Eddie. As soon as he gets the papers he'll probebly jump ship. After that we give him a week, maybe more, then you go to work. Okay. EDDIE~ O~Pd~Y: All right, we're all eet...we know where we're going? AIJMA: Sure, go meet year sucker, Oharley...we~ll handle it from this end, don't worry. CAPTAIN: 80 Hanson paid six hundred dollars for the false cltizenehlp papers end jumped ship the next day. I reported to the I~Igratlen people end I suppose they get in touch with you. You were working on some of these eaeen with the Border Patrol, weren't YOU. SHEPpARDs Only on one angle of the oases, Captain, impersonation of Feder sl officer. tb ~TN01 01e2493
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CAPTAIN: You mean Wellere~ confederate in the aohe~. BAILEY: Yes, i% was part of the set-up for hi~ to pose as an ~ent of our ~reau° OAI~AIN: Oh yee, that's what Henean told me. 8B]~P.~RD: Of course that was the difficult part about breaking up this operation. Host of the victims of the acheme were under the impression that they had tried to bribe a Federal officer and they didn't want that charge added to the others. BAILEY: plus the perverted notion of loyalty to the seller of the false papers, C~TAIN: Yes, that's the part that's hard to understand. You'd think once e man was caught...(LETS IT HANG) BAILNY: You'd think so, Oaptain, but it doesn't work that way. In fast, we wouldn't have known about the impersonation augle if it hadn't been for a notebook that was foumd on one of the sailors. In this book he'd written dove bribe payments to "Agent Kohlar" of the FB[. CAPTAIN: Then how did you ever catch up with this crowd? th RTHO'I 018249A I ili i
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16 BAILEY: Through the papers themselves. Since no one would talk we decided to try tracing the origin of the false papers. They were printed on very good stock so we get a laboratory e~slysie of the paper $~d went tc work from there. CAPTAIN: T~at mast have been s long p.rceass. SHEPP$AqD: 1% was, Captain, and we'll tell you about it later. Right now... 0APTAIN: Yes, of course, you went to hear more of Haneen'e story. SHEPPARD: If you please, O D ; OAPTAIN: Wall, as I said, Haumsn paid elx hundred dollars for the false papers and jumped ship. Naturally thie man~ell~ra kept cloae watoh on him end, about a week later, Hanson invited Wellers to take e drive in the country end see the farm that Hsneen was going to ~y. Wellers picked this a8 an ideal time for hie confederate, Eddie Kohlar, to pull his pert of the operation. tb ~I"~01 0182495
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17 STEVE: (HAPPILY) Well..,there we are, Charley.o.wha~ do you say? (FAKE ENTHUSIASM) All this..ofOr only five thousand? STEVE: Tan acres. Aud that bungalow. Wait till you see inside, 0harley, it is built as stron~ as e ship. (~OUN~ OAR DOOR OPEN) OHARLEY: It's terrific, Steve, 8ay.,,the owner isn't here, is he? $TEVEI No, I ~ the key. 0om~ on. ( • ST Of oo~ree there is a little work to do..,fix up the porch a little, anew roof on the chicken house. GHARLEY: (OP~CELES) A chicken houe~ too. You're really Btealln~ this ~eint, aren't you. STEVE: (LAUGHING HAPPILY) Wait tlll you see, ( 0 • This man who e~s it, he is a carpenter himself, everything is made by hand. Vnen I move in...(HE STOPS) SOUND: (FOOTST~OS OOMING IN) C~LEY: (L~ VOICE) Who's this guy? tb RI'H01 0182496 i
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I don rt knew. 18 STEVE: EDDIE: (DOMING IE} ~'~rni~ gentlemen...which one of you is S~ephen Nansen? My ~an~e is Eanee~. ST~VE: EDDIE: I 'm Agent Kohler of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, ~. Haneen. My credentials. STEVE: (DRY-MOUTHED) Ye6, ~. Kshler. I What m the trouble, Mister? CHARLEY: EDDIE: Just a routine cheek. We received information that this proper~y w~ being Bold to a former eEdlor.Do you have a shore permit or are you a citizau, Ft. Hansen? Ii,l STEVE: OHARI~f: He'e a citizen, ~r. Kohler, Just got him papers this week. EDDIE: Do yeu have them wlth you, Mr. Hanson? tb F~T~(01 018249?
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7 19 STEm: No, I...(APPEALING) Charley... He doesn't ~ow much about the FBI, Mr. Kohler. I can vouch for him. EDDIE~ Sorry...I'll have to see hie papers, Itll drive haek to town with yOU. STEVE: (F~IGHTF~ED) I have the papers, /tfeter, I era a eitisen. OHARL~: Steve, let ms handle this, ~uh? Yeu go sit in the ear. S~VE: I have the ]~apers, Oharley, you imew I have. CHABL~Y: Ye~h, ~ure, I'll explain the whole thing to ~r. Kohler. Go sl£ in the ear, Steve. STEVE: (GOING OFF) All right, Charley, you erplain. 80END: FOOTSTEPS GO OFF. DOOR OPEN AND ODOS~ OFF 0K~LEY: (ON CUE) (LOW~D VOICE) How de you like this one? tb AT~O'I 0~82498
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20 EDDIE: (LOW~ED VOICE) He's perfect. You want me to ride all the way in with you? CHARLEY: We'll go to his room and look at the papers, than I'll offer you the dough. Okay. Turn it down the firet time. EDDIE: OHARLEY: EDDIE: Don't worry, I know my end of the act. OHARLEY: All right. We'll stand here talking a couple of minutes and then go over and give him the business. EDDIE: Look at that face on him...he'e ec~rcd stiff. OHARLEY: That's the way you like thcm~ ASh ~t it" tb A]'HO~ 0~82499
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21 EDDIE: You bet. Just get them aeared ~ou~h and the rest is easy. This looks like ~ goad deal, Oharley...you eure know how to piok them. ~USIO: TO A OURT~I~, TIOE: B~ok--t~"i'~ ~Y FEE in ~u~t a moment. ~sIO: SHOW TK~ f..~-- tb RTH01 018250O
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THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COI~PANY THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR JULY 31, 1952 MIDDLE COMMERCIAL MUSIC: TICE: BARUCH: (TO A CURTAIN) END OF ACT I Back to "The Entry Fee" in ~usb a moment. Friends, Luckles are made better to taste hotter -- to taste cleaner., f Tesher_, smoother! And It's easy to £rove this to ya.rself Simply da this: Take a Lucky from a ne~ly opened pa~K and carefully re'~,ove the paler by tear!nz do~'n the sea~a from end to ~nd. Be su.z.e to start 3n the seam, In tearin@, donlt crush or di7 into the tobacco. Now look at that perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobacco. See ho~; it hol4s to~ethe~, -- without those annoyln% lo~se erJs that set In your mouth and spol] the taste? ~hat'~ ~hy LuckJes taste cleaner! Notice hDw frec Luckiee are from excessive air s@aces, hot soots that burn too fast -- and ~Ive you a hot, harsh taste. That's why Luc~les taste fresher. Then look st that flne, mild, ~ood-tastin~ tobacco, perfectly shredded and ~acke0 Just rl~ht for smooth, even bn3Kln@. T_~a_t_I~ why Luckles taste smoother. Yes, friends, the~e are the important inside reasons that make every Lucky taste b_etter -- cleane__~r, fresh_~er, smoother. So for your own real deep-down smokin~ enjoyment, Be f{appy - G~ Lucky! Make next carton Lucky Strike! MUSIC : (SHOW THEME] RTH01 011~2~01 i
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22 ANNOUNCER: Aud now back to "The FBI in Peace and Wara and tonight's story... The ~itrv Fee. ~l~o; .~HEME AND OUT FOR: CAPTAIN: And then Hanson and Wellere drove back to Hansen's room in New York and showed the citizenship papers to "~gent" Kohler. Kohler, continuing his act, declared the papers to be f~ked and pretended to arrest Hansan, 8H~P~RD: ~at's whenWellers steppedin and s~ested abribe. OA~TAIN: Yes. BAILEY: Hew ~ch did Han~en pay the first time? CAPTAIN: A thousand dollars. 8~PPA~.D: And, of course, Hanson thought that elosed the matter. I~1810: P~T,J~8 AND UNDER: OA~TAIN: Yes. He thought now that he'd bribed a Government official he'd be permenantly safe, but three weeks later "Agent" Kohlar moved in again. AT)CO'! 0182502
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23 STEVE: (EXCITED) Hello, NJ.BB Alma? STEVE: This is Steve Hanson, Miss Alma. Listen, is Oharley Wellers there? ALMA: No, but I san get him, Whet'e the trouble, Steve? STEVE: I can't tell you over the phone. Get hold of Charley, Nice Alma, lql be down there in fifteen minutes. MUSIC: 0V~q AND OUT. OHARLEY: > Go on, Steve, th~ what happened? /~ ,~ i'~.~ ~ -'~'~"~ '~ STEVE: . / q4e~l, then he said to me, he ie very sorry he has to come beck .m~ but he iB badly in debt and he doesn't dare to tell hie superior officer at the FBI..o ALMa: (FAKE INDIGNATION) The nerve of that guy.l CHARLEY: How m~oh did h8 want, Steve? Fifteen humdred dollars, STEVE: tb AI'HO 1 0182503
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24 AIFa: Fifteen hundred. You didn't pay him? STEVE: No, not yet~ Well I should hope not, Fifteen hundred tucks, I'd tell the guy to go j~ in the river first. Right, Charley? CHARLEY: Well, I don't know, Alma, it looks like he's got Steve over a barrel. Yemh? He accepted one bribe, didn't he? He could be turned in for that, couldn't he~ Sure. Turn him in &ud he opens up on Steve's phoney papers. ~hat good is that? (INDIGNANTLY It ~ght be worth it..4 OHARLEY: Alma, talk el~ Lse. ~ All right, al~ right, but I hate to ei~ here end see someone make a Well who doest t? But what else can he o except pay the guy off. tb ! A'I ~01 0182S04-
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Pay him, Ohcrley? STEVE: CHARLEY: Do you see ~ny other way cut,P.S~eve9 STEVE: I could go back to my ship, forget the farm... CHARLEY: Uh - uh, the guy would hound you right across the OOeen. The best thing is pay him ~nd get rid of him once end for all. ALMA: Fifteen bun~-ed is an awful lot of dough, Oharley. CHARLEY: All right, give him a thousand, end tell him he d~esnrt get a cent D~ore, You really think khis is be~5~ Ghorley? CHARLEY: NO, I think it's !ou4y, b:% donft went tc cos you in jail. STEVE: No...nc, I couldn't gc to jail. ALMA: Charley...why don't you gc alen~ with Steve, see that he gets a square deal from this guy? tb A1" 01 0182505
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26 OHARLEY: ~ell~ I dontt l~owt Alma,..you want me~ Steve? STEVE: Yes, I think it would be best, Charley. CHARLEY: All right. When ere you meeting him? STEVE: he's coming to my room this afternoon at three... 0H~RLEY: Okay, I'll be there at two-thlrty. STEVEt Th~nks, Charley.,oyou're o good friend. 011~RLEY: Forget it. ~TEVEt (DOWN) I...I guess I better go to the bank now, get the money. CHARLEY: Yeah, you better. STEVE: ~N) Goodbye, M£se Alma...l'm sorry to bring all of my trouble to you. AI~A: That's okay, 8teve...yeu do what Oherley says and you won't have ~y more trouble from here in. tb RTH01 0182506
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I hope not. • (ON OUE) one, 27 S~WE: I'll see you at two-thlrty, Charley, at my room, OHARLEY: (SMILING) Whew' I oould usa a glass of beer after that AL~| yBBh, me too. (0HUOKLE$) You know, 0harley, what I been thinking? 0HARLEY~ What? AI~ Bailers should atiok to the ooean...it's not safe in a big city like this. ~_jSI0~ mIDGE AND SUSPEND OUT FOR: 0APTAIN: Aud that web when H~nBen made the sanond payment to Kohlar, ~uat a month ego. Did you know anything about Kohler at that time, I~. Sheppard? 8HEPPARD: No, but we had narrowed down our meareh for the man who printed th~ fake citizenship papers. .Agent Bailey leoated him in a dingy bemamant shop on Water Street. tb Ar ol o e2so
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How, ~. Bailey? ~8 OA~T~IN: BAILEY: Well, it was a long proeeas, Captain. We traoad the paper from the mauufaoturer to local New York jobbers, then we had to have a look at every customer who bought this particular type of paper. Wnen we found this basement shop using en expensive bonded stock like that, we gob suspicious. OA~TAIN: BAILEY: I see. ~SIC= IN AND UNDERI of oourse there was no !areal that this was our man, so we decided to ~ut a surveillanoe on him to see who hie eustomars were. Through that surveillance we found that a frequent visitor %o the shop was Alma Stearns, owner of a bar an Front Street. The Border Patrol had been suspioious of thle bar as a eontaot point for sailors who jumped shilD so ~gent Sheppard, posing as a British merohant seamau beosme friendly with Alma Stearns and one niKht at the bar sounded her out on a proposition, HAS SEGLgD rO ~ BOX I~ B.G. SRE~PARD: J~L~A: ~USIC: Alma.,. (00NING IN) Yeah? tb RT~01 0 ~82508
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'Nether beer, huh, Sere thing, Bill. 29 SB~IPPAP~: swBe~e~t, SHEPPARD: Thanks. 8ay...~hare are all the customers, this place is like a morgue tonight. ALMA: I dLmno, everybody's shipping out, I guess. Whente your boat sail, Bill? Frideynight they tell me. 8HEPPARD: ALMAz Be glad to be getting bask to Liverpool, huh. S~PARD: Glad for what? l'm sick of this whole business. Bask and forth, Liverpool, New York, New York, Liverpool. What does it get you? ALMA: (LAUGHS) Three squares a dew ~d a glass of beer. SHE~PARD: Yeah, asd that's all. ALMA: So why don't you quit if you don't like it? tb 8 T~qO'I 01E~2509
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30 SH~PARD: Quit? ~nd try to get a job in Mverpool? You don't Imow what it's like over there. AL~: (S~ILK~G) You like it here, huh, Bill. 8HEPPARD: Sure. With the money they pay meoha~ios in this town K could live on top of the world. Okay, so live. 8H~PARD: (LAUGE$) Yeah, sure, just like that. ~/~ll, why n~ ? SHEPpARD: British subject, that's why not. You wouldn't be the first Limey that jumped a ship. 8HEPPARD: Yesh, end I wouldn't be the first caught doing it either. Uh-uhj Alma, you got to think of a better m~e th~ that. ~JJ~A~ You redly serious, Bill? tb ATe01 01825;10
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About staying here? yeah. Sure I ~. 31 8HEPpARD: SHE~PARD: How math would it be worth to you? SHEPPARD: You tell me. Five hundred bucks maybe. Eaybe...if it's a good idea. AURA; 8H~P~D: ALMA: Okay...tell you what, Bill,.ol've got a certain friend that specializes in a ease like yours. Supposing I talk to him end see what can be done? SHEPpARD: Okay, Alma, you talk to him. But my ship goes out on Friday. ALP~: That's time enough. I'll talk to my friend tonight, ~nd see that he e~a do. MU8IO: BRIDGE TOt tb AT~O~ 0182511 ,i
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32 BAILEY: And that night, after ~ent 8hepp&rd'B oonvereation, we followed Alms Stearns to the print ehop on Water Street end we knew we were on the right traok. CAPTAIN: But you didn't know about Wellere and Kohler. BAILEY: No, not yet. CAPTAIN: Well, neither did Hensen, but he found out about them when they stretched their luok just a little toe far. S~PARD: How is that, Captain? CAPTAIN: Veil, as he tells it, he was hiding out in a cheap hotel on the waterfront and one night Kohler m~t him outside the hotel end demanded enothar thousand dollars. Heneen was desperate at this time, eesir~ his life's aevings going, and he arg~ed with Kohler en they walked down River Street. That was when Ko41er'e luck ran out. $0~D; WAT~Om'. LIGHT TRAFFIO. FOOTST~8 WALKING. STEVE: No, not one penny more. Turn me in if you want to. tb RTN01 0182512
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33 EDDIE: Now look, Haneen, I don't like this deal any more than you do, and if I didn't need just a llttle more money I'd drop the whole thing. You don't ]mew %~h~% a job I've had protecting you. STEVE: No, I don't pay any more money, Mister Kohler. EDDIE; (RAISING HI8 VOICE) All right, if that's the way you're going to act, I'll tell you what I'm golng to...(HE STOPS DEAD) (~ (IDW~S HI8 VOICE) Step in that door-way a second, Hansen STE~E: No, I pay no more money, I.,.(SOUND:FOOTSTI~ COMING IN) EDDIE: (HOARSE WHISPER) 8hut up, get in there. STEVE: (LOW~ED VOICE) Listen, I tell you once and for all.,. LIEUTENANT: (DOMING IN) Hello, Eddie, @Dine out of there, I want to talk to you. EDDIE: (NERVOUSLY) Hello, Lieutenant, how are you. LIEUTENANT: What are you doing in this preolnct. Eddie? EDDIE: Nothing. Lieutenant, I... tb ATHO~ 0182513
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~nota this guy? LIEUTENANT: EDDIE: He's...ho's a friend of mine, lisSen, Lieu~nenb, I we8 just on my ~ay through town...l been living in Phily... EDDIE: Hie name's Harmon, Steve Harmon, Lientenant.... LIEUTENANT: He can talk for himself. What are you doing with thia gay, Harmon? STEVE: No~hi~, I... LIh~TENANT: You trying to swindle him out of enythln~, Eddie? You paying him any money for en~thing, Mister? STEVE: (AFT~ A BEAT) No. Ve...we are jue% friends. tb I-)T~Y01 0182514.
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LIEUTENANT: Okay. Now look, Eddied I told yo~ once if I ever caught you down here on the waterfront I'd run you in on general principles. Now get out of to~m, go baek to ~hilly and don't give us any more trouble, you understand. EDDIE: (SWEATING) Yeah, sure, Lieutenant, I understand. (~) LIEUTENANT: (GOING OFF) Okay, beat it, beth of you. $0~J~B: FOOTSTEPS. EDDIE: (ON DUE) Hanson, listen, I ~ow thie locke kind of funny... STEVE: (~JRD~OUSLY CALM) ~hy didn't you show the detective your FBI badge like you showed me, Mister Kohler. EDDIE: Look, I can explein this, I...(EE ~/~OEU IN P.~IE) /~ go of my arm.,. STEVE: Why didn't you ehow him your badge.I r~aybe you're net from the FB!~ maybe like he says you're o swindler, right, N~, Kchlero' EDDIE: (WHITE) Please...yeu're going to break my arm... tb Pl'l,~01 01B2S15
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36 STEVE: Where is my money, Nr. Kohler? EDDIE: l...we...we spent it. STEVE: You and Charley and Yds~ Alma. EDDIE: Yee...please...pleaee let go... STEVE: It was a trick, the whole thing. EDDIE: (BREATHING BARD) Yes...but it was Charlayle idea, he dregged me into it, I didn't want to came in. Listen, Hansan, I'll get money and pay you back, I'll...(HE GASPS IN PAIN) STEVE: Sure, youtll pay ms bask, all the money I saved, ten years you'll pay me hack. (VIOIOUSLY) I'll pay you back, N~. Kohlar...yeu and Charley and Miss Alma...lql pay all three of you...you111 see2 M~J~G: HITS IN AND UNDER: ~OUND: DOIN IN PHONE. DIAL. FILTERED BUZZ. ALMA: (EILT~q) Yeah. STEVE: Mies ~dma...thie is Steve Haneen. tb AlRO') 0182516 i
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37 AL~,: Yeah, Steve, what can I do for you? STEVE: I have to see you and Charley right away, Miss ~ima, are you busy? No, I'm just closing up the place. STEVE: Let me in the back way, Miss Aln~, I'ii be there in ten minutes. S • OT. SOUND, FOOTSTEPS UP A F~N ~EP~ DOOR OPt. AL~: Come on in, Steve. (SOUND: DOOR CLOSED) What's the trouble? STEVE: I'll tell you in just e minute, is Ohsrley here? AL~A: Yeah, he's helping me clean up the ban, come on in. (SOUND: FOOTSTEPS (OFF ~ LITTLE) Hlya, He]lo, Ohsrley. What's on yanx mind, tb CH/~LEY: Steve. (SOUND: DOOR 0L08ED) STEVE: CHARLEY: Steve? ATH01 0182512
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38 8TEVE: Trouble, 0harley, that fellow Kohler was over to see me egain. What? AL~A: You didn't pey him eny more money, did you, Steve? STEVE: No, not this tln~, Alma. Huh? I didn't pay him this time. I was right, wasn't I, Charley. CHARLEY: Well sure, Steve, you oanTt let the guy milk you forever, but if he ever turned you in,°. 8TEVEI He oouldn't turn me in, Charley, I just found out. CHARLEY: Found out what? STEVE: I found he was fooling us, Oharley...he isn't an FBI man...he is just e plain swindler. Did you ~ow that, Miss Alma? tb AI'HO 1 01B25'18
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39 ALMA: What are you talking about. STEVE: Mister Kehler. He warn walking with me on River Street and a deteetlve c~e along. Mister Kehler warn very frightened, he didn't even show his FBI badge like he showed it to us, remember, Oharley? CHARLEY: (N~VOUSLY) I don't get it, Steve. Where ie Kohler new? STEVE: If he oan swim maybe he is climl~ng out of the river...if he can't ewim...(QUIOKLY) Take your h~d off that door, Alma, I'm net through with you. OHARLEY: SteVe.,, STEVE: d You sit in that ohalr, Charley, I~bueiness with you too. (SOUND: OLICK OF KNIFE BLADE) OHARLEY: (T~qRIFIED) Look Steve... STEVE: You're not good, Oharley. Naybe you did things like this be other sailors, but this is the last time, believe me. ALMA: (BARELY ABLE TO SPEAK) Steve..,we can talk seneible...put that knife away. tb 0'1825"19
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4O STEVEI The last tim~ you do things like this to a sailor, Charley. Do you want your money back, is that it? STEVE: Kohlar told me the money is gone, you spent it... AIr, A: Steve, listen, I've got five hundred dollars in my office... STEVE: No, Alma, you stay here...l want you to see what happane to Oharley. ALMA: No...don't, Steve...please... STEVE: (NOVING IN) You stay, Alma, and see what happens to a man who pretended to be my friend, who said, go ahead, Steve, buy the farm, I'II fix it for you to be a citizen. (YELLING AT CHARLEY) You fixed it, didn't you, Charley' You fixed it, didn't you' SOUND: HE LUNGES AT OHARL~Y. A STRUGGLe. OHARLEY: (BREATHING HARD) Alma; Grab the knife...greb it.t STEVE : (WILD LAUGH) Youtre not very stror~g, are you, Charley. tb f~T)401 0182520
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,f H 41 CHARLEY: COICE-FO0~ DOOR SLAM) OHARLEY: (WE HEAR HIg LABORED BREATHING) STEVE: (GRIM SMILE) M~vbe Hiss Alma doesn't llke to see blood. CHARLEY: She...ehe'll get the cops, Steve,,. STEVE: You .h~A~t got a very strong grip on my wrist, have GRARLEy: Steve,,, STEVE: I ~m very strcn~ in the hands, Charley, all I have to do is... (HE GRBRTS AS HE H~EAKS CHARLEY'S GRIP) just like %hst. ORARLEY: (NU~ WITH TERROR, BACKING OFF) Steve...gtevle boy.,.(~: ~Qgj~O~ 8tevie, please, o ,please, Stevie. °. (THEN SUDDENLY) Help" Somebody oome help me,I (8CHE~S IT) Help me" ~USIO: ORARHE8 IN. O~T FOR: SOUND: KNOOK ON DOOR. DOOR OPEN. tb RT~01 0182521
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42 VOICE: (S~ AS ACT ONE) Oaptain.,. CAPTAIN: Y~S° VOIOE: ~Oe~A(LY~ HPwnBBn~ Bite OAVfAI~: Thank ye~l, Nielsen. Oorne in, }{ansen. CAPTAIN: Hensen, these men are from the FBI. I told them you surroundered %0 me vol~ntarily. Itve also told them as mush of your story as I know. Oounsel will be assigned to your defense 8.nd...well,..I hope it deesnlt go to hard for you, STEVE: Thank you, Oaptain. OAPTAIN: All right, genblemen,,.I guess that wlnde up the story. I~JSlC: TO A QURTAI~. BT-H01 0'~92522
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% THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR JULY Ol, i~52 CLOSING COMMERCIAL MUSIC: TICE: BARUCH: tell you ~lhat (UP TO CURTAIN) In Just a moment, Agent Sheppard will hapcened in tonlghtls story. Smokers, you can easily see for yourself the inside ~easons ~hy Luekles taste bett~r ~ ~leaner, fresher, smoother! Just take a LucKy from a newly opene~ sack and carefully remove the paper by tearing down the seam froq~ end ta end. Be sure ta start on the seam. In tearing danlt crush Or dig into the tobacco. Ho~, exa,~ine that perfect cylinder af fine, milJ tobacco. See how it holds together -- without those annoyln~ loose ends that get in your mouth and scotl the taste. Thatle why [uckies how free your Lucky is fro~ that burn too feat -- taste why Luc~ies taste fresher. ~ood-taatin~i_tobaeca -- taste cleaner. Notice air spaces - hot spots hat an~ harsh. Thatts And look at that fine, perfectl~ shredded and packed just ri__~ht to draw freely and smoke evenly. Thatls why Imckies taste smoother. SO, far a cleane~, fresher, e~oather smoke, make ~ next carton Lucky Strike! MUSIC: (FANFARE) CONCLUSION OF CASE TICE: MUSIC: (SHOW THEME) RT,W01 0182523
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SHEPPARD: Although Gharles Wellars reoovarud from the wo~ds inflioted by Stephen H~sen, a charge of assault with a deadly weapon was brought against Hanson and he was quickly convicted and sentenced to a term of five years. Wsllare and Alma Stearns, tried for fraud suffered the ssme fate, recelving terms of eight years each. Edward Kehler0 is still at large but we feel confident, thresh recent information, that he will seen be picked up to close our files cn...The Fntrv Fee. F~JSla: TO FINISH. P,T>(O 1 011~2524 ill
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR JULY 51, 1952 CLOSING C0~,~4ERCIAL (CONT'D) TICE: -D- An names and cbsraeters used on this program are fictitious• Any similarity to persons living or dead is purely coincidental. This program is based on Frederick L. Collin~' copyrighted book, L[~: FB1 IN P~,aCE AND WAE" .. and is not an officis] program of the FBI. In tonight's story ',, ,, played the part of ~. g~/~ ,: The radio dramat~zstiS~n for TEE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR ~s written by Louis Pelletier and J:ek Finks. These program,s arc produced and directed by Betty Mandev-~l!e • ~ sure to listen to next Thursdey's story, "The Fenca ' on "E'I~ FBI IN P~r,~- aND N~R Ssme time -- sa~e ststion. MUSIC: BARUCH: 'MUSIC: TICE: (SHOW THEME -- UP AND U~]DER) This is Aodre Baruch saying goodnight for Lucky Strike, product of The American Tobacco Company -- America~s leadin~ manufacturer of cigarebte~., THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR has been se]ected as one of the programs to be heard by our Armed Forces overseas through the facilities of the Armed Forces Rsdlo Service. (SHON THEME -- UP AND OUT) THIS IS T}m CBS RADIO NETWORK. el 1"NO 1 0182525
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r~
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r i~" >i .i7 (REVISED) ".~tl~ THURSDAY, AUGUST 7th, 1952 ~ODUOED AND DIRECTED BYi WRITTEN BY: ATe01 0102522
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:A~ -- /- THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" OPENING COMMERCIAL TICE: MUSIC: TICE: BARUCH: MUSIC: AUGHSTIL_ LUCKY STRIKE presents ... "Tf~ WAR"! (FANFARE) Another great story copyrighted book. Drams ... Thrills Andre Baruch! THURSDAY FBI IN PEACE AND based on Frederick L. CollinsI "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". ... Astion~ But first ... Friends, in a cigarette it's the taste that makes the difference and Luckies taste better - cleans1', fresher, s~oDther! Merels why: First of all, better taste in a cigarette begins with fine tobacco and Lucky Strike means fine tobacco - fine, llFht, naturally mild tobacco. Second, Luckiss are ,~a@e better, Every Lucky is round and firm and fully packed ... ~ithout those annoying loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the taste. Yes, every Lucky is packed ri~ to draw free~ and evenly! So for a smoke that tastes better -- cleaner, fresher, smoother, Be Happy - Go Lucky_. M3ke oo~ next carbon Lucky Strike! (SHOW THEME UP AND FADE) F~1'RO 1 01~2528 ill
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-2- ANNUR: TonIEbt's story on the FBI In Peace a~ War...~L~ SALESGIRLI (PROFESBIONALLY) Good afternoon, Bit. (L~.~l~_If~l, SPENGEI Good afternoon. Y~B, watches in solid gold, or if you prefer plate... I~d like to see oc~ethin8 in ladies wrist watches. 8ALESGIRLI sir. About what price range? We have some very fine SPENOE: I prefer diamonds. Let's see that tray down there. And that one. (P~AOHING DOWN) Yes, sir. SALESGII~z SPENOE: ArA that one over there. tab FIT~O 1 01B2-~29
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-3- SALESOIPL: This one, certainly. (OOHIS9 UP V/ITH THE TRAYS) Now if it18 a di~ond one, sir, Day I reooa~end thi~ very fine Swiss r~over~nt,.. (SHE STOPS WITH A ~TIFLED GASP) SPENBE: (b0~ AND HAPJ)) 411 ri~t, ke~p the trays o~ir~ and don't r~aoh for any alarm, Dump all the watohe8 in this b84~ and when you ~et throug>h open that safE, (I~IOHTEiqEI)) Hister... ~LES~]IRL: SPENOE: Do like I tell youand you won't ~et hurt. Hake one wron~ move and I'll blow your pretty face off. All r~ght...get gol~gt. 19TH01 018P530 il
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-4- 8HEPP~: In the late eu~er of last year several eastern cltieB were pla6ued with a series of hold-ups " ~s. Aceordin~ to a description by the Victims each of the robberies was pulled by the same Indivldual, and when this was made evident the Bureau was asked into the case. We were looking for a tall, well-mannered man in his early forties, and we were aware that the search for him wouldn't be easy. Not a sin61e article of stolen property had appeared since the original robbery, and it was natural to assume that our man had either held on %o hie hauls or had found an elusive means %o dispose of them. (~J_~IO__$~TS.~.llQ3t~il It was with this in mind that ~zent Bailey and I began... bq~EILA: Catena ~seoeiates, good morning. Oh hello, Frnddle...yeah, just a minute I'll let you talk to him. What? (LAUGHS) No l'm afraid I'm busy tonight wise g/y...(STOPS) Wait, held it a second... ( 80~ _QLQ_82~ Yes? I'd like to see Mr. Oatana. ras 8PENCE: ATe401 0182531
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7" SHEILA: (INTO PHONE) Someone just came in, Freddie. I'll connect you now. ISO~Z~LI Fre~ ~ovak, ~r. Oatana. (=~It-BiO~.J~JJ ~o Go you wan5 5o s~e? Oate~a, Tony Oaten. ~no reoe~ended you? Who wears to know? SHEILA: SHEZLA: (SHRUGS) Okay. Only I oan't let anybody... SPENOE: I have some business for Mr. Corona. If he doeonlt want it I can always 6o someplace elee. SHELL&: W'nat kir~l of business? (SMILES) Who want8 %0 know? SHEILA: (A BEAT. THEN) What's your r~me? RTHO~ 01B2532
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Raymond Spence. -6- SPENOE You call me P~y. Did ~urray Lenner send you? (GRINS) You send me, You'll talk to Mr, Uh huh. SHEIL:A SPEN(~: SHEILA: (~ILES IN SPITE OF H~RSELF) Okay, wait here. I'Ii find out if he'll talk to you. (~_Q~IA_~-~) SOUND: BOOR OPEl[. FITH01 0182533
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-7- TONY: (ON THE PHONE)(ITALIAN AO~EDT) All ri~t, Freddie, you do that. (80UND: DOOR CLOSED) And if you ~et into any trouble let me know. Fine. So lon~, see you ~r~y, (~O_N~F~_ 8HEILA: Somebody to see you, Tony. Spenoe? Who sent him~ Name of Spenoe. Raymond Spenoe. TONY: ATH01 0182534-
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8 S~l~: TONY: SHEIIJ~: Yesh, a smooth character. Playin~ it safe, for you, He says he's go~ bue~.neee TONY: Okay, She~la, I'ii see him. SREILA: I figured you might. TONY: Sheila. •. SHEILAI Uh huh. TONY: Dinner tonight? SP~ILA: SUre, Tony, anything you say. Sand the guy in? TONY: / Ye ~h, ysah. SHEIL* (SOUND: no0~ OPEN) (PROJECT) Come in, ~. 8peace. ~ee you now. tb N~, Oateaa will RTN01 0182535
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9 SPENCE: (OOMING IN) Thenks. sweetheart. TONY: Hold my calls for the next few minutes. Hies Blair. SHEILA: Yes. F~. Oatena. TONY: Sit do~, ~...uh... $PENOE: Spenoe. Raymond 8pence. TONY: Sit down, SPENOE: Obliged. TONY: Now then., * 8pENCE: J~rey Lenner eent me. TONY Oh. Lenner. ~ny didn't you tell my secretary? Do you tell everybody your bu6inesi? TONY~ tb ATHO~ 0~B2536
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i0 8P~OE: I don't know yet. That's what I came here to find out. TONY: What did ~hrray l~nner tell you? SpENCE: He said you were the beat fence in the business, He sald you could take good care of me, I could. What's your line? TONY: 8PENCE: You read the papers, donlt you. D~e~e. TONY: SP~OE: That jewelry store robbery on West Broadway yesterday. Did you read about that? That wa~ you? TONY: 8PENCE: The watoh crick-up lest week. Did you read about that? TONY: Yeah, vary neat job. Over eight thousand worth the paper said. That wa~ you too. tb ATH01 01~2537
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!1 SPE~OE: That w~ me. TONY: You work a/one? 8PF~CE: Uh huh. TOi~Y: Phoh better idea. 8pEkOE: I llke it. ~t MArray said it'e different on the other end. TONY: He'e right. Getting rid of the 8tuff, that's another story. ~]orkir~ through me, it narrowe the rick, 8PENOE: 9o what have ya~ to offer? TONYz (S~LE$) You doa't waste time, do you, ~enee. 8PENOE: ~0. TONY: Okay, I'ii give it to you without the trimatngs. Whe~ you come in with Oatena, you come in for good. I keep twenty per cent of every job you dc in return for my 8ervioes. tb RT~01 01B2S38
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All right. What ~orviaee? 12 $P~OE: TOi~f: I get rid of the stuff ~d callao5 the cash for you, You get a regul~r drawing account. Uh huh. 8P~NOE: TONY: If you get in trouble I go bond for you snd my lawyers take the asse. SPENOE: [lh huh. ~4aat about the oa~h you oal~eot for me? TONY: It's alwayB yours when you want it, F~,ue, of course, twenty per cant. SPENOE: Okay, Oatena, Itm in. TONY: Good. BPENOE~ I'ii bring around the stRff I've got later today. TONY: No, no. You don't bring anything here. Just tell Mian Blair your address and I'ii send ~ collaotor to you. tb ~T~01 0~82539
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SPENOE: (ADMIRING) A oolleotor, huh. You really have things organized, haven't you, TONY: (S~LEe) Thetis right, n~ friend...wlth Oatcma Associates, we try not to leave an~hlng on ~e f~e. ~JSIC: STI~ IT AND b~DK~/DR: ~_~: DOOR DLOSED. 8P~OE: (POLITELY) All right, all ef you ladies up agalnst that wall there, You, Blondie...put all that stuff in this 5~ and make it fast. And remember.,.th8 first one who doeantt act nloe ~8ts a taste of this forty-flve~ Start ~ovlnE,wm~ ~JSIO'. SHIP~LY OVeR AND OUT, TONY~ Ra~aond 8penee,..stat~nt of account. Oa~h on hand, nlnetean thousand eight hundred dollars. Weekly withdrawals einoe September firet, two thoueaud four hundred... ~UND: TYPEWRIT~ STOP3. (TIRED) S~ILA: Whew, I'm beat. Oanlt we flniehthie in.the mornln~, Tony? tb PlTl~O'~ 0~8254-0
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.... -- .... . k r . • Okay, Shei~a, Tharak8. 14 TONY: I guess ~hat'8 enoch, let'B take a break, fllgaret? ~EI~: TONY: of eeurBe, ~. R~ond Speaoe won't think it's enough. know exactly where he stands. Light? SHEILA: He's quite a guy. isn't he. TONY: 8HEILA: TONY: Spence? (EXHALINO) Yc~. He llkee to Depends how you look st it. (SOUND: RUSTLE OF pAPER) The way I have it here he's pulled three etore stick-ups in the l~t couple of months, one payroll job... 8MEILA: (SMILING) You know what I mean. TONY: (RETURNS ~ SMILES) Uh huh, he's quite a guy, On account of he hae a yen for you. That isn't what I mean. tb SHEILA: ATH01 01B2541
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:5 TONY~ (ENJOYS TEASING Hl~) You had a drink with him last night, didn't ysu~ And last week you had dinner %wice, and,.. 8HBIIA~ Tony, donlt be a goon, I'm only belr~ nice. He's a client, i~n't he? TONY: (ODD 8HILE) Okay, ;~dse Buslnees. Only den ~t let i~ go 60 your head, know what I mean? I know, Besides, Don't you? Tony... 8HEILA: TONY: I have an idea Hr. Raymond 8pence won't be wlth ue very ior~, SftEIIA: Well look at it realistic, 8heila. He's g~% mv~-%~ci~ty thousand cash with me. He~s, like you say, quite a ~uy. At the rate he's going he'll have close to one hundred thousand by %be firs% of the year. 8HEILA: tb ATN01 01B2542 r
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16 TONY: He's too n~/oh a guy, baby, %4hen he gels that hundred he's goln~ to want out~ I know hle kind. Remember Bert Nixon? He was llke that. SHEILA: Tony..,you wouldn't turn Ray over to the oolm? TONY: Wouldn't I? Hetll get twenty years at laser, and that leaves me wi~h one h~dred thousand. Tony**, SHEILJ~ TONY: (SUDD}~LY UGLY) I turned in Bert Nixon, didn't I. /'~rke. I'Ii do the same with thle 8penoe. (P~HEE) on, let's go get a drink. I...I'm not thirsty, Tony. SHEILA: TONY: You're not, huh. (THEN) Okay, suit yourself. one and get beok here. You're conthq~ back? SHEILA: I turned in Niok (OHA~GING) Oome I'm going to ewallow TONY: Yeah, I'm putting in a little overtime. Sp~moe is doing hie first job on a bank. Be asked me to fix him up with s getaway oar. tb ATHO~ 018.2543
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Tony... Uh huh? 17 SHEILA= TO~f; Don't turn him in, Tony. BHEII~I TONY= Don't worry, baby, I won't. (SMILES) Not while ho's going strong. You have my word I won't touch one hair on his hasdsorne haed till he has one hundred tho~Bond oB~h with Tony. Y/USI0= STING AND IAVD~R FOR; SOUND: ALARM BELL. (OFF) (LOUD) Stop that oar.~ BOUND; I'~USIC: BOUND: VOIOE: ' Stop him. •, it's a hold-up: CI~ HAS STARTED WITH A ROAR. CO~ERS THE WHOLE EgFEOT AND OUT OUI~LY FOR: GARAGe. H~J~ ON STEEL. STOPS, CHIEF: ~rnlng, ~son. ~OHANIO: (00MING UP FROM THE FLOOR) 0hhelle, Chief, howWre you? tb RTH01 01825,~1.
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18 CHI~: ~11 right, thenke. These gentlemen are from the FBI, Benson. ~e~ of Investigation. ~hep, this is Joe Benaan, best euta mechanic around these parts. SHEFPAED~ Federal ~HANIO~ 8HEPpARD~ t'~ n~me is Sheppard, This is ~gent Bailey. OHIE~: They want to take a look at that wreoked Plymouth etatlon wagon you brought in lest night. MEOHANIOI sure thing, gentlemen. Have it right over here, (~l~/_2J~ Haven% started work on it yet. Thought I'd wait till I heard from yot~, OHIEF~ Good. We don't want you to touch anythln~ inside the c~r eepecislly. Figured. (S • ) There it is. Not banged up too bad. Just skidded into the telephone pole, no real dam~e. Could you tell anyth~ from the wreok, t'~. Beneon? How it he p~enad? tb A] )~01 01~2545
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19 Net much. Just looked like the driver was going too fast for the turn, slid off the road into the ditch. Uh huh, Went to have a look inside~ BAIbEY: ~CFNd~IC: SHNPPARD: Not yet. We're expecting a couple of our technicians any minute. They're going to try for fingerprints, tread marks, anything that might give uB a lead. I get you, MEOHANIO: CHIEF: I wouldn't talk about this around town, Benson. / Co~r~e not, Chief. But a lot of ~eople are talking already~tSay this e~r is the same one that web used in that psycoll stick-up over in Mason City. OHIE~ It's possible, but let's keep it to ourselves anyway. ~ep, you want the ear jacked up while we"re wsltlng7 tb ~7"~40~ 0~2546 ,,Ji
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¥esp that'a a good idea. Jaok it up? Oh huh. Oh, 20 SHEPP/g~D i~OH/LNIO# BAILEi~ For the ~laster impreBsions of the tire treadB. M~OHt~IO: I'll do it right away. tb ATH01 01825;47 ~f
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Fine. -21- 8HEPPARD: MEDIC: Say..,isn't it rather unu~al? Using a station w~n in a robbery? SHEPPARD: ~/t ~'re dealin6 wl~h a rather unusual type of arbnlnalp And from the evidence we've ~thered so far itts ~oing to take an unusual method to oatoh up wlth h~m. Fin~erprint file, class twenty 8, reference UL, m~ber four-eh-eix- five-eeven...Rabert 3~encer, alias Ray Spitz, alias Ray Spenoe. Last ueed...epence... 8-P-E-IAC-E. First r~.rne, Raymond. TONY: Ray Spenoe...put him down for another four%sen thousand. 8HEIL~: Tony..,youtre not really going to turn him in are you? TONY: Not yet, ~eila. Like I eai~ before, ~penee is safe untll he hits top money. ATHO~ O~ 825a8
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The top money, Sheila. -22- 8PENCE: That's what l'm hea~in~for. BBEILA: Yeah. (IN LOW SPIRITS) I'll have another se~s Ray. You and me both. (PROJEOT) Wai~r.~TO ~HEILA) ~hat's the matter with you tonig~ht.~%~.~ WAIT~s (COMING IN) Sir? Two more of-the Berne, please. -- -. WALTER: (GOING OFF) Ri~t away, slr, -~.,~,~. 8PENOE: ...... ~at Ie it, ~eila? Somethln~ ~t you sln~r~ the blues? 8HEILA: Ob..,l don't know, it's...it's... SPENOE: Tony. 8HEILA: Oh no. tab AI"~O 1 0182549 ,~rb,
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-23- SPEN~: Here worried heoauee wo|ve been eeeln~ eaoh other too muoh. SHEILA: (LYING) Of course he IBn't. Tony and I...(~ H~OITATES) SPENOE: Yes? 8HEILA: Ray. if...if you did ge~ all thls money... ~nat do you mean, if. SPENCE: And when I do,,, When I do I'm ~oing %o take it from Tony, wrap it up in a pretty blue rlbbon, and ask a cerfein party if ehe wsnte to sper~ it ~%h me as Mrs. Raymond 8pence. S}~ILA: ~nat? (S~i~S) How a~utit, ~eil~ r~B R[H01 0182550
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(HIT) Hrs. Ray Spence. -24- B~ILA: ~PENCE: Why n~t? I've been thinking abou~ ~hat elnoe the first day I walked into Oatesa Aemeeiatem and saw you sitting there. SHEILA: Ray, cut it out, will you, Give me one good reaeon. SPEN~: SHEILA: You eantt me&n it, .t SPENOE: SHEILA~ Ray... SHEILA (TOUORED) Stop it, wit1 your ?euJ4@'Wawe-r4e'~iw'~i~ Ku~ ~e~o SPENgE: ~hee~,~wlt~ You feel the same way I de, I know you de, FITHO? 018P55~ II
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25 SHEILA: Don't be a fool, Ray, It'd never work, 8PENCe: There's one good w~v to find out. 8HEILA: (ALMOST READY TO TRY) You've orazy. 8PENOE: SUre, let's both be. R~y, I... Yeah? 8HEIIA: ~ENOE: ~HEILA: (HELPLESSLY) It just wouldn't work, that's ell. ~ony D I. BPENOE: look. When two people have ~t it Okay? ~ila, look at me. Oome on, together, that' e all that oounte. Nethlng else. 8HEILA: (T~ND~RLy) ~,v'~e ~bep,Xplease, I'm not stopplng until we have the ring en that firmer right there. tab AI'NO 1 01825;52
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~O,,o -26- ~ILA: BPhNOE: I'm not etopping until I've got that top money. SHEIL~.: Lieten te Me, Ray... SPENCE: You li~teu to m~. I've ~t big plane. ~hei~, I've ~t the blggeet plans in the world. ~[eu held on to my hand, honey...hold on real tlght...when I get that money we're really going places, b~lieve me. MU~l(h TO A O5~TAIM~ \_
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR AUGUST 7, 1952 , t MIDDLE COMMERCIAL MUSIC: TICE: BARUCH: (TO A CURTAIN) END OF ACT I Back to "The Fence" in just a moment. Friends, Luckies are made better to taste better-- to taste eleane<, fre_ehef smoother! And Ills easy to prove this to yourself. Simply do" this: Take s Lucky from a newly opened pack and carefully remove the peper by tearing down the seam from end to end. Be sure to start on the seam. In tearing, donlt crash or dig Into the tobacca. Now loak at that perfect eyllnder of fine, mils tobacco. See how it holds together -- without those annoying loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the baste? Thatle why Luckles taste cleaner! NDtlce how free Luokies are from exceselve air spaces, hot spots that burn too feat - and give you a hot, harsh taste. ThatTs why Luckie~ taste fresher. Then look at that fine, mild, good-tasting tobacco, perfectly shredded and packed Just right for smooth, even smoking. Thatls why Luekles taste smoother. Yes, friends, these are the important inside reasons that make every Lucky taste better -- sleane__~r. freshe_~e, smoothe[. So far your own real deep-doom smoking enJoy~lent, Be Happy - Go Lucky! Make next carton Lucky Strike! MUSIC: (SHOW THE~,~) FI[ :01 0182554 i
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ANNCH: And now, back to "The FBI In Peace and War~ and tonight's story • ~ D : 8P~OE: I've got big plane, Sheila, I've got the biggest plans in the world. You hold on to my hand, honey...when I get that money wolre really going places, believe me. Y OV~ ~T Going some plaoo, Sioanoe? TO~: SPENOE: Uh huh, I guess I'd better get started, Tony. I'II Bee yOU in a oouple of days. Night, Sheila. So long, ~x. (TOUGH, SP~,NIBH AOOE~IT) Be Beei~ you, Spenoo. (OFF A LITTLE) Night, Ray, I fll walk you to the door. SHEILAI 0 : ) You'll have a new oar for me, right? TONYI Don't worry. tb /~TXO ? 01 B2555
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,f (OONFIDENT) l'm not. SRENCE: TONY." (SOUND: FOOTSTEP~ STO_~/ Good. How much do you think this job'll net? SP~OE: With you handling it, Tony...l figure I'll be up to the hundred thous 8nd mark. That high, huh. What I figure. TONY: 8PENOE: TONY: Okay, go to it. I'm ~ith you all the way. 8P~3E: (E1,SY SMILE) I ~mow you are, So lon~, Spence. Tony. So long. TONY: TO~: (SORE) I don't like that guy. He's too familiar. SOUND: FOOTSTEPS AOROSS OFFIOE. PAUSE. TONY: (CRISP) Max... tb Tony, Tony. 8"1-)401 01H2556
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Yeah, N/ster Oatona. -29- r" ' TONY: You =tick with him from now till the time he finishes this w~rehouss job. Don't leave him out of your eight, ~nderst~nd. ~JX: SHEILA: TOBY: (HARD) Shut up. (TO ~X) He's smart, Mex, too smart. him know he'e beir~ watched. ~EX: Leave it to me, he won't k~ow a thi~. Tony...listen, will you... SHEILA: Don't let TONY: (kLFDST SAVAGE) I told you for the last time, Sheila, shut up. l'm through talking about it. This guy is ready to take a powder soon as he finishes this job. I know the signs, l'm not letting a hundred thousand dollars walk out of this office. Get going, Mex. Sure thing. (GOING OFF. 0~) I'II keep in touch with you, Mister Oatena. I' %h I~TROl 0182552
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-30- TONY: Never mind me. You slick with Spenoe. HEX: (OFF) Like a glo'.'3o ~nd when hers finished with the job...(LETS IT HOG) TO~"/: 8HEILA: (RIGHT ON THE DOOR CLO~E) Tony... TONYI Now don't start bellyaching ~gain. 8HEILA: (WORKED UP) You're going be got rid of him. Tony... TONY: Supposing you mind your o~n business. SHEILA: You're going to get rid of him aren% you. You're not turning him over to the cops. You're going to let Mex Lake him for a ride. TONY: 8o what, it won't be the first Lime. SHEILA: Tony, don't. Don't do it. tb AT~O? 0~B2558
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-31" TONY: (UGLY) Sey what is this? You goir~ soft for Mister Fanoyp~nte? BHEILA: No, no, I jueb don't want a killlns, that's a11. I... TONY; (GRABBING HOLD OF HE~) Listen. you bi~mouth, you open your yap ~bout kill~ngs and I'll close It for good, un4eretand. Just ~cause this clown makes a couple of/passes at yo~. f l~t... Le~ 8o of me, Tony... ~ILE~ TONYz You just forget about this guy, undere~ex~i. I'm not lettinE that money walk out of this off Joe. If it means getting rid of Ray Spence, okay.,.I'~ 6string rid of Ray Sperms. : S G R.. BAILEY: Y~ted by the FRI, Ray~on~ pence, with allases. ~ about for~y- two, height six feet one, weight one hur~red and seventy, eyes brown, hair brown. Fingerprint ola~elfloatlon, twenty S. UL[ number four-oh-six-f lye-seven. (~J~/P~_~ Reference Any information oonoerni~ thlsman should be reported i,~ediatelyto the .. •. ffJSIOa_STING AND Ui~ AGAIN FOR: ~Q~NDI_~Q~= FtTHO? 0782-~59 Ii
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/ -32- TONY: Oatena Associates, ~. Catena speaking. SPENOE: (FILTh) Hello, Tony. Ray Spence. TONY: (SMILE~S) Well, hello, 8pence, I been waiting to hear from you. SPENCE: (FILT~q)I imagine you have. I'm all set for that warehouse thin~ ever in Jersey, Tony. Friday night, TONYs Sure. You want the oar, right? SP~CE: (FILTER) If you can fix me up. TONY: Don't worry, I'll fix you up fine. SPENOE: (FILTER) Okay, Tony, that's all I wanted to know...that you'd take care of me. TONY: I sure will, Spenee. I'll take care of you one hundred per cent. FUSIC: RISES OV~q IN 8ROSS-BLEND TO: BIZ : SOFT PIANO BAOKGROUND. tb ATe01 01~2560 ,i
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-33" SPENflE: Be I'm all set for Friday night, boney. ~ right after that... 8~I~: SPENCE: 8HEILA: I don't want you to do this job. 8PENCE: 8~I~: I~an'b ~k me ~o~ it. Net do ~ I e~. Sheila. • • 8pE~E: 8~ILA: Please, Ray. I've got a hunch. I'm funny about hunches. SP~0E: Vnat are you talking about. Thb job is in the pocket. All I have tO do i8,,, 8HEILA: (LOUD, Id2~OST BREAKING) I "re. got. a hunch I tell you.I Don't do it, Ray: tb RTN01 01182561 i
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Hey, keep your voice down) (LOW) Ray, don't do it. -34- SPENOE: S~I~: SPNNCE: Aw now look, honey, just because you've got some silty hunch... SHEILA: It ion't silly, Don't do it. For~et the whole th~ng, Maybe ev~ leave town for a white. 8pENcE: (SMILES) What is this, you a tea-leaf reader or somothlng imave town? I'm serious, Ray. (FROWNINS) yoah? SPKNOE: SHEILA: Don't ask qusationB. Do llke I tell you, please. SPE~CE: What's ~oing on, Sheila? SHEILt~: Nothing. I told you, I got a hunch... tb
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-35- SP~OE: Oh huh. (P~I) You know something. What is it. S~I~: I told you... SP~OE: Is it Tony? Is he cooking up something? S?~ILA= Ray, etlppose I did like you e~y.Suppoee I we~t away with you now, picked up that ring... (HI2D) It is Tony, isn't it. No...honest... SPEI~OE: SHEILA: SPF~OE: Is he figuring to hold back that money I've got with him? SHQILA: Ray, you said if two people had it for each other... SPF~CE: (EXOITED) ~nat'e he get in mind, She~la? Tell ms. S~IIA: No~i~. SPENOE: The money. He's going to hold back, right? (GRABBING H~q ARM) Sheila.. tb Rl'HO ? 0182563
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-36- 8~EILA: (I~$1G~D)Jf~'s going to hold bask. He was golns to turn BEAT) yo~ r over to the cops... SP~NON: SHEILA: Re was. 0nly he'e decided to get rid of you instead. After Friday night% job. Mex has got orders to etiek with you every minute. SPENGE: (EXHALES, THEE) Nice boy Tony. SHEILA: We could l~ave now, Ray. Tonlaht. We could go ~onmplaee and get married. Imve got come money caved up and... SPENOE: ([~EI~ING) Real nice boy. A h~udred thousand in his Isp and me on a slab ~n She morgue° Nice. Ray., • SPENOE: Too bed it isn't going to come off, Really a ehame. SHEILA: (HOPEFULLY) You r~ it,, Ray? You'll leave wi~h me now? SPE~ON: Huh? Leave? Vno's talkip4~ about leaving? I'm etayln~ right here. ~nd what's more I'm goln~ through with the job Frld~v n~ght, tb ATe01 0182564
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NO, Ray, no,°, "37" 8REILA: 8PENCE: Yes, honey. I'm going through with the job just as I planned. (rely l'm coming up with a new wow finish. Ray, please... A new wow finish, Tony. ~SIO: SOUND: 8HEILA: SpENOE: Sheila. A special fencing-in job...all for our pal HITS IT AND UNDER FOR: DI~ IN SLOT. PHONE DIAL. FILTERED BUZZ. GIRL: (FILTER) ~hia ie the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 8PE~0EI Hello, I'd llke to speak to one of your ~enta. I have some important criminal znformation, l'm langing up in exactly sixty seconds, so -en put fast. t~JSIO: RISE AND SUSPEND OUT TUNOUGH: j~_. t\. tt ~, ...... I Catasa ~ssooiates. tb 8HEILA: AI )401 0182565 |ll
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/ (FILTER) 8helle, this is Mex. F~. Oatena. Just one... -38- ~X: Let me speak to Mister Oatena. 811EIId~: TO~Y: (COMING IN ANXIOUSLY) That for me, Sheila? (NOT WAITING) Hello? (FILTER) 'bo, Mister Oa~ena. (AL~T) Max. ]~: TONY: ~here you calling from? (FILTER) Booth outeide the warehouse. Railroad Avenue. TONY: And~ (FILTER) It's all over, Mister flatena. ~Tk'~z d~,., /,~-~ ~- TONY: //. c ..... ~X: (FILT~)-ye~. I called to find out what to do with the "goode." TOIX: (RELAXING) Don't do anything, not a thing. Wait till I get there. tb P, TH01 0182566 il
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(FILTER) Whatever you say. ~qd,~ex.. o (FILTh) Yeeh? -39- ~X~ TONY~ tb AT~O~ 0~B2562
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/ Good work. -40- TONY: I knew I oould count o~ you. (I~IIGII~NED) Tony... SHEILA: Get your handbag, 8heila. some goods, sou~_ P~292~ ~. DISTANT OOOASIONAL HARBOR EFFE~S TONY: ( "aQU~ugZ~m~ Tony6.. TONY: /d-.~j You're drivingme over to~pese~of SHEILA: And keep the motor TONY: Aad for the final time, shut up...(SOU~_LP~.QP_B_p~9.~ ~ see . (8911~'~_AYQQ-T~ Douse the lights.. SOUND: FOOTSTEPS ON GROUND. STOPL ~,I.z J~.~o/,~ • o . rB, B RT,'V,07 0182568
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TONY~ (C.~I,S SOFTLY) Mex... sou • ?ONY~ SOUND: A FE~ FOOTSTEy~ ON VOODo STOP~ TONY: (AT THE DARKNESS) Hex, ,, Itts me,,.Tony. 8PENOE: (OFF A LITTLE) We won't need any light. TONY: (WHIRLING) Huh. SPENGE: (ANOTHER STEP) Wherele a light? Won't need any, I can make you out fine in the da~k. Spence| TONY SPENOE (OOHING IN) You know, thlm IB what I call realpersonal eercloe. Good of you to oome around, Tony. Tee F~r ~0 1 0182569
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Listen, I thought... I know what you thought. trioks. -42- TONY: SPE~GE: Uh-uh, stay where you are. arg no fsnoy I wouldn't want this ~un to go off aooidental. Bpencea what is this? TONY: ~NCE: You haven't figured it out yet? I always thought you were a ~msrt apple, Tony. I thou~t you'd figure it the minute you walked in that door. ~19e~o8,,, TONY: SPENQE. (EARD) Stay where you are, Tony, or I'll blow your head off. TOW: Listen, if yOU're trying to Involve me In this hold~up... SPENCEr Say, maybe you're a smart appl6 at that. That's exactly what ~'m going to do, Tony. You're g~ing %0 be the hold-up, a11 by yourself. r~s I'NO 0 825P0
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(- TONY: know, Huh? SPENOE: You'~e ~ot a oar outside. I'm handing you some furs and... TONY: That's not for me, I'm no ~ood at this kind of SPENOE: You're only ~od at the fancy doubleoross, aren't you. TONY: SPENOE: The doublecross, like you did to Bert Nixon and Nick Harko and like you were goin~ to do to me. TONY: Who told you... SPENCN: Sheila spilled the whole deal. Tony~h ~ow you / unload ms after the job... J .. ............. ~Ny: ~ She ras were fixing to lled, Spenoe, lied throu~ her teeth... RT.~O 1 01B25P1
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Uh huh. SO help meQo. 8PENCe: TO~f: 8PENCE: / Yeah, sure, W~h-y~r~e~ You and Mex, you got the same eon6 and dance. ~ex, Yeah. that phone call for me. No,co Uhhuh, ~nat, TONY: 8PENCE: I took care of your watchdog, Tony, rig>ht after he made TONY: 8PENCE: And rlg~ht after that I called the cops. TONY: r&S ATH01 01825?2
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SPENCE: The cops, the bright boys in the FBI. in Jersey ou~ht to be a federal rap, that federal stuff, To~y. What are you talkin~ about. TONY~ I fi~red a .Job over here You get loner terms for Tt~E FBI...they should be waittn~ for you outside r|@ht about now. I tipped them off ~ job~w~_._.c_~:~,.~ ~f_~, Theylre gein~ to catch you red-ha~e~, Tony. You'll probably get ten years. TONY: Listen, if you think you can force me... SPE~GE: Who me? I wouldn't think of suoh a thln~ Tony. A big man like you. I'm glving you a great ~ig oholoe. Ten years In the pen or a bullet right t~aok between your beady blue eyes. Spenoe, listen.,. TO~Y: I'm tellir~ you for the last time. Stay where you are, Tony. ras .... RTX01 0~,~2523 Ii
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-4~ TONY; (DRIPPING ~EAT) You ~ot to listen to me. business on this. Tell that to the FBi. You 6st to listen' ~nella gave you the She wanted that do~ for herself,.. TONY1 Would I do a thing like that, L crazy thir~ llke that? Look, tell you what 1'11 de. You've got close to a hundred thousar~ on hand with me...I'll glve you double that,.. 8PENOE: You're a louse,~ I'm telllngyou, thing in the mornings TONY: I'i! double it. I'll ~Ivc you the cash firBt ~PENOE: You'll be ti~it behind bare in the merning~ TONY: (~NFURIATED) You abut up you.I I don't have to take this from you.t Of course you don't. Nake one move and flr~ cut, TONY: (DEBP~ATE) Listen, ~ence, ~lve me a break... r&s RTX01 0182S74
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--¢7- 8PENOE: ~qerots a hunch of furs All ri~t. and get B~rted. ~ONY: Spence, , • 8PENOE: You want a bresk, I'm giving yeu one. Maybe I'm only testing your nerve. TONY: ~Oelo Pick them up. NO, SPENOE: TONY: 8PENCE: Tony... TONY: For the last time, (LOW, PLEADING) Listen, please... That's better. Now get out. Spence... SPENOE: TONY: next to you. Maybe the Pick them up FBI isn't waiting. RTF~O 1 01825?5
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(MEN~OING) Get, out, Tony, BIZL/.2a% __ -48- SPENCE: SPENOE: All right. Go ahead. TONY: (LOW) For the love of heaven, Spence... SPENOE: (MOVING RA~) Here'8 a ~n for you, Tony. You oan shoot it out with the federal boys if you ~ke. ¢01~F[-8o long, Tony. See you in ten years. M~.~d~w~, S_O~ND: OF GUN BEING T~ONN. OALrGBT. S~LI(]HT PAU~ T~A TOi~Y: % .... RTHO'I 0 "f 82_~?'6
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(OEE)(E.A.) l~: (DRAWS UP IN ~AR) -49- 3HEPPARD: Drop that ~n! TONY: 8HEPPARD: Drop It..,put your hands in the alr.,.thi~ is a federal offloer. SHEPPAP.J): (OFF) 8t~p~ BAILEY: (OFF) 8top or we'll shoot,t B_L~.~/L~ONY, H~s BP~AT~ eOMINa IN H~ _S£L~3.~ S~PpARD: (OFF) This is your final warning. ~tep or we'll,., TONY: (GASPING SAVAGELY) That' s what you think, Mister...'
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/ - 70- SHEPPARD (OFF)(LOUD) All ri6ht, men...let him have itI, _SO~ .~- - " F~_~" " TO: \ B]'~01 0182578
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR AUGUST 7, 1952 CLOSING COMMERCIAL MUSIC: TICE: BARUCH: MUSIC: TICE: MUSIC: (UP TO CURTAIN) In just a ~o~ent, what happened to the people Smokers, you can easily see inside reasons why Luckies cleaner, f qesher, smoother! A~ent ShepparO will tell you in tontghtls story. for yourself the taste better -- Just take a Lucky froqi a ~iewly opene¢~ pack and carefully remove the 9aped by tearing do!~n the sear~ from end to and. Be sure to start 3n the sears. In tasrlng ~anlt crush or ~ into the tobacco. Now, exam, ins that 9effect cylinder af fine, mild tobacco. See Now it holds to~ethe'_' -- without those annoyln~ loose ends that get in your mouth anO spoil the baste. Tnst~s why LucklEe taste cle___ane_[r. Notice how free your Lucky is fro,.] sir spaces - hot spots that burn too fast - taste hat and harsh. ThatZs why Luckiee taste fresher. And look at that fin_~e, go3d-tastln~ tobacco -- oerfectl2 shredded and 2acked Just rieht to draw freely snrl s~oke evenly. Th-~trs why Luckies taste smoother. SO, for a cleaner, fresher, smoother smoke, make o~nsxt carton Lucky Strike! ( F ANFA RE ) CONCLUSION OF CASE (SHOW THEME) 0182529
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fS ~-~ J / SHEPPARD (~FTER A P~USE) Anthony Ostena was killed ~n zn ~ttempt to shoot hie way out of the trap Raymond Spenoe fixed for him. Although Spence went free for several months he was caught later when h~ tried, with Sheila Blair, to return for the cash 0arena ha5 held for him. FBI surveillance of Oatena~s home and office led to the arres~ of several o~her notorious associates ~n Oate~m's crlmln~l clrele, thee permanently closlng...~39_2~D~ ra8 ATH01 0~S2580
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F THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR AUGUST 7, 195~ CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONTZD) TIOE: MUSIC: BARUCH: All names and characters ~sed on this program are fictitious. Any similarity to persons living or dead is purely eotncidcntal. This program is based on Frederick L. CollinsI copyrighted book "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR"...and Is not an official program of the FBI. In tonightt~ story ~ ..... -~,-~ _ plays the part of ~-, ...... . dramatization for "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAN" i~ written by Louis Pclletle~ and Jack Finks. These prsgsams are produce~ and directed by Betty Msndevllle. Be sure to listen to next Thursday's story, "The Super Salesman", on "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". Sa,~e time -- same station. (SHOW THEME - UP AND UNDE~ }Ierels an Important announcement fo~ every American. Our Ar~ed FDrees in Korea have issued an urgent call for more blood. Have o~ist the~ down? What happened to that pint of blood you were ¢oi q~n~ to give? Please give that pint na_._/w at your Had Crass Chapter or local blood donor center. Thank you. This is Andre ~aruch saying goodnlFht for Lucky Strike, product of The Americar Tobacco Company - Americals tee~aadi_~m~nufacturer of cigarettes. (CONTINUED) RTH01 0182581
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THE PBI IN PEACE AND WAR ~U~UST 7, 1952 , CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONTID) ~ARUCH CONT D "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" has been selected as one of the programs t~ be heard by our Ar~ed Forces overseas through the faeili%ies of the Armed Forces Radio SerPics. MUSIC: (SHOW THEME - UP AND OUT) TICE: THIS IS THE CDS RADIO I,IETWORK. RT~401 0182582
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f "~11~E SCIP~R 8kI,E~kN" IV AUDUST ~, 19~2 Produo~1 and Direoted Toys SorJ.pt ~: A T~O'/ 01B2SB3
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/ f /f THE AMERIOAN TOBACCO COMPANY liTHE FBI II# FEICE AND WAR" OPENING COMMERCIAL AUGUST I~, 1992 TICE: MUSIC : r~CE: BAEUCH: MUSIC: THURSDAY LUCKY STRIKE presents ... "T~ FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" [ (FANFARE) Another ~reat story based an FreJsrlck L. Collins copyrighted book, "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR'r° Dra~a ... Thrills .., Action! But first ... Andre Earuch! Frlen6e, In a cigarette Ites the taste that makes the difference and Luckies taste better - clsa[~er; freshs[, s~o~t~!~! Hersls why: First of all, better taste J~ s cicamette b?~Ins with fine tobacco and Lucky 3trike means fine tobacco - ftns, li~ht, naturally mild tobacco. Secand, Luckles are ~,ade better. Every Lucky is round and fir;~ anC fully packed ... without those annoyinE loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the t~ste. Yes, every Lucky is packe~ right to draw free lz and evenly! So for a smoke that tastes better -- cleaner, fresh_~er, s'noother, Be Happy - G_9 Luckz. Make vo~ur next carton Lucky Strike! (SHOW THEME UP AND FADE) R I'IWO 1 0182584
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-2- ANNOR: And now tonight's story. ,.,on the FBI in Peace end War...~l~ C. T z1 SOUND: STEEL ~30R CLOSED. FOOTSTEP8 GOING AWAY. v DAVE: (ON CUE) C~ on, ~i. AL: Huh? DA~E: What you were say~ before dinner, about the proposition. ALe The pr~l~sition? DAVE~ Yeah, when our time 18 up I said, why don't you end me go into partners end you said... AL: Oh, that !~'opositlon. Well look, ]}ave, you're a nioe guy end ell that, bat after whet heppen~d lear time, no thanks. DAFE: What last time? th A/H01 0182585
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-3- AL: When I waa doing bhat two-year stretoh up the Hudson, I had a oell~te just like you and he said let's go in parbnera when we get out. I wouldn't be hero now if I hadn't listened to that guy. DAVE: You donft amnb to some ins ALt It isn't that I don'b like you, Dave... DAVE: So what hsppsned with this guy that you don't like workh~g with your oel]~ates? You want to hear? Why not? It's s long story. DAVE: ~t DAVE: We're gosna be in h~re six months mere, ~o ahead, bell me. AL~ Well..othis guy's name ares Freddy. Freddy Waleh end the boys at Ossining used to call him "Itchy Fingers." DAVE: He p£oked pooksts? tb F~T ~0 "J 0182-~B6
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*4- Uh huh. Pookets, looks, an~hlr~ he oould get his hacdB on. He was very ~ood, Froddy, and one of the nioeBt guys you'd went to know. What happened? Well, like We're doing here, Freddy says to me, why don% we work together when we get out, you got a good raoket and I've got lots of talent, let's teem up. DAVE: So you teamed up. AL: Un huh. I got out six months ahe~ of him and did a few jobs, the, the day he got oub, I pu~ h~ to work. DAVE O~ your racket. AL~ Uh huh. DAVE: How did he fit in with that? tb R, TH07 0 ?,~25e P i im
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AL: Wvll,,,for my r~oket, first of all we had to find a brand now oar end I figured l~eddy could handle that. So the morning we went to work I had already apotted a now Ford that w~ parked on the street, end while I washed out for the oo~s Freddy picked the ignition look. $ ." AL: (SUBDUED) How you doing, ~raddy? FRBDDY: (WOR~ING) Don't worryt lql have it going in two shskes. Bnt what do we went this oar for, Al? You*ll see, AL: FREDDY: Okay, you're the boss, but if I'd kno~ your racket was snatohlng oar~, t, AL: I keep tolling you, we only went this thing for a ]prop. FREDDY: All right. Snatching cars ie for juveniles. tb ALg racket... RT~07 0182588
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S -6- FREDDY: 0 • 0 ) Okay, she's ready. Y~Bh. Hop in, FREDDY: • AL: Good work, Frad~y° FREDDY: Uh huh, but let's get out of here fast, AL: Okay, we're going, SOUND: OAR HO~ OFF. EflTABMSH 80U~D FULLY. TM~: FR~DY: You going ts drive? (ON OOE) Okay...what nsw? AL: Well first we're goir~ to take this over to Dixie 8~dth's filling station ~nd park it, then we get a new set of plates, a phoney re~istretion, end I go into my act, Vn huh. Now what's the act? FREDDY: ~L~ Reach in my right hand pocket, there's a newspaper clipping. (A BEAT) Get it. tb AI'M01 0~82589
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Ye~h. Read what it says. -?- FR~DY: ~L~ FREDDY: "Blonde siren slays mate in..." AL: No, no, on the other side. Oh. "~ilford Library Fund sets goal ~eevanty-flve thousand dollars". What's that? AL: ~C on, FREDDY: "Hrs. Nartha Dillon, of 14 Maple Drive, director of the fund, announced this morning that plans for the drive would be discussed at a meeting of the oonlr~ttee..." AL: That's enough. ]~ough what? Information. ~s. Dillon, dollars. tb FREDDY: AL: 14 Maple Drive, and severity-five thousand
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I don't get Jr, -8- FRF.D~: Would you like fifteen psr oeat of that seventy-f lye thou~d, Fce~dy? Over ten thousand bucks. FREDDY: Sure I would. (ACID) ~hat are you golng to do, sell them this oar for ten G's? AL: (I~UOHS) You might almost say that's just what we're going to do. FRE[DY: Hey now walt a second, I don't know much about your kind of reeker, but this 8ounde awfully sarewy to me. AL: I know it does, Freddy. But you just hold on to you~ hat ~ I'll ~how you what happen8 when a super selesman goes to work, SOUND; DOOR BOZZK~. R~EAT. DOOR OPEN. A/u: P~s, Dillon? MARTHA: Yes? tb RTH01 018259~ i
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/ -9" I'm Alvin Oonno~e, F~s, Dillon, of Canners Asaooiatea, I oalled you on the phone this afterneon. ]~,.~T~L~.; Oh yes. F~..Oonners. Oeme in, please. AL: Thank you. ( 0 : NART~A; l'va been so busy over a~ the library all day that I havenrt had a ohanee to disoues your proposal with the oom~ittee..,elt dow% won't you...bu5 I'm almost aura, Nr. Oonnere, that their ~newer would be he. We've never employed professional fund raising organizations before ~ud I don't think we need one now. AL: That's quite poeeib~e, Nrs. Dillon. But seventy-five theusand dollars is a lot of money in a town this size. ~RTBA: I suppose it is, but... I looked up same back newspapers. Mrs. Dillon. Leery ear the library bad a drive like this and raised just a little lees th~n half its quota, YesI thetis tr~las tb N~RT~AI last year we~ disappoint/rig, but this tlme... F~I"HO1 0182_~9P
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10 .tnd~%,he -Firemen-t w~rg m~t~,atd o~ ~idR~ .d~..~_.we 1-l~ ~ whan..i~ ~u, Dillon, more ~d more o~tti~a llke ye~rs arc ~tting their fund-raising problems up to Oor~ors Associetee. We handle everything and g~ar~r~tee results. We'll held a bazaar, picnic, raffle, blr~o... V~RTHA: I'm quite sure your organization is oom~etant, ~. Conners,.. AL: And just to show you that we get results I'll find your first contributor right now and he'll donate the equivalent of twenty-three hundred dollars to the fund. Twenty-three hvndred. MARTRA: Uh huh. He's a dealer in Ford oars and I'll get him to donate a brand new sedan to he raffled off during the bazaar. You'll get the car free and I'll ~uarantee to sen five thousand worth of ohanoes on it besides. F@RTHA: (I~=P~SSRD) You could get us a new oar? tb AI"~O~ 0~82593
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f ii AL: I could, es a donation. May I use your phone? ~THA: Of course, b~t, the oo~ttee.., AL: (80UND." PHONE DIAL) You leave the corm%Ittee to me, ~e. Dillon, I know how to h&ndl8 ~em. ;~ARTHA: I..,I guess they would be ~leased to get ~ oar free, but... ollo. FREIDY: AL,. of ~onnor~ /~eooiatee. FREDDY: Where ere you, .%17 Up at her houae? That's right, Pred, I fm working on a new cempalgn and I'm going to give you a chanoe at a little publlolty for your produot. How abant donating a new sedan to the Milford Library th~nd, Fred? I ~arantee it'll be worth while. FREDDY: What do I e~v now? tb RTH01 018259~
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12 You will? Thatle great, when can I get delivery? F',~EDI/'f: Go ahead~ talk, thie:over my head. AL: Monday. That's perfect,Fred. Deliver it to Mrs. Martha Dillon,.. MARTHA: But just e minute, Mr. Conners, the committee... You leave thie to me, Mre. Dillon. (INTO PHONE) Deliver it to Mre. Martha Dillon at the libr~y fund headquarters, Main Street, Milford. And Fred... Ye~h? FRED: AL~ Thanks e lot, you wontt ever regret this, believe me, (~.~_~_ F@~RTHA: (ASTONISHED) F~ goodness, ie that all there is to it. AL: (OHEOKLES) That's all when know how, Mrs. Dillon. New here's e eontraot stating our pereent~es end outlining the funetiene we'll ]perform for the fund. tb ATH01 01~2595
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f /~.'b the oorrrnittee,,o MARTHA -, AL| You take this %o the oonvnittee just after the ear is delivered on Monday and I think they'll he pretty well impressed, don't you? N RTHA: (SMILING) I 'm afraid they will, Nr. Conners, almost as mash as I am. My goodness, you certainly work fast, don't you. AL: In this ranket...I mean, in this business Nre. Dillon, you have to. Fast and out...that'a the way we work it. I~SIfl: IN AND UNDER: DAVE: So that's how you got in, huh. At: yeah, that's the way we waffled it, and the whole deal would have come out jus~ fine if it hadn't been for two thinga...m~/ partner, Itchy Fingers, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 80UND: TELETYPE. TB \ RTMO'! 0182596
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/ 14 BAILEY," ~o Sheppard, PB~, oonfiden~lal. Complaln~ on ohari~y fraud, Oakwood Comity Ohest, iook~ llke Alvin Oonnore job complete with new oar raffle, Will be weitln~ for you at Oakwood station, 10:15 train, sign it, Bailey, 0 BAILET: There it ia, Shep, Hax'a t~at Harket. &'t~ppAqD: Uh huh. Be keeps the car in a parkir~ shed behind the shop. S~PpARD: I guess he won't be very happy to see us. BAILEY: I guess not. SOUND: DOOR OPEN. ~AT BEING POUNDED. IDOB CLOSED. MAX: (COMING IN) Good morning, g~%lemen. 8HEPP/~ql]: Good morning. Are you Zro Max Sohmidt? tb A1"~01 0~82592
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~at 'e right. J'IA~s SI~'PARD: We're ~onts of the FBI, Mr. 8ohnddt, we'd like te talk te you for a few minutes. FBI~ %/hatle the trouble? BAILEY: No trouble, Yr. 8chrddt, we want to see... Now look, fellahs, if it's about the prices I got to charge for steak %o m~ke a living don't look at me, iris those wheleselars, believe me at ninety-six cents a pound IIm losing money, BAILEY: It's not about meat, Hr. 8chmidt. 8HEPPARD: We'd like to see the Plymouth eedan you won at the Oommmity 0heat bazaar last month. MAX: (PROUDLY) Oh, the Plymouth, now therels e fine llbtle oar. I've got it right in back of the shop...(STOPS) %4hat do you want to see i% for? BAILEY: We believe the oar was e$olen in Jersey City six weeks ego. th ~T'H01 0182598 ;i
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16 MAX: Stolen? (A BEAT, THEN CI~OOKLE8) No, you've made a mistake, it couldn't be, I won the car with ticket number 1762 an account of a dream my wife had becanse she's sixty-two and my dmghter is seventeen--- (STOPS) Stolen? Wemre afraid so, t'r. 8chrddt. SH~P~: But how oould that be possible? The Qom~m~nity Chest is a fine organization... 8HEPPARD: It is, but a swindler named Oannore man~ad the drive and umad this car to sell himself to the oommittas. MAX: You mean.HI got to give the car bask? BAILEY: If it was stolen, ~. Sohmldt. MAX: Ohh, wait till my wife hears about this. SR~PAHD: 14ay we see the car, please? tb RTHO't 01B2599
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17 (DO~) ye~h, I guess so. (~ /rod my brother Herman, wait .5';11 he he~rs ebou~ i~. I bought ~Ibooks of ~inkets five dollers each, you'ro throwing money 8way he says, ten dollars for tioke~s, and wh~ I won he wouldnVt speak to me for a week. And now...~) (~) There i% is, you o~n look at it... I havenSt got the hosrt. Thank you, Yr. 8ohntldt. BAILEYI MAX| (QLOO~LY) Don't mention i%...it was a l~le~are. 80UND~ DOOR CLOSe. A FEb/ FOOTS~ILP8, ~AR HOOD OPt. $HE~pARD~ All rlgh%, Frank...%.h~'8 %he motor number of ~hat stolon oar? BAII~7~ 706058. sH P : 706058. Oksy...thie is it, Yes, sir, everythtn~ would have been fine if it wasn't for the FBI and my partner Itchy Fitters. DAVEz Freddy gur~l you Up, huh. tb AT,, O 1 0182600
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18 Uh huh, he gummed me plenty. Hew? DAVE: Well...everything looked rosy on the library job. This Dillon female was the perfast sucker, the town was excited about the drive, asd contributions were already oomlng in. So, on Monday morning, Preddy and I drove the new Ford te the Library Fond headquox~ere on Main Street in Milford. ~QEND: OAR COMING TO A 8TOP. DOOR OPEN. AL~ Now remember you're a Ford dealer, you're doing this for the publicity value, and you believe Ln libraries sots people e*n be educated and not turn out to be crooks like us. (~ FREODY: (OHUCKLES) Okey, I get it. ALt Here, you take the key to the oar. You got the regietr ation? FRF~DY ~ Irn huh. ( o "~!Ql~IDl.l~ligJ~) tb 8TM01 0182607
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19 AL~ TYPB~ITZR COra'S IN. STOPS AS DOOR IS OLOSED. ALl Good morning, is t'ra. Dillon in. S~RETA~Y: Yea sir, she is. I'm Hr. Conners and this is F~. Walsh. SEOR~Y: Oh yes, ~c. Oonnorst she's expeoting you, go right in that door, please. AL: ~Thank you. (~ NERTP~: (ON THE PHONE) (OOHING IN) Yes, that's right, Ella, a brand new Ford sedan and...oh, just a minute, he's here now. Sit do~m, Hr. Conners, I'm just talking to one of the ladies on the oennittee... (INTO THE PHONE) Ella, I'll oall you heok later, dear, and don't breathe a word to the rest of ~he girls, I think this is going robe a lovely surprise. Yes, dear, I'ii oall you.,.'Bye. (~2t.2~D~ DO~) ;'~. Conners. Good morning, ~s. Dillon. tb AL: BT~O! 0182602
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20 (CORDIALLY) And ~hie is F~, Walsh. FREDDY~ Yes, ~'~. (BRIGHTLY) And on behalf of the Ford ~btar Co~pauy of Ner~pert... Mn (POLITE LAUGH) Fteddy, give the lady time to meet you, huh. ~TEA: (LAUGHS) I don't think any introduction is neoessary, ~. Waleh, 1%e already heard a greet deal abou~ you. FREDDY: And I heard about you tee, ~s. Dillon, plenty. Well, ~hsnk you. ~THAs You're welcome, Ha'am, and here are the keys to the oar and the registration and... Freddy.., AL~ FREDDY: (DET~MINED TO GET IT OVER) And I hope the library gets all the books it wants so people don't turn out to be,.. AL~ .(FIRMLY) Tha.5's enou~;h., Fred, Hrs. Dillon aceept, e with pleasure. "tD Al'~O 1 0182603
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21 MARTHA= (LAUGHS) I do indeed, V~. Welch. Thank you, FREDDY.. (RRLIEVED) Yeulrs weloems. And now would you like to tee the car, Nre. Dillon. NA~TH~: I'd love to. (SOUND: DOOR OPEN) Yes, Edith? SEt'RETARY: Nt~eo Brooke just brought in her oolleotion box, Nrs, Dillon, will you put the money ~way~ ~5~-~/~ P~/( NARTHA: Yes, of course, th~atk you/ ~.~L B~RET~NY, And Miss Brooks is outside, she'd like to Bee you for just a minute. NaRTHA: I'll be right there. Are you in a hurry, Ft. Oonnore? AL: No, you go right ahead. /l (BOUND: SAFE BOLT OPENED) I/~-l--j~ece Mise Brooke for a moment, • ' I'ii be right with you) )~ tb Al'~Oi 01:82604 ii
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22 FREDDY: (~m A BEAT) ~I... AL: Yeeh. FREDDY: Did you eee what I just sew, AL: Huh. FREDDY: That 8ale. They keep the contributions in that safe. A ten-year-o1~ kid could blow that thing with a waS of bubble gum. AL: (ALARF~D) Now look, Freddy... FREDBY~ I'm telling you, I could open it with one thumb, left-handed. AL: Listen, you goon, I'm getting fifteen per cent of this thing, legitimate. •. FREDDY~ B~t why take fifteen per cent when all we'd have to de le open that sole,., AL~ No: You hear me: N- O. tb ATH01 0182605
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23 FREDDY: All right, it web only a suggestion. You keep your suggestions to youreelf. YREDDY: %fell dontt get Bore. All I meemt... AL: I }mow what you meant Emd I don't want any more ideas out of that second-story brain of yours. This is my rocket and I'II run It my way. le that clear. FREDDY: Yeah, Bure. AI, anything you Bay. .. (MILDLY) it was only a BuggeBtion. HU810: TO A CURTAIN. (~~ tb ATe01 0182506 h
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THE ~BI IN PEACE AND WAR AUGUST 14,'.9~2 MIDDI~ COmmERCIAL TICE: BARUCH: MUSIC: END OF ACT I Back to "The Super Se!esm~n" in just s ~omsnt. Ffiem~e, /2J~les are ~Daoe b@ttef to taste better-" to taste ele~n_ e~, fresher smoother! AnJ it1$ easy to orove this to yourself. $1,J~ply do tbls: Take s Luak~ fror~ a newly opene'J pack anO carefully re,~ove the paper by tearinF down the seam from end to eng. Be sure to s_tart on the seam, In tearing, donlt crush or dig int~ th~ tobacco. No,,,~ look at that perfect cylinder of fine, mild tobceco, See how it holds to~etber -- ~iithout those arnoying loose en'Js tbst get in your ~outh an4 Spoil the taste? Theirs ~hy Luckies taste cleaner! N~tloe how free Luckies are fro'n excesslve air spaces, hot spot~ that burn too fast - an4 cive you a hot, harsh taste. That's why Luckies taste freshe.______~r. Then io~k at that fine, ~i18, ~ tobacco, perfectly shredde~ and pseke~ Just right for smooth, even smokin~g. Thatls why Luckles taste smoother. Yes, friends, these are the i~.portant ~nside reasons that ,lake every Lucky taste better -- cleane_ r, fre~he_~r, Smoother. So for 2our own real deep-~own s~oklng enjoyment, Be }{sDpy - G__~ Luca/fk~! Make o~ next carton Lucky Strike! ( SHOW THEME) FITH01 0182602'
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• And now baok to ~U80. -24- ANNCR: "The FBI In Peace and War" and tonight's story... AL| Yes. sir. I%ohy Fin~ers ~/,med me up plenty on that deal. and Just when overythin~ was ~otn6 good. DAVE: Yeah, I guess that's what happens when you got a partner with a one- traok mind. Of course there was a!so a couple of wise ~uys from the FBI who stepped into the picture, but it took Freddy %0 fix me up with five more years on this etretoh. DAVE: So what happened? Well, llke I was oaying, after we gave this Dillon dame the oar, I was in solid with her and the committee and it was a elnoh from there in. They signed the oontrao~ givlr~ me fifteen percent and I started the campaign rolling. ras ATHO? 01~2608
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-25 DAVE: You mean you aotually did some work? AL: Work? Listen, when it comes to fund raising I'm the best little salesman you ever saw. I ju~d into that drive with beth feet and at the end of three weeks me and ~he losal talent pushed the contributions over the flfty-thousand-dollar mark. DAVE: And they were ~oing to give you fifteen percent of that? AL: Ye~, free and olear, Only Freddy ~nmed it up. Uh huh. He couldn't wait? Uh huh. DAVE: DAVE: ~Lt DAVE: That's why they called him Itchy Fin~ers. ATH01 01!~2609
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-26- &L: Uh huh. DAVE: Go on, AL: Well, natorally, when I work a ¢a~palgn like this I usually call in one high-pressure boy %0 ~t eontrihutieno over the phone, but since Freddy was with me, I let him de this kind ef work and I told the Dillon deme that Freddy was ~enerously taking tt~e off from his business to help the f;. AI,: Well, one night, after a hard day at the campai~ office, Freddy and I were in my hotel room, me havin~ a hi~nball and him totallng up the week'B reoslpts. He liked to do this even when he ceuldn't ~et his hands en the dough, he eald ~t kept him Interested in the work. FR~DY: ~nd two hundred and six bucks and fifty oente from the Girl ~outa. And fifty husks, compliments of the Elite Dry Oleanlng company. Total, twelve thousand and three bucks and thirty cents. r&8 ATH01 0182610
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f How about another drink? Yeah, Itll have one. AI,.. -27- AL: FREDOY: Say, you know, I've been thlnkir~ so.ethic, ~Pnatsver It is, itls no goOd. (~OUND: LIQUOR POURED) Say when, FREDDY: No, Itm serious, Irm kind of worried. When. AL: Uh huh, Well you let me do the worrying for this team. THE DRIP) Here you are. FREDDY: (PASSES You arenlt worried, At? AL: About what? FR~DY: Well, I admit I never worked a job like this before, but I don't like the idea of staying it! one spot so 1on6. We've been here three weeks now.~ What if the sops ever oaug~nt up with that ear we took? What if they start pinning up your ploture in the post offices llke they used to? R'l'HO 1 0182611
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-28- AL: How could they l~In up my picture, I'm not Wan~ed for anythln~. FREDDY: How about those deals you pulled before I got.out? AL: Clean as a whistle, they'll never catuh up with me on those. FRAY: All the same I'm worried. I think we ou~ht to take another a~e on this job. ~Jhat other ~e? AL| FREDDY: Wel~, for instance, you're having thls big bazaar out at the ball park on 3aturday night. Hew much do you think you'll take in on that? AL: I dunno, it's the big wlr~i-up to the aamp~i~. With the oar tickets, g~nos of chance, all that, we might hit fifteen to sixteen thousand backs. FR~DY: Yeah, that's what I flared. On Saturday night, right? tab Ar~O~ 0~26~2
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/ -29- AL: Well sure on Saturday, what about it? FREDDY: On 8atunday night the Dillon dame oouldn't put all that douF~a in the bank, oould abe? She's got to put it in that safe in the office, AL: Now. Freddy°.. FR~DY: (PLEADING) AI, I'm tellln~ you, I oould open that thln~ standing on my hea~ and one hand in my pooke$| AL= No soap, Freddy. FR~DY: Al. we senti sbsy around $hls town forever. AL: Wo can stay till the end of next week llke our oontraot says. FREDDY: But wet11 only get about eleven G'S on the oontraot and my way... AL: your way is out, forget it. ~as ~TH01 0182613 t
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-30- A1, you're making a very serious mlo'take. (~6'RL~8) The only mistake I've made 8o far is knowing you. ~DY: All right, laugh all you want, but don't blame me if we go~ in trouble ha~Iging around this town too Iong...don't say I didn't tell you. 8HE PPARD: Memo to the Direotor, Alvin Oonnors searoh° Stolen oar used in Oakwood Community Chest drive traoed to filllng station on Highway 22 through lubrlcation sticker on door post. Owner of station+ Dixie ~ith, former conviot, Agent Bailey and I are going to work on this immediately. Sign it, Sheppard. 80UND: OAR pULLING TO A STOP. MOTOR OFF. OAR DOOR OPEN. DIXIE: (OOMING IN) Morning+ gents, fill her up? r~s RTH01 0182614- ii
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-31- Sl~EPPAKD: No thanks. We'd like to talk to you, Dixie. FBI. DIXIE: FBI. Yaah, sure, what's the trouble? BAILEY: Supposin~ we go in your office for a few minutes, Dixie. DIXIE: Okay, come on alert@. (~~2~ But look fellahe, I'm clean, you can ask the Sheriff. I been in this spot for the • O last five years, ~UND: D~ And you can ask anybody around here about my record. (~) I been off parole since 1945 and I've got a legitimate buslneee here. t~EPP~D: Dixie,..wben did you last see A1 Conners? DIXIE: Conners? Who's that? BAILEY: He's a swindler, Dixie, who uses stolen oars as part of hie racket. DIXIE: why should I knew him? ra8 F/T:'40? 0182615
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/ -32- SHEPPARD: You did a lubrloation job on one of his cars. was on the door post. BAILEy: Your milse~e sticker I can't hslp it if This crook, Dixie, also happened to have been at the E1mswood Penitentiary when you were there ten years ago, DIXIE: So what, lots of ~ye were there. 8~PPARD: You'll save us a lot of trouble if you tell the truth, Dixie. ' DIXIE: I 'm telling you the truth, I never heard of any guy named Alvin Conners, RIILEY: A~ent 8heppard didn't say Alvin, Dixie, ha said AI. Hew do you know Conners' name Is Alvin instead of Albert or Alfred? DIXIE: (FLUSTERS) What's the difference, Klvin, Albert, I ~eaced, that's all. rae t91",~0 "1 0182616
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-33- SHEPPARD: All ri~t, Dixie, if you want ~o ~p baok up the river for harborlng stolen property, o. DIXIE: (ANGRILY) Now wait a minute, I said I wee olean and I meant it. I don't aek every customer who parke his ear here whether it's stolen or not. A guy oomee in with a car and tells me to store it, I don't ask him where he got It~ 8HFPPARD: Not even someone like Oonuors? DIXIE: No. Where he gets a car is hie business, not mine. BAILEY: You do know him, don't you, Dixie? DIXIe: All right, I met the guy a oouple of timee, sue me. When was he in here last? DIXIE: I dunne, five, six weeks aso, I Bees. r~s ~T~01 0182812
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f i Where is he new? I dontt know. DIXIE: Okay, Dixie, I {~ess you better some along to headquarters... DIXIE: Now waiS, I got a reputation here In this community, if people find out I served time... Where is Oonnors, Dixie? BAILEY: DIXIE: Well look, if I tell you what I know, and you find out my reoord is olean like I Bay it is... 8HEPPARD: If it is, Dixie, you have nothir~ to worry about. DIXIE: Okay. (A I~AT) Last time Oonnors was in here he asked me for a Pennsylvania road map, he said he had a proposition in a plaoe oallnd Milford. ras RT~01 0182618 i,i,
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Milford. Pennsylvania. Ar~ lis~n. driving was stolen... ~e understand, Dixie. DIXIE: if l'dlve known that car he was S~PPARD: Your record may be jua~ as clean as you say it is. Meantime, just stick arouM town here in case we need you. Okay, Frank, let's go. Oh, ub, one thing, Dixie... Yeah? DIXIE~ S~ppARD: Haybe you'd bet~r give us a road map of Ponnsylvanla too. AL: YeB sir, overythir~ was goin~ just fine and on Saturday night we wound up the campaign with eighteen thousand bucks that we took in at the ball park. Hrs. Dillon put the dough in hey safe at the offi~ and I figured the whole deal was in the be~ DA~: Only it wasn't. tab A1-NO 1 0182619
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f Uhhuh, 8o what happened? -36- AL; DAVE: AL: Well, on ~unday morning I was eleepingpeaoeful in my room when there wae a knock on the door. ~OU~ LOUD KNOOK I opened %he door~.~.~) and a repuleive charaoter et~ak hie head in and eaid... Are you Alvin Oonnors? / / And I eaId "yes". And he * FBI, Oonnors. Come along with me. ~- / tab AI"~O 1 0182620
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-37" AL: Listen, boys, :this Is a big mistake, I'm rurmin~ a legltlmate drive in this town, you san ask anybody, ~- ~.~ BAILEY: We know/ ~ " , ~- There's the office, ghep. Okay. 81~ppARD s You san ask Mrs. Dillon, she's head of the OOmmlttss... SREPP~: That'~ just w~ we are aekir~, GonnorB. AL: (RIGHTEOUgLY) Good. You'll see I didn't take a dime of this dough for myself, All I'~ ~ettlng is a strai~ht commission. S PPARD: Did she say she'd be in front of the office, Frank? Yeah. There's Mrs. Dillon's ear. x.l~e BAILEY: S~e's driving s Pontlso s~ation wagon, AL: Go ahead, ask her about me. 'I'XO 1 0182621
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~PPARDz Did you ~ell her ~uythir~ over the phone, Frank? BAILEY: No. (S_~'~ Just asked her to me@t us here. E~E PPAP~: Okay. ~OUND: DOOR OPE~ Oome alen~, Oor~ore, AL: (CHEERILY) Morning, Mrs. Billon, of bed ~o early... We'll handle this, Oonnora. Ere. Dillon, (PUZZLED) Yes? sorry these boys had to ~et you out BAILEY: SHE PPARD: MARTHA: SHEPPARD: We're agents of the Federal Bureau of Investi~tlon, Mrs. Dillon. We'd llke to talk to #ou~bout Mr. Cormors' par~ in the drive you've just completed. rae A "J" HO "~ 0182622
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About Mr. OormorB? -39" Lls~n, ~s, Dillon, tell %h~ if 1%ook one dime of %ha% dough, %e11%hem... PPARD; Do you mind if We ~o in your offioe and %alk, Mrs. Dillon? ~ARTHAz No, not a% all, oome ri~n% in, (~~ I hope I have %he key. ~'nen you oalled. I g0% OUt ~n suoh a rush...yes, here I% is. Hrs. Dillon, %hese gentlemen are under & 81J~nt mjsapprehenBion, • ' )An~ I know you're ~o~ng %0 be able %o s%rai~h%en ~hem ou%. MARTHA: I'll do &ny%hin6 Ioan, Mr. Conners, hut I'm afraid %his 1o all a Ii%%Ie oonfusing. 81% down ple~,oe, Eon%lem~. SH~PPARD. ~ / Thank you. ~/// Now what would you like %0 know7 RTN01 0 62623
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-40- BAILEY: // Gracious, what wa~that: Excuse me, gontl~men, something see~s to /~'- ~ in my offiae. (SOUND: OUICK FOOTSTEPS. DOOR OPEN) (A BEAT, THEN) Why, Mr. Walsh, what are you doing in my office,~ (OONINO IB) Hr. Wsl~h; SF~PPARD: (COMING IN) What's going on here? Y~d~THA: Tnls is Hr. Valsh. He...hels an automobile dealer. (TO FP~DY) But flr. ~alsh...what are yuu doing with that safe? FREDDY: (TRYING TO BLUFF IT OUT) Ere. Dillon, ever zincs I saw this safe I osme to the oonslusion that it wasn't harg%ar~proof ar~ I said to myself, that safe isn't...uh...safe..,so l...uh... AL: Hr. Walsh, this is very emharrassln~. (TO 8HEPPARD) Gentlemen, I suppose this is an unfortunabs time to clear up your ~isunderetsndlng about me ... ~T~O? 078262~
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Very, Conner e. back in the ears and we'll all ~ke a rl~e to HarrisbUrg, Harrisburg? -4]- SI~PPI~D ~ ~II ri~t. *~ietern ~/aleh, you can put thaf money You're urger arrest, Mister. FREDDY: BAII~Y~ FBI, FR~DY: FBI? Alo+,What Ie this? (A BEAT, T~N DISGUSTED) Just what he they ~t to oatob you ~nloadlng ~ safe. Now wait a mi~nte... FREDDY: said, y~k, FBI, and Go on boys, take him away, hs's nothing but a oreok. known better than get tied up with a partner llke that. HARTHA: Hr. Connors.o.are you and Hr. Waleh... I ehould'vB TaB RTH01 0"~t9262~
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-42- AL: Yeah...we are, Hrs, Dillon, and I'm ve*y sorry he tried this unfortunate method of eolleating our commission. H%vbe bettcr luck next time. HART~A: l...I can't believe it, Hr• Oonnors, alon6 so nicely. AL: Sure we were, till he @mined it up. (TO SHEPPAKD) Okay, boys, let's get it over with• Oome, 'Itchy Fingars"...I hope they give you life for not knowing a good thin~ when you see ~t. N We...we seemed to ' be getti~ ~T~O? 0182626
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TH'E FBI IN PEACE AND WAR AUGUST 14, 1952 'OLOSI NO COMMERCIAL MUSIC: (UF TO CURTAIN) TICE: In Just a ~,,o~ent, AEent Sheppar@ ~;I]I t~ll you BARUCH: MUSIC: what happened to the people in tonight's story. SmoKers, you can easily see for yourself the insid[ reasons ~hy Lueklee taste better -- clean~qr, fres___~h[[, 9mOO___ tth~C[! Just take a Lucky frDm a ne~;ly opened pack and carefully re,love the paper by tearing do~n the seam from end to end. Be sure to start on the seam. In tearing donlt crush or dig into the tobacco. Now, examine that perfect cylinder of fir;e, ,nild tobacco. See how it holds together -- ~ithout those annoyinE loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the taste. That's why Luckies taste cleaner. Notice how free your Lucky is from air spaces - hot spots that burn too fast - taste hot and harsh, Tnatts why Luekiee taste fresher. And laok at that fi~e, good-taetln~ tobacco -- 2A_~mfectlyv shre~de~ and ~e_~d just ri~h_~t to draw freely and smoke evenly, That~ why Luekiss taste smoother. So, for a cleaner, fresher, e~ootbeq smoke, ,~ake o~_oq~ next carton Lucky Strike! (FANFARE) T K%"R~.. ~ONULUSTON~ ~CAS~ RTHO'I 01/3262," i
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NgPPkRD: With undeniable evidence piled up a~ainst them, Alvin Conners and Freddy Welsh were breu~% %o trial, Oonnere charged with fraud, Welsh with fraud and grand larceny, Both were convicted, Conners given a term of five years, Welsh ton to fifteen. OormorB is ~omtng up for parole soon ~na we understand ~t~t he is sincere in hie desire to give up hie career as,..~a~._ PITH01 0182628
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TKE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR ~.49----j ,/'~/ / AUOUS9 i~, 1952 CLOSIN6 CO~,fM~.ROIAL (CONTID) TICE: MUSIC: BARUCH: MUSIC: TIOE: All names and char%stets used on this program are fictitious. Any similarity to persons living or dead is Cutely so~noldent~l. This 0rogPtm is based on F~sde~ick L. Co[lirisr co92righted bOOk "TE4 FBI IN PEACE AND WAR'f...anJ is not an offiolsl pro[r~m of the FBI. In tonlghtts stow '-/~-' ..... ~ .... p[~y~d the part of . ,~ -:~,/ I'KIS /).,./., .,.,,':.,.. The radio Or~m~tl~atiai) for "T~ FB~[ I~l ~£A0;£ AND WAR" is W~'itten by Louis Full,tier and Jtck Pinks. Th~se 9ro~r?~is sr, t 9:[,o@vc~d and directed by ~=tty Msn~evtlle. B~ sure to listen to nuxt Thursdqyls , II storT, "The B~itI', on "THE FBI IN PAACE AND WAR . Same tim~ -- sqm~ stttioD, [SNOW T}Ib:,v~" - UP A~ff; UNDER) "TK~ K6I IN P~ACE AND WAR" h~s b~cn select~4 as one of the cro~i,:~ms to b~ hoard by oul" A~med Forces overseas throuFh the facilities of the Armed Forces Radio Se~ioc. ~ ~ ~ ~-~h ~ ~h% for L,~cky Sla~tki~ product of the ~rie.~ ~obac~o ~y -~ llieiteale (SHOW TI{~I<~ - UP AND OUT } l~tt~ mm~,~ of i~,. THIS IS TK~ C:,a RADIO NE~]7ORK. f:t1-)~01 0182629
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l ,, )) ) - FBI IN PEAL~ A~!B VA~ TaB A]-~O 1 0102630 ili
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-A- THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMP&NY "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WARu OPENING COMMERCIAL TIOE: HUSIC: TICE: BARUCH: MUSIC : JULY~, 1952 LUCKY STRIKE presents ..... WAR[ (FANFA~) Another great sto~y copyrighted book. Drams .., Thrills Andre Ba~ueh, THURSDAY T}~ FBI IN PEACE AND based on Frederick L. Collln8~ ~'T~E FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". ... Action! But first .,. Frfends, II~ s4ra yo,O]l agree that taste makes the bf~ dlffereoce in B ci~arebte and Luekies taste bct~e... Th%, taste better for two Important reasons: Fii°st, Lucklss are made of fine, mild tobacco. EverybodF kacws LS/M~T ... Lucky Strike mesns fins tobacco ... fine, mild, gsod-ta~ting tobaccs. Second. Luekies are made better to taste better ... always ro~d, firm and fully packed to give ye1~ a cigarette thatle mild an~ smooth and fresh -- with better taste i~ every puff! YouJIL really Be Hapgy -- when you On Lucky -- because Luektes taste better! So tomorrow why dcn[t you start the day off with Lucky Strike! (SHOW THEME UP AND FADE) o!026 I
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....... ~ ......... ~ ,~--__ ~ .~_~k¸ ......... -2- Tonight's storya... ~oj~3~j~. ~_~T0.. ~OUNB: FOOTS~. DARE~ED ALLEY. B.G. WHITSY: (~OFT) 0~ay? B~T: O~ay. ~DI T~O P~T~S OF FOOTSTF~PS ON I~OOD WAIXIN~_SLOVLY. R~T: (ON [YJE) Ho~ abrupt right here? WHITEY: No ~ood. Flash your light down that w%v. LOOK) Va huh. ras THEY STOP. (A PAUSE WHILE THEY ATe01 0182632
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-3" The cutting table° ~RITEY: Maybe. Come on, we'll take a look. ~DUNO: TRE FOOTSTEPS AGAIN. STAY b~BER (ON CUE) ~hitey. yeah. BE~ ~JHITEY: BE~." He said he was goi~ to leave a few bolts of silk here to make it look le~iti~te. ~RITEY: yeah. So he mid. A few bolts for bait. BEEr: Bait. You ~ave him that idea. huh. S~F~. ~ITEY: BER~: (CBUCKLE$) Nic8 idea, ~hitey. ra8 P1 T NO '! 0182633
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Whatts the matter? This il the spot. Oho -4- BE~T: We'll u~e that waste-bin right there. BE~r: Burs. Better than ~he "~e.b~.e, Flash your light on ~he ceilir~. ~ITEY: (PAUSE) Oh huh. Nice up-draft. It'll burn right up that stairway aud hit the second floor. BERT: Faybe we mhoulda brought some gasoline just to be aafe. WHITEYI (SCORNFULLY) ~a~oline. You talk gasoline whe~ we ~ot thermlte. BERt: I only meant, I never seen thermite ~ork.., WHITEY: put it ou~ onoe ft ~t~rt~ burning, F~ur thousand aegrees l~renheit. r~B F~ r gO '1 0~B263~
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(IZd~ESSED) Yeah? BEST: X4HITEY: Couple of ounces in that waste-bin and this place goes up Four thousand degrees. Oh huh. Where is it? What. The t~rmite tube. Oh. Here. Oka¥. BERT: WHITEY: BE~T: ~IITEY: BERt: WHITEYs BEST: That's all you need, Whitey, just that little tube full? That's all. she goes. WHITEY: I set it with this here fuse and in six hours..blooey up ATe01 0182635
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-6- BEhT: (STILL I~SSED) Soientifie~ huh. (S~L~S) Yeeh re~l soientifto, ]~sh your light eo's I ~n ,see zhat I'm dolog. BEI4f: Yeah, sure. (~ %~hitey. What. BE~T: We better locate those bolts of silk. WHITEY: Sure we'll locate them. Thatle Important. BERt: One sample out of eaoh holt, huh. WNITEY: Right. (PAUSE) Well, there we are, all set. It ~on't go off too Boon, ~lll it? ~B AT"~O $ 0182636
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~iX hour, E~ot? Uh huh. Itvs eleven olclock now. Okay. Five A.M., -7- ~HITEY: BERT: ~TEY: WHITEy: up she goes. A three-alarm Job if I ever saw B~T: (THINKING BACK) Four thousand degrees Farenhei%, huh. ~TEY: (C~UCKI~S) Yeah, Real scientific. MUglO: HIT8 IT SUDDENLY AND }lARD. INDER EXCITED FOR: AT~O1 018263?
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-8- WONAN: (EXCITED) Hello, operator.o.Operator...I want to relmrt a fire' It's a warehouse right do~n the block' First Avenue and River Street. You better tell them to hurry, operator, itls burning eomethlr~ terrible! ~OOND: FIRE ENGINE COMING DOWN THE STREET " " - ~,. • " ~QUND:'EXCITED CROWD.. ROAR OF FIA~EB. stand back' There goes the wall. POLICE~N: Stand~\back of thewoMAN:llnes there! /////-// / Stand back. Get bask! / Anybody inside there,/~ffloer? POLICEMAN: Who'd be worklr~ on a Sunday. Get back you. AT~O'! 0182638
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• ............... "9- ................... . -... VOMAN: .,~he~'e~it ~oes, the wall.t Thatts the sn8 o.f-~$h~rehouse.I ' sOU~D~ ~AII, C'T-~.BI-II"I,I~,~ UP Ii~'(~... B~um."F~m c,P~,sH TO t eumx A~ o~ OUIm'LY Fo~.. IX)I~ IE: (ON PHON~) Eastern Silk Tmdi~ compaRy, good mornir~. Vnat? Oh yeah, just a mlnute please, I'Ii let you speak to him. (~OJ~LI~L~ RI~S. GOES ~ F~W ~EP~ TO A DOOR AND OpERs IT. ) (LOVERS }~R VOIO@) Jim,,, (OFF A LITTLE) Yeah. JIM: It's the Y~rlo~ Silk Hill~. DOTTIE: JIM: (OFF A LITTLE) %~bat d~ they ~nt? DOTTIE: 8omethin~ about the fire. They ~ust~ve read it in the paper. better talk to them. You JIM: (OFF A LITTLE) Okay. I EueBm this is it. 6%ese the doer. Dottie. ~TNOI 0182639
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-10" DOT~IE: $1~r8, (OFF A LITTLE) Hello. JIM: This iaMr, Gordon epeakilw,... r /0~LZL OS_F2~_ ./~E21 ~%T~TSBA~II. DOTTIE: (A S~ALL GASP OF )~IGHT) Oh... ~ITEY', Mornin~. Dottie, hew are you. DOTTI~: X4hlT, ey, for ~oodnees sake you seared me. BERT: 'Lo, Dettie. DOTTLE: Hello, Bert. You might at least have knoeked, Whitey. WHL~Y: (EASILY) I% Bays on the door "Eastern Silk Oompany, walk In,' so we walked in. Jim here? DOTTLE: Be's busy on the phone. Mac RT;,/O 1 018264-0
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-ll- VHITEY: Okay. Oome on, Bert. DOTTIE: %fhltey, this is an important oe/1. ~41TEY: Yeah? IXYI~IE: The ~low Silk Mills, WHITEY: Oh. Good. They're cslli~ alre~ly, b~h. This the first one? DOTTLE: Yeah. ~ITEY: Donlt worry, there111 he more. Mr. Big handles %his one. ~nltey... Oc~e on, Berb, I want to hear how DOTTIE: WHITEY: Jim alwsys likes to see hie pals. ~LDA_~!~Q~) A?~O? 0182641
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-12- JIM~ (OOZING IN GRADUALLY ON PHO~) Yes, of coarse, Mr. Johnson, I understand your position f,~ly. W~mt? NO, I'm sorry ~o say I didnlt oex[y a cent of insllre~oo on any of the silk in my warehouse. What.~ (PAUSE) (PUTS HAND OVER PHO~, SOFTLY TO WHITEY) Sit down Whitey. WHITEY: (SOFTLY) Okay, Jim. JIM: (INT0 PH0~) Yes I know it's ~uqbusinesslike. Mr. Johnson, I a~ml% it. What's that? Well, frar~ly, It looks like I'I~ have to declexe bankr:~ptey. (SLIGHT PAUSE) Uh h~Lh...1~q hl~h...well, I'll tell you what Nr. Johnson, you send yo,~r l~wyer over here and I'll talk to him. Yeah, you do that. Goodbye. (BOUND: PNONE D(]WN~ (LAUGH~) Nice work, Jim. JIM: (PLEASED) You llke that, ~h. WHI~Y: BERYl What do you have to declare b~r~raptey for? FITHO 1 01612642
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-13- WHTTEY: BO'B he won't have to pay back all that silk he got On oredlt, yo- dope. Oh. ~RT: WHTTEY: How ~,oh stuff did yo~ cart out of that watchcase before we b~rned it, Jim? JIM~ OUHTLY) That's my 1~SlweSS, Whitey. ~AIITEYJ NO offense, just asking. From the size of the place l'd Bay it was forty maybe fifty tho,~sand yards. JIM: Look, Whitey, yo,~'re Kettln~ a nice cut, don't ~et itchy. WHITEY~ Sure, Jim, I know. When what? When do we get ~r ~. (SLIGHT PAUSE) Only when? JIM: WHITE~ o is2643
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A8 soon as I sell the silk, Uh h~h. -14- JIM: JI~h That was our deal, wasn't ~t. ~HITEY: Sure, Jim, that was the deal. (~JlI~D'J_2~I~A~--D~I DO, TIE: (oFF) (INTO PHO~) Eastern 811k Tradln~ company. Just a minute. $o,mds like another one of y~r e~edltors, JIM: Yeah, they'll be flockin~ now. DOTTIE: (CC~IING IN) It'~ the PQmpton Mills, Jim. JIM: All riEht, Dottie, I'II talk to them, Whltey, maybe yo~Id better... WHITEY: Sure we're gaing along, Jim. J, mt dropped in to see if everything was working on schedule. ~"1" F( 01 018264A
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It's on sehedL~le. You do that. SO Ion~, Jim, ~0 i0~, Bert. Be eeein~ yo% Dottle. ~ure %hi~, ~&itey. JIM: And donlt worry, WHITEY: Co~e on, Bert, B~T: I'II keep in toJ~oh with you, JIM: WHITEY: DOT~!E: WHI~Y: One on, dope. ~~~0_~ JIM: (GOING OFF)(ON THE PHONE) Hello...thls is Mr, Gordon speakir~. 80U~D: FOOTSTEI~ DOWN H~L. TR~%~%~r-- tab FITNO I 0182645
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~nitey. BERT: ~HIT~Y: Yeeh, Bert. BERT: When do we ~ive him the bad newB~ ~ITET: (Ch~C~I~S) The ba~ news? Well I figure as soon aB he caBhes in on bha% silk, Bert,..then we give him the bad news. ~q~o. TOIIOI.IE~ OMINOUSLY AND IINIER FOR: MAN: (TOUGH) Fifty thousand y~tg~B of ailk, }~q. HOW much dO y(~ want for it, Jim? JIM: Two dolla.ra n yard, Stabby. Take any quantity. MAN: Get it over to my p~aoe Okay, I'II go for flve thensand yards. tonight. ras ATe01 0'IB2646
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Whitey... YoELho -17- B~RT: BERT: He sold some of the stuff last night. Do We tell him nov~ WHITEY: Let him get in a little deeper. Let him stick then we'll tie it up with ~n yards of Uh ~hj not yet. his nook e~t real long, his e~n hot silk. MILLER: Well, there you are, Oo~issiener, that's the inventory of the silk that wa~ in the warehouse at the time of the fire. At yol~r s,~setion...L~0~O~-~O~I Oc~.o in. (~D~~ GIRL: Mr. 8heppard iB here, Mr. Miller. Oh gOOd. Y6S~ sir. MILLER: (PROJECT) Oome on in, 8hep. Thank y@~, Miss Black. GIRL: RTHO'J 01~2647'
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-18- MILLER: How are y@~, Shep...~ "~08ED~...how're thln~e in Washington? Fine thanks, Tom. S}~PPARD: MILLER: Shop, I want yo~ %o meet Fire fl~unieeioner Orady. 0ommlselanar, this is Willia~ Sheppard of the Fe~aral Barea. of Investigation. CC~I83IOl~R: G).ad to know you, Mr. 8heppard, .the DoA. here's been %elli~ me a let about you. 8}~PPARD: (SMILES) Oh he has, eh. (LAUGHS) All to %he Eood, Shep. 81t down, SHEPPARD: Thanks, help yourself %0 a m~oke. HILLER: Commissioner? r&B ATM01 0182648 fl
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Sure, yo,~, 8hop. I don't want to ~IlLFa: I understand, we'll Sot right to work. I ~*ese itle up to What about the laboratory analysls of that residue? I'll %ell you in just a second, SHF2PARD: TOUo Co~a~issloner~ I wanted to ask you, what made y~r investiKatore sueploioae of this fire? 0(~I8810~I~: We weren't suspicious at first, Mr. Sheppar~. We were just doir~ a routlne oheok when one of my men notloed eouethln~ peot~llar about the waste bin on the first floor. sheppard: Uh }~lh. 00~IISSION~q: The bin coute.~ne~E sil~ sorapB whimh ~ere completely oorts~ed, leavin~ a ohsraoterlstio black ash. B~t at the bottom of the bin there was a ~m~ll pile of molten sl~ ~hat leoke~ ohemloal rather than animal. $~PPARD I sea° ra8 A1-H01 01826A9
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-20- O0~SSIONKR: NaturaLly we tho,~:ht of aooelerante and I deotded to ask Tom's offioe to 8end the stuff to yo~ people for analysis. 8~PPARD: Well, I1m glad you did, O~ieeloner. Uh huh. result of turning ¢hermlte. Thormito. HILLERI O0~IeSIONER: (A LITTLE PROUD) My men were righ%, oh. 8~PPABDI The slag is %he They moet oertainly were. ,:,vW: d_.. </ /~-~<D~ . ;< k<,.-,-,2Z.c..j. :) • }~IILLERI ~' Poison? 8HEPPARD: Bnrnlr~ ollk glv~a off hydrooy~anio sold, the deadliest poison known. O0~IeSIO~Ri They oerZalnly ~t. raa FI I"HO I 0182650
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t~ -21- HILLER: YO~ think there wasn't any invento~ of silk in that warehouse, Shop. SHEPPARD: Exoep~ it looks as if yon're go~ I don'~ think an~thln~ yet, Tom. an arBon case on your hands. HIEbER: TheiSts. Where w@11~ anyone get a oompo,~n~ li~e 5h~to C0~MISSIO~: ~t once they got it, why wo, dd they want to fire a wareh~me that was m~ppooed to be full of silk. MILLER: An inside job? Maybe. (SHILES) I know. ben4s. MUST(!: HTTS IT AN~ F~i SI~,PPARD: Pat all I oen say a~ the mc~snto.° I~LLER~ The off los has a nice case of arson on its
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/- -22- JIM: Eastern Silk Tr~In~ C~mpar~, Mr° Gordon speaking, (FILTER) Hello, Jim, this is Whitoy, (JOVIAL) I svxe did, ~dtey. some ~ood news for you. WHITEY: (FILTER) You sold all the s~fl ~h° JIM: That's right, Real go~ news. VHII~: (FILTER) Okay, Jim, we'll be right over. s@ms bad news for you. MU • ~Et dO yo~ meens bid newso In this herepaok~e, Jim. ~@rlt].ems~1. Yoa wanted me to oall? Oc~e on over to my offioe| I|ve go~ Only I'm afraid we got JIM: VHII~Y: Unwrap the ps~ka~e, Bert, and show the r@.B RT~01 01B2652 r~
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Okay, Whitey. JIM: (TRYING THE LIGHT TONGH) 0oree on, WHITEYI No ga~, Jim. Just have a look. ~RT: (LAYING IT O~T) There you are, Jim. ~hat' s this. "23- BERT: (SOUND: RUSTL~ O~ ~A~/ PAPER) (HARD) Yeah, JIM: ~HIT~Y: Don't you reoo~nize it? Whltay, whatls the ga~. That's a bolt of silk fr~ your JIM: WHITRY: Pattern number ten oh six. Flowered print. JIM: All right, all right, so what aboub it. ra8 RTH01 01i82653
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-24~ WHITEY: J~, supposing the cops ever got a sample of this here pretty print. They'd know that fire was just a cover-up, wouldn't they. JIM: (GETTING RED IN T~ FAC~) What are you trying to pull. WHITEY: Nothing yet, I'm just supposing. Wo,~dn't look good if the D.A.'s office Rot a s~ple of this in the mail, now would it. JIM: Listen, you two are in this j~st as deep as I am,.. WHI~EY: Oh no, Jim. We were fifty miles away when it happened. Over in Jersey with an air-tight alibi. JIM: Now look, Whitay, if yOU think you can hold me up... I don't think, I know. that, Ji~. And I'll tell you what we!re going to do... JIM: Yo~'re not golr~ to dc anything. tab WHITEY: Vo saved this little belt of silk, just for Wh a~reed on five thousand for ~T~01 01~26S4 ii
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WHITEY: (GOING RIGHT ON) What we're goinZ to 40, nice flowered print real cheap, What. Fifteen thoue~nf4 Jim. a bargain. Rizhto That's riEht, Jim. Jim, is sell e~me of this Fifteen tboue and, b,~A~ WHITEY: And believe me.*.at that price you're ~etti~ Bert? BERT: We ~ot it all fi~ured out..,a% fifteen thousand you're ~ettin~ a bargain. ATH01 0182655
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T~E FBI IN PEACE JULY ~ 1952 AND WAR MZDDLE COMMERC [AL TICE: BARUCH: ] (END OF ACT I) Beck to "The Bait" in Just a mo~eflt. Friends, ~hile all cigarettes may look the same on the outside - therele an important in___si_._4~ difference in Lucky Strike -- an inside difference that crows Luckiee are mad___£ better to tast.___£ batter and you san see for yourself - just TEAR AI~ COMPARE. From a ne~:ty opened pack, take e slgarette made by any other manufacturer. Then, carefully tear a thin strip of paper straight 6e~n the seam, from end to end, and gently remove the tobacco. In tearing, be earefu[ not to loosen el, dig int____o the tobacco. Now, do the same with a Lucky Strike. Then compare. Yeufll find some cigarettes are so loosely pa~ked they fall apart. Others have ~xceesive air spaces that burn too fast -- taste hot. harsh and dry. But Just look at that Lucky. There you see a perfect cylinder of fine. mt1@ tobacco, So round, SO fir:s, so fully packed, so free a~d ees~ on the draw. And notlae these long strands of fresh, clean, good-tasting tobacco that smoke smooth and even, that give ~ou a mi[der, better-tastlng cigarette. <MOR ) AT)~O 1 01i82656 il
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Tllz FBI INoP~ACE AND WAR JULY ~, I~5 MIDDLE COMMERCIAL( CONTID) ARUC : Yes, friends, tear and compare - see for yourself that Lucktes are made bs}ter to taste better, So, try it yourself -- and for more smoking enjoyment you, too, wi~l make o~next carton Luck~ Strike! MUSIC ; (S HCW TH~4z ) AI"NO 1 01B2652 ill
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~NGR: ~nd now, back to "The FBI In Peace and War" end tonight's story Belt. ~USIC: THEME AND HOLD THROUGH: JIM: (HXRD) All right, Whitey, you get your fifteen thousand, But I w~nt your word the D.A,'e office never Bees %hie !~rint. VMIT~Y: Jim, you have hi/ eolerrn oath, The D.A,'e offioe'll never see this print. ~JBlO: OVER OUIOKLY AND OUT, BIZ* WHITEY AND B~T O~JOk~ING OUT OF ~JelO. WHITEY: There you are, Bert, fifteen thousand, Severity-five [hundrBd apiece. BERT (HAPpy ADMIRATION) I got to hand it to you, ~4hitey. ~I~: (GRINNING) The bait was & nioe idea, huh. BERT: N~oe? Juet leo~ at this dot~gh, I never knew there was so muoh ~rean in the whole world, tb ATe01 018265B
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27 ~HITEY: ((~UIX~ING) Ys~, fifteen ~'e ain't b~l. B~T: (TO THE WALLS) Ain't bed the men says: ~ITEY: Okay, It's good, ~ut thirty's even be~ter. H~h~ B~T: ~ITEY: When your bait hooks a fish, Bert, it's not emart engllng to throw bsok your catch, ~hitey, youlre not thlnki~... BERT: Sure I 'm thinking. We got fifteen thousend, yeah. But Jim mast of got a rlpe eighty, maybe ninety. Ninety thousend duet for sitting around doing nothing. B~BT: (FISHING) You con% hold him up again, ~hitey. You gave your word. Sure I did. My Bolel~ oath, I gave,..the D.A. ~s sffiss'll never see ten-oh-elx, the flowered print. B~RT: Well? tb ~TH01 0182659
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28 WHITEY: Yell, they won't see it. B~t they could get an eyeful of nlne-four- two, the Ohinoeo damesk. (SMILING) Oh. BEll': WHITE"{: (GRINNING) That wouldn't be goin~ back on my solemn oath, Bart~ now would it. BE~T: (CHUCKLES) No, %hltey. I'd certainly say thab wouldn't. WHITEY: 'Course, we give Ji~y first crack. He wante the D.A. shouldn't see the OhineBe damask, for fifteen thouoend the D.A. don't. BERT: You know. ~hitey. that's very eoientific of you. WHITEY: (BIG GRIN) Sure. We got a guy earning and going, we got to take adventege don't we? ~jSIO: SHARP TRANSITION AND UND~ FOR: JIM: (LOBST~ RED) Fifteen more, eh. You two rr~et be out of your r~nde,v WHITEY: It's a bargain. Jim. A very rare bolt of goods. tb R'TNO 1 0182660
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29 JIM: Whitey, I... WHITEY: (SMOOTHLY) Don't answer now, think it over. B~T: That's right, Jim. Take a few days, JIM: (STORMING) Think it over, think it ove~. of tho~e punks' DOTTIE: Take it easy, Jim. JIM: Can you imagine the D~ of them' Right, Bert? think it over, Can you imagine the nerve Rel~x, will you. DOTTIE: JIH: (COMING INTO MI}~E) Relax...I told you what they're tryir~ to pull, didn't I' Yeah, you told me. DOTTLE: JIM: And I'll tell you somethingelse, Dottie, I'm not let~ingthem~et away with it~ th 01B2661
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......... 4" 3o DOTTLE: There's nothing you ,an do. Jim. JIM: No penny-ante cheeps,are are going to make There's plenty I can do. a patsy out of me' DOTTIE: It may be worth fifteen thousand extra just to be rid of them. JIM: I'ii never be rid of them, I l~ow their kind. First, the flowered print, now the Chinese d~mask, they'll be pulling oat the blue moire next...they think this'll go on forever,v DOTTIE: There's no way to stop them, Jim.' JIM: The B.A. oan stop them. DOTTLE: (PAUSE) The D.A.? JIM: Those two skunks are looking for That's what I said, the B.A. trouble, they're going to get it. DOTTLE: You can't go to the D.A.' JIM: ~10 Bey8 I cent,. tb You're getting on the phane to him right now. AINO1 0182662 i
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B~/tjot 31 DOTTIE: JIM: Lieten, it'e right down the line, donft you get it, A couple of hoods tried to sell me some ~ilk looking suepieieuely like my o~a~. I dontt think that fire was arson at ell. I think it was a oover-up for robbery, Jim... DOTTIE: JIK: Right down the line, Dottie. Ten years up the river for eanh of them, juetwhat they got comir~...l'm in the olear. DOTTIE: That Whiteyte ~ rough boy~ JIM: (SORE) Sow hat hels rash, maybe 11mrongher2 ~myway, heql never know what hit him. I don|tk~ow, Jim. DOTTLE: JIM: You don't, I do. What do you want, I ehould sit around here till I'm bled white? DOTTLE: Of course not. tb RT~01 018266S
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Then do like I tell you. see him. 32 JIM: Got on that phone, tell the D°A. I want to I)OT?IE: But supposing... JIM: Supposing nothing. The boys wonted me to think it over. Okay, I've got the onswsr for them. I~SIO! = HITS IN H~D, CARRY UNDFR: SOUND: BWITOHBO~. GIRL: Dietrlct Attorney's office, good morning. Just one moment, I'll connect you. (LOOKING UP) YBB, sir? JIM: I believe my Beoretary made an appointment for me with I~. Miller? Jsmes Cordon of Eastern Silk, GIRL: Oh yeB, I~r. Gordon. The DiBtrict Attornngts been expecting you... will you go right In, please. JIM: So that's Why I one to eee you, ~r. Miller. As I maid ever the phone, there may be ne~,htng in I~, I dom'~ know...I thenghb I'd bet~,er oome to you anyway. tb ~THO'/ 01.82664.
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33 MILLER: I'm oartalnly glad you dld, ~x. Gordon. JIH: There's been something very peouliar about this whole business right from soratoh. I thought of arson, but dismissed it for l~k of motive. Now seeing the silk like that...well... MILL~: ...You have the motive. What do you think, (SMILES, FINISHING IT) Shep? Ssms as you I guess, I think so. Adds up? SHEPPARD: Tom. Oertain!y all adds up. I~Li~R: JIM: MILLER: z~. 8heppard arrived at your conclusion several days ego, N~. Gordon. (A BEAT) Oh? JIM: SHEPPARD: But for different reasons. Tell me...you feel the silk was stolen from your warehouse, then the warehouse fired as a sever-up. That's my ug~_~. tb JIM: Icl T ~0 "l 0~82665 i,i
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34 8~PpARD: These men who approaohad you with the Bil~. n~nes? JIM: Well, my ~eoretary armo~e~ one of them as a Mr. Kane. eaoh other Bert and ... I think, W~/tey. Did you get their They oali~ Commotion, Shop? SHEPpARD: We've been lookin~ for ~ ~, . named Whltey Kene, he could be the e~me one. What exactly made you suspicious ef the men, F@. Gordon? JIM: Well in the first ~laoe the patterns they had to offer were all identical to my inventory that went up in the fire. Y~LL~: I eee, JIM: But the main thing was the prioe they were asking for the silks. Ridiculously low. ~ILLER: Uh hah. th AI'MO~ 0182666
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35 SI~PpARD: You told them yould sleep on their proposition overnight, is that it. JIM: Yes, right or wrong, I wanted to stall them. SHEPPARD: And after you'd slept on It? j!i~h I'm to meet them tomorrow afternoon ~t a restaurant called the Sea Grill. I believe it's on Ches÷mut Street. I know the one. ~hat time? Three-thirty, quarter of four. MILL~: JIM: MILL~: We'll be there. (~l~u~l~) Well, ;%:. Gordon, we oert~dnly appreciate your cooperation in thie. JIM: Not at all. (0~) Believe me, I'm as anxious to see those two behind bare as you are. (SOUND: DOOR 0P~. F00T~TE~S Oh, incidentally, gentlemen. I certainly would appreciate it if my name could be kept quiet. (SMILES) I've had enough publicity out of this for a lifetime. tb ATHOI O18266P
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36 MILL~: Everything you've said to us today wa~ ~ald in atrloteet eonfldenoe. SHEPPAED: You just go home end sit tight till this is over, Mr, Gordon. We'll handle it from here. JIM: That's just what I'm going todo th~n~ Mr. 8heppard. Go home and sit tight. 0 D" Helle. (FILTh) Whitey, th~s in Jim. WHITEY: JIM: VHITEY: Oh yeah, Jim. (HA~D O~ PHONE) Bert...b-*-, JIM: (FILTER) Whitey, you gave me a oouple of days to think ever your propoeltion. Looks like I have an answer for you. W~ITEY: (WAITING) Yeah. tb
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37 JIM: (FILTh) The answer's in an envelope in "5" pocket. contains fifteen thousand dollars. ~IT~: (RELAXED) Good chewer, Jim, JIM: The envelope (FILTI~q) The only answer, l'r~ afraid. But I want your word that this is the end of it. WHITEY: You got my solema oath, Jim. There's no had feelings is there? JIM: (FILTER) Listen, a guy outsmarts you, he outsmarts you, No ~anee acting sore about it. WHITEY: (GRINNING) You got the right outlook, friend. JIM: (FILTER) Like you say, fifteen thousand'e a bargain. You might're tried to grab it all. WHITEY: (CHUCKLES) You know, Jim, one thing I go for iea good loser. I have a feeling this j~ the end of it. JIM: (FILTER) I'm glad you look at it that way, Yhitey. I have tha same feelln~. tb ATH01 0102669 i
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38 WHITEY: Okay, we'll wind it up. Bert'n ms'll be right over for that envelope, JIM: (FILTER) Better not com~ to the offloe, Whitey, there's a oreditor8 meetinggolng on with my lawyers, Someplaoe else. %/HITEY: You neme it. JIM: (FILTKq) Wall...you know the Sea Grill Restaurant on Gheetnut Street? WHITEY: Stlr e. JIH: (FILT}~) Ioan meet you there in...half-an-hour. VHIT~Y: The Bee Grill, half-an-hour, right. JIM: And, WNitey...you'll bring those a~,ples along, won't you. WNITEY: They'll be with me, Jim. IBye. JIM: (FILT~q) (SMILES) Goodbye, ~nitey. ( • + - SOUND: PHONE DOWN. tb AI'MO~ 0~B2620
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We ire in? (BIG GRIN) We're in, Bert. Thirty thousand? Uhhuh. 39 B~T: WHITEY: BERT: W~IITEY: Told you thirty wee better'n fifteen, didn't I. B~T: You sure did. California, here we come.t WHITEY: Oalifornia? Well now I don't know, I've worked up quite a fondneee for the East. Huh? Bert, I been thinking. together? Businees? BERT: WHITEY: Bow would you% me like going into bueineee BE~TI WHITEY: The eilk bueinees. Jimmy s getting along in yeere,could use maybe a couple of partners. tb t~ T ~O'l 01026 ?'l i
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4O BET: (ADHIRING $HILE) Oh. Thle isn't the end of it after all, huh? WHITEY: (G~INS) Why should it be? Like I said, you got an advantage, ye~ take it. A set-up like this, Bert, who knows Nh.e~ it could lead. S • D HILLE~: All right, Shep, the men are posted. SHEPPAWD: Good, Tom. HILI~q: Two in front of the restaurant, two in a parked oar, a couple more in here at the tables with us. SHEPPARD: khat time do you make it? HILI~ Three forty-five. SBEPPARD: Three forty-five. Then we... POLIOEHAN: (COHI~G IN) ]~. Fdller... HILLER: Yes, Sergeant. tb A]'MO~ 0~82622
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41 POLICemAN: Reynolds juet signalled. One of there's coming along now. MILLERs Okay, back to your post. POLICEF~N~ (MDVING OFF) Yes, sir. 8HEPPARD: (UP) All right, men, ready. Rere ~hcy OoK,~. I~JSTO: HIT8 UP TO A FULL CLIMAX AND OUT. JIM: (HU~ING GAILY) (FILTER) your order, pleBse. FX. Gorden, r~,//'~'~ii you tell ~h'e doorman to ge~ my Ca~ o~t of the g~rage l~ke-a-~e~-g~l° /" "i ~ :i., •., ; /o ~,/<., ,a~ ..... OP~qATOR: (FILTER) Your oar, Righ$ away, I~o Gordon. (.~ BIZ: JIM 8TARTS AOROSS THE ROOM. T~ HU~ING RESUP~D. SOUND: }O~OOK ON DOOR OFF A LITTLE. JIM: (PROJEOT) Not lo~ka4, Dottle, come on in" stool 0192673
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42 JIM: (HIS BACK TO IT) I'm all pecked, just called for the oar, (HE HAS TURNED, STOPS DEAD) (OFF A LITTLE) 'Lo, Jim~. Whltey. leoa WHITEY: JIH: !~ITEY: (COMING IN) Good to see you, Jim. Sorry I was late to the Sea Gri~l, but that's the way things go. JIM: Vnat? ng'~'LYou WHITEY: Packi figuring on z'~aybe going semeplaoe? JIM: (HIS BRAIN RUNNING) You were late to the Sea Grill? V~ITEY: Uh huh. 8topped off for train tickets. And you know what~ I saw Bert leaving the Grill in a oar, figured he maetrve mome on back here with you. You going eomeplaoe? I, tt tb JIM: FtTNO1 01f~2624 il
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43 !~HITEY: Where ie t~e-dope anyway, Jim, inside? JIM: Uh...no, no he didn't come ba~k here, ~hitey. WHITEY: No? (STRAIGHT AT HIM) Where ~ he go, Jim? JIH: I...I don't know. WHITEY: Take a guess. Jl~I: I donWt know, WHITEY: The station house ~aybe? JIM: Station house, (SMILES) You know, Jim, loser you been about all this. (PAUSE) look, ~hitey, I,o, Sit down, Jim, tb k~ITEY: I just e~n't help thinking what a real good JIM: WHITEY: ATe01 01£262S d
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Whitey... Sit down. 44 JIM: WHITEr: You and melre gonna wait for Bert. JIH~ (SWALLOWING HARD) Look, I... (~) ~;. THERE'S A PAUSE WHIT~Y~ Answer it, Jim. JIM: It's only the doorman with my oar... Answer it. Hight be Bert. WHITEY: JIH: (A BEAT. THEN) Yeah. yeah. ($QU~D; PHONERINGS. FOOTSTEPS. PRONEUP) (PAUSE) Yes...? SH~pARD: (FILTh) ~'r. Gordon, gled I got you in. ~nie la William Sheppard. JIM: 8HEPPARD: (FILTh) Wanted to let you know, Hr. Gordon. Something slipped up, only one of the men showed at the Grill. But we'll get the other, don't you worry. tb R'I'HO 1 01B26 26
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JIM: (BREATHING HARD) Wh...Bure, Bert.he's here. (~ILT~) What. SHEPPARD: JIH: (TRE SWEI,T ~TANDING OUT) Yes. there's been...uh...some miBunderst~ding, you better hurry right over, Bert. SRFPPARD: (FILTER) (AI~T) W~t a minute. Vhitey K~e's there? JIM: That'8 rlghtt Bert, I,.. WHITe: (OFF A LITTLE) Put the phone down. Jim. SR~PPARD: (FILTh) Now listen t%me. Gordon...~-'~ ~i,'~'~ ,' .... SOUND: A RUSR OF FOOTSTEPS BMB~ ABOVE. NOW PHONE 8LAI~,D DOWN. Shut up. tb WHITEY: JIN: VHITEY: AI~01 01B262P
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Listen, I dontt.°. You heard me shut up.t wasn't sure, I WaSnzt sure. JIM: WHITEY: (LIVID) I thought you creased us, but I What. Don't talk orazy... JIM: WHITEY: Yeah I'm talking crazy. Crazy that Bert was picked up by the cops, that you tipped them off. I'm talking crazy that wasn't Bert on the phone o JIM: You've got this wrong' WHITEY~ Shut up shut up/ You ~now what Bert was to me, Jim? JIM: If you'd only listen... WHITNY: Listen? l'n tear your lying tongue out: JIM: (BEY) Whitey... WHITEY: You crossed me, okay now ~ cross you. You Low what this is, Jim? I'll tell you what it is. A thermite bomb, the kind you burn a warehouse with. tb I:1 T.~O "1 0182628 ii
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Huh. 47 dI~ WHITEY: A warehouse, or a dirty-douhle-crossing skunk. JIM: T~ke your pick. WHITEY: It's plain, isn't it~ Flash this cap, Jim, lock you in. Twenty, thirty seconds you go up like a matchbox. JIM: What are you serving" Thirty seconds. Jim. Four thousend de~ree burne. Itm~s plain. JIM: (STARING) You're out of your mind. WHITEY: A three alarm job, you'll be fried before you can yell smoke. JIM: Stop it' Stop talking like that: WHITEY: Four thousend degrees. I want to see you fry. Jim. you melt away. I went to eee tb A]'H01 0~82679
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48 JIM: (A FRENZIED LUNGE) I'm getting out of hare.| WHITEY: (HITTING OUT) You're getting noplace, Jim... ~ JIM GASP~ OUT IN PAIN A~ HErB HIT. WHITEY: hare.( '-/;% I . .yeu|re 8t ~yln~ right JI~I: (PANIOKY) ~tey...~hltey, listen to me, Listen now. All right, okay, msybe I did cross you, maybe I did. But they didn't get you, you're in the clear. They got Bert sure, but you're in the clear... WHITEY: You crawling little louse you. JIH: ~hltey, listen. You llke money, you want money. Itls yours, Whitey, every cant,,, WHITEY: You're ganna fry, Jim. You c~u't put out thermite. Touch it, your bands drop off like pasteboard. JIH: No' • tb A]-M01 0182680 li
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WHITEY: (FLASHING THE FUL~N~TE C~P) There goes the cap, Jim..,you got thirty Beconds. ~: WE HEAR THE SLOW NON-EXPLOSIVE HISS REACTION. JIN: # .. (HOARSE PLEA) For the live of heaven, Whitey. /, ! ..... " .... ' : yell smoke. A three alarm job. Youql be fried before they can BIZ: THE HISS IS (~0HING FULL ASI MUSI0: TO A 0URTAIN AND THE ~ND. tb P]THO 1 0182681
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T~ FBI'IN PEAOE AND WAR JULY 2~, 1952 CLOSI'NO 00~ERCIAL TICE: BARUCH: MUSIC: In Just a moment, A~ent Shopper6 will tell you whet hepaeneo~li7 toni.#ht s ~tory. Friends, why don~t ~ try that el~arette ccmgarlsen we talc you about tonight and see with your own eyes that Luckies are made better to taste bette~. YOUTII discover that the heart of 7o~r Lucky Sti'~.ke is a perfect cylinder of flne, mild tobacco. VouIll see how round and firm a~]d fully oaeked it is ... with tong ~trands of fresh, clean, ~ood-tastln~ tobacco. Now it stand~ to rseson because Lucklee are made this way they draw freely ,., smoke smoothly and evenly ... always taste fresh and clean aad mild. So for your o~n real de~p-dowa smoking enjoyment, switch to Lucky Steike ... yes, Be Happy -- Go Luckv, Make your next carton Lucky Strike[ (FANFARE1 uu~iu~uSl6~' SF OA~ f~THO I 0~fl2682 i lli
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SH~opARD: (AFT~ A PAUSE) Jim Cordon was burned to death in the thermite fire in hie apart~,ent, but Vhitey Kane w~ picked up within a few houre trying to leave town. He was quickly brought to trial and convicted, a federal court judge sentencing him to the extreme penalty. Hie confederate, Bert Leffete, went to prison for a six year term. Thus your FBI closed its files m a pair of hoodlums who failed with...The ~. tb A]~01 01182683 i
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR JULY ~ 1%2 CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONTID) TICE: ~IUSIC: BARUCH: MUSIC: TICE: All names anO characters used on this oft[ram are fictitious. Ao,~ similarity to persons Itvlng or des4 ls purely coincidental. This program is based on Frederick L. Collinls co#yri_h~ea book, "T}~ ~BI IN PEACE AND WAR" .,, and is not an official prod'ram of the FBI. In toni~htls story • . ,; .... played the part of /," .- ':,'., ; , • ~ ,, Was -,,,: . ..~.:.. ~he radio dram~tlzatlon for THE FBI IN PEAC~ AND WAR is written b,v Louis Peiletier an4 Jack Finks. These proEra~la are p1~adueed and directed by Betty Nandeville. Be sara to listen to next Thura~ayls sto~y "The P~,t, cho Case" on THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR. Same time - same station. {SH~{ T~5~5 - UP AND UNDEE) This is Andre Bar<oh saying gsodnlght for Lucky Strike, product of The American Tobacco Company - America Is leading manufacture~ of ciEaret%ea. THE FBI IN PE@,CE AND WAR has been selected as one of the arc[rams te be heard by our Ar~ed Forces overseas through the facilitlea of the Ar~e~ Forces Radla Setwice. (SHOW THEM~ - UP AND OUT) THIS IS THE CBS RADIO N£q~ORK. RT240"~ O182684L
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"T}~ O~RLSON PLy" AUGUST 28. 1952_ tb ?roduo~ and DSreo~e~ Wri%ten By: Louia Pelletter sn4 ATHO'I 0182685
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THE A~RICAN TOBACCO COMPANY OPENING COMMERCIAL "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" AUGUST 28, I~°~2 TICE: MUSIC: TICE: LUCKY STRIKE presents (F~NFARE) THURSDAY ... "THE FEI IN PEACE AND WAR'i! Another great story based on Frederick L. Collins' copyrighted book, "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". Drama ... Thrills ... Action! But first ...Andre l~ruch! BARUCN: MUSIC: Friends, in s cigarette it's the taste that makes the difference and buckles taste better -- cleaner, fresher, smoother! Herele why: First of all, better taste in a cigarette begins wlth fine tobacco and Lucky Strike mean_.___~s fine tobacco -- fine, light, natu~slly mild tobacco. Second, Luckiee are made better, so round and firm and fully packed ... without those annoyin~ loose ends that get in your mouth an~ spoil the taste, yes, Luckies are packed ~ right to draw freel~ and evenlx! So for a smoke that tastes better -- cleaner, fresher, smoatbe~, Be Happy - Go Luck/L. M~ke vo~_qrZ_u~ next carton Lucky Strike! (SHOW THEME UP AND FADE) i' I~TH01 0182686
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/ -I- ANNOR: Tsnightls story en "~he FBI In peace end Wi~r"...~ F~J81C: EBTABLISH T~ AND OU~ INTO: MANTY: If I'm telling you onse I'm telling you a hundred times, ~r. Sheppard, this is all Borne terrible mistake... Uh huh. SNEpPARD: F~TY: We're honorable legitimate buBinesamen and all we know about any jewel robbery is not anything. Right, Sam? SAM: (E~HATIOALLY) Les~ than that even. Lrn huh. 8~PARDz ~TY: All right. You can "uh huh" all you ~mJlt, only this shoving around ie gonna cost you your job. I got friends in this town, I got,,. (80UNDI DOOR OPEN OFF I~3 HIM) 8~PPARDz All right, Dave, bring him in. REYNOLDS: (OFF A LITTLE) Go sn, 8hsrty,move. th ATH01 01~268 F'
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-2- SUOR~Y: (OOMING IN) (A SMALL ANXIOUS APOLOGETIO MAN) Look, I'm moving, Only anxious to coogernte, thntlc me. I llke the inw, I respect it, nobody ever h~s more respect for the FBI than me. Hello, Marry, hello, Ssm, SAM: (PROMPTLY) Don't talk to me, ~o are you? I never enw you before in my life. S~2PARD: You donlt know this man, Dnweon~ 8AM~ Know him? Right this ~dnute is the first tlme I isdd eyes on him. 8HEPPARD: 5% huh, And you, ~nie? ~ARTYs Me? I look like I a~sooiate with such rlff raff? 8HORTYI (HURT) ~/arty. S~. How can you say each things? (TO 8P~2P~D) Believe me, gentleman, they know me. Like a brother they know me. I should lie to yo~? The last thing in the world I would do is,.. REYNOLDS: Oksy, okay, we know all nbout it, 8HEPP~O: Just tell us ~hioh one sold you the rin~, Sherry. tb FITXO 1 0182688
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-3- SAFe Whatever he tells you I flat-out deny it. Quiet, Dawson. Sherry? 8HORTY: Both of them sold it. B}~PPABD: Both, 8~RIT: And such a price I gave them, in all good faith. Believe me, if I hsd known the merchandise was atolen property.,. 8~P~D: (GOING OFF) In sueh innocence I trusted them. Like a lamb I was. Me, a man of rsspeot, who has only the highest regard,.. =ave it for the ju~e. (OFF) Ok~, (AFT~ A PAUSE) SO this ie all some terrlble n/stake, ~m1~s.,. tb ..... ~T~01 0182689
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-4- (BW&LLOWING) I...l don't feel so very good. Neither de I. S~PPA~D: You're going to feel s whole lot worse ~tulee8 you deoido to oooperate. Oooperate. 8HEPP~RD: Like 8berry. (THai) We're after bigger fry than you two, De~eon. Cooperate and the Bure~ may recommend leniency° You mean you might let us off? SHEPP~ID: I m~an just what I said. ltm ~sklng no promieee. You don't have to answer now. think it over. I 're already thought. 31~PpARD: And? SA~ I 'm cooperating, tb ATN01 0182690
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8t:T~P.~DI (SHRUGS) Thinge eouldn't be any worse than they are now. What do you want ue to do? SHEPPARO: Tell me everyShing that happened. From the beginning. The jewels, the robbery, who put you up to it, MAWI~: Who? Thatta easy. Oarlson. 08rleon. 81~ppARD: tb ATH01 01B2681
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Tho in~u~snos inveeti~a%or. He put you u9 to i%, 6 ~%%RTY: St~PPARO: • ~RTZ: I know it sound~ crazy, but I ~Ive you fly word... SHEPP~%RD: All right, I believe you. MARTY: It ~va~ i~im, he e, rrar~ everythfng. Had a v~*ole plan, Carlson did, And it woul4've Walked too,..If it hadntt been for l~me-brain h~e Getting too greedy. (STUNG) Never r~nd lam~-brain, Pkybe I did, m~ybe I di~Lu't. ~OW, ~0 On, SAM: You wanted to keep ~e ring as much a~ Pt~R?f: Any~9.y8 it don'% make much difference BP~PP~%P~: DL ATe0"1 0182692
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7 Well, like you say...frem 'd~e beginnir~g. That wae in Eelly'e Bar ov~r on Taird Avenue. (~) Me, I'm nursing along a glass of beer wizn netting but ehar~ge in ~ pocket. Nothing but charge, an~ ~ho would're thought just a few seoonc~s l&ter eon~ total stra~ger would be offering me one thousand bucks. EUSIO: IS OUT. 3BI(E BOX B.G. CARLSON: Tnatls wh~t I said...one i~ouaan4. NARTY: (AT THE BARTEND~q) }lay Joe, you better call the wagon. This guy's he~ded for the booby n&tch. OARLSO~: I mean it, Er~nis. One ~1ousand dollars isn't hay. ]%~TY: Yeah. Either is one hun#~e4. CARLSON: (EAgY S~LE) What are you drinking? N~RTY: Beer. And you can't i~ave any. DE I91"~01 0182693
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{r " (TO T~E BARTENDER) Now w~it a ~n~to... It'o all right, Ermls. (STARING) 8 OARLBON; Scotch for both of u% Joe. ~TY: The twelve year old, OAHLSON: I'm paying. (~Ifa__~ID_Of_~) ;i~RTY: Hey. I~ tha% ~ouff real or did you make it yourself. BARTENDER: (CONINC~ IN) lh,lo scotc~. OARLSON: (' • ' A ~ I JM) Keep the change, Joe. BARTEND~h (GOING OFF) T~Ik~, ~r. Carlson. MARTY: Li~ten, mi~ter, are you on the level? CARLSON: I've boon trying to tell you, I don't go for any rough stuff. (FiSHII~) RTH01 0182694-
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IIm an investigator. CARLSON: (~~) See for yourself. PARTY: "Lelgh Oarl~on,..Ea~tern Insurance Compare." OARLSON: Claln~ Depar Jsnent. (CAUTIOUS) Investigator. ~,o? OARLSON: Relax, it~ not vil~t you ~ir~, ~RTY: Olaim~ Depart~ent, a taou~nd bucks, I don'% get it. CARLSON: Then suppose we cu% the preliminarie% get ~o~m to ca~e~. MARTY: Right. ( " "? ~ "' S 0 o) C.~RLSON: ~mia, you come highly reco~nde~L. Dependable, a ~quare-ahooter, ~riotly on ~le up-and-up... DL F~T..~01 0182695
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You can aay that again. I0 OARL~ON: In fact, you're ~uppo~ed to be one of the boat ~eoond-atory men in the bu~ins~, (AS ~t~RTY B~N~S) Now don'% ~ako offen~e, t~lia i~ ca~e~. (Tt~N) You work with a partner, don't you. MARTY: (ON GUARD) N~ybe. CARL~O}h Sam Daw~ono ll.so ~ighly reoo~endod. Now ~OOk*,, (~LD) ~RTYI OARLSON: E~i~s ~onlt ~k@ o~fenBB. MART~: ~y ~ouldn't I. OARLSONI Because I wanb you to do a job for me, you and Dawaon. dol]ar~ now, a~otner five after it's aocompli~hed. Five nund~e~L DL A '1" ,',~ 0 '1 0182696
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(A BNAT) ~fnat kind of job. 8ome jewele in a house aafe. }mh? Tnerets notnin~ to it. t~e jewels eff~pro~e~. ~t? II ;'~RTY: OiRLSON: OARLSON: I give you the combination, you dent% even take tIARTY: OARLSON: Leave them right there. I don't get &t, I don'~ get it ~t ~,ii. CARLSON: (SMILES) You will. All you have to do is emm, etly what I tell you. How about it? MARTY: You're ~ t~i~ i~ on the level? DL 01 2 9,
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f k 12 OARL$ON: There's five one htmdred dollar bills in front of you. do is pick thegn up. • MARTY: You give ~ the combination. OARLSO~h Un ~Uho MARTY: And we leave the jewels right on the premises. C~RLSOH: T~at'~ it. N~RTY: (T~ ) Okay. I'll take a chance on it. OARLSON: (REL~C([~G) Good. Let's drink to ib, t~en I'll giveyou the plan. ;%tRTYI I'll bet it'~ a beaut. It is, (S • ~S " ~ ) To the plan, m~ frier~[. shall we 8ay...~l_~ it8 success. MdSlC; A ~IO~ ~I'OUOH ,~ID UNDO. All you have to OARLSOIh A trifle elaborate perhaps, but well wor~* it believe me. F~y your pre~e~e, DL A[HO~ 0182698
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13 M~ZRTY So trot was the beginnit~, over at Kollyt~ on Third Avenue. ~qd after the drid< Carl~on let~ me in on hi~ plan. Sam anti me were to hei~t the svjank ~ome of a company olientj a F~° Jame~ Forfeit. Oraok the ~afe and leave the jewel~ on the premi~e~. Db ~TH01 01~2699
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And that's what you did? Uhhuh. Left the jewels in the houQe. -14- BH~pARD: MARTYI Right in the same room with the safe. 8H~PARDI 14hat about the ring? (]/ULNERABLE) The ring. All right. MART/: Wstll get to th~later. SHEPPARDI MARTY: We hid the ~ewels right there in the library, behind a few fancy book, on a ehelf. About nine ololock I'd Bay that was. And a couple of hours after that...(~ sou~Di S~iu, RI~ oF PHONE, .......... B~T" (PHONE UP) Har tedale Po!iqe,~ergeant Miller. hj A]'~O~ 0~82700 ii
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(/ • FORR~T~ (FILTh) (EXCITED) Hello, polioe, I rant to report a robbery~ J~IUS]~g! BAtiK IN TO HOLD THROUGH: MAR~Yz ~nd r~ght after that the Carlson plan was all on its o~, [~US~O: OVER AND OUT. ,~pm~D: DOOR OPt. FORREST: And thi~ is the only other exit out of the room. playroom in there,,, OAP, LSON: I see, D" L Mr, Oarlson, I know, YeB, hj ThLB is J~e~ ForreBt Bpeaki~g. That'e the childran,~ FORREST: Of course the polioe have all this infor.~tion, OM~I,BON: But the company require, a eeparate report. The eafe over hare~ FORREST: RTR01 0"f827'01
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..16- O ARL~ON : For a claim ae large as youra we naturally want a full investigation, you under Brand, FORREST: Yea, but the return of the jewels is far more important to me then the claim amount. They have a sentimental value. OARLSON: One hundred and forty-ocbl thoucand dollareq That's a lot of eentimant~ (A LITTLE STIFFLY} The company didn't seem to object when they wrote out the policy, FORREST¢ In fact quite the opposite, CARLSON: We're not objecting now, Hr. Forrest. I realize that, but... FORRESTI Z" Itm only doi~ CARLSON: The look waan't forced, was it. hj AT~O~ 01B2P02
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f FORRE~T: No, tee polloe mentioned the% ~o0. comhin~ion, Uh huh, Apparently the thief knew the CARLSO~: • ~ T What about the servants? All been with u~ for years. (CASUALLY) FORREST: OARLSON: Quite ~ collection of books, FCRREOT~ You don't think it wao one of the oervants? CARLSON: I don't think anything yet~ Mr, Forreot, Thackeray, I always liked Thackeray, FOREST: Those are all first editione, OkRLSON: Don't say. ~ "Vanity Fair," wao in high school, I read this when I hj FI ]"HO 1 0182703 il
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-18- FORR~T: (A LITTLE PROUD) That particular volume wae among the first twenty printed, you~ll find the author's ei~natare on the fly leaf, / CARLSON: Tel/ dongt ~ ~~d MHerlry ~ond." ~oee that bring back memoriee, I remember when,,. (HE gTO~ SHORT) ~nat iB it? (SLOWLY) anything like I think it iB°.. FORRE~T: CARLSON: I'm n~t eure...(BIZ: BOOKS PULLED OUT RAPIDLY/ but if it's (A PAUSE) F0~EST: (STARING) Wall I'll be.,. OARLSON: -/r ,. ISOUND: JEW~/~y HANDLED UNDO) Rraoelat~ rings, neoklaoe, olipe.., i Mr. Forreet, thia wouldn't happen to be the jewelry that was "stolen" would it. FGRREST: I...I don't understand... OANLSON: Maybe you don't, but I'm just beginninK to. hj PITH01 0182704,
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Huh? House looked up tight, thieves,,, Vnat? (ST~LY) thing~ Mr, Forreet° FOBR~T: OARL$ON: safe not ferced, no trace left by any FORREST: CARLSON: Tnie isn't the first time I've come aoroes this sort of What have you got to say? FORREeT: (OFF-GUARD) Well, I...l'm highly gratified, naturally... Naturally. I beg your pardon? On come now, Mr. Forrset. believe me. Fraud? hj OARLBON: FORREST: OARLSON: I can appreoiatc your emharree~ment~ But when an obvious fraud hae been attempted,.. FOREST: 8]-~0~ O~B2 P05
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ThattB what I said, fraud, on this, What are you t~iking about? Sentimental value indeed. there yeu had me fooled,,, -2O- CARLSON: The ~olioe aren't going to look lightly FORREST: CARLSON: I must confess, Mr. Forrest~ for a time FORREST: (STUNG) Mr. Carlson, if you're insinuating,,. OhRLSON I Ineinuating? That'e putting it mildly, FORREST: Well, youtre on the wrong traokD this is just ae muoh a surprise to me as... (~EAK8 OFF) What are you doing? What does it look like matter for the polioo. OARLSON: I'm doing? (80UNDt PHONE VP) This iea hj AI'H01 0182706
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NOW wait, don't do that... 21 )ORREST: OARLRON : ~(@_ND: DIALING UNDER). I believe the psnalty for this ~ort of crime Js about five years. FORRES~: Wsit, Mr. Oarlson. Plsase.l (AS CARLSON HESITATES) I'II make it • f worth year wails. (THEN) Very/~"~'-'t <~" ' C~RLSON ." ll~OJ~D:_.~~L All right, I'm listening. FORREST: (PERSPIRING) Yeutre on the wrong track, I assurs you. A~-V6on--a~--- CARLSON: If I'm on the wron[ track the polise ~I 18% ms ~. FOREEST: 8top talking like that. I'll bet you don't. It isn't that. understand? O I don,t want the polics in on this. OARLSON: FORR~ST: T~o publicity would be terrible, can't you RTH01 0182707
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22 f T~t deper~l~. CARLSON: FORREST: (WIPING HIS FACE) ~be fact ie the Jewele bare been located and ~e oan both be your ocmpany won't bare to pay out any claim. satisfied without bothering the police. I'm still listening. OARLBON: Sit down, Mr. Carlson, Bit down pleaeoW We'll nave a drink and talk thie ell over. Itm m/re we can arrange something to your complete satisfaction. o 'mLELCL_L AE And he did, 8HEPPAID: ~a~% NASTY: 1,11 Bay he didr 1son had ~im right beblnd the eight b~ll and he know it. It was a clever plan, you got to hand him tnat, With the Jewble recovered, the bea~ wa~ off all around. Tee police were eatiefied, the insurance company ~aa eatiefied, even James Forreet was satisfied. And the day after the a~ca~ement ~ae ~de we got a call from Oarleon ~ayin~ meet ~im o~er at Kellyre ~r Be*8 he could eatiefy us. HUSlO: OUT IN ~UE TO JISKE BOX. B.C~ FJTH01 01B2708
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23 OARLSO~: (O~JNTING) T~r~e hundred, four, and firs. five nandrod dollars more just a, we agreed. MARTY: (OONT~T) Tee easiest grand we aver took in. 6AM: Eaeier than that avon. CARL~O~ There you are, gentlemen. Right, ~am? (SMILES) I told you tbore,d be nothing LO it. MARTY: ~4hat a aet-u~. Better t~an plain atealing any ald day. SAM: Mnch. I guess you pocketed a pretty pieae of change for youreolf, huh Mr. Carlaon? C~RLSON: ~y business. NO offense, only asking. SAM: MARRY: Say how% for a littl~ celebration drink on ue? G R]~O ~ 0182709 ==r
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24 CARLSON : I'd like tba%, bat I have %0 get back to %be office. (~8) They'll be ~anting my full reporb on %he recovery. ybe. ~aybe t~e company even ~ive~ you a raise. CARLSO~ Gentlemen, itts been my pleasure, If you're so inollned we might all be working together again. 8AM: ~f we're BO inclined. ~RTY: Cell on us anytime, CarlBon. Ve're your boys. CARLBON: I,ll remember. An)~ay, Be long for nOW. (GOING 0~) round of drink~ for my friend~, I'm paying. BA~TE~DER: (OFF) Okay, Mr. CarlBon. MARTY: (ON ~E) W~at a guy, S~. 01~. G JOB, 8 f~TH01 0182710
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2~ (SOOP~PJLLY) Ola~e. Tnore'p a difference. He has it up here. 8AM: He'e e orook just like you and me. NARTY: SAM: N~RTY: Plan~ eomethin~ out, ~ete somebody else to do the slop. I,llb.et he clouted ten g'e from %hie, We come off with a lousy single. 8AM: (~O~I~G BETTER) Wt~t do yOU think. ~ARTY: ~Uh? ~arty, ~he% would you say if I told you I had it up here too? MARTY: You kno~ what I'd sey. G BTHO~ 0~82P~]
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yeah? What? This° (ST~TLED) SAM So take a look at this and then say it. MART/: 8AM: (~OUND: RING ON TABle) Take a look. MART/: ~nere'd you ~et ~t ring, Where do you think. SS~. BAH: MART/: SAM: Now tell me I haven't got it up here. MART/: (EXOIT6D) Put it away quioko SAM: There were so many in that safe, I asked myself who'd miss only one? I~RTY: (FAIRLy HISSING) Put it ~way: (AS 8AM DOES 80) You crazy idiot you. JAN AI'MO 1 0182;'~2
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f Sure, crazy, 57 SAM: There'~ eight carats in there or I sw~llo~ it v:hole. If Carlson ever foLtud out.,. MARTY: SAM: He didn't know about it ~daen he was in here. character is never 6onna open ~]~gmouth. NA~TY, (THINKING IT) Of co~se it's right. (R~IaXI~G) Sa~, (GRIN~) And that Forrest No, that's righ%, SAM: And wh~t I always ssy, finders keepers. I think maybe you got something. SAM: Sure. Up here, Fbxty, I got something up here. ¸¸JAN RTH01 0182P13
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(LAUGHING IN SPIT~ OF HIMSELF) something up here. BIZ: T~Y'~ BOTH LAUGHING AS: MARTY: Okay, Sam...I admit it...yoa got JAN ~IHO? 0182714
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THE PBI N PEACE AND WAR AUOUST 2~, 1952 MIDDI£ COMMEHCIAL MUSIC: (TO A CURTAIN) TICE: DARUCH: Back to "The Carlson Plan" in just a moment. Friends, Luekles are ~sde better to taste better -- to taste cleaner, fresher, s~oother! :nd itls easy t{.l~. T%ke a to ~rove this to yourself. Simaly do '~'~' Lucky from 8 newly opened pack and carefully remove the peoer by tearinz down the ses~ fren end to end. Be sure to start on the sea~. In te~rin@, 6onrt crush or dig Into the tobacco, Now look st that perfect cylinder of fine, mil~ tobacco. See how it holds to~ether -- without those annoyinp loose ends that ~et dn your ~outh and spoil the taste? Thatls why Luckiee taste cleaner! Notice how free Luckles are fro~ excessive air spaces, hot spots that burn too fast -- and Five you s hot, harsh taste. T_ha_tl_as why Luekles taste fresher. Then look at that fine, m{id, good-tastin[ tobacco, perfectly shredded and packed Just right for s~ooth, even s~okin~. Thatls why Luckies taste s¢~oothsr. Yes, friends, these are the i~portant inside reasons that ~ake Luckies taste better -- claane_.___qr, fresher, smoother. So for your own real deep-down smoking enjoyment, Be Happy -- GE Lucky! Make voourur next carton Lucky Strike! ,~IU81C: (SHOW THEME) AT)401 0182215
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29 ARROU~CER: And now, back to "The FBI In Peace and War" and tonight's story iB.gn NARTZ~ Yea eir, Carlson had a clever plan, only Sam and me we thought we had an improvement. Holdin~ out on him. Holding out and caehin~ in. sr~Keker s, (WORRIED) Nanty... Listen, ~if we're goana come / Smart. SHEPPARD: MARTY: The ring brought us twenty-five hundred SAM: NARTY: clean we might as well go all the %ay, SHEPPARD: NARTY: (STILL TO SAM) Who are you to talk anyway? If it wasn't for you we wouldn't be in this spot, you got it up here. RTH01 JAN 01822"16
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I ~ot it all rig~ht. I'll say you aren't. What? T~enty? Over twenty. 3o SAN: Only maybe I'm not the only one. SHEPPARD: That ring's worth over twenty thousand dollars. SAN: NARTY: SHEPPARD: The Forrest collection is very well known. ~hy that crook Shorty. A fa~er he was dein6 us: NARTY: SAN: HARTY: (FOI~ET21NG NIESELF) No more business thro~a him. SHEPPARD: Or through anybody for a while. Just tell me what happened next. NARTY: What happened? Two things happened. This whole deal ~uld have come out perfect if it hadn't been for these two things. JAN A T,',401 0182P1P
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Your partner S~m, and the FBI. 31 SHEPPARD: ~ARTYs Yeah that's ri@ht...lame-brain here. and you people of the FBI. BOUN~: SkqTCHBOARD. GIRL: Federal Bureau of Investi~tion. ~. Andrews' I'll connect you with his secretary. Good morning, Miss. Yes, air. Who shall I INSPECTOR: I'd like to see Z~. 8heppard. GIRL: say i8 calling? office? Just s moment. Matthew Ryan...New York police. Q_UL Come in, Matt, come in. INSPECTOR: He's expecting me. 8}~PpARD: T~ie ie real Good of you coming here, JAN A - ol o 82?18
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k 32 INSPE 5~fOR: My pleasure, 8hep. it's nice eeein6 you ~in. RHEPPARD: You know Agent ReTnolde. don't you. INS~C~R~ Sure, we worked a case together once, how are you, Reynolds. REYNOLDS ". Fine thanks, Inspector. 8}~PPARD: Sit do~n, ~tt, help yourself to a smoke. That the itsm you phoned about? INSPECTOR: (EI~A__~EL~/~) Uh huh. I only hope this isn't a false alsrm. REYNOLDS: Inspector, where was this ring located? INSPECTOR: A pawn shop in Philadelphia. Philadelphia. REYNOLDS: JAN 19TH01 0~822~9
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33 Yes. Of course, the men there weren't looking for the tin6. When the Forreet jewels were recovered we Bent out the UBual cancellation on our circslaro They were lookin~ for a fence named Sherry Blevinj he just happened to have the rin~ on him. SHEPPARD: I Bee, INSPECTOR: Nat~rally they thou~ot it kind of odd, the ri~ turnin~ up rigjnt after our cancellation. They checked with mep I checked with yeu...here I Open it up, ~ve. SHEPPARD: R~YNO LD S: SHEPP/II~D: Did he talk, Matt, this Sherry Blevin? INSPECTOR: Not yet, but he will. Here you are. Shep. Not the defiafl~ type. RSYNOL~: JAN RTH01 0182720 If
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/ • 34 INSPECTOR: You can see the initials on the inside. E.F,, Elizabeth Forreet. 8he has those on all her jewelry. $}~PARD: Uh huh. (TP~N) ~lell, what do you make of it, Mat%? INSPEOTOR: I don't know. James Forrest has a top reputation, as you know. But this whole ease has a smell to it, P~-TNOLD8: You haven't epoken to Forrest, INSPEOTOR: No, I thought we'd all speak to 8harry Blevin first. 8HI.PARD: That sounds right to me. (SOUND: OLIOK O~ flY.ROOM) I~isB Green, I'm out for the rest of the day, give Agent Dailey my calls. GIRL (FILTEr) Yea, sir. 8HEPPARD: ,~.- ) Let's have a little talk with Blevin, Dave, then we can take it from there. ;TJSIO: IN ~ UNDER. A]'~01 a~ ~'nc 0182?21
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Ycah hadn't butted in, Berry. ~e ~ole d~l would've come o~ perfect if you ~I people 8I~PPARD: While you were %alklng with Sherry, we were living the llfe of Riley,, Nice room in a hotel, money in our pookate, all the credit we pleaeed at Kelly's bar. And on top of all that we got this race,age to call Carlson for another job. So while Sam wae buying drink8 for the houee, I went to the phone booth~ dialed OarlsonIs number, and waited for the good news to come in. OARLSON: (FILTER) Lelgh Oarleon epeakin~, NARTY: Helle, Oarleon, this is Harry I~nis. The bartender told me you called. QARLSON: (FILTh) That'e right, ]~mio, how're you been. Rr~01 01~82722
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Never better. Yourself? 36 ~q~RTY: (FILTER) Fine thanks. still interested in picking up some extra coin? M_g~TY: Like I told you, Carlson, we're your boys. OARL~ON: (FILTER) together for details? Tonight? OARLBON: Why I called, Ennis...you and your partner Ueil, I have another client in r~nd. ]~iRTY: (FILTh) 0 A[ILSON: Tomorrowls soon enoLk%h, Okay be me. Here? OARLSON: gay about this time. (FILTER) All right. We'll be waiting. When can we get ~mc RTH01 0182723
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37 OARLSON: (FILTh) 8as you then, There's another thousand in it for you, maybe a little more, 'NiEht. MARTY: Goodnight, Oarlson, ~Iu~[~022) SOUND: PHONE DO~/N. BOOTH ~OUR OPEN. SOI~D: FOOTSTEPS BAOK TO BAR. MARTY: %omorro gh, (OHE~RFULLY) All sot, Sam, Meeting hero W ni~ t SAM: ! (OOHING IN) Marry,,1; NAR~: (PROJEOT) Set Wem up again, Joe, r~ night to howl, SAM: Nffl~: (SITTI|~G DOWN) A thousand the man said, maybe more. me have really walked into something, Sam, you and nT~O RTH01 0182224
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You're telling me. What? 3O SAM: (GLIb) SAM: I even offered to bt~ him a drink. Buy who? This man righ~ here. HA~gIT: BAH: So what? Maruy... ;gI~TY: We'll both buy him a drink. We'll buy him ten dri~e.., 8AH: ~U~TY: SIJ'I: Harry, the man is ~eht Reynolde. / ~IARTY: In fact... (eTOPQI/The man i~ who. ~J BAH: A~ent Reynolds. Of the FBI. 0182725 i
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39 ~ART~: (PROI42TLy) In fact I'm late for ~n appointment. will exo~se me,.. I do? At headquarters. If you gentla~en REYNOLD~: You have another appoln~aent. P~Y~OLDS: Headquarters? (SADLY) a one track mind. You must have the wrong party. SAM: That's what I told him, P~rty, But Agent Reynolds, he'e got ~tle right, I have, the t~Iking for later. ~EY}DLD~: Now suppoe~ we go nice and quiet and ~ve all MI~IO: 1i~ 5'000V~R JUlf~'~ BOX AN]] OI~. elm A]';WO ~ 0182?26 ,i I
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4O N~RYY: And that's the whole story of what happened, Mr. 8hePl~rd. .As you can easily ;rake out, flare and me got carried avay by this smooth-talki~ Carlson and if you let us off I can give you our word we'll never get mixed up with any Bush low-llfe again. Right, Sam? $~: More t}~n our word.oven, I told you before, i8 entirely voluntary. S}[~PPARD: I'm m~king no promises. Everything you're doing ~RTY: Voluntary, of course, You ~ant snythir~ more from ue, only ask, 8HEPPARD: You say this entire business yam all planned by Lelgh Carlson. ~RTY: Tbzt ' B right. SHEPP~RD: And you're supposed to meet hlmat Kelly's bar tomorrow night. All right, Eanie. meet him, ~RTY: We warm_ ouppo~ed to. ~HEPpARD: If It's a~bl~ to you and l)aweon youql eti]l sfm '" I~I 1"~0 i 018222?
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What? 41 8AM; Quiet, l~ne-brain. 8heppard. Good, The FBI haB to have evidence. SHEPPARD: Agent Reynolds will keep you eoml~ny meantime, ~h,. James Forrest. ItIB agreeable, Mr. while I call on Forrest? tYRTT: S~PPARD: Yes. If it's also agreeable to him, I have an idea the Carlson plan is about to collapse, M[~TO: LI~[T ~TIN(~ AI~ UND~R FOR: • - O~ RL~ON: o im o < soo One moment, Mr. Oarla~;..,.i have a call for you... Nr. James (F ILT~q) Forrest, A1~40"! 0"I~2 228 i
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CA~S ~TH07 O!B2P29
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~)~'~,s F~~ ~T~'~3~~ Al'~Ol O182 ?LlO
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All right, thanks. . n~l'I~.,. ~nie and I~wson? Yes, that's right. 42 CARLSOn: BARTEICDER: How are you tonight. CARLSON: Say, Joe, I'm expecting to meet somebody here at E~RTEi~DER: OARLSONs BA RTE~DER: They just got here a coupla minutes ago. there. OARISON: Oh good. Send me over a drluk, huh. BARTE~JDER: (GOING OFF) %hey 81reedy ordered. M~TY: (OFF A LITTLE) Here he is, Sam. (UP) Over here, Carlson. CARLSON: Uh huh. ~ext to the last booth over arm AIM01 0182731
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(COMIi,D IN) 43 ~AM: We gnt hero ahead of ynu. (DRYLY) ~n I see. CJ~RIeON: Draw up a chair, we bought you a drink. CARLSON: I'm not stayip~ lona. (SMILES) All business, high. (COOL) Oily, let's have it. Huh? lhve what? You know very well wh~t. (PL~YI~:G D~.[B) We do? ;~RTY: OAR~OM: ~MRTY: OAR~ON: SAM: sfm RrH01 0182232 i'l
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Look, Dswson, dnn't play foetsy with me. I want that ring. I~RTY: Ring? ~4ha% sre you talking about? CA P,I.~OI~: I'm talkin~ about the ring you took with you from the Fortes% pretulsss, I ~nt it. ~RT~: Carlson, Be help me I don't ~ow what you're talking about. You donJ~j b.~ht SAM: What is this, ~rty? You said we were meetin~ tn talk over ~ jcb. don't have to stay here and be insulted. fiARL~ON: Sit do~n, D~wson. Listen,,, ~AM: ~ARIBON: I ~aid Bit doval. (H~RD) Now you listen to me. the both of yoU. not fooli~ sround. a~y ~llth it. I I'm Ynu pulled a bnn~ha~d play and you're not getting sfm ATM01 0182233
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Carlson... llm running this deal. mess things up for me. Listen,.. (MILD) Bhut up, Sam. You heard me. ~aybe we can, 45 NARTY: CARLSON: And I'm not lettlngany two-bitohlselere ~RTY: (TO CARISOII) You're running this, huh. OARISON: And if you think you can nutanart me.., I@RTY: sfm A 1"~40 ~ 018223~
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(A B~T) 4~ OARLSON: And if you think different you're makin~ %ha mletakeof OkaM, Oarleon, we have the ring, CARLSON: N~d~TY: Tnat's more like it. We have it, only we can't give it to you. OARLSOM: No? Oan we, Sam? Oan't possibly. BAN: GARL801~: Apparently you two don't realize I mean what I say. Uh huh. I'm givin4~ you exactly ten aeoondo %o hand over that ring. Itkr~: And if w~ don't hand it over,..? ~OW AI-~O ~ 0182735 i
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The police6 CARLSON: I'll be forced to take up tho n~tter with the police. MARTY: You hear that, Bam. Do I. $~qi MA~TY: You wouldn't do a thing like that, Oarlson. OARL~N: You'd be surprised what I'd do. I've arrayed for such ~attere as this, I've planned everythin~ thoroughly. Maybe too thoroughly. I wouldn't say that. O~LSON: HAI~TY: iYou'd take She ~atter up with She police. OiU~LSON: If you foroe nm to,
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Okay, ~o ahead, Huh? Take it up with them. I'm not bluffing, Ennie... Noibhor ate we. a8 C~.RLeO]~: MARTY: O&RLSON: SAM: You can take it up with them right now, CARLSON: What? Right now. jv~ There's a police officer in the next booth, In fact, there ere two officers. OARL$ON: (FROWNING) Eanis, I'm really not emceed... nT~O A]-)40 1 018223? ilil
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~ybo youTre not, but we are, MARTY: S}~oPARD: (OFF A L~TTLD) Re's get eomethln~ there, Carlson. CARLSON: What~ You stay out of this, buddy. $!~PPARD: (OOHING iq{) I'm already in, }Zero ere r~ credentials. flARLSON z (ALMOST EXPIDDI~G) ~mt i~ ~hisl Sifl~PARD: This is ~en% Reynolds, here are his creden%iale. OARLSON: ~OtBm P~fNOLDS: Just stay where you are, Carlson. Pu% out your hands. CARLSON: I donlt believe it... .~) REYNOLDS: You will do~% at headquarters. -- __ L OkayI Dave, All right, ~ep. tgTN01 0182238
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5o CARLSON: (FAIRLY BLUBR~RING) E~nls,.,D~wson...you planned this,,, BAH: Well not qu~%e. It was Mr, 8heppard'e idea° 8HEPPARD: Let's nay it wa~ all three of us. A l~ttle plnn of our ov~n, MARTY= Couldn't outamart you, huh Oarlsen, We got It uphere, SAH: That's right, Narty,.,the FBI and us, we got It up ~U~IC~ TO A OURTAIM A%~DTHE~NDI mmo RTHO'I 0182239 II
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,THE FBI ~N PEACE AND WAR AUGUST 2~, 1952 CLOSI~8 C01~ERCIAL MUSIC: (UP TO CURTAIN) TICE: BARUCH: MUSIC: TICE: In just a moment, ,~gent Sheppard ~,~ill tell you ~vhst happened to the people in tonightKs story. Smokers, you can easily see for yourself the inside reasons why Luckies taste better -- cleans___ r, fre~hP1] s~loother! Just take a Lucky fro~ a newly opene~ pack and carefully renlove the paper by tearinF ~D~in the sea~ from end to en~. Be sure to start on the seam. In tsarin~ dontt crush or di~ into the tobacco. Now, sxa~ine that perfect cylinder of fine, ~ild tobacco. See how it holds together - without those annoying loose ends that get in your ~io~th and spoil the taste. Thatls why Luakiee taste cleane__~r. Notice ho~, free you~ LJeky ~s froz sir sp~ees -- hot spots that burn too fast -- taste hot an~ hersh. Thatls why Luckies taste !rasher. And look at that fin.__e_e, oo~9~Z tastin~ tobacco -- perfectly shredded and ac~ed Just rl~ht to draw freely and amo!<e evenly. Thatls why Luckles taste smoothel,. So, for s eleane____~r, freshe____.__~, s,~oothe~ smoke , m~Ice your next carton Lucky Strike! (FANFARE) CONCLUSION OR CASE MUSIC: (SHOW THEME} ATH01 01B2 740 ,i i
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~/EPPARD: (~!~ A PAUSE) Leith Oerlson, Marry Ennie, and Sam I~wean viers indicted ;n a conspiracy charging fraud and ~rand larceny. All were brought %0 trial and convicted, Oerlson going to prieon for five years, At the rooo~ondation of the ~ovornment ~mis and DaweanVs eentsnoe was reduced to one year each. Wi~1 their eoiffineman6 the files ~ere closed on a trio that al~ust built a bankroll eu~ of..Th. hl u. ~Q
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THE FBI N 1952 AUGUST 25, PEACE AND WAR -D- CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONT~D) TICE: MUSIC: BAEUCH: MUSIC: TICE: All names and character's ueeJ on this program, are fictitious. ~ny similarity to persons living or 4ead is purely coincidental. This program is based on Frec]erick L. CollinsI copyrighted book "THE FBI IN i ~ l'I PEACE AND ~AR ... and is not an official program of _~z~ ,ed the<' / the FBI. In toniKhtls story//~¢ ply The rau_o dra~aticatlons for "FIE FBI IN PEACE AND UAR" are written by Louis ~el_etzer and Jack Finks. These ~ra~ra~e are proOuce~ and 6irecte~ by Betty M~ndevllls. Be sure to listen to next Thursday1~ story, "The Serpent Ring" on ~H~ FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". Sane time - sa~e station. (SHOW THEI.~E - UP A~$D UNDER) This is Andre B~ruch saying goodnight for Lucky Strike, product of The American T~baoco Company -- A1,ericats lea6in~ manufacturer of cl~arettes. "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" has been selected as one of the programs to be heard by our Armed Forces overseas through the facilities of the ~.rr.~ed Forces Ra~io Service. {SHOW THEME - UP AND OUT) THIS IS THE CBS RADIO NETWORK. A]-~O 1 0182242
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---
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"~4~ S~J~P~NT RING," DAY E ProdL~o~ and DiroQ%od by: ]~t f,v H,%ndevlll e Soript by: T,~utm l~lle%fer \ le R'r Ho 1 0182244 i
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-A- THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CONPANY "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" OPENING OOi,;~,fEECIAL SEPTEMBER 4 I~2 TICE: LUCKY STRIKE presents ... "THE FBi WAR" ! MUSIC : (FANFARE) TICE: PARUCH: MUSIC : THURSDAY IN PEACE AND Another 6rear story copyrighted book, "THE F%I IN Drama ,., Thrills ,.. Action! Andre Baruch! based on Frederick L. Colllne~ PEACE AND WAR". But f~rsb ,,, Friends, Luckles t~ste better -- eleane~, fresher, e~oother! This better taste starts with Ix/skiesI fine, ~ild, good-tastlng tobacco. Remember, LS/MFT -- Lucky Strike means fine tobac@o. An~ Luckles taste better because theyJre made better-- made to taste cleaner, fresher, smoother. So for real smokin~ enjoyment -- Be HspDy - GoLucky. Nake ~ next carton -- Lucky ~trike] (SHOW THEI, iE UP AND FADE) PI1-HO 1 0182?45 il
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I ANNOUN0~ And now tonight's story on 'qha FBI In peace end War"... The 8errant Rir~. MUSIC: TH~E AND INTO: SOb~D: TRAIN. ESTARLISH THI~ UN~_J_ JOE (TOUGH, BUT WELL-MANN~ED~ ABOUT THIRTy) Yea sir, I got this ring in '$9 at the World's Fair. Been good luck to me ever since. Say, how abeut one more h~shball before you turn in, Hr. Miller? HENRY (MIDI~E FIFTIES, SHY, TIHID) Oh, no thank yOLk, I OOUldn't really, my wlfe'll be wonder~ What happened to me. JOE (CHUCELES) Yo~ eald this was your vacation, didn't yo~? HENRY Yes bnt, ~ma.., my wife llkee to set ~p early. She doesn't ~nt to m£se all the scenery, ltrs been very pleasant, ~... ~h Fay... perhap~ yon and,., yon a~d your partner y~nld jedn ns at l~ch tomorrow. Be glad to. le JOE Where's yo~r compartment? I~I"XO I 01:B2 P4S
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HENRY We're right in the next oar. JOE Okay, we'll see ym~ in the morning° H~RY Good night, ~. ~ That wo~ld be very pleasant. 80UtID -. (80PrLY) JOB Good night, Hr. Miller. TRAIN UP. CAR I]OOR 0P~L ~UEH OF AIR. 80t~D 0}~ RkILg. EAR BOOR OLOBED A R~AT. OOMPART?~NT DOOR OPEN. HENRY E~n~... yoL~ asleep? ,~ E~NA No, dear, I'm J~mt ~tchlng the sth.re, ~ all these fanny little to~ ~'e 8o thtol~. Yon o~.n F~t on the llgh%, D~ ~a he nlee, that Mr. Fay? (80LFJ~LY) B~.. that Mr. Fay le the man Who held ap the bank, 7 I'm ~osltive of it. lo 0182?4? i
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3 f E~WA (DISTRESSED) Oh now really, Henry, if you're goi~ to start @nat e~atn Rnd spoil O~LP Vao&tlon,., HEnRy l~, please boltove me, I'm positive th~e time. E~NA Henry... HENRY All ri~t, I was wrong ones before, but... B~A Twice before. Henry, yen j[~t can't keep on ~mbarraeain~ me llke this, identifying people as held-up men. That man in the reet~l~ranC last epm~sr and the one at the movies... HENRy Emma, listen to me, pleasB. This man was weari~ a ~old ri~g~ ~ma, a ~old ri~ made in the form of a sr~ke with two r~blee for eyes • E~WA Darling, go to b~, please, and 6st some rest. FIT ..',.¢ 01 01B2248
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4 HENRY I tell yo~ he'e the one~ I couldn't forget that ri~ becalme I was looking at his hand ~hen he put that bag thresh the ca~e and aeked for the money. EMmA YoL~ never mentioned a ring before. }LE~qY I l~ow I didn't, I for~et it till jl~t now. Oh, Henry... Well I did, Dm~. HI~Ry The hold-up wae over a year ago, darlin6... ~EARY (DP~ATICALLY) Do yo~ think I could forget it? That man pointing the g,m at my face, telling me to... EMNA But you told the police the man wore his hat pried way down on his face and you were so frightened you oo~tldn't really remember ~hat he looked llke.., le AI"H01 0182749
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I know all that... HE,mY FlOrA And when they showed yo~ pictures of hold-up men you Hot all confused and ~a~d you weren't s~re. HENRY But thlo ring, ~ma, I'm s~re of that. There are probably thousands of rlnge llke that. HENRY ~ybe. But I'm ~oln6 to see the conductor of the train and notify the police. (A BEAT) Henry ~iiller, if you spoil the first vacation werv~ ha~ in five years, (ALMOST ON THE F~E OF TEARS) if you spoil my trip to Californla, after we've saved up and gone without... HENRY ]e RTH01 0182750
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6 (CR~) W~II it's jL~t too m~eh~ really. you've made llfe miserable for both of i~. Ever elnoe that hold-np They didn't steal your money, it ~sn't yo~r bank~ you're j~at a bookkeeper and you keep on wanti~ to be a hero and trap hold-up men... HENRY Aw, ~n, don't cry now... It's too m~oh, really. H~NRY I... I won't Be to the eonduotor now, Era, not till I'm outer. l... I'II talk to Mr. Fay eome more and.., and see if I was ~rong. ~e,e I'm ~oinS to sle~p, Henry. T~rn o1~t the bight, please. I n~y have boon wron~, ~, brit.., but I donft think so... not with that eerpent ri~... I don't think I could be wror~, ~mla, I really don't. IN AND II~D~ FOR: SOUND: T}~Lh~YPF~ UNDO: be 0182251
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7 To ~ent 8heppard, FBI, oonfldentlal. H,uldre~-dollar-bill bearln~ sorlal n~ber Br~d~etown National Bank robbery located in deposit of railroad booking office th~ morning. ~altir~S ymlr arrival, b~t make it fa~t, a~gned Jen~enj Chief of Polloe~ Mason Oity. L 0 • CHIEF And thls is Mr. Wallaoo. lie was the olerk onA~ty attjthe reservation /St j& ~-~ desk yesterday. Agent &heppard, and A~ent ~? of the FBIp Hr. Wkllace. WALLACE ~ (60EiqOWI,EmlN, G) J'@. ~heplmrd, F~.Jl~m~. OHIEF I've already told Hr. Wallace abont the robbory. ~opj and how thee~ bLlls have ;~on turn~ z~p off and on for the past year. I &~ve yon can take it from there. Thanks, C~lef. SH~PARD OHIE~ Fr. ~llaoe rcmembere the men ~ho paaaed the billo. (BMILII~G) Says It'a about the first hnndred-dollar note held ever eeen. le I~l'~O ~ 018~ 752 h
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if 8 BAILEY There were two menj I~$. ~lallaee? WALLAOE Y~B. eHBPPAP~ Oould you desoribe there briefly? WALLAOB Well, the one that handed over the money, he wae about thirty, I'd say, medit~ heisht, dark, mllst have wei6hed around one sixty. The other one was taller, Paid+ about forty, had bad teeth as I r~member and I think... I think what hair he did have was kln~l of reddish. He was sort of thln. Tha~ help any, ~nep? OHIEF SHEPPARD Not too much, Chief. Welve been workln~ in the dark on thie thlr6 as far a~ descriptions ~. ~here were six ~mpleyeae in the front of the bank at the t~me of the robbery and the etlly thing they could agree on was that one of the men was taller than the ether. And thinner. le ATN01 0182253
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9 yeah, I know how it ie. CHIEF BAILEY The only leads we've had in the past year are twelve of the h~ndr~l-dollar bills. WALLAOE ~ / • How roach money did the robbers @et, ~. BAILEY Forty-two %he,mend, five thousand of it in humdred-dollar bil]~ ~hlch the bank had recorded. I See, WALLACE 8HEPPARD Now yot~ have the reeervation%/%e men made~ V~. Wallace. WALBAOE Yes, ~hlef Jcr~en asked n~ to brin~ it alon6. Here it Is... Ooml~rb~enb D, car i06~ on the Western Limited. The train left Union 8tatlon at nine P.M. last nlg~ht, it's d~e to arrive in Los Angeles Friday mornln~at ei6ht A.H. le ATH01 0182254
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t 10 ~IEppARD Have ycL~ got a schedule of steps, ~. ~,llace? OHIEF We worked that out already, Shop. Ym~ can get a plane out of here at two this afternoon and get into B~ Creek, Utah# tomorrow ~lorni~ at six A.N. Itts not a re6~ar atop b~t you can have the train fla6Eed there. That's perfect, Chief. SHEPpARD WotGdn't it be possible to have the traln stopped and~m~ now, N~. Sheppard? SHEPpARD Yes, b~xt the trouble is we're not e~re of our 6round. These may be the men we want and they may not. Vnen we get on the train we'll look for money, not the men. I SeOo ~%11, Chief, thanks a lot... WALLACE SHEpH~D le A't'~o ? 0102255
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,r That'~ okay, tako you to the ~irport. ii CHIEF ~qop, ~lad to help. I've sot my oar o~tslde, I'II 8HEPpARD ~ood, CHIEF Oan I drop yo~ auyv&ere, Hr. Wallace? WALLAOE No thanks, Chief, they gave me the day off, I'm not 6olr~ downtown. ORI~ Okay~ Goodbye, ~ir. Wallace. SHEPPARD Thanks for holpln~. WALLAOE Vellj I guess I didn't help milch, b~t I hope you're on the r~ht track, ~. 8heppard. SHEppARD OP ~vera~es. ' E 80UND: TRAI~. E~TABLISH. THEN U~D~: Welre d~e for a break ~n this case ~uot on the law Okay, CHief, welre ready. 10 01S275g
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~2 (CHATTKqIMG GAILY) And I eald to Henry, hhle le the first vacation we'vs had in five years and we're goln~ m~b to see Belen...that's my d~ughter, she and her h~Bband l~ve In Beverly Hills, he's in resl eet~te. JOE NieQ epot,~erl¥ Hill~, I ~ot eonneetlene there myself. EJ~ And Henry said, we can't afford a vacation this year, and I s~id, wol1~ you only llve enoe and what's the L~B of saving money if you can't epend it? JOE You ~ot something there~ Hrs. ~ller. Well, that's how I feel anyway, and I ~t hope Henry will enjoy the tr~p and not go spoil~n&thlr~e. JOE He looms to be having ~ ~o~ t~me. I s~ppose he does but... (A HEAT) Mr. Fay... le ATe01 01B22~2
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Yeah? 13 JOE I... I hope you won't think thf~ sounds f~my but.., if Henry act~ eort of queer and ~tarte ~skln~ quest/one.., well. don't mind too much, will yo~? Questions? H@w do you mean? J~ ~ll...it's awf~ly hard %0 explain to people b~t.., well I ~ess Henry told you he works in the Brid~etown National Bank, dldntt he? JOE (OAREFULLY) Why no... he didn't. Well that's where he works and a year a~e they had a held-up. I... I ~ueee it Was j~t about the meet ~mpertant thing that ever happened to Henry and he.,, well,.,he keeps trying to Identlfy the hold-up men, He's already been wro~ twice and now..,well now he's Cot his eye on you. On me? le JOE AT~40~ 0182258
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14 Ye~. And believe me, I apologize in advance, r~. Fay. JOE But... how come he picked on me? EMMA That rlr~ you've got on. He eald %he hold-~p m~n wore one just llke it. (CHUOELES) Ye~'re klddln~. JOE No, I'm not, believe me, this is very serious to Henry. He w~nted to go to the oonductor and c~ll the police. JOE Yon didn't let h~. Of oo%Irso net, humor h~m, will yo~, Mr. Fay. B~t if he does start asking ym~ q~eetlons, j~st JOE 8~re thing, Mrs. Miller, leave it to me. i le FII-XO 1 0182259 II
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~N~Y (OO~E~ IN) Hollo, Z¢. ~ay, hollo Farna, d~d I miBs anyth~r~? . j JOE Not a thi~, Mr. ~ller, ~ ~en t~iki*~ aDo~t California ead the weather. Come on, i~ii ~p and have a drln~. ~nat'll it be? H~NRY Nothin~o thank yo~. I... I fool j,~t a little n~rvo~s th~ afternoon. . .. le 8r~O~ 0182?60
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\ : 16 JOE yeah, well a drlnk'll fix you up. L~ke your wife w~s just say~ng to me, you only llve encej you m~ht as well have some f~n out of it. ~J81O: BRIDGE TO: O~'D; RE~STABLI~ TRAIN. THEN UNDO: DAVE (ANGRILY) Some fLm, h~h, gettlr6 off the train in the middle ef nowhere. I love this. JOE All right, all right, shop b~eflr~ ~d pack that bag, we're due in this whistle-stop any minute. DAVE You're sure thIe Is the ~y, Joe? JOE -~ ~Aow many tR~os do I have to tell yoR; He works ~n the Brldgotown Bank, he spotted this rlng of mine, his w~fe Bays the {~uy ~s practically a nut, he's been tryln~ to Idontlfy hold-up m~n for the l~t year. DAVE 80 Whah do we ~o when we get off at this joint? IQ ATe01 01~2761
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17 JOE Take the flr~t plane back to l~illy and lay low awhile. ~.tnen gho goon flnd8 out we're gone, he'll start yelling m~u~or. DAVE Of all the cranny luck, jnst when wotro s~ttlr~ !oretty...(.$.~ X~QOK ON DOOR) yeah, what le it? JOE That's probably %.he porter, I told hg, to lot tm know when we|re oorni~ into pine Valley. (PROJEOT) Oomo In. (~ HENRY Good evenir~, ~. Fay, I hope llm not ~let~rbing yet@ JOE (M0~ARILY UPSET) Well, Mr. Miller, hollo, how ~ro you, o~me on ~n, Yol~...llh,..yo~l haven't mot my partner, have you, Mro ~llor~ Mr. Gormor. Thlo... this is the gontl~man I've boon telllng you abo~t, ~. JHr. Miller of the Brldgotown Ban~. ~bll, ~hat ar~ yon doi~ b~ck at thls end of the train, Hr. Miller. HN~RY Well I hope you won't mSnd, Mr. 9ky, but I saw yo~ readll~; one of those John Ha~on doteetlvo storles ~n the ol~b car this afternoon and I wondered... 10 ~T~OI O?B2F62 i,
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(TRYING TO GET RID OF HIM) Mr. Miller. 18 JOE You ~n% ~o borrow it. 8~re thin6, ~l~e,/whoro s thst book? DAVE I jL~b paok~4 L'~, Joe. I mean, ~t's in your su~to~se.o. P~gRY If Itts too much t~o~ble, Mr. Fay... JOE (HASTILY) No, no, not at all. (SOUND: CLIOK OF ~UITDASE) ~lad to lot yo~ have it. HENRY ~iI +/~%nk yon. Itm very fond of Mason's stories. Thorets nothln~ llko a 6ood murder... ( D. JOE (NER?OUSLY) Yeah, wha6 Ls It? (~ Oomin~ in to Pine Valley, goublemon. JOE All r~ght~ Porter, th~nk~. (N,~) Yo¢~ sate yoI~ p~t the book In here, ~. / le RTH01 0"1192,~.63
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yeahj of co~Irso~ Itm s,/ro. 19 HENRY Now if it's too m~oh trouble, Mr. Fay... No, no, not at all. (A~RILY) I tell yoI~, I put it in there: (~OEEY LAUGH) JOE DAVE Hore~ let me look. JOE I n~ver can find anythln~ In that bsg. HENRy That's all right. (BOUND: ~RAIN HAS B~EN 8LOWING) porter Bay this station was? JOE Pine Valley. It's ~nst a Y;hlctle-stOp. HK~RY Oh, Pino Valley. I llke to keep track of all the s%atlons, it make~ the trip more Interocti~, don't you, JOE le ~at ~id the
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2O DAVE Hero it is. (SHOVING THE BOOK AT h~Y) ,TOE -~ T~ko It to your ee~ No. Miller, keep it as loiE as you want. (SOUNDI TRAIN CO~I[~D TO A 8TO~) H~RY Did you read all of this, Nr. Fay? JOE ye~h, ~reat story, you'll love it. HE~Y I'm m~co I will. You know tharole one th~ absL%b a John Mason detective story... .. ', .... / / DAVE (POINTED) JooA/dan't you want to 6or out here and send that telegram? ( m~. • JOE Oh ye~/a, that's right, the tol%zrsm.,. Here's the book, Mr. Miller. le AtH01 0"182765
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21 DAVE You'll exm~e u~, Mr. Miller, we've get to Bend an ~npor~nt buslnoa~ tel ~ram. K~RY Oh, of OOL~CSB, Itm Be eor~, of~ioe~ right there. I m%ppose you'll have to hlzrry, ~ine we s~ay bore very lon~. JO~. Y~sh, I guese we better hurry... H~Ry ~h you know, 1%hlnk %ha~ off leo le closed. DAVE H¢~. I don't se~ any li@it /~ide. (~I~) Thero'B the tel~ral~ 1 ~on't ~Y I bhlnk the ~vhole etat~on ~e Closed. DAVE Woll, we'll take a chance any~y. Come on, Joe. JOE Uh... Bee you later, Hr. Niller. I~ITHO 1 0182266 II
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(G 0 II~V~ OFF) (U~]~ HIB BREATH) (STRUGGLING) Okay. it. 22 HENRY Yes, of co~rsoj and thanks for the Peek, [~. Fay. JOE Come on, lot's got out of hero, gab the b~s. DAVE Hero, you tako this one, it's Got the do~h in I 60% it. Come on, h~ry. JOE DAVE That wa~ a close oo11, ~I r~ht... (SOUND: For the luvva mike, ~.. JOE Hurry L~p. ~to..: It's lockod~ Corse on,,, TRAIN. BOOR OPEN. DAVE (SOUND: P4~TTL~ OF CAR DOOR ENOB~ JOE Where's that fool porter: T~AIS STA~S NO V~) Open the door...opon 16 fgF}(01 0~{~226,~ il
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DA~ Oome on, the no~ oar. ~80UND: RATTLING OF K~OB) BOUND:. TRAIN PIOKI~ UP 8PEED. Kick ~ open~ l'm telling you It'e locked.! 0 • 2 Mr. Fay? khs the door locked. yoah, It was locked. JOE We'll never ~Qt there in time. Porter: DAVE JOE (~QUND: RETRY JOE HEnRy JOE ;~RE I~ATTLING OF ENOB) ~0 RTH01 01822'68 "i
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Oh what a sh~e. (RECOV~ING HIS FOISE) SO~F~O p~aoe 91so~ 24 }~NRY Now you o~nVt send your tole6ram~ can yo~. JOE It~s...ItlB okay, we ~ se~d it from HENRY Yu~, 1 8~oss you can send it later in the mornln~ when we get to salt Lake City. Bait Lake2 DAVE h~Ry Yes. I remember tho schedule, there aren't any stops betwee~ here and Salt Lake City~ Well... ~h...~Im sorry you eol~dnVt send ye~r tele6ram, Y~. Fay. Uh...~ood night a~a~n, and thanks for the boo . ~SOUND: DOOR OPEN) JOE Dontt mention it. (~} " DAVE No stops between here and Salt Lake. JOE That's sweet, Isn't ~t. le BTH01 0"182269
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25 DAVE Ye~h. ~at are yon ~olng to do about it. JOE I don't know. Woql have to figure somethin~ out. DAVE OP~y, this is your h88daohe ... go sheBA, start figurlr~. TO A CURTAI~I. (~B~IAL) ]e RTH01 0182770 ]]
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THE FBI II,] PEACE AND WAR SEPTEMBER 4, i~52 MIDDLE COMF~RCIAL TICE: BARUCH: -E- EI~ ON ACT I Back to "The Serpent Ring" in JL~st a ,rJorne~t. Smokers, there~a no ~oubt about it -- Luakles taste better. And this better taste starts with Luckles~ fine tobacco. Yes, DS/MET -- Lt:ck$ StriKe means fi~ie tobacco in a cigarette thatr~ ~s~e better to taste clcsns.~_~, f re_~h~r, sra~other. Cleaner? You bat! In a Lucky you have a perfect cylinder of fine, clean tobacco -- free fraa tho~s annoying lo}se end~ that get in your mouth and spoil the taste. Fresher? Of course! Lucktes are fully packed -- ~Ithout air spaces -- hot spots that burn too fast -- taste hat, harsh and dry. An~ every pack of h~ckics ie extra fresher taste. And smoother? Yes, tightly seale~ to keep in that inOasOl Luckies~ long strands of fine, mil~, good-tasting tobacco are made into 8 cigarette that draw~ freely and ssakes ~rl]oothly. So friends, enjoy a betted-tasting cigarette -- a cleaner, fresha._____fqr, smoother smoke! Be W~ppy -- Go Lucky! Make your next carton Lucky Sbri~e! MUSIC: (SHOW THEME) RT~01 0182771 II
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26 And now back to "The FBI in Peace and War" ~q ~ernent Rin~. MUSIC: THEF~ AND OUT FOR: ~OUND: E$TAFLISH TRAIN. LOSE UNII~R: Hor~yo,. (I~EOCOUPIED) Yes, dear. HENRy and tenlghtt~ story... ~MA It's two A.M., Henry, and I think it's ~ust about t~mo you pt~t down that book. HENRY If the l~ght bothers yo~, dear... Itls not the light, Itms j~l~t ~ fool detective stories, every t~me yea ~et hold of one, yo~ stay up the whole night. Ye~, dear. le ~T~O? 01822P2
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(" 27 ~lo le~t you cm~id do when we're on oar vacation... (g~'E STOPS) Henry, ym~'ro not readln6 the book at all. No, dear, Ifm thlnki~. At this time of night? HENRy I was jnsb wondering why they wanted ~o send a to]q~ram. What in the world are you talklrg about? HBmy Ft. Fay, and that /%~. Gormor. They were gein6 to send a telegram at Pine Valley. Do yon suppose theylre aa~plolous, Emma. E~MA (EXPLODII, D ) 81~pioio~.t Henry, if yol~ donlt mtop this nonsense... H~Y RTH01 0182723
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28 It's J~at ridic~lous, the t's all' If Mr, Fay la suspicious of anyth~[~, ~t'll be yo~r sanity. I told him you'd act q~eer and ~f yea don't ~top... R~RY Yon told him? Told him v~at, Drma? Her~ry, I refused to be Qmbarrassed every t~Ro we.°. ~t di~ you toll him? I told him what I'd tell anybody ~en you aot this way. I said y~u'd probably s~pect him of boing~ a bank robber on aooount of that ring. E~ma, you didn't. HF~RY B~NA I most cortalnly did. The next thing you know people will start snln~ yo~ for false aooasatlons. HENRY Yell bold him I s~spocted him. Is RTNO? O~lB22p4
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r / Oh stop talkin~ like a detective story. HENRY That's it' Thatls it, ~n: They weren't golr~ to send a telegram, they were trying to get off the train' Henry... F~'~ HENRY They were, l'm poslti~o, Their bags were packed, N~. Fay had to open his to get me the book. Now listen to me, Henry... (DETraINED) ~A HENRY I'm not ~oi~ to listen any lon~er. I'm goi~ to the cond~ictor right now. To,Ire not Eolng to do any e~eh th~, it's two o'clock in the morning. ~, these men are desperadoes, patenti~l killers.°. 18 ATR01 01B2775
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3o I will not lot yo~ wake ~p the whol~ traln at thls hoar, Henry Miller. HENRY They'w get to be steppe, ~:~la. It'~ my duty as a o~tlzen. FF4WA Vury well, go to the c~ndactor, ruin our vacation, do ~hatever But ~hen we get to Bolt Lake I'm getting the first train you llke. back. HE~rRY I mean I%, Henry. Go ahead, oall the conduotor, raise an a~oar. you'll get more than you bargalnod for, you ~Llst see if you dont%. MUSIC: IN AND UNDER FOR: ~CE B~ ~ by plan~ six A.M.~ will board Western Limited after fla6 down, please extend all ~osslble coeporatlon, passenger age~by a~horlty of 8. ~btzel, general manager. SOUND: TRAIN ESTABM~. ~08E UNEF~z t~l r ~01 0182?26
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..... • , ,.~ ...... ~ .6 31 (~L~pILY) yes, de~r. F2MA Henry... h~I~RY K~MA Yan can't sit L~p in front of %h~$ win~ow all n~ht. Five o Volook. It's ~etti~6 light out. ENMA Go to bed, ploase. All right, de~r. HENRY F,~MA ~hat t~me la it? Yan wonlt be fit for a thir6 when we get to Los ~eles, and Helon's planned so n~ny trips... All r~ght, Fro, I'ii go to bed. Io ~]'~07 01822?2
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32 EP~A (RELEWflNG) Henry, I don't w~n% to sound moan, really 3 don't;, but this is our vacat£on and if yo~tre golr~ to 50 exoand m~speQtlz~ people and ~poillnE thlr6e... UND. Goodness, who's hhat. HENRY I'm sure I don't know, E~n~. (UP) Yes? JOE (OFF) Can ~ talk to yoi~ a aecond, Mr. Miller? This is F~. ~y. (LOWED VOIgE) Mr. Fay, ~hat do yo~ 8~pposo he wsnts? Hand me my robe. (UP) Jl~t a second, Mr. Fay. HENRY You don't suppose he wants his book back already?. EN~A How should I know. le P~THO I 0182778 i
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33 k~rRy (BOUND: DOOR OPEN) Yes~ }~r. Fay? JOE You mind if Mr. Gorraer and I come in a ~econd, Mr. Miller? /mportant. kbll, my w~fe and I... HENnRy It's (GENTLY FOROINGHIS WAY IN) ~t the be4~s ri6ht there. (SObq~D: DOOR CLOSEDI 8orry to bother you, ~s. ~ller, b~t since you were so nice to me, woql be easy on you. (FRIGRT~ED) Henry... Bit down, Mr. Miller. This ~tls loaded. JOE We won't stay a m~n~te...okay~-]~ # En~A JOE is what you think it is, a gun. And RENRY Mr. Fay... DAVE Sit down, Mr. M~llor. Do l~ke Mr. Fay 8aye s~A you won't get h~rt, le BTHO'I 0 82229
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34 H~RY kh~t,,,~hat's the ido~, Mr. F~y? JOE You don't kmow? I should think ym~ would. Honry... (FRIGHTENED TRIUMPH) I... (ORANG) ~onry,, ° I was rlght, wasn't I, Emma. You...yo~ are the men who held up ol~r bank, arsnVt you? JOE Oo[11d be. Mrs. Miller..oyou'ro making too much noise, if you don't m~nd. (ORYING 80FTLY) Get out of here, please... JOE ~.~.~hat her ~p. I0 At"NO I 01~2780
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35 ATH01 01192781
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36 JOE Well, I'ii tell yo~l, Mr. Miller. You are what l'd call a cla~a-h blabb~Z~ol~th, so we're go~ng to keep yon ~nlct till we get into Salt Lake City. ~hen we get Ins you're going to stay here in this o~nl~rb~ont till ~r. Gormor and I get off %he train. And yo~Ire going to keep your mouth shut, you understand ~hat. HENRY Yo:~'ro going to tie ~ tlp? JOE Thatls the ~de~, And a little adhesive tape over that b/g momth of yenrs when we come into the s+~tlon. HENRY You... you won't get away with this. JOE (0HUCEIES) ~r. Miller~ you read too ~ly detective books, ye~tre talking dlalog~e. HEN~Ry I mean it. Io.. Oh yotl have. I... uh ... I've alre~4y Infonaed the conductor. DAV~ le PITH01 0 B2282
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f 37 HENRY Yes, I have. I've s~pected you all afoot... ~MA No he hasn't, Mr. Gommer, he'~ only talkln6. Henry, they'll kill HENRY He hasn't done anything, Mr. Go~ner. (SOFT CRYING) Henry.., please, please don't make ~t s/~y worse°°. HK~qY (DOGGEDLY) You..° you won't ~et aw~y with it, Mr. Fay. The ~ank had the serial n~ibers on tho~e hundred-dollar bills, they'll get you f In~lly. JOE (QUIETLY }L~RD) All rlg~ht, Mr. Mill~r, that's enough dlalc~e. DAVE Ten after five. ]O RTH01 01~2783
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38 JOE Uh h~h. l~ow look, the both of you, we got about throe ho~rs till we get into Salt Lake and if you act nice, there won't be any trouble. If yoL~ yell, ar do anythin~ foolish, It'lljoe the ~ast time yea ever o~nyour mouth, is that clear. (A ~T) O~y.r.."'~ ~ tzo then up, Bmmr..~MILING) And ]s~t Mrs. N~llar aver by the window, This is her vacation...she wants to ~en the econeny. SOUND: ~ID~E AND LOSE INTO: TRA~ APFROAOBING ~TATION. ~UT PORTER SLOWE. STOPS. WE HEAR Are yot~ A~ent ~ncppard, sir? S~pp~D That's rig~ht, and thI~ is Asent PORT~ Er. Johnson, the condactor, says he|ll be with you as soon as he can. Meantlme if you want anythln~, he ~ays I should take ears of yon. (SOUND: TRAIN GETS UND~rAY) Have yah gontl~en ~md brealdast? BAILEY Yes, we have thanks. We'd llke to go to compartment D, ear 106, plea~eo le P~TMO~ 0~I~278~ II
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39 PORTS Yes, sir, that's the next car. This way, plcase. SHEPPARD Yee, sir? Is Lho dlnlr~ ear open yet? No, sir, not till six thirty. PORT~ SHEppARD PORT~t SHEppARD Good, Yo~n.. (TO BAILEY) They'll probably be in the room, i~ BAILEY SHEppARD yolt wait outside in case tharo's any trouble. le
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4O BAILEY Okay. PORTE~ Hers we are, sir, Compartment D. SOUND: }(NOOK OH DOOR. PAUSE. REPEAT. -~J_ [I i ~ ....... - .... ' ILlll Have you got a pass key? Yez, Birl SHEPPARD PORT~ ~HEppARD Yea, slr. ~S0b~D; ~ ~N DOOR. DOOR OPEN)/Gi~eaa nobody'e in here, sir. ( • E le AT~O~ O'IB2 P86 i
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\~ere's the baggage, Porter? (~UZZLED) (~OUND: 41 BAII~ ~0RT~R Was r~ght here when I made up the berths last night. BAILEY DOOR 0PEN) Nothlr~ in the washroom, ~lop. PORTE I don't ~ndorstand, Bir, looks llbe they j~st moved rIF~ht out. BAILEY Has the train stopped anywhere slnco yea saw the baggage in hero, Porter? PORTER Well now let me see.., we stopped et Pine Valley laet n~ht.., but that w~s before I me~le ap the berths. No sir, we haven't stopped any place since ~ne Valley. ~EPPARD They're on the train then. How many cars are yo~ oarryl,g, Porter. FORTER Ten B~Imans, two louse oars and a diner, air. io ATM01 01B2PB7
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42 8HEPpARD 0~%y, we'll begin at the last oar and go straight through. time are yo~ duo in Salt Lake? khat E~it otolock, ~ir. Two hours, It might not be enoughe 8hop. PO~?ER 8HEppARD BAILEY 8HEPpARD ye~/n, it might not. Will you tell the conductor to meet us in the last c~, porter. PORTER Yes sir, I will. (iO~ 1111 tell h~m right aw~y, BAILEY Ton ~d!mans. 8HEppARD Uh h~q. And ~yoe thoytre not even the pair WeCre look~ng for. BAILEY Maybe. B~%t it looks kind of fRnny olee~iD~ the Dag~e err of here. Their tickets wore for Los An6eles, weren't they. AT~01 0182288 i/
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43 8HEPPARD yeah, it looks fishy all ri~it~ but it doesn't prove anythln~. O~y... let'~ go to the back ~ar and ~et to work on it. ~gSIe ." BRIDGE TOt ~Q_[I~D: ESTABLISH TRAIN. _ .- D~MA ~. ~ormor.,. Yeah, DAVE ~o~I~ you loosen thic strap, please. DAVE Now lookj yo~... Loosen it, ~ y2~o~ OF..~.y, My arm is hartln~. JOE oan fix her up when we ~ct into Salt lake. DAVE B~t donl% yo%~ try any tricks, lady. HENRY RI':401 0182789
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7 ~nat. 44 JOE yolx'ro net going ¢o got ~w~y with this, Pk. Fay, I promise yea. JOE yes, h, yeah, I know. Crime doesn't p~y. Maybe you better tape his mo~th up, ~,~T~ tired of llsteniP~ to h~n. DAVE Good idea. HENRY I mean it, No. Fay. You can tape me up, you can get away wi~h this now, but sooner or later... JOE (A~GRILY, GHABBIHG HIM) Look, blabbermouth, 1 said I was tired of ILstonln~ to you End I meant that. One more crack out of you s~ you111 get a s~ck on the skull th~t'll shut yell up for good. EP~4A Henryp plebe, don't talk, darling. J~t do ~hat they say. H~RY Em~, yoL~ canJt ask me to su~m~t to... le AT~O? 01B2290 ,J
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45 JOE U~_~T~ Do what they say: You hoard the lady. t~po ~p his big mouth before I... S . (LO~RED VOICE) Answer it, ~rs. Hiller. y~? ~o i~ it? (OFF) The conductor, ~a'amo I (A AT) CONDUCTOR We'd llke to see your ticket, please. JOE (LOWERED VOICE) Toll h~m jL~st a rn[n~:te. Jl:st a m]:n~te, pIe~.se. (LO~RE~ VOICE) E~NA JOE Takn the ~traps off,~ Right. (LO~E~q~D VOICE ) Remenber m what ~ Ms got for yo~. DAVE JOE th8 both of you, no tricks or yet~ know Mr, M~ller, I'm talkln~ to you. le AI'~WO I OIB2291 li
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I... I hear you, Mr. Fay. OP~y, Joe. OP~y, Mrs. Mlller, go ahead. 0 • 0 ~I 46 HENRy DAVE JOE CONDUCTOR Sorry to bother you, Malam, may I see your tickets, please? E~MA Yes, of couras, Henry... H~:RY They're right on top of the suitcase, an... CONDUCTOR And may I sse yo~ tickets please, gentlemen. JOE yeah, sure, this isn't oi~ compartment, Conductor, we're j~t vlsltln£~ with Mr. ~dller. Here's our tickets. CONDUCTOR Thank you. Compartment D, car 106. is ~THO? 0182?92 fl
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~t's rf~t. 47 JOE CONDUCTOR 8~EPPARD O~ These are the gentleeen ooo~pylr~ D, 106. ~HEPPARD Thank yon, Conductor. CONDU[JTOR Where is your bcgga6e, gentlemen? (SUSPICIOUSLY) Rlght there. Here are my t~ckets. Thank yOU, r~I~. i0 JOE ~nat's the trouble, Oonduotor? 0~ 0182293
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DAVE ~h~t's the troublo~ Cor~nctor? CONDUCTOR No tro~ble~ sir, I~. ~h~pI~ml ~unts to... HENRY (CONIC- IN) ~o ~ep~° YoB, that's right. Aren't you Mr. W1111~zn Shoppard? ~PP~ My... my name is Miller, Mr. Shepl~.rd, don't you remember me? JOE (ONEAgILY) Henry, why donlt we let the conductor look at the tlekots and get back to o~r card game, h~. HENRY Donlt you rom~Iber me, Mr. ~heppard? I... I e~e to your offlce last year to... to disc~ms those pictures of B~njamln Franklin. SHEPpARD (~UZZLED) ~. Miller? Henry H111er. HENRY 10 BTHO~ 01B2294
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49 JOE Hellry... PITHY Those pictures of Benjamin Franklin, Mr. ~eppOmd, donlt yo~- remember? Oh yOS.o. I do ro~obsr now~ 8HEpPARD DAVE Listen, Mister, I donlt b~ew who yo~ are, b1~t this is a prlvate p~xty ~n here... HE~Y (HAPPILY) That'8 ~II r~ht, ~. Gomaar, ~. ~heppard is an old friond of mine and... JOE Look, wh~t'~ thi~ all about, Conductor? H~RY (TRIb~P~L~NTLY) Abo~t Benjamin Fr~klln, Mr. Fay...and yo~'ve got his picture, I know yo~ have~ JOE ~hat*s the ~tter, Henry, are yol~ Off your head. - ~ Is AT~O'! 0182?95 rl
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You'll see if I am, ~. Fay. (OoMING IN) yeah, Shep. 5O HENRY $HEppARD PAILEY ~ppARD Cover them. Yes, ire under arrest, both of you. HENRY He's got a gtm' That one.| BAILEY Ik'op it, Mister~ Henry~ H~Y It's all r~ht, ~. That's Mr. Sheppszd from the FBI, he's the one who talked to me after the robbery. JOE FBI. le Ar:qo 1 01182796
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That's right. R~&ht, Shep. 8~EppARD Go through their baggage, N~'. BAILEY JOE Now wait a mfnnte, v&at'a the idea... HF~RY He'e the one who held .~p the bar~:, Mr. Sheppard. I'm positive thls t~ae, I know him the mln~te I saw that serpent ring. JOE Lister~ Mister, th~a E~y is j~st a little crazy. Hi~ wife told me he Identlfie~ everybody as that robber. My rgme is Fay, llm ~n the real estate btBineaa... BAILEY Yo~ c~ry ~n ~wf~l lot ~of cash for the real estate b~slnass, ~, Fay,~Hera yo~ ar~ Shep, stllt l~.en~y of h~r~l-d.ollar bille left. HF~RY H~qdrcd-dellar b111B with BenZoin Franklin's I told yo~, didn't I. pietltre, Hr. Fay. le F~ THO ~/ 018279;'
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52 JOE ~hy yo~ orgy little louse... ~ppI'.RD (TAKING HOLD OF ElM) All right, Mr. Fay, let's go back to your compartmant till we get to Salt Lake City, Mr. Miller... HENRY Yes? SHEPPARD Woi~Id it be possible far you to got off at Salt Lake and make a for~ idontlf Icatlon? HENRY It certainly wonld be possible, Hr. ~eppard. 8HEPPARD Good. All ri~t, hold out your hand~, both of yo~. (~ OF HANDCUFFS) ~Y ~. Fay. JOE (80URLy) Yo . i0 ATe01 0182~9B
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HENRY I hate to ~ay I told you so, Hr. F~y...but I told you Be, digit I. TO A OURTAIN. i0 AI'%0 ? 0182F99
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T}rl FB~ IIJ PEACE A~ WAR -C- SEPT. ~, 1952 CLOSING COI~ERC IAL TICE: In Just a moment, A~ent Sheppard will tell you what happened to the people in tonightrs story. BARUCH. Friends, youlll find L,.tckies taste battier -- tas_%~ cleaner,__ ... ~freshel" ... smoother because Luck~ Strike ~Ives you fine, mild, Eood-tastinF tobacco in a cigarette thatTs made better to taste bettor. Luckies taste cleane_r because Luckleal perfect cylinder of fins, clean tobacco is free from those annoyln~ loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the taste. Luckies taste fresher because they:~s fully packed ~llthout air spaces -- hot spots that bul.n too fast -- taste hot, harsh and dry. And ever,y pack of Luckles is extra ti.~;htly sealed to keep in that fresher taste. Lueklea taste 8~oother because is a Lucky you get ~on~" stranr]s of fine, mild [,'oad-tastlr5 tobacco in a cigarette that d~a~,Is f~'ealy and s~okea smoothty. Yes, friends, Lucklee taste better[ So for your own ]~sal deep-down smeking enjoyment -- for a c~ean~r~ ~ fresher, s~oot~r' ~ smoke -- Be Happy -- Go Lucky! Make your next carton Lucky Strike! MUSIC: (FANFARE) AI'H01 01~2000 h
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THE Eel IN fLACE AND WAR ,SEPTEMBER 4, 1952 MIDDLE COMP~;RCIAL TICE: Bac~ to BARUCH: MUSIC: -2- ELD OF ACT I "The Serpent Ring" in Just a ,~,or~ent. S~o~ers, thereTe no ~oubt about it -- Luckles taste better. And this better taste starts ~ith i.~ckiest fine tobacco, Yes, LS/MFT -- Lucky Strike ~eans fine tobacco in a ci~erette that's ~.a-ie better to taste cleaner, ~j~fr., smoother. Cleaner? You bet[ In a Lucky you have a perfect cylinder of fine, clean tobacco -- free from those annoying loose en4s that get in your ,~outh and s,ooll the taste. Fre si<er_? Of ..... ' ~oar .... Lucklee are fully packed -- without air spaces -- hot spots that burn too ~e~t -- taste h~t, harsh and dry. And every pack of h~ckies is extra fresher taste. An6 smoother? Yes, tightly sealed to keep in that Indeed[ LucklesI long strand~ of fine, ml14, go~d-tastlng tobacco are made into e cigarette that dra~ freely and s~okes s~lootdly. So frlen~s, enjoy a better-tastlng cigarette -- a cleaner, fresher, smoother smoke! Be Happy -- Go Lucky! Make your next carton Lucky Strike! (SHOW THEME) PiTt401 0182801
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k ..~. : c ~ ...... ~n~ 3- _ ~. . 8HEPPARD Jone~h Fay and Davld Gorger were brol~ht to trial for the rob~ry of the Brld~etown National B~nk and the defense att~pod to dleerod~t the testimony of Henry Miller llltmtratl~ the wltnees's provi@ue fal~o idontlfaetlons. ~t FBI testf~ony placing Fay and Gorger in the vsrlou~ places ~lere the hundred-dollar bille had been pa~eed aM the balance of the money recovered on the train, convlncod a ~l~ry of their g~ilt. Eaoh was sontence~ to fifteen years in prison. ~ome t~e before the trial, Josol~h Fay encceedcd in gotti~ rid of ... The Serpent Ri~, le PI'I- ~01 01B2802 ,i
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• THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR ZEPT. 4, 1992 CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONT~D) -D- TICE: MUS I C : SARUCH: MUSIC: TICE: AI] ne~es and characters used on thls program are fictitious. Any similarity to persons llvin~ or dead is purely colneidental. This program is based on Frederick L. CollinsI copyrighted book ~JTHE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" ... and is not an offle~el pro~re~ of the ~Z. In tonlghtts ~tory -o" ::::,, ,'? .-',, played the part of ~.~ ,~, .~z~,:~:, ~ /£_~____j,u~ .~:..,~ ~_.~. The radio '""~' FBI ~U PEACE AND WAR" iS dramatization for i~fl. i,iritten by Louis pelletlar and Jack Finks, These pregrems are produced and directed by Betty Msndeville. De sure to listen to next Thursdayls story, "T~ I~TII N~N", on "T~ FBI IN PEACE AND WAR", Same time -- same stetlon. (SHOW THEME " UP AUD ~,D~R) "T}~: FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" h~s been selected as one cf the programs to be heard by our Armed Forces overseas through the facilities of the A~,med Forces Radio Service. (SHOW THE[~g - UP AID OUT) THIS IS THE CBS ~{ADIO HE;T,,~ORK, ....... fgr1401 0182803
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~HURSD.[Y. 8BPI~]~LI~ ii. 1952 " t : Lnuis pellotiem ~-~[ Jack Fi~lk9 DL ATHO'I 0~82804
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TICE: MUSIC: TICE: -A- TEE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY "THE FBI IN PEACE AND ~TAH" OPENING COMMERCIAL SEPT~,~RII~ THURSDAY LUCKY STRIKE presents o.. "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR"! (FANFARE) Another sreat story based on Fre0erlak L. Collins copyrighted book, "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". Drama ... Thrills .... Action! Bat first .... Andre Bsrach! BARUCH: Friends, Lucklee taste better -- cleaner fresher s~oother! This better taste starts with LuckiesT fine, mild, good-tastlng tobacco. Remember, LS/MST -- Lucky ctrlke means flne tobacco. And Lack~es taste better because theyTre ~ade bette_.__~r-- made to taste el.__e_~neqr, fresher, smoother. 8o for real smoking snJoymsnt -- Be Happy - Go Lucky, Make oZou/rnext carton -- Lucky Strike! M[[SIC: (SHOW THEME UP AND FADE) igT~:O? 0782805 I
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-I- ANNCR* Toni~'~ ~tory on "The FBI In Po~oo an~ i~r"...T~e ~ ~. GORDOI;: (O0~IN~ I~) ~n~ your nnm% ~ir~ i~...N~llor. O~RL: (OORR~OTINO) )lill~r, O~rl Nill~r. N~ller, I'm ~orry. Your occup~tlon, ~c, Ni~lor? O~RL: GORDON: Uh huh. F~. Ylillor, my nn~o is Gordon. ~efen~nt in thi~ cass, F~. Niohola~ F~rron, N~. Forron or n~sslf? O,~L: Do you kno~e~m~. ~e~u~ for the Attornoy @onoralr~ office. I'm repro~ontln~ ~o Do you know ei~or He'~ ~oln~ to ~ro~oute D~
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NoD I 4onTt know him, (TO AT~OR~Y ) for number twelve, -2- Oz%RL~ GORDON: I'm ~atiefied, ~. No~nan. He'~ all ri@~t wJta me ATTORA~Y: Uh huh. (TO O~%RL) Ft. Miller. tai~ Io an action brouzht by the State again~t~. Ferron. Havo you ever been involved in any lltization with the State? ~0. Oir, O,~L: ATTORi~Y: Then you would have no Rar%ioul~ preju4~oo in this ca~e one way or the OthOr, NO, I wouldnlt. O,~RL: ATTORNEY: An agont of the F5i, the Federal Bura%u of Invostlgation, i~ goln~ to be oalled upon to give to~timony. That wouldn't prejudice you either, C.%RL: No, ~ir, I would only go by the faot~. DL #3TKO 1 0182807 i i
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-3- I ~ee, tOank you. (TO 90RI~N) ~LII right with me too, )~. Gordon, GORDOn: T~at about comple%eo our liar ~n• ATTOR~Y: Yes. (SLIGHT FROJEOT) Olerk...will you inform Judge Ry~m that a jury hag been agreed upon• ~JSIO: ~TING ;~ID UNIER, B~PPkRD: In the Fall of laat year a jury ',~a fiwally ~cleoted in the o~o brought ly~t~,~ 5~L~ o~ ~w Ju~v~ ngain~% one of tJ~c natien'B leading racketeers. For a period qf~era~ montha the etaff of the Attorney General'~ office ha~cquire~ the pegm~@~mYg~evldonoc necessary to bring in an indictment, and now that the preliminary step had been aecompliehed everyone involvw6 was determined net to let t~e eluaive defendant slip away as he had done so often in the pa~t. But bringing a cri~i~l to tri~l le one thing, ~eouring a verdict against him i~ another. Twelve oltlzene control thi~ delicate b~lanee ~heel, ~elve citizens, and any~of them enough to make the cliff emcee between acquittal and convletion...from t~e first through the twelfth• Y IN LOG OU~ BOOR OPEN. FOOTSTEPS. T~N DOC~ QLOSE.DL RT~01 0182808 ill
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(OFF) Carl? (U~ABILY) -4- }{~LP/'h I~ that you? (OOI~/~IG IN) O,IRL: Yes, Helen~ itS~mo, HELEN: A BITI"m~ FRUBTR,ITED WO;%IN) OARL: (ABOUT FIFTY. then. What happened? I'ii tell you aftar I wash up, dear, I... HEL~: Oarl... I just got home. You can put G~em away after you toll m. OL%RL: Helen. • • HELEI~: Are you on the jury or aren't you. (THEN) Oa/-I... So why don't you answer CARL| Let me at least put ~way t~ese ~umples. Wh~t b2.ppened? Wolf? DL PITH01 0182809
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(~KT~ i BRE.~TH) (PLi~A,~D) O~%RL: I'm the twelfth nm~. HEL~: Ourl, so why didn't you my so. Is it? I'm not so sure. It is, believe me i% is, Helen,,, T~%t1~ flno, ~ELEN: Here, let me take your things. OA%RL: You go right insi4e and w~s11 up, 4inner will be read~ in ~ few minute~, (B~LES AT HIM NOW) Pot roast, the ~y you like i~, G~L: ~n~t? I Oant t, (~/~) l...l'm not going to do it. I HELEM: (T~IN) l~o.l'vemadeupmyT~nd. DL ~ F;401 0182810 it
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(COOL) Oh you have. -6 H~LE?!: giqL: Ye~. (PLEADING) Helen, don't ata~t anything° I'ii at~%rt somo~@~ing all ri~It. I'Ii start plenty. Helen,,. HELEN: I t~ou~ht we h~t thia all ~ettled, Oaz~. (NISERADLY) We did° I know. not going through with i%. Pl~%ee, O.~h: B~ it juat lan~t any good, Itm ~ vLE~: O~L: I'm a Good oitlzen: Helen. (HOLDING }~ELF IN) call Ferron'a la~,~er this very minute... I.Je HEL~!: Oarl. if you don't pick up that phone ~r~L DL RTH01 0182811 ,,,i
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(TOR~NT~D, ~qE~(8 OUT) (A BE&T) Very well. OIRL I e~n't, I tell you.~ ~LEN: I wenlt 40 ~t~ QARLz I...I'm ~orryj Helen, but l*ve thought it ~II out. Thi~ eountry~ been ~Ood to me.,, ~/~LENa (OONTEMPTU~JS) It has, h~. l~le been good to you, Z like that. A ~ixty-dellsr a ~eek ~ale~n.,. Don~t talk llke that, Helen, HELF/q: (~NGRILY) I'ii talk anyway I want] How many people get ~ eb~nee like taia. How n~uny? ,ind youlre-%m~&frai4 to take i% when it oome~, O,%RLI (DOGGED) I'm no$ ~oin~ through with i%, I donl% like the whole ida. Yo~ den1%~ Isnt$ that too h~d, You don't 1£ke twenty, ~hirty Khousand ~ollara oith~r~ do you, You don~ ~n% to have ye~ wife l~ve like deoen~ normal peo~le~ do you. DL f TM01 0182812
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-8- It i~nit that i donlt ~nt,~° O,~RL: (OVERLAPPING) dead, you'd rather be a "good cl%£zen." ~d~) Well I don%. (DIAL "0") HELEN: You'd rathor stay in your erummy job till you drop You like that. (S_~: O~L: (k~RRIED) ~t are you doing? HELEN: What do you think I'm doing? (rNT~) Hollo, operator, I want to get the business numbor of Mr. Jame~ Gordon, ho1~ an attorney in this city. I don't ~ve a phone book handy. HSlOn,., HI HEN. (INTO PHONE) Gordon, th~t'~ right, thank you. O~L: H~len, li~ton to mo,., DL RTR01 01828~3 ,%
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"9- }IELEN: I'm tired listening. We're not lotting eaey money elip through our fingere this time, Carl, You don% get a chance like this every day in the week...ws're going through with it whether you like it or not. Oka~eet. NICK: NGeIO : OV~ AND OUT. NIOK: (SOFT LAUGH) So hot11 vote not guil%y if the price is right, hun, GORDONz T~t'~ what hie wife aaid. Hie wife, NICK: DL R r,-'qo 1 0182814- t
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"7- -lO- GORDON: Didn't I tell you, it w~ ~a. Miller came to sou me. She said it w~s bBtter for her husband to ats, y in the background. (THINKING) bail, Jim? Tomorrow, NICK: Yeah, woli~he~'a rlgnt. A ~on you getting me out on GC~DON: the next d~y. Couple of day~. (N~q~OWING) ~hat? NIOK: GORDON: We don't want to rush thing% Nick. NICK: (RA~ING BUDI~NLY) Ruin thinK~: We don't %an~ to ru~h thlng~I• Y told you to got mo out rigat a~y. dldn~ I| What am I paying you fort. GORDOH: (STUNG) Now hold on, Nick... NIOK: (LOW NOW, UGLY) Look. Jim, don't you never tell me what to dn. DL FIT ,~I0 "1 0'182815
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~ill l'm P~ying.., Don't, it in here. -II- GC~DON: NICK: I told you once I told you a hundred ti~e, I don't like GORDON: Nick... NICE: They got no right to hole me up in here, no right at all. get me out, Jim. You ha%r? (PAUSE) Jim... GC~DOi~: (~ARILY) Yos, Nick, I hear. NIOK: You ~aw Joo Fisher, didn't you? Okay. (OALHII{G) Uh huh. GORDON: NICK: 80 monoyls no worry. Fi~her give you anything you need. GORDON: Money won't buy everything, Nick. You DL AT)401 0182816 i:
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Tell me what it wonlt, I can got you out on bail. Theylve got a case, Nick. They've had caees before. This i~ different. You t~ink so. -12" NICK: GORDON: But the trial's set for n~xt week. NICK: GORDON: NIOK: GORDON: Much different. They've got you dead to rights. NIOK: They've ~dme dead te righte before. G(~DON: T~is time it could etick. ~ho'~ side are you onj Jim? NIOE: R'I'~01 DL 01B281P
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Niok,o, It could s~ick? All right. How muoh? -13- GORDON: NICK: ~Jith a j~or voting the other way? GORDON: But that'~ going ts co~t you plenty. NICK: Fifty thousand, ~o a%id. Fifty. They'd settle for half. Uh huh. A bung j~y? GORDON: NICK: GORDON: NICE: Tnat'd beat thi~ rap, Jim~ GORDON: They'd bare to call a now trial. NICE: Give it to them, DL ATH01 01~28 18
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Twenty-five t~ou~d. (THIN 3MYLE ) -14- GORDON: NICKI GORDON: 8he*~ & shrewd operator, Millor~ wifo. She wants t~o money in a4vance. See Fisher, Okay, Nick. I want time, Jim. NIOE: Tell him I ~%id, GORDON: If thatls how you wan% it. NICE: l wan% to beatth~ rap. GORDON: Well you'll do that all right, Nick. ~ith the twelfth man in the jury box]~id off...~ guaran~ce...ycu'~! beat it. MUSIC: HITS IN l~O UNDI~R pf~: DL AT~O~ 0~B28~9
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-15 ATTOP~Y: To ~eppardm Federal Bureau of Inveatigation, Waahlngton. confidential. JudGe Ryan aete Nicholae Ferron trial for nex% week. Will appreciate Rent Reynolda and your presence a few c~ys earlier %o go over testimony. Sign it, Nov~qn, Office of the Attorney General. ~SIO: OVER AND OUT. ATTORNgY: (~) Well "dle~e you are, gentl~nen. T~ere'a the St8.%oI e ease, REYNOLDS: Un huh, SHEPP,~RD: You feel oonfident you oo~n get a conviction, I~iI. ATTORI~Y: Donlt you? SHEPP~RD: Well, if Ferron had any other l~wyer but Jim Gordon...(I~S IT I know, ~LTTOPd~I: Shop. Gorden'~ a aharp cookie. ~u% WO ~eo the ovldonoe. DL RTH01 0102020 if
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U~ huh. Al~o, wo h~ve your ~eatlmony, Uh huh. You tO0, ll~ve? (~PTIOIU~) ATTOP~Y) R6~NOLDG: &TTORI~'Y: REYNOLDS: Well I know you've got the evidonoe, Phil, testimony on top of it. (SMILES) But • • • ATTO~EY: But Ferron still ~%~ Jim Gor4on, is th~.t it. REYNOLDS: Ju~ ~bout. £T£ORI~Y: YOU t~ink it v~8 a mistake to go to trial? REY~IOLDS: Or* no, on the contrary. \ ,tnd oUr DL F~ T,-~O 1 0182821
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-~7- BF~PP~Ih Frankly, it's hard to ~eo how Gordon possibly o~%n bess this one. ATTOR~YI M~/ feeling. What about the jurors. ~]il? REYNOLDS: ATTORneY: Well, Judge Ryan has promised to speak to them in his.ehamber~ before tho trial. But I ~nt something more than that. Youlve both rm%d a transcript of Ferronts Ia8% trlal~ h~ventt you$ 8}~PP.iRD: YOS, WO ~ve. ATT(hq~Y: Well then you know what we're up ag~in~$ on bhat score. SHEPP,h~3I U~ huh. ATTORFEY: Naturally I was very careful in my selection of jurors, but e.s you point out Ferren'~ lawyer is ~ very slick article. He rmvmage4 to pull a rabbit out of ~le hat when ~ere wa~ an apl~xront air-~ight ease ~gathst him lash time. And honestly, that's why I ~s ~o anxiou~ to got you both here before the trial. DL FflH01 0102822
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Ohock up on the jurors. -18- R~fNOLDS: ATTORNEY: I want to find out all I can about every last one of them, included, SH~PARD: I see. alternates ATTORNEY: Backgrounds, past history, present associatlons) the works, Shop... And, SH~PARD: yes, ATTORNNY: What do you think about a full surveillanoe on Ferron's lawyer and on. Ferron himself - he's getting out on b~il, SH~PARD: You oouldn't hold him? ATTORNEY: Not forever. BH~PARD: I think yes. /3 TMO'/ 011~2023
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-19" ATTORN~f: All riEht, I'ii assign all the men necessary to work with you, And we needn't keep this any secret, gentlemen. If the jurors understand the FBI will be watQhing them, I don't think Ferren'e lawyer will be pullin~ any rabbits out of any hats in this air-tight case. ~____S/9/_ ST G AN L ~UND: H~: (SLIGHT PROJECT) I'ii get it, Carl. SOUND: DOOR OLOSE. FOOTSTEPS CROSS ROOM A~I o HKL~: Who? (F~T~) (WARMLY) from you. GORDON: Nick Ferron~e attorney. 0hNr. Gordon. yes, of course, I've been waiting to hear RT~01 018282,4.
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-20- GORDON: (FILT~q) I imagine you have. HEL~: Well, the trial starts on Monday, you know. GORDON: (FILTER) (ACID) yes, I know. Mrs. Miller, I spoke with my client about that proposition you come to see me about. HELEN: And? GORDON: He'e quite prepared to go through with hie end of the HEL : L~caaho (FILTER) In ndvJ~lc eo (FILT~q) GORDON : Of course° Hl~: GORDON: The money's ready for you. hj ATMO~ 01~2~2-~
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How much monsy. -21- GORDON: (FILTh) Mrs. Miller, let's not diBouse thia over the phone. If you'll drop by my office sometime tomorrow I~m sure we can come to an a~re~ment. lql be there. (F~LT~) Good. yes~ HEZ~N: GORDON: Andj Mrs, Miller.,. HEL[]: GORDON: (FILTh) you might speak to your husband for me. Tell him to act perfectly normal in court. There've been some federal agents noeing around, I wouldn't want them to ~mell anythinG unusual, HEL~: You leave Oorl to me, Mr, Gordon. GORDON: (FILTh) All right, I will. Just remind him of one thing.omy client isn't sympathetic to any slip-ups, hj A~'Y~O 1 0182826
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-22- H~N: Don't worry, there won't be any. I'll see you tomorrow, GORDO~: (FILTER) Tomorrow, right. Goodbye, Mrs. Miller. (~~ 8 CARL: (OFF A LITTLE) you'll see who tomorrow? HEL~: (ANNOYED) Carl... OARL: That w&e Jim Gordon, wasntt it, Helen. (COMING IN) you,re golng to see him. HELEN: 80 what if I am. What of it? CARL: (UNHAPPILY) Helen, why do you have to be so ~rabby. I've got a job, we've saved up a little money in the bank...(STOP~) Helen.. H~EN: (D~INITELY) I'm ~oin~ to see Mr. Gordon tomorrow, we're going %o have e lot of money in the bank. hi fll- 01 0782822
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Helen, pleeBe.° - \ -23- C~RL: I teld you, carl. this time. I'm net letting easy money Blip through ~ fingerB CARL~ But supposing somebody found out.., Oh don't be such a scarecrow, you make me eick, out? Helen,,, CARL: HELEN: Twenty-five thouBand dollars. Carl. the right way. OARL: please listen %0 me, juet once. How could they find And all you have to do ie vote HELEN: I told you I'm tired liotening. I've been listening to you for thirty yeare and all it ever got elther of us wee a headache. hj AYX01 0~82828 l i[
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-24- OARL: You can't ever tell where this kind of thing will end up... H~: Maybe you can't. But I'm telling you it'll end up on Easy Btreet, and we're going to be on it for the rest of our days. CARL: I hope you know what you're doing, Helen. H~L~ I I know. Now etop bellyaching and open up a couple cans of beers wetre going to celebrate, Oelebrate. G~L: That's ~t I eaid, Garlo Whoever thought you and me would ever see this kind of money? Oelebrato, that's what we're going to do.,l've got a feeling this is a night we'll want to remember, ~IV$1C: TO A flL~RTAIN. hj AT~01 01821~29
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAH SEPTEMBER ii, 1952 MIDDLE COMmeRCIAL MUSIC: TZCE: BARUCH: MUSIC: (TO A CURTAIN} END OF ACT I Back to "The 12th Man" in Just e moment. Smokers, there's no doubt about it -- Luckiea taste better. And this better taste starts with Luckies~ fine tobacco. Yea, LS/NFT -- Lucky Strike ~esna fine tobacco in a cigarette thatls made bstte___r to taste cleane~, fr__cs_~e~, amooths£, Cleaner? You bert ~n a Lucky you have a perfect cyl~naer of f~ne, clean tobacco -- free fro~ those annoying loose ends that get in your mouth an5 epoll the taste. Frsshsr_[ Of course! Luskles are fully packe~-- without air spaces -- hot spots that barn too fast -- taste hot, harsh and dry. And every pack of Luckles is extra tightly sealed to keep in Luckies fresher taste. And smoother? Yes, Indeed? LuckiesI long strands of fine, mild, good-tasting tobacco are made into a cigarette that draws freely and amokes smoothly. go friends, enjoy a better-tastlng cigarette -- a cleaner, freehs____~rrr, Smoother smoke! Be Happy -- Go Lucky! Make your next carton Lucky Strikel (SHOW ~} ATe01 O~2830
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ANNOONO~R: And now, back to "The FBI In pesos and War" and tonight's story.,, h~.h_l HU$10: TH~E AND UNDER. SH~PARD: The Btate's ease against Nioholas Forron came to trial on the following Monday, with Ju~e Ryan presiding. ~ent Reynolds and I had meanwhile prooo~d.od along the lines disou~Bed with the prosecuting attorney, We had looked into the backgrounds of the jurors, we had put a full surveillance on Ferronls lawyer and Ferren himself, we h~i deliberately kept our movements ~ar from aeore~, But by the time Monday morning came around we were still in the dark about Jim @ordon's sleight-ef-han~ magio and just what rabbit we could expect him to pull this time out of just what hat. $ • 0 IR~E' (OFF B~-IIND DOOR) Yeah, who is it~ Jim Gordon, ~r~n~--O!m~v1~. ~O~D: CHAIN UNLATOHED. THF~ DOOR OPll~, hj 8I-HOI 0~B2831
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(L~ZY-VOICED) I~ he ready? (OFF) That you, Jim? (SLIGHT PROJECT) (OFF) Sure. I will, (FIIDETY) -26- G'mon in, Jim,j~ Nick'8 been ~aitin~ for you. GORDON : We havenlt much time. IR~E: Just putting on his tie. Nick,,,. NIOK: Be right there. GORDON: Be~ter step on it, Nick, NIOK: Irene, help the man to a cup of java. IR~E: GORDON: ~hat time do you have, Irene? IR~E: Middle of the night, why can't they have these thinge at a mere civilized hour. (~L.~J~I~Z~ Cream and eu~ar? No thanks, hj GORDON: I~TH01 0182832
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\ No coffee? Uh-uh) ~ettlo your nerve@. Ey norvea are all right, ~lept like a baby, (OCCUPIED) What? ~lespo Oh. -27- IR~E: GORDON: IR~E: GORDON z Howls Nick? ~E: (S~) You didn't, huh, G0~DON: GORDON: Li@tsn, maybe I will have a cup after all~ ~uro, it's good and strong, IR~E: ~ ~d~/~ NICK: (COMING IN) "~-fcr me, baby. Morning, Jim. hj RTH01 0182833
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-28- GORDON: Hello, Nick, Nice suit, huh, businesses please, (LAUGHS) Thanks, Natch. JimH. Thank you, One swallow, Huh? Vnlonljuror. : ~' Oh, hj NIOK: Snappy, Got to show those jurors I'm s respectable IR~E: You want ms to spill this? NIOK: Irene, Two sugars? GORDON: Nick, we haven)% much time. NIOK: (DOING SO) %4hish one's our boy? GORDON: NIOK: GORDON: Second row, last one on your right. Twelfth man. RTH01 0182834. I
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Here all set, Uh huh. HIOK: GORDON: IRENE: For twenty-five thousand I should think he would be. NICE: How many d~ys you figure on, Jim? GORDON: Hard to tell. Finish your coffee. HICK: A week? Ten days? It all depends, Nick. Jim. Uh huh. (CLOSE) Wish me luck? hj GORDOn|: IR~E: N ICK: Irene, you'll be in touch through A?'~O I 0182835
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F~. (THEY KISS, THe4) -30- IR~E: Only I guess this %ires you won't be needir~ any. yeah, thstls right. fist. NIOK: you tell the gang they'll be seeing me in no time GORDON: Nick,,, \ SH~PARD: 8heppard speaking. hj A r,'gO '1 0~B2836
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"31- REfNOLD~: (FILTI~) Hello, Shop, this is D~ve. • • /V SHEPPKI~D: , ~ ~.:~ >~, "." .~.~, .,~,~ Oh hello, Dave, hold i~ a aeoond~ (TO ATTORNEf) Phil, ~'s Dave Reyno).ds. (~ GO ahead, Dave, you'r~ in New york? REYNOLDS: (FILTh) That's right, I've been doin~ that check up on banks. Looks as if your hunch waBn't so bad. Ghep. One of the ~urore wives h as an account lu five figures at the geoondNational. (FILTh) Uh huh. Yes? SH~PARD: REYNOLDS: Mrs. Oarl Miller. And, ~hep.i. SH~PARD: REYNOLDS: (FILTh) Up to just a few dsya a~o she never carried n balauee of much more than seventy, eighty dollar~. SH~PPARD: Hrs. Carl Miller. The aoeountla in her name. hj FJ ]':40 0182832 i,
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(FILTh) -32- R ~/N OLD8 s That's right. And the new deposit. (FILTEN) Yes. Check written out by whom? (FILTER) No cheek, Shep. Ossh6 BHEPPARD: Was it all in one lump? RE?NOLDS: REYNOLDS: BH~PARD: (FILTh) Uh hub. (FILTER) R ~fN OLD8: Maybe we've come up with something? BHEPPARD: Maybe. you did all right for yourself~ D~ve, Thanks. REYNOLDS: Right, ghep. See you back at the office, SH~PARD: Okay. (SOUND: PHONE DOWn) Phil.... HJ At"H01 01i82838
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(s ~ o ) from any number of sources. Of course, -33" ATTORNEY: Of course t, ho monoy could h~ve come 8H~PARD: HJ R, 1",'401 0182839
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b- ~h A~O~EY: (THIK~I~ IT) We've eome thiB far in t~e e~e. ZJdhato %o a~k For a miatriel on t~e mole baals of that inf©rvation. 8~PPAID: SHEpPA~: (~FPRAISI~G IT) I donlt know, Phil. I've had my eye on C~rl Miller. Frankly, i don't think he~ the type. ATTOItI41~: l~either do I. Inere's pro~ably e perfectly ra%ional explanation for that money. ~t if it'8 all ri~t ~ita you I'll ~ke out eome ins~ranoe any*ey. ~H~PPA~)I Have Judge Ryan .peak to ~liller. ATTOI~ET: If there'8 nothlng to ~i8, it wonit dO any har~. If there i~, I'm ~ure the~e ~on't be once he ~eee the ~ud£e. 8HEPPAI~: Well I guess thaws best, Phil. ~ you say, yeulve csme thie far in the ease, it ~ould be too h~d to thro~ in the eponge now. ILLS/L G 8"I'MO 1 018284.0
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l'~. Cord.on end ~h'. N~en, l~oaeel -34-A JUDGE: Would you both Btep ovec here ~ moment+ O(l'{IM)N: (O~IHG IN) Yes, your Honor, JUDGE: It's a little %0o late to begin your e~%ions ~oday+ right wi%h you, we~ll recess un%il ~cmo~ow, CORDON: Oertainly, your Honor, J[~N: If it's all (SOUND: GAVFL) The court will recess until tomorrow mornin~ ~t ten o'clock, The jury will kindly not discuss this ease with others or amo~ themselves, (B ' Oh, t{r, Millet,,, OARL: Ne, your Honor? JUDGE: (OFF A LITTLE) ¥eee, Would you step in h@t@ With me, ~ease, I want to talk with you a moment privately, MUSIO: UP OV~ AND OI,rJ:,,, fgTH01 018284~
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VOICE: (OVER THE RADlO~,.and, both a~torney~ havin£ been told to ~um up, there should be a veridct in the Farron trial mametlma tomorrow~ AooorSAn~ to n2mor, presiding Jud~s ~yan oullsd one of the juror8 to hie chat.beta late this,.° H~LE~: Now what did you have to do that for? of it, You've ~ enough. Oarl,.. I wanted to ~ the feet OARL: Naybe no~ you believe me. RELE~: OARL: (ALMOST CRYIt~G) I told you aomething llke this would happen, I told you. I never ~hould have let you talk me into thie mohame... O~ far the lo~e of heaven mto~ snivelling, it i~n't as~bad as you t~nk, OA~: Tha~a what you eay. G I-.WO 1 01182842
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-36- REL~ : Just because the judge said boo at you. CARL: He said more than that. He warned me, he sa£d t~e has his eye on every juror and if he finale... ~LEN : Don't be a fool, he was only talking generally. If he ~uepected ~ometnlng need to~e you right out of the jury box. CARL: T~at' B what you e~, bJt I k~ow... HELEN: You ~w not~ing. You never did and you never will. CARL: (TAKI~ ~ STAND) Helen...I want ymu to give tack that money to Mr. Gordon. I mean it, Helen. through with thi~. I~LEN : CARL: ~ive it hack. Tell ~im I'm not going to gO FtT,~O"I 0'1~2B,4-3
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.i -3?- HEL~: Youtre not what. CARL: (L~I~DLZ) Well you can ~ly e~e~t me to not can you.' HEIR~4 : Keep your voice do~n, Carl. ~4ny cantt I hardly. CARL; (S~ARING) Helen...ere you out of your mind? ~m not. Helen... But I'm beginning to wonder about you. CARL: You don,t make a b~r~ain ~ith a man like ~ick Ferron and then back down on it, believe me you don't. CARL: I don't care about Nick Ferron: HELEN : . Let'e go to bed, Carl, ~e'll talk %hie over in the morning. CARL: (FAIRLY 8OR~AMING) We ~on't talk about it at all: You're taking that money back de you h~r me: Either youtre taking it back or I will' G ~[R01 0182844
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Either you or me, Helen.I (A BEA~) All right, Oarl. W~at? -3S- HELEN: CARL: I mean what I say! HELEN: CA&L: liELF~: All right, I'Ii take it back. CARL: Helen... I'ii go see Mr. Gordon. cARL: You...~ou mean it, Helen? HELEN: First tain~ in tne morning. HELEN : (81~JRGS) If that's what you want tnere'~ not ~uch I can do about it, You're the one on theory. G RTH01 018284-5
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---
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-40- ¢O rk. JUICE (OPP ~ LITTLE) Iadiee and ~ntlemon of the j/ry, have you reached a verdict? FOPJ~IAN: !4o have, your }~onor. JUICE: Will ~. Ye~, your Honor.(~DS) "We, %he J~T." ~qsnlm~81y find the d~fendan%.., gu~l%y a~ ohargod... ~__ __~. o_~_ o~_~_q~ 0 \ fll'~O i 018284?
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-40-A IR.~: Guilty ao charged. Well that's cute, ientt that cute: GORDON; (PACING) Ok~, aks~v, but how was I to know? IR~: How were you to know, You were enS~!~e~l to fix thls, weren't you, Yen w~e supposed to have it in the bag| G(IqKON: That' e it. Blame me Who else should I bl~e? down the drain. I still can't believe it, I~ENE$ Niok behind bare and twenty-five thousand GORDON: I still o~t believe that ert~m~/ !~ of a juror had the nerve to !alll this. IP~: Oh you oanVt. Hie wife gave me her werd,,,eher solemn word,,,~ IR~E: She gavo you the businesem tha~'o what, to trust a lunkhead llke youtH, GORDON: (STONG)~ Now see here, Irene,,,, I told Nick, l told hlmnot 8]-~01 07828~8
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Oh, dry up,, know it, GORDON:: I don't have to take this ~com you, IRENE: Toll that to Nick. -40-D If it ~asn'% for Nick youId be out in the gutter ~ad you c~PmON.~ I dontt. And as soon as I have this straightened OUt.,.. (ACID) Oh, you're going to straighten it out, are you? GORDON: I'Ii show yOU how. ( 0 • What are you doing? (DI~ING) You'll find out. and get the money back too. ~hat about Nick? CFILT~BUZZUNDER) that. I'll... }low? GORDON: I'll take sore Of that Mille~ ehe~caater IRE~E~ I'ii get an appe~ for Nick, donlt worry about FISH.q: fl'l" HO "I 0 1828~t9
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That you, Fish,r? (FILTER) Maybe. This is Jim Gordon speaking, (FILTER) Oh hello, oottusA1or. YOU heard the n~wsI ~i~Itt you? (FILTER) I heard, That's what I'm oallitE about, -40-0 OOROON: ~no ,cants to know? GORDON: Yeah, this is me, GORDON: n m, I~ake llke somebody or.seed Niok u~. GORDON; FISR~: (FILTER) I'm llste~ing, GORDON: Niok wants to take care of that samebodyj Fisher. FISH~: (FILTh) May'qe. GOR~OY: You name your own !~rloe, FI~ER: (FZLTER) I'm interested. You interested? ATH01 01828S0
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-40- D The nsme ie Hill~, me~. (~ILT~R) Iql be there, ( , ~. L GORDON, Carl Miller.,. One-two-four Riverclalo Road, GORDON: That's how, Irene,,,,£oi~g %,o be all shraigh%ened out, ( MUSIOJ OV~ TO A ~]04AX AND OUT.) ( SOUND: TAXI PULLING TO A STOP.) Me~b \ LDG ATHO1 0182851
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-41- FISHER." Okay t~i~ ie the piece, driver. rISHERz Here y'are, t~anke. (OFF A LITTLE) Yes? You Mlller, Carl Miller? OARL: FISHeRs OARL~ I come to talk to (T~TATIVELY) Ta~'~ right. ~y na~e'~ Fi~her}~Jee Fi~er.~_H~_.]~A~8__~ you about a pereonel matter. CARL; Look here, if you're auo%~er reporter... G
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.42- FISHER: Reporter? ~S_~.I.~_O~.~.~_DI Ifm no re~orter, l~11er. Your ~ife ho~ ? UAP~: No. A~ a hatter of fact when you rang I thought it ~ae,.. FISHER: Ycah, yeah. ~BIZ:F00~_~_ND~ Jim'8 not hole yet either, Jim? huh. CARL: Jim Go~don. FISHER: (SMILES) You bow who he ie, don't 9m/? What do you ~ant anyhow? He? I donTt want anything. Nick. ~ARL: FISHER: It's Nick w~o wante. CARL: PISHNR: Nick Ferron. You got a bad memory for names, Hiller. wetll ~ait for Go~don~. L" • \ 8it down, Ziller. Sit down, ,R"t'H01 O't ~92853
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What does Niok want? Hey, --43- OART=: FI 8~R: you got aomething ~o dr~nk? I1m dry. I said... CARL: What doe~ Niok want? Nothin~ to drink, ~u~. CARL; Vrmt'~ Jim Gordon oom~n~ here for. FISHER: Hey youlr~ a funny @~y, Miller. plenty queer onee. Huh? OARL: The Z'unnieet ~eybe, an~ I ~et 0 FSTH01 01,92e_ 4
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The way I see it, pal. have to ask too many questions. CARL: Cross him? I didn't cross anybody. FISHER: (LOW (~R~I~) The funniest for s~re. What are you talking about? the raoney, •,. Uh huh. Well she did. -44- FISHER: ~4hen a guy crosses }llek Ferron he ehoulcln't CARL: N~ wife saw Gordon. she ~ave him ~eck FISI~R: O~L: I had Helen tell him I wasn't ~oing through with it. Honest, you kill me. FISHER: OARL: Listen, you better 6or out of here... FISHER: (HIS sMILE FREEZING) And you better shut up~ jn AT,~O'I 018285_~
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What? "45" CARL FISHER: ~no do you think yo~'ro conning, yoor wife sa~ Oordon$ ~saw nobody: She never ~id nobody anything: ~Jhat are you talking about? Don't give me thatl Helen never saw Gordon? You don't know, CARL: FISHER: 0APuL: FISHERt CARL: Your wife (IN VAGUE REAL I.ZATION) Helen,,,nevor,,,sa~,,, FIS~R: (SORE) You don't know, I'II tell you ~omething you r_~ don't know-~ Yo~, Ji~n and me are ~.o;ing for a little ride out in th8 oot~try. Three of us going out, but only two coming b~ok, ~n A'I-~O 1 01828~6
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-¢6- CARL: XCnat~ Okay) that's Gordon now. FISHER: it. CARL: FIS~R: ~.~_.__A BEA~, THEN CA~L tOES sm~Y TO THE DOOR. STD~. (LOW) Go on. FISHER: "~_~_A~~. Mr. N~ller~ MA~: CAr~: ~m~e i\ \ ~n A'I- NO 1 01828Sp
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-¢?- Ve're fror~ the Daily News, Fr, Miller, ~e'd like %o Ee% a pio%ure, r~ybo a e+~%ement from you on Che %ria~, cJ~ The Daily Novas? FISHERs (8TEPPINO IN) Fro. Miller ion'% givi~ ou% any e%etemen~. ~/,, ;, • ~ho Bay9 I'm not~ (HE STARTS TO LA[~H) Co~o in. g~%lamen..,~qm~ "/ ~ive you e sta%ement ~.~. (THE LALDH BUILDS) ~... I'll ~ive you %50 b~e% statemen% your paper ever 6o%,.. H~ Is LA~DHINC, HYS'~BIC4~_AS/ ATN01 0182858
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THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR S~PTE~ER ii, 1952 CLOSING COEMERCIAL MUSIC: (UP TO CURTAIN) TICS: In Just a ~o~ent, Agent ~heppsr6 wlll tell you BARUCH: MUSIC: TICE: ~MUSIC: what happened to the people in tonlghtVs story, Friends. youtll find Luckies taste better --ta~_~.~_ cleaner .., fresher ,,. smoother because Lucky Strike gives you fine, mild, good-tastlng tobacco. in a cigarette thstls m~d_~e better to taste better. Lucklee taste c!esner because LuokiesI perfect cylinder of fine, clean tobacco is free from those annoying loose ends that get in your mouth and spoil the taste. Luckles taste fresher because theyTre fully packed without air spaces -- hot spots that burn too fast -- taste hot, harsh and dry. And every pack of Luckles Is extr_____~ tightly sealed to keep In that fresher taste. Luckles taste smoother because in a Lucky you get long strands of fine, mild, good-tasting tobacco In s cigarette that draws freely and smokes smoothly. Yes, friends, Luckies tas_te better! So for your o~n real @esp-8own smoking enjoyment -- for s cleaner, fresher, smoother smoke --Be HspRy -- Go Lucky! Make your naxt carton Lucky Strike! (FANFARE) (CONCLUSION OF CASE) (SHOW THEME) /a. T,WO "/ 0"/~2t~59
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-4B- S~PPARD: (AFTER A PAUSE) Carl Niller gave hie statement to the paper, and another to your FBIo The infor~tion he offered, coupled with the evidence already secured, was enough to have James Gordon join , . Nicholas Ferron in the federal penitentiary, where both ee~ced eight years terme~ Miller's wife ~s picked up n fen days later in Florida where she had ~one2the day of 6he trial; and she M~IO: TO FINISH. JN ~'I'HO 1 01821:160
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• THE PBI IN PEACE AND WAR SEPTEMBER ii, 1952 CLOSING COMMERCIAL (CONTTD) TICE: MUSIC: BAEWCH : MUSIC: TICK: -D- All names and characters used on this program are fictitious. Any similarity to persons llvlng or dead is purely coincidental. This program is based on Frederick L. Collins' copyrighted book ~tTHE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" ... and is not an official program of f p the FBIo In tonightls story~-~,~.-~ played the was part The radio dramatization for "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAN" i~ written by Louis Pelletler and Jack Finks. These programs arc produced and directed by Betty Msndeville. Be sure to listen to next Thursdayls story, "The Opportunity Man" on '~THK FBI IN PEACE AND WAR". Same time -- same station. (SHCW THEME - UP AND UNDER) This Sunday America's favorite comedy show returns to the air. Yes, itTs THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM and Jack and the gong will be back for another season of great comedy. Consult your newspaper for time and station. ThatZs THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM back on the air this Sunday. Thle is Andre Barush aaylng goodnight for Lucky Strike, product of The American Tobacco Company -- America~$ leag~manufacturer of cigarettes. "THE FBI IN PEACE AND WAR" has been selected as one of the programs to be heard by our Armed Forces overseas through the facilities of the Armed Forces Radio Service. (SHOW THEME - UP AND OUT} THIS IS THE CBS RADIO NETWORK. #~T)~O 1 0182861 ,i

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