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Atco - Iceberg & Lucky Advertising

Date: 1977
Length: 689 pages
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HOCKL~/RobH Herman /zvest/a, shmizvestia ars*Edk Eriksson put down his glas~ Lof vodka and orange juice and paused Io survey the cr o',vdod, labyrinth-like bar of Movcow's [ntourist Hotel. the'only tar ern in to~vn open pa~ midnight, "If we cared about this tournament," said Er- iks~n, "do you think we ~vouid be here?" And with a slow sw=ep ofhls gtas~, he in- dicated the entire Swedish national hock- ey learn and the WHA'~ WJrmil~eg Je~s /~u[pin~ poslgame scrcwdriv¢~ and Rus- sian ehamp~Bne, it was the only comfort they found last w~sh during the hard- ~irip assigmmetlt of the European hockey circtlit--the Sovlel [Jnlon ~ annual Izves- tia Cup toum~ent, foducing the paeti~rlts to co,me to Moscow in return for I~:rativ~ Soviet tours through their own countrles, the Soviet l-lcckey Federation for ]0 yca,~ now has dra.~ad Sweden, Finland and Czecho~fovakia to the Izvestia evenk where the only prize is a snowman stat- ue. This year the Winnipeg JeIs, the WHA champions, also made the irlp to ~lushy Moscow as the price for an eight- city Soviel tour of the U.S. and Canada that began this week. Al~ho~h there were 10 Et~fopean-borrl professionals oI~ their r~ster~ the Jets puspne~cd to rep- turi3ed their watches ahead eight hD, uts and skatad into the 14,000-s~at Pa]ace of $por~ to play czechoslovakia. The ~ou~h opening game a~ainst the world daarapion~ was Soviet r~triburion for the ~sent Canada and forts helped fhe tour- older of mB(ches ill the Canada Cup las~ namenl sell out for the first time ~nce September~when the Soviet Union faced ] 969, when the Soviel ~e~m's rivalry with the Czeche in the opening round. Cze~hoslovshis wa~ at its hostile peak. The Sov~ coaching ~taff. which tlsu* Debilhated by their own busy schad- ally seems reluctant to display the na- u[¢s.theplayers'distasteforMoseewand tfoRal tca~'s full strength unle~ the their halaherinh to be home for Christ- World or Olympic championships are at mas. visiting teams usually fall easily to the host Soviet squad duriIig the week- Ic~g Io~rnametlt sportsortd by the gov- ernment newspaper lzvcstla. The Sovi- eta, sparked by the return of superstar Valery I(hadomov, who brake both his ankles ht a car crash ]asl May. hardly w~rked vp a sweat while sh¢in~ through their I~rst three opp~tlents. Jn the ~ham- ~o~sh~p garae, though, they ran fe~o the bulldozal~ Czechc~lovaks~ and only some friendly refere¢in~¢ by a Finnish ofhaad allowed the ~ov~ets to prevail 3 2 and win the snownlan for the eighth time in 10 years, Winnipeg fialshad fourth in the llve- aadon round robin, managfog only a 4~ ti~ wifo Swedon al~d a 2-1 defeat of ]bqll - laird, Canada's (~ri~i/lal r~presenl~rives. the WHA Quebec Noofiqu¢$. underwent a recent ow~er~hlp c]~ange and could not go, so offer playing seven WHA haines in 10 nights, the Jets hopl~ed a plane. stake, rhls tthte tleidod a team for the [zo vestla Cup that was a close gauge o~' lhe tn~ Sovall muscle. ~¢This tean~ is j~t as strong or ~ronger thai1 the tearn they Sent to the Canada Cup." said Wthni~e~s Bobby Hull. who played on the vitro- riot= Team Canada in that to~trnament. "Anytime ~au have the line with Khar- lam~v~ ~erazxhey'r¢ stronger" SOf~. whi~e Khar/~cnoe and linemales Bo- ris Mikhadov and Vladindr Fetrov were hash on ale a~er ralsalng the Canada Cup. the Soviet hieral~hy managed to ~amoufiag~ its h~d by sitling out the line of Alexander Yakushev, Vladimir Shadrin alld Victor Sheiimov. The ex- plarlaliofl was that all three hnd mlt t~¢ ~rt- juries and that their recent p~H'orma nees bad not he~ u~ t¢~ par. SO. the three reserves and their wives watched the tournaraertt f~C.lfil ~ea~5 at center ice. ~/ahush ev s~av¢ in ~ fawn-col ored suad¢ spools jacket and his wife 48
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goal Thorn six yards out. Standth$ on file goal line, U.S Captain AI Trosl of St. Louis, tried to block the shot, oaly Io sgc it spin offbls thigh arid into file n¢~. Callnda 1, U,S, 0. From then on, th~ pattern of the game was set. The Americans, needing lhe equalizer, wcould b~ve to ~bandon any thought of caution. The Canadians would defen¢~ ,,vi~ ~s ma~y a~ blghl men but would always be iooking for the chance to oolluterattaek, ]loping to c~.tch the Americans wifil too many men upfibld. When the U.S. conic oul fror th~ Second half, Ttost was missing; suffenng from an intestlrtai infection, he knd bare]y su~ vived the first 45 mulutcs. Urged on by New York'~ v~iferous and ubiqllitOl/s Bobby Smi~mnt~mit~lly a fbllheek hal now running ful] tht wherever he thought he could get to the ball,he Americans battered away at the Canadian tfefense. For 20 mblute~ the ball seemed Io be daneulg and bouncing and bubbling around the Canadian penalty area, but the sad tilth ft~r the ATllc~s w~s that bll of fills was gettblg them rtowhere. As so often ha/~perls fe soccgr, it was the counterattacks of the defending l~am that looked the more dangerous. As the clock ticthd on and the equal izing goal jusl would not come, the U.S. play, tlever e~actl'/smooth, bec'am~ no- tioeably cdgf. And that nervousnes~ finally des(rayed lhe American hopes¸ With 20 mlnute~ ]eft and the Cana- thans $iill hengiog on lo their onc-g~3al ]cad, U,S, Fbliback Steve Pecher of Da]- ]a~--wbrJSe crudely robust taeklulg in the first h~f had somehow escaped the ref- eree's eensttte--~udden]y kicked Victor Knd~lja's legs t~ul from und¢~ hin~. It w~s an abst~rd foul, commiltcd at m~fibld in a sil ~lioll that prc~eltzed no thr~at at all to the U,S. Almost before Kndelja hie thg gro~lth the referee was raCil~g ~o ward PecheL ~hisde blaring, his left hand groping into hi~ brea~ po~ket. Tb~ omty question was which ~ard would come out Of dial pocket, yellow for a caution Or red for ¢Jection. T11e ref- er ¢c'$ arrtt swepl Corlllnanthng]y straight tip in Ihe all and in his hand a s~a]l rec- tangle of red Bashed in the floodlights. Pceher trudged to the bench, aad file LLS. "s.~uld /~tr¢¢ t~ p/~y a m~n s/~rt. But with all the perversity that is so lyp- ioal of ~o¢¢er. the I0-man team now see:reed to be more ~3rgaiozed. There was Bobby Smith, Cor exampic, his ~tt~ggly bait dancing on his shoulders as he raced down the fight wing, dblbl~riog a per- foet ero~$~ rigl~t to Bal~dov racing i~. at foil sp~ed and. heading it [mwerfblly-- but a foot or two over the bar, Wifo five minutes left in the game, the ia~vit abic Blm~dian second ~oal arrived, 8ndd again broke through the multhe, thl~ drae I~ng off ~ I~erfecz ~as~ for Bob L~Ilarfillzzi to l~n On to and driv~ Un- darncath the diving Mau~ Even then th~ American agony was not rover. With I 0 se~ond~ remaining, [he referee detected SmiTh tugging at a Ca- nadian thirt. A yellow card for Smith, and a free kick for Canada. ~ch [fo]dho hooked the ball t~ver the wall of U,S. play- ers ~ iolo Ih~ ~op ~orn~T of file ~ogh ju~l o~t of Maus~r's reach, A perf~cl fl~e ki¢~ executed with aheosl iasblfil~g ease, demonstratillg that This was unar~ably Canada's night, Canada tro/s, America zero F~r the Carlathans, one big obsta¢[~ ~r~ the road ~o Argentina ~78 had begn o'¢ereom~. All ev~ll bigg~ olle aw[li~$. In the nexl qua~i~ing round they will m~¢t the fo'~ b~t teams from. blorih and C~l~tral Amed~a and the Caribbean; M~xico, Gaatemaia, El Sblvador and Su- tina~n, plus the winner of a Playoff gam~ between Cuba and /4~ili. Ouly otl¢ of these teams will make it ~o the finals¸ In the American ]oeker room the play- er~ slouched oi1 their b~u~e$, sortie stal- ing at the floor~ some at th~ bar~ wafts, some gazing a~lead with utffocused eyes. Bobby Smifil broke a hetlic, and the noise was magnified a thousand lim~s by the ove~o~'~thlg silence The dreams of Wo~d Cup ~fory, of ,~¢filng lo the finals--even of g~l~ing into file aext q ubl- ifyiog roued--hed been snafehed away. A~¢r 15 mitlut e s, still in uthforrn, they bled out int~ the parking lot~ pas( all 1he stall fog frient~ly boys and the hundred El- tic hands reaebblg out to touch them. And again the fanny [i~zlc bus, the s~ts with no [~g roota, the kid~ running afong- si~e. Dut on this bight there was no sfog- ing, no talking, barely ~ human Sound. Just the hal~h m~¢bani¢al noises of Ihe hi/s, the g~r c~ng~s, Ihe toys, the cr~aks and the t~Ifles--t~o~ses that ~o o~ bad nolic~¢l before. And in the streets of Pori- a~ Prlllce nobody t~rn~d 1o watch as th~ b~s went by, Of a/1 100 : LuN lOOs *LUCKY 1QO's ............. '~ff 4 rag. alcelm ~4 m~ 8rend W .............. , ~tar'18 m~. nzo~e 1.2 ~ *Of all b~rids, lc~t ........ "tar" I r~g~ nit.~ ~,1 r~g per ~igac~tle b'/FTC msd~cd lWarning: The Sut~a ~eral H~S Oeterminad That Cigar~e $mBki[l§ Is Dangerous ta Y~¢ Hethh. a~. per ~i~lle by ~TC melh~t~
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Ofallmenthol lOOk Iceberg lofts are lowest intar! tat thanthetwo menthol] 100% 'ICEBERGIOO's ............ "I~V 4 rag, nicotine g 4 rag. Br~6 g .................. 'lar" 17 rag, ricot[~e I 3 filg Brand $ .............. 'iar* 19 mgr ~icOIIle ]3 ~. "01 all br~rzd~. Io~.e ~1 ...... "taC 1 mQ. aicotine 9,1 rag. "Av per ci~mtte t¢ ~C met~cd Warning: [he SmgeQn General Has Betermined That Cigarelle 3mokin8 Is Dsn~mous to Your ~loa[Ih ~v. per Cl~arettu by FTC mtthod I~OKS one of tt~e gifts, the Grand Duche~ An- ast~ia, ¢~¢~ped and is ~i]l a]iv#- SO runs the ac~pteM versien of the R~31~tal~ov I'~cide, NO',V t',vo report¢~ from BBC l"elevision, Anthony Stlmmers and Tom Mangold, asser t a dramatically new version: the ]'t.eds faked the orig- in~[ iTt aSS~Cy¢ ~]3~ in cqd~]" t~ ¢o~ t vince White Russia~s---who ~oon ca~ur~d Ekatcnnb~rg--that their goal ofa :0oy- al restoration was hop¢]~ because the Tsar and his famdy were d~,~d The t',~o journalists conclude that there were not eneugh ballet holes or b]oodsmim; in the murder room to ac- cord with the gur~hot d~aths of s~ven Ixopie. [n their opinion, "the women Of all filter lOOk LuckY lofts are¸ though for docade~ she has stubbornly claimed tube An~.~tas[a. Ft/¢ has caused both favorable rc- vit,~s and a w~e of wr~h and ~oln. AS a setGap1~inted def~nd©r oflhe Brki- ish royal family, Lord Mount hatten has denounced th~ authors' ¢onclu~lons about ~m abomed Brldsh revue P]ot:Ss¢~ retary ~:f State I{enry l([sslnger has stoi%ewalled on Ibe qUaileD of whather U,S ar¢ h iws also contain doc~men%~ r~- garding Atnerican compIiclty in a i~- cue Diet Th~ authors do not claim that their conclusions are complete But they a~ confimllng to dig~nd fl~¢ new ~nd- ings ~peeia[ly in the US archives, may be even more sen~tion~l than tha in- t rigtfing malerial they ha'~ already un- earthed¸ David ~n~. Best Sellers ~t~le 70% lower tar thanthet~ he,selling filter KingsJ
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The $9,000,000 ..... beer..dxlemma Iv/ ) ................. ., ...... ' .............. .~...~ TVor not TV isn't the question. And ~ines and only ~zines isn't the answer. A $9.000.000 budget win buy you a lot of beer advertising. But il you pu~ eli or most of those doi1ccm in one m erbium, they wc.n'i work as ha~d as you might thin k. To start with. there are 278 roLl]ion aduits ~JSo consume 5 or more q]~ss~s oI beer each week. And they'l'e ire beclvy users But before you fry ~o reach all oI them wLth a lep~iSei media p]an consider twc !c~cts First. 10.5 miSion heavy users a~e big on t elevisicn end not so b!g or* r~.aqc~zines ~liCh in~kes lh~ .2n TV Imperc~tivez ~ - Second. 106mil]ionhe~vyusem c~/e big on xn</gc~zin6s and not so bic] on television. Which rnc~kes them Magazine Jmpeiatives. PERSONAL AND CONFIDENTIAL The resu]t is <, ~plit med~ Mn G Eclward Winslow personclity. Andhere's~vhatitdoes Maq~zlnePublishersAssocia!i~n.]nc. to a $9.000.00~ television budget E75 LexlncJton Avenue In any given inonth, you'][ hit Ne~v York. N.Y. 10(322¸ most af the 113.5 mil]Lon heavy users who ~re big on leIevision. E~[ -£ou I! m!ss an a ~c~rnlng nuPnber ot {he ] 0.6 lni~Iion heavy users who at9 bl~ on magazines. Speskin~ of those Magazine [~nperatives 3.3 n~i[]ir~n won't see any of yo/lr comrnercicSs at alh And at thele%/~ol-Illor~ t~q~r]c¥ level¸ you'll mi~ 89 milhon of them. Which is mole than 8 out oi 10 The point i~, the heavy users ~ren~ all siitunq i~ Ron~ ol c~ ~le vision ~et. Far trcrn it. Please contact me regarding [] A Tehna~" computer analysis ol my media plan, [~ A research presentation of the Media [mpeiatLves. Name Title Company Acldres~ City, State, Zip $¢~*rce:vl R. Simmons The Television Imp erat ires The Ma~azine bnperative8 represent 10.5 million adults who are big on been represent IOY~ millban adults who ar~ {dR on been
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~I~+ ~" .... ~m+m3 ~++++ +.+ ++~+ ++ +m +++.+ +.~+,+++° +++++~+t+ I,.°+°+ ° =.° ++ ++++urn+ ~m+++ ~ ~.++++ +~++++++ +°°=o++o +++++ :+~++ +++ :+++.++~"m-m ++ ,~+~ ++ +~+m++++m++ ~+#+ mm+m m +m++ ++~++ ++++ +++~a+
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Practical [
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q llfilterlO0 : Lucky lO0's !owest lntar! Act 70%hver t~thnthtwo be~sellin_g filter~gsJ BOOKS class and background. The urban, afflu- ent, "representa~ve coined men" who held political oiBce advised their poor tara kin that flight from the South would reflect badly on the race's ahilitv to en- dure hardships. And the twentieth-een- t~ry "Back to Africa" movement had i~s roots in the "Liberia Fever" o~deepaifiag black political organizers during the lfl70s who became convinced that their people had no more chance in a whffe co~mtry"thanacatinbe]hvithoutclaws," The book's dramatic center, though, is Painter's aecot,~t cf the 1879 Exodus---or "dae African hegira," as one u~tt/abed observer called it. Between Febraa~y C a]lmenth01100 : Iceberg tlOCs are II ,est n am Kingst Iceberg *LU 0JIy I001 ............. %If 4 rag. nicotine I~¢ m Brand M. • ......... '~ff'17 rlfl~ Ninon, L~ m 8fa,tt W ................. "iir'18 rag. ni:otiqe ] 2 m "Of all bma~ lewis1 ........ "tar i ~lg~ aicDnno 01 m *hr. oak cigarml ~ FTC mel~o Handbill touting the ghries of Kansas and May of thai year, the made to the Mississippi River were fil]ed with blacks frt~'in g to hook passage to St. Louis, and om there to "their Mecca,' Kansas. ~oiztflem landlord~: persuaded river. boats to pass thell~ by and merehatRs to deny them food and supplies. For weeks they camped on the river bank, "house- bo]d goods stacked tap, wMting for a boat to give them the laxnsporLation they were eapRb]e of 9aying for,'" By the time boats began carrying Idaek passengers again~ many Exocfusters had been forced to turn back• Those who made it all the way to Kansas--about 4,~0C~-fared reasonably well Some migrated tu crLher states, to Oklahoma and Nebraska, but almost none returned South. New~eek, Janmary 17, 1977 8-~
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For corer repraducbon ~lWib~ Turh~ ~i.tlng ~y Ken DaVIes 19" by ZI~' ~end $2 to BOX ~-W.L Wall ~t S[a., ~ r l~05 W'dd Turkey Lore: In 1776 Benjamin Franklin proposed that the Wild Turkey be adopted as the symbol of our country. The eagle was chosen instead. The Wild Turkey later went on to become the symbol of our country's finest Bourbon. 84 WILD TURKEY/101 PROOF/8 FEARS OLD. Now and Nevei'?Never l'J]x ALT~T[ON, By Kt~_ gsle~ Amis. 220 ~. Vdan~. $7.g~. Here is Kingsley Amis's twel~h novel (actually the~e are two others, including a James Bo~t eat~, which he na ki~ger bothors to list). One of the pleasures of picking up a newbook by him, gg ye~a~ waer"L~kyJim; is d~t ~erc's no s.ch ]thrarv reader c~a check out in the com- fortable expect~len of finding a familiar ~tu ct. In recent years he has w~Ren a t story "The Green Ma~". a wh~ ("The Rivermide Vi ]as Mm~er and a disquieting,~ce shout facing dea~ with malice ( Ending Up"). "The .~tem~a," his oddest yet, opens in 1976 in the g~at Catholic c~e- • al at Cowley (the site, as Amefica~ readers may not recognize, era mighty B~itish automobiI~ factory). We soon re- alize that the Beformat~on neve~ took place and Enrage is still a unified Clais- tendom. Monsigno¢ Jean-Paul Saree is a ~esuit theologian; Himmler of Almaigae lead Beria of Muscovy are ¢enerahin pa- envo s. ~zils~ from Cainsbomu~ ~low~ to ~avld Hochaey and "the illus- h'inus Netherland#r de Kooding" .have ~ted inspiring devotio~ad wor2<s are no automobiles or ~irplanes in this England~e highest advance $cience, a dirty wo~d, is the diesel em g~ne~ and eleelxictty, though known, is outlawecL ~. ~ao~'~a: In an es say a decade ago, "%Way Lucky Jim Turned Right, Am~s ex- plained his gmwh~g conse~vatism. But if you think he has moved all the way to a Chesterbelloalan nostalgia for a return to the medieval world, you are in for ~me nasty shocks. The preservation of Chris- t~ndom has entailed some heavy losses. "When Maria Luther became Pope Ger- .~aanins I, far instance, and sternly deemed that St, Peter's must not be a luxarious showplace, one of its I~ian designers Boon~rotW or some such name," killed hlrasel£ A playbill a~.: nouneing that Thomas Kyd s "Hmnlet still holds the boalxts is our ~rst in~d/ng diat~'s~reer vcss stifled, ha a way later explained. Christendom in 1976 proves to he a wel]-orde2ad totallta~adi sin. Amis's plot turns on the discovery of a brilliant hay singer and the ple~to preserve his gdiby "altenng" him, for an ilinstrlaus career in church music into alifelong soprano. For at least half the book, especial y when Amis is g~iding us through h/s in genious alternative present, the story holds. Whenthe boydec~destot~sfst his fate,we • k enter a ~easy sequence of boy sdioo adven~s---~s~pe, &b~Ketler~ rescue -~hat might be a rewrite of "Treasure Islaad withJimFIawkins" teslicles, ln- stead ofpfraie treasure, ~ the ¢fllaias' objective. "The Altemtinn star~ out far better thml it ends. But it is ~ higlif y ia~[- I/gent entertainment. Newsweek
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0fallmenth01100's: Iceberg lO0's are lowest intar! "ICEEERGIOO'I ............ '~ar 4mg, nic~ineO4mH. Brand K ................... "zar~ 17 rag. n[roLinD 1.3 m9. ~[~qd $ .................. "lar" I~ r~ g., nilol~ne 13 m9. • Dr all blands, ~owesl ......... "1aft ] m~. nilotlqe 0.1 m~. "~. per c~areae by FTC melhed. Warning: ThB Surgeon Ge~elal Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking ~s Oarlg~iotls tD Your ~leallh. 4 mg~ '~mr', o~ rag. ~oline; av per ciDaret[e ~ FI~ methc~ M ~:wum,ed placed fifth in a Swedish slalom cham- pionship. Why didn't lngemar become a ~o~,s-country ~¢cr like the rest of the Swedes? Stenmark says that it is too sLTc[1UOU$ 9. SpOl"t--a strange 8ttitude ccmthg from the I:~st~zonditioned skier and hardest worker on the Swedish team. When St¢~nath jodiad his small, light-knh national mare of haft a dozan racers three years age, the a~pme divi- sion of the Swedish Ski A~sociadon was¸ so poor that the rac~r~ had to ffavcl by bus or train To get lo the World Cup cac~,. ]['or St enma2k, the trip from Tfirnaby to KitzbOhel took 48 hours. But even after he b~:ame famous and the Swedes got a pool of suppo~ equipment z~m~u fac turers going, St~nmark p:foscd all favors. Last October, when the tc2m ~etlffn~l from training camp in Italy, St~nmath was given a dck~ for a faster and smooth- er train ride home, whdc his teammates had to travel by bus. One of them had hu[~ his back. Stcnmadi switchad lickets and rode the bus himself. Last year, after Slenmadi had finaily dethn~med fair-time World Cup cham- pion Gusta~ Tho~di, T~t~aby threw a for SPenmark and p~e~ente([ hLra wlrh a h~mth~ knife, whose handle was ca~ad from a reindedr antler. Last sub- met he was awardad a Sl~cial gold medal by Kfag Car] XVI Gpsmfin a private au- thence--about the hi~st honor that can be bestowad upon a Swedish citizen, Bu~ he was no~ exempt from mllilaff service. "Usually I spend my summ¢~ rending with my dog Zorm, and riding my fa* cycle 20 or 30 mil~ a day,"he says."Aad I like to go fishing al th~ lakes n~r T~a- by. But last .Tdiy [ had re go into the a~my for three months. Mi]ita~ sc~wfoe is s~tim~ good for conditicniz~g, blot somcslm¢~ i~ is~ot, llhooring and crawl- ing on the l~]ly is not quite the right training far ski racing.". This season, SIcnmark eecladi]y c~n- In the coml~fition for the Ovcml] World Cup, th~ indomitable Kla~mer oauld ama~s 250 points in l0 downb£1I events aIonc, one more than St¢~k n~dad ]as[ year ~o wth, And ther~ aw a ~¢h of 1milan cont~ndeIs, like Pi~ro C.ms. Thoeni and Facto ]~adici, p]~ the tiny Swiss, Hemmi. Now, last but not le~t. there is Ihc kid from V~hit e Pa~s, "[ can't any longer afford to hevc any slow rues," says St cnmark. "It's ~ot $o e~y to catch Phii anymore." mm Of all lilY, lOOk Lu.cky lOfts 56 "LUCKY lO0's ............ '~aC 4 m~ ni~t be 0.4 rag. 8T'~4 M ................. "~aC I] ms, eicdine I.(I me 8r~W ............... "~r" 18 rag, s~co~na I.Z m~ "D[ a~ br~ds, lowes[ ........ ~ I rag. n~coz~ 0.1 m~ "AV. per c~ga~eztl by ~ mmlhod, Wami~]: Ihe Surgeon Genial Eas ] Oeterrain~d ~haz Cioaret~e Snwkieg is D~n~ous to YOu~ I~eall5 4 $0- "t~ll". OA m~. n coc~qB~ av, per c~ze~e by FTC me~l~d
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"I was two ~econdl ansi against Stenny. But in the slalom tllet'e ¢+~¢1~ rdI1S ~'hen 1 tied him cr was just two tenths slower," "1 knew from Phil's training runs that he was getting very good,*' says Sten- mark. "I watched Mm, all right." Mahre also usl~d the Va] S¢/k'lJes ellmp to Mealy the Swede's flawiess techrdque arid to corollate it with his own. 'qa the slalom," he says, "Stenmark is ahead of every- thing• The gate doesn't come to him; he goes to the gate. When there is a rlxythm change, he h~ a feel for the line where he shonid be. His style is letter perfect," Hank Tauber, lh~ director of the U.S. learn, says, "Philis very spontaneous. He makes errors. But he is so xalented that he can correct a mistate at top speed in the middle of a tilt n, He has not ~kied hi~ p ef- fect race yeL but when he does. the rest of the world WOlt't be able to touch him. Incled feg Stenmark. When Phil won the I~st race, the Em'opea~/hol/~ il was a fluke. But when he got that third place and "~as leedingin the cup standings, they said, 'Hey. bu's for real!'" Mahre's win w~ reasort to celebrate, a relatively rare ~caalon for the U.S. team~ and Cdimar, the company thar tur.s out raging suits for the tearn~ pre- ~en~ed him wi~ two cases of champagne. "We only let him have a few stps," says Tauher. "But he doesn't really hke the stuff~ anyway. He tikes millU' B~th MahJ'e mad Stemnark are coun- try boys who ixa~ no taste for cham- pag~ne or adulation. While Mahre is a bit more outgoing and an easy talker, Seen- mark is so reserved and shy that he is usu- ally referred to as "the silent Swede•" At times he opens his ~aouth as if he wants to say something, then, apparently think- ing better of it. closes it agmn, Other- wise, *hey are quite St bit alike: both came from a ~gged Life-style ~tnd a home mountain that is not big enough for dowM~Jl] tr~niog Conseqoently. both concentrated on the slalon~ event~ and developed their tgghhiqnes all their own Says Stenmar~'s coach, T0rgny 5vens son, "Talents ate born, not made, We coaches can do nothing hez organize the training fac*hdes." Mahre and twin brother Steve, also a proroJsJng r~cer, were ham Jn Ya~ara~, Wash. Every winter the family weal ski- ing at White Pass, When the twins were nine the family moved there, after Dave Mabee had been named assistant m~nag- o of the whL..soo o.ab.es ;=',/,I--', LDe. ha ,o -- a, now here dine ehi/&-en, a~ld at/ but 4- yeavohi Rmkie spend summers moving rocks and stumps to clear trails, painhng ski lifts and diggigg trenches¸ "It's a kited of pioneer life+" says Tauher. "They are tough ~d~ l~spdi/ed. Liko Kinramer. who shovels manare oa his farm." When he was nine, Maitre decided that he warned to ma~:e the U.S, Oiynl/0ic team ill 1976~ but on the day before Thanksgiving in 1973, he broke his dgbr leg racing away from an aval&llche--and losing. "I'm lucky I'm bore t~day," he says. '~I raced in~o the Lreea a1~ hit a st~mp, l wa~ buried up to my wai~L" Mahre brake the leg again the next sum- the tOp of my a~fdit¥," he says. "So I try r~ ignore it when the Europeans lmmpfe all over ~1~ hi the lift lin~s~ or when they try to psych us out- sa~ng, 'Good run' with those sly little grin~. Klammer is J~ally tops in Ihit dep~ronent. He k~e~ talking to Herbert Plank [Italy's top downhiUer] ahem how load he feels tm- ~l ~ank get~ at/rattled and yells, 'Shut u~]> But ~tenmark is aheve all that. When he shakes hands and congratulates you~ you know he is lineere. ~e doe~a't have to intimidate People. Jusl be hag Stenraark i~fimidates peo~fe en~." Perha~ having gmwa up so fox no~t of the madding crowd helical Steamark mer, thisumeelowinngaroundonaehit- keep his vataez neat and honest. His dren's playground slide, and doc~rs in- -lsome is-T~ria~:(pop7700} in Swedish stalled four steel screws in it. His victorY Laplanto near the Norwegian bdrder and in the GS at the national ch~mptomhip the Arctic Circle• 2q~e sun newr ~ets ha in February ]975 was his first race hi summer, mad the winters are cold and 1½ ye~s. Toe next season, be made the gJ~omy, thenmark grew up skiing "stoke Wodd Cup team and the Olympics, in line~." as he says, on a 2,0~0-foot mole- which he fiff~hed lifth in lbe GS; Seen- hill ediled Laxtj ~let, which means Salm- mark won the bronze, on Mountain. His father Eri~, who owns Racing ia Europe was bewildering at and operates a balMozer, wan his first first, but Mabre has decided to play it coach; after all, the old man had once eoetint,ed 55
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0faU menth01100§: Iceberg lofts are lowest! Some low-tar cfgarettes use artificial flavorings. Not Iceberg 1 Off& Get Iceberg 100's with only natural flavorings. A little tar~ a Iotta taste. Warnh,g, T~e Surgeon 6enera[ ha~ Determined ]hat Cigsrette Sm01~ng Is [)anger0us to YOL~ Health. 4 m9 "ta¢', &4 mfi.nlc~bne av. per ¢ fiatette b~ ITC morned ing which he had married his high school girl friend Maryleu (she w~s 17, he was ] 9L Anibony went to spring training with a Vancouver farm team in 1960 but quit father, and Marylou ha~plenty to do keeping'house. A talI woman in a light blslc pantsuiL Marylou wears an expres- sion of thint hut perceptible concctTt, as when he was refused the sa]ary he de- if she sasp¢cts that thare just possibly manded. He took a job with the West Coast Grccery Co., a vast wholesaling warehouse a couple of miles from his frame house in Tacoma, and began fit- ting in bowiillg-Ieague schedules with his shift work as a receiving clerk. As a member of a shop league in which night-shift workers bowled on Friday momthg~ Anthony ~arted off with a 165 average and immediately began improv- ing it by practicing daily. "It's my na- ture to try to do something hatter than anyone else," he says. "I tried to howl might be a gas leak in the basement at any moment. The Anthonys look at art Opened but still unpacked sultcase and then let their eyes stray out tht~ongh the picture window in the kltchan to a post- card scene of the snowy peak of Mr. Rat- nier. They agree that the crucial moment of their lives came in 1970 when Earl de- cided to go professional. "The question comes back to that competitive rta~Lrre again," he says. "I was 31, not getting any younger, 1 would never have known if I could de it or not, if [ hadn't tried " against guys who were better than | was, := tt w~ a poor time to quit a job in the and I learned by Iosthg money to them. ~eafue-Tacoma areal 100.000 workem We used to put money on a game, may- had just been [aid off in the aircraft in- be a couple of dollars--that's a lot for a shift worker with a family and a mort- gngehand the best scorer would take it alL, from maybe 20 or 30 guys who were in it. ] Rover Llsed an inst ruc~or, but I do advise amateurs to get one, even though it t'osts money. What i did w~s ask the good players, 'Hey. how do you do thatT dusffy, and a newspaper headline toad. LAST ONE TO LEAVE SEATTLE pLEASE TLRN OFF THE LIGHTS.BUt a work reflnetion in the warehouse was about to put Antho- ny on the swing shift, which would hiive brought him home too/ate to see his chil- dre~ before they went to bed. This en- couraged him to get out and do what he whan they'd roll strikes [ would try to wanted to do--go bowling for tunney put what l learned from~l~Em into'rq~ "tti~a~ a diillcult dacisionC Mar~lou own game, but still I was ~:OlnplhieJy on sayq: "We talEed it over a long time." my own, [ mainly wanted to prove to ray- self fllat I could beat the other guy." After four years Anthony was aver aging 204. He felt ready for the plunge into professional competition, if only on summer vacation from his job. So he joined the PBA and competed in tour nautch L~ in SeattIe, Spokane a~d at hom~ in Tacoma, winning very little but get- "Nobody is going to be sorry for you if you don't make it bowling," Anthony says¸ "If you fail, they just say goodby. Out of the 90 profe~ionals who work the tournamenls full time only 15 or 20 make a good living out of it. Who would have thought l ~ould make the top 20?" Anthony needed about $15,000 for travel and equipment e:cpen$~ and on- ring a strong taste for the life of a full- time howler. A Ihird child was on the way, however (the Aafuonys have two girls and a boy), and, unwilling to risk his financial security, he returned to his job for another seven IoEg yeal~ prae, tieing nearly every day and slowly im- proving. By the time he rot urncd to pro- fesslona] bowling, Anthony had a 2~7 av~Fage. In their modest living room, dominated by bowling trophies set on a sideboard and on the wail-to-wall carpet, Earl and Mary[ou Anthony sit in armchairs, ex hausted from a tournament trip to Ha- waii that included, for once, the whole family. Ordinarily it is only in summer that the kids are free to travel with their try fees A friend, David TueLI Jr., a Ta- coma attorney and fellow imwler, vol- unteered to help sponsor him ~n return for part of his eventual winnthg~, a cnm- fflcn al-raflgement hi1 tolffl~ameut i}la)'. "The Way it works," Anthony ex- piairls, "is ~hat, say~ $4,800 goes into a bank account to cove[ expct~c~s on a doz- en tournaments, The hank sends me $400 a week and [ send back all my winnings. if] make any, In ~he bank¸ The sponsor first gets hack his $4,800, if there's enough ~o pay him, and then 40% or ~0% of atiything more than that. according to the deal you make." Anthony wt~uld have struck out on his own if it hadn't been for Marylou's in- sistence that somebody else take the main risk; with a sponsor footing the bills, the ?4
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MI Hie average house can contain. With- in the prescribed limits of circumspec tiofl, each bowler shows emotion in vary- ing ways. Sandy Finkelslein, 34. of Corl[and, N.Y. crumples up in mock de spair when he leaves a pill standing on a crucial frame and pretends to be dying in his scat, Frank Zitnik. 2~. of Hubbard Obio. prelers to kid around about a low snore, anrtouncilJg to a couple of pretl~ young ladies in his claque: "This is it rnl reciring after this lOUl~ament. You'll never see me around here again." And he gives them a big grin. as ir he is really er~oying the game even though he's not doing so hot at the moment Mosl of the bowlers, though, appear to be under con slam strain, as if there ts not much fun in h wheq they're winnlng--and onl} black misery in defeat. Anthony rarely shows emotion, he it deJight or despoil He picks up foe bowl- ing baTI and then. with his righl hand. he lightly brushes an earpiece elf his glass es--a gentle, deliberate little movement thai is lhe onty wasted motion Aathotly makes while bowling. But there is a b0 nked fire in him thal was a hot lemper when he was a kid. Growing up in Ta- coma as the youngest of three children of a career Atmy alan who win, away much of the lime~ Anthony feh carry on that he was on his own and wanted to prove he was as good as the others soJe ]y for his own satisfaction His drive tu win in high school came ou~ or his '*orneriness" Amhonv ay He '*as already showing a good pitching arm ill the 10th grade bul lhe baseball coach advised him to wait a year before trying out for the varsity. "He told me that in another year rd he able lo th re2 v,¸ harder." Anthony ~ys. '~But [ wouldn't wait and 1 thought.']f I can't make pilch- er as a sophomore then ] w~Jn't pileh for you next year, either.' ,, Hungry for coro- petillun and refosing to be ptJl Off'. Ile took his pitching eisev, heremto an aduh city league team. He also took a job as a pinsetter in a bowling center, but rolled only a few casual g?ames in those day~; he thought of himself as a baseball pitch- er. Graduating from high ~chool at 17. he joined the Air Force and hccame a radar techn~elan Phehing for Vinceni Air For¢~ Base againsl an Army learn he threw ba~:k:to.baek seven-innillg no- hitters, striking oul i9 in the ~rst game, 18 in the second. Completing his four year hhch. dur- corr~hJued ?3
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in~ yet can draw enough mo~ey to live ~. Antony I~gan with a 60-40 splk ha his favor. "~ my very first fourname~lt-- it was out ira Wtchila--i won secmld place and $3.500," he saYS with a ww ~lane~ at his wife. "When I heard whal he'd won." site says. "1 thought, 'He's going to km me for mak~ him get a sponsorr' " In ap- Weeiation ~ot Tudl's eor~dev~e. A~h~ ny rotained him as a sponsor unt~ l~t yeur, ~lxe~ fo~ tlxe ~ time he w~ked with a 100-0 ~plit in his favor. Maryiou bowls once a weel~ in a wom- en's leagtle ila W]lJcla, she say5t newcom- el~ expect her to be a whiz because she is Mrs. Anthony. But they soon accept the fact that her talent is modest. Earl, she s~lys, eficoura~ her but Won't coa(ll her; he doesn't lik© instr0eting ~d would ne~er conskler doh~ h lot ~ living. The three children (Jeri. 18, a legal secretary; ldi~, 16, ~ lah~ ~a~aol jumo~, ~nd Tr~- ey, 13, an eighOl-g~der) bowl in local leagues. M.kke says proudly. 'q can bear him may~o once ha 10t) games." Marylou hardly acts the part of a wife whos~ husband i~ ~c~ 1 at lli~ o~ct~pa- tion. On the morning of their r~tur~ f~ Hawaii, she did thr~ toads Of w~hhag and ~tar~ed her ~roni~--"or else nobody ~roaalad large Will l~a~¢ m~'~hil~ ~ w~.a~ ~' In seven y0ars, Anthony has won haft a mi/l~o~ dollar, $31~,000 tlae tagt t~see, but the only major app~anc~ Marylo~ r~ calls getting was a new s~wing macl~h~e. A now cat was a tournament [~'~ze~ but ot het'wis~ notl~ suggests tllat the An- thcnys' ho~s¢ ~ flo ]o~r th~ home of a l]a'ocerymall. Anthony ha~ I~ught land for mve~lmeut--~ pul~ha~ last yelar of 40 aer~ of woodland on the O]ytapia P enin~ala ~ the m~t ~cen~ h¢ tittle intert~t in v]sitlng the ]mad o~ en- anywhere ¢Ise. for that ma~t~r, ez~e~t may~ on ~ golf ¢oulse, whel~ his ~am¢ is improving from the mid-80~. Antony t~vtly p~ssed the exams for a Wash- ~ton real ¢~tat~ ficense, just in ca~ his bow~ sc~res shotdd faE off. Though it is clear tha~ Anthony ~ lil- tie t~sle for spending mo~aey, ~t is also ev= idiot ~ I~ ~ not thhak ~s ~'a~d ea~ of mor~ than $100,000 a~ very haxW¢~v~. The ~t thhag [1¢ Rk~ to point o~til that a golfer in his class, play- h~ tile v~l~¢ number of tou~n~ and enjoying the s~n¢ suc~ he do~, would OfallfilterlOQb: ] oo's lare "And the ~ller$ would have to whi~p~ w]tea he Was about to shoot. ~o," he say~. He notes fi~t he is already w0rh- ing fo~ 50¢ on the dollar ~¢cau~e of taxes, and says that air flue and hotel~ cost ldm e~il~ $~60 a we~ and thin l~e spends about 30 weeks a ~ear on the tour, The A~ll~ony~ ~pend as li~e on f~ as ~h~y do oa m~r appfiance~ ~nd were o~tmge~ at !~ $~ for ~ ~e~ f~ P¢¢o on art eve~ out with busin ¢~,s as- ~c~e~ d~g ~e~ H~w~iL tt~. "Pay- ing that much i~ ridiculous," Ear[ says. His f~vor~m meal is bmakfast, at which he ¢~ l~hed brown potatoes, bacon and cg~s, ~ p~ncakes or wa~es. He ~o likes ice cream, arid does away with hail a gallon a:~lay ~Any flavor at ~, exce!t~ gre~ tea," h~ says. "Dontt uT it/' T~e $|~00~ mark m b¢~ng ~, un~ ~,mtho~y ~u~p~ssed it in 1975. much tike the ~o~r-mlnute m~le. a~ altl~u~ his eamh~ had ~ increasit~g most years, h= de~pe~el~ wa~ted to he the first to ~ it. Ill 1974 he ev¢fl w¢~ so fat as to e~ter low-payit~g regiov~l tour- hamlets at ~he ~ of the year in ml ~- tempt to reach hi~ goal. Anthony recalls ~hat 1974 '~oked l~e a $40,000 yeer to me ~ood but Ilot phenomenal. Bu he the end of th~ year, "and everybody was l~um~i~ me t~ t~" for th~ $100~000." Havi~ ¢~tmed $76,000 by early Septem- be.r, Anthol~y entered a mino~ coolest in an ~ight-lane hot~e in Cat~onwood. Ariz., where only the fi~t prizt of $1 fl00 was worth his ~irne and travel. "I b~ely won it." he says. ~t by winning at Cot- tonwo~l, he b~l¢ eligible for a ~o~- ~est Of l~g]ona[ cl~mpions in Ohio---and thin Now)~e !~gone over $$ L000. He wen a~ otb.~r $2.(]00 in ~l~ttle Creek. fin. ished 27~ in Syracuse, earning $405, and got $5,000 for wiomng in C[eveIand. To- rah $g8,66~ He would have made the $100,000 if he had won the World Open in Cl~cago, but second plae~ raised the pot ~o o~ly $96,160. TO ~ep in the rim* nmg m the ~ end o~ fne sea~vn, he h~i to win in Hawaii, and he d~d--the $3,025 at $ I ~,~00 c~mc in Saata Mgrla. Cali£. where ~ first p~e was $I.000. '=I fin- ished tilde" he says. Al~o~gh he mls~d • e magic number by $415, he made it Jn 1975 with $ l 0"~,585. 75 ~o~ {ow-tar cigarettes u~ art~ci~ t~avo~ngs. N~t L~cky ~ 00'~. Get Luoky 100's with only neturat flavorir~s. A rime tar~ a Iotta taste.
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What a year it was--and SPORTS ILLUSTRATED covers it all In A Year /n Sports: a ~peclal issue fvaforthg more than 80 pages of fulbcofor photographs of the 9real '76 sports everlfs • lllhe Innsbrucd~ O~ame~= • NIA mt¢l NOAA P~lmtls and Final= * ltte Montreal Olymplos * The U.S. Opmt * Indy 500 = Forest Hills * Wlmbledon * The Works Slm'l~ • 'lrhQ ~,~nloy Cup • Kin1. tucky Derby * 'llhe lrriple Crown ** Supe¢ Bowl XI ...and more!/~ ~fem th ~ is des- ~¢led to become a coilec~or "s ftem, a much-uSed reference booit, and a rreasu~ of the ho~ of sports photog- raphy. Make sure you get your Copy before they're all 9onQ. PICK UP A COPY WHEREVER YOU BUY i$ to kill time. I keep watching TV as Mte as I can; ~ou get some ¢~ls whe/c there's a late movie on until maybe three ia the morning. 'llhetl it's easy to sleep till 10 and ~rctch he¢clffast out until noon, When it's time to start bowling." AS long as he is bowim~ Anthony doesn't much mind whcr~ he is, though ha prcfca pleasaaf climates, b/c sees a couple of dozen cities for a week each Fiat but knows very little about them be* yond the direct route hetwccn the motel arid tim bowling center. Besides watch- ing w.fevlalon he ~ads "~, but ~- itkc other prof©mionals who have out- side hltercsts st~ch ~s antique co[[cct/ng or portrait pointing, A.thony Imeps his mind rurally on the paine. HIS favoed¢ trophi~ thcludc a samurai helmet he got for bowling a perfect game on live ]alP* anese tekiif~on, and the Ige3, to lha City of Falelawn, Ohio, where the Firestone Tournamcttt of Champions is held, and he enjoys knowiatt that the news of ev- ery tournament ha plays in is posted on a spatial lindelin board la the 0faces of the West Coast Grocery Co. Among his least fovotiIe rvwazds a.~ a gdl Midas muller on a stand, which he received "It hasn't really changed our life any." he says. ~e, xcepl thaC r have kiss [lale to my~alf," Says Marylou, "We resily didn't run right out to buy an~ but it iS nice to know that if anyd~ happed ~o us we'd he taken ca/¢ of~ After his car on aaotimr 300-game reisv~on chal- 1975 fea~ Anthony ~old a ~t~ for the Seattle post-/nmil/~ence~-. 'q~ has a~ b~n kind of a dream, lihe a script made up in Hollywood. [ kept looking for that Alfred Hitchcock ending, but it Anthony is not qt!lic sure wh~thtr hc shouM regard hewmig as work, "h'~ fan, hecatt~¢ I~ht eo~lperent ~t it." he says. "but. yes, it's work. I had m work hard at it; it's blood, sweat and leafs. But, still, il is flever a chore, never drudgery to Neverthal~ss. Anthony does hev~ a mild s[gmp abOUt once a yeat when [~ g¢~ into whet 11¢ calls a state of "satiat Lop." ~What goes wrong with son't~proles- sioaal how]exs is thal timy bowl ~ve~y week in compefoion and they gt:t too much of it I try ~o relax ~m i¢ ~ tournaments but usually there isn't enoug~ tha¢. R reaffy tahes four wveks to get complet ely aw~y from it. but us~- ally [takerwo at themost." =~thony would like to keep liowilng Anthonyndmits "thekeythingonto~ for at foas~ three mo~'e yea~ and says • at he will be satisfied with $40.000 a yeac. He world ~Jso ilk¢ to dose tha pay ~vcl of howiing to parity with golf, as w~ll as l~iS¢ the lowbrow i~ag¢ that con- lf~ues to plague the sport in spli¢ of ies whi¢ acceptance wit~ most SC~nL~ of ~ha A~mican papule licm~ say hath ing of the c~tx~nt boom in Eui~, Asia and the other Amerfoas. [¢ is ~o~ [~aly that he will slow down of his own ~c- col~l. Once. at~ hem w~ a c~r M a toegh tournament in Madison Squa[¢ Garden, 11¢ ~r~rted off m the nee. con= les[. a ~r~clfor one d~v~ hi Vli-~L~a. hy I¢lfthg a mediocre bowler beat him and was. as mi sa,ys. "very upset with my~¢l~ A ~fieml tol~ m~. 'Ease up a ilttis, you just wo~ a big one in New York.' I told ~d~ there was going to be a Wthner here, too, and I wante~ it to be file. You have m #~,e 100% alJ ~he ~. You here io k¢~p VTing to he a lnachinc.~' So Eaal Anthony is out on ehe cli~uis again. Ather that spatkiin~ly succes~fol year of 1976 ~adod at the Cluist~ hol- hia,ys, ha hescrihed how 1977 fooknd to him: "It's ilhe finding out. after you've ju~ wo~z t~ f~t~sl rally. Lhel you have to euu atlot hen- ki~," MA / INgS. I 7il / ahcr ~llng [o toll a perfecl'~am¢ on t¢ie- " vi~on for $200,000 (he felt tha lO-pth stl~ding in the svventh frame), and an immovable pin that, if it had faL!cit. would hay© meant $10,~0 and a ~ew leng¢ (~a this oa~ lie got II strthes be- fore leaving a lone bed-news 9-pin). Dur- hig his ca~cr he has hawfed fourteen 300 garoes, all as a professional. Anthony advises that imwhas who contempl~t~ )oLking ~ha toer "im~ in a tcmrnarnent Rear home to see what h is like. See if you enjoy h and whether yau'r¢ capable Of living this lifo. That w~y yoti can saet yourself $15.C00 if you dem't like it. le's a bodng life on the mad. travaling all the time, beL~g away from hOmes Ifyo~ can hactdle Ihet yo~ ea~ ~e a professional" To good bowlers 'whO would ilk¢ to improv~ grodua~y to the pro fessioncl level, Anthony says, "You'd ha'¢¢ to spend tha n¢.~. two or t~ ysars hawiin8 every hay, you'd have zo ilv~ L~ a bowling center and somehow get free imw/thg, work eherc or someth/ng. Bu~ pro hOwling is a scary proposition. If ~ou ha~e one good week~ you never know ~f you're Eoin~ to make a dollar the nexi."
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OfallmenthollO0§: Iceberg lOfts are lowest! Some Ion,-tar cig~,r~s U$~ artificial flavorings. Not Iceberg 100's. Get Icel2e rg 100's with dilly natural ftavorincJ~. A little tar. a t~ ffist~. Warning: The Surgeon GeneraJ Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Sangerous to Your H~rlh. SOGOER c~]linu~d that," says Rogers. "bul on ~ha whole [ think l~ople loved it," Somebody loves that !oft of thing. Lasl year the Rowdies were ttah in league auendallee, avef~lg- ing crowds of 18,000, and for Zealt they drew atl astomshalg 41.680 to Talttha Stadium. ~.o g~ ~ud his team firam and p~cajeet. so well that their NFL neighbors, the Buccaneers. who are suffering at the Kate and in the media, have sent people to take Iessons from the Rowdies. It might ~eero odd that a teazn from the mighty NFL would he showing up on the door step of a team in a league that doesn't even have a national television cenmlet. but Beau Rogers thinks he knows the tea- son why. And the answer, he believes. works for all sports, "You can do all the promotion you want," he says. "but if you don't cul it the 6eIti. ~c.u'r ¢ 4¢ain A. wlralh~g team makes any front office knffi go~d." The team itself works a~ b~ily pro- raoth~g R(~wdyisrtt ~ fire ftor~t office V ario(ts Rowdies appear on the local PBS stations, for instance, doing public-~er- vice spots. ]n one, Alex Prffigle. file Scot- tish defender and the first p/ayer the Rowdies signed, is shown being ejected from a game, file reJeree holding a red card over his head "You too have to stop on the ~d," goe~ the warning about crossing streets. Aside from the usual spate of soccer clinics, speaking enga~e- ment~ a~d ribbon-cuttings at mtw auto deale f~hlps--~lll of wllich the players tin dertake with grace and humor, for file Row61es a~e mz~elc.usly acee'~s~ble-- there are more ambitinus projects, such as one in which they took over an eighth- grade d~s a~ti gave a ~urs¢ on how to operate a sporls franchise. [f all this sounds lille a ero~s between a successful Junior Acluevelnent Corn- pany, a Dale Carne~e course and par* adise, nothing is perfect, not even the Rowffies. Even though Coach Eddie Fir maal scouts the English league for play- ers that fit tha Rogers mo]d--t hose who have a flair and are willffig to sl~ contracts that call thr ¢Jff-seeaon promo- tional and ¢duc~tisaxal work ~"our Ftta- him love to hear thcc.e English ae- cenrs")--it is interesting to note what happens t~ players "~ho oeea~i~,aaliy choose to b~eak the mold. Last so,scan. Stewart Scullion and Clyde Best, a Scot and a ~ermuffian te- speetivaly, groused and fomented a good ¢onolzUed 71 OfaUfil lOOi: Lueky lofts are lowest! ~ome ~tar ck~r ettas artificial f~,vorings Not Lucky 100's. Get Lucky ~ O0's with offiy natura~ ~avorings. A little tar, a Iottataffie. Wynin~ ~he Sur~.~ General Ha~ Delermined That Ci98r~e Smoking Is Dang|feus to '/our Heegh. 4 r~,' l~", 0,4 mg nlr~t[n, 4 ~g,'tw', 04 mfl, rllColine
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deal of troubLe because they v~nted to be paid on the English sys~m--I~nus~ for ~, more money for ",'*inning away, mu~h more for playoffs, ~. Sope~tar Rodn~ Marsh ~ve up his te~am capmln+ cy rather than get involvod in the fray. The r~ob ~ that neither ScuLEoa nor Best, both of whom had been ~mportant to the team in a statistical sea,e, was ~gaod this year. De~k Smcthur$L 29, a South A~iean~ born for~aof who bounced around the E~,~sh ~cDnd and ~ di~o~s ~forc landing with the Rowdies thrc~ years age, does fit, although he has ~se~- tidns. L~lais is a whole n~w ]i~ in see= cer for me.11 hc ~. ~ar~d l'm hapL~y for the chance. I think sometimes we maybe do too much promotion and ap= peara~, Som~lim~s I wish we wcrca't q~tc ~ aco~ssib/e," But whatever eLse they doI th~ Row° di~ put oe a good show, .~d't~ t~atdig th~ Soviet team to bags of oranges, free ~vi's--a mL~st for visiting ~on Curi~n television actor Robert Conrad, Beau Rogers Productions saved its best show far S at m~tay dight)~ game. Before the n~apaciLv crowd, on a humid evening, the smiling Wowdies presumed each Zeni~ player with a SOu- quct of ~ellow and green roses ~md a kiss, and each Rowdy b~d~l his Sovi~ cot~° tcrp~t a small star oetze of a soccer pl~y- ~r, a Rowdy promotional i~m called Stoney Malon~ys. O~ the ~¢in, ~r, th~ Rowdies wer~ oatclassedmthough barelymby the innovative Soviets, Playing exactly the same styie as the P~owdi~--hath=cbarg- thg, s/ion pa~mg) ~nadiot~ at mid= l~ein the Z~i~it side confused the ]ocais, whose intelligence lind led them to ex p~t a dour, mechanical, team-play g~e from the Zen~ APdiot~gh AJ~n~ Augusta, 26, a Hal tian ddei~er, did a re~mthable job of marking the Soviet first~livi$inn goal* scoring leader Aiexaoder Markim he only goal of the game. Charging in, Mar- kin got offa h~of head shot that cebvund- ed from the crossbar. He headed the ball again Io Forward Viache~iev Me.b~kov. who w~ turking by the com~ of the gc~l mo~th, and Meldikov put a low, dribblin~ shot into tl~ comer of the net, ~ Rowdy Keeper Patti Htmunood, 13:44 into the s¢¢cC~d half for the only goal of the game. By NASL stand~, th~ Rowdies l~ay~d ~ win/ as the Soviet, die ~fth- tanked t~m in the soccer=mad U,S,S.R. It was a '~fun" night, a~ Rogers would put it, and also flrStorate so¢cer~-~xactly the combination that has made the Row° dies' operation a ~cecss. Gordon Hill has only one big worry. .~1 ~ol~ that w~n ~ccer ~co~s ama= jot ~port be~e Eke football," he says, "and Ro~vdies are t)p ~hcre at th~ top, that we don'~ forget all c~dr m~theting and ed= ucalinn proRrmns arid mc~t of aIl orb- fans. I want to be ac~s~ble." m/a) O
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OFF THE | play schoooks." observes Ned Beat- ty. "That bothers me," it's also true that the sensitive but meaty-faced charac- ter actor may be Hollywood's first significant contribution to redneck power. Among his sornpone roles are such good (and bad) Die boys as the blubbering victim of a sodomy attack in DefiverztnGe, Lily Tomlin's hustler husband in Nashville and the slippery Miami DA in All the President's Men, Despite his recent string of success- as, Beatty, 39, also seems bent on shedding his Southern Rim stereotype. in #Jetwork he plays a hard-nosed, pompous conglomerate bigwig. Ha is on camera barely six minutes hut de- livers a mesmerizing oration that is making hfm the odds-on favorite for best supporting actor at the Academy Awards. Yet even he concedes, "If I'd been casting that role, I'd have been the last person Fd have thought of. Basi- cally I took like a used~car dealer," Just three years ago Ned (unrelated to actor Warren Beatty) passed a hard- scrabble 12 months on six w~eks' pay in an $85-a*month cabin tn the hills be- hind Malibu. He and his family used art outhouse, raised chickens and tur- Keys, and chopped wood for their Franklin stove, Even now the unassum- ing Beatty pads around his modest North H oily, re od house in HUSh Pup- ~ies, rumpled and sockless, "I'd rather be a good Die boy than anything," he i says. Ned was born in Louisville, Ky.. the son of a traveling salesman who died when he was 15. (Beatty later found playing Willy Leman onstage painfully "close to home.") Early on, he yearned to be a ja~ trombonist, and his basso )rofundo voice won him a music schol- arship to Transylvania College, a Disciples of Christ school in Lexington, Ky. Beatty flirted briefly With the min- istry but "linked out" to sing folk music at Berea (Ky.} College. He finally switched to theater, reasoning that CONTINLJED
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I ~cr e~llC ONTINUG D Of all menthol 100 : .oto,o iceberg [ o seasons at the Barter Theater in A lO0's - are lowest! Some low tar cigaretles use artificial flavorings NCR Iceberg 100's. Get Iceberg 100'~ with only natural flavorings, A little tar, a Io~a taste, War~ng, The 5qrgeon Da~r$ Has Dat~inod That Cigarette SmokJng [s Dangerous to Your Health. 4 mq,-la", 0,¢ ~, ncod~:d a,, pzr c/gazette tr FTC r~echa~ 9O The roly~oly Beatty labored nine bing- ~on, Va., pDaying everyone from Big Daddy to Uncle Vanya. ("Being heavy made me look older.") After that he was divorced from his first wife, an ac- tress, who still lives in Virginia with four children from their eight-Year mar- riage, "The pain of separation," 8etatty f omemb(~rs, "wa~l inhuman, iflcocroct Iznd ridiculous." Foln/unat ely, while performing at the A~ena Stage in Washington, Ned was cast opposite a sUm, curry-haired blonde, actress Belinha Rowley. "AI the time I wasn't f~elirzg too swift aboul my ability to pleaSe a lady," Ned re- calls. But he evidently did, Six months later Belinha WaS ~weiling with thel¢ first child, and Ned and she married~ "Ned did ~zll he could for the theater.'* cracks the 30-yeat-o~d Belinha, "when t~e took me off the stage¸" Of N~d'~ recyClQd grits 'n' hicks parts --the ornery sheriff in White L~tnl~g, the d~bauched ~lesm~zn in Sliver ~treak--the most indelible romair~ his first a~ D~]iveran~'~ brutally violated ~anoeist. Strangers still prQvokEt him wgh vulgar remarks about It. "1 held ~ onto that role for I long time." Beatty ~lays, "probably bocaus~ I had probed ~to more aspects of myself than any other part," Now ho has "mOre money than I ~ver dreamed of" ~nd the leisure "to be at home and goof off." A part-time car~ ~ I~M~I fMIm,e O~ue ~ peter A'lt~r hl~ cl~l~l debut m~ a xvapd ~1~ '1~ Bealty ~wu nlvor e who grinds his own hamburger, . the 5"9", 21 S-lb. Ba~tty fights a constant battle with his w~ight~e recently tared off ~0 pound~ wilh daily gym workouts, For all his aw-shZJcks man r~er. he is ~ cfoset I~te//ectual w~o writes lyrics ("pur~ doggerel"), reads C. G. Jung, listens ~o chamber music ~l~d dgcornpresse8 by playing the dul- cimer. Ho also likeg to b~ke his own bread, "$i~pping that dough," he says, "Is a great way to relieve f rust ratto~," Ahead is a possible six-part C8$ summer miniserie$, Szysznyk, about a Polish-American eX-Marine. Both h~ ~ Belinhe h~'ve Lo~rts }n th~ unr~- Ioased Exo[cisf • Yet N~d LInc onve~% tionaily rejects leacling r ole.~. "They*re more trouble than they're worth," 110 Slys, and ~dd3: "l rJ ouldn't hav~ dreamed Up a bettQr career. I feel ~of ry for people in a st~r posit io~----it*s ~nn~fural " LOfS #.RM~TRONG
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have lethaed to sanetthn the formula, say- ing they would participate at Telemark only if the words *'World Cup" were nev- Pr~ never use~.. So 1~ Week's race w~$ ~fieO t~ American CUp, even though it was in truth a World Cup event--and a Landmal'k in that it was the first ever held in America. However, tbe question remains: What ~uc2~ ~.uro~'~ cross~,ountry s|al$ Co come 4,000 miles for a race completed in little more than 40 muiute~ before only a couple of hundred people from Wis- consin? The answer lies in lhe imaglrm uo~/be ~/let---of one Tony Wtse, a bulky, round-fnced, 55-year-old proton ; j~r/cntreprene~ who has run the Tel- emark ski area for almost 30 years. In 1947 Tony Wise bought a small s'a,e~ing o~ glecia/momthe 18 miles north o f Hayward, Wis. for $75fi, got a war-su~ plu~ Jeep engine to rl~n a rope tow and went into the ski-resort busincss. Al- though it is a celebrated joke around the Midwest t~r Telemark is the only ski area in the world where the lodge is big- get than the mountain, the 370-foot hiU attracted Ioany Pinlns Stat~s siners. But not enough to maintmn itself by s,Ming alone, a~d Wi~ had m rely on the s#~hy promotion, the clever gimmick, He hlred big-name performers--5om Du~ EI- lington GO Chubby Checker¸ He threw an almLLa] dinner called the Blue Ox Fe~t. He ~reated a mass ~isJzeos' cfo~. cotlntry race, the Amedean-Birkebeiner, which ha~ come to be the U.S.' inrge~t llt will probably draw 3,00fi in Febru- aryL In 1972 he began adding a network of cross-country tmfls I~ow close to fi0 miles), and last year the O.S. team held its Olympic Trials at Telemark--largely because it had not snowed at Lake Pine id, the original training site. Logically or not, all of this caused Tony Wis¢'s imag- ination to percolate, and he came up with the idea of holding a woHd-elass race at T~Mmark. "I was trglng to think of a ve- hicle to promote the Bkkebeiner Race," he says, "and this is what came to mind." Fair enough. To hold such a race, all Wise had to do was 1) get hiros¢[f a wotld-clas~ crc6s-country course and 2) entiee a field of world-class raeels to show up i~ wisconsin. Being a man of di- rect action, Wise decided that the quick- est way ta do this was to ~pend money. Which h~ did Fie spent $100,(300 last summer to build a spectacular new series of racing trails. They were designed by the U.S team coach. Marry Hall. a veler- an of ma~y years on the internattona] cir- cuit, and they wind through the woods in a classic arr angcmem of chitlins downhill dro~ (skiers reach speeds of 40 mph) and ~SJlthg uf~i~ climbs teat drew gasFi~.g praise from the expe~is. John C aLdwell, a former Olympian and coach who has long been one of America's best-known c~oss-eouatry authonbeL says that Tele- mark tto¢~ h,~ the d~esl tml/~etwork in this country, end Kcch says that even in Europe the only course ~uperior to Tele- mark's is the Olympic trail at Seefeld To get the racers, Wise put up anoth- er $60,0~ for Ih~ir p~anc fares, three days' lodging and food--everything from the moment they left home until they re- turned He paid for the top U.S. skitr~ as v, eiL Wise put eve~0ne up at his Tel- emark Lodge, an ~Met~¢ p/ace gcat'¢~ for every kind ef guest from famliies who cook in their rooms to singles on the prowl through the cavernous carpeted lobbies, haas and ballrc~n~s. Because To~y's psyche is I~tbe~ charged u ]iffle more with the spirit of P. T Barnum them that of Uil, Ibe Norse ski god, he laid ~n an entertainment package that included several dozen OAibwa Indians in full feather doing cetemothal dances, and he gave out lavish gifts, including furdined deerskin gfoves made by the Indians. When Wise had co01pletcd his prep- arations, the quality of the field w~ not in doubl, WoiId Cup/lde5 require thai at least l0 racers who earned 20 or more points the previous season must be in the field for a race to be sanctioned. At Telcmzrk there were I6, including KUIV- isle, who was NO. 2; My)'mt,, NO, 4* Br~. No 6; Repo, No. 7~ and Koch, No. 8. Koch sind, "There arc <~niy three Wnrid Cup races all this season that will be as good as this one. They are all in Scan- dinavia at the emi of the seaso~" Of courbe, ~3nch of the attcUtJon--atld the presatu'e--was on the 21 year-old Koch to deliver snmeththg spectae3 fiar in hts first major American race. It was a lot to expect Few young men have ever undergone such a wrenching transforma- tlon in life-style as Billy KOCh has since winning his silver medal. Less than a yetlr ago he wa~ an intense, ascetic young man, pcrha~ bordering on the reclusive, who seemed to en2oy the [onelthess, the in. trospeetio~, even the seifiess suffc~ng tff cross-country skiing Then he became :in instant star, and his sbefi of sol~tude was shat toted. His days wer~ filled with p~0- motional ~ppoinlments, contract negoli- ations aqd plegs for intcrdews g2th au- tographs, These interrupted his concen tratinn and disrupted his training. A month or so before Telemark he suffered w0s takthg for a chronic asthmatic con- diuom an cxclueinting malady [or a cross-courtesy racer in that it is severely aggravatcfi hcah by extreme exertion and by cok~ weather, KOCh, who is 5" 11 " and norraaBy welgh~ 165, Iost 15 pounds at one pdinL The week before the race he caught a cold. And the disastrous short age of snow in the U.S. caused him aud the real Of the Ameticaft team to ~om plete only about halt" of the on-snow training they had last )/ear at the same tinlc. The U.fi. Nordic team director, John Bower, said before the r 0.co, "I doa~t see how BilIy can do anyth~ag very ~m- pressiv¢, I'd have to say his chances are pretty alien--but I've seen him surprise the beck out of everyon~ before." The day of the American Cup race wa~ partly cloudy, ~,'~ the ctmrse was not pariiculariy fast. And whatever you wanted to call it, the event did not be- long to America. From the start, Koch looked oddly limp, ~ and determined but obvi0u~ly far off form. In a field of 78, which ittcluded dozens of American and Canadian rookins, he struggled to fin- ish 27th and will not enter any more World Clip rares until he has fully re c~perated, Burop~ans swept the firsl nine places. The winner w~ Pithaenen, a member of Fthland's 1976 gold-medal Olympic ~lay team, Who completed the course ~ 43:32.7. Br~ was second in 43:506, ~oBowed by two more powe~uJ Finns, Re, po and Koivisto The best Americml finlsh---qmd a very good olte in such a select field--was lthh by Stan Dunklee, 22, of Bmttieboro. Vt., a U.fi team m~thcr elBCe ] 974 WhO had never bcfor¢ placed higher than 27th in an in- ternational race. Tim CMdweU, 22, of Pumey, Vt,, who finished 15in, was the only other Americml in the top 20. Dcspi~ the relative reed ~ocrity of the American performances at Telemark last w~ck, the race itself was a milestone. By elything tthout the Gitchi Gami Games was wofldselass (with the possible excep- tion of t~e name), and Tony Wise has every int~ntinn of staging it again next year--anti for a long time to come. He said, "We're hke Green Bay with the Packers. We may be a smafi town in a re mote place, hut we got here thst--and we're golr~g to stick with it" ~ 45
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Ofailmenthol lOOk Iceberg lO0's are lowest inLar! Actually 70% tarl qCEgERG 100s ........ '~' ¢ mg,nicetime Q 4 m9 8land K ............ 'hi( 17 rng, n[coliae I 3 r~ Umnd S . "tar'19 n~g, ~icm~e 1.3 ~O "Of a][ braq~s. Io~est ......... "tar" I rag. niculine OI m~ • Av ~er cqare~e by [TC rne~orl Warning: The Sur~Bon General Has [lete~mined Thnt Sig~rel~e Smoking is gangeroos IO Your He,lift 4 m0 ~ta~ ft.4 mo. fllCellne; av per tigereye by FTC me~cd SOCCER~Paul our nights m a row the stumpy tittle Fbus took the playert of the U.S. im- tional soccer team hack to their hotel af- ar the ~raini~g sesxiora. Each night, a* the bus pulled away from the stadium in downtown Port-au-Prince. hundreds o~ yeUing and cheering young boys ran along behind for the ~ bonth~d yard~ or so. Than they fell back and the titda bus ~Ped off thxough the dallied mght- thne of the erratically lit streets, clatter- ing and snorting and leaving behind in the hea'~y warm air the mucous stralr~ of Yenkee Dood/e Dandy, or I Ain't OomJ a G,qeve No More. All along the route, the Haitians ill the crowded street~ stopped to turn and stare after this exlraordinaty i~reci of foreign noise ~sting t hi.ugh their city, Some smiled, some waved and some shouted, but ~ey ~ noticed, Not so nodceabbi, because a good deed quieter, was a similar bus that lea~ the sta- dium earher each evening carrying the Canadom aatlanal team, For she moment Canada and the U.S. were just two of more than 100 national teams thvolved in the qualifying rounds of the World Cup, soccer's quadretmial Holy Grail, to be field in Argenttim ira the summer of 1978 for the 16 fmatisr~. The nvo co.tries ~ s~az lad thalr quest along with Mexico in a three-nation sub- ~oup from which two of them would go on to the next rotmd. Mexico had won the round-robin series but the U.S, and Canada had e~d~d up with identical 1-2-1 records. To decide which woulti advance, a fmgle pinyoff game at a neuo tral site was necessary. When the U.li. and Canada e~uld not a~ee on whert and when the game should ha play~l, the WOrM Cup orgaulzers told them: Port-au-Prince, Haiti. three days bofont Christmas~ The America~ approved, They had played four games in Haiti in Novem- ber, and felt at home in Port-au-Prince. The Ca~aedM~s, svffedog fmarlulal pro~ lores, had favored Mexico or Bermuda to keep down traveling eats. But when the World Cup organizing committee da- cide~ there is either ohadience ~r there is a forfeit. Canada would play in Haiti. Coach Walt Chyzowyeh put his U.S. squad--players of U.S. altizeoship pre- ponfieranfly from the North Ametica~ Soccer League--through a series oF patatot~ games in Curacao and SurinanL 46 Gardn~ End of a dream in Haiti Canada closed out U.S. ambitthns for 78 Wo~ld Cup glory on a neutral field His co'donee before meeting Canada was total. "We are ready," he said, "1 think the score could be 3~) m us." Within a minute of she start, the U.S. hati i/s ehal~ee---t~vo efiances, in fact-- to score the vital first goal. A hectic s~tamble hi the Canadian goal mouth raised a great cloud of dast on the deyert- dry field and left the ball rtmning loose to Canre~Forwaed Freddy Qrgurev from the German-Am¢rlcan soccer tongue, His sotid eight-yard shot spun away off the body of a Canadian defe~lfier. From the sal~¢quent corner kick, a glancing head- er by Minatsota's Mike Fbiter was a lti- tie too flnri~ ~ed, se~adi~g the bali wide of the hilt*Mind post. Three mthutes later, Seattke's powerful Boris Bandav brol~ dirough with ordy GoalXeeper Zeljko lYfiecki to beat. Ban- dovti shoK W~ taken too soon and Bi lecki had the split second ha needed to dive and smother the ball. The Canadians had bee~ lucky, but they bud survived and were praying the ball forward with a methodical coolness so different from the brittie nervoosness that characterized tha ILS. raids. Their first threat ~ame on a diving header thaz seemed ~most in the net until Goalkeep- er Ardi¢ MItusser of Tamper Bay threw himself acrc~ the goal and. scooped the ~#d ~re,~y from t~e foot o£ the posL Twenty-two minutes into the Rame CiLme the cralcial play. and this time the outcome wits less happy for Mausser. From out tmar the left touehth~, Cana- dian Left Back Bruce Wilson lofted a 40- yard frt~ kick, a ball that seemed 1o dip suddenly as it came into she American goal mouth. Mausser came out for it, and came up with aoti2W. The ball rma through to Brian Budd, who volleyed for
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CHEVY S40 IT LIVES UP TO i Ford and Dodge offer nothing like Chevy S-1G And Datsun's King Cab doesn't begin to compare in: Maxi-room. Up to 50% more in-cab storage space behind the seat than Datsun. Maxi-towing, 3.000 lbs. more than Datsun on 2WD models with available V6 and Trailering ~uJ. (~ Maxl-power. AVfi e.~s Mm im~¢s C~mEXN E~CE letsyou~ ormm mr'~R~Es High and back again at any Maximize your truck value with a CHEVY TOUGH IS TAKING
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LIFE/STYLE Jame~Bw,=en--rt~,nn~x Bob Allan, twice widowed, with photos of ~cond wife and sons: The bottom line is loneline~ LandSman, a 34-y~ar-old Was~- ingto~ aRoraey whose wife, the~ 34 a~d aisa a lawyer, thed ofheeasi cancer last Jaunty, is waking up alone in the morning. "The ~ thing you think about is how she isn't there. And suddenly you fed death all around you." Donna Price (who asked that her las~ name be ehang¢~ recalis that as her own husband lay dying in her amls after 14 years of marringe, the thought that kepl ~g through her mind wos, "You s.o.b,, you're not going to be there for me when I the '* A year and a halt' inter the stlil walks out into the Lps Trgrmias hills, near her Contra Costa COtLnty, Cdii£. home, to weep and rmi at the ~ptiness. Thee a/~ some of the pr[va~ sorrows that widows and widowers have been describing at hereavcmeRt .coul~se]ing oexatet'g and workshops or in their a~la local support groups. They axe tales shot through with the an- guish of baseless guihs, objectless raSeS and disabling loneliness, but they bring the eonsoindon of in- slant r~zognthon from thetr l~ten ors. Sface the lind 1970s, hundreds of such A Great Emptiness oo=,in or,=tin and gro~lps have sp~g Up across the country, partly as a byproduct of the explosion of i inter~t in "death and dying" brought on bv With little support from family or friends, the w d- the hos¢ 0 mo emo, t, m.ch or owed are relying on each other to ease the pain of loss. bopetus hs ome from the widowed them selves, searching for a place to vent thetr rving Kernlish, a falm[y COUllSelor in IMarin County, Calif., was oat driwng one ~ay when he spotted a woman with a hairstyle similar to Ills w~fe's. "1 said tc~ myself, 'There'~ Nolo'," he remembers. "Then l laughed out laud and told myself, 'How silly of me Noin is dead.' Then my next thought was, 'I mus~ go home and tell Nolo how silly I just was ' It ell happened in a fraction of a second." They stumble, at unguasded moments, into "little ambushes" of grief a remem- bered ritual a familiar item of clothing, a too-familiar face. Some stdl earth them- selves setting the unneeded place at table, or feeling dt~mayed when they return from work to find no lights on in the house. Some try, deliberately, to palaver the rind, sithng in the vacant chair, sprawiing diagonally act n~.s the bed at mght or tucking the lius- band's pajamas under the pillow to keep his scen~ near* More than 13 yea~s after her huthand's death. Btrdie Boutte Fields comes home from her publle-re]aC~ons job at a HoustoIl hospital each day and turns On the television to fill up the silence. "Some- times." s~s Birdie. now 77. 'Lthey'll do s~methibg fanny on a progral~l and | catch mvseR smiling al m y husband's picture and ~aylng, ~How 'bout that, P.oy ?'" At first, there is simply the raw pain of /2Q loss, In the month after her husband of 49 sadness yors died, Rose Made Smith would go Men and women whose spouses have down to the eellar of her Los Angeles house died are fluffing they can grieve mere open- "and actually bellow. I cried and cried and ly----oRen more frultfully--with each other blamed myself far all sorts of imagined than wth friends or relatives who keep shortcomings," The worst of it, says Ran pushing t hem to shape up and get back lilto the pitiless swing of things. "Being Sheehan, Po~erycki, Mc Walte~ Closer than family strong and bucking up is a lot of Irt~mJ~ ba]olley" says Carol Sheel~a~, a sodal worker m Concord, Ma~s., who found herself "on the fringe of madness" when her husband ~ed of a heart attack eight years ago, leaving her with lheee young cmldren "You don't fed like bucking up. It i~ a real process that you must be allowed to go thet2ugh.'* M¢ol'e a~d more people are tm- dergoing that process. By latest ~tmaate. there are 10,8 million widows mad almost 2 million ~ad owe'~ in the United Statgs---7 2 percent of the adult population¸ As lifespans lengthen and the pop tdmion ages ever the next 20 years, a growing legion of A11~erlc~ns could be li~ing out thear lives iu p~o]on~ed widowhood. B~lt there is as yet little professional ltnder- standing of the emotional strug- NEWSWEEK/NOVEMBER 7, 1983
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had iost its only doctor, from the bank deposits of ; Other townspeople were like concerned, too. t hey got together exox with their local banker and he ~ serve to get thing arranged a loan to help build Your money ina bank a clilalc. was built and had not just one, but two doctors. "You can't imagine how S ; for home [ construction
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Ofallmentho]lO0§: lo elg IO0's are lowest! Some low-tar cigartates use art/ticia/flavorings. Not {ceberg ~ 00's. Get Iceberg 1 QO'S with only natural flavorings. A little tar, a lotto taste, W~ing: lhe Surgeon C~I Xa~ DItermined T~at ~]fla m~t e Smoking b Dang~-out to your H~hh. 4 mg."t~',04 m~ r~Ddn~ SKIING/Sam rchcr Wi~n is 72 years (~Id. Ob- Avlously, h¢ dccs not have as many Fo~s Ln life as he once had, but one rc- ma~i]s ~ons~ant. In fact, it occupi~:s his taot:~Ls a lot from winter into spd~: W~rcn wan~ to win a gold med~ #a~t slalom. Because ~c is ~o such thing as a Winter Ol~Itaics for septu- agenarians-own if tae~ w¢~, he ~ould probably not enter it; ~½ that kind of mm1--Winstc~ races agmn~ m~h younger s]dcl~. As young as, w~]h as young as 2~ years old. WJ~s~c~, a film cr;fic for ~b¢ ]Vcw York Post, enters NASTAR races at H~r Mountain, 2½ horns north of New York City. }:or nine yearn now, skiers have been thrashi~ throug~ grant sla(o~,~tes in NAS~'~ races held on intermediate slope3 at ski r c~or1~ aerc~ ttte cou~, The NAST~g scoring system, copied from a French methoa, is in~ious, K importer. There arc 76 U.S. resorts of ~ri~ NASTJ~ff, a~d they are divided NAST~P~ hoLds a GS race in each re- ~c~1 to d~t c~T~n¢ handicaps for lhe fast- est pale Of s]d~ ~om each r~olt, who arc: Called paees~[te~. Only o~e ~ier, a gcn~eman nan~cd Chris YaM f~m Waits- field, Vt,, races in eJi five regions, and NASTAR usc~ hlm as a nexus to ~cter- mi~e the ~s~est pacesett~r. This year the pa¢~sc~[¢r ~u131ed opt to be p~o racer KeD CozTock. CO~ l'ock reeelvcd a zero ]~J;d. ~cap~ and t~c o~ers e2r~ ~ca~ ~vtach directly rcpl~sent ~hcir percentage slower than C(~rmck. ~thou~ they may r~ot have mecd Corro~, they have raced Vala, and Vah has race<~ C~oc~ This isn't nearly as confusing as it sounds, and it works. The pacesetter rUlt$ his ~sort's cot~c the day of each race, and, u~ this pacesettcr's ~c and handicap, Cor- rock's suppo~taona] lime is ma~m~- ically established. This time is called "~car' and i~ the standard ~NASTAR stands for Natio~l Standard Racoh When each NAST~ emr~m races, he ~rgs a handi~apmhis p~:rcentage slow- cr than par. The system is a t~t fike ~mparing foot- ball scores to show that S~pIx:~' RoCk would beat P~n~ State by 50 pota~s-- and it d oc<~n't pro~de for ineonslsten¢ies such as a l~d day for the pace~cttcL which would raise p~r--but s]. r~ing is a spor~ ot'~'drc~t~s of seconds, and hundredths don't chanl~ percentages 64 Moses Making like a g/ant in slaloms ]'he meJal$ may be ~/ns and the races e~y, but everybody stars it1 NASYAR vtry much. If Jones from Sun Valley has a handicap of 50 and Smith from Sugar- bush has a 52, chances arc .runt's is fast cr than Smith. Resorts offering NASTAR ~]] stage weekend races, and many have one or more races during the work--Devil's Head in Wisconsin bad nine NASTAR races a week. The entry fee is $3 ($2 fo~ kids}, Race~ slart at l I a.m. arid are usu- ally over by 3 Skiers can earn gold, sil- ver or bronze medals, with I~r[ornlanccs weighted according to age and se~ For Archer Wiflstcn to get a gold r~edah he needs to lower his h&ndicap to 35 l¥onl his presem best of 57. (He's also in a race of his Owm to g*I a gold medal be fore his 10-year-old grandson, who nee& a handicap of 30,) AS a plum. xhc two fast esI skiers from each region, in each ( ¢ts~et art expensc-paid trip to Ke stone, Col~. for tht "N ASTAR fil~ aLs n¢ week There are some recreational ski who see this whole NASTA g husine~ Mickey Mous~. These purists turn their noses at NASTAR because they lieve it inter fer~ with the purpc*e of i~g. which is enjoyment in a free wa) no[ being organized into com~etiI ~el Moae haviag the s~oges crowded Walter Mittys. A purist may sngg~
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There are no simple solutions. Only intelligent choices.
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Of all filter 100 : Lucky lOfts are lowest! 8001gs Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings Not Lucky 1 QOs Oet Lucky l OO's wittt o~ly natural ftavor~ngs. A littte tar, a iotta taste f~r~O: T~ ~rg~ ~ral Has Detelmineg I'hal Cigarette Sn0king Is O~ng~rous to your Haahk 4 mg."zz ~', 8.4 mg.nii~l]ne 8v ~t ~g~r~8 ~y FTC rl~ho~ are¸i lowest! , ± Some low-tar Cigarettes use artificial flavorings. Not Ioeberg I O0's. G~ ~ceberg 3 {)O's with or~ly nalura/ flavorings A little tar, a Iotta taste, getertaned ~at Cigaret~e Smoking Is Omgelous to Your ~leallk 4 mg.'te¢', 04 mg. ni~rm a~. p~r dfiaretza h~ FTC ril~thud OfallmenthollO0 : " sa tlSl~ them TI~ ¢o~$~$$ FLOWER WS MERWIN q~ pr~ges. Ataeneum, ~,9~ This book should wia WS Merwin, 49, some n~w fans, especially o~ colflag~ ¢ampuse~ where he is already a big ~raw [t may also trouble some eldel" ad- mirers. Ever since his Asian F/g~res (1973), a collection of sayings from the Korean, Phflipptae, Ckinesc and Jap- attes~ ~M¢~a~i~'~ ~nlaganatiori has been ntcmg eastward. The effoct o~t his po- otry is often a studied inscrutability --purposeful but somehow aimless jou~ ixeys through a lands~ap~ of ~lot~ds and ~nntairxs. Some ofhfla poems stem like private marltra$: "Dark rain at/ wbit~r ~st tcc/and in the raornmg/ rosemary tladet clear sky/ bJrd on souOz ~teF/ ~meli like a stone." When MerwLa descends to rub his language agai~t th~ here aad now, spa~'ks c~m fly, as in a poem calJed "Fishing": Day and night as a child I could tmag~n efealing the bile a~ the line momentaffire above a drum of ~hite $1one ~er ]~t the bulk of The Compass Flower ~.e m s t~o serer~e to rid itzel£ of faligued images ("autumn lea~es," %air of the ~th") or to prove that its seremty has ~en earned by struggfla. Many West- ~IIa e~rs ~lll ftnd it hard to tell whether Merwin is b~iog wtic or phatic. 70 page. Y~le Univorti~y Press. $6.95. $2.95 poper Liack. [rt hea" tas~ book (and the new vta- urne {n the Yale ~iie~ of Younger ~oet$Li Groek-born Olga Broumas, 27, displays both reckless energy and pas- sion Her subject is se)tuaI love between women, and her allusions range from the biassical goddea~ through flaky- tale heroines to such coatemporar,/ poets as Sylvfla Plata and Anne Sexton• 3~e poenas pOl~ray lesbianism as a brave new wott& a terrain that women have b~sn tricked (by themselve~ and men)
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BOOKS the welfare of his state and his people, It's hard to know how much of t~is to believe. The princess has a lot to tell us, but the glimpses she allows us of her life are formal and carefully posed, arranged like family photos in a presentation album.. She means to be discreet, to promote for hlstory views of her family with its make-up all in place, Before her marriage, she tens us, she worried that Jai might continue his womanizing; she doesn't tell us whether he did. Jars dedication as a ruler apparently did not impress the Indian Government after independence arrived; dismissed from power, he returned instantly to polo, whloh may have been his primary con- cern all Idong. Curiously. it was Gayatri who entered polities; elected to ParlLa- Can s inp wnno wnh chore hymn. L it's t(~3 slow. 2. It's too expensive. 3. It's boring. 42 It disrupts regular work. ' 5. It's totally unnecessary...beeause Pitney Bowes has perfected sys tents for doing mailing chores with systematic speed and precision. Pitney Bowes Maharani and Maharajah of Jaipur, 1940 merit in 19S2. she seems to have worked for democratic reform while insisting that princely pr/vilege be maintained. An opponent of Indlra Gandhi, she was arrested in 1975 and jailed for six months on a charge that $17 million in uurepoi~ed jewels and gold had been discovered in her family's vaults. Of this episode, she has nothing whatever to say. Jungle: On balance, her book seems to rne a worthy enterprise, the hind of story that will ]~erhaps not excite interest in its subject hut which adequately repays any interest hrought to it. Gayatri tells us that when she was ~ child, hunting in the vast jungle that her family main- tained as a private preserve, she would climb on an elephant's neck and "lie down, my head between the elephant's ears, feeling flJe faint breeze as he t~apped his ears, listening to the buzz of Newsweek, March 28, 1977 College dollars need time to grow Take stock in AmericcL Helps Shrink.Swellin Of Hemo/rhoidal Tissues flue To Inflammation. Relieves Pain And Iteh... Gives prompt temporary relief in many cases from hemorrhoidal pain and burning itchlin such tissues. There's an exelusive medication which actually helps shrink painful swelling of hemorrholdal tissues caueed by tn- flararaation. AJtd in many ca~es it glvm prompt relie~ for hours :from rectal itching ~ndplain in such tissues. Tests by doctors on patients showed while it gently relieved sue& pain, it also hetped reduce swelling of these ~ssuos. The medlcatlon used in the tests was Prepe*xztien H~. No pre~;eription is needed for preparation H. In oln~me~t or suppository form. 81
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~ °~
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Old Faithful. Old Fcsith[ul Always got y where you were going Always did :t nomic~:lry. A whole generation of ArT can~ grew up with Old Faithful And r 27 years and 33 million cars later, il a symbol of depenc~obility Gnd econ~ Now there's cl ca r that's i ust as ~el¸ and economical as Old Faithful eve~ II's New Faithful The 1977 VW R With ~ngJrl~ring $o advanced tha motive experts have boiled i~ as tf
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NASI AR has a lot of check calf ng the award5 ,'medals,, when they Bre not med- al** at all ~ut ~nt~ll plt,.& To some, Ih¢ sk~r who pros his NASTAR trophies to his jaekel is like the person who plaster~ ~s car with bumper stickers. The NASTAR Feactlon i$, w~ caTes? Few NASTAR racers--and there have been more than 450,000 of them--will knocf~ the program S~ one, "i've been racing NASTAR a couple of years, and i"e r~evel felt like a~yone was putzing any pres$1lTe On me tO join or become a racer. They're Just providing the t~por tunity to do it if | want to, There's no place el$~ [ earl ra~e. | don't care if Ihe plrts are cheap. Lots of people don't even c/alto lh~ ones they win," TMy Bo~e MoumaM M ~rginla's Shenmldoah Valley is one resort that is exch~d about having NAS'[AR, There are only three siof~s at ]BrYce, and their names are appropr tat~ In t~e are~ Red eye. White Lightning and Revenuers' Run. Many of Bryee's skiers come from the Sot)~, afld the atmoaphere Atotm~ the fireplace ill the lodge is [ik¢ that around the grease rack in ~illy Carter's g~$ StRtloI1 It was at Bryce that Ihe 2½-year-old, a little girl, raced a NASTAR giallt sla- lom-with a pacifier in her mouth. And th~l'e ~ ~ plaql/e oli l~¢~entlers' /{un in memory of one AI Conrad, a NASTAR addle: in his f~es who ~ed to do noEh- ing bul praeti¢~ turns all day IonlL lry- ing to p~rfect his raclng technique. (He died of a heart attack.I The major NASTAR sponsor is Schff[z, which has been with ~he program from its inceplion; othet~ are Dstsun, Bo~ne Bell and Pep~i-Co~a. Thi~ year Datsun has been hosting one NA~TAR race at each or 10 resorts; it is paying th~ entry fees of many par ti¢i~ant~, One ]lr those lesorLs is Bryce, where 11 ~ rac- i~ coml~eted that day. There wa.~ one tdy in her fOlXi~s whose /lest muttered 'ords before sh~ ]eft) I~e szariing ~e ~re, "] must he bananas¸" HavLng thor- lghly psyched hersef" out, she fell in t~ second gate. Then there was a man, ). ll3, who was asked, '*Is thaI ),our ?" "NO," he replied, "I was lhe 1 [ 3~h ,i~n tl~ That's how long it took my ~o I~lk me into t~ti$ ,, .fterv*ard, Ihe racers gathered ~t the om of the hill for the presentafon of oins: five gold. and 42 silver and the/~ won pillS. Dick Br~wn. who heads the mcin rice at Hunter, says. "Any skier who can make ¢©ritpclent iLqked ttli'ns can rllfl a NASTAR course- The ttlrrts are nice and ronlxd. 8nd we try to el'lease a Yhyth ~1 to the gates: tip. down. up. down. Some peo- ple • r~ ll~la/otlg ~l fiPJt, hut [t I~lgowl~$ a fun Ihing because it's easy. Yet il'$ ex- tremely sa~is~mlg I've seen il happen a Ins where a guy x~il] come out and l-tin one rac~. and th~Ii he gels ]~ooked. Tiler e are a lot of frustlated ra~el~ oul there¸b' ]~Xpel~ skiers, and ~ertaill]y rscers. might find the giant slaloms less ehan t~illing, but NASTAR ofl~cial~ point out thai. while 11~ eo~1~es are comfortable for iatenaediates."Nobody can run them flat out. experts included." "lt's a fan- tasy trio." says one enthusiast. "Your arms are over the star~ing w~nd at the top and a ~uy goes. 'Racer ready: three, two. one. go!' YOU feel the wlrM in your face. antlcil~te't~e gales, feel your edg- es cutting the snow.... It's a rush." Fol a real rush. a few resorts oceasionafy have dual-gate NASTAR rBceg--lh~I iS~ ~imuitaneous, bead-to- head racm~ like the pros, But for the roost part NASTAR is a very irtdividual thing; lbe obJeCt ~s sim~y to ]o,.er yam band~ leap, which is on© reaso~ NASTAR is at- tractive to, say, 5O-2/ear-old women With a predilection for psyching themselves out. Or course. NASTAR is not free of pressure from the ego-stroke elemenl-- what competition is?--but the biggesl s~fokes come /'~rli ~eI(~mplo~em¢~tt, which is a whole lot more re~nabie than getting ~atisfaction from beating someone, mm Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings Not Lucky 100's Get Lucky 100'8 with only natural flavorings, A litile tat, a [otta taste. I Wemirt9: ~e ,~rgeon ~eneral Has [ Oe~ermined l~t £i9~e $m~hg Is I]mgmous to Y~ut Hsal6~. 4 toO. -ta¢', B 4 m9 nicene a~ ,t[ ciaar~ae bt FT~ method 65
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she admits, "wants everything---and in thing. I'm in controL'* She haS set up ened her performances. "My deepest ~DCONTINUED my business there are a lot of very at- tractive peop]e. But you carYt have everything and keep the on8 who mat- ters most," AS for the Oscar: "Yes, I'd like to win. It woutd be s nice present. But my lifo doesn't depend On it. What matters more is that I know where I'm going in my work." Faye's instinct for career management has in fact grown since her ~ardage. "~Over the years I've lost a lot of money. Peter showed me where rd been rnanlpulat- ecF--in tact just plain lied to, He went w~th me to a big meeting ar~ be was amazing. Quiet but devastating. [ got everything I wanted." Faye also found a new [~wyer, a new accountant, a new aQenL "Nobody has power of attorney now. I sign every- her own productlan company and Is de- feeliilgs have always frighte no d v¢loping three properties, among them her own screenpl41y. Her Iongeprange plans Include directing, p='oduclng, helping to eat ablish an American Na- "Uonal Theater--a subject on which she buttonholed Jimmy Car tar last August • in Hollywood. "A star today hlls to take Charge of avery aspect of her c~treer~" Faye says. "ThoLe are no studios left to do it for you. Yes, you hav~ immense freedom and gnancial r ewlrds, but the risks and r~sponeibilitlE~$ ai'e oF the ~me Scale, AS the ~tar, for instate, it's Up to me to take responsibility for the mood on the set~ and since my marriage I've de= veloped the stead~ass to do this." F eye's new calm has also strength- me," shl| CO nth~,~e~, "hu( llow I can face them more easily end use them in my work, As the feelings WeLl up, I feel somehow bigger. [ want to play bigger people now. Large, Wtgl, mai~ stream characters who live on a 1or of leveLs at once ~,nd e, re going through dramatic changes, Just as I feel I am. "1 feel my work and my marriage nourish each other and repast each other. They are two ways of living, ex- ploring, growing. When I work I work -- like a denton, but before very tong I "would like to take 1 g months off and have a child. The human heart Is for me a labyrinth that goes on and on, and [ want to explore its turnings as far as I can go." BRAD DARRACH
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i someth~g biggeT than we had bar- Io see him at the Nsw York fiat, a spot- gained for, glat it was dnle to make a tacular but not gJos~y seven-room deeper commitment. That was when I affair with a postcard view of Cenf~sJ r e all~" began to change.*' Park, a ~a(I of Rausc~enhergs ~d a FRye says marriage haS changed hsr "through and through," and Dunawsy watchers agree. The change began at home. With the help of a pSyGhoana- lyst, Faye was able to experience mar- rlage 8s the root of her life, her career a~ an es~enlial branch. ~yst ematl¢ltlly, she reorganized her career to fit her marriage. "Whsn you stay apart," Faye believes, "you grow apart" ,~he and Peter also decided to set a wide moat between their public and private lives. First off, they agreed to live away from Hollywood--"l can't grow," Payo says, "in a company town." Then they decided to keep two apartments, one in ~e~ Yofh, the o~he~ I~ Bosto~. ~F aye had also studied there; she took a B.F.A. in thaater from Best on Univer- sity.) New York was a base for doing ~,uslness; 8oston was home. In this contemporary taJe of two cit- ies, the New York chaptem are usually shorter. Once every week or two, alone or together, they hop the shuttle to New York to "do a blitz," as Peter D'~tS i'1---¢ee ~awy~*~s and ~,ecc4~n'c~nts, take in shows, cruise the shops, All last week, for instance, Peter and his band were shut up dusk to dawn In a Manhattan recording studio ='mixing" Duchamp print in the bathroom. Both times she grabbed the 9 p.m. shut- tle back to Boston. "l [eve Boston,'* says Faye. "Tha heat's off there. People recognize me on the street, but they allow me my pri- vacy." Peter adds: ~'And where also can you have the Celtics, Indian piJcl- ding and Yankee ~ensiblllty?~' TO visitor % the Bo~to~ r~Lde~c.e ~omBe as I~ shock. "You just don't expect," says a friend, "to find a screen queen and a rock star flvIng together in a four= ~oom apartment." Faye and Peter chose it for its tight security, a must for th~ famous th~se days, and its heart-of-th~'-~ub location. '~eme to me," Pave muses, "is a womb, a quiet, ~losed space where I re-create myself, unwind here. ~ gutter. I g~rden. I cook a veal-an~chic ken dish Peter fave~. BometJmss when I'm riot on a picture I don't t urnin tltl 4 or 5 in the morning. then I may sleep till 2 in th~ afternoon. I work at borne too, t~lnking out the pro- Jecfa a~d parts I want to get into. I live hate ell ~ th~ de.pest levels." FOr breakfast Paye usually has tea (but sometimes a Coca-Cola), arid she : Usually hms it in b~d while distance with Peter if he's away. their nest album. Faye f raw down twice When she talks she waves her ar ms and frequentJy splashes the quilt. In the ~vening one of the five other J. Ge~ls Bandsmen might drop by, or a friend tlke Tennessee Williams when he's l~ ta~r% or Mari~ Co~nc~a~, the phc~ thgrapher. Faye and Peter often have ffatvardpro fessor-playwright who has been DtJriaway's mentor since Ihe |tarred in his Off-Broadway hit, Ho- gan "s Goat. He makes a spsctacu~ar hurgoo {Depression stew~ Marriage and a qu~t home life hllv~ rot altogether sed~it ed the tempestu- ¢~ua Dun~way. ~he ~st[ e)ceGute~ some mighty swift lane-changes in her runted Aspen, still wears e;~pe naive (Jlothes wgh sfapdmsh unconcern, still Irnpatiengy empti~ her purse on th~ floor of an elevator when she can*t flrid her house keys. Rec~,n fly, after a ~ong h~rd day, she posted back the Hamadan rug on her living-room floor and, giving a sharp right tur~ to the vol- ume knob, rocked through a grinding, growling, sOck-it-to-the-cheap-seafa imitation Of the old Eivis Pres[ey. Nor has the amorous tlgrsss lost her hun'dng Instincts. 'l~omething In me.~ CONTINUED Ofallfil lO0 : Lucky lO0's are lowest! ~orne low-tar cigar 8tree USe , ar~l'~ f~vo~ings, N~t Lucky 1 O0 s. Get Lucky 100's ~th on~y natural flavorings A IfftJe tat; a Iotta taste, [ Warning: ~ Surgeon ~ Has ome~ T~ot CiGarene Smoldng Is I~ge~us t~ Your g~h. 4 m~.'tar', ~A mg. Muudns 75
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FAYE DUNAWAY HAS A SURGING CAREER - " PLUS AN UNUSUAL MARRIAGE-- NOW WILL SHE WiN THE BIG O?
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Of all menthollO0 : Iceberg lO0's are lowest! Some Iow-t~r oigar~tt~ use 8~cia[ flavorings. Not iceberg 100's Get Iceberg lOfts with on~ natural W~ngg~ The Nr~n Genre[ Ha= geterrnined ~ot C~gwmte Srholdng Is O~gm~ to Yc~r Health, 4 mg ,,tar 0,4 mg, nlco~i ~OCONTINLIE 0 songwriter and load singer with the 4. Gegs ~and, "H/s perform~ce elec- trified me. HIS movements were incredibly fast and unexpected. L felt I had to get to know him." She did; the vohage stepped up. "He was so dark, so vivid, That pale skin against his black hair! And his velvet eyee! I thought, 'he's a Black Prince,' He wa~ intense but gentle, wild but kind." He wa~ allo three years yout~gor, but they found their interests matching their temperaments complementary, Faye, desPite her s~cce~s and expe- rience, was still at heart an Army brat who grew up on military posts and i spent her te~ J~s the sur rive,," of a bro- ken home in a small southern town: Shy tn company, naive In practical matters, aPxJous to ~lease, depressed when she failed to. Peter, the product of a ~table upbringing in the Bronx, had street sensibility al~d was witty, up heat. widely read, manyota[ented. Before t~klr~g uh music, he spent thr~e 'ears on schoLaPship at the E~osto~ Mu- seum ef Fine Arts. One day in late 1014, after ~ years of alosenes$, F aye and Peter took a long walk on the beach at M&ilbu. "We had beth been afraid that two careers would be toe much for one marriage." Faye remembers. "but we both wanted to try. SO we.talked about what ~ _ dreamed el being and doing, what we were afraid of. At one point [ stopped and turned to Peter and =aid to hln~ '1 believe in youJ That walk wa.s a turn- ing point for US." Next day they were married, and for a year Faye turned down air offers of work, "We hid a 12-month honeymoon. I was in the ¢!ouds." But the second ear she made Voyag~ Network and SPSter A/mee, ~ TV dra- ma &bout AIrnee $ernple MePhers0n, ~he ~nd Peter were both buay, ~'eoccup/ed~ separated for weeks at a time. They miSSed each other, made demands, resented it when the de- mands were not met. They bega~ to uarrel. One day in Canada, where Pe- ter was performing, they took another long walk, this time along a river that had dried uplnlo a bog--"My God," Faye says wflh a shudder, '~as that symbollol" The tension became urtbear able. "Suddenly I saw we were wrecking our marriage, ~'eterl' I ~ald, 'we've got to stop this! Right now1 It will destroy us[' That was another turn* ing p~int. We both saw how much we ~eant to ea¢h other and how litt[e our irritations were in comparison to that. We also saw that marriage w~s
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Ofallmenthol Iceberg lofts are lowest! Some low-tar cigarettes use arM~clal flavorings Not Icaberg 10Os Get Iceberg 100's with only nalural flavorings A little tar, a Iotta taste. W~ming: The Sufggon Genaml Hgs OBteTmiaed That Cigarette Sm0king Is Oa~g=0us to Your Health+ av ;~ d~af~t~e I~ FIC me=od MUSIC George Benso.: In Flight (Warner Lucky for the re~t of his llfe. Bmezin ~ BelC~n's 1976 LP, [uraexl the trick for tha gai~ar- ~st~singcr, 14.¢ tOOk the premmr si~ on file jazz. rock, soul arLd ~.s~-listeuing charts HIS name Logan crop~ioa up on network TV. GeOrge bought a Mercedea. tl. was a alar. Hew did succ¢, affect his lO0's rattsic? If attyClitng, it improve~d it, In Flight is his linest album so far The ma- terial spans a wide stylistic rango, from BOOSOn'S silky vocal on the ]~iat "King" CoIc classic Nature Boy to the di~o- Television: Marquee MOOR (E]ek- ira/Asylum) Thas grmap was one of t he "-- fie'st, and J5 cea'Ialn]y the b~ ¢xponcfl t of punk rock Its home is CBGB, a gr,,,-lowest! Ly Bowery bar that now exemplifies LowerMamttattanc~ac, fhere Tota Ver- lsine, who writes Television's lyrics, de= livers taw, ]abbir~g vocals irt a decigrn- atory, prcpsychotic style similar to Patti Smith's It is Richard Lloyd's nervy, bitu~s-tmged guitar however, that gives this band ils disth~¢five sound Lloyd has po~ndal to become: a major spokes- man for rc~ck galtar Joun Oow~ Classic and Choice Mozart= Piano Concerto in C~ K, 24~; Haydn: Piano Concerto i~ D (Ana-MaF~a Vor~ ~auist, Rotzcrdam Only Philhaim~0nic Orch~tm. Edo de Wama col~ductor, PIttffps}. Another up-and- coming pianist is An.a-Maria Vera of Washington, Dk~ The joyous innocence with whisli she attacks theav lightheart- ed eorlcertil#, k~ ~t OBC~ adlalrabl~ 8.nd tc~ching So is har s~arkllng techalque a~t~ rapport with Maestro D¢ Wmar t, the Dutchman who is succeeding Sc~Ji (~za- wa at ~e helm of Ib~ Son ~ran~isco Syrnphnny. Aria-Maria, born in L955. wa,~ eleven when this r~cording ~ts to&de. Mendelssohn: Quartet ia D, ep. 44~ He. 1; $chumatln: Quartet ht A mlitor, O1~. 41, No. I (Budapest Quar- tet, OdysSey) Though le~s w~lI kaown then their c0mpo~rs~ works for or- chestra or piai~Os tht:s~ strltl~ quartets arc ~harmers The fir~ i5 as spirited Some [ow-ta.r cigarettes use artificial flavorings NOl Lucky" 100's Get Lucky 100'~ with 0nly natural llavoring$. A little tar. a Iolia tastg. Wamiag: The ~rgeoB General Has Oeterminad That Cig~reRe S mo~it~g Is ~]anocfD~| to Your E~lth. 4 mg "~ff, 0.¢ r~ nkmme • t. p~[ i~gar~e by FTC me~M
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PRO BASKE'rBAU. papanek A toddling team on a rampage Tim Bulls are maMng a late charge to tho playoff~ end Chicago's in an uproar nofll~r cow could kick over another Alamem. Frank Sinatra could an- nounce that heli running for mayor• Whatever, Chicago has something more imporlaqt on its mind. From the steel mdls to the Gold Coast To Hcrm)s Hot Dog Palace on Dempster Street, the Windy City is in the grip of Bulls pleyoff fcve~ Laughed at hi Novemha~ ~ just an- At~andat~N~wV~'r/d~fg~z~zr~so~mg~mfr~w~al~kefmmfan. other mismanaged 2-13 team wah a :~'-==- = stooge for a coach and a hound for a cen- ter, and written out of the playoffs as re- cently as the end of Fehiuary, the Bulls now are rampaging fight through the NBA. Last week, before three successive packed kettles at "qTn¢ Miracle Mad- hotk~e on Madison SL~et"--also kncwa as Chicago Stadium--the Bulls walloped the l.~ers, the Knicks and the Cavaliers for their 13th, 14th and 15th victories in 16 game. Meanwhile. tha Kansas City tripl~d three times on the road, giving the Bulls, however tenuously, oc- cupan~ of the Western Con£erence's playoff harth. That man you see walid~ in the clouds is rc~kle Coach Ed Badger. "1 read 1 was gou© so ninny fmaes early in the semmn," he says, "that ifI had alease I eondin't have gotten ir re- newed. Now my wife thinks I'm Coach of the Year. 1 told her Jen3, West has the Hollywood vote." When a disgusted Dick Motto quit as Chicago coach at the end of last sea- son, the Bulls were a tall-end, 24-58 pile of rubble. Hal~S for a Phoenix llke ri~ flared briefly when the cohage draft yielded 6' 7" Forward Scott May from Indiana. and the ABA dispersal draft Bed4er~m~istant coach, Gen~rormoh- delivered 7'2# Arlis Gilmore. But in short order both May and reserve For- ward Jack Matin succumbed to mono- outlets, is, Gttard Jerry SIo~ could not make it back from knee surgery and Cap- rain Norm Van IAer found himself hi a backcourt "ruth a bunch of virtual non- entitins: Tom Kropp, John Laskowski and rookie Keith Starr. The Bulls didn't have a shooter who could drop a hall into Lake Michigam Opposing defenses eollalx~ed on Gilmone and Farward Mick- ey Johnson Tae Bulls ran, as Badger had prom- L,*d they would. They ran off a 13-game losing streak= The blame devolved on Badger, became he was the coach, aad on Gilmore, the savior. Some gentlemen of the press demanded that Gilmore he traded. "Didn't Wilt ChamJharinin t~ed to say, 'Nobody loved Goliath'?'* asked Gilmore. "1 can't do it by myself. What do liaey expect of me?" Help began to arrive a little at a time. The guard problem e~ed when the Bulls bought John MengeB from Detroit and signed 6' Wilbur Holland, who had called lee, mad begged for a tryout after being cut by Atlanta. Tormolden had drafted Holland for the Hawks aad lie told Bad- g¢r, "If he can't play, I'~ pay his salary." Within a month Holland was a starter. May returned m the lineup in Novemo bet and, after groin surgery following iris mono~I%ir t~ ~a~iad¢ in kenuary. Slo~n omald not bear r~ stay away al- together, so he hung mound as an in- formal assistant coach--he later offieiaily joined the staff--tcachiog the young BulLs the kind of defense that had caused his old t=am mate:s to call him "Gestapo" in practice. , • "Jerry rcatly turned it around."¸says Van Lier. "He came in and said, 'Let's play some dsfcm¢ and then do th¢ other thing.' He'd stop practice mad get on guys. I imow. I played with the ma~. We were the best dsfe0alv¢-guard combination hi the history of tha NBA." After r~ailin$ the defense, which, true m Chicago custom, is the stingiest in the league, the Bulls hoaed the o~ lense: they bcgaa to ran more plays for Gilmore where be wants tha ball--on the c~)t/ntn~d 71
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Ofa]]menthollO0§: ri~t side of the [azl¢ so ~ carl take his uIallIl~r IUt/s. lcft-I~m~,d hook, or fake the middle ~md Icebez lOfts are lowest! Some low-tar cigaretles use artificial flavorings, Not Iceberg I Off& Get Iceberg 100's with only natural flavorings. A little tar, a Iotta taste Warning: The SYlgeoo General Has Is Oa~'ou~ to Your Health. dr~w for the dunk; they zct screens for May to get him open for bls baseline jumpers; theY got lolmson inside for of. fensiv© r~boundlnB and dish-offs from Gilmore; they let ~Dt. Junk" Ho[hnd ~c hi~ odd lefty beav~s from the outside. Re- s~rve Copter Tim~ B~nld© ~ot the ball to the hot hand, usually Matin, zmd Mcn- gck spelled Van Licr ~ the playma~r or l~oUand as the shooter, The r:vamped BUt{s opened in Chi- cago on Wasl~n~on's Birthday. at whi¢~t point timir record stood ~ 2,~34. Gold- ch Stat~ was the ~ffst victim, ltg-102. Gilmore CXptodcd fo~ 24 points and 15 rebounds; Johnson+ May and Holland scored 19 each and Van Licr trod I5 as- sists. Ne~t the Bulls beat Atlanta 96-87. Tkcn t~c miracle moved out of t~w~ where the Bu]ls had bccn ~-25. Late in a tt~ grin* at CI~ Gi]ttmre b]ockcd~ Ma~4, ~ th~ o~tlet to Hol- ~l, F~ed t~ Irate *v~d ead~ the bre~ with a shattering drink. Chicago won by ~LX. '~q~ w~ thv g~c," f~ys Vatl L~er. "That made us cocky enough to think W@ wfz~ ~ood," Five more rce.d wins followed. ~ne ~ad Le~ Aogt]es, foe NI~A's best homc~.o~rt team. down by 36 in t~ fourth qO~Lr tet,' they emlmnm.~scd Golden State. Phovmx and Detroit. and won at PbJladcl~ Van Lk* pm it to ~e rest of the Bulls: 'q~cm is nobody, no-body, in this le~me we c~'t play with. We bet- ter ~t our bu~ts iDto tb.c playoffs." Final~ free of Motta, with whom he was constantly at odds, and at ImaCe and in low with Cl~¢ago. Van Licr has curbed the ]e~ndaty temper that made him the perennial NBA leader in t¢ch- ni~als and+ am0ng otlacr opisod~s, go1 him suspended for knocldng down r~ferc¢ Darcn Gar~tson and freed $~.0C~ for chasing Sidney Wicks off the floor with a ~hatr. Even so, in the biggeat gamo of the streaker Kansas City+ which was on a mar of its own and sti~ 3{6 games up on the Bulls--Van Licr got so hyped be lost his cool and was ejected after nine minutes of play, with the BxdJs dew~ b~ scv*n. TI~ 18,129 home fans gave him a standing vvadoxL "I couldn't belies it+" he said. "| looked ~t t~c crowd and. thought, wow, I can+t do anytbJn8 for you tonight, but I'm sum going to gtt you into the play- ofl's. I was so ttp, I walked m~und *he sta- dkan for 20 minutts, still in tmiform. [ 72 Lucky lO0's are lowest! S~me Jow-tar cigarettes us~ artificial flavorings. Not Lucky 1 Off& Get Lucky 100's wilh o~ly natural flavorings. A I~le tar, a Iotta taste, 1 Wemi~g: T~e S~lTonon General H~s | /M~ Tt~ ~te sms~,~ J I~ Dar~erous to Your Health. m. ~I r~reXll b~ FTC m~t~gd ~. pm c~Oa~,tm ~ FiC =~
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OfallmenthoIl( 'k Iceberg lOfts are lowest! Iceberg SOMe low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings Not Iceberg 100's. Get Iceberg 100's ~th only natural flavorings A little la~ a Iotta taste• lWarning: The Surgeon General Has D0tennined That Cigaretle Smoking IS D~lg~mllS [o Your FleBJIh. 4 rag. tar". 0.4 mg n[¢ozin e ~v ~6[ ClOt 8LT~ ~y ~TC ~l~Od CINEMA (ienl, circumspect, careful not to let his o!oioiolls get in the way of solving the puzzles his job presents to him It is a ~ute to walch "o0Ib ug them at work RlchDrd $chlrkel R~yding Job r, ROIN~II$ D~rected by ARTHUR gARROM Sc~eenplcxy t~y EaW~Q ~ ~d ~IL~E~ ~WL~ Old newspapers are recycled by ttrst being ~'tastt cd into pulp. Brothers shows that old newspaper storlcm can be turned tnto pulp too The movie taken one of the notorious headline dran~s of ttte past deCade-~the case of Arlgc[a Da~lS, George Jackson sad tile Soledad Broth- elf--and recycles it inlo a racial moray ity play of staggelltlg and offensive slmple-mindednOSs The real George lacksom was gunned down in the yard of San Quentin Prison in 1971 Was he trying to escape+ as prison c~ciaJs had it. or was he met ul~'1 When he dmd, lack~n wa~ a~at~ ing trial otl a charge that he and t'~'o other black pn~ners in Californta's So ledad Prison had killed a guard Jack- son karl helpv~d to make ~.ls ca~ a raL lying cry for the [eft by writing scores C,F lacerating, eloquent letterl from prison (published in 1970 as .~o]~dad Broth~'~ ) lJi~ ck~I all,/~u th~ outs~d~ w~ BIagk Activist Angora Davis wttom he loved His hrother had died in a wild shooLout while t ryilag to kidnap hostages from the M,~in Cc, ur~W eour~, presumalN.~ in o~der to bargain for J=ckson s free df~rn D/Iris had been cirl~umstantiglly tied to the epistxle [I "~a~ a cor~pl~x, ambigaous st~ua tion--bul not to the makere of Brothers They offer it as a $~des of melodramatic clich6s, seen strictly in terms of black triable, Io[~g-~ug©ring, ril~ht~us) and white (Sadistic. loutish, bigoted) Any shred of evidence damaging to Jackson ~nd lhere is a good deal.s conve- niently ormtted Viv~ldJ Cycle, That ~e~rge Jack- ~,on may w~H have been ill, raised, tiler ultimately none of the chargez against Dart~ or Jackson's So]edlld c(l-defen- dents could be made to s~ie~k--these are vah~' points Brothers renders Iherrt in valid only by exploiling their quasi~ fac- tual basis while ei'~anging all the names mad parading tile ease as fiction AS the Jacksoll fLgure, ex Pro Fo~l- bailer Bernie C'asey goes In for heavy brooding and g]o',~erlng. Vonetta Mc- Gee drills in and out with all lhe sen~n- ity of a model in a soap commercial and with no~e of the blting intellectuality of Angola Davis (We know the lady is classy however, becalase dtlr Lr lg a SCezle at her hoirte Vivaldl is ostentatiously be iz~g played on the phonograph ) Whclh- er the perfotmers could have done more [s hard to loll with I~ scripl as one-dirnen slonal az this Like so /llally ottter recycting job~ Brothers ends up as cardboard ChrlstopherPortetfte.~d OfallfilterlOOk Lucky ZOO's are lowest! Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavonngs Not Lucky 10Os. Get Lucky 100's with only natural flavorings¸ A ItttJe Ia~ a Iott~ taste Warning= The Surgeon Geqe~el Has Omermmed That C[9ar~e Smoking Is [l~ngerous 1o Your HeaJlh, 4 rr~ "in(', 04 rag. nicotine uv. ~[ cfgarePe hk FTC method
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~d /' >~ii~i i~ ,, A NI~/APPROACH TO I]Ul~d~lLIfl~ The New Chevrolet has e'~n more corrosion Oroteatlon than last year's fuLl-size C~evtolet. More cln~l-corrosJon Ooc~ngs hcR~ been used. Aluminum and bimetal roofings continue to be used wherever pracilcoi. ]]le rear wheel houses are made from QoivanJzod steel. Galvanized sTeel also F~otects the floorat th e Irunk. " Many of the nooks and ~c~QnnJe$ where moi~uro like" The Caprice Cta~ic : couk lave been eliminated, AS a final example of the detail we went to, even foe roof sail panel name plates have been applied adhesively, to avoid dnll- ing holes where rust could staff. A N~.¥ APPROACH TO I~OR QUIET We know thai quiet is important to your comfort So we gave The New Chovroret a one-piece car- pel unbroken fTom front to rear, from door to door '~ oiso gave ~ a one- piece acoustic headliner But our search for rule] didn't stop there. We #amod the door glass. We sealed the instrumenl panel¸ We added soeclal insulating materials to areas where noise could be a Because quiet ls impar It has an engine noslfo temn[nal that quay and easit~ e New Che~rutet also incofpofa~s some other advances of recent year& ~ar senso~ for the front @sc Drake linings. Wear indicafo~ for the lower bait joints and far It. ~.es. A High Energy Ignlltoi system, a COOlant recover system. Extended intervals be- tween scheduled oil, filter and spak p~ug changes. ~JI at these features help re<luce the I1 rne needed fo~ se~cing, A REA.~UR] NG THOUGHT ABOI;I RF~AJLE VALUE 3nt, And ChevreJet wants tobdngyou more. Resale value is a major concemof peoptewhobuy fleets of cat& A NE'~ AIz~IROA~H TO EASY MAIN[ENANCE The New Chevrolet has made some helpful ad- vances toward reducing time ~eded for ~- a Freedom batter~' that never needs water or scheduled maintenance. And Iteet I:~y~ are now )uying The New Che~olet imber~ (Re~t ~ ~ l~e New Che~alet are up t68% over the sarr~ pe~od last ~ar.] l~is isn't a prediction of future resale value. ~t Jt is a ~eassu~ng thought.
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Of all menthol 1oak Iceberg lOfts &re lowest! ~ome low-tar cigarettes USB artificial flavorHaOs, Not Iceberg 100's. Get Iceberg 100"s with only natural flavorPrgs. A little tar" a iotta taste. Warning= The Sur~mn General Has Oetefmined That Cigarette Sm~ing Is Oangnrcu$ t0 ~ ~v m ci~amn+ ~ FIC m~thM 12 tal hill. £wryone wantg a piec~ of~te act$on when it comes to hoa]~ care: pha~:n ~ceut Jeal cnrtt~ties wake R~ izrtnletlse pratt; sundial- supply houses charge exorblt~nt prices for small pieces of equipment that arc o~y brie £- ly ~sab[e, Hospi~)s are hm fficie~fly ~dminis- teted, ~d the use of materials is waste~ul~ not to nlenti~n fl~e theft that occttrs ~ong the eYg~loyees, [g~ BI~N M EP~DI I'H • Beau~ing ~J~c ~c~c[ary awards ofa p~ofes- sio]~ ha~ yet to F~'odu~e a i%toro coplbt~ ~T¢+ ~r~, ~OlltC~ UC~I, ~OCt~'r Or ed Jl/~r, ROB EP,~ IND~CH 7r~vlde~ce, ~,] • Peters disregards th~ £~ct tK~t l~biJct)' suLm ported I~nr~aucraeic~ are notOdOl=S for th~h" qua]it~ personnel, HE ~]SO hoid~ the economi c~]] y ptc~atc ~r Jt~s~ ~p ~s a~ e;t~JO]~]e~ey who must wait hours f~ sc~ o doctor ~d y~cs for a]} but essent~J s~rgery. C]fft~ Park, N.Y, • Pete~'s p~n to en~J~ve doctors ~qu]d be ~een for what Jt it ]f nn the other 1~nd it is •fter all, control fl~e ~ht~u~hts o~the A~tencan pen~]~, s~oula ~)~ bc to]~ what to write, ~d esp~ei~tly wh~re to go C,A,O~,M,D. "Carndenj bla~t~e , .~ Failing Integrity? Y~u~ ~r~icle "An End to Expulaions~" (KDL-. C~O~, M,~rvh 2~) iF ~c~, di~tttrbJng. When ~xDnision from 5¢kool me~t i~tdu~or~ JnkD rise Am~y and the Viel~m war, cc,]]eg~ hesi- tated to ~p~] s~,ldents ~ausc t~e co~se- greater than the crime. Wh~,t exe~se is offered now? 0~ the one hand, we ~-e t~]d ~at st~ldetxts~Ie "adnlts"a~dca~otbe~altwit}~ tJ~ey s]~ould not have flleir pre~Jou$ car~ers destroyed by youth ftd mJpt~es, ]~Av LD S&L~BU~G ~,e~ Londoa, Corm. • ]Paul DcFma~ of Lhe University of Virginia describes ch~otsrtg as +'~ ~om~nt of wea~* heSS" it~ thu face o~the ~x~t~l~e ~o~p~tlfion to ~et into ~rad~ate school. Alt~o~gi~ DeTuz~a's cor~passio[i J$ ~thlllr~b]e, [ woB~er i~ it is not misr~ir~te~ Has he ~*n~ide~ed d~ honest 5~del]ts to whot~l ac~c~n~ ltlto ~e~lt#O possibly be ~cnied ~mit~ce ~le to anoOzer S t~<~ z R" ~ undetect~ d "hmn rant 13 ~ ~t e~J~zle s~"? Notre Dome. In(l, Woman's Work There it is ~aill, ~ your r~vJew ol~ "pink Colhr "~Vorkel%" {BOOKS, M~r(h ~1), t~iis b~lsJ- nnsl O("buLtsewive~" wog~ S." M~ wiSP hltmc with that when [ cam~ hort~e [z~m ~t3rk on~ l~ay~.ay. I totd h~r L thought it a per~c~y par~er~ ill o~r m&rria~, [ &~reed to pay h~r Of all filter 100§: Lucky lofts are lowest! Only g. tar. Some Iow~t~r cii~a arettes use anJficial f/avorin{~s ~oI Lucky 1 C~3'S. Get LuCky 100's with only natural flavorit~s A Gtt~ tar, a ~tta t~ste, Watmng~ The Gurge~n General Has fl e~lmined ]~at CigerGtte Gme~fng Is ~a~geross to Yeur Health. 4 taD.' tW, 0.4 ~.~m pl t ci§ii~tl~ ~ 13C m~eod Newsweek, April ItS, 19"/~'
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No g~clla= are f a~4dden Dr. Jordan,s citer e~l~ ~llpl SallWUlll~s U~f may have ta eel ~ ~. IN HIS OWN IoralWelghtControtProgramatthe psychoJogist Dr. LeenardLeWtz, More recently, they estabJ/shed the EUREKA! HERE'S ONE DIET EXPERT WHO SAYS, 'EAT WHAT YOU LIKE" BUT CHANGE YOUR LIFE-STYLE' /t'~ not what you ea t, but how, when, wh ere and why tha t makes you over- Institute for Beha vIoral Educ~ion, an Independent study center for obesity, wh ere m or~t than 200 o verweigh t adults and children are treatecl a yea~ Dr. Jo~ dsn JIves It1 an 18th cerltury farmhouse outside PhdadetphJa with second wife BItrbara, 31, and th[ee children, aged 5 to 1 ~ He s~ tries to keep with- in 10 pounds of his weight as a member of the Harvard crew (180 pounds), Re- welght. That at least /s the argument of cently he tafked to Bartlara Kevlee foJ D~ Henry Jordan, 40, ~s~ociate profea- PEOPLE about correcting often uncQ~= sot Qf pSYchiatry a t the University of Scious ~ating patterns Pet~nsy/vanla School of Medicine ~rnd co~a uther of the recentiy pubhshe# Is ~t physicat/y dangel ous to be EalJnglsOkay!(FlawsonAasoc.;$7.95) obese? graduate of Harvard wl~ Qa f~D~ I ~hor~er ~ive~ ~ ~o thought ~h~ C~N~tJE~ 67
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Of all menthol lOOi : Iceberg lofts are lowest! Only g, k . WlB,f'dSC ON TINU£ D obesity contributes Io hypertension, di- Wilat ~Jcce~s have patients had ruth abetes and cardiovascular diseases, yourmethod7 In our program 65 percent of our pa- Whom do you consider obese ? Anyone who is 20 percent or more above the ideel weight for their height¸ How malty A r~eFtc~ns ~re obe~ ? Estimates are from 20 to 5(3 mil~io n. Why do so many diets fail to achieve a 1E~/ [nane/3t we/ght ld~s$? Diets Iha~ depend on drugs or fads --like the water diets--count on patients following the dictates of the ther apist. But when the patients go oft their rigid dlet~, they often revert to their gel ways because they never learned in the first place why they eel the way they do What ~ your appro~cl~ to red,icing ? Oar method is based on the age-old prescription for weight leg~llmltlng calories and increased exercise. But, in addition, we change bow a person re- acts to those- ertv[ronment al, Social ariel dluences that originally tients lose 20 pounds or more, and 15 percent lose more than 40 pounds After a year our figure9 show that 85 percent of those who lost 20 pounds have kept their weight down or lost more. For many programs the success rate after a year is only 5 percent. What's the tirst step? To become aware of your eating habits and what triggers them. We have our patients keep detailed diaries of their eating, not only calorie counts bul also the time, length, place, physical posglon, whom they're with and mooa in which they eat Then what do you do with these diaries? ; We go over them together, looking fez good habits as well as b~d, Many people have control most el the day, but they may find one period when they get into trouble, Overweight peo- ple [eel all their eating habits are wrong, and this is not true.
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Wor~BCONTIN U E D iS important fhat our patients ~xperi- enee a binge so the)/learn not to f(~el guilty or a failure. Guilt is a use- le~ emotion. The danger, of course, is that when patients go on binges they may never return to dieting again. We advise that an uncontrolled episode be ~nalvzed, undeCstood and accepted. J~rdm~ mu~¢lhol fnarlNU~ ~ ho ohm:ks Ihe =c~des t o make rowe I~ stnym wffiq~ t D pa4~J~ af h~s ooUego ~W w~g~ overeater? the rel=tionshlb between them, Often where the food is stored is im- portant, One patient ate three to four boxes of pretzels a week from a jar on her kitchen counter. One day she put the jar in the pantry. As a result she cut down to one box. There are other things that can be done---freeze left- overs ~o they are less readily accessible or put snack foods in the rear of the refrigerator, How can the weight reducer hand/e the unavoidable =oclal situatiorl ? A person can always plan his or her business tunch menu or at least exert some control. No one Is forced to stand next to the hers d'o~Jvres ta hie a t = party or ordBr dessert, it's important outside the home to make Other people How can parents train their chgdren to helpyeuexertcontrolwghoutgiving . have goodeatlnghablts? up your own authorby, By example. Parents must be care- ful not to impase their likes and dislik es What rnaintafns a weight reducer's me- about toed on the child. A child should tivctfo~ to rose ? have the freedom to experimenl Most often, the stngte mo~t imporo with food or to refuse it, "Bottoms up!" rant factor Is a patient's realization that and "clean plates]" should be left I~e- he or she can control the eaUng th=t hind wit h the Great Oepr ession. [] previously was unm~nageabJe. ~lth ~fl Charl~, 17, Ja.,dan ~,~rs OoapouseshetporhinderweighttOs$? aromld i¢1= j 8th~ f arm. F~ dle4e~ Sometlrnestheyw~ilsabofag~their he~;~=~le~orfandwalk. How can people incor~o*fate more ex- ercise Into everyday #v#~? First make a liSt of all the labor-sav- Ing devices you use in a day~-esca- lat opt, e~vatQrs, eleetrLs cat1 opener~, ce, r s--tlnd then decide which ones you can do without and when. We had one woman who h~d not walked to the I~earby grocery store to{ 25 years. Isn't that Inor edibl~l The first time she rn~de the trip by foot the neighborhood chil- then asked h~r If her ~ar was broken¸ At ~h~ Offic~ ~ s~cr~t~ry who switches from a manual to an electria type* Writer can gain up to six pounds a year.
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Must a dieter sacrifice favorite leeds ? NO, whether it's Ice cream, candy hats or eclairs• All we ask is th at they plan their calories to allow for it eal it s~owly and savor every bite. How do you teach a pa tient to cut down on hiS favorite dassert? There is no way to curb p~ea$~Jre Iron', a favorite fQod. We would rather u~eroa~e thal p~easure. We might ~sk that person to have his favorite course firstmeven it it's dessert¸ He might then pass up less preferred food later be- cause he fair stuffed, DO~S any single activity prompt over- eat/ng? MOSt commonly, eating is pair ed with simple routine activity We had or, e pa- tient who Snacked ab~os~ contlnuous/v while cleaning house and ltstergng to the radio, We discover ed she had made a special ~pron with pockets blg enough to hold candy, COOkies and oven bofUe6 of SOda pop• She never had to m~ke a deliberate d E, cisio ~ or take another ~ep to eat• Obviously, the first stop Was to get a new apron with- out pockets, De people overeat out of stress ? Conlra~y to ~opular belief, very few patients overeat out Of ten,ion, de pro~slQn or anger. MOr~ commonly, Deople eat too much when they are boreO or tired• How does fife tempt overeaters? People are Pombar(~ed nowadays by Cues to eat, Theft, too, mol-e food is available through easy~to-open snacks, vending machir=es at work ansi oven the supermarket. We had to teach one patient to recognize the $uhermar- ket's sublle enticements, and to shop only afros a meal¸ Ofallfilt rlO0 : NO• A man's eating behavior is equal- Iy influenced by hi~ etwit~rlmetlt, tho~lgh often his problems occur at work, r~ther th~n at homo, On~ man, whoa~ job required him to travel, ate all his meal~ and endless amounts of junk food at the wheel of his ear, We advised him that if he truly wanted to eat he should ~top at a restaurant and take time for a saflslytng meal, Does how f~st a person ea te in fThence I~ow much he ~ats ? Yes. Studies from our human feed- ing iabQratory show that if a person o! normal weight eats quickly, he will tend to eat more. in one experiment, sub- iects w~o rap/dry drank ~ liquid diet from eight-ounce glasses consumed more than when drinking the same diet from two-o~rce cups. With the srnalleY cups the subjects paused more often, drank at a slower rate arid COl3$eguea|~y CONSU~eEi f e~Nef calorie~, Do people stop eating when riley are fuji? Not always, In some experiments, we fed people by mouth and by stomach tubes. The results demonstrated that" the desire to continue tasting fOOd was stronger than the signal~ to stop eat- ing That come from a full stomach. People may overeat simply because the food tastes good, Do patients ever experience setbacks from spontaneous food binges ? Yes. Life is such thal t)o one can con- trol behavior 100 percent of the time• R CONTINUED p~le~ts ~o hi4p tllem sp~--end ~'~engo Lucky lO0's are problem? So~e low-tar ck3areties use artdic~al flavorings. Not Lucky 1 O0 s, Get Lucky 100's wi~ only natural flavorings A little tar, a Iolta taste Warning, The Surgeon Geneud P, as De~b~e~ Ttm C~ga,ene SmoY~9 LS tanger~us =o Your Xeahh. a~ ~r ~igar~e ~ FTC method 69
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But / DT Titleist. It's tough to cut. 4
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Ofallment llO0§: Iceberg lofts are lowest! Some Iow4ar cigarettes use ar~cial flavorings Not Iceberg 1 Off& Get Iceberg 100's with only natural flavofi ngs. A little tar, a Iotta taste. • Wamin§:TheSurgeonGenemlHas 1 Delermmed That Cigareue Sn~hng I$ Dangerous to Your Health• 4 mg 't~', 04 ag~ niooline per cHaratB I~ FTC method TO..,GO .O.O--o- Of all filterlO0§: listen to reason, "What it boils down to, he said, "is that campsites they have picked as safe I would place a short dis- tance away in what I consider a ~afcr ..dl ~ ~l place because of my experience. Both lJ lm IJ~l~ LOU and Wick said the slope to Savoih IUUi Pass was a good one even after the wind Callsed slough~ Now it's avalanched sev- eral times. Lou said the slope above the pa~ w~ a sate one, Later it slid over the are anchor points and we lost some items we had cached there" lowest! different from the somewhat meek and submissive man we had judged him to be during the early stages of the expe- dition. We all knew that he hada tre~ mendous drive to climb mountains, but we had seen him absorb direct insults without reacting in his own defense, f be linved Leif Io be too modest and docilc for hi* own good. But after all our weeks of discord and conflict, Leif had emerged as the man with the greatest strength of character among us. When hurui]it y was a virtue, hc had it. When a Imckbonc WaS needed, his I~came unbendab[e. He was the only member of the climbing team to be thl]y accepted by botll of the opposing factions. On June 2] Leif visited Jim Whitta- ker in Camp I to discuss what he termed the "fanaticism" of the lead climbers. The statements on this subject in his diary had been growing increasingly suong, until they cuiminated in "Are they will- to go over dead bodies?" Instead of holding his emotions inside until they bumL them into the open as tactfully as pm- sibl¢. Jim Whittaker agreed that a prob- lem existed and thai changes should be made. although he held a far more be- ne~o~m ~iew et the men who had so fat" forged every step of new gtollnd on the ridge. Jim was definitely becoming more mellow and be showed a new awareness of how critical Ins own de- c i~oias Were in healing the breach in our social order. When L¢if returned, he and I had Iong, pleasant discussions about the arts, sci- ence and llfe for two evenings rlnning. | had sony missed this sort of unobstrLlct- ed conversation on the trip; it had al- ways developed dunng the cou~¢ Of other expeditions [ had been on. Wlxen 98 Some tow4ar cigaretles use athflclal flavoring& Not Lucky 100 . Get Lucky 100!s with only natural flavorings. A littte tar, a Iotta laste. Waming~ The Surgeon General Has DetmmJned ]hat Cigarme Smoking Is Dangerous to Ycor ~eallh, 4 ril~."tar", Ih4 mO. hi.liCe ~V. per tiger =ee by Pr~ mJlh~
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OfallfilterlOOk Lucky lofts are lowest! Only mg. tar. Some low tar cigarettes use artific[ad flavorings Not Lucky 100s Get Lucky 10Q's with only natural flavorings, A little ta~ a Iotta taste. Warning: ~e Surgeon ~nerd Has Oezermi~ed Tzlat Ci§areHe Smoking I~ Danofirous la Your Heahh 4 r~. riB[". [l~ m~. ~icDIInB a~. pet 5ya[~ ~ H£ ~h~d ,,-,- ' Of all menth011OOk learned the ways of the white man. 211¢ Indian is, in fact, using a ia~l system that he has leamod to undemtand~ ~d the entire world is watching to $~ if it ~ ~" - Iceberg Russell M Peterx, President Mashpee Wampanoag Indian T~bal Council Ma~hpee, Ma~, I read with astonishment Essaylst IOOs Tnppctt's remark that it is "impossible to nnagine either the courts or Con~ actually rem~iling long-populated lands totheIndians." The ~urtand Coagress have or- ~11~ ~1~ demd the Navajo tribe to move 3,495 Nava~ from their ancestral homes in order to "give the land back" to the Hopi Indians. The largest for~sd ethnic rm lo~tlon of humans since the hysterical internment of the Japanese during Wurld War It ~ taking pla¢:¢ with the approvat of the Federal This [r~tment has been C~3vefllment bureaucrats as the I~ult ofa longslanding policy never to inter- fare in disputes among Indian& 0nly To encourage this forced mi/~tion to unknown lands, the Navaj~s have ~1 been fiaed $400,000 for contempt of mg court. Their contempt was catlsgd by he: • ing unable to live without food They tnn could not promptly comply with a court tl(lJ., order requiring an immedJ ate reduetior of ¢beir sheep and ~0~ts by 90%, Perhaps taring thdtr range a supple thing. George P. Vlassi$, General Counsel The Nava]o Nalion Window Rock, NavaJo Nation 64~z.) "Should We Give the U.S. Back to the Indians?" What makes you think they'd want it h its presenz condition? . IMrs ) Almeda Marnson The Indians did not own the land in America; they sLmply used k much $US animals do. Ownerslup comes with im~eflt$, Such as fanc~, 12tees, roads, buildings, ctc To give the U.S back to the ladi- afis Wotrld 13¢ as erroneous as givh3g me a large part of Colorado beca~ my ~m- c~tors and t havo hunted and fished over mc~t Of it. Allen Smith Redding, Calif, Let us hope that something finally will be dofi~ Io ensure some me.asttre of an honol~.ble soIotion, even Lf a eom- pia~ly honorable one is impossible¸ I am disturbed, how~cL by Mr. Tisppett's failure to mention the law- suits that might r~ult if some of these tribes win their claims. For e~ampis, will thv Pequot Indians return to the Niantic Indians the lands they stole in the eady 17th ¢~ntury? Will tba Paw- Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings. Not Iceberg 100's. Get Iceberg 100's With only natural flavorings A little tar, a lotta taste. Warning: The Surgeon General ~as Uotermined ~mt ~garatte Smoking Is Dangerous 10 Your Health 4 im +.-ter" &+. m9 nimli, ~ w pn ~amr~ bl FTC med~od
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seems like a gamble to you and me is not a gamble to him, He doesn't make a ]play unless the odds arc with him. And he's the same with horses¸ He doesnlt do ~ntyt hing there either, unless the odds are with him." Cheerers' first experience with thor- oughbreds was walking hots and work- ing a.~ a pari-mutuel clerk at tracks in OmaHo That hooked him, and five years ago he began putting ins hockey winnings into his own stable, the Four and Thirty (Cheerers wears No. 30, his friend Bob- by Orr wore No. 41, He combed horse4 sale cataings, and before the 1975 Keene- land Fall sale put a questiot~ ma/k alongside the descriptinr~ of a yearling that his trainer, John (Butch) I.enzini, wound up buying for $20,500. The horse was Royal Ski, who last year earned $3t~9 704~ becoming the leading money- WinIter ttmotlg 2-year-o]ds. The sum in~ cinded $86,046 for winning the Laurel /Md.I Futurity on Oct. 30. That evening, in the Montreal Forum, Cheevers pIaycd spectacularly as Boston handed the Ca tlaitlens their olity regular-season home It~ss, 4-3. RetLltning to Boston. he shared his good fortuzae by rcntlng a bu~ ~ild tak- ing his teflramates and theft wi~es to see the musical Grease. Checvers dressed for the occasion ~n tails--and tenms shoes. ]n January Checwr$ arran[led to syn- dicate a orm-folrd interest in Royal Ski for $1 million, retaining the other two thirds for himself. But the horse contract - ec[ a Severe vi~xlS, and when it appeared he would nDt he ready for any of t~ Tri- ple Crown raees~ Cheerers voluntarily dissolved the syndicate rather than seU a "faulty product." Out a cool million. Cheevers hopes to statx rebuilding Roy- al Ski's marke~ value in maJol stakes this summer. '~l'm disappointed about not be~ fog in the Derby," said Cheerers. who watched the race ~n TV just before leav- ing for the Forum, E~but I'm cocky and ar rogant enough to think I~11 get another shot Someday." It was Cheerers' team, not his horse, that [~gured to be out of the running by last week~nd. The Bruins~ after all, were a faceless club with little of the flair of the Orr-Esposito teams of the immediate past, Bm flair ma~ters little to Cherry, a [}ugnacfous sort who ~arrle~ in his wal- let a picture of his bullterrle2 Blue but r~one of his wife Rose and their two chil- dren. Cherry kept the team p luggil/g ond. after polishing off lhe Flyers, the Bruins h~d ~o cool tkei~ skal.~s while mighty c~ued 7~
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Ofallmenthol$O§: Iceberg lofts are lowest! Sorr~ low-tar cigarfttes use 3dJfidjdj flavorings. Not Iceberg I O0's. Get [Heberg 100'S with One/natural flavorings: A little ta~ a Iott~ taste. Wei~n~: The SU[g~11 ~Dneral H~ I]ete~ined T~nl Cigaette SrP, ek,~g Is O~ngerous ta Your Health. ~. ptr ~inier, e 5? ~C mB;~d Montreal straggled to oust the feisty Islanders. Facing ¢l~ainaritm in the Fov.wa, New York u~e~ the Cao~dltns 4-3¸ in ova- time Tuesday night to foi"cc a sixth game back on knng Island Montreal had not I~t two ctraight in mnrc the. a year, he1 now, tantalizingly, lhe Canedicns seddc.,fly seemed a mite vtaaerab]e They were riddled with injuries, and Lafleur appeared tired And could it be that suc- cess had, in a sense, sPcfiled K¢~ Dry~ dea? promoted during the regaiar sea- s~n by the NHL'S best dcflinsiv¢ corp~, DE,den had known more inact Lvriy than adversity; for want of p.zcks to stop~ 11¢ had spent a lot of time [caning on his stick and reading the Forum's ttckcrtapc message hea~k Fgdling the need to re- assttre lds goa]ic~ Bowrnatl huddled with Dryden at the team's motei, "People .,~.re gettlng on K~nny ~ust haceuse he hada~t come through fo[ us this one ttr~c," l~wman said "l want~l him to know he didn't owe as anything l told. htal the odds on his ha.ring art- oilier offgam¢ ~ as~cotlomlc;ll." AS though by Bowma~inn fiat, the dis- cor~thtt s that Dryden hgai sulfcrcd were now visited on mhar ~aiies, ~ ~a'st wa.~ the Islanders' Chicb Resch; who mis- h,~ed Bo~ G~ffaey's seemingly harm- less flip s~ot mad watched the puck roll into the net only sewn seconds into the game Rcsch sceted he,ga, but Dryden wa~ clearly on mp oftas game again, aad th¢4~ W85 ~1o mo~-c $¢odfl~ for the n~xg 49 mint~tes Tt~en, midway through the third peried, Geiney caught Resch o.t of po~[tiOll for al~other soR goaI--a play an which an obvin~s offsides by Mon- treal's M~tray Wilsotl was overlooked by tha oflieia~ A shot by N¢w Yock's Den- is Potvin ~li]pped by Dryden in the wan- ing ~econds, ha~ tac 2-I wir~ s~ll ~'lon - treal into the flnai~, The secmld discomfited g~lltender of the week was Cheerers Though Chee- rers' pt:rformance in the Brulns~ ?-3 Ices wa~ wo~ t~l~ ,Izly Of fliryden ~s against the lslaahazs, it is, rcmcraber, tha nature of motley goali¢~ to be tm¢onc¢ffled by ~oals-against figures "What djfferenee does it make if Iha score is 2-Q cz 18-37" Ch ee,~er~ ~in after the ~amc. '% ]o~ Js a loss AI~ [ know is tha~ I'm gtfing trJ have to make some adjustments if we're going to bea~ Mo~ltmaL" Tha task is probably no harflcr than bcatalg Seattle ~J~w. But iz m~y nat be ~lly cagier, ~itacr, I~ ) Ofallfilter_lO0 : Lucky lofts are SoFtie low-tar ¢(garettes use a~ficia] flavorings Not Lucky 1001s+ Get Lucky lO0's with only natural flavorings. A I~le tai~ a letta taste. W~mino: The Surgnrm Gene~l Has [ [l~termhad ]hat Ci~r~e Sm~ing Is Dange~eus ~ Your Heakh. sv. p~l dgeret~ 5~ FTC mnlSOd
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m How many times has the water been used before it gets to your house? Thousands of times, and probably mo~. Why? Because the same finite amount of water has been supplying our planet ever since life began. It stocks our rivers, lakes, and oceans, evaporates, and falls to earth again. [tg all the water we can have. So this inelastic supply has to serve our needs over and over again. And therein lies the problem: our FMC has developed a pure oxygen process to speed the treatment of wastewater, a hydrogen peroxide process which removes the obnoxious odors occurring in sewage treatment, chemicals to control algae in swimming poots, chemicals to prevent scales in industrial boiler systems. It is not how many times water is used or re-used that counts, but i modern populous communities are what happens between usages to adding pollutants to water faster protect its qual~t'~= ~ :: than nature can purify it. Man must FMC serves worldwide markets take over an ~ver larger share of not only for environmental the responsibility, equipment, but for food and A number of FMC's agricultural machinery, industrial and environmental capabilities are agricukura[ chemicals, material devoted to solving water use handling, construction and mining problems. Example: waste treatment systems which remove pollutants from the used water of entire municipalities, or of individual schools, factories, hotels, hospitals, residentiaJ complexes. equipment. For a folder describing FMC's machinery/chemical capabilities, please write FMC Corporation, 200 East Randolph Drive, Chicago 60601. Or call 8004~214500 (in Illinois: 312-861-5900). -FMC
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OfallmenthollO0§: Iceberg ZOO's are lowest! Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings. Not Iceberg 10Os. Get Iceberg 100's with only naturaL flavorings. A little tar; a lofts taste Warning, The Surgeon Gmeral Has Oetefmined That Cigarett B Smokin9 ~z Dangerous to Your He~kh. 4 mS."tar', 0.4 m8 eicoline ~ pm c~mlJ+ ~i FTC 11m'im~ letters inns Obviously the strikers could u~e a 50- cent pay raise---~ouldn't we o/P--but dump- ing trash on Cit) Ha]l wi]] not make the city mnie flnancial]y able to meet their demands, i hope Mayor Jackson has star~ed an eptdemlc of g~L~u~d comlitoxl sense. BETSY DUCEy Los Gates, Ca]i£ • If Atlanta cannot afford the raise for its g~ebage collectors iLs mayor concedes they deserve, theeityshoumgetouto£thegarbage- eo]leetion business At leasL ffgarbage ¢o]lee- tinu were done by private ~llns, the users would be paying¸ for the true costs of ool]ee- OfallfilterlOOk The New Times Your article "The New New York Times" (NEWS MEDIA, April ~) misrepresents what 1 said about The Times's Weekend Section. FO~ from avoiding hard hitting critical pieces, ~eekend maintaius the same high standards ~lat have alway~ prevailed in The Times. We do indeed serve our readers by guiding them to things to do and scout wor thw};i]e things, which ha~e had to earn our eTilics' approval by their very tea] merits. - SEyMouB PgCK , Cultural Editor The New York, NY, Finding FBI Leadership San£o rd I. Ungar's ideas about a new dir ee- tor for the FBI (MY TU~'L April 25) all sound good--hut isn't the question of what the FBI should or shouldn't do already an understood !~,~ ~ t nfo~lr d~mocratic Cnllstitution? Aud whn will fill this job--C, od ? Or lPny Brown? LO]~ A BEBEAU Minnetonka, Minn. • It seeras nofldng less lhan the second com- ing of Christ can save the FBI~nd l didn't see him on the "shopping list " LI.'~DA WAI~KR S~ Diego, Ca]i£ The Panama Negotiations It is very difficult to un dersLaud the re marks mad~ by Gun Omar Tn:rijos, chief of the government of Panama, in his recent tn- tetwiew with NE~'S~X~EK'S Run Moreau (IN. TEP~ATIONAL, April 25)+ The :'1,000 private enterprises in the Zone" mentioned by Pana- ma's "m ~.ximum leader" are uouexfstent. The ten~s of out ~reaty ar~tgetneat with Panama preclude the estahlishment of private enter- p~Sse in the Zone unless it is directly related to the maintonance, operation, sanitation and protection nfthe eanat. I do out know the nature of the "lies" Ceneral Ten,los asserts Ihe Unt~l States has made. I do know that the Panamanian Govern- ment has eonsiswntly leaked selected Infer+ marion involwd in treaty negetiatinn~ to Lucky lofts are W~c~ing~ The Su(geon General P~ Oezermine+ ]hat Cioarette Smoking Is Dan§erou$ Io Y~ur Health. 4 mo 'rio(, 04 tag rl~oti~ av. per c;samtt" b"t F~C m++ho~ Newsweek, May 16, 1977 Some low tar oigaretle~ use artificial flavorings Not Lucky 100s. Get Lucky ~ 0O's with only natural flavorings. A little tar, a $oita taste nly mg. tar. tion and nnt benefiting from a subsidy in Lhe +0++++++++ lowest! would be dealing with eeo~lomie realiW m their negott&t:inns, not the I~sturings of au Seatile, W~sh elect/on-eve politicizm jAM£s ~. ~IC~
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m~ONTINUED career am a baseball word, he turned through the minor leagu=e-¢ for Idaho FalPs, Phoenix, then Oakland Where Stengel was manager. "He was like a father to me," s4ys Martin. "1 don't know where I would have gone [f he hadn't been ~round." Martin has worn a black armband on his uniform since Stengel died in tg75. Except for a hitch in the Army, Billy h~ never held a nonhlseba[I Job, and his devotion to the sport has caused de.era te $¢ra}na at home. HIS flrs¢ wife; LOIS Elaine Berndt, walked out on him after his fourth season as a player with the Yankees, complaining, "1 ~Jon't want to be married to a news- pa~er clipping arty Ion~er." Although Billy says he tried to remain close to ~eir daugilter, Kelly Ann, "It was diffisutt because we didn't see each Bon Elmy Jo~ acdy t0 In ~d. 1974 p~"fmr~ Other that often." ~=h.~ t~vem wl~ h~B ~d amd CM ym~ : : Wh/Je hls second m~rrfage, to : Gre chenW1nker haslasted nearly 18 r years, Billy admi s here have been d * fisuti times. "We argue a lot," he admits, "but that's what baseball does to you." Qretch~n says ha brJr)gs the game home with him. ~ometimes he stays away with It; afler the disastrous World Series last year Billy took a long ,detour t~Ok[ahorno; Where he went ~1 Ir~tlng aild tishlng w]th M]ckey Marl e bOforeshowngupa he amly's ranch-stYle house in Arlington. Texas, While he was away at spring training this year Gretchen sent Martin a hu- fnorous card that read: "Play me or trade me." :: When Martin is home, he devotes himself to t~llly Joe, who,/i~e C/ad, ~e~ NO."1 antis uniform and playS second b=tse. "You don't have much time to be a family man if you are mar* rled 10 baseball too," Billy eay~, "but I try rily best. NOW that myson is a ~ttia older, he comes 1~ New York when sctiom is out, and this summer he'll go on the road with me," During the season Billy lives in a cramped two-room hotel suite in New Jersey across the Hudson from Yan- kee Stadium. 'Tin usually at the ball park each day at 3 p,m. and I get back to the hotel about I a.m.," he SaylL "J'JJ f~p On the TV and faJJ asleep. That's the way it goes, night after nlgh'L But it's hard for me to be lonely as long as I'm In basebalL" RONALD B, SCOTT
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Of all filter 100 : about hJm--he's 20 years oldez and he's dancing out to the mound just like Casey Stengel used to," 'qn many ways Gee rue thinks of him- self as a reenter to Billy," ~ys ~not her Yankee official. "George would like to teach him to act like management's representative to the players." Billy says he would like nothing bet- ter than to be working for the Yankees in 1997, "1 have a lot of respect for George," he says. "In many ways we're very much alike. We're both very proud. We've worked out this arrange- ment--we try 1o stay out of each other's way." But if the arrangement breaks down? Bitter, almost compulsive struggle has been a part of Maofn's existence ~lnee hie childhood in Berkeley, Calif. ~'1 lived in a tough neighborhood,'! he says, "YOU had to learn to defend your- self earl~" Christened Alfred Manuel Mart~n, he was nicknamed Billy be- cause his doting Italian grandmother insisted on ealllng him Bellie, & dlmino ugve of "be~lee/me," Italian for beautiful. HIs father deserted the ram° ily when Billy was 8 months old, leaVing the child to be reared by his mother and grandmother. He became batboy for a girls' soft- bail team, and was so taken by the game that in hlgh school hE* confidently told a counselor he had decided on a OONTINUED Sorne ]ow-ta r'ciga rettes use artificial flavorings. Not Lucky 100"s. Get Lucky I O0's with enly natural flavorings A lirile tar. a Iotta taste.
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N You ca n count them on the fingers of one finger, alI the cars like Corvettel All the T.roof fiber-glass-bod~ed two-seaters with fully independent suspensions, power disc brakes at all four wheels, GRTO stee~belted radials, two leve~ insfrumentetion, refracteble headlamps, tinted glass all the way around. There is one, only one, role production sports car made in America. And Chevy moke$ it. In limited numbers--for people vJho grew up dreaming of the day they'd own o Corvette. Corvette by Chevrolet. The one. The only. And, offer almost a quarter of a centurg, still a breath of fresh ain
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Ofall menthol1( Iceberg lofts OfaJl filt, erJOOh: Lucky To the F.diters. There's that man again I[~tck on lOftS gctttng rich dif Watc~ga~ is deprc~ing. TO learn that he still feels no guttt is dis CUrbing, if not surprising. To b¢ told that all th~ publicity could mark lh~ begin- LETTERS rdng of his rcincar nation as a public fig are lowest! rune I Some Iowdar cigarettes use ariificia[ flavorings Nol Iceberg 100's Get Iceberg 100's with only natural flavorings A little ta£ a lethe taste Waming: The Surgeon General Has [letermin~g [hat Clgareue Srnehing Is Oangeraus ta Your Health Perrysville, Ind. Why bestow honor and pulilicity tlpo~ a man who betrayed us and dis- glaecd 1As b¢ for~ the entire wo£1d, a rfla~ who proliably headed th¢ most corrupt Administration the U.S has ever had Lst's bury this man in obllv[otl o~ce and for all. or send him to the nhath ek- ~lc of the Inferno. where Dante might have reserved & niche for ]ali~ Joseph A. Russo Oakland, Calif The mtc]ligenmia went after IL~cli- ard Nixon as they have no man ha his- tory. Taking a third-l~at¢ burglary ~nd btuldiitg it into a monstr~iey, they w~rc able to btlng about the downfah[ of a great man That he will be vindicaled thet'¢ is nc do~bt we may se~ the great- est comeback ha political history. Jerey Too~ey Sioux Falls, ,~ Dak. | n dt~ -eyed silence millions watched the purgatorial unpeettng of tlt~ Nixen soul as angel hosts intoned, "Will ha ever Some low tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings, Not Lucky 100s (Set Lucky 100's with only natural flavorings A little tar, a lethe taste
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BILLY MARTIN COULD BE ONE OF THE GREAT YANKEE MANAGERS--IF HE CAN KEEP HIS TEMPER AND HIS JOB During MS 25 years in major league baseball, New York Yankees manager Billy Martin has acqu bed a reputation as a brawler who is as likely to slug a teammate as an opponent, his philos- ophy being, "Whoever lands the first ~unch wins." His on-field repartee In- clines toward the sort of thing he shouted at an archrlval manager last so&son: "Bit down, you bleeping fal foul" E~ven the way Martin's head Is at- tached to his body--long giraffe neck thrusting his chin out, ever aggressive -*-=onsplres to make him look as If he*d rather win a fight than a bait game any day. Be it is hard to believe that this gray- ing. 49-year-old man With a high- dtched voice rarely rising above a whisper is Billy Martin. He is sitting at his desk in Yankee Stadium and ex- plaining sadly that his obsession with baseball agows him too Itttle time to spend with his 1 g-year-old son, Billy Joe. Even more melancholy, he talks about hix daughter from his first mar- ri~.ge, Kelly Ann, 24, who was arrested in Colombia for possession of cocaine 16 months ago. "It was probably the low- est pstnt of my life," he says. "1 would go to the ball park and people weald yell atme," Hey, Billy, how does your daugh- ter like it in ja[l?' Well, any goddamn fool who's ever been a parent knows the pain you go through when your child gets in trouble~ was no different, I felt amp y and alone." (Kelly Ann is still in jolt, but Billy I~ hopeful she will soon be released.) The converser Jan ttJrrl~ to baseball. but sthl Martin does not bluster. Instead he refers with humorless sincerity to such verities as "team pride" and "playing your heart out." Curing the Yankees' hu miliating tour- straight Io~s to Cincinnati in last year's World Berles, Martin avoided the press much of the time, hiding out in his locker room office. It was there, half Martin s4tved thin tgE:E Wck~d $1wles for the ya,~cees vAth tldl lur4~ng ¢,dch a f ~ p.ol~lsalt's blSe~oaded p0p fly. an hour after the third loss, that Yan- kee ovmer George M. Stelnbrenner III found his manager huddled In a chair, Weeping uncontrollably. "1 know we were capable of better," Martin says now. "That's why I was Up- set. it WaS bad enough that we had lost. Then there were some reporter ~J SOnS of b[zcr)ee who wanted to rub Jt in my face. They were asking things li)~e, 'Hey, Billy, what do you think of the Reds now? W~ll you spell awesome tor t~?' Wel~. bleep 'eml I don't need to talk to them. Hail the writers who come in hwre have already made up their minds that I'm gonna be an s.e.b. But did you ever read Just once that Billy the season?" it is tnJe that his temper and affinity for trouble were legendan/~,im oat from the day he moved from the minor leagues to the Yankees In 1950. When- ever ~ tearnrnafe misbehaved, Martin always seemed to be at his side. One season he and Mickey Mantle were caught dumping water from a win- dow of the St. Morltz Hofel in Manhattan. Another time he was there when a teammate signed the Yankee ~Tvner'~ name to a tab after a ntght on the town. As a player Marlin was only a me- diocre hitter, a steady but unspectac- star 11e~der. Yet Yankee manager Casey Stei~gel. one of the shrewdest and least set3timental men In basebaJl, kept Billy at second base for seven ye~baps because the team was winning six Wodd Series. (Martin saved the Series for the Yankees Jn 1952 wgh a diving catch in the seventh game against Brooklyn, and in the 1953 Se- ries he was named Most Valuable Player.)Says Yogi Ber~a, then Martin's tee, tomato and now one of his assis- tants, '~He was art all-hear t player." Still, in 1957, after he and several oth~ er Yankees were involved In .a brawl at the Copacabana club, M aitln was traded.~over Btengel's objections to Kansas City. H~S career on the declir~e, he bounced to six ether clubs in as many years, enhancing his reputation only as a fighter. Playing for Cincinnati in f 960, Billy threw a bat at Chicago Cub CONT~NtJED b tl~ NOW ¥~rk ¥ alkl~l~ nliale r~ Billy Mm.Un hs tUllng 1he pinstr~ of the ma~ he reveres iii f atilel~Calmy Stemgel. photographs by Fir/t~ White
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Of all menthol 100§:I Iceberg lO0's are lowest! 4rag. Sopr~ low-tar cigaretL~ use arlificisi flavodrOs. Not Iceberg 100'S. Get Iceberg 100's with only natural flavorings, A/i~e tar, a Jolla taste. Determinsi lhat Cigare~e Smoking Is O~ngetoos [0 Your Health. pat Clga m[~ ~ [TC method 9O , Mi.ele be~uM~t tm e~ iml Imdk~ Mantle, ~O~ON]3NUEO kM~ to ~ lit Ii~ ~lJJIl~ ~1~ Gro~ pitcher Jim Brewer, wad. Mar tsi eV~ If~ll Ik~ Is a ~JlLT.e c¢~c1~ ~aJmed, he~ been aimsig f~tballs at hishead. ThebatsaitedwtdeOfltstar- .... . get, but as Martin walked over to :Jim Campbell, general manager of retrieve it Brewer came off the mound the Detroit Tigers who hired and fired toward him. Martin promptly socked Martin, explains: "[ still had complete the pitcher in the Jaw. Players from both confldemce In him on the field. But dugouts spilled onto the field, and In We had good and suthclent reasons to the eh~t}ln~-sc'e~im'rn~e~E~r e~e=r~ h[nl:g~clau se ~ his r elatlo n s wit h cheekbonewaefracturedandhis~ye : ~h~frontoffice," ......... was injured. Martin was fined ,$500 end MarUh returned to New YOH< in the Brewer sued the Reds for morD thart middle of the 1975 season, when the $1 million, Settling tlnady for $10,000. once.~t~ghty Yankees had gone t t Even after Mar tsi's playing career years wRhout a pennant, A year letter ended and he became manager of the they won the American League title, MInnesota Twins In 156g, he decked his which the Series embarrassment hard- own ace pitcher, Dave Boswell. (They ly dimi~ed, in th9 paltt few rt~onth~ they were out dr~klng together Wh ~pn ~ ~ P'.~ve signed three superb p~yers g ht star ted, supper ting a freqUerd crlt~ :.:~eg~gt o Jac kso n, Becky D ent and icisn~ of Martin--that he is too familiar with his players for his and their own good.) Later he went ~fter th~ t camps tr~velthO socretaty, who Martlr~ said was~rying to tell him how to run the ball club. M~rtln insists that his uncertain dis- position h~B made him the success he is, a manager who turrted the Twirls, Detroit. Texas anti Yankees from losers thto wlnners. "t believe th forcthg the ~¢tion,~' he says. *'That'~ how you win ball games." Unfortunately for his job security, he also forced th~ action with his employers and was flrl~d from all three prevlou~ jobs. 'Tin a fighter.*' Martin admits. "No goddamn guy wh(~'s n~ver put on a p~dr Of spikes ]~ gonna tell me how to run a ball club. They can give me advice and I'll listen. But then rll go out and do it my way." Don Gullett-~mekin~ them wide f~vor- gee to win another pennant thiS season. Yet George Stelnbrenner~ho h~$ ~sked h~s shit~oin~ fortune and ~ie ego, both mommoth, in building 1he ~e~m ~has already pu blie~y quarreled with Martin on ~a number of oG~asion~. ~telnbr~nn@r ~ven tried to meddl~ in the IJn~up when the Y~nks slumped early this season. M~rtin responded by choosing his Itheup for one g~e out of a hat. Short~ thereafter the (earn be- gan to win again, but a lot of Bronx bookies will give odds that. pennan[ or not, the Yankee~ will have a new man- ager by the end ot the season. ~telnbrenner, 46, desies that he and Martin ire at odds. "Hell, when I hired Billy," he says, "1 did it because I knew he could last with our organization. I understand him. I have dreams at night
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named----~schewiny any reference to the primip~J comba~am--the S~nith- American Wm-. Cuban baseball prospered after his death. The coumry took to the game with an enthusiasm rivaled only by that of its ne ~,hbor to the north, A number of pro leagues were formed, and Havana was represented in the Americsn minor ]~yuc~, most notabty in the Triple-A In- ternatJonal League from 1954 to 1960. the power alleys and 400 to dead cemer-- bat the air ~s heavy and balls do ~oi seem to carry well. The fences arc painted a subdued green, unblemished, of course, by advertising stgns, there being none in Cuba. However, the foul poles are light- ed for night games, an innovation the biy leagues would do well to consider. The electric so~reboard does not trans- mit quizzes and cartoons, nor do~s it wel- come KlWauians from Matanzos, but it Most of the best players made their way does list the hattui.g orders and advise ~A to the Stazes. Altogether, 98 Cubans have the fans of each hitter's average. ~l~n ~ either played or managed in the maior A May 7 doubleheader at the Estadio i;I,l t) ! leagues, including such [ong~ime sta .... tubed second-place Las Villas with lowest! Pitcher Adolfo Luque, who won 194 third-place Havana. Cuban games begin games in his 20-year career lad 27 in precisely as scheduled, and this twin bill the tll23 season for Cincinnati, and Mar- was under way at 6 p.m. sharp, follow- ale Muioao, now a Whhc Sox ¢~ecb, ing the i~/aylng of the H~arb Naclana,,L whose Lqst at bat a y~r ago nlada him an anthem from Martrs, not Castro s, one of Orlly a bandfuiof players whose ca- revotution. The four umpires offered the contemporary Cuban stars of Ull. base the Amerlct£u.game. While they wore the ball are Tony Perez, Mike Cuellar, Luts traditional dark blue hats and trousers, k 3qam. Bert Campaneris, Jose Cardenal their silken shirts were of a luminescentl [~g and Tiso Fue.ntes. And it was a Cuban, magenta. Th~ Las Villas learn was all in • Migue[ (Mike) Gonzalez, a former man- orange, an outfit pioneered and ultimate ager mad player, who coined one of tile ly rejected by the Beltil/tOre Orioles. Ha- game's more memorable expressions: vana was stylistically indebted 1o the "Good field, no hit," Reds, with white double-kuits, red stock~ One Cuban who did not fath his way ings and cal~s, There was a notable ab- into the major leagues was Martin Di- senee of unbbrmity at shortstop--Las t uiJo, whom many consider the finest player the island has ever produced. An outfielder and pitcher of Rutuian vetsa- tUi~y, Dh~i, io, a black, bad the bad lira- hag to reach maturity during the 1930s, when baseball in the United State~ was a wbit~ man~s game¸ Until his recent se- lecrion to Cooperstown by the special committee on black players, Dih0o's fame had not reached beyond his island, but it long has been firmly entrenched there. His bust is alongside the revered I.uque's in the foyer of ~he Eatadio La- tin0amrricano. q7Re Estadio itself is realty two ball parks, pre- and IX~t -revoluslon. The 46- year-old covered gtxuldbtand lies been gussled up with fresh Imim and new seats. The ot~t field sections were completed in 197] by volunteer labor, the product of revolurionary" SpOlOllg fei~or. whale--25,001l old seats, 30,000 new-- looks as ff it is one part Comislcey Park and one part Riv¢ffront Stadium. The hy- brid is Cuba's largest stadium, an impres- sive structure for all the commmglmg. The otltheld fences are somewhat cLoser to the plate than in meat major league parks--325 f~t at the foul hn~, 345 in Villas' Pedro Jo~a sported a green batting helmet and Havana's Rodolfo PueDte appeared allin shocking pink, the resdt, one assumes, of ~xalessly tossing his uniform socks in the wash with Ms trousers null shirt. There were several immediately ap- oarellt differences betwe¢~ the game and the one played in the Amer- ican and National Leagues. For the first time in the National Series, Cuban hit- r~rs 1Ms year were swinging aluminum bats, which a~ mamlfaetured IN the United State~, but obtained through friendlier Central Amrrlaan counthes. The metal bats have tile twin virtues of lasting Ionge~ and costing the govern. merit less. They have also led to dramat- ie increases in both batting averages and home runs. The bat controversy in Cuba is com/x~r~Me to ~be ar~bSc~al-~rf/ss~e in American baschuil, With Ihe anti-afa- mintml forces Lnslsriny that such tlrtifi~ alality leeds to inflated averages and af- fects the continuity of the game. But Cuban oitrhers are not without their ow~a [~ourc~s. For One, they are not required to toss up a lily-white ball ml every delivery. A Caban bail is at- c,c~anoeo" 77 ~ome low-lar cit~at reties use arlilicial flavoringll, hlo~ Luck,/100% Get LL~ky 100's wffh Or@ r~atural flavorings. A lille tar, a [otta taste. [Waming, ~e Su~eon ~eral Has ~e~r~l That C~m~te Is ~ngffo~ to You~ Heahk ~.~ t~mtt~ W F~ mthmi
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player has influenced him mc~t, and he will name Ted Williams or Mickey Man- tLe. Tlley have seen the fronting films. the last shipped here before relations be: twoen Cuba and the U.S. disintegrated. ]~ut if one ]18s aceess~ ~15 some Ctlhan journalists do, to foreign wire-servlce re- ports, it Js pe~alble that the name John ny Bench wilI stand for something other than personalized furniture. Caminada, the INDER magazine ~vriter. keep~ up. "We will see whert Joe Morgan (the two italne$ b~coi/1c nile; JcemoFgan~ ggts here. if he can get to second base." he says. At~d Catale~ada's colleague, Edel Casas. keeps up* too, Every day he saun- ters down the street to Agence France P~sse to learn how many homers Reg- gie Jackson has hit. Caminada lind Casas are Yankee fans. convinced that the game's most bleated capitalists have sperxt their money ".~4sely. Cuevas. the old ballplayer, also has done pretty well at I'ollewulg the modern ~roe. He lags only about 10 yeats behind, During a recent discussion of batting teeboiques, he felt compelled to rise to his feet and demonstrate a point. "Tlley pitch Lou Brock outside all ~he time." He as- sumes a left-handed stance as he speaks of the 1967 World Series between the Cardina/s and ~/~ Red Sox. "They pitch him outside, and he hits the ball to left field. 'Aha," ~ay the Red Sox. 'We will pfinh him inside now. Taut wiLl stop him.' So they do." Cuevas takes a hefty swing with his imaginary bat. "Home run! That Lou Br~k. He is a good hitter." An estimated 493.Q00 Cuban~ out of a total population of about nine million play some form of organized ba~ball, ei- ther i~t school or hi the complicated sys- tem e~tablishad by the govemment'~ Cut:an Basebnfl Federafinn. In essence. the season ixms the year round, though at the very top level it lasts 0nly from lal~ February threugh early Nh~y. It in- vhives ~ ~rccl¥ col~dt~ve wo~.d~ng-out process that begins in the towns and vil- lages arid finishes at what m~ght be called the supeFprovmcial level, Froia the mul- titude of municipal teams, the best play- ers are selected to represent tbe 14 prov- inces. After a 39-game season at tiffs level, the best of these players are picked to play on the seven learns representing the seveIt original provinces (Cuba was segmentnfl into 14 provinces ~tz May of 1975). All the players are On teams rep- resenting their b~arae pr~vlnces, so that 75
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Ofallmenth011OO's: Iceberg lofts are lowest! Some low-tar cigarettes use a~finM[ flavorings. Not Iceberg ~ O0's. Got Iceberg 100's with only natural flavorings. A [iltle tar, a thtta taste. l Wan/ng= Th0 Sur ~oa £~nml ffas Is Oangemnl ~0 Your ~ethh, Cuba~.~u~ fan lifotld~callon is a~ ]mpo~ant factor, ]n Cuba, the home team is just that. ~even top teams then p]ay a 54- game schedule that is c~led the Nation- al Series. The winner, Camag'~ey this year is the national champion. It is po~- sthle, urnler this rather involved s~stenL for a playe[ to perform for as many as three teon*s, all based re[at Jv¢]y near his home, and to appear in many more than 100 games. However, the best players com/x:t¢ onJy on the provincial and su- i~r-provincinl levels in a season of 93 games (39 provincial, $4 super=provin- cial} that lasts 4½ months. But Imseball does not end for the coun- try's stars with the crowning of the ha- tional champion, bocaose from the scvca teams in the National lleries an All-llmr squad is selected to represent Cuba in in- ternational compollrion. Because only amateur teams Take pall in inr~'r n~t lional baseball, Cttha is unexeehed in this sort of play. For example, its nationnl team has not lost in the prestigious Pao-Amel~ inan Games since 1967. Playing on the national team, rel0resentlng the country against other nations, is considered the ulluba]e dlsfincIJon in Cuban baseball. A p]ayer's worth is measured not in J~ Mom's fl~e Mly, for a #aver of Gour- rial's youth and natural ubflity would have big lealiue scouts weeping tears of gratituds in backwaler Holiday Irms all across the U.S. Six-feet~one and 150 pollnds~he is a [9-year -oal fotToet $1)rint- er who has ~t fine throwing arm and who hit .348 in fl~, his rookie season in the National Series. The Cuban stars' appar- ~11 unwlllli~gness to defect and pu~ue the rich and merry life of a big-leaguer confounds ~ome American I~schall pee,- pie. Preston Gomez, a Dodger coach mad a Cuban, feels his countrymen are misA- thg an opportuthty for ~ax~'*vt h After a re- cent visit to Cuba he said, "Baseball is the only sport there where the play¢~ ~ort't have the opix~rtua~ty to compem with thcae better than they arc.... Tho6e players ~ach a certain age, and then they stand stll]. They doi~'t make progre~ They have several players there that. ff they had had the Opportunity five or six years ago to come to the States, would be playing ill the big leagues now." Ir- relevant, say the Cubans. "We have our game," says Las Villas First Baseman An- to[lio MLI[~OZ~ "&Od yOU have yonrs.~ The Cuban fan has at least one pro- found advantage over his Amedcan ¢a~, but by the number of times he ha& ¢ounterpar.; admission to all games is been seh~cted for the natthnal temn : free. He pay~ otdy for his food and his he- Beyond tho considerable honor in2 ~loved boer, though the brew Js sold ex- vowed, piny~ng on the national team of. thrs rare oppormindes for travel. CUe- vas has pcrfolmed in Puerto Rico~ Jammea, Vcn~u~la, Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Korea, China, India, Egypt, Rus~ sin, East and West Germany, England arid Catlsd~ Even a so faewhlit ]~ssc f ~ Camag~ey's Hcmandez (a .321 hitter], has played extenslvcly in Europe and in Central and South America. ThuS, the al- lure of playing for the New York Yan- kc~s is l~st on Cuban pla~ers reared since the m~oJubon. "To defo~d Cuba th io* te~l oompehrinn is what we sttiv~ for," says Hernandez. Unpaid, the Cu- ban plays for honor, pride, patrindsm, fan adulatton and government frthgo ben- efits, not necessarily in that oedcr. These, apparcady, are re ward eno ugh. Whca ~h~ splendid young Las Villas rightflelder, Lourdes GourrleL was asked h-he would accept $i million to piay major leagut baseball ia ~ho United States, he I~oked as indignant ~ if someone had proposed that hc scck empioymenr in some tcn- dcrioin district massage parlor. "I do not," he replied in a lev~l tone, "sell my- snlf thr money." nlusivnly at beas beneath the stands and may no( ho carried back to the seats. Be- cause all of the National Series ball paxks have been hollt ---~r, llkc the 46-ytmr ~oid Estadio Letinoamcricano in Havana. re- built--since the revolution, they arc gen- emliy comfortable, though hardly plush as the more modern American sta- diums. The country's oldest bali pafl~ in MataiIzas, erected in the 19th century, is being converted into a hall of fame to ac- commodate artifacts cf Cuba's rich base- haft hlsto~,. The first llame in Cub~ w~ played on Dec. 27, 1874 with Havana dofealing the home team. Mhtanzas, 51-9. The Havana Ieftfinlder that day was Emilio llabourin. who was ~ become the A. G. SpaIding of Cuba~ b~,eba~l. Hc va~ inllueudM the organization t~f *he cour~u3"s first-- and the world's ~eeond--professional l~guc in 1878. It was formed only t'~o years after the ~ational League in the U.S. Subourtn achieved coveted martyr dora at 44 When he died in the llpanish prison, Castillo dnl Haehe. on July 5, 1897 daring what Cubans rightfully ca[I their war for independence and we have 4 mg."lm",OA mg ni¢odne 76
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OfallfilterlOOk Lucky lofts are lowest! Only g. Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings Not Lucky 100's Get Lucky 100's with only natural flavorings A lflt]e ta~ a Iotta taste• Warning= The Surgeon General Itas Oetumined That Cioarette Smoking Is Dangerous r~ Your Health. BOOKS itles of a picturesque, barren region where the old are dying, the 3oung have fle(I and souvenir shops flourish A he~ gar woman with a vJav pipe tells him she hates tc, smoke it but does so to give tourists a touch ol" "Ould Oireland." Mi]lman snught out elder]v storytell- ers, one of whom had m be tom away from watchin~ "Kojak" on his snowy TV ~cree n. Instead of a [look of~fes, this is a 4 mg"ta('.B4 r~ ,[Int[~ He piimfered l];ass proflllotion of ~pr igarelle~FlCrael0d • • i~ arts products with mterchangeab p . by Of all menthol lOOk Iceberg lofts --WALTER CLEMQN5 Keep Them in Stitches A CAPII"~LIST ROMANCE: 81NGER A~ THE S don. 244 page~ Lippincott. $10 Had he flourished a few decades later, the se~ing m~chine nl:tglta[e Isaac Mer- IRt Singer wocfld Dt perfec ]y into E.L Doctomw's "'Ragtime" ArM i£ Karl Marx and Holatlo Alger had pooled their t~ ents, the? could hard]~ have rooked up a ale any gaudier or more emblematic thal~ Sin gf'r's career, Ruth Brandon, who is Bfitls h, has stl~ck a rich lode of Ameri eana in thls hrst biography of a blgger- t ~mn-]D[v nineteenth-c~ntuz~' eecentHr', Si[l~er~ ~1 ~cn~/arl illllni~rctrl~'$ 5on bon~ in 1811, waated more than anything ~Ise to he a Shakespearean actor (in later life he [iked to boast that he had beeI~ onn ofthegreatRicher~ I' ofhsday) He t~lwmd to invention ill hls 30 on y when his han~ stox~ing t herttrlcal company col- lapsed. He didn't originate the sewing machit~e--Etlas Howe, Anloitg others, prPcetled hltn--hut he was the first t~ make it work. His histrionic talents sel~ed him on demonstration t~l]r~, ~here he suppferaented exhibits of his new flan ~Jed contraption with hea~" remk- in~ r( eibttions of Thomas Hood's "Song of d~e Shirt": "With fl gets wereT and worn/ With e/el ( s heavy and led,I A wom~n sat. in nrlwonl~x~lv rags./ '~]ying h~r nrcdlc and threadj Stitch] Stitch! fltffchl . ." Some Iow4ar cigarettes use artificial flavorings Not Iceberg 100's. Get Iceberg 100's with only natural " flavod ngs A litde ta~ a Iotta taste. W~ning: The S~geon General Has ge¢~rmined Thet gi arett~ ~o~ng t~ Osn~emus to Yore Hsa ~h. 87
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OfallfilterlO0 : Lucky lO0's are lowest! Only Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorin0s Not Lucky 100's Get Lucky 100's with only natural flavorings A little taL a ]otta taste Watning~ The Su~eOll 6ene/aJ Has Determined Thet Cigarette Smoking Is FJangemus to Your Health. 4 m~ -I~f' 0.4 rag niceline av I~r IiDore~e ~y RC ml~d Lm$ fev~ she ordered hma to the dormitory • of corporal punishment Glen G. K~n~ Oakland, Calif. "e erg It depresse~ me that 1~4ely it is not ~ible te read an article aLmut a~,l- lion or space exploration without the writer's jaded attitude toward teehno. Logical achl ....... t creeping in I .lllr]ing,,~ It seems as though most Americans +..+ ++ p++=a-- T+ + JIUU ries with too many re!~,ats--not really comprehending what it is all al~t: roan'$ innate quit for knowledge. Pr~sl~llt-day avlat~rs and aMroilallts are highly trained and skilled profes- sionals who stlJl have to cot~, a* Lmdy did with complex machines in a three- dimensional environment that call [3~ hostile, alien and fulJ of "adventure" Jack b~ C~rysler Jr Santa 3eIonrca; Cahf Jail for Dissenters? If we the American people allow Ihe sentencetg of the Wilmington Ion [May 23] to stand as is. we are no better than the Soviet Union or any Latin Amer ican country that puts its political dis- senlers in jail to shut them up .4bber C'lerchelzlIatis Miami When our courts are free of preju dice against t he blacks ~.nd the ]poor+ we can then preach human rights to the world But firsl we must plactice whaL we preach. (Mrs.) Ro3alfnd Itel&trn Cohtmbus Dracula Resurrected Re your article on Dracula IMay 231 may we call your readers attention to a mere historical hero Draeula siands as the symboI and essence of philoso~ phics o£ the East and the West Drae- ula presents the messages of resurrec don Iransmigratlon. rebirth, renewal and immortality Our love of horror fdms and gothic literature brought us to Dracula and the founding of this nation a[ nonprofit society 16 years age. But we, of course, have Iotlg realized Dlac ula's symbe2ie importance in our cutture. Donald A. Reed prdsfd#lll (~ozofg I)racul~ Society Los Angeles You said. regarding Dracula, "Af- ter all, as every vampire watcher knows, Dracula was zapped for all eternity when a stake was driven through his evil heart' Not every vampire walchcr iS so misinformed only those whose knowledge of Dracula is limited, to the various film versions of Brain Stoker's great novel Dracula t1897}. in Stoker's tale. Draeula is destroyed Some low-tar ciIQ+ arettes use artrlicial flavorings, i~ot Iceberg 100's Get Iceberg 100's with onry natural flavorings A little tar, a Iotta ta6te. [+++++r°++++ O~minal That Cigarette Smoki~ Is Oanoerous to Your Health. ~ per d~e N ~TC m~0d
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Advertisement Information: a resource that helping us manage our other resources better. World population is increasing at more than 200,000 every day. It is expected to double in the next 25 years. Where will the additional food come from? What of the other resources needed to sustain economic growth and provide a better life for the individual on this shrinking planet? The supply of many of our resources is finite, and our rate of use, alarming. For example, consumption of mineral resources has been soaring throughout the world.This country alone has consumed more minerals and mineral fuels in the last 30 years than all o{ mankind used in all previous history. Finding new deposits of these finite resources-and, where possible, de- veloping alternate sources-must obviously go hand it~ hand with more careful management of what we consume. Supplies of rep!enishab!e resources-food, fibers, timber-can fortunately be expanded by human efforL but t~e required scale of increase poses an awesome challenge. Most critical of all, the sustaining resources of life itself-air, water and land-must be protected from mounting dangers in our ever more crowded, more industrialized world. in the struggle to manage our resources more effectively, information is proving to be an immensely valuable ally. Thanks to rapidly advancing information technology, it has become a vital resource in its own ~ight,~ Informatioll is the essence of IgM's business: providing products to record it, process it, communicate it, store it, and retrieve it. Computers ar~ being used in the effort to locate new sources of oil, gas and minerals. They are being used to explore ways to apply solar and geotherma] energy, to maximize hydroelectric power output and to reduce energy consump- tio~l in buildings without sacrificing comfort or safety, t Computers are processing information about soil chemistry, climate, pest resistance and plant genetics-helping in the campaign to produce mote abundant food crops. They are aiding in smog control, investigating ozone depletion, con- tributing to improved water purification. There are many other examples. All, like these, have been made possible by innovation in information technology. Clearly, better management through modern information technology is only part of the solution to our resource problems. But it is an important part. 18M will continue to advance technology in many areas to develop better ways to help people use the vital and productive resource called information.
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OfallmenthollO0§: Iceberg lOfts are lowest! Some low tar cigare~es use artificial flav#d ngs. Not Iceberg 100's. Get Iceberg 100's with only natural flavorings A little tar, a Iotta taste. Warning: The Surgeon General Has gelelreined That Cigarette Smoking Is D81gorou$ to Your Health. 4 mg "t~' 04 rag.nicotine &u, ~r ¢ig.te ~tq L~, FI; i~zthad MOTOR SlPOm'lr $ ,~oqun~ more prepared to win it than I am. Ev- erything I do, eat, think and breathe is directed at that. It has reached the point of ob~&s~on." Whatever its drawbacks may be, Chee- rer's sing[e-minded life-style seems to ix paying off. He has I~en approached by several Formula l teams and feels almost certain that the right offer will come along before the Italian GIaad prix at Monza on Sept. II. He would like very much to race there, and at the U.S. Grand Prix at Watkins GIen this October. For- mer world champion Jackal Stewart, who c-~an e up through Formula It on his way to winning the title tkree times (1969. '71 and '73). believes Cheerer is at a crit- ical!~rlod in his career. "Eddie is one of five young drivers in Formula II with considerable potential," says Stewart. "But the step from Formu- M 11 to Formula I is a difficult one. and many go~d drivers don't make it." Stew- art says that of those five top Formula ]l drivers, two may have already "mined their careers" by signing too quickly with wrong racing teams just for the chance to drive in Formula L "Many promising careers have been destroyed by ill-cho- sen affiliations," he says. "This is a very crucial time for a goad young driver be~ cause there Ere a lot of people who would like to take advantage of him. There are only a bandthi of really good drivers in the world, and tile attrition rate in For- main I is tremendously high. If he is con- fident of his ability, the best thing he cart do is wait for the tight factory team to name along." For the moment. Cheerer has enough en his mind and hands jost battling fox the Fornlula lI championship. He is sex.= end in the standings, in the ntidst of a fu= rious struggle with point leader RenE Ar- noux, 24, Didier Pironi, 22, and 23 year- old Riceardo Patres¢. With six of 14 races rim. only 1 i points currentty separate the four rivals. But Cheerer's jump to For- mula 1 does not hinge solely on his talc ing the title. His performances thus far have been impressive enough to make that move almost a ear talnry. "The Ralt- BMW is not a car that is complementary to Cheerer's driving style," notes Stew art "He drives a very agg~ssive mac. and he's not afraid to manhandle the ear when it's giving him problems." Tbes~ days those are the least of Eddic Cheever's problems Handling his vaulting ambition may take a bit more finesse 5~ OfallfilterlOOh: Lucky lofts are lowest! Only g. Some Io~tar cigarettes use artttictal flavorings Not Lucky I Off& Get Lucky 100's with only natural flavorings. A little tar; a tatta taste. Wamin~= ~e Su~Jwn General Has Is [Jangemus to 'four Health, Determined That £3garelte Srnoldn~ av per ~9~Iettq b, FTC mettmr*
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I.mlt year PaJ~vsky Ironed a $500,~plate dirmer at home fur Cmndldate Car t iw. "fl~ pa~MLIG he a WadlOL BIOCONTINUED as Well as his abortive Involvement with George McGovern {disgusted with MC- Govarn's "incompetence," PalevSky walked out of the 1972 Democratic Convention) and his recent disaf faction with Los Angele~ Mayor Tom ~radley, whose first Successful campaign he had run in 1973. has saddled Palevsk~' wffh a reputation as a manipulator. "His money is used a~ a stick and as a threat." says another Democratic ac* tiv~st. "He is terribly impatient with people who don't see the Ionic OI ~s arguments." On the other hand. Palevsky'sinter- est In risky, unpopular causes and hi= personal ser~e? Only a lot of second- rate guys wo.]d resent 'dlat." Palevsky's dr[re collidec~wjth his mortality five years ago. when he walked off a tennis court to discover thst the ma/n a~tery ~ ~s ~eart was 97 percent clogged. Four hours of open= head surgeW followed. Within two years the arter~ had closed again and this time he barely escaped death. The experler~ce turned him JntroapectJve and also heightened his sense of living for the moment. Months after the f~mt ope~at fen, he married his present wife, Lynda, a strik- ingly attractive Los Angeles tchool* fr 9quent unheralded generosity (he gut teacher 20 years his junior. ~ey have four of his brother's children through a 3~year-old boy. Lysda Paleysky re- college)haveearnedbJmasmaIJbut ft~sespressJnterv~ew&Butit~ems lOyal band of admirers. "Thera are ~aP~arent that five Years later the 10 people I'd trust in an impodant cam- marriage is working Well. "i'm paign or a persona( crisis ¢a~irLg for vQry marr fed." ~ays Max. "lIove honesty arid smarts~-and Max is one my wife." of them." says David G6rth. a cranny ~ He is raiaxed these days. His corn- New York peliticlU consultant who ~ peOy has no ~ms curl~entLy in worked with P~evsky in the Bradley ! Production, it's off-season politically. car~peJgn,"Sowbatlfhemak~sh~s at>dPaleVskyha~}ustcornefromaone- money work for him in an emotional. • month "health cure" ~t the grit]kin . CON11PtUED OH pAGE 9g 94
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Ohllfilter 100 : Lucky lO0's are lowest! t [n 1969 Xerox, seek!rig to penetrate the computer field, approached $DS. Within days the deal was made. A com- pany bankrolled for $1 million eight years earlier sold for $940 million. (Xe- rox later dumped its computer operation at an $84.4 mi[lion Ices. Pa- levsky later commented, "Its manage- ment didn't know how to run lean and c~t corners ...') Palevsky's nostalgia for that brief era is like a football hero reliving the big game. It clearly stands as the most fu[fllling time of his life. Not unexpect- edly, it played havoc with hie marriage --the Palevskys had two children but divorced In 1969. For Max, the world had taken on nGw t exture-,-iik8 Dorothy in Oz, it was sud denly Technicolor, unfamiliar and probably a little scary, Superrich and a bachelor, Palevsky plunged into the L,A. scene, ~e took up tennis, sporty clothes, pot smoking; he had a toupee made to order, he befriended movie stars in the Warren Beatty set He had a brief, unhappy marriage to a UCLA ceed. "mher FJ' s an enor moue soci~,l aft xlety among people who are upwardly mo- bile," he recalls. "That whole business of starting ordinary and suddenly being thrown into a 91tu~+tion where you don't know the rulea--the price is eTior mou$." Seeking ot~tlets for his energies mend anxieties~Palovsky expanded into politics, publishing and films fin- vesting in Marjoe and St~ te of Siege} In 1970 he bailed out the f~Lltering Roll- ing Stone magazine, put it on firm f coting and remaln9 its chief stockhold- er. Less successful was his effort to angel the weekly tabloid LA, which fold* ed after six months when he abruptly Withdrew his money. This experience, CONTLNUED 4mg. Some low-tar cilgaarettes use ar tir~ial flavodngs ix~t Lucky 100's Get Lucky 100's with only natural flavorings. A {gtEe tee a Iotta taste. Warning= The S=geon Ger~r~l Has 0etermined Th~ Cigaretxe gmo]dn9 Is U~nger~JS to Your Health. 4 reg.'Jar'. 0.4 m9. nir~d~e ~. per doa~cte ~ FTC meti~d 93
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Of all menthol 100§: ImoVtho .ed op bo,o. °ucbtordb,° compromises," Iceberg lofts &re lowest! "Contr or' and "compromise" are the operative words. Palevsky likes the former end Is Impatient with the latter. There is a quality of icy self-assurance about him that turns many off, Re can be argumentative and arrogant. In Califor- nia, where more than anywhere except New York money I8 power, Pa- levsky is respected and somegmes feared, but not universally loved, or even liked. "There's a deep-seated petulance and hostility about Max that he's never been able to f&ce up to," °aye a non- admirer, an L.A. Democrat. "A discussion with Max invariably be- comes a hostile confrontation." Pa]evsky acknowledges some of this. "Anybody with power--from mon- ey, from running a large corporation, from whatever source in this society think it's corrupting. And I have a certain natural propensity that way, There is a part of me that's very abrup and impatient. But if I'm impatient with others, I'm certainly impatient with myself.*' f~ and Max palevsky we¢~ en hand at it's clear that Palevsky has spent ~- _ ~ patty k11973 ¢e~ tl~ Yi¢t=3f good deal n f time in self-reflection (he's of Lo= ~ele= Mayor l~¢aa= BPa~. Vied several therapies). What emerges ~rl'~ low-tar cilg~arettes Us~ artificial flavorings, not Iceberg 100's. Get Iceberg 10ffs with only natural flavorings. A Iittle tar, a Iotta taste. Warning= The Surgmn thneml Has Determined ]'nat Cigar~ze Smdking I~ thngerous t0 Your thakh. 4 mo."la~, ~,4 mS, mo~ne 92 I= a man reexamining his verses, his ambivalence about wealth add power. a man looking to his roots. They are buried In the old country. . in the ghettos of Eastern Europe and Russia from which his parents es- caped: They settled in Chicago, where Isadore Palevsky eked out a living as a house painter. "1 wanted nothing more than to get away from that house. to become something different from what my parents were~poor, ignorant people who didn't understand Amedca, didn't understand the world. The ten- sion between my home and the world I lived in gives me the terrific drive I've had." His older brother, Harry, now a nu- clear physicist, remembers how Max refused to attend the high schoolln their lower-income neighborhood. In- stead he took the trouble to get a spec[at permit and bus pass to a school in a better section. At first the way out seemed to be the traditional one for immigrant Jewish of fspring--~aeademia. After a stint in the Air Corps in World War II, Palevsky studied mat hematics, engi- neering, economics, philosophy and logic. Then he went to UCLA to work toward a doctorate In philosophy. He met his first wife, Joan, there. At the age of 27, he suddenly found him- self sick of universities. After hearing a lecture on the infant science of com- puters, Patavsky quit school in 1951 without getting his Ph.D. and took a $100*a-week Job designing computers for the Bendix Corp. There, and later at Packard-Belh Palevsky did his ap- prenticeship. "1 have this feel for technology and the market," he says. "At that time, nobOdy had thought of a small computer, not IBM or any of those people. We built the first one." In those years the F'alevskys lived modestly in a small apartment. Their first child. Nicholas, slept for a few days in a bureau drawer until the crib ar- rived. In 1961 Palevsky was ready to go Independent, With $1 million from a group of Wall Street investors, he cre- ated Scientific Data Systems. "For the first time in my life, I found that J was perfectly suited to what I was do In g," he recalls, his voice filling with remembered excitement. "~ loved it. I worked 18 hours a day, seven days a week. That enormous energy I had sud denly blossomed, it was Just a terrific tl~e."
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~r, lrma The more you look, ....... ...................... the more you likt
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Of all menthollO0§: Iceberg lofts are lowest! Only " 4mg. Lag. THELAW OfallfilterlO0~: Lucky 10' Os Some Iow4ar cigareltes use ar~iffcia( flavorings, Not Lucky ~OOs Get Lucky I O0's with only natural flavorings• A little tar, a tetra taste De~r~ed ~T~I Ciga~e Smekir~ [
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MOTOR SPORTS/Sam Moses Runn/ng fast and funous t 'Nil] not come aS a sho?k to m~tor that this was to he the year's lies[ race Lacing fans to hear that A. J. Foyt is The lead changed 20 times and there known as a man nr mercurial temper, were always two or more cars dicing When last we left A.J., he was wreathed for the front sp~0t. Andretti was up (start- in both flowers and smiles, having won ing from the front row) and down {in the Indianapolis 500 for a record fourth last place, half a lap behind the fie]dl time. Not far away was the driver who and up again.while Sneva held a smooth. had starled from the Indy pole position steady pace. easing into the lead at Lap and finished second to Foyt. a comer by 162 and fighting them off the rest of the name of Tom Sneva, the way home. Now advance the scene to last Sun-And what of Foyt? He dropped out day afternoon at the pocono Internati¢~: =~n hi~ q ] 9th lap wiih a burned piston al Raceway. a lovely 2,5-mile track in and was relegated to lSth place when the leafy Ibolhillsoutsid¢ Allentown. Pa. the race was over, which seemed to This time it is Sneva who is all smiles, end his week on as grouchy a note as it having achieved three notable successes: had begun. he won the Pocono 500; he took over On Tuesday. the opening day of prac- the lead in the USAC championship dee. AJ. kept his Coyote in the garage, standings: and he outraeed the man who a strategy that did nothing to curb a ru- had beaten him at the Brickyard. mar that he wasn't going to race at all Sneva also proved something to his In fact. Foyt added his own touch to the boss Roger Penske, a theory he had been story by claiming that an unknown rook- t~,ying to.sell Eenske for more than a year: ie by t he name of Sam Houston was going he knows what he's doing In winning at to drive the Coyote. Pccono, Sneva demonstrated he had the ~ost folks Close io the race were con- experience Penske often thought he had lacked last year by lapping the entire field except for teammate Maria Andretli, whose second-place finish made it a one- two Penske sweep Near the end of last ~eason. Penske had added the more eelehraled Andreltl to what had been a one-man tSneva) team and then had benched Sneva in fa- vor of Andretti for the last two races of the year. But this s~ason it is a two+man show all the way, and as Sneva says "They're beginhing In trust me." With reason. In addition to the pole and second place at Indianapolis, Sneva has won two races this yeaL and chanc- es are Penske will be trusting him more often from now on, especially because the race setup for the winning blue and- yellow Norton Spirit had been suggested by Sneva. In addition to being the prettiest. Pc~ono is one of the most interesting Pomona Winner Tom Sneva was cooJon tracks on the USAC circuit. The sur- the track, and A ~ Foyt was hot unde~ ~ race is bampy--"well, it's O.K a'~ long " the collar in their 500-mile contest as you don't put your tongue between your moth," said Andretli~nd shaped like a triangle with rounded canters. ][-ram the start, it also became evident vineed that Foyt wfls holding out for ap- ixaran¢¢ money from Dr. Joseph Mat- tiolL the Peml~lvania dentist-race {an who owns Poeono. But that wasn't the case. Mattloll insisted. "AJ. has never made a demand on me.*' he said '+He~ never asked m¢ for deal money and I've never discussed it ~ith him. We want him here. He~s a wonderfo] pemon and h¢~ beert v¢~ gOOd to me." But there was more on Foyt's mind than whether or not he got deal, or ap- pearance+ money. Last March. just after the Ph~nix 150~ Foyt had grabbed John- ny Rutherford's crew chief. Tyler Alex ande~ by the collar, shaking him vigor- ously while accusing him of ordefing Rutherford to block him on the racetrack Rutherford's meLaren team is sponsored by First National City Bank Travelers Cheeks. That concern is a pr~ducl ofC¸ ti¢orp, sponsor of tbe USAC champ ship series, Fred S~eeher, presldenl tieorp Services Inc and one of 11 powerful men in racing by vlr~ control of the purse strings. ' all pleased with Foyt's pugne er e~lled Foyt's sponsor. • and suggested that he '+vr 52
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UnmvJted McEnl~ ~ al, qo made t~unc# of eight make she qvatters No phyer obliged to earn a place in the tournament by qualifying had ever reached the quarter- finals in the 52 yeats siove that pmce durc was initiated. "Who is this McEnroc and how old is he?" one re cotter shouted~ followlng an other upset by the New Yorker. ~Shanty Irish from Queens," was the reply. 'LHe's 12." Before Tracy and Everl took the Cen- tre Court at 5:15 p.m. last Friday (you might retail that used to be just after llap time thr children), nobody gave TPacy much of a chance. "One game," sa~d Pat ]]ostrom. an- other tour player. "I pract]¢nd with Tracy. She's not ready for grass." "The kid is cute, but she's just here to the ropes." said Kristien Kemmer . who phys for the WTT Phoenix ~ts. "Chiis is here to smash peo- ! ~J3d love." locker room King told Evett she would know how Billie when Chris was a 17 year- old beloved by all. Chris replied that she had to convince herself it wasn't her 9- year-old sister Clare on the other side of the net. Except for the first game of the ma~cb and the I ]th, EverL Was in control oftbo classroom, After teaching Tracy how to curtsy ~o the Royal Box, Chris taught her a valuab]e ]es,s,s,s,s,s,s,s,s,sson in power, depth, con- cealment and ~Ollch on the drop shoL about 400 of which she employed te win 61, 6-1 in 49 minute~. Strangely e~ough, for what reads like yot2~ basic Evcrt m~ac~, the match Wfl$ tatlt arid much closer than expcetnd. Chris wen only 62% of the points, 61 to 38. Eight of the 14 games went to deuce and among the other six were Tracy's ~wo succ~sfu] servlc~ games, Wthch she won at 30 and 15. Tracy 31so had seven b~cak points in foot separate ~me~ agul]lSl Everl's s~£vc, most of which she gave 8way thFo~h errors 0n So.fee ~tllrn$. "1 felt sick to my stomach the mo ment I ~tep~d oB the court." Chris said afterward¸ "I guess it was nerves and ~en- ~thn and the crowd pullirxg for her Tra- cy's got more vaticty than I had at ]4. M~ybe 13ervo]]eys 3re 'oettcr than already [Austin won the Ilth game by rushiog the net four times]¸ But [ never felt threatened. Hah! I sound so bumble. This w~ my touE, kest match, emotthll- ally. Compared to this. playing Bil]ie Jean will be a piece of cake. It's funny. I looked over and felt ~or Tl~cy, I wondered what she'll be like at 22. Will she be able to take the pressure?" Facing a mass of rcpoltcrs. Tracy said she h~ never seen so many people and she land bad loads of fuc and she would like to do it all over again because Wim- bledon was ~pecm!---"all the tradition arid slEl~" It remains to be ~een how good Tr3cy will be, Evert herself said we all must w~il, ~nd Ted Tinlltlg. the lel3nis-dress desigller, even pinpointed t~le yea~ "Six*~een," be ~aid. "Give Tracy until she's [6, when tile sotll takes over and tb~ child either refutes her training or ad- vances t owal~d grealne~ Ri~t now ~b~'~ just a puppet, All [4-year-olds are pup- l~ets oil s£rin~.'~ Tilat eou]d he. But ill las~ week's b~taql~c moment at Wimbledon, Amer- ica's new tenths puppet looked e~pable of cutting he," strings very quickly, i~m Ofall!ilter 100 : Lucky Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings. Not Lucky 1 O0's. Get Lucky 100's with only nataraJ flavorings. A little tar, a Iotta taste, Warning: The SurQem f~neral Has De.mined ]bat Cigarme Sm~dn9 Is DBng~r~JS to YO~C H~J~I, 4 mg.'~t', 0.4 m O. r~erne av. per Ii[emlte by FTC ~le~d 51
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he arrived in Great Britain at 6:30 Soil a nd~erably enid and laJny morn- ing, but two dozen reporters and pho tographers were there to meet her any- way. During the following week she was given official escorts and the kind of at- tention reserved for personages. Then on the big day, her picture was splashed across several columns on the front pages of London's three most distinguished dai- lies. The Times caption began: RESTING BEFORE I~IE ORDEAL.... The marvelous saga of Traey Austin had wound its way to Wimbledon. Over the 100 years of the lawn lennis championships of the All England club, there never had been anyone quite llke 7racy Austin. The debuts of Evonne G{mlagong (at 19) and of Chris Even (at 17) had been noteworthy and charming. Lottie Dud had won the tournament back in 1887. after the invention of strawber des but before the founding of the BBC, and she was only 15. But their appear- ances paled before that of Austin And her braces. And her pigtails. And her size 6½ feet. And her cute little bib and-tucker Disney World waitress pin- afores. And, of course, her age. "Fourteem" Chris Evert sighed one day, letting it sink in "Eight years young- er than me, Etght years!" When the Pall England club rescinded its hoary age rule that competitors had to be at l~st 16, Jt was considered some kind of public-relatlons gimmick to cap- itaBze on Austin's pubhcity, or to add much-needed interest to the women's draw, or to placate Captain Kangaroo or something. Though the club had a legit imate excuse because of her precocious achievements, it is doubt fu] that even the blue-blazered fathers of Wimbledon had any idea how well the kid could play Last winter, following her vletory al Portland on ~he Avon futures circuit, Tracy left Dapple Gray SChool in Roil- ing Hills, Calif. during show-arid-tell pe- rlod to go up to the big league wllere she won four matches in four Virginia Slims tournaments, including defeats of Greer Stevens, the lop-ranked woman in South Afric~ and Dianne FromhoItz~ eighth ranked in ~he world. Twice she extend- ed Rosie Casals. who was forced to stop hitting ground strokes and resorted to dr~p 5hotq to wear Trflcy down. TENNIS/CUfF/Kirkpatrick First she curtsied, then she bowed Be/ore their match, Chris Evert taught 14-year-old Tracy Austin, the darling o! Wimbledon, how to bob be/ore the Royal Box, then gave her a tesson in the game Like Evert back in her bassinet day~, The British were eapdvated with Tra- Tracy is all steely concentration and dou- ey. She seemed so fresh, bdghL unaffect- b]e-fisted backhands, Unlike Evert, she ed, cooperative, polite, outrageously spurns long rallies to go for the big win- nice---and had such a wonderful metal- ~ nets. She loves to charge the net search- lie sm]le~that everyone wished her well ingforvolleyopportunities, whicbisnot and predicted supedative things. More only rare for a girl of such tender years to the point, with women's tennis in butalscfairlydangerousffiranyonewho, its parlous state--Goolagong-Cawley a at 4' I1", 90 pounds, just makes it over new mother, Margaret Courl an old thetapewilhberno~e, mother, ffillie Jean King aging,, Everl ~ndnued Alto• Eve~ beat A us/to 6- I, 6 L she sa~ #hat Tra¢7 m/ght ~ lready b~ ~ betl~t golte/er than ~ha 49
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OfailmentMlOOk Iceberg lO0's are lowest! ...qo ff~ ,LOt." hd( ~gst',8~es U6~ artificial flavorings Not Iceberg 100'~. Gel Iceberg 100's with only natural flavorings. A little tar, a Iotta taste IWaming~ Yhe Surgeon General Has Daatn~/T~ar C~tene 3m~ Is Dal~leroos to Your Health. coalinue# cy's meeting with Evert could have any ill effects, she answe~d like a UalC bOx- ing man~ge~ "1 was hoping not to face Cliffs yet," she said¸ "It's too soon. ~ut if Tracy gets crushed, it might show her h(~w much work site needs She mi~at think, 'Lo~k, kid, you get all this pub- lialty, but you aren't that good.' " For Tra~y's first raatch al Wimbledtm. a~ain~ EII~ Vesims-Appel of The Neth- ~allt~, her too(her, faific¢~ g~andmo ther, Coach Robert Lansdorp and 27-year-old sister pare settled in with the crowd, ~ix row~ deep, arc~.'~d court No. 7, ~tzu~c~ in the middle of Wimbledon'~ 14-corot complex, 14or three older tetm~s-playing b~t hers were b~k home. b~ they would, imvc been proud of TracY's 6-3, 6-3 victory, which seemed little mo~ than a ca~e of a Rewe[¢ss baby taking can- aow, sqttitt? Why don't you go home and play with Ra~edy Ann." Lansdorp did uot think his pupil had played well and he told im~ so. "She's still fighting the bounce off this grass," he ~id, "but the herdest purl now is wait- ing for Evert. It'S ]ihe death r o~." Tr aey'~ performance was not the only American surprise. ~ne Smith, 18, took King t~ tlltee ~t$, and a tlio of youo4 A~lerlcai] ~/lcn threatened t~ tur~ ~e toutnam¢~ inlo a kiddie Wimbledon. Tim Gullikson, 25, imoeked off eighth seed Rail R~lhitez ~fotc k~ir~ to PI~J/ Dent. Billy Martin, 20, rcaabed lhe quar- terfinals by elimit~aung 14th seed Mark Co~. M~t surpimin$ of all, 18-year-old John McEnr~, who bad had to win tllre¢ qualifying matches j~t to get into the Wilnblcdota lineup, heat Sandy Mayer to 4 ~,'tB¢' 04 mg nicofinB ~. pB[ C~aI~TtB ~ F[C method 5O
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OfallfilterlOOk Lucky lofts are lowest! Only Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings Not Lucky 100s Get Lucky 100's with only natural gavorings A lillle la~ a Iotta laste Wahang: The ~gl~Sfi[1 BBlq~la[ ~8S Determined Tfiat Cigare~ie Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Heath. 4 mg -lal" D4 mg ~¢otmB av pet 6gmxte by FIC method ¢INllV.A sweet-faced youth (Timothy Bottoms) hirki~ ground the wide SCT¢cn has got more On his mind than cotton ~ndy. He is a hishly iatelhgent psychopath who g¢ts at l¢ast as much fun out of mak- ing the cops Icok like fools as he do~ out of malting thrill lides ev~ mo~ thrilling than they were intended to be, It is only a matter of trine--too much time. as things turn out--before he is apprehended Writers Lcvin~n ~d Link develop a few pl~] t comr~ly hils involv~lg ~- gal's status as a divol~eai father who is trying hard to control his cigarette hab- it but not hard enough tc controt his fasl lip~ They ~ de~i~ a ~ice, sThw- moden chase between S~a] aM Bot- toms ha one of l~ amll~ClTlellt ]~ks where the film was shot. This ma{erlal Ofallmentho!lO0 : Iceberg lofts are SCENE FRO14 ffOLt££COASTE£ Chlckenhearfed al the firth. J. is at least mildly amusing, and affords excuses for Old Pros Henry Fonda and Richard Widmsrk Lo eor~ on irascibb~. The trouble is that ~e~writ ers could not talk anybody into letting them blow ously threaten one, for the climax SO the movie just sorl of peters out as ev- erybody chases about at Los Angeles" Magic Mou~taSn park. Could~l't hero aRd villain at least have wr~t[ed arot~d up there atop the scary Magic Moun- tain coas~r? W~F did ~ey bring Scga£s daughter near the ride if they were not g~Th~g to put her on it and thus halO thrillhag jeopardy? There is something chickenhearted about this backing away 5~m the sc~t of big fimsh that pictures like this im- pllcifly promise 0~¢ cannot help thmk- ing that the producers were afl~d of malong draraa too strong for the family audiences that PG ratings pull in, The resukt, however, is a film of small ap- peal to any audlenee RichardSehlckgl Some low-tar cigarettes use ariificialflavorings Not Iceberg lO0's Get Iceberg 100's with only natura[ flavorings A liitle ta~ a Iott~ taste. Walnhg: The Surgeoa General Has Oetermined That Cigarette Smohng Is gas~s to YOU[ Health. 4 rag. "lap. 0 4 mg ni~li~ av pEl ~19~ r ~m ~ ~C mIIMd
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ran Tarkemon, that revered Geor- F gian, stood smiling and expectant in the Atlanta a~rpor t last week as a group of fans appeared to surge toward him. HIS expresslon turned to puzzlement ~s the crowd rushed by, unseeing, to greet instead a skinny, bearded man. Lasse Vi- ten, Finland's double gold-medal winner at Montreal, had come to run in Atlan- ta's Peachtree Road Race, and the air- port mob SCene was a taste of what was to occur two days later when Viren was one of 6,000 who competed on a sultry Fourth of July morning. That throng, and others llke it recently in San Francisco (12.000) and Chicago (5,300), attest to the vigor of the road-runfong boom. Atianta's race, 10,000 meters over the hiUs of Peachtree Stree/ ~nto the clty~s center, attracted the best field of the year, Viren wouM meet Frank Shorter and Bill Rodgers for the fast time since the Olympics. Defending champion Don Kardong of Spokane, who finished fourth in the Montreal marathon, was back, as was Atlanta Olympian Jeff Galloway, through whose cajoling these worl&c/a~s runners had assembled. The most trav- eled contender was England's Chris Stewart, an antique dealer who had run road races earlier this year in Brazil, Puerto Rico, Iran, Afghanistan and Mi- lan, Italy, in which an estimated 62.000 runners took pan. "Order wos best kept on the starting line in Teheran," Stew- art said, "They had a tank with a can- non pointed at us," Some attention to order was alsn re- quired in Atlanta. where race organizers promised every entrant an accurate time and place and offered T shirts for those breaking 55 minut~bout a nilt¢ rain- me-mile pace. To keep runners properly sorted out at race's end, 15 sepalate ehut~ were erected, each 80 yards long and designed to let 150 to 200 runner~ tunnel through at a time. An organizers meetmg was held in Galloway's mnnthg- equipment store, an emporium called Phidippides ("The name in running for over 2.400 years"), and all possible ca- tastrophes were considered. "What hap- pens if sorne turkey dies in a chute and we can't clear it?" asked one worrywart. A computer simulation showed that at peak flow as many as 12 runners would cross the finish hne every setmnd. "Twelve per second?" said Galhiway's wife Barbara. "It's going to be like try- ing to put tags on raindrops." ROAD RAC[NG/Kenny Moore A/most too warm for the swarm ed with a good splint into the finish at Central City Park His time was 29:20. six seconds slower than Kard~ng's rec- ord, set on a cooler day. A disgusted Rodgers finished shi seconds back. and Kardong held tifird. Galloway. rmming after a shot of bmazolodnl for a sore hip, pIaced seventh, and Stev*art outkicked Vimn for eighth. "I had no idea those hilts wonld be so hard," said the Finn. Be- hind them came a thickening torrent of runr~tts. Peg NcppeL the world-record hold~ at I0,00D meters, was the first woman in, at 36:00, "I'm glad 1 was hid- den in ell the~e men," she said, "became Frank Shorter beat the h~at and 5,099 I was running like a grandmother." rivals over the hills of Poachttee Street Half a mile from the finish, a man with a number, obviously fresh and bent o~? cheating, came out of a side street to join Orl race day dawn mists rose ~owly be- the pack~ Members of the crowd grabbed neath the July sun, leaving the aB dense and held him until the time for winmng whh vapor. Frank Shorter, in drowsy~ a Tsbirt had passed. A mannamed Ed- good spirits, slipped from his bed in the die Murphy towed his yea~old son, Galloway home. skipped breakfast and, climbing into a car, pawed through a plastic sack. "One right shee, one ieR shee," he said. "O.K. we can go." Rid ing to the house where Viren was stay- ing, Shorter spoke of the 20-1dlometer race be had won in Chicago the day be- fore: "A truck driver ~n an ~dj~cenr~x- pressway watched the race and not tbe road" he said, betraying the runner's an- tipathy toward vehicles. "Terrific three. car pileup." Then Viren got in the ear and he and Shorter compared tendon and [o~t in2nties. "[ ha~ en,t got your seal~." ~aid Shorter."but feel this lump¸'* At the starl~ the best ]nnfl~rs were seeded into the front row~ Visen, glanc- ing over his shoukler at the mmTnuring ma~s. took a position in the center of the road. When foe gun sounded, he sprint- ed out hard--too hard, he would¸ gay later¸ After a downhill miIe Ireland's Ed Leddy was in front in 4:15, with Short- er, Kardong, Redgers and Viren dose be- hind. After three miles Shorter and Rodg- er~ had drawn away from a dizzy, heat- slowed pa~. The temperatlI[e wo$ now in the 80s and climbing. Rodgers dearly wanted to win. "Here I was fresh and Frank had run a hard 20 kilometer yesterday." he said. "It really irritated me that he shouldn't seem tired." Rodgers clung to Shorter on the uphiIIs and passed him on the descents. but up tbe last hell-mile hill into Mat- garet Mitchell Square. Shorter pulled Omari. the length of the course on a pil- low in a lkda red wagon. When he turned to pick the boy up at the finish, he found him blissfully sieepithg. A~ the e/lutes filled, a few runnct~ be- gan to drop of heat prostration. Cluslers of onlookers formed around the fallen. soberl~watehing medlcel attendants pack them in ice and administer saline so- BRiola. Sirens wailed as the most serious of the 60 victims, one with a temper- ature of 107~, were taken to a nearby hos- pisai. No one dlad, but had the race been five ot 10 kilometers longer. Someone would have. Therein lies the peal of the running boom. L'As road racing becomes the thing to de." said Galloway, "there al~ more and more people enterlllg un- prepared, often because of a bet ha a bar the day before." Race Director Bill Ncaee listened the elrcng attd prayed that every rUlmer would survive. "How do you limit this kind of field.*" he naked. "How do you identify the ones who aren't prepared?" In the akternccn, when it appeared that the WOl'St vlcflms were out of danger, a I¢- lievcd Neae~ declared, "Next year there might be two ra~s---one at eight o'clock for the mob, one an hour later for the erem~x That way the majority c0a be fin- ishad and cool and see the world-class iqlml~r$ [a~.)) Shorter considered that fair enough. "Much better." he said, "than us watch- ing them die before breakfasL" M 48
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the ~beraeed M~n Lelo was chain- ~moking Saratogas. The rtmtch starzad late. Washington was playing not in Washington but in a ¢aloictia at George Mason University in Falrf'ax, "Ca. There was only a puy phone~ ~zJ their opponent had had lo place tlm call Ihe Threat~ had got through, bu[ the Plomher~ were having problems. There was a noisy juke- box nearby *rod there was some dltl/cl~l- ty getting thclr eh¢~boards and clocks Out Of storage. Leln, with a rating of 2,518, was p~ay- i~g first board for New York¸ Against him was Mark Diesen, a 19-year-nid frora Potomac, Md who last winter bceat~le the first Am~r fean irt 20 yeal's to win the World Junior Champ~onshlp His rating was 2,428¸ r~ New Yoth¢rs were h~h- er r~ted ~/I rke way down the Ihie, t~su a~, ~'~ ~,urK~ 10~ points, bat Washln~- tort hahn t lost a r~ateh in the league's two ~easons and had done w¢lI ag~hist higher rated teams~ At board six for the Plumhers was the Cat Man of Washington, Robert Eher- ]eln Though barely a master at 2,206, he had severt witis atxd a draw in /eagt/¢ play in 1976~ an amazing performance tice of bringing his two Si~m~,e cats t~ matches, They like to leap up on his tu- bfe, SOlltctim~s $t~oliJrt~ OVer the ehe~5- b~ard and reducing the whole position to rubble The toLh~i1Rment ioom ill ~anh~tt~l~ Was $om¢ ,,~h~t Cfes~r to p~o~)er chess ~i~- bi~n¢¢. The walls were ~stoolled w~sh portraits Of chess immortals ~rom P~ul Morphy (1837-1884) t~ Be~by Fischer. In otle Corller, a [3 ye~r-nid prodigy hemmed Joel Benjamin sat ~ayfeg an adult, while ~ the oulel" room, his moda- ~ah plctatres to club members. Skinny kids in l~Ofe shirts a~d sneaker~ playing against aduhe is something of a club tra- ditiort. Fischer ~taried it years ago. At times, more Of the faos were watchJtlg Re~jambr*s game than were walching the league p[ayels The first game to take definite sha!0e wa~ o~ fourth board, wb~re #,t~y ~I [is, ail irlter~latJolll~l rrtust~r and a l~ew~ paper reporter, was pla~ing Bill H~c~k, a toaster. Hook ~s the Plumbers' ca~0- taln, which is wh~ the Threats refer to brm as Cal~t~in Hook. The Captain h~ad developed his pieces too slowly in the Gpenlng and was paying for it. Solth only4mg, tar. LuckyiO0 .
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Of all menthol 100 : First Iow-lar with no fake flavormgs. First iO0 s with only 4mg. tar. ~ continued came from Bill Ginchhar$, a plump man of 34 with black-rimmed glasses and a deceptively phlegmatic mien. A fair country chess player hlmseif (2,336), Goishherg has chiefly been interested for the ~t dozen yean, in organizing [oul3lam~lltS and compctitinns of varioL~ sorts. As a member of the Chess Fed- etation policy board in 1975 he pro- posed rile world's tirst tcl~phonis cha~ league. The board approved and voted "m spend ~,~,~i) ~a lot of mone~ in chess} for a first season with Goichberg For his itart, Gdlchherg has hegtm expref.,sing hart feelings and is ta~i~ about going Imck to playing and teach- ing ehe*s. He complains about "a lack of tolaranc6 and under~mndlng" and says the pinyer~ ate too quick to ima0ae "there is ¢itber mass cheating or ram- pant chaos" on the other end of f0e hne when there are merely unavoidable de- lays and bonest errors. For instaace, he says the Phoenix team got mad la~ Fear when its game agalrtht W:lshington was snowed out The Wash- in charge, ington players couldn't make it through An experimental game had earlier the drifts m their communal tcisPhone, b~rt Set up between teams in New "TheyneverhaveanysnewinPhoenin," York and Cleveland, with 10 boards says Goichherg, "and they didn't trader- played. Too many¸ The match w~nt on ~tand what the problem w~" ti?l aboul; d am. "Y'/¢ ¢ompintely am~ ~Tlle~dcene. durin~ a~ National Chass derestimatad the delay," says Goish- I-¢aguematchisusuallyoneofquietmn- berg. The number of hottrds was cut ~ glen. Whatever emotions and cerebra- six, hut scalletimes even that many took dons are beth£ whipped up in~[d¢ foc r¢~ king, "~hat ntlfo *an~ pbort¢ lir~ f~r ~il~a*. pla~crs rcmait~ ir~id¢, t¢ b¢ ¢h~- 12 players, neisd in~ the game. You can ~e the re- VmaUy, the league put in a rule that after 60 lnoves, either player could de- mand an "adjudication." Ia this ritual, the game is stopped and th~ final posi- tion is submitted to an impartial grand master (if one can be found). He must an- lease in the fieme swoop of a player's hand as he sllatches up an enemy plebe and plunks dov, m his own on the sud- dea]y empty square, idl in one mc)tion Whan N~'v York played a critical game against archeival Washington, the continued with each player making foe strongest possible moves. Despite his calm, almost haharglc manner, G'oishharg s~ms to have a tal- ent for b~comlng involved in dlsput~s. Or maybe it's the kind of game chess is that is resllomibl¢. For some rcasOlL the Ne,u Y~ll t~m~, of which (3c;v:laha~g is captain, seems to ha involved in the mole intense fracases in foe is~gue. ColL~ider an incidetlt that aro~ during New York's match with the Wmtfield, N.J. Colonials, a strong team tlmt has been in ~he upper quarter of the standings. It ended with the Jersey players hang- ing lap oll `N~w Y(~fo--whh two games tmresolved--afler outraged cries of 'qr- regularities." Their main ¢omplal~ was that by the end dl" the match only one pe/son was left in "New York to handle all rulme~ and t~ephon~ dutlas, cau~- iltg delay~ longer than Wesffield could endure. But tha underlying problem seemed m be dissatisfaction with Gdlch- hate's adtnlni~tratieaa of%ha l~agq~ ~4 the feeling that he ought ~o run either the New York ~am or the league, but not hath.
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ri¢~as [June 271 as weU as ~'thch... re- moteness from the world and from re- ality." But TIME magazane, lik¢ many others, is reluctant to suggest just what shcnld b¢ do~¢. Might I suggest the fullowh~ 1) pay mere atteauoa to the unofficial but l~- ~timaie black leadership there that is drowned out by ~vemment propagan- da; 2) urge U.S. multinational corpora- tions to raise the wa~s of their black workers, him and fire on nmdt, and in- stitme training programs for midffi¢- 1¢v¢[ and manab.~ment pc~itfuns; 3) cut the hypocrisy and try to merg~ our dip- iomad¢ and economic policies in ~uth Africa. We can no longer "abhor" apart- keid and wink at our ¢orapanics' double- digit returns on iave~tments there, which are the rvsult of the risliculously tow wages paid the Afutcan worker. Arthur Ashe Miami Jimmy and Taxes Re "The Tax Voltmteer" [July 41: Mr. Carter h~ evew ~ht to give the Gover~n,ent $6,000 ffhe so chooses, but he does not have the right to call the girl a tax payment ffhe owes no tax~. D.~ Fielder Webster New York City New Family Doctors The ardule on nvw family d~etors [July 4] was certainly nfisleading to the genera[ public. There is no question that America needs moi¢ family doctm s, ~s- pe~iai]y in rural areas. Unfortunately, many young family ~octors who have had no more Ihan six mortL~ of training in each specialty ¢lnlm to be supe~pecia~ts m all fields. Thei~ fees am s~[dom/c~ver but u.~u ally higher than those of .onsur~eai spedal- ists San L~ndro, Calif. I am thorougMy disgt~ted by our age of speciuli2~taon and tired of being asked by a lc<a[ medical clinic (full of spc- ciffiistsl to diagnose myself. ~iarcah for the fatally practitioners God b]~ 'era and may they prosper! Elizabeth Handy Befult. Wis, There is a pressing ~eed in this coun- try for the kind of welJ-lrained gener~ practhJoners tl~t you describa. Tho~e of m in the busiaeas of training people to be doctors have fuua4 them to be among the most ideafistie and enthusi~tic of irainees. It th©re fur= disturbs me to s~ their specialty and ~.~ described in term~ of econohacs or specialty c.ompctitina, It is cer~dr, Jy not my impm~J~ that the family pl~Ctislone~ are purveyors of "disCount m~iefue" and that they would attempt pro~ulums and substitute therapy for w~c~ they are not trained rIME, JULY 2S. 1977 We welcome their attltadas and applatul the kind of standards they Eave set for the prof.s fum Bob Lanier. h£D ,~an ,qnloMo Jesus as 1he Messiah Yes, there is titer~ly a war ~thg on between Jews and missionary gt~ [JuIy 4]. Although it has only recently' bit the headlines, ~ phenomenon m noffiing new; the ~ewish peopia haw been the fc~ms of pezsistent attempts at c0nversi0n e~er since the advent of ~ty. The JeWiSh answer is to bring every Jew back home to his people. Roy ~ Neuh~g~r North W~dmsre. ~ ¥, I was born into a Jewish home and acoepted Jesus a.s my Messiah at the age of 22. Despite what other Jews might say, I am still a Jew. Bec~ a C~ns- han does not deslfoy your Jewish ulen- tity, it ordy fuffills it. Jaei ~inhauser Rio Ra,who, N. A~e:c. Why ~ltonldn'( young fews, or older ]@w~ for that illat[~r, beco[E~@ C~ if they think this is the way to go? Why S~ldldldldldldldldl~dn't the F~labbahment Prote~L~nts be~0me Or thodox Jew~. if they want to? Fr~om lfue~ On it two-way strut, and the last 1 heard we stir Lad religious freedom in th~cou~t~. Ca~r/~ Damam : I~ .~geles The e~na and paradox of~h¢ so- oailed M¢-~anle Jewa ate that they have apparently repi~ed their c~n (and Je- sus') Judaism, of which ramay seem to be quit~ ignorant, in factor of someoae else's (Pltul's) Christiaaity. Ronnld Rutzky Ric,~ton Park, lfl. I was quoted in the article 'yesh~ Is the M~siah" []nly 4] as l~x~fug gaid that young Jews who bacom¢ cLristians "are not looking for Jewish rap gr~I~. They are lonl~g for God." To pit Jcwi~ rap ~oups a/~aimq Ic~king for God is foolhardy for the ob- vious reason that it haplies that God is no~ to be found inside the rap groups Sl~= ei~cally because they are Jewish, This is no( true. What I did say, and cominue to be- bare, is that many Jewish young peo- ple's spisisual needs are not met in a purely cuItulm] interpretation of the Jew- ish religious t~4iti~n. In this sense, a Jewish rap gl~up does not touch the l¢- ligiously meaulngful core required by to- day~ young people, Donald LaMagdeleine Mundelein, IlL Atldfess Letters tQ TtME. r~e & ~e b~d~ng. R~.kef$1ler Center, New York, N.Y, 10020 Of all filter lOOk /Lucky ll00's Some low-tar cigarettes use artificial flavorings. Not Lucky 100's. Gel Lucky 100's with only naturel flavorings, A liRLe tar, a iatta taste Warning: ~e Surgeon Generar EI~ De~rmined ]hat ~garetze Smoking Is Dgn§~rous ~o You~ HBakh. ev. p~ giga~'~L~ is FTC method I1 lowest!
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0fall menth01100k I J !, Some Iow-lar cigarettes use artificial tlavorings No[Iceberg 100"s Get Iceberg 100'$ with only natural flavorings. A little ta~ a Iotta taste Weming~ Th~ Sulgmn General ffas Delermined That Ci~aelte S~o~ng Is Dangerous to Yt~ur H ~l[h. 4 ~lq. "iar", O~ n~, nicmlo¢ mY }BI ciga;e?Ie bt FIC eet~0d Here Come the Joys of Summer To ~ke Edilors" "Here Comes Summer" iJuly 4] -~¢xcellent! Finally an interesting, ia- ~epth article trial dl~s not discover a [l~w Americ~R p[ob]¢hl, al]i~c~t ol- eaus~ to preach on. Nor does it presont ~. view og Anlerica i~ trite, sugar-co&ted bomilies--~m~ reality, profestfonally apiced with some enjoyable, entertaining and fodivld oal perceptions. Richa, d penek El Granada, Calif. VoBr cover sLo~¢ On stlmr~cr d~- Scribes thetne parks as '.Din at,d fan- ta~y." We have lived in Southera Cal- if~¢nla ~r twelve )qars and watched nearly ¢verytbino° enca~ulat¢ itse]]" within a plastic bubble; not oidy gidm "pop Xanadus" like Universal Stadi0~, but also miniature goffcoarses, ~hopplag ~.ntcrs and finally the AmericaI~ home. Vigartous llvla, g d~es me tip a tree, which, by the way. used to be a gr~at s*o0rce of fun and famasy. So did tid~- lineN, hopscotch and lightning bugs Se~n Die$.o Swimsuits7 One two. three goad strokes and you'd be out of Ibe $~tiL. Hanover N H I would not mind seeing a bit of skfo to refresh my poo~ tired cye~ £rom /he hea~iae~ of daily news But I'¢~ prefer to see some male skin. male stridg bi kiais How about some equal time? Mat i/)~r Tpessel lVaahingt#n. D:C. Fiery Abortion Debate Dollars and-een IS idgic is (¢l*ete~anl ~hen disettssln~ the ~.illful terminatR~n of I~nnlan llr~ I July 41. The laxpayer has spoken I will no longer be an accom- plice to nltlrd¢c. Mor~ money for con- traception, not 1 ¢ more for abortion. ~nn Gvcker Buffal~ J us~iee 'F~urgood Marshall ar*d oth- ~ w~o advoaale aboriloB rather than letting a child llve ia pover~ sbo~ld re- alize that it is better to have lived poor than ilever l~ have lived at all. John ~ L)'do~* Wes¢ Chesler. Pe Abortion can be made illagal, but this simply put~ such operat~n$ into the bands o£ "get rich ql~lak" belchers, id- ~tcad of ¢ompeter~t oh~'sicians. Path Stone . gfabr) ~'een~ille. £C Th~ bes~-Rept secret in the U~. is that abortio~t is legal up to aad inclad- ln~ the ninth month of pregr~ar~cy. Tn 1973 the Svprem¢ Courz said ihat in the I~rsl thr~ rootless algaL~ Call,at rotor7 fete. gn the ~¢orxd tbi'~e mortilas ihey may rcguidt¢, but not prohib~t~ abo~ tides. IB the last three months lhey may prohibiL abet tidr~s in ~be interest of the baby'~ life. Some sr.ates howe~er, allow It?nor tions through idn~ months. Bert) l~Rola New Jersey ltigbe ~o Life C~mmmee l~/e~rfiefd. ~Z A~ti-abortidnists should put Ibem- telves o1~ the line ariel slgn ..lp &t Med- icaid5 cc~t~ to rai~. ~eed. clothe and edt~:at¢ th~ children they wish to "save" After all if they care so much. Ihey wout~f t wlll~L to see %h¢~ children grow Up in hom~s in the sltJms with too little [cod. Or hc~tt Or educat fort--not to irlen- tlon ~ove--would they? Mary Schuhz ~tz Frntlcisco Wome~t ha~e be~n controlled by pregllancy. ~or ¢cltttlrle& Who ueed~ wom¢~t's tiberatlort? All women do[ Ro~e Sot~a Naiional Ot~can~ation ~" Women Miller Proem. iV 1~ If the Government provided its ¢it- }z#/7~ wJI~ aJ~rJlativ¢ birth ¢onlr~9 methods Ifree of charge), ther~ would be fewer abortions¸ E~en the righ~-to-li g- ets would ]iRe that¸ B~verly A. Aima~ Ha~l~ill. Mass. Reality and South Africa Ma~agidg EdilOt ~nry ~ru~lwald certalnly was correcL in descrlblr~ the pervasive fear amont{ white South Af* TIME JU(Y~5,1~77
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. < It's one af tony ways_ wen ta Co~l is one o[ Amerin~l's .ost p]'r,~f~] at ahou' h I~2~) resources I~ been estimaIed our ¢oun~r'f haa enough to meet car n~eds for ~he nex[ three hundred ye ca ,"~ And now it is pocssible to chcmge thi~ abundcmt coc~[ into clean gas energ~ Not the old-lashioned cocd ga~ o{ years ago, hut an alme3st exact copy o[ natural gas, Extremely decm Extremely etlclenl because ii has the same high energy contenl GaS/s t/re cleanestv most efficient way to use AJmerlca~s coal. There ~l~ other ways coal ~an }~e u~ed, cJ course ff can he burned dJre~Z bm lhJs causes pellulion Droblems It can be used to ma~:e e]~ct:dcit~ t~ but conver~ln9" it 1o 9ns is less costly and more elticlent. Turning coal into qa~ provide~ cfl leas~ 25% more u.~olul energy; The gas mduslrf ~nd government crre worhng together on many coal ga~ication research prolects. Ga~ made from coc~l is one way we can help meet our country's {uinr~ energy needs Getting more gas ean't wait any longer. The gas industry has ~ long list of other supply proiects--like acean drfllLng, Arcde drilling, and ~por~ng liquefied natural gas. But much of this work w~its on the tough energy declsians America must make ~n pricing, offshore drilling le~ses, new financing affemat~ves Mecmwh/le, it wilI help if we ~ll conser~ gas in our homes and businesses Conserve gas. AI~"~" t~
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Of all menthol 100k First low-tar with no fake flavorings. First IO0's with only 4mg. tar. lofts Menthol. First lofts with
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rosaytNs album is destined to become a classic is an understatement: -I m grMeful to lie IlvlnI d~lr~ the tim9 of their o~l¥1ty~ ic~ R~r~x~ld~ F~c~lnl Qu~x~rba~k ~The imlr~ ~ the DVl t~$ml tram ppmsllmce of thl~ ~n~P imlte~ml sN=~ V~ln a~e bznll AOR ~d top 44~ pmyll|t p~sltimxlP 6ol/Mar 2e. 19n 662rhQ ¢Om~l~ $owI4 ~ |Ollll,, .this set pl'oVkhW a I~eW bridle gl ¥~1~ Oh tl~Q soft vo¢115 ~1115~ |yRthe, $iZ~ Ityk t~at mlde the M oodl~l a top w~r ~I-W~dlK =~r~l, mony o~ their ~r emendOl~s pop. ul~r dry I~ m~re ¢il ~l~ S d~de~ "Th~ U~W mlt trial ~n~45 Iram yelp ~ooD to ez~lkmtp ~BS~QmU|I h~" I~Wd~ore ( Mo0dlut ~ldOm d~e~ o11@ heir all al~lO~ ~w~l~ ~ ~e CA fdOl4T LfV~ + I;2' R~ar~ ~leW ~T~e DYe p~P~On ~ ti~ W~um ~ a tru~ dellgl~-" • 'A roll@die mlllow m~lst fo~ Mo~llU mzl.zc~ ~tl'Schn~ckM~ New ~U~ t ~, I ~ The Moody Blues Live+S BJOCONTINUED f rtend), Peck was d in 1954 after f 2 years of mamage and three sons, Jonathan, Stephen and Ca.ray Paul. The day after the divorce became final he married V6ronlque Passani, whom he had met three years earlier when she interviewed him in Paris. The second marriage has endured. and the ehitC~ren from both wives "are the most rewarding part of my fife," ha says. "Movies are a sidedne." His family was, however, the source el the one great tragedy ~n his lifo--which Peck can still scarcely talk abeL Jr--the suicide two years ago of Jonathan, his eldeof son. Pgzguect bydail!( pressure as a Santa Barbara TV newsman, by,re- mature arteriosclerosis and depie~sed ever his br e~.kup with a girt and the sui- cide of a friend. Jonathan1. then 30, ; shot hlmsell In the head. His father wa~ I Jn Fra~cth where he also ha~ a home. "The 'if' that haunts me," Peck says, "is that if I had been here in Los An- geles he would most car tain~ have calthd m~. I'd have tOld him, 'If the lob is too much pressu re, qui~ it. ~ll 'am to stt~ffit.Cometeme.' "UnUer the knhted brows, the eyea are dark with lear$. Peck rofutned to actln~ a few In ~ p~r~om V~m~lue ~ows P~-~k the I~hqm~almg she ha~ chN Io Faue ~he m~ hall. The hOuSe is on an Informal summer schedule. Ant~o~ and Cecilia [~op in months later onJy when the maEers of "an~ ou L ~hr'9 study~ g ao~lng with Ste~= the supernatural melodrama ;-he Omen, seeking the stamp o! legitimacy lhof the actor's presence would le/~d, pressed hfm to accept a featured ro/e. A ofr e.%9 L~B B ernick, WhO had been Iohothoe ad miter of the public Peck but had never worked with him until The Omen, found making a fi~rn with him a "r~velatio~1." He wt~s ~elaxed arid yet absorhBd wlth the dataiJs of his role. "As the shooting progressed," she s~ys, "his COpy ef the script became a mass of ~crawied merges to hlmseiE And that conslder~te~e~s! It's not fat:l'tC~t~. it's devastating." Today Peck clocks five miles each mor~ing on a stationary bfke white he "fllp~ bac~ and forth" between the TO- day show and Good Morthng, America or reads G magazine or n~wepaper, After breakfast (coffee a~d grapefruit, meybe a boded egg) he r et:eof~ to his now office. Whge he once worked for LBJ and the Great Society and pre- sided over the Academy of Motion Picture Aria and Soreness, he now pur- sues "causes" Jike reg~onat thealet and o~portunit~es for new fllmmakers. ta Adler and she's gethog re~dy for a tdp to Japan and E~rape with her par- en'~s, durthg wh[Gh she'll ~ct as Pack's secretary. H~s next movie wgl be The Boys ~om ~azJ), with Laurence Olivier, which will start filming in Eu- rope In Ootober, He~md V~roniq~e dine out two or three ¢~me~ ~ we~k, sometimes with old friends ,ks producer Mar~in Manulis and his wife. K~th~rlne Bard (with who~ Peck first s~reen-fosted), or Mary Livingstone, the widow of Peck's close friend Jack Benny'. At home they eat with tl~e kids In the breakf a~t room rather than i¢~ the formal dining room, al~d once In ~ while Peak IndLllg- es himseif in "pure ruxury"~nner ~ d~ux Or} trays ~n bad. "We never seem to have time on OUl hattdt," ~ay~. Peck. "i'm bouncing bac~ L<ve had my day as a [eadrng man. NO~ I'm h~vit~o a ~ate~b~oornlng career aho enjoying th I'm not fighting tooth and c]aw to get back to the top of the heap." He stares reflectively into his g~aa~ of w~ite wJn~ ~t the p{ayroom ba "1 am qu}fo happy In the fullness of m~ yeays," LOiS AF~t~.STRO~
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I~e phot ogenlc per.k [Enily Qf 1949 Cmn. sl=ted of Oze~l first wi~ Greta, J0n~ha~ 4,and Sh~ha~ 1. Jonathan vlsltud a Tanzanlan market as a Pea©e Corps volulxteer in 196Ch nine years beform his trmgic death. *'entirely free. There was a certain amount of loneliness, but [ have won- derful recollections of playing games in the twilight and romping barefoot." A t 10, though, he was packed off to SI. John's Military Academy in L.A. It was lat ge~y attended, he recalls, by the chil- dren of divorced parents who, *'out of guilt and uncertainty," sent thorn there for discipline. During high school days in San Oi- ego, while living wfth his father, Gregory, a pharmacist, the boy shot up ts 6"3" by 17 and discovered girls. "1 grew like an aspar&gus~and looked like one too," he say~. "1 was always shy, a bit reticent, But girls brought me out of myself and gave me confi- dences" He went to San Diego State College, then transferred to Berkeley so he could compete on the rowing team. In his senior year he decided to focus all the "discipline, hard training and teamwork" of crew on the theater. After graduation he left for New York so fast "they had to mall me my diploma." He dropped the Eldred ("It lines to her. She never forgot that." She gave him his first big Broadway role in Morning Star, and his career was launched. : In J 943, a~ter mar ryihO ~ Finnish hairdresser Greta Konen, Peck got a chance for a screen test and went West. ("1 had no need for nightly alP pIause. PIImmaking is my thing.") His first movie was one of those Iove-our- RussianLallies drumbeatars, Days of Glory, in which Peck, ironically 4-P be- cause of an old spinal injury from rowing, played a Red Army soldier. His second, Keys of the Kingdom, made him a star. He went on to play 60 film roles, from Captain Ahab in Moby Dick (1956) to Hemingway's Harry in The Sno~ of Kn- imanjaro (1952). He won five Academy Award nominallons--t or Keys of the Kingdom(1944), The Yearling(t946), Gent/eman'sAgreement(1947), Twelve O'Clock High (1949) and To Kill a Mock- ingbird {1962). He finally won an Oscar for Mockingbird, his favorite role. He hung on even after ~* string of fail- ures--sush as Shootout (1971 ) and BIgy Two-Hat (1972)--because "1 love the work," he says. "It may sound crazy, but I sing and hum and whistle and snort on my way to the studio in the morn- ing. I'm not at all blasG about it." Although his life has been tree of scandal ("He couldn't deal with the fear and guilt of unfaithfulness," says one COHTINUED Of all filter lO0's: First low-tar with no fake Warning:TheSurge0n6eneraJRas 0etBrmiaBdl~alCigaret[e Smoking h l~nq~r0ust0Ya[~ He~[~ ¢ rag. *l~' 04 m t ~cB1i~ ~ par ¢ig~Btt~ ~,~ N~ mtIlod 63 Lucky lO0's. didn't have much punch") and studied acting while supporting himself with i flavorings._ jobs as a Rockefeller Center tourist guide and a midway barker at the 1939 World's Fair. He performed in regional theaters, thenlanded a, smaU r0lein [ First lO0~s with The Doctor*a Dilemma, touring with Katherine Cornell. The first night out, O°rn°"f°rg°' h°r"n°s" r*'tO "od I onJy4mg tar, my face upstage and whispered the •
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° oi ::: i I,he.aoA*f,urpa readl0ga,oog,s ~~i~J o f books about the generaJ "from the violently against to the cloyingly pro. ] could identify with him In his olP " I s~ssion with an ideal, in his concern I for duty, honor, country, in his compas- ! Of all menthol lOOb: 0,on forh,s o ooofhing almoy have boon overlooked heretofore. I realized that most of his idlosyscrasies II _ ,,.,.,., ha,onoboadngontheman°aooo HB~B B~IIW BMB pllshments, One hundred years from with no fake no. oobodywi,,be,ntoras.od,n the scrambled eggs on his cap or h~s evangb[istic rhetoric. They'll be inter* no rlng"L -'---S oared in .o, • Puck's turnabout marks both a'po- litical mellowing (though he still dislikes Not Im~l after M= paJ~mt s ~pa='~d In Richard Nixon, on whose 1971 "one- 19~.2~ I~¢lked ~'lgeflt Peck ut =~ his p= First lO(Yswith miss list" he found himself)and the .lu~ for a enalpShot, reemergenoe of the former maSnoe idol as a character actor. The MacAr- only4mg tar. ,hur ,eon0 ooovofoo*c,us,ve. gr s.homado. .Om,,,,onon oO • woodsy Holmby Hills are part of a de- of Navarone. Peck has also Invested liberate attempt to change the Peck wisely. Today he malntafns limited pa family's way of I]fe. It is aimed, he says, nerships in a computer component at "more privacy, adventure and ex- factow and in industrial and commer citement~' for himself, V~ronlque, 45, a clal real estate. He also recently end former Paris Journalist, and their two bt. , a four-year, miIlion-dollar a~so ciatior lingua] children. Anthony, 20, is with Travelers Insurance Company a~ studying drama at Amherst, and Co- the voice for their commercials. cilia, 19, IS an English major at When he could not find films to act Princeton. VGroniquo*s mother alSO in, Peck tried producing. He made Th 11OOJs lives with them. Catonsv[fle Nine (1971 ), from a play The two-level house with five bed- about Vietnamese war protesters, ar rooms is surrounded by fonr acres of The Dove (1973), the adventures of a roIfing lawn graced wgh tall pines and a teenaged boy who sailed around the gnarled oak, InVisible from the street world alone. TOO controversia] or and protected by electronically con- too clean, neither film did well. But, trolled wrought iron gates, the says Peck, "At least I put my money estate was once hired out for a Cou- where my mouth is, I'm glad I did t herr 9ar TV commercial with Farrah Faw- cett-Majors (before Peck bought It, As a kid in La Julia, a town 112 miles needless to say). There is, of course, a south of L.A. on the coast, Eldred Gre pool, plus tennis court, guest house, ory Peck developed movie fever earl greenhouse and a log cabin tucked In 1922, when he was 6, his parents away in a wooded hollow, separated, and he lived with his ma- VSronIque, an expert decorator, ternal grandmother, Twice aweek sh foundthehousewhllePeckwasfilm- • wouldtakeEIdredtothetown'snew ing MacANhur. Smitten, she phoned movie house. "We didn't care what w~ him during a lunch break and he came showing," says Peck. "One night in th rLght over in his uniform, makeup and lllm a man w~ts playing an organ In a 100~r~alm thoI all. He decided to buy it in 20 minutes, Paris sewer, and when he turned in • "She fell in love with the place," he around and looked straight Into the says. "1 bought it for the oak tree." camera, he had no face, Just a mass C Winning, The Surgeon General Has Affording it was not a problem. AI- scars. Grandmother let out a screBm. Dmermined That Cigarette Sm0~ng though Peck has never commanded and my hair stOOd straight up. t Ls Da~ger0us ~0 YuLe Heal[h. the supersalarles of other stars, he can haven~ got over The Phantom of the ask and get $750,C00 a picture. Be- Opera yet." ~:~g't~"04~gnicoti~eeYpercig~,~ztahyF[Cmet~o~ cause he had a percentage of the His childhood, says Peck, was 62
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"if your dog wears a flea collar and still scratches --he may need the Vet's medicine made for dogs" skin problems." "Catfish" Hunter.- Expert pitcher & DO~; Bieeder ";j )o~r dog wears = flea collar a,td ~titl scratches, odds ore/le~$ ,lOl $cratehlng ~eo3, bur an rrndaleeted cut, ~ap¢, irritatLon, sor~, ever= eczema. That'~ ~hp a Vet developed SMJodene--the skin medicine/or dogs. Dogs have thl~*cer 8/¢in than we do and 3r~cial d~ germs. Sul~ode~e kills dog germs heles hba~ •top xcratching f~L ~ULFOD~N~ ]~zoved e[- fecUv¢ in 9 of 10 cases tested, Alao use Sb]I.F(3DEHE SHAMPOO, nlod~cated to help k~cp Sulf0den Wherever pet prod- getg ~re sold. MUSEUM COLLECTIONS CATALOG... AJI things for some people. II you have a flair for the unusual or o feeling for the post, yo'£11want to see this sumc)luous hel-color colfi~Iog of hand-ctofted sculpture Qnd ~ewelry replicas from hoosures In the wodlfis great museums. A bor~INza cf unique gift ideQs you COn Choose ol your leisure wilh the CorNenience of shoppfng al home.., five thousand y~:]rs of man's creollee genlls -with a specie[ section el excllslve reproductions horn lhe Louvre. Send 75~ fo: MUSEIIM COLL[~JTIO~$r D apt. Sl ~ 40 Gfee'~wic h A,,,e r ~e, G r emr rl~lC~, ~ p,~c~icu~ 06B 30 Marlin=oo pushed tlsrough ?::~w~Yd gzabbed the reed a h,a.~.,t woman wirh fire in my head. Grininag tooshlegsly, his ey¢~ wide wish somctinng beyond mirth, h~ rubbed my ha~d on hns bald forehead and spoke in a lenguagc that was not Spamsh. From heed to toe his smooth, mahogany-dark skin was covexed with art--cabalistic symbols, totemic designs, naked lldies, stars and moons aad plen- ets, serpents and ftql-rigged baxkenfiaes, wolves, hears, a dxagcn breathing fi~, a heart pierced by an arrow. Then the pounding of the steel drum r~sumed, and he ~vhirled off into the crowd, his pll- rare gallery binging and writhing to the play of his musclls ruder the hot s~n. her eyes stood glaring at the speeding txalfic, clutching a sq~z~hed chicken in her left band while she shook her other fist at the trockn The Mu.~o l-Iemingway was tempo- ruffly dc~ed for renovatinn, but the gate guard, an ok[ maa with steel-rimmed glasses and a pothe]ly pushing incon~- ously through the oinigatory Castro- gt~.n fatigues, l~t us in anyway. Just be- yond the bat=, up o, llocks, stood Ifie P;/ar. Her black hug looked faded and dead, like the hides of the dead marlin hanging from the crossbeam at Cojimar. The grounds were gree~ and co~l trader As the four o'clock deed]in¢ for the .-she ~ tropical p~ltings~ and the pot- end of the tournament approached, the fish rack slowly filled--small mathn. wintes mainly, and a single sailfish along with a few dolphin. They turned slowly on their roped tails, heads down, flies emwidig on their glazed, unlinded ey~ The sllns, whose colors in life Heming. way had so often admired--the madin's ellctfic-llvender siripes against fiery sils ver, the golden glllLm of the dolphin holed driveway wound uphil[ past flow- ering franglpani, Workmen plied their trowels over the broad front s~aftway, ce- me~sing cracks and sags. T~e huge cciba iree at the sight front comer facing the house, the trec under which Hemingway and Mary used TO sing folksongs in many languages and drink the evenings away, had been heavily pruned, but the gnarled gray mass of its thick t~nk wag ~till ira- flashing li~ R rainbow in death, green, pres~Jve, like the glimpse of an old blue, red. then back to gold--had ali fad- wounded elephant standing silent, wait- ¢.d to a ullifotra g#ay-inack, without ing.inthethornbuslL sheen, like so many hunks of wean-out truck tire_ Thene was no fish h¢le to compare with Gonzallz Araza's 248-pound blue marlin caught on the opening day, the day of storm and heawy seas. lfiSs ~am's 1,230 points held up against a lest-min- ute, three-marlin onslaught by the De- partment of Tourism team, good for 1.040 points and second place. Pepe Mils era looked up from his seat at the jndg¢'s tabIe and watched the last fish of/he day, a small white marlin of about 30 pounds. heing hung on the crossbeam. "Robert." he said with a wink, "we are icing down the fresh baits." On the Molnhlg of Our departed, we drove out with Captain Gil to visit the Hemingway museum at San F~hac L~c o de Pauhe The o~d Cat.teen din Notre. the coastal highway from Havana to San Francisco, is now potholed in places as badly as New York City's roadways. Big- shouldered Russian trucks and East Ger- man buses grumbled and ground their gears bumper to bumper. A choking mi- asma of dle'~el smoke dimmed the bright sunlight and stung the eyes--flashes of L.A. freeways during rash houri Beside 62 Inside the front door the house opened out into enormous rooms, coo/ behind thett thick stucco ~ the air faintly musty Iike the air of a mausoleum. But as one's eyes adjusted to the indoor dim- ness, the rooms gradoaily began to fill with remaants of a llf¢. From the high- cahinged wads stared the heads of big- game animals---two splendin oryxes, an enormous elk rack, a g~cd kudn, the thll- head mount of a fair-to-midoling Cape buffalo plus the sk~ls and hems of two others that had to go over 50 inches in spread. A leopard skin lay draped over a couch. On the wills were 1930 bullfight posters from Spain. A 6.5-ram. Mann- licher-Schoenauer rifle foaaed in a enr- net, its thlIlfiore-er~ded wsinut stock gleaming cool and smooth in the dim light, the bluing worn from its wed-oiled her~¢I and helt. And books, books, every- where heoks. When the Hemlngways left 17 years earlier, they did not know that they woold nwer return together, not even as visitors, hi donating the house aad all its contents To the new Cuban gtw- crnmenls Mary Hemthgway [eft hehind some 8,000 voinmes---heoks Ernest had ~antmued
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humor. The first was a man of huddle height, about 50 years old, clean shaven, wJOl a deep while scar on his upper llp. He spoke ex~eilem English. The other, Shorter~ with a broad pla¢~d face alld wJdt'-~i slce~y ~yw, s/~c only 5p~- isb, and that in a strong campes/no ac:. cent These two were fishing that day in one of the new Pit aria boats and invited us to hake a qulck look at rbe shipyard where they were ¢.OIl~Lr~cled+ jL!SI a co~- p~¢ ot'huodred yards up the dyer. The shipyard, cool and cinttered gll shipyards everywhere, smelled of glue ~d river rot. Its workers looked qu~ck [tn~ compete|l|. ~cy |Feared lh~ ~caF- faced man and his companion with a te- $~ct that ~rde~d on revereilC:e. We slli[ did not know" hi~ nar~e, nod later w~en he revealed ~t he did so o~iy on a prom- Jse of se ci'~cy H~ n~me is famili~ to any- one who has stud~d the origins of the Cubat~ revolutio~ partlcuinr]y ~ it ap- pllcd to urban gu eedlin warfare. T~]ing back toward Cojimar for the $1ar~ oF th~ ~ay's ¢ompetiiiorl. we saw the scar-faced man in the Piraila hc~k and boat a 60-pouod sailfish on l i~t ;ac~ J~, la~ Lfi~ ~h sraudi~ up, handling the rod and reel wi~h coot authority. By now he had ~aken offhls ~hi)t. and more ~ars could b~ seen o~I his back and chest, long straight stashes that matched the o~ o~ his upper llp. After boating the sal]- and condng alongside, ha i~vited me to come aboard wilh him. +'~/her e did you get the ~cars?" "Bafista," be said. He smiled. Thi~ was a day for ideohi~y and rercl- [in$ce~ce. A~ we tro~J~ back Ic~ward Tatar§, for what seemed the umpteenLfi hoe, w~ talked of Cuba's future, of the role ~t was piugl~g ie t~la~k AFrica and of fli¢ l~OSSiLfi¢ renewal of diplomatic and trade ~latinns between Cuba ~od the Un]led Sta~$. There was rio c~rll in the conversation of th~ ~wo Cubans, i)Ol~e o~ ~he propagaodizing ~ndcmic to the ~om~nUnlSt~ of Eas~rll ~urope. BOLfi men Wet~ tea|isis, re¢ognlzlng thch" young government's wea]~l~3se$ ~ ~veil ~s J~ strengths; The ~lk veered ba~k t~ those ear~ days ofth~ 1950s in the SJ- ~r~a Maestra, and I toLfi them of bow con- fused so many Ame ricans--incinding Er~ ~st Hemingway--hed been al the sudden spoflin8 of th~ [oi~g, warm CU- l~tn-Amcrican friend~hlp. OFhow man~ ~ou[Ig Ameriea~s in tho$~ day~ want~ Of all filterlOOk First low-tar with no fake fiav0+ri s, - First !00 with only 4mg. tar. Lucky
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I In 25,000 rages of normal driving, our Chevette owner's manual recommends a lube and off change just three times, a change of oil filter two times, spark plugs and fuel filter just once. Compare that with what Datsun and Toyota recommend in their o~Yner' S manG~$. How important is it to you that Chevette offers extended service intervals? Well, it mea~ls yol~ c~.n expect to save time and money. But moze 4 CHEVY imporbs. DATSUN TOYOTA important, it reflects the overall aFdtude that Chevy engineers brought to the design o| Chevette, a caz engineered to g~ve ser ~ice, not get it. See any one of our nearly 6,000 Chevy dealers and let him go over the fine points of Chevetto with you. We th/nk you'll be unpressed. CHEVElllE B-210 COROLLA A**%**AtJ ~ ~ ~ o,~,~, ~,~ ~_~'0~i## ~LUO~ '~ ~ ~ '~ FUEL FILTER ~ AIR FILTER AUTO. TRAILS, I FLUID POINIS O0 0 Chevy Owqm~e
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Of all menthol 100k First Iow-tur with no fake flavorings. First IO0 s with only 4mg. tar. Iceberg i00 Menthol. Walning:TheSurgeonGeneral ~as t [htetmiaed That Cigarette Smoking Is Oange~us IO Your Health 4 m g.'r~ar¸, 04 mg nic olin~ ~ pel cigarelle by FTC melhg~. Papa's marlin much time on the sea without becoming a poet." "Pot nada," I told him and turned the other way. By now the wind had ffesheneBB so that GBB could not bring the Ow~ safely back into the narrow mouth of Cojimar har- bor. Most of the other boats were in aI- ready. We headed for Havana. passing tba high-rise, somewhet shabby apart- ments of Habana del Es~. a housing d¢- veldpment for workers erected by the Castro regime shortly after the success of tba rcvohnlon. On a roof just offshore lay the rusting hulk of a freighter--Pol- ish registry. Gil thought--that had ,ran joined tn for another day's fishing, ab- SOlved from his duties on the totaroa- ment's technical committee. "It is eel7 important for the workers to live in buBBd- ings that look beautiful, in Cuba wc have only work and study and spot~. The art psychedelic allows one to relax." l thougbr of my hippie ['rien BBs in the com- munes of New Mexi~ and California and j~st how iclaxed they were in the presence of the art psychedeli~ Blown away¸ Wiped out. Wow! / At Cojimar we learned that the tour- hament had been c0tnceled for the day be- cause oftba high winds and heavy weath- er, but in the big O~ca '~ were able to aground during a rlorihet the previous ~h, anyway_ Again Lh¢ yerba buena winter. "Now we will cut her up for the steel plates," he said. She looked like a huge red whale up there on the rocks. There is nodfing so helpless, u~el~, as a ship gone aground. Turning the point of MclrO Castle, we opened up the roadstead--long lines of fre~ters and tankers. Russian and Pol- ish and East German, lying to the hook under the lee of the CasaBlanca Pcldn- fail~ to do its ~tuff. We cruised on up (o the camp of the P/oneras. yanldng 0ldy a single barracuda off the reef¸ Yester- day's catch for the tournamenz boats had included a few dalghir~-dorados in Spanish--and we trolled past pieces of fl~t~am, hoping to entio~ one of the brBB- BBandy colored fish out to the strip baits and feathers. Nothing. The sea appeared empty of fish. and we found ou~eives sula. As the wind dropped, a nauseating= wondering about the Soviet trawlers and reek of o~ fi~led she boat: You coalBB see ~tllotbar ships wc had seen anchored in it shining like a moribunBB rainbow all the oily hethor. Tba Russians fish hard up and down the harbor. The eastern and thoroughly. The barren reefs and wallsoftheMalec6n--Havana'saucinnt, fishless blue water stood testimony to once lovely sho~sid¢ promenade~-were their assiduity. We brnched, t hongh, on coatedwithoilasthickastar.Thescrews ¢xceBBent Rupiah sardines and the of" the Orea'~ twin 295-hp engines churned up great swifts of setlled petro- leum, davk as dl3dng blood. Pepe shook his head smily. :-.__ "Havana harbor is a lake of oil on top of a pool of water," he ~aid. All through the night the wind howled strong and steady from the northeast. From the 16th floor of the Havana Libre Hotel (formerly the Havana Hilton) one oonld see whitecaps roBBing on the Stream at first light. When we rendezvoused with Gil and the Orca at the mouth of the Rio AImendares on a sBBp just behind the Restaulant I g30, one of Havana's finest, i~ In,shed unlikely that the tournament boat~ would be able to fish on this Sat* utxtay. Wc ran on down to Cojitaar, p~t the sunSt stucco facades of Havana Vie ja, the old town babi: of the Maleedn, the buildings glowing pld¢ pinlc and blue in the momin~g sun. A few were trimmed in fines of st tong ebior--red% hard blues, yeBBov,'s, oranges. 'That is the arl psy- eBBedalle/' explained Pepe, who had hearty; uninbaled Cuban beer that used to be called Tropical. Pep¢ pbrnxed out the new worLers* city ~of A!amm-, with Soviet crones beetling over the gla~-anthsteel slabs agnlltst a aloud-blown sky and the feath¢~ casua- rina trees of the Pinn~tos ~amp, under whinBB children played in the sand or splashed ia the erasldng surF. We talked some mort? of ldelattlr~--Po¢ and Ten* nesscc Williams and Carson McCuners. The big blue-Black sea roiled its white horse~ arounBB us, th at tim~ to cobalt by the breaking sun. Shoals of flymfl fish popped from the wavet~s and skimmed through the scud. Man-o'-war birds cir- cled low over the seas. A solitary bleck this winged in to shore. But there were no fish, not for ns. not that day. That night the wind abated. In the mornthg~ when we arrived at the O~ca on the Rio A]mendar~s, thel'¢ were new fates On the fenndL Th~ two men did not introduce themseIves, but Both stndled us cinscly anBB with $ood 6O
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Of all filter DOk [ menthol 100k .rstlow-tar I wdh no fake no fake First 10(Ys with only 4mg. tar. I.ucky lO0's. custom house, Herman"? Probably not. for the analogy bcL tween kll]cr w~ale and great whib~ shark is just to~ tempting--they are b~th bl strongandmystefio..ther~f~msca~ only4mg tar. [o landlobb~rs Television documenta- ries ha~,e Laughl us thai Ihe whale has a 0 also be monogamons, I~r T~11~ a hu~lan hke emotional life It is ~a.sy, therefore, Lo aI/thropomorphiz¢ the whale and ~:~: then cobi~l~ up the kin(] of runs lugglshly through Ore-a: R~chard Hazris is i~troduced as a dumb fishcnnm; irRcnt on eollectlng speclmetls of mariIte lif~ for sale to aql~arlums In the col~t~ 0~" his work he carelessly kills a female whale who ~lO0~s is pregnant This furies hal mat~ into a psTcho~h of Ih¢ s¢~, lurking a]'ou]~ the harb2r of the fishing ~illage wher~ HaITiS does his brooding. Olca is s~+n '~ki~ muc~ colonial havoc on the townspeopJe and the Jr Works. In the ~Itd Harris is forced to p~t to sea and fight like a tlsh-~.r, man Rubber Whalo. Char]oRe R~m- piing is on ha~ld a~ one of thos~ movJ~ ~cJentisls who~¢ pre~:i~ di~iplin¢ is ~J~gxpl~hlcd but whig f~J~ct Jo~ ~s to ex- plain and explain to the less enlight- ¢~1¢d that they must not underestimate the wit and sonsitivily of th~ animal kingdom This is a big mistake Melville ~ven Peter Benchlcy ~nderstood that it is heal not to hu ma niz~ the ¢rca- totes of Lh~ deep b~o lllBch They are mor~ ft igl/tcning if perceiv~:l ~s import- demblc forces ~o mo,.i0ma~o*~ h~,0 ,hom~ !00~ Menthol heavily through the literature of the sea in lheir £calch for dramatic CliCheS, • Technically. the film is inept~suspense Is Daagm0us t0 Y0ur Health e s v shot each re~ort to the special- Warning: The Sure,on 6¢ner$ H~S effects man visible In closeup, Orea has O~lel~ined Tm £ig~leile $m0kin~ a very rubbery kx~k. but pclllaps no more ~1 than his human co-stars, come to think of it Rlchard$clffckel ~ ~ ,,tar,,, O 4 r~g 0ic0t~e 0v per iigarelm b~ ~ Sngth~d"
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r ~ ~E~R~ DI~TILLFR~ COMply NEW ~D~K CITY 80 p~O~F. ~ll r~LLE~ D~Y ~IN OIITILLEO F~OIf k~ERIC~ ~IAI~
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i - !,i! ,~ii~ii~" Of allmenthol 1( ~: First low-tar with no fake flavorings. First lO0's with only4mg, tar. 100"s r Iceberg IO0's Menthol. Walning: The Surgeon General Has Determined Y~al CigareUa Smoking li D~r~ger~s to Your ffeBIIh. 4 mg.'l~r ~ OA m~ nilelina a~ pe[ eigaletle by ~( melbc~ Pushing Rights Shame on you for your Essay on dis- crimination [July 25]! Using such trivial 0;(aIn p]0$ to issue: equal rights. [ susI~Ct that the ed- itors of TIME ~tre simply tmcomfortabl¢ wi~ social changes already accomplished -~pocialiy thc~ that ar~ a r ~.ult of af- firmative actio~ pro~as and tlto pt~h for women's rights and gay rights, Cambridge, Mass. The example oftbo loft-handed post- al clerk wasn't silly, Reg~ttably, the man- made environment is usually deslg~ed for the "average" citizen, which leaves om the majotlty: shor~, tall, pregnant, fat, dis- ablod or ItR-]laxtded. Fl¢xible solutions a~e possible if the buyers of design ~r vice see the iml~rtanc¢ ef designing for everyone. Keep fightL,'zg, lefties! Marnie dones Los Altos Hills, Calif tuckymO~.
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kill or be violent five years from now is they have to come in contact with oth- essentialty Impossible. er~at mealtime, tar example+ you are agaicwt early screenlng? Even if it were possible to Identify po- tentially dangerous schizophrenics, I would he concerned about the princi- ple involved in locking up such people. One way our system is sup- posed to be different from totallts,+~an gover r.m~nts is thmt yo+J caR"+ go te Jail for what's In your mind. Not to sound too callous about the vlcUms of have any really effective treatment at mass murderers, but you would do far this time. "-- We can treat paranoid schizophrenia quite effectively with drugs, which re- duce or eliminate completely delu+ stons, halluCinations and bizarre be- havior. TheSe drugs do Not cure the illness, howeve£. They controt it "~he way Insulin contt ors diabetes. AS for the Sadistic sociopath, we don't • moreh.rmbyst.rungtheprin<~iple Wcu!drest~ringthedeathpemaltylnfl~ I Rrst low-tar of locking up people in advance than is done hy the ~ca+¢fena, paranoid +ha +.~J~der~'P I ~i~ ~0 ~ke schizophrenic. It would h~ve no influence, except that it might serve as an incentive for ++--'-°+°°+++++°" ],.,o..g,, d~erstoprlsonlnsteadoflTospitats;' mass murderers who were suicidal~gd It is unfortunate, if for no other tea- hoped IO get the death penalty as pun- son than it means these people will Ishment for their crimes. And Jn two probably not get the treatment they eases, the people actually moved from I l~ir~t ~00~ ,wl~ need, and therefore Will remain a dan- a state that didn't have the death pen- get to inmates and prison guards airy to a state that did b~fore they around them. Even if kept in isolation, began their kiilings. D ++. I only 4mg. tar.
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Of all menthol 100k First low-tar In a variety of ways in childhood or by the taking of LSD or PCP. There Is re- search that raises the possibili~ that a long-acting virus contributes to the symptoms• However. a bad home environment is not enough to cause paranoid schizoptoenla, a!- though it is important in juvenile delinquency and In psychopathic OF so- ciopathic behavior. with no fake Several rooters are involved, both the killer's victims were hitchhiking co- hereditary and environmetttal, as in ads. Yet mau~y young women continual other diseases such as cancer and TB• • to hitchhike in the Santa ~ruz area He may have a hereditary pred]spc~i- ---,and SOme became vlctPns. tion to paranoid schizophrenia, or the environment can have contrlbutod¸ Is~anywaytospotapotenflalmass murderer? Yes. It is very unlikely that a psychi- atrist would fail to see the symptoms of a paranoid schizophrenic. The sadistic soclopath, however, is much more difficult to spot even for a trained per- son. Nelt her would be obvious to the lay person in casual encounters $hou/d ~ere be ear/y screen/rig/n schools or the arrned sertdc'es to spo! What about reports that Berkowitz paranoid schlzophrenlcs or other darP ~ radlcally after tak lng drugs, gerc~Js ty~? n ,g"avor'n=s partlcularlyLSD? Nothing beyond what already exists. At the trials I'v~ been inv olved'in-'~'arl$" screenlng woul~ i~e iheffective, e personally, such claims are invariably - because paranoid achizophren]a does mada. Those claims were also ]nvarl- not typic all~' show ul~ until the person Fi st IO0'swith aPyirrelevant. We don't know what ,sin his early2Os. Most enlistments ere r causes paranoid schizophrenia, but we at 17 or 18 years old. Telling which do know this illness was around for paranoid schizephreni¢ or sociopathic hundreds of years before the discovery person--<Jr anyone else-is going tp only 4mge tar. IO(Ys Menthol. ~arrlmg: T~e Sur§e~n General Has Delermined That Cig aretle Smoking Is [}angef0us to Your H~llh 4 rn~ !at ~) 4 ~ ~COtlgB ~ par ¢ ga=ella bt FT~ rl~ln0U 48 Of LSD. However. a person already psy- chotic may become somewhat worse under the Influence of LSD or the even mere potent PCP. HOW does suP..h a man escape notices? FirSt, such a person tends to be a loner. Second, In ordinary Pay-to-day transactions such as buying food at the su per market oT working in a post of- rice, he may appear normal to other )sepia. It is only when something impinges on his de]uslons or hallu- cinations that his behavior becomes bi- zarre. [n a trial, people will testify, "He seemed normal to me"; experts say Just the opposite. These two seem- ingly conflicting reports of behavior are quite typical. If Yaced by this k/nd of person~ what can one do f~'self-protection? Probably nothing. Reasoning with him is not apt to be suecessful, be- Cause the paranoid schlzo ph reni~ is viewing yet; from his own delusional place. However, if a killer seems to have a specific v~ctim in m{nd and a pat- tern emerges, then one could take pr ecautlon$. For exarnp]e, it became known before Kemper was caught that Against the maso~W wall of their home rear Pale Alto~ Dr, Donald Lunde lines up with his wlfe~ Marily;1~, a11d t heir five t owheadecl some, from k~ft: Monty, 17; Chris, 16; Glenn~ t4; Evan, 12, and Bret~ S.
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,fJ'l
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Liqueu rDrinks.
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A Ne~vYear's Day Feast FIESTA BOWL. ROSE! BOWL. ~ BOWL Check local listing~
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You. waited all year for this 1983 v, ill be a breatht ,king :,er wig: the all-new Slx~ris illustrales11983 ~ -'-m~"~.~ml~ Swim!,uil Calendar J(,i~l follr lop fi~hh~n mode]s, K[m Alexis, Carl)l All C~afissa Craig. and Kathrvfl Re~ding on ~ome of the world's most exotic beaches ill th~ sumptl ous lull~olor photc~g~lphs of h~hn G Zthun !rlnan Nmv av~dlat/le di:ect]y flom the pllblisher, mit C~lendar is superbl3 pnr,ted o~ heavv, art-quality bound to keep Ih¢ months log~ theL l:ven after they have gt~ne by. Large 15" x 15" lbnnat 1993: a ye~ t(/n_'memb~ Order now tot yo~self A splendid gift idea, tc,~' Credit-card orders 1 CALLTOLL-FREE 1-800-345-8500 Ext: 37 sp.,,~, l,u,.~,ed 198~ S,.i ,,,u~, C~t~.d~, S8 9S e~h al~ .., SPEC[AL SAVINGS: Order 3 or more @ $7.95 each. .~d $1 pc) ord,:r Rlr shipping ('all[ now 6)r cmdk card orders, j¢ ~/ or send check or money order to: #'A.~. Sporls llluslf at~l Switilsuil Calendar Pt) Box 11011, (~icago, I11 60~II
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1 DELTA'S LATEST MEETS.OR-BEATS FLORIDA ....... BARGNNS ' S99one-w~ Touri~.~ ~%*~*o~ Free Wheel Deal s35 ~PCOT/Walt Di~ ,World Dream Vacatioff Delta does it again] With a Florida fare 11o other airline beats• With a great new Free Wheel Deal: And with a special new EPCOT/WaIt Disne DreamVacation lowest price going. $99 one-way Tourist Fare to Ft.Lauderdale, Ft.Myers, Miami, Orlando/BPCOT/Walt Disney ~brid, Sarasota/Bradenton, Tampa/fit.Pete or West Palm Beach. Available on selected flights. Check for details: Good for travel January I0 thru February 6,1983. Free Alamo rental car for 4 day's (Chevette or similar) when two passengers fly Delta round-trip. Unlimited mileage. Gas, taxes and options such as the $5.95 eollision damage waiver are extra. Check for details. Good January 6 thra February 7, t983. EPCOT/Nhlt DisneyNbrld DreamVaeation--2 nights as little as $3fl per person, double occupancy, plus air fare. trD~cm~: For details, see your Travel Agent or call Delta. Fares, car and tour rates subject to e without notice. ~ t::3 ~ t_-rA DELTA IS READYWHENYOU ARE~
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GE HELPS YOU SAVE THE MOST VALUABLE THINGS IN YOUR KITCHEN: TIME, SPACE AND EFFORT, GE, with over 80 years of save a busy family time. throughout your home. kitchen experience, racog- The Toast-R-Oven You'll find the GE Home nizes their value more than broiler will quickly bake, Library, four booklets anyone else. broil or toast small meals or about the home, After all. we deveLoped snacks. It also makes re- filled with use- ~j~*~' many innovations to make heating portions of meals ful ideas and ~'/~ your kitchen more pr6duc- easy and conv~nientT~"~nformatiorr.:~-~ tive--from toaster ovens to And since the Toast-R- To get your self-starting coffeemakers. Today we offer a full line of kitchen appliances designed to save you valu- able time, space and effort. WAKE lip TO FRESHLY BREWED COFFEE. Oven broiler does much more than just toast your bread, ~t usescounter space efficiently. OPEN UP ~ORE THAN BOTTLE5 AND CANS, free copy, send your name, address and zip code to: GE Home Library, Box 4523, Monticello, MN 55365. Be sure to include 50¢ for postage and handling. The GE SpacemakerTtcan ,~lf yau have any ques- The GE Brew S'tarter*"drip opener quic~:ly &nd easily ,floes on ahyGE consumer ceffeemaker saves you opens cans, bottles even product Of service, ball the timewhen you need it most-- in the morning. You simply put in cof- fee and water and Set the timer before going Ito bed. The Brew ~ Starter drip ceffee- I~ ~1maker will turn it- ~T-==.~J self on so you can 2441c~r ~,~,.i,,~,. wake up to freshly )rewed coffee. And it keeps the aof- ,e hot too. So your next .up is always ready. B~ PWRPO~AHCe ~H EHAU. OVE.N$. plastic bags. And since it GE Answer Center"infor- mounts under the cabinets, mation service, toll-free, at it opens up valuable court- 800-626-2000, 24 hours a ter space as well. day.Tdays a week. BLEHD, CHOP, GRATE, And if something ever mHCE, H~X,FUREE,r.:. does go Wrong with a GE In just a few seconds, a GE Food Processor can help do some of your most tedious ,..~ [I I I/ cooking chores, f lid One of our models even dou- ~ ,r~,.~, bles as a blender ~°'~'"~*' to save you space as well. MORE GE HELP. appliance, our nationwide network of service centers staffed by factory-trained technicians is ready to help. After all, designing " quaity producte you can : trust, with features and reliable performance you expect, is part of the GE commitment to help make The versatile GE Toast- GE can help you save R-Oven" broiler can time, space and effort GE ~tian~ help iNahe your Ntche. ~lole prcductNe your life a little easier. WE BRING GOOD 11tINGS TO UFE. GENERAL 0 ELECTRIC
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Now, from the Editors of MONEY Maqaz[ne . Your Complete New MONEY GUIDE to IRAs Arc you wondering where to open your lhads Wluch are the best alteraauve tax GUIDE to IRAs Plus a Persona] IRA IRA? How to get the highest yield? shelters. Savvy tactics for two-income Quiz. A quick and easy tool to determine Where your money will be safest? Which couples. And how to decide whether to your IRA necth and pokqt you toward¢ IRA is the one for you? open your IRA with your banke~ broker the lnvestmem optiom that wifl serve you Eel MONEYs excrts be our aideI insurel:monevmanagel'...orsomconc~o~d-- P • Y g else " MONE~ Directory of Mutual Funds Your Complete New MONEY GUIDE • The most complete listing of Mutual to RAs tells yon everything you need to know to take foil advantage of the tax saving, money-saving investment opportunity of the decade. "I]ae guide covers all the ins and outs of IRAs-with readable, reliable, impartial in formation and advice. You get the best IRA articles from recent issues of MONEY, updaled with the latest infor- mallon. PI~ a wealth of new material prepared by MONEY's ediwrs ~o~i~v lbr this mgfoda. And available nowhere ! etse. You'll find out All about batth IRAs. How to make the best use of mntual You'll get clean concise and unbiased answers to 50 of the most commonly asked IRA questfons in the MONEY Funds, with information tm one fi~e and ten year perfolXll,~noes ann money- market fund yields compounded to show effective almual interest rates, includas addresses, telephone number~ and com- mTt ssio n information. Published nowhere else. this section alone is worth the $2.95 you pay for the entire guide[ TherEs still time to open your IRA for 1982. So let MONEYs experts take the confusion out of IRAs. Return this coupon to reserve your copy of Your ~lete New MONEY GUIDE to IRAs. Or pick up a copy at your newsstal~d. nmmmmmmmmumnmmmnmmmmmmmmmnmnmnmmmmmmmmm Mail to: MONEY IRA GUIDE, Box 999, Radio City Station. New YorL NY, 10019 YES! Send me the valuable new investment tool from the editors of MONEY! Enclosed is my check payable to MONEY for $2.95 for my copy of Your Complete New MONEY GUIDE to 1RAs. Mall nay copy to: M~/Mrs Name (please print) Address Apt.No City State Zip
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continued looked on it at aJl? And if so, did they peso eive ~ as a kind Of ~ettospective on all those years when [hey had Lhree shows a week lo look forward to? Did it make them sad? Or had television by this time so altered the texture of their evenings that they had ceased to miss the movies? Possibly by then, they were qui~e con- tent to receive their movies on a smaller screen, were gkad tD be spared the gig- gling kids and only missed the popcorn, if anything In any c~se the ROyal has been gone for so long that few 10so pie under 40 can remember ever having been in ~t fts dee good wall has become rather teetery in the last few years ann the deCision was finally rnaoe to knock it dawn, leSt it fall on something So far ~e demolition seems to have aroused little emotion in local breasts After ell, anyone on see the old ~leater once or twice a year, when "The Last Picture ShoW' domes around on TV, and few yearn to see t oftener than that I wonder if anyone, now, can reCall the Last movie they saw at the Royal? In the novel, ~ used an Audie Murphy movie called "The Kid from Texas, Wanting a sornewbal more mythic tone; BOgdano- rich replaoed it with 'Red R{ver" in the film ~n actuality the !asl m~ie i can remember seeing ~n AroheiCity was"Plnk+ y" (1949) and the gary thing I can re- member about "pinky' is Ihe ~ovely Jeanne Crain However the c~ip from "Aed River,, was s,o pofent Ihat most local8 are quite content to believe that the last faces to appear on the o~d screen belonged to John Wayne and Montgomery Clift Unquestionably, the big development [n the town's entertainment l i~e occurred t¢~ years ago, when the cable arrived Though virtually everyone subscribed only those of middle years or beyond seem to regard cable as an unmixed blessing Practicing parents now face the hopeless task of keeping their preteens from switchthg constantly to R rated late the minute they leave the room. Thanks to the constant plesenoe of rflev~es on the ~ screen, a generation of young Texans barely out of diapers has 52 • ;T begun to tatk like mov+e critics On a recent trip home I found that the 8-year- o~ds in my family knew things about "Looking for Mr Geodbar" that Ihe direc- tor himself has probably forgotten me fact that movies now roll 24 hours a day across the television screens in a town that has less than 2(X)O people must pe having =)me effect on people's lives But what effect? In my view the most detecminative fact about w~at appears on televisiot~--movies included--is that al- most all ot it is repeatable. "The Kid from Texas came to the Royal but once. but anyone with access to at1 old-movie chan- nel can r~w probably see it severe} times a year, shOuld they choose Thanks to rerur~s, al~d vidE~3cassettes, alrr~ost at}y- thing can nowbe seen over and over• What this encourages, I think, is a ~ess oonce~tratect, even intermittent, way of S~ing movies SLno~ they have 13eCOF¢~ constantly available, peOple a~e free to treat them as casually as they treat com- mercials, sitcorns or the election returns. NO reason not to leave the room end cook a pork chop, or blOw.a ry one's hair After aik the same show w~}l be back around in a !ew deye, if !t isn't a!ready trapped on a cassette In Archer CJty, the toCel avanFgard~ i.e., those wi~ose fortunes have been freshened by the leeent oil boom*--regard the satellite dish as the most prom/sing innovation These dishes now blOOm here and there th~ou~fhout the oil 13~toh like giant ~lowers. Some of the newly rich havent had time to Upgrade their hous- ing. or even their automObiles but they ha~e quickly acquired a vmrld peI~peo ti~e where entertainment is concerned Sex shows straight from Paris, the Roya~ Ballet fr~rn London and bull fighting from Mexico City: a~ ~lese and more can be e,~pec~ly ~3ickea oul of the heavens wilh- out even leaving one's kitchen, right there in the boonias It's a part of what the newreel used to call "The Mamh of ]3me " L~rry ~cMuttrys J~tte~t novel. "Cadillac Jack¸. tr~ ces the picaro,cque #+d.~en~Jes ol an itinerant ex ~eo ~zr lv GL~OE MARCH S 19~
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THE MOMEHTI$ RIOHT TO • OUTSTANDING TEST MARKETRESULTS AND REPEATSALES • CONTINUINGADVERTISINGAND PROMOTION SUPPORTAND CONSUMER OFFERS MEW LUCKY STRIKE RLTERS OUP OR BOX. RETAILERS: DISPLAYING AME~CAN~ QUALITY BRANDS CAN MEAN EXTRA MONEY FOR YOU THERE'S A PLAN TO RT YOUR OPERATION FOR FULL DETAILS CONTACT YOUR AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY REPRESENTA~VE i •
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30 UNrlED srI'A:rES I'OBACCO JOURNAL January 22. 1983 JANUARY 28.30 young Leaders Divi~iou~ Suulhern Tobacco & Candy Association, had-year nleeflng, Holiday Inn Tampa Airport, Tampa, FL Contact Kim Clawford, STCA, 30~'9 Rail*bow Drive, Ikcatur. GA 3(](](34. Tel: 4U4-243-3974 Calendar of Events APRIL MAY I~ne~'dl 15.17 19-22 North DakQta Candy & Tobacco National Conlectionery S~lesmen'~ Wholesalers+ Inc.. aon0~d ~nti0n, Ass~iation, annual convc0tiofi, HOsl HolMay lint, Bis rmxrck, Conta;I Gordon C~I, lancaster, PA Contact John T+ Emerson, BOX 818, Minok ND 5870[, Mnll~rkcy, i~CSA, 5 J~tpiter SI New 701-857 I1~+ M~momh* NJ 17748, 2~1~71-3435 FEBRUARY 13.IS Nmional A~iation for the Specialty F0od'rrade, winte~r fancy food & cmlfcc- tion show, Civic Center. Ph~nlx. COl~- laet Jean Frame, NASFf, t270 Ave of the AWerJeas, New yo~k 1~)20, 212. 5867313 16 National Candy Brokc~ Association, brokers day. Town & Connlt? Hotel. Sam Diego Contact leny Panaro, NCBA, 17~.7 Pennsylvania Ave + N W . # 1000. Washingm4n. D~ 20006. 202.785 9509 1620 Nrtiun~l Candy Wholesalers Associ ation, ammal .:.itktel convention & ex [O~iliOn. T(~n & Country Hotel. Sat, Diego Contact Audrey Payne, NCWA. ]430 K St, NW. Washlnglon. DC 20005. 202 393 6733 1%20 North Carolina Wholesalers Associ at[on. 32ad annual convention. Raleigh NC Contact J~eph ~ Wall, P O Box 71~ !~hegh, NC 27,502, 9tg-B28-gq57 MARCH 3-6 Illinois A ~,~'imion of T~O & Candy Iowl~ Maiii~tt, C~ic~go Uon~ct Bud Kelley, k~T~l~l. 82g S. 8ecnnd St , Nal~On al la~l Dlstrihntt,r~ A ~st ~.q~llion. ~nnulfl winler ~nnvenlion. Hyau Rcgen cy, New Orleans. LA Cuntact Mnrllyn Briggs. NFDA. I II E. Wacker Drive. Chicago ]L 6233Or. 312.64A.6610 16-211 N~linn~d A~m~21utltm of T(~baeeo Di~ tribnlor~, annual convention & ex[x~si tion, H}att Regency. Chicago, IL Con tact Ter~ Burns. HATD. 630 ]h~rd A~e New york, NY 10017. 212.59~. 3344 Your best choice for today's market. Borin Meke~ orU~e clgazs ollmported toba~cosJ~ce 1905 ~r~l~ ksy(., I~ Fior t~ 31~q MAY JUNE b.8 3-5 Ari~tma Aa[~ml,l$ie Merchamlisfl~g ~nnt~l convcnchm & exl~ithm, MtLf Council, inin( cnn~coti[m 'l~h¢ poinle t[olt]~nteI. Allatqla Contat~Ja~e~ln~h Rnson. phc~ni~ C~a~ctF~dT Polte[. SICA3009Ramb~Dtive.~143.1)c. ACId. P~ Bnx 328. pIx~en~x A2 tat~tr ~ .~)34 4114 ~43.3q74 gSf~01. 602 272 943[ 16 18 8-11 Indiana [nbacco Car~ly Oisteibalorb & h~l Mttrkcting Insliln~c ~nual cnn- Vendo~. annual eonvemion, Ad,~ras ven6on & EMxr,ilitm Chlcago. [ L Con Mat~ I]ole] t fo~lerly Sheraton WeslL taelMidlaelMuldcon FMI. 1750K~t. Indi~napo]i~ Contact pan] Seali. H V~. Washnl~ton. DC 20036. 2()2. ttCD~, 6101 N Cnllcg~ Ave , In 452-8444 diana[x~tis. IN 46220. 317 251-9556 JUNE {¢zatinue~) 16+19 Virginia Wholesalers and Distributor~ Asso¢ia[ion ~nnual conv~ation. ~rt Ma~ru~[ Inn. Will,amOur/. V~ Con tact: Linda V Dnwll. VWDA. Suite 2t)k Herilage Building, L0~ and Mai~ Sts . PO Box 2129¸ R~hm0~d Va 2~216. 804643-4715 19-21 Nutlonul C~llcctioners A~iation & Reiail C~nfaelio~r~ Intem~nnal. un- n~ul ennvention & j~nt exposition, e~- rad Hil~n. Chicago¸ C~nt~¢l RichvpJ O Conm'll NCA 79~ Westp~rkDr[ve, ,514. McLean. VA 22102, 703 790 5750 24.2~ W~hingttm ~tate A~s(~'iatlnn u]¸TOhae cn and Can~y Distributor, annual con vnntimi. Red Lion Inn. ~sc~. W~ Cnn ta~:Chack Hnrd. WSAIC'D p O Box 25711, Seattle+ Wa 98125 206-3~- 26-~9 [q~tinna[ t~,~iation ~i~r the 3pecialt~ I-(~od Trade. ~umnlnr faPx~ fnutf & enn te~uun ~llow Civic Cemer. ~hLn~ ~m. DC Conlaet lea~ Ixame, N~,SFr, 1270 A~e of tile Anlettca~, New York, Ny 111(]20. 212 5g~7313 JULY 12-14 finn. Fnwn & (~mmry Hmcl San Die~. Contacl Marilyq Briggs, NFDA, I I I E Wanker Drive Chicago, IL ~O~t ] * 312 AUGUST 3.7 ~all(mn~ Candy Wholesaler~ Assuci m~on ~m,~ M ~mme~ convention & eX- po~ifiOh, ~h~lalo~l Bosl(m and Hyne~ AndiR~fJnln, ~os[or3 Ma UonlzC[ An ~re~ Payne. NCWA, 1430K SI* N W, Washington. DC 24~05. 202 393 6733 18.21 I olocad4~ A ~ ~x iMion (ll I~h~n t~ ('an dy Di~¢rlbUh~r~ an~u~fl ¢,mvcnli,ul Keyshme, CO Conta,~ Mary C*'D¢[I, CA InD. p O l~ox 441134, AnTnr~t. CT] ~4, 303 1~70 6391 2S-27 ~ctail Tt~l,accu Dealers ol Alneriea'~ ~l~t annual ennvellfion an,[ natlonal trade shol~. H)au I~egcJnc~* Cltica~o Contact: Mat~31m L Fleiachel RTDA. 401 7th Ave. Ne~ ynrk. NY ]00OL 1212) 244 8650
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7~ lrJ ~a l ' Lr,r~ [,J~t~'r ~,~Z h, a ara -- lr~rrrg, r L,um .... • , r sion • Rack-and • Power h:~n t dL~c brakes • split h)ld-dt~wn rear seatbacki ° Cut frolll vehlur upholsh~ry • Tinted • Da)/night rea~'iew mirror and Marketing Inc Box 5960 , CA 92@~g Of 6"r you look, you like.
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• + The jazz that I~v~ Br uh~ek a~d ~[ De'mond at B0~t ~'s le~t~a~ S t or yville Club. 1954. DAVE BRUBECK Early Fantasies TRIO. Dave Brubeck. C+i Tj~ter. Ron Crorty. QUARTE L Dave Bvabo:k Paut Desmond. Lloyd D~vis. ~yat t Ruth=r. OCTET. Dave Brabeck. Paul Desmor~d. Cal Tjader. Dave Van Krled:. Btll Smith. Dick Co/[in+• Bob Collins. Jack \Veeks SOLO pIANO. Dave Brubeck. 37 rare cur* from the {amous Fantasy ~ecord label. Here are the cuts recorded between 1948 and 1956-that made Brubeek's reputation* that in troduced Paul Desmond and Cal Tjader to an ~nternaOona/ audience Here is the jazz that changed iaaz. Despite ~heir impor ~ance, most of these 37 cuts had been long buried in storage vaukts-ou~ of print ~or years. Re~enr 1¥, wlrh the help of Dave Brubeek hkmsel[, who s~leeted each of the cuts, we made them as~ilabl¢ to member~ of the Book- nf.she.Month Club We invite you now to ~r~loy thetg+ too How to auditiun Early Fa+ltesies with no obligation and no club to join. To charge on Visa or MasrerCard, call our toll- free uumber: 1.800-345-8540, Ext ~46. in pel/os¥1vanta, [~3-fi62-5180, Ext #46, Opera. tors are available 24 hours • day. 7 days a week. To order by mail, s~nd your check or money order to Booker-the-Month Records, C~mp Hill Pa 17~12. Please i.dude the item number of the ~et you want, shipping and hatldkittg charge of $175 (and sales tax if you live iv, Ny or PA) Also, please x~ rite the code number (lower r~ht c~rner of this ad) on your order. ~or a h~e reci ebooldet, wnteHitamWalkerCordials,I~O-B°x22$5, FarmingtonH~L~" M I 48018 ~S~pI~. 60 Pr~o~ Hiram Walker & Sons, Inc., San Franc,sen, CA. © 198 I AllanW. Ecke pushes back the frontie In the fifth volume of his acel£1med Winni~u~ of rt A~eriea series, Allan Ecke tells in compelling detail how Amerlean settlers wrested control of the southern Great Lakes from the BriOsh and the. Indiaas establishin, g Chteago as a major contmen- tal tradin center. "This a~sorbing 704-page bioekbu~tor...'recreates the frontier struggle with undeniable conv~ctlon and accurae~ This is a vast wilderness drama held together by the stories of Illustrated with maps LITTLE, BROWN and COMPANY
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i: little gkzy can't win? Tnc~e who dismiss basketball as a game for the glandularly imbalanced are missing the point, AS in point guard¸ The poim guard's role is to shoulder the bulk of the bail-handling burden~* first, to dribble the ball upcourt and then, from ~he "point" above the fre~thmw cir~ ole, to diPe~t hie team's offerlse Even if yo~ have a giant under the basket, it dCeSn'~ mean a thing units you've got a li~le guy who can get him the ball¸ And ~aL feFIOw Students, is the whole polnt of the 13oJnt ~uard, Take last year'~ NCAA Tournament¸ With a thigh in jut y hampering Vir-: Othell WilSOn, 7'4" Ralph Sarnp~n became a vit~Jal spectator, touching the bell utes of a two~oint loss to Ala- bama-Birmingham On the other handr point guam Jimmy Black wa~ one Of the herae~ of North Carolina's championship baam, dishing off a garnc~ligh seven n~ists in the final againet G~orgs- town~ncluding the garne-winnm with just 17 seconds lelt to play• Such evidence does not, howev~, impres~ New York Knick' executive Dave DeBu~chere "Whats ad ~alk about point guards and were L¢~ types of guards; these who gould play and those who couldn'~, '*mi3e garfle*$ Cfl 8J3g~ "atl~were ~ar- 17 Brake, who scou~ the COllege ranks for the NBA. "players are quicker anO defenses are better Jug[ get~ing the ball upc(3urt can be a ~no~lumental task" This season's Geo~etown-Virginia game, says Brake, may haVe been bi44ed as the "CJash of the Titans~" but • big reaSOn Virginia won is that their point guards were able to handle Georgetown's press The first thing you look for in a point guard, according to NBC'S AI McGuire, is quickness. "He's got to be a t~it of a waterbug," McGu[re says "But he's got to have a head, too Hes your coach on T~ GUJDE M*~RCH 26, 1~ the flaor~icklng U~ the tempo when you're behind aria putting ~t in the re#ig- ~r~tor when you're 8haled " One thing a point guard can't have is an ego problem¸ Which is something that Dirk f~inniefield, the hi[~hly regarded point guard t0r Kentucky, understands. "My job is to keep the big g~ys happy," he says, "They try a let harder for nd~out~ds when they Imow they'll get the bali back at the ~lJler end of the court.~ "A point guard's a role ~lay~r," adds ~lcGuire, "And ~hat role is ~ make other people look good." Acid sometimes, ~ls Get,on P, ustl¢l proved against pat Ewing~ ri's to make took bad Indeed, Tt takes a certain personality to run the offense and forage among the re~woods, says Villanova coach RoJlie Massimino, whose Dwn poi~t guard, Stewart Granger, Is a strong All America canCtid~te. "you really don't make a ¢oit*t guard, ¸¸ sighs Massimino, "if '#0u're lucky, you find one." Nevada-Lee Vegas coach Jerry Tar- kanian found his sitting actc~s the break- fast table, It's ~is son, Danny¸ "rm sure," coac~ Tar~anian admits, 'lt~t I yel~ at Danny' morn than any other p~ayer on the team." B~ thats the nature of the pO~rUon, he explains~ "A point gparc~ c~n't mak~r em3rs If he stumbles, the who~e team fells apart" What's kept the si~Jati~n Irom becorrP ing a problem, says the elder T~d~a~ian, is that "Danny knows his ro~e: he plays hard. under o0etrOl anO rnosI of a~e gives the ball up when he sP~out~" C~n suc~l unselfishness be c~ae~l~? The benCh, lheotlzes Rollie Masstrnino, can be a great teacher. Qn his team, if yo~'re not unselfish, you deal play much BUL as Gordc~ Austin points out, the value of unse~ishne~s ~ fr~uentiy driiled into the brains of small ~l~ye~ long Iota they reach college, Literally. "Growing up," says Austth, "1 was al~ ways the ~ittlest guy on the court. If I tOOk a ~hot," he ChuCKles "sor~ebody On my OWn team WOl~ld smack me on the head." P i , i
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• : [[. • • " Join tl~ Ar~ Rem'~. k's the best ",).'ay men" n',~y of the benefi~ that come ~¢r/~n~ in the ,but wid~out " ~. ~ you're a ~ughh~ m~den~ 17or older, '¢ou can learn a valudole flail. We elecconu~ medical techn i au~o- mo~ve repot, to ~me~u~°a~. Youll aho be emided ~o pX pr~vi- ]elcs, Iow-o~ [i~e imuran~, ~md ~m ¢redi~ tov,~d renremeat. TI~ ex~ m~',W voull ~ro~ o,,er $1,200 a yem-, will mine in hm~ly, uJo. And, ~ ~m Army Rm~tvi~ you'll f~el d~t q~l kind of ~id~ a~0o~u~:l with • your ~ouncry. ~ differeace is, you'll ~'/~e r~ght /n your own aoram~/t~ One ~elcer~ a month ~ two weeks a ./e~r. F~r roam~ Lrlm~a~n, o~nmt~ your hc~l An~ay ~ rem/*tet. C~ ~oll fte~ 80D-421-4422. In ~ 8~-252- ~11. Aladm ~ Hawaii. 800~23-2244.
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Burning a DUCK iS hard. fnioying it shouidn't be. Y You work just as hard to pick up a spare as you do on your job. It's Worth it. Especially when the Iast frame is finlshed-and the first Kess er's poured. Because Kessler S a smooth, easy whiskey- as smooth as silk. And Kessler's a smooth, eas~ too.
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~ ~,,~ ,:. i. ,i,~ .-. ,~ ~ . • ~..
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McEIhenny, sometimes billed as the last of the great white open-fie~d runners in the National Foot bell League¸ The pilot succeeded in ~elllng ~he package, and the world was introduced to Greatest Sports Legends, the o~dest 6y~dicated spotts series on television, TO film the first collection of episodes, Roffeld. wittl little to offer guests exceDt a smile and a fund of oOmpliments, was able to bring into the fold such prlme i livestOCk as Mickey Mantle, Start Musial, J Bob Cousy and Elgin Baylor The shoot- ; ing studib? The third floOr of ~ San i Marco, of course "T~e pay t0r each was only $500,.¸ recalls Rolfeld "E]ut they got i some great pasta with it" i Losthg its noodles the first year. Ihe sedes came back the second with a fOrml0able line,up including Sam Snae.d. Ba~t Start, DOak Walker. Willie Shoemakm" and Jim Taylor. "We had to t:*orrow $150,000 i¥om the bank, On v~lr[ous COllaterals. to do the second aeries of 17 allows," says Ratteld. "And we lOSt money again. The icJea f~ nelly took off in our filth year and we have bern extremely SUCCeS~u~ since." T~e shaw won,an Emmy for its .Jackia RobirP son episede last year. Rot~ld'$ s0nl Steve, was the write¢ The show's format is uncomplicated, if not puerile, Film cfips of the athletes in ~ion ~ wPappcd around ae inteP/i~ in which the her0 updates his lile and discusses his sport today ~ fee re* mains SS0C~ and even thD pasta has been removdd as • fri~ge beeefit siaee ~le shooti~:j grOueds have been shifted to the La Cc~sta Resart i~ Carlsbad, Cal For the SUm it pays. how can Spa/re Lege,lds attract SUCh super persOn~tli- ties? It is only a guess, but Roifeld teals the magic ~ord is "Leg and." It is a term at~tetes find irresistible It er tticE~ Afraid Palmer to fly all the way from Pennsyl- vania to California in his own phlne re1 a filming. It brings in Joe DIMaggio, Willie Maya, Warren Spah~ and John UnrTas The fishing recluse, Ted Wiffiama, ¢011a in from the streams of Nova Scotia¸ His raced is dar~ hi~ appearance fishy. He glowers at Rotfi~ld, then smiles lhin~y w OU~E A='RIL 16, 1 q~lB3 "1 migilt like you, at that," he conc~Bs = i "You're not wearing a tie." Williams and t, Bill Veeck are sports' most formidabJe opponents of neckwear, ~ Tom ,~aver, host of the series that year, ,~ talks Williams into going out to s high- i~ schoot tie~d nearby. The camera is roiling I~ A schoolboy pitcher, who is 23-and-~, 6~rows Ted a amokeball The 6/-ye~r-Old Williams slams it over the right-field ~ fence~350 feel "My God!" Seaver screams to the audience "O~ you see 6~at swing? ~at's the Teci Williams I idolized" Wilt Chamberlain did sur~ swinging, too. Ardv]l~ at La Costa In his ~antley, ha was given a lu0(uq/ suite befitting his Con6nent~J test~. Once settled, he or- dered two bottles of Dam Perigno~l, ~t $80 a bottle. "During his stay," says F~Ot- reid. "he ~nd friends ~onsumed at least 14 b0ttles of that b~t our expense." In the long and happy life of the series, the producem ha.~e been rejected by only four Legends. Jim Brown didn't like the pay. Customarily shy. S~u~ Ko~ax v.lote, "This is one legend I want to keep quieL" Ben HOgan said no without e~olanation And while Jack NiCklaus allOWs he may ~: shownfind t[metor the series ~e day, he haSn~up yet. t " Credited with cracking two tough cases ls Jayne Keflne~dy, tall ~ncJ deli~ous host- l~ ass at the 1963 series, which goes on the ~) Nr ~is month for a 41-week rue K~nnedy induced Legends Kaream Abdul~?=bbar ~rld Bill RM~ell, pravioualy impossible to ~, capture, to appear wdh ~. NOW 10rig cal~ a series like this continue i tO pull the =trirlg? "1 think we C~ Dull it for as long ~si ! people worship 9boris heroes and argue i it= bars." SaYS Rated "~ports is p~rt of , our cultuce Lik~ opera singers, eaters and writers, il~ artists will endure efld- ", In a ~ent tr~,~ion, ~ld and his ' wife bought the pmpedy housing the San ~ Marco Restaurant. They i~o remodeled ~: the third floor, where corporate head- q~er~ of SI~ Legands, I~., mr~ins
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myou economy car in this pictm.e? A~un~ikel as it seerns, you're look. ~tlg a~/~. ~at stylish BUick Sky~rk. ab°U~theeconornycarJnourpi¢, o~o~.~ tune is that nobody pictures i¢ as an
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Set Liel feJt J had to )eave, run ~way from ev- eryt hing and be a fugitive from my- Self," he reCalls. '1 felt trapped, No one looked at me a9 a human b@ing. I couldn't get on with my life." Eventually, alarmed by his depen- dency on the Cubs,' organization, which had paid his salary for ~5 years, Banks went to a psychl~legist. "She helped rne to get the right perspective on things," he says, "lPs fabulous be- ¸ ing a baseball star, But too many peo- ple direct you~ life. Yo~'re always do- ing what you're told, I lust wanted to be alone ¢,o I could find some aftswers. On~/recentJy have f regained some control of myself." A ft~'dolrig some Customer rel~tgo ns work for a Chicago bank, Bai~ ks be- came deterr~ned, he ~aye, to be rrlore than "a cigar store WOOden Indian," He hopes evenfually to obtain a degree )n finance from the University of Chicago. Banking i~ an exclusive club; white. rich, by invitation only. But Banks has worked hard for admission. "It's going to be a while before I get to play far this to&m," ha oortoed(~s. "Blacks aren't exaetiy in the m~inst ream of banking. I'm getting there, though. You - h~ve to develop credibility; And I've done that by going to school," .... Once he ha~ arrNed at hi~ p Banks, 52, plans to enjoy more than the v~ew. "Being a pathfinder, that's what ( want," he says. "The baseball provid- ed a Htfle entertalnmenf; now I real~y want to do something for people. In my bank, people would gel money based on sweat equity, not collateral, rm es- pecially interested in new business de- velopment, rising nations, the Third World. Tapping an oil well in Nigeria or developing farms in Saudi Arabia, that's what I want to do= "Sure it's a few year~ off. Dreams don't become r eali~ that easy. But the Establishment, the top of the econom- ic club, is where I want to be, t don't want ¢0 be a pea bra(n. I remember kids asking me, 'Why do you want fo be a banker? You're a big star.' But the real bottom line et life is, 'What have you do~e )afety?' Elaseball is reagy thee past now. I want it to go away." V|nce DJMagg)o: Uving in a afteranother, from bartender ~o brother's long shadow carpenter, from milkman to liquor DIMaggio. The name is a national tree- Today, after 11 years of'traveling sure. It evokes all the Innocence, }oy door to door with cosmePo~, deter- and promise of the game In ~ t~me gents and bribes, he often takes a whenmenseemedmoreheroic. The day et f to g0 gshing, tend to his garden nlemorlesareetJoitin'Joe, thepoker- or study the Bible In antialpP, tion of be- faced kid who did all his talking with a Ing called to "that hJgherleague." in- bat and moved in I~ dizzying, glamor- alsting that he's found inner peace, he eLlS wodd. He is the quiet m&rt who says only one thing disturbs him. Ex- married Marllyn Monroe and who sept for a phone call every six months, feathered his retirement with Mr. Oat- or a fleeting glimpse et his brother on fee commercials. TV; Vince, like the rest of us, has been But the name also belongs to Joe's forced to wonder, "Where have you older brother, Vtnce, who at 70 is a gone, Joe DiMaggie?" Fuller Brush salesman In Los Angeles. "Joe's e.lw~.ys been a loner, and he , A competent, lighEhitting out fielder always will be," says Vlnoe. "When the from 1937 to 1946, Vince has had to folks were alive we were a lot closer. scramb/e to ~urv/ve. H~S retirement But f gueGs in the test four yea~ i've from baseball meant one job change seen him two Gr three gmea. What can I =i ~ould ~lay the outfield bert ~ ~d~n Joe," says Vlnce. ~lSut b~t~g; foeget it."
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GMC'S JIMMY AND NEW TRIJO~S AJ~E INIIAT WEll [ ALL ABO U rl
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: ........ you look, *~' :!ithefi~ore you l~e.
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2noA ol palelaJ asia auoatuos le4~ auO ~noA plO; aq leLIl auO , A8OIS ADVIS A]]NV/S V :IAVH DOA OCI ~ FO~sed q~[q "aJ il!q ~reu3s ~qluuV inj lu~o0s!p ~J~wolsn~ oql u~til J~ql~ Suno3~]? II1UO!ldoo×~ ue ~Ll~',~Ol]~ I~ -uo!l!ppe % I *sl~Jnl3nJnqcLu oql ~]u!~lu • I3V so[t~S ~11~111~!,) J]e~[~ ~11 u! a~l~ll~ ilml~q uo a~IlpULUOJ (llSltl~UI pul~ IL~qlrI ~p,iJ:~£ ~q] ~ql~q pOLH~31 juI ~a~!~ .~d '~nl~S i,~,a,i Zalll~t i~p~l:d ~ ui "l!ptd3 J~J~] ~oJJ~ Ill pq~q ~u]~J~u~r~ 311~ff!~ e /qt!~ JO) Io ~Yeld U! I!p,%~ 3O J~iioI ~[q I1[ p-~,~[O ~ U! ~[lU~3~J ~n;~ ,f ~;]~[ ",k~N J~> azn#l~lRBal Jo 9lieq tq aAIlOe I'N 10 VGI ~ql ~ ~n~uo3 p~:t~u[ aq) z~l ~lu~p ;~ to uo!leJmaOuo~ t~llu~ ' ;pF,~Og~U '~luaod -urnS ~o ¢~nOH ~ £q ~3,~aopuj '!/~[ g] p~l~C,~jllueg[ ~e s,V eu~c.ckue~ s~cD pu~ o0,,IKO1 pOD¢I~ Jo u0~u!q .moo e ¢J~ s~ll~b~ :f#lg£1 ~ql '.~qs ~uo~ ~ ~u14n ~ plse p~[IOZpU~H I1[ pc~q] JlS[p ~upq ~'~J ~e ~]touop "S'[I u! p~lnq!Jl~lp :6U.laq s,V euJaoduJes 'a31t~g7 'l~Jpl]q90oJql pine :opU!ln~ uI '~J]~ s[q £q po;,[~zns ~[ UaqlV Sl~;of ~q (q p~pu~ s oe. nq ~ uod • pu~ • ~uI u,aS ,-~ 'p:*qlv T~l $o lut~l!t:~d ":oqiv ' i £~IM $ :1 J ' HDI~AN:=I~pj D lJeqlV "p Aeup!S pue pleUO~ '~uol t~e4 t:~3!u~S ~ll~] £~[ -~!IIS "o$[~ s!q .~q p~.~!~ns ~! "J~!ulr,S "[~JS[ Jo ~l~]s ~ql ol ~l!t~J ~4o!u~oS ~LD o stloI Px]~J uo~ ~ldOt4 u~ffqd ~q oj ~ pu~ ~u~!ls]ltL~ JO l[c4lno~ leUOll~BN ~t~ ~q .~tnf u! p~0uoq ~:~ i i!'~ :(o!u~S SJ~lCSaloqA~ ~p~:) [euolleN Cql pae ~Jolnq[q~K] o~:~]03, to ~lO!l~!aOS$V Ie ~pUe~ pue O~1~qo1 ~O UO!Ie!C~V e!U "~qUCPJIf~3eS tt] pue ~[J ISe~ ~ql U[ sd!q~J~lng!JIS!p ~ltm!t u0~ t3;~1o~q o~.i s]~[ ~lttl~, In~lJ ~ql p~l~J~lo 'raq~ ~.'~!usoS .~q poqs![qe~s~ uuU ~! -i~q!J'~]p ocoeq~l p~Je .0?e~ xo~tu e -o3 ~:AJIII j;.uq ~ J~ 09 Jn ~e o~11~ p~!p ot~ :~a!USOS P~I/¥ [~m:l :(IN,d:4) ODSIC*NV)]d NVS 09 'Ho!usos Ul~.lel/q 6¢ 7VN~IOOf ODDVSO,I, S~'IV, LS O&l,lNfl gt~6[ 'ZZ IT3dV
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THE MOMENTIS RIOHT TO • OUTS~NDING TESTMARKETRESULTSAND REPEATSALES • CONTINUtNGADVERTISINGANDPROMOTION 5UPPORTAND CONSUMEROFFER~ NEW LUCKY STRIKE RLTER$ CUP OR BOX. RETAILERS DISPLAYING AMERICAN'S QUALITY BRANDS CAN MEAN EXTRA MONEY FOR YOU 7FIERES A PLAN TO FIT YOUR OPERATION. FOR FULL DETAILS CONTACT YOUR AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE m
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the news publication of tobacco/confectionery distribution Cig. tar and nicotine levels down from 1981 WASHINOTON, DC: The average I Cillarctt¢ ~llokcd irl America I~sl Tear U.S, ~411~.Weighted Averlge yJ~,k~ 12,5 milli~ras of t~, and 92 Cigarette Tar & Nicotine YIBIdJ~ milligrams nic0tine, both down slightty Twr'~ .-- ~='=m'* ~ from 1981 le eels, ~ Tobacco Institute ~ ~ =* r~cetLtly annoul~c~d, i ~ f The federal g~vernmonl defines +~A ei~SrellgS ~,ielding 15 mg and belc.w as ~ Historiealty. aegording to T'nu In PJ stitut¢, I~le Washington ba~d tilde ~ 26 grc~up ~t I1~ US cigarette mann factur ~. ~ ci~aleK¢ ~lelded a pgak 37 9 mg of lat in ~ ~o 1956 'fhe seer,~e lar yield had drc~F~ ~ ; ,~ ~o23~m~in1964~v!~en~kehrstSer. ~ ~ = ~ gco, General's r~i~ct on sl~oking and ~ health ~ released, and has been falling ~ et~ns[stent~v sln~ in res~t~e Io ~olt ' s.mer tlelll:trl~ The MaxweJ] Re ~1% an i~et~end~ ~l ~c~t~rce of cigarette indaslry ~ales, ~; Ii~lated III1¢ ]asl year tbR[ ]ew-lar r~o <i~m'ettes now ~omTclse $g.8% of the IS=a I~'~ I~o .~ 1~,~ I~r~ i~ I~ dolnestic market In 1970, low-tar cigarettes/leld on13~ a 3~ market sl~e. ~l~.eakZ69mgintgSS Tar yield is determined by dra~i~g The 13g[ Federal Trade ~lllmissi¢~ cigarette smoke through a special filter rcp,~rt on t~r and nicoline yields, iss~d pari[c aisle I~la~/er collected o~ the liher is ciga/elle bra~d~ ~esled yield no more t han ~eighed a~d atmlyzed for ~islure and IConti~tued o~/,.age 20) nicotine ~nt~l O~lee lhe~ elements have been subt.~.~ed, lee resulling yield i~ ~ulk~d ,,rut ", U~TJ Interview Chilcote c,ites growing need for unified action the sales weighted ,%( :2 F~ i~o dh~droppedftOln II,~Z r O ," g U.S, Tobacco makes waves with smokeless We're 5l,~,a~ing gith Peter GhitlmL llberld The new pdicy will begin m acctmnls ind Iheir eBSlOlllcrs Ill market our ~txhtet~ eorteet fy On any iicw moisl srrK~keless prodtu:l intr~luction~, ~.e ~i[I extend If~% cl,~l 100~ ~redit is ~lill in e~)e~t for oltr other klhlc¢o ~ine~, ~lJ: Whal linnet ~,lll the new I~l- ey h~e on I~ e~uriler ? Ghll0~L: II¸ all f~:tor~ a~ working well il will have little ~r n~ imp~t on Ille ¢onsnrnet, ol~r th~ to provide frcsher dltes fbr (=int t)n the re[ai( ~fl~ll, Onr WAT~ phone line ordcrin~ ~ystem b~l~d uptm our weekl~ .~wrag~ ~fdcr nat {Iilt dbu ti~]l, [Jail fu~-tinns ale v, ntk in~ well, we ~oa]d N. lm ning a~lt pr~- nn damaged gt~l~, (C~mtinved ~at l.~lge 6) .... ~~.m.~L.~,...~.~ ~
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Why Bell Just ask: Who brings you 107 years of experience. And has hundreds of styles to show you. From the latest cordless to early Americana. Who stands behind each phone, whether we make it, or someone alse makes it for us. Because if it says Genuine Bell, it's made toour high standards for quality and engineering. Who never forgets: This isn't the phone. This is, Who has all the things connected to phones. From 25' cords to modular jacks. Who even has a 24-beur service assistance number which comes with every phone. Who has the people and the places where you can go and feel good about buying a new phone. Look for this sign.The Bell PhoneCenter. After all, who knows more about phones• Who knows more about phones.
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German engineers were pleasecL But not surprised. 5000S bdst]es with fresh ideas. Such as million kilometers in Europe, Africa and mostaerodynamJcluxurysedan. flush mounted side windows that provide North America, Ifthathel~smakeitthemostbeautifulfor panoramic visibility Together with bonded So confident are we of its quality we've you, all the better frontandrearwindews, theyvirtuallyelimJ given the 5000S our new 2z$-month, *YourPorscheAudidealerhaseomplete note wind noise. An almost unheard-of unlimitedmileagewarranty* information on this ~imlted warranty. For quiet awaits you inside the sumptuously And we've included a long list of luxury your nearest deaie5 call toll Iree (800) 447- appointedluxuryinterior features as standard equipment, including 4700. **Manufacturer's su~lgested retail Ouallbt Bmkl~ By Out Outstanding our new electronic Auto Cheek system, price, Trio, taxes, transportation, registra- NeAr ~tanrant'# The 5000S is one of the Perhaps, most surprising, is the pric~: A tion end dealer delivery charges additional few automobiles in existence that wiJl not very reasonable $15,800'* for the worJd's PC3~CI-II~+~U.II~I ©]ea3Por~h,A~i b,,onOe °odso'etebyo entheeom,oo ' thC-- ofengineeri e decade. It is built rock solid for years of .~ :~ - dependablemoteitng Roadtestedover3,2 ~'.~J. ~ ~.~-
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Honda can give you al! the power you need for good times in the great outdoors. With a complete line of fightweight, portable generators from 500 to 800 watts, Each is really easy to operate, Just turn it on, pull the cord and you're off and running, Honda generators are ideal 'F~eept on EM500 for lighting up a campsite, charging the boat battery, powering small appliances, or providing standby power. Each one features a quiet, reliable Honda four-stroke engine• An advanced Oil AlertTM system that warns when the oil level gets too low." An Auto- matic Decompression system and CD Ignition for quick, easy sbrts. And a USDA approved spark arrestor muffler so it can even be used in National Parks. So if you're looking for the best generator to fit your outdoor power needs, size up a Honda. Check your Yellow Pages for the Honda Generator dealer nearest you taday, T'S HONDA
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Goodrich E C. D.E This un/que combination d advanced mate~ and techno/ogy sets Rata/TI~. fires apari from the re~: A. Deep ~ead depfl~ ~ve, ~d seven ~ v~de. E Four-~y DuroC-~~ ~o~ded ben s~em. Dua~ compo~d ~ead. D. Two rad~u/pl/es. E Wra'~d ~ad deign. ~1987~B~dr~ C~
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52 UNI'] II) SLATES "[~Oi~A CCO/()URN AI. M;ly 22, 198~ I_ ~alendar of Events 1 AUGUST I~,nt~n~l) y-<.~ trade SHOW, Hilt Oa Fa~c~,~ dcl R~, 5~ TAT~D ~$00 Shoat C~ek Blvd., UX, S~ffFF~M~ I£R IF THEY'RE NOT ON ...... ~'~'~"°'~"~"°°~ .... ~ IH.2I r'ol~lr~ oh 43215¸ (614) 2~ 3435 ~cau~ hyl~r s 1~3e aztd L-~[ G~ett I*lu w~ I~f ~ mo,~ Jar c~hintmth~lXO~r~[~lr~n%ml~6oncor, t~t~our]oc~o~wc~clt~ t~ ~ Mealphi~ ra Co~.ct: MI Ji~u~ie 1 ~lm execu~i, e dlre~lut FW~JA 2t~32 AUGUSI ~.28 ~tone ~,, C~l~t Mary (J Del~ t~:t J,,hh R H,~ ~¥WA 22~3 ~X~4 ~J~ ~ ~L ~V 2~18 304 5~9 [~r~ OCTOHER
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THE MOMENT IS RIOHT TO STOOK-UPJVOW • OUTSTANDING TEST MARKET RESULTS AND REPEAT SALES. • CONTINUING ADVERTISINGAND PROMOTION SUPPORTAND CONSUMER OFFER~ NEW LUCKY STRIKE FILTERS CUP OR BOX. RETAILFRS: DISPLAYING AMERiCAN'S' OUALI TY BRANDS CAN MEAN EXTRA MONEY FOR YOU THERESA PLAN TO FIT YOUR OPERATI~ FOR FULL DETAILS CONTACT YOUR AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANYREPRESENTATIVE
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3~ UNIIED STATES 10~ACCO JOURNAL Julle ~ 1983 of Events JUNE 10.12 Mi~nesol~ Cxndy & T~hacco Di- M~dd~s Re~, ~[~r~, Mn Con ~ct A~dfey N~$Sheim. I1~1 Plymu~h Bmldh~g, Mio~capOlls, M~ $5402. (~t2) t39 ~121 Kentucky I~b~cco & C~y Associ ~C~ [*O Box 2129. RJehm~d, Va 24.~ Calendar JIrL¥ H~tel CIlL~g~ Conl~t: R ~ WoLfL 900 B~ Dr. M~ami B~, n 33141~ Nalian~l F~d Di~ibutot s A~t~km fio~. Tu~ll & Ce,un~ Hrl¢l San Diogo ~4 f,,51 I] AUGUST 3.7 dP.y Pa! ~g,NCWA i430 K 5~ N W.. W ~hi~g~on, DC 2~05 2O2 393~733 Slm,e Co C~mt~Cl Mary O Dell, 1~-21 Michigan T~bac~o & Ca~ly VCl~d~t~ A ~c~a~ma a~.al uonwm~tu~ Boy~ L~sing Mi, (~171372~323 N~i~,,,~l ~s~i~l~ I~r Lhe $~¢~h~ ~l 71h Av~ N~ york, NY I~L AUGUST ic~:~ 2~.28 ~gn~a~ co~w~n La~,~w /an & C~ Club, Morganco~, WV Con- ~c~ John R ~lo~s, WVWA, ~3~ M~l]~- I~, PO. BOX 1774, H~nti~gt~n, 2~71~, 3~29 1412 ! ~ ~ As~[~io. of Tob~cc~ apd C.~dy Di~Ltibulocs ~?th ~n~l coe~nli~ m .~d r,~ ~ho~, HIl~ ~al~Jo ~l Rio, San A.iotlfo T~ Cont~t: ~ Ratc[[ff, TATCD 78OO ~ Cm-k Bird, F~ Chan~c p~k $~t~e ?~0 g, Austin T~ 7~7~, (~/2) 4~ [251 S~:PTEMBER I¢-15 ~y Di~trib~to[~ ~n~al coav~n~to~ Bc~t C~nt~c~ M~lyn Mad~o~ MAICD f~ 442 155~ ~ Ph~l LOU~ItC e~ec~iw ~Lce p~ • ea[ Q~zl~,c H3A ?W~ Jel 514 ~2 4129 Candy Di~q.~/.~t~ ar,,~u~l ~,n~e~tion ~iu,, P~ CoMta~u I,ATC[~. ~t~ IO~ E~OSl [no ¢7~ LJn~le Rd H~n~trg P~ ]Till ~71~) ~39 216~ 22 2~ Ohi,, A~ocJ~i,,n of ~b~ueo & C:Jndy I~ N,~th C~qumhus Oh Cont~q: ~cn~ T~,C~ OA~D ]6 E ~ 5;. I~ib.cc,. Di,Eri~ut,.r. A,~,~i~llo~ ~f SEPTEMBER ico~it~t~ N~W Ig ~sey, 34th ann~al convlnti~, TDAN~ 576 Ce~r ~l Ave, ~t orang, NJ tlTOIS, (201) ~7~ 8~O 28~0 Tenn~ss~- Who[~s~c G~.~e~ A~c~ atic~ ~nu~] ¢~mion,l'eabody H~ Memphis Tn Con~t: M~ Jimm~e DUn~, ~¢~tiw divot, TWGA 2~32 ~ostc~ C~i hton D~ • ~ash~i]le, T~ ~7204. (61) 25~35~1 Marylan~ A~ocia~i~ o~ ~ob~e~ ~d C~ly D~lyi~ato~ a~[ coav.nEic~ Shc[acoa t Iotel Oce~ (its, M~ Con tacl: r~ Kar tt~an. ~ Ocea~ pinc~ Berlin¸ Md 2181[, (3~ll) ~24 2~4 OCTOi~ER Gophcr ~.,~ Club ~kn~ual Friendship Dinncr q~l~dcrbird MOtel Mi~n~ ]i~ Mn C,,nl~ct Dol.~es pc[ligre~,, $o Mh~lle~po~i~. M~ 5~423 National A~tom~q~c ~e~h~ndi~ing pIJ~Eu ChtCa~o C~nta~: N~t~o~l A~r, t~E Me~handl,in~ Assoch~ti~ ~ $~ Dearb,,rn ~t Chicago 606n3 ~311~ 346 O37O DECEMBER CMA, II0~ 171h 5~ [4W. W~hi~ t~ll, I~C 2~J3~ re1 2~ 466 307O 2-7 ~L~. N~wOrlc~m LA ConEact Miclt.~] K~ng ~ 1916~ N ~ • ~fk ingLE,n DC 21~6 ~b2 ~l ~120 Herbert Maddock I I/RJI~ ~JB) H,,be~ M~dJ,,:k Iobacco Co ~llh hi~ family darling th~ t[tr ~o ~ H J Madd~k Ill Kcvh~and
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also be deveJoped [hrot,gh intimacy The more two people make love to each other, the beltef il iends tc De Imp0[ence, on the olher hang, is a very vague wore, ~lnd is some~hi'lg that has Ihree possible as- pects¸ Gqe you don't get h~ird enoug:~ to D~[t~r~ b~t~3, ~otl Cf3me too SOQ(I[ 0[ three, you don't come at all, In your ease, you cen come el] right, but you have probtem getting hard¸ This could be caused ~Y the type ol backgloiJn~ yo~ ~e- scribed Fn this case you may need more heJp tha~ you are likely to £;et from ~ girl frtend Your best hope is sg× therapy. Mear~white, thi~ situation should not charm you AJmo~t every ma~ ~[t some ~ime (it a~other has feelings of sexual inade- q~l&¢y #, tr3ver (3f ruirte, w~3 i~ Qrte of the qorniest s~uds [ ever knew, told me oi a girl qe once loved lrorn afar¸ He finally lured her into his bed and found himself totally impoter~t When he got rt, It was loo much for him or maybe il was a dleappointme'~l LATE-NIGHT RERUNS My b~y~end and I have been seeing each other ~r at)aut fotjf years ~t]d have been
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our Business Class An aisle. ? MCST 37HER CAW ~IERS Oiler a,rlr/ }yi'l~ ( Jlaiy Si£t you six ac/oss Jn BusJ~e5:; ( Jk[58 Or ever~ eislh: U~ Ami!aha¸g /~" ~'g ~ W'e ~,e&l ynL. four across¸ Tw~ wide sb~b; nn ore 5idP- O~ tLe ~lar ~ aD~ i,'~q o~ th~ ct~!l V~I:~" a ~uge a Sic in between¸ ~o theres ~[erl~ 9f room :~ s~n:: j Jr aJk p cl LJ~: 51 !~cb :~r:ur !e~s !n YOU~J ~%'ed J~ a~e, ~e ~he ~r~a dn~ ~oii I~ 11.-o :ba~i ~ta~ipg ,vith CDCKtails arid contin,Ji~,g through a ~L.pe'b I~Liar ml!~l A, rG fh~'e~ ec [y Sc::,~'b s~('p}sinq f'oq~ the Afitafia Boutique tea bring lhe best s I:a;a - ianon B ,11; topi ,2/la }an o. Gann; V~rsac~. TrL.SSZ~/C]J, Valentiflo and n''re BuT vo~ d~ri: "av, :) we: t I youre on : *~ard [o expr'll~aCe our ~JSIReSS Class s~'v :o It £?arL ,,:l ~ ep ir?~tG r~sc~ fi Et?:~ L~r~ exclu;ive Waltn9 oanL]e And it L'cr blzqe~- a~er ~:)J tir, g ~'~[~i sniP. O '~ I~*~ and 2:ll:e .'.h D #DU retel,~ i Hertz C~r qr a room :~t a Joil~ ir Cic~ m/)lel ~! ext :,'~! :~ h¸ tc ,~a• m&~e gu'e :r:~!: fly with us lli alia
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m 0 0 U)
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German engineers were pleased. But not surprised. 5000S bristles w~h fresh ideas Such as flush-mounted side windows that provide panoramic visibility. Together with bonded front and rear windows, they virtually elimi- nate wind noise An almost unheard-of quiet awaits you inside the sumptuously appointed luxury interior. Quality Backed By Our Outstanding New Wsrrant~ The 5000S is one of the few automobiles in existence that will not be renderedobsoletebyeventhecoming AL,,di the decade, It is built rock solid for years of 0epenc~abte motoring. Road tested over 3.2 million kilometers in Europe, Africa and North America. So confident are we of its q u aliW, werve given the 5000S our new 24-month, ~Jnlimited mileage warranty?' And we've included a long llst of luxuo/ features as standa~ equipment, including our new electnonic Auto Check system. Perhaps, mcJst surprising, is the pdce: A very reasonable $35,800" for the worid!a most aerodynamic luxury sedan. If that helps makeit the most beautiful 1or you, all the betteL "Your Porsche Audi dearer has complete info[mation o~ this limited wartenty. For your nearest dealer call ~oll-free (800) 447- 4700, **Manufacturer's suggested retail price. ~tle, taxes; t ransper tation, reglstra- tion and dealer delivery charges addidonah i==(~1 ~ ~I-IE +AJLIDI ¢~ t983 Po~ A.~ azt ofengmeenng.
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When there .reason to the thyme, It must be Charge Osgood time whimsic~ CB$ corresi:~ndem likes nothing better than a story he can turn into doggereJ By Don ~,owet S everal ,/ea~s ago Dr. Thamas Harris the best-~elfing ca-authot (with his wife) of 'Ira OK--You'r$ OK,¸` flied a $19 million libel suit¸ The target of Harrise 8uil w~$ an ova fl~elist W~lO ha(~ Said that Harris was Fret okay--rle(~ ~rl lacI com- mittee $uJci(l~ Here ie htJw, on rediD. CB~ News Ctlar~e~ O~good summed up that story: Were a// Okay¸ You te okay, e~r Youre okay, too ma Bm ~F Ham~ is a~iv¢~, yo~ s~e Sue, therefore f am ]VIlli arts e~ ,~,merlc~rqs turle to r-lD~n~rl~ to I~arn if ~te~terday ~ new~ h~$ g~f,e frc}rn bad to '~r~e oe~pla who want to hear t~le news ~0 from ~ad to ver'~ tuna ~heil lalJ~ ~o ~ew~bt ~'~( ~T The O'~gi~c~d R/~, with Charles Q~g0od Every weekday morning¸ on mdio Os gc~d ~resses up the n~w~ in dog~erel Datl Rather r~sting O~oo~ dresses up end beceme~ the anchor of the C~S Sun- day Night IVew~ But re¢it!ng radio news ;n ver~e ~t ~be c~r~ty t hi~(~ that Osg(~od I does differently Did Dat~ Rather ever write But fisl~ t~t are a little we,/'d COme ~wirmning t~ the to~ When O~good wrole that rhyme, he was 1beet% cor~menling On ~]is OWn ~nlikaly ielerrJng t~ his news items¸ He t~ig~t have career. • '1 think lye been 3art of ~ Jate=bloorler in everythlltg lye dor~e,¸' Charlle $ay~ One ~urlny morning. He is Sillin~ in blue lean~, bss~e his 13eehn~paint bat~- house, ne~t a swirnr~ing p~ol D~hJnd !tie massive ~ck-lf~h mallet rlo~s~ he te~ ~ently purcf~aSed ir~ New J~rSey This ~a~, tn~ bm~se is be~ieg~¢i b~ ~ a~'~ ~f p~inter~ ~d ceq3enter~, all of whom call Osgeoa "Charli~" The notion th~.I ~ne ~s in the ~oml0arly ol ~n exalte~ when Ct~arlies wile Jear>--a former New York Daily News r epor t er~.orlscr i pt S th~ CBS ~ncl~orman to hustle ~¢ro$~ the h~u~d From within tl~e house, one Of Chadie~ fo~r youn~ crlildrer~ 13y ~his ~nd mar- riai/e adds clusters of viotin arpeggios to tl~e ec~mpanyirl~ concerto o~ sawing and a tw~e that topped the pop chxrls? Did hamrnefin~ arid sanding. "By I~e-bloom~ NB~'3 Tom 8rokaw h~lp midwif~ ever- frlg, I me~rl ~ have ~ y~u~g family and the-air pay~TV? Can A~C's Ted Ko~pel ~m older thai1 mo~i¸¸ says Ohath~, 0~- claim he co-invented the Jc~ea for Geo~ ~ositing the dog behind a screerl ~lor Motffi~&~ America, neatly ~ dozef~ years ¸'And phy~ic.~lly [ate~bEoomin~, ~oo I can before ABC did? piety tennf~, for insleeee, better now thar~ IZ, oppel tl~e anch~l o~ ABC~ Ni~hdine I could wbe~ I was in my 206 I'm only ~he ~ews ~,ill never stop lalso humility. ~harl]e ha~ goot~ rea~ say~ he di~ itldeed fnvlenT the prototype ba~ al ten~is now,'¸ ~harJie ad~3s ,'1 u~d of ~ood Mot~ng America---in cOllabo to be awf~t~,v bad ra On wi I~ CherJe$ Os~ood Osg~3od s self.deprecating ~umor i~n t, *~'het~ heavy sea~ r~t up ,1 bit, as it oftefl is with celebrities, a form of
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w#.~J tteat waocm ana ~ Jwna Sel~erabct 9, Jg~ 6y Georg" ~ K~tn, Mar~ev,g C~u~n~nl ,, George ~ Kahn Developing a sales idea ~ ~s he hind ~d~-d ~aJ~ m ~e]l ~ omnplexe ~ir ~ndi~e.~ sy~m I~ ~e Ide~ ~d ~ Pax ~omc sbar~ I t~k ~1 l~ h~n~e~,hlef ~ ~pp~ "qL'~ klr~ ~f h~in h~ " sale¸ he~ ~on~6~ ~ d~ w~ g~l[~g the ~ ~l f~mTe of n,/n~
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THE MOMEM" IS RIOHT TO SlOCI[-UP#OW e OUTSTANDING TE, STMARK~RE'SULTS AND REPEAT.~ALES • CONTINUING ADVERtTSINGAHD PROMOTION 5UPPORTAND CONSUMER OFFERS, LUCKY STRIKE FILTERS CUP OR BOX. RE TAILERS~ I~ISPL AYING A/4ERiCAN'S QUALITY BRAND5 CAN MEAN EXTRA MONEY FOR THERE S A PLAN TO FIT YOUR OPERATION. F~ FULL DETAILS CONTACT yOUR AMERIC TOBACCO COMPANYREPRESENTATIVE
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Create two divisions from General Cigar & Tobacco
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22 UNI I~1) ~'IA LES II}I~ACC~) JOUI~NAI J~l~ g, ]983 FTGA I~l I~ ~lulu~ q~l t~" clean i~r n~li dL~rn ~ ~ ~llcd ChrL~L~ll~s Irle ~nd Announcing The First Industry--Wide Poster Campaign on tho Proper Warehousing of Conteotions Created an.~ ~.~Ordl~OI~c~ Unlted States lubac¢o Journal Sponsored by American Chlc/e Dhdsion Beabtce Confeofions Hemhey Choco/ate Co. LifeSavers, Inc. Luden's, Inc. M&MNk~s The Nes~ Co., Inc. Pe~ Pa~ Oa~bur~ Ir~ disc~Js~lO'~ w~lh dl~riDuk>~ arid ~upplie~ of ~liT~or~ pI~UCI~, United 51c~tes Our Goals Are Set: A Posler In Every Worehouse[ Fresh Confections From Factory Reynolds to prDduce 2 brands in Yugoslavia R~td, lu~,cLL,Lt~tcr,l~t[o~=,l 1he k,us
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KRWINA M]CHELSON president G]ik1~BroaI~, NaWarLNewJer~ey Here is what Erwin Michelson says about his DEBS/Texas Instruments Computer System: • "At first we thought we couldn't afford the DEBS System; now we realize we couldn't afford to be without iL '" • "Efficiency of the DEBS System has smoothed out our entire operaEon." • "Experienced a decrease in inventory investment with simultaneous reduction in out-of-stocks," • "While we're at home relaxing, the syste~n continues working." For Add~5onaJ lnform~ ticm Contec(: Pml~ George FIJ ~rllsn y Mink Chapm~tn r~r~m~Em Fmk~ Cm Jrr,~n C,,,,rr Dick ]/od~4~r ~ I~m Mc~4eJl~,l Di~trlbutor Co[IceptB ?Aft0 Soulh Industrial IIighway Aim Arbor, Miehiga n 48104 Telephone: [313)6634214
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Televlewers hear cigars have growth opportunity i Suppliers see plusses in 'national' distribution
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THE M~fENT m RIOIIT TO STOOK-UPNOW • OUTSTANDING TI:STMARKETRESULTS AND REPEATSALES • CONTINUINGADFERTISING,a, ND PROMOTION SUPPORTAND CONSUMER OFFENS~ LUClD[ STRIKE RLTERS CUP OR BOX. RETAILtERS ~SPLAYING AMERICAN50LIAUIY BRANDS CAN MEAN EXTRA MONEy FOR YOU I T~FRESAP'I-AN YD HT YOUR Of~E~]TDN FOR FULL DEF~LS CONTACT YOURA~ERICANTOBACCO COMPANy REPRESENTATIVE J
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w----.V..V ---- ~. ..... W OCTOBER 13.16 N~ti,,n al Au~ra~c MeF~b~.di~in~ AS ~iaLh~L exhi~? ol ~¢nd~ng ~d fix3dscp vkce man~g,~nt, MCCorl~llck pI~¢ Chlcag~ C~nl~: Natioaal Av~,~l~ Me fe~r~sing As~Clgg~n. ? SO Dens borl St. Chicago 6~03, {312] 3~ 0370 & Ca~dy D~[ti~u~or~. annual ¢~ Whotes~te ~obac¢~, l~t fi~nic~ of Nca 1L~17 {2L2] 6~2 3176 NOVEMBER 2.5 N~tionat C~ady V~at¢~a]~r~ A~at[~a The ynu~g ~ec~t~c~ Gr~u~ o t e NCWA C,~t~ct: Dottic Rtts~l NC~ 1430 K St • N',~ ~V~hi~gE,+a r ali(n r ~a As~iali~ n o( Tobacco & D=lM.~t:lly~t Mont~ C~ C,Jntact, [3~nn]~ Lope~ CXCCI~Ii~ ~tt~CtO~ CATCD 9~ L St S~k. ~ Sacra. nw~o C~ ~kl4, f~t~144~784t 19 Me[cham~ & ~J~le~ ~ Club o~ ~rcaler ic p~.k ~lu,kir,~ NY Cont~c Heine ~¢rf.. n~r.~y~ 77 Court ~E~e ] ~,~ Se~,,ih A,~ . New York. r, y its~J DECEMBER 1.4 c~n ~tkm. Bqa [/UUHt ~o{~i & ClU~. lY~ 2tX~36 Tel: ~2 ~66 31}7{~ 2.7 M[¢had King NPBA 1~3tO Ma~. FEBRUARY 1984 15.19 Na~i~ Ct ady x~Jt~sat~v* A~.~ct~,i~ DimcyJ~nd Hr*-], Anehe~m+ C~ C~n t~t: A~J~y P~?~, NCWA,I*30 K St • ~, ~es~ngten. DC 2030S, (202) 39~6733 L~m£hu ~ bIARCH 24 Na]ic ~al ~ Dt~t ,~but,,r ~ A~oci~ti~ • l~ual ~in~¢r ~ati~n, H?atl R~n NFDA Ill E Wrck~t Dr, Cnicage I~LliL,n "h~,t Mo.c{ire C..I., ~n ~ran to~ you. ~ ee3.e~. ]f~'e m'o~ts. 2~ 2~ A,~ • N~ ~,,L r,y I[10i7, 12121 ~9 ]344 JUNE I~ i? Na h~ifle [~ Cont~el: lane Smilh S I C A ~ 303J Rainb~ D~, Suit- t43 Dc~t~ Ga ~34,{~04) 2~3 3974 JULY Nalioa ~] C~L~dy ~A holcsalcr ~ Ascii ~itm ALImlt ~t Hllt(~l~ ~4~ct At [allt~t ~n ttltt ~ itil!n Bri ~ NFDA III E ~,44 (,r, lo SEtVI'EMBER 22.26
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THE MOMENT IS RIOHT TO $TOCX-UPNOW • OUTSTANDING TESTMARKETRF.~ULTS AND REPEATSALES • CONTINUINGADVERTISINGAND PROMOTION SUPPORTAND CONSUMER OFFERS~ LUCKY STRIKE RLTERS CUP OR BOX. RETAILERS: D/SPLAYING AME~ICAN~ OUALIT]" BRAND5 CAN MEAN E)FfRA MONEY FOF# YOU THERE ~ A PLAN TO FiT yOUR OPERATION. FOR FULL DETAILS CONTACT YOUR AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY REPRESENTATIVL.
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Signature Serwce: What a sxgned commitment to excellence means to Mercedes-Benz owners. engineered llke no other caz in the world, you expect service of the same caliber For this reason, authorized Mercedes- Benz dealers have always taken special pains to offer their cus- turners outstanding service, Signature Service, however, goes a step f~rthen It involves a personal commitment to giving ing courses li~ service maintenance and repair. In order to keep pace with technology, prod uct development, and new service methods, I continually participate in advanced and speciab ized training courses." And when you pick up your car you'll get a Cofiktesy Folder signed by the Service Advisor responsible for servic- ing your car. Not because he's supposed to "sign a folder" hut because youserviceasunparal Signature Seroicp lnvo!ves a personaI comm~ment to excellena'. Here, a hetakesgreatpride leled for quality and [older s~ned by the Sero~¢ Advisor r~pons~ef~r strutting your ~ in providing outstand- efficiency as the . ing service for his Me~cedes-Benz you drive, vice our custom~2rs c~4pect and Merc~des-Benz customers¸ deserve,.." More than a facade The dealer makes a rare Bu t, in truth, the dealer's com- commitment mitment would mean little with- Signature Service is more than Each dealer who offers Signa- out the commitment of the entire promises and good intentions. tare Service makes certain that staff. More than signatures. everyone on the staff abides by the same high standards of courtesy, efficiency and thoroughness, 2 =: ::: :: S~gned name tag5 yort of the visfble ¢wdenc~ you'll find of Signatu re Servi~v. For this reason, ¢'¢e~yone-from You'Us~,nseitsvaluethroughout the Service Manager to the Ser the dealership, in an unmis- vice Advisor and Service Techni- takable enthusiasm. A personal clans who work on your car makes a personal commitment to giving you outstanding service. Each technician puts his reputation on the llne On the wall in the service area you'll find these words promi- commitment to excellence. See the list at right for the Mercedes-Benz dealers who offer Signature (.~) Service near you. You'll find visible evidence of nently displayed: this unusual commitment °I am committed to provide throughout the dealership- the standard of service special wall plaques in the Mercedes Benz customers ex- service al~ea, employee n,~me pect and deserve. My signature tags. And a showroom display, is a personal endorsement of the signed by the dealer, wlth the quality" of the work 1 have per- following words: formed as part of the Signature "As an authorized Mercedes Service program. Benz dealer, we are dedicated to 'q have successflflly completed provide the unparalleled set- the Mercedes-Benz skills train- Signature Ser'oi~e ~ unFaralleled for qualiOd ~nd effirien~
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ETHREI; IN THE FIELD PUTS MORE GOLD IN THE BARN. More golden tobacco. Fewer gresn veins and sterns. That's what youq[ get in the ham when you use ETHREL~ ethephon plant regulator on tobacco in the field. Field spraying ETHREL plant regulator re]aases nature's own ripening agent an#orrMy throughout each leaf. That speeds up ripening. Speeds up yellowing. And colors each leaf completely-- veins, sterns and all--to make it worth more at auction. Up to 31¢ per pound more with ETHREL! Thafs a sizable chfference. But consider how much these additional E'fHREL benefits can ~ve you. Saves Priming Casts. ETHREL brings treated leav~ to ripeness all at the same time. So you can pull more of them with fewer primings to save [uel and labor. E'IHREL Saves C~ing C~sts. The acoalerated ripening action of ETHREL can cut hours aft yellowing time. And dollars off oaring oosts. Helps You F~.~h Early, With ETHREL you can get your tobacco out of the field earlier to avoid late season weather and disaase, 1 Make EI'HR~I, W~k For Y,m*. To find out how, send for a free copy of ETI-zWEL® TaSacco Profit Po/nfera. Write Union Carbide Agricultural Produc~ Company, Inc., P.©. Box 12014, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Or ask your dealer for a COpy. And while you're there, }~ick up a free ETHREL test kit. t will show you how to determine when your leaves are mature enough to treat. This season, put more gold m your barn-and more profits in your pocket- with ETHREL. HELPS NATURE I-I~P YOU. I.
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For Mr. Goodwrench Good Service, see the participating GM dealer nearest you. NEW JERSEY JOSEPH F STEIN, INC ~)ur~ Park WERRING C HEI/OLDS, INC. ~asking RK]ge SEA COAST CH EV-OLDS, ;NC Be~mar FISHER OLDSMOBILE, INC Berq~nfield HOFFMAN CHEVROLET, [NC Bloomfield SIFFORD PONT-GMC :NC 5c~JC, ta SCERBQ BROTHERS INC B~onton ROyaL CHEVROLET. INC Bound Brook ROYAL pO NT-OLDS, INC ButJer ROC-=RTS CHEVROLET, ~NC Ca[~ret N ORMAN GALE OLDSMOBILE CO Cedar KnotJS LEXINGTON CHEVROLET, INC Clif ton ~EAR H~T CH EV~OLE~ INC. D@nviIle A~ERS OH EV-OLDSr INC Dm,~r HOLSEY PONT-GMC, INC E~lont~wn ~ITSON CH~ROLET ~NC EB~OlII~WR pORCELLI GMC TRUCKS, INC. Elizabeth DEMASS[ CADILLAC CO., INC. Engl~wo0d Cliffs CARTER OLDSMOBII-E. INC E~IeWCQd APPLE CH ~ROLET. INC. Fair Lawn BEYER BROTHERS GMC CO Fai~i~w E]CHLIN PON]qAC JNC Flemington L A DEPP CADILLAC, INC F~or~ Park WHE~N PON~BUICK INC Freehold QUEEN CITY PONTIAC Green Brook JACK $CH LEIN BUICK, INC Hack~nsack RATN ER OLDSMOBILE, INC H~kensaek GUY-ROS3 CHEVROLET INC F{acke~ss~k FELDN~R CADILLAC, INC H~kensaek SCHENK CHEVROLE~ INC Hasbrouck Heights HA~VTHORN CHCV-GMC Hawthorne FRANC:3 CH ~ROLET, INC Irvlngton p~R~INCS PONT]AC INC Jamesbur~ DIFEO ~ICKr INC ~erse~ City , J & F OLDSMOBILE CO. Je~ey City PAR K PONTIAC. INC Jersey City STRAU ~ MOTORS, iNC ~eypor[ ABELSON OLDSMOBILE INC Keyp~ BURACK CH~OLDS INC Lincoln Park WALLACE CHEVROLET Linden SCHUMACHER CHEVROLET Lktle Falls WIGDER CHEVROLET INC Livingslon DE MACSI CADILLAC CO Lyn~hurs± FRANK~ GMCTRUCK C~NTER INC Lyndhu~l FUTUR~ CH~ROLE~ rNC Matawa~ JUNE CHEVROLET Metuchen JOHNSON CUICK OPEL INC M~t~lair MCDONAL~ PONTIAC INC Morristown PARK CHEVROLE~ INC Neptune RECK OLD~MOBILE INC New ~runswi~k ~ ANGELI3 MOTOR CO New ~runswlck J R ROOF INC NeWton H~SE ©LDSMO~LE INC North Bergen ROTAM KIN MOTORS CORP N~r~ p~ai~ ~ DESIOERIO OL~SMOBILC INC Ocea~ BRICK CHURCH BUIC~ CO Orange C EI:tA M I PONTIAC CO ~ramus MALCOLM KONNCR CHEVROLE- CO ~ramua W~LLIAM J SCERSO & SONS Par~ppany CII~ MOTOR S~LES CO • INC Passaic LESCHEL BUICK-OPEL INC patel~on REIMAN PONTIAC P~ter~on SONNY CH EVROLE~ INC p~t~on pOLKOWlTZ MOTORS Per~h Am~ RAH WAY AUTO ~UppLY & SERVICE Rahwa~ MILLER RONT.CAO CORR Rah~ COMMUNITY CHEVROLET SALES CO Rid.cefield Parl ~ROGAN CADILLAC, INC Ridg~od VEY CADILLAC CO ROCkawav LAIRD JOHNSON¸ INC Rutherford BUIC~ '22:' INC ScotCh plains CI~ICLE CH EVRCLET CO Shrewsbury FENNESSEY BUICK INC £om~t~ille COLONIAL MOTORS, ]NC. ~r~rvil[e WELLS CAD OL~ CO South Orange LAFRN CHEVROLET SALES ~ol~%h T~ve r SPRINGFIELD GARAGE Springfield PACE BUICK, INC. Summil BArN ES ~H~ROLET CO Summit D AND C CN EVR~LET CO. Ten,Iv MCGLQIN BUICKr INC ~nton Falls BROGAN CAD OLDS CO I'ot~ G~LIN BUICI( INC Union MAXON I:~ NTIAC. INC. Union MU k~l CHEVROLE~ INC Union K~NG OLDSMOBILE ~NC ~r~na BURg) CH EVROLE r, [NC Wa ~hingt~ CRO~VN CADILLAC. ]NC Wd~hUn MAROON PON~GMC Wayne ATKIN S CHEVROLE~ INC Wayne J USTUS B~J~CK CO W~st Caldw~ll DERIO OLDSMO~IIL~. INC. W~st Caldw~ll KONNERS CHEVROLEI, INC ~s~ Caldwel] CLAIRMONT CA£1-pONT /~t Ca]r~w~ll
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The vehicles pictured above represent some of the newest offerings from Ford Motor Company, producer of the highest quality vehicles of any major manufac- turer in America* Better than GM. Better than Chrysler. It wasn't easy to accomplish, and it didn't happen overnight. Here's how we did it. Employee Involvement At Ford Motor Company our greatest resource is our people. In plants and off]ces, on test tracks and in meeting rooms, Ford people are dedicating themselves to achieving quality. Employee Involvement groups meet regularly in almost all Ford plants and locations throughout the United States and are making significant contributions. As an example, over 500 employee suggestions were accepted for improving the assembly process and quality of the 1984 Ford Tempo and Mercury Topaz. Engineered From The Driver On Out . At Ford Motor Company we're committed to building cars of functional integTity, character and unequalled quality that give you, the driver, real value for your money, and then some. Automobiles with proper steering wheel to pedal relationships, spaciousness, with precision-bnilt instruments and controls that are functionally beautiful. With torque and horsepower characteristics that are well matched to carefully selected transmission and axle ratios. Powertrain, suspension and steering that give a feeling of confidence and harmony, at city and highway speeds, even on rough roads. We call it the completely integrated vehicle. The driver's car. Better Fit And Finish The way things fit and the way things look are pretty good indications of how well a vehicle is made. At Ford Motor *Based on a national sul'cey measuring Lhings gone wrong after thr~ months of ownership~ conducted among over 14,000 people owning Ford and competitive 1983 new vehicles, introduced prior to Feb., 1983.
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mmmm
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"My hotd recognizes the qua[i~ of Smirnoff. My guests ,, demand its value. "At the Stanford .n,~ Court, we've built : ,~s~,~ ¢~,~,,.L our business on quality-- from the back of the kitchen to the front of the bar. "That's why we pour Smirnoff~vodka. It's distilled from the finest qual/ty grain money can bu~ And only Smirnoff is checked 47 times for quality and smoothness. So for just a little more than ordhrary vodkas, we can offer our guests the quality of Smirnoff. "I thhlk Smirnoff is an exceUent value in vodka. ~_~.~O~- And our guests must, too. The), keep asking refit" There's vodka, and then there's Smirnoff.
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vehicles to And the countdown~ just beginning: ...THREE Caim© "ce Classic Estate Fulr-size ~uxury and cc~n fort rrean Caprice Classic, our top-of-the-line combinatien of space and value. ...T I,,' O Cavalimr The state-of-the- art Cava ier comes with more cub.: feet of cargo space and goes w~th more cubic inches of power than SubarL, N ~an SenlTa or Toyota Tercel wagons NIT/ON.
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Rum. It's What's Happening. America is switching from vodka and gin to Puerto Rican whke ~um. It's happening in Monterey and everywhere else. Ah~ a ro-d~*xL on the fabulous Fehble Px'aeh ~ ffaer~ r~hmg kk¢ a i~hmhang whim ~ ,Lad ~c past a~k Cyp~ss Po~t% TLrn La;~]~ and Johnny Por~ of Carnad V~lley ]Ka~ eh. A p¢e~ bmarmh wht t e z~rn pAood,f/vlaW at tim ,¢*nzc B~g SUl d~gs of Will and Carol Sm~mm. Monterey ~sidents Kenneth mad VIxgmla Bar det t wlth mul¢~ all ato~ad and roan on the r0ck~ AJ,~: a liwlv doubl~ match "ftict~ Allmt d T~excsa Briant, Ma'.~een and Vano~ K~ len pa~e ~ ~x~eo ,~crrwdnvem Seen wtrh Pebble Beach lennts Club Pro And,/BrLan~ Im.agtne sm.s0rmg a ~ m znd ma~c on the r0~txmg board of yore- oxvn 1923 I~o1~ R~,)t~! Ant~q~ ea~ colle~r Wm Emm. RUINS OF PUIERTO RICO q Aged i~)r ~[nt~o[hne~ and taste,
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him to lower his price by $500 as a result of the survey report, "nicn tlghter~ the cleats, epoxy the oracles and paint the hull yours~f and you rosy end up with a boat worth In rely case, the marine smaecy Js the w~se way to go to pto~¢t the motley you' re invc~t~ng in the deal. Dry rot, the disease ¢n~umged by trapped moisture in wood, can infect a hull Cxt¢~$ivclv wiLhout any OUtWard signs, I was once c~ffered a cla~$1¢ ~,L~c~t '.chalet [~r $~. I~ had beami~I lines but, if you had dropped a winch hart d]e on deck, it would hBvc falfen thzough and landed on th~ gromt~ b~low the ~choo- net's cradle. The boat 3*~rd finally sl~d the it b~forc it could ~nfect other wo0d~n boats nearby. Cu~Ung out damaged wood and using imw epoxy tr~nlcnts now Call stop d~ rot b~fote it progrcs~s too fat, and th~s i~ tb~ klml ~ tk~ttg ~,~tr m~d~x¢ ~t~r will determfoc for yot~ NO boats ~ "mallxI~na~¢c fr~e'" so a~sttme froln th~ start that you wiII be doing ~om~ Sel~bbil~g, palntit~g and rer~e,xit t g ol. hnes and hardwm¢, The edvantagc of do- lt-yourself projects and ki~ boats is that you don't charge yourself for your tlm~, and little upkeep work mak~ many of today's usct~ boats ~ai barg~un~ Figure that fiber- glass and aluminum httlts will require the least work, and will probably co~t rflor¢ to b~y as a rcsu]t. Wood r~eds more affen- ttor~, a~ a rule, and so will usually ~av¢ a lower price A ifoc duck boat, pjIogue, fishing ~ldff or offshore ~dl~ty i~ particular- ly hoa~dsome when mede of w~od m~l is easier to customize with bui]t-Jn cabinets. rod racks af~d cudd~ ]c~k~ Picklng up a used ~n$ine this end of the ~ason is aL~o a quick way to s~t~ a c~asid ~blc mato~rd Of rnor~v. , ~c manoe ~,~1 veyo~ ~iil giw ~ou ~ report on the inboard ~nglnc of a power cruiser or-aux~llat~ sail boat as part Of the analy~i~ Tak~ ,m Out '~oard m~or to a good r 0~xln~ m~uhaoic for m~chanic r~ay, in foct, have SOiltc r ¢~o~ldi~ ~ioned on¢~ in ~tc~k. Unilkc automotive cngin¢~, na~r~ne powerplanls ~re mor~ llke- ly to co.ode out th0n to wear out. pl~asL~re ¢~ft dQ t~t get the r~0.mtlg tiro~ t~t cars g¢~ on highways, b~t they live in ~ wet attd utffnendly environment¸ The marlr~c m~- chanlc c~ll give a goo~ cedmate ~lf iln engine's condition and also look for the I~l[t ale signs that indicate that it might have l~cn under water. Re~x~ntly the Coast Guard has issued waznirtgs reg~rdlng one ~"0oat hal.gain,, that should bc avoide6. C~mmercial ~sh~ ~ng boats haw a pmicul~ly honest work hoz's~ luQk to lhern th~ appeals to many outdoorsmt~n Their Co~str~clion, howcv- el', dogs not come under the s~m~ tegula ttons that apply to pleasure ~r~ft, a~d small ¢r skiffs d~ not have the horsep~w¢~ and passenger-|o~c[~:apaclty plate~ that ~ r¢ quired on ~ecrcatlonal Craft. it is not legal to sell these comnlcrclal hu]]~ for plcastl~e u$~, so sometimes t]~y m'~ offend at reduced priog$ to boairilcla wh~ don't know When you end up with one of th~se and then try to resell it $ometlm¢ you ,:~ll b~ in for big ~'oubl¢ ~ Bctt~r look for a goo~ deal ~ a de.~ you can m~t, one who htis 3ccn m~u~d ~ a while a~d w~ll st~l be in bu sinews when you t#~d him Septer~ber 1983 Silva beat COMPASS ,a~D AN AREA TOPOGRAPHIC MAP 19
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Smokeless tobacco: The bright star of the US market In a year of general decfine for sales of tobacco products, moist snuff sales registered gains healthy enough to keep the U.S. smokeless market on an upward trend. M' O[$T SNUFF continues to be the star of the expanding smokeless tobacco market in the United States, While sales ef midst smokeless products show some degree of decline, increases in moist snuff and loose leaf chewing tobacco products are keeping [be market strong and heafihy During the first six months of this year, moist snuff sales regis toted a gains of 7,3 percent over sales during the same perlud in 1982 Such increase was great enough to maintain an overall growth of 4,2 percent in the snuff market even though dry snuff con- tinued to lose ground, with sales dropping 4.4 percent. For the same comparison period, sales of loose leaf chewing tobac- co gained ().4 percent, firm plug Iost 8.4 percent, moist plug drop- ped 13,8 percent, and twtat/roli tobaccos ~I[ 3.7 percent. Combin ed overall sales of chewing tobac- co declined by 1.6 percent for the six months. Output of iota] snuff increased while production of all chewing tobaccos fell slightIy. Loose /ear production was 1.6 percent higher for the first half of the year; output of firm plug and moist plug drop- ped 12,3 percent and 11.3 percent, respectlve]y; manufacture of twisffroll products declined 1.I percent. Dry snuff production declined 8 8 percent, but output of moist snuff products rose by a substantial 9.4 percent. HE EXPORT piCTURE for U.S. Tsmokeless products is also uneven. The first half of 1983 saw overseas sales of moist plug rise by 64.7 percent, loose leaf exports gain 33.3 percent and firm plug lose 16 percent. Total foreign shipments of chewing tobacco in- creased by 12.8 percent compared to the January-June period in 1982. Exports of moist snuff were 1,9 percent higher. Market wide~ smokeless tobacco products' output rose 0.9 percent, sales gained 0,3 percent, and ex- ports increased 3,6 percentLa positive and encouraging pk:ture in an otherwise stagnant U.S. tobacco industry, TANI]ING NEAR -rllE TOp of this Shealthy smokeless market is U.S. Tobacco, with a 23.6 percent share of 1682 Iota/ sales. Latest rankings by industry analyst Iohn Maxwell place the company in so- U.S. Smokeless Tobacco First half outout & sales~ Output Domestic sales Exports 1983~ 1982~ 1983~ 19822 1983' 19822 Moist sn~f~ 17,608 16,091 16,984 15,834 488 476 Bty snuff 5,477 6,005 5,433 5,682 -0- 1 Loose leaf 37,827 37,230 35,409 35,275 36 27 Moist plug 2,442 2,754 2,302 2,669 28 17 Firm plug 4,614 5,260 4,727 5,163 42 50 Twist/roll 877 887 853 885 ~- -O- Total 68,845 88,227 65,708 65,509 591 571 t january June cornpartsa'~ ~Thousand 9ounds ~lflcl~des products formelly Cl3S~d as finec~t chewing IeMCCO 68 TR--November, 1983
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' THE MOMENT18 RIOHT TO • OUTSTANDING TEST MARKETRESULTS AND REPEAT SALES • CONTINUINGADVERTISINGAND PROMOTION SUPPORTAND CONSUMER OFFERS LUCKY STRIKE FILTERS CUP OR BOX. RETAILERS: DISPLAyiNG AMERICANLS OUALITY BRANDS CAN MEAN EXTRA MONEY FOR YOU 7 THERESA PLAN TO FIT YOUR OPERATION FOR FULL DETAILS CONTACT YOUR AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE
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The sporty feel of an Oldsmobile. WF~al II/akes the llc~ I)l~]'- Fi ,:nza dri~¢ :lJi a~ai]ablc 5.,p~ ~'~i a~!d ,~vcr head L~lm ~!¢ctror [c !'uc[ [:lic~tc~[ engirl~ and handI~J!g a~ ~p~,!'Iy ~i5 i[s Pltl~ special sp~rt graplil~ bi~icr,: matte ~tcceuts stvl,.d Wll~'~ and ;po~s steering wheel with perforated leather grips Plus one thing more FTrenza GT lsn t Just any sporty car lt's ~t sporty Oldsmobile,. And that's sonlcthing special• StJmc O[dsmobiles ~re equJpped wilh m/ghlt~s pre~d~Jced I:~ o{her GM dix ~sitlns, subsidiaries or affiliated connpardes world- v~idv. See yot~r defiler for details
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Rum. It's What Happening. America is switching from vodka and gin to Puerto Riean white rum. It's happening in Monterey and everywhere else. Aher a round on thMaholozs !~bble 8~h oamse, thews nothing Iil~ a re~r--~hmg wtu~ ~ Apr~bruach whim r~ma 81~dyMa~ and ~r_ r~s~ ask c~,p~ss ~t s lixn Langl~, a~d lolL, xny pnt~ Ot C~,m¢1 ~ ~ m the" scem¢ Big S~lr dig~ a f Vv511 and ......... :: ........ CaZOIS~rrr~tu Momm~ remden~ Kerme~a ~d ~ou~d ~d nuu on the ~c~ Im~gur~ savonng a r0m ~ad ~me ~n tl~e ~max~g baird o f youJr co.~ra 192~ Rolls- Roy.! Antique r~r ca~ v~r,n Da~. A pKr~ at C~el'a Atelier G~d~¢ Carcne[ at09mcy Don H~hbard ~ ~ wh2~¢ ~ has a Azrlime e~ecud,~ Nor~ ~w~s,amd O-,~ner S~m Eh~nherg and la,enn and his ~ile phylhs IKke wt/te =n<~hne~s ,a~dka or gm can't km w,Xe ja~xa¢ ~ a ham mnd mca~ Rlv~tn "asltors Ricordo and Ingrld ~ ~ma ~uh thexr wh~cmpl matcl~ Beaaus¢ it ~s ag~ one f%*l] alo~ on a Sanxrday a~rnn~n sa~l]. Jim~acx with wh~¢¢ r~m, of coupe, ~a~ by la~, RUMS OF PUERTO RICO q ~ged for s[~oothness and taste.
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mlmmmm"
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2 GET BRIGHTER AT SEARS. ALL G.E, HALOGEN POWER PLUS" HF.AI~IGHTS NOW ON SALE @
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SPACE WHAT HAPPENED Cosmonauts: A Scare in Space fal]theways~dfaonasp~eemi~sion, stayed on board and their own $oyoz, O the most frightening is the I~te that's Which brought them up On 3~tme 27, and in never happened: a crippling accident that straads a capsnle in space, a lonely death ha the sky as oxygen inexorably runs out. As- tr0naur~ c~rcte close at least once;it took the Apollo 13 crew roughly 290,000 miles mnl 87 hours to return 8afaly to earth after a nearly catastrophic explosion in an oxygen tank en route to the mOOn.* Last w~k the world got ~l rfa/lftlder ofju~ how far even 2t~O miles can be when it's straight up, when it appeared--probably thcorreefty--that two Soviet cosmonaut s mlgh~ be st r anded in their damaged Salyut 7 space stafton, with time running oltt for a safe trip home. Two u/l~fated ac~nlen/s were ~eid have eledaRgcrcd the co$13~ollaut$. Accord- ing to an article ha the Oct 10 issue of Aviation Week and Space Teedndi- ogy, which frequently ralfects the thinking nf top U.S. aerospace otfi- eiais, the hacnleats deah the Soviet SpaCe program ~'the most serioos. •. setbacks since the death of three cosmonauts 12 y~ars ago." The Sovi- ets have c~nfir reed only one of these: the explosion on the launch pad Sept. 27 of a Soyuz space ferry that was to i~ildezvous with the oThit- ing Salyut. The crew of that SO yuz--cosmonaltts Vladiralr Tftov and Geramdy $treaklov----ejeeted safely and landed two mile~ from the launch site (diagram above). But the rocket's failure meant that for Salyut Ts V fadimir Lyakhov, 42, and Alex- ander Afexandrov, 40, to come home they would have to leave S~[- yut empty, Possfely abandoning ex- perimetlts in progress, and cer~ahaly delaying the Russ fans' goal of keep- ~ug a permanently inhabited space station aloft at all times, So they 4Ther e have been seven mi~e~ r~at~ ~ead~s in the U.S and ticket ~aee pr~gr~/na Three Ara~o~ died in a fire in their capsul~ aa the ~und, ~ld fo~tr RU~mts have died m ra.entry which they would have to return, h~s now been in spa~e for about 120 days. longer than any Soyuz has ever spent betweea the two legs of its romed trip. The other aeeidem, according to the Avi- ation Week r~port, was a break in a propel- lant lhae asoard Solyut itselfoa Sept. 9---not long after art unmanued Progress rocket deftvered a fresh load of fudi and supplies (dia~am below). The poisonous nitric oxide i$ So dangerous t ha~ t he cosmonaut~ report - edly donned faeir spacesuils and wexe pre- paring for an emergency trip ~ earth; only after it was determined that the leak had dissipated into space did they return to the space station. But the loss nf propalhmt left Sdiyut with half of its atl~tude-control NEWSWEEK/OCTOBER 31. 1983 thr~ters out ofeomwfesfa~, threatening conUol over tumbliag and pitching ha spaee--"dead ha the water," according to one U.S. analyst quoted in the magazine: That may have been an unfortunate ehnlce of words. Since Salynt is not a re entry vehicle, c~3ntrollfag i~s attitude is not crucial to its phys~eei survival, al- though obviously ~senUal for some proce- dures, suob as a~tr~nomical observations or earth-resource~ inveed~fans. Picked up, first by the BBC, a~d later by neWSl~apers, the phrase created the impr~sion tlml the ~osmo~ftuts were in S~l~OU~ ~allger; tile New York Post fall a page-one s~oI~ head. lined TRAPPED IN SPACE. The lack of h~rd information oedy added to the problem. The Soviets denied there had been a Ieak, and the Department of Defense said only that the Unfted Stat~s was "not aware of [the cosmonauts] being in ~ny danger." If nothing else, thelnaldent revealed how buo~,*~,o¢~ little the West really knows abo~t Sov~ space missions. It WaS thTown back on cocktail-party KremEnol- ogymtwo t~3p Soviet space offfeials ~ ~vere ~lpotted relaxing at a reeepilon, so dieariy the sito~t fan was not crift- eal and on a network of moslly tutoflieial Soviet spacewatchers anti cosmonaut eaveedropper% like Geof- f~y Perry, an Engli~ hoard~g- school master who reporled heaft~g the cosmonauts lau~hhag and jol6ng with gro~m~ control last week, al- though h~ admits to understanding o~ily a little Russian. Comervatlvm All of the experts agreed that there seemed to be no £e~eaton why t he cosroonauts could net ret th'n to the earth safely at any time. Although the Sov~s have avoided keeping Soyaz rockets ia o~b~t for longer than 115 days, that figure is likened by Perav m the explraftou date on a food packaga---a eotmerv~- tlve limit that can probably be e~- celled. If the Russi~s are still in orbit, it means there ~s no r~oxl to bring them downyeL condimies M~r- cia Smith, who keet~ track of the 87
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Today# Chevrolet After 16 i refinements, we Announcing What we did Since !979, Chevrolet engineers have been busy iefining ~he ~:itation~ And after 16 improvements- in every area from performance to comfort, to ride, to extended ant'-corrosion-we think ~u're really going to I&e Citation rf Here are just a few I'easons why : :: :- performance: TO give you reliable starts, we added standard electronic fuel injection, We also included an on-board computer that continually fine-tunes engine performance as you drive. And when you add all-season, mud-and-snow radials for increased traction, you've got performance that won't quit. Comfort: Body-supporting front seats are just the beginning of a very comfortable Citation ~. We also retuned the body mountings to reduce road noise and provide a quieter ride for you. Ride: From redesigned rear shocks and front stabilizer bar to vibration-reducing engine mounts, we think you'll find Citation 1T% ride is everything you're looking foe Corrosion Protection: What do you do after you've improved Citation? You protect it. That~ why we increased the use of long-lasting coated metals and zinc-rich primers. And we improved the underbody treatment to protect against stone abrasions and corrosion. What we didn't do What we didn't do {s change any of the features that made Citation one of the best-selling new cars in Chevrolet history you still there. So are the ) . . convenient the fold down ~'~ea~'ihat lets you turn Citation Tr ~' + . from a car to a wagon in seconds. It~. all still there,
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& ..... Isiti , r lh. h? by L~Jwi~ ~.Ru~t~r | CONTRACT: 61t The openin3 Icad is ~¢ ten of spades. (T~mps are 2-2 ) Muff rids c~c ~nd even Santa won't b~ able to help on lh~ othcr~ ~ .~ ~t: f~H ~e ~ le~d is Ibe kingofcluhs. W~atistheproperlln¢oFplay? You wake up Christmas morning to find that Santa has crammed your stocking with ace~, kings and queens, enough high-card points to launch you on the way to a very happy new year, but will you have the last ClauMan laugh or a down-one groan? Getting such goodies is line; however, you must know what to do with them. The hands in this quiz contain ~o manypolnts that you and your partner have reached slam on every one. in some eases you have been given the additional gift of a favorable opening lead. But can you take advantage of your good fortune? To find out how you did, turn to page 123, 102
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Iceberg lofts are lowest intar! 0fa]lmenth01100k ° C[a~io. Duke Kahanamoku Classic. THE BEll ANNOUNCER--Dick ~nberg {N~C) for his bmadeastlng of NCAA basket b~ll and "'"' /lO0's TI4E MOST IMPROVED Ar, NOUNC~--PhylIis George (CBS). MOST MEMORABLE CAMERA WORK ABC for keepin$ its I¢n~$ on Americans Edwin MO= Actually 70% lower tar th nthetwo best-selling menthol "~CE8 ERG 100s ............"tar' 4 m#. nicotine 0.4 m8 8ra~d K .................. "tar 17 mo. nilotin~ 1.3 rno 8i~no ~ .................. 'r;ar"19 mO, nicntlne I 3 mH • 0[ all brands lowest ......... 'tar" I mO nicotine DIm0 • AV per ~ioarel18 by FTC melLod, Warning: The Surgeon Genmer Has Determined That CigareZle Smoking Is Dangerous In Your Heagh. 4 m~ 'lar' 04 mg nJca[~e~ a~ pel ci~arlnl 5y F'C melLod ses and Mike Shine, who finished 1-2 in the 40~meler hurdles at The Montreal Games, as they took their victory lap and looked up at themselv~ on the hoge TV screen inMde the Olympic stadium; CBS for i~s end-zone shot showing CardJnal Terry Joyce's punt being blocked in the Dallas-St. L~uis game oa Thank~glving; NBC for mi]izing its center- field cameras thro~ghout the World Serie* to show that the yankee pattie[tiers could not throw as well as Chariie's Angels. B~$1 NEW S~IES The Olympiad (PBS). BEST CO:~ ZNG SERmS--The Way h W~ (pBs). AMAZING GRACE A~,kAR~TO Dick BU[IO;I of ABC for covering all those Lutzes. S~] chows and camels-inrc~flyin~sit-spins dur- ing tlle figure skating at lunsbI~IC~ ,Mtt) ~el= tug. clariw and poise that pul other athletes- turncd-anncunce/~/o shame in 1976. yet AIN'T COME THAT FAR, B~BY AWARD-- TO Bi]]i~ Jean King of A~C for t ryitlg to put the World Wristwrestling championshiI~ from Pctaluma. CaliL into perspective by ~ay ing: "[t'~ the World Series, Super Bowl and Wimbledon all rolled into one," A WL~K ON GU-I.]GA N'S ISLAND--TO anyone who can re~.all who h~d the be~t bacld~and in the Macdonald Carey-Ben Murphy vs. Jim McKrelI-Howard Duff doublea match oft Ce- lebrtLv /e~lnts. HI-YO SILVER AWAPJ)---fO NBC's Grand- ~tand for showing Ivat0ica's win in [h~ Prix de ]'Arc de Tdomphe at Longchamp, then cutting away when the hol~e phched Jockey Freddy Head to the ground, thus leaving the viewers to wonder if the rider was olive or dead and if lhe horse was running loose through the streets of Purls ~ORRECT[VE ~N~KE~ AWARD--~O Wond~ Woman star Lynda Carter for doing aerobat- ics in harness on Die Battle of ?he Network Sm~s and never landing correctly ~H~ER GALL AWARD---To Atiama Braves president Ted lamer, who also ] ust happens l o own T~' stmlon WTCG (Channel 17} in A t- lama, for issuing $1 million free-agem Andy Messel~mith uniform No. 17. then persuading him in wear the word Channei--inltead of his name--above the number pt BLIC DVF~NDI~ AWAI1D To Commission. er and lawyer Bo~ie (No Overcoat) Kuhn, who assumed that his job entitled him to pre- vent Howard Cose[[, a sometime critic of baseball from announcing baseball's cham- pionship series on ABC ~O 101 lowest intar! Afl, uaIly 70% lower tar tha thetw0 best-selling filter Kings_[ "LLICKY IOO'm .............7aT" 4m~. nienfir~ 0.4 nO. Brand M ................. "(a)" I ? m~. nicotine 1.0 r~g grand W ................. "Ia['18 n~9. ni:ofin~ 12 m~ "Of al brand~,l~es~ ....... ~tet" I m~, nicnliie Ol mg 'AV pel ¢igafe~e ~ FTC n~eth~fl, •arnino: The Suroeo~ ~nem{ gas Dete[mined That CiGe~te Smohng rs gengerou~ to Y~r Hsalth. 4 roO. 'ira(', ~).4 m9. r~ottne~ ev pit eider e~ ~¢ FTC method
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Of~ll!'" ;er!OOs Y ~ g s i Test New~week Km~ar~ Gr anara Chai,~ oj zhe B~ord Larrt H~ l~r ael, p,e~iden t Of~,~men~hollOi. '¢ lowest i ar! "tar! • G~ Zelma~ 70% lower , 'LUCKy IO0>S ..... . 't~l" 4 m~. N:~I~t 0 4 rag. Brlr,~ M ................. "l~r'~7 mR, aico[in~ I 0 mg 8ran~ ~ ............... .."(~r" 15 4. ni~tin~ I 2 m~ "Of all bands, low,s: ........ "la:" I rag. ni~oline Q.1 m~ Ii'l/arni~g: The $~rg~on 6an~tal Hss OeI~rr~f~gd ~t Cig~r~:Ie ~mo~ing e~ per Ci~II ~ bi ~lC r~!hofl ActuMly 700/o lower "~ best, sel]ing Warnin~ The Surgeon General Has Oeletmm'ned ~at Cigo~le Smo~io0 Is Dangeroo~ lo Your H~al~h. 4 ~ "~; 04 mg ~/a,!~e: per c~retle ~ ~TC re![hod
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DELTA DREAM VACATIONS From only ~ to ~452, induding air fare ..... ~ Orlando,i: home of EPCOT C~-ltex/!Ahlt Disney. World-- from $349 to $481,* mdudlng round-trip air fare. Also covers hotel for 4 days/3 n s with admission to Walt Disney World or EPCOT Center Does not hadude taxes, gra~uities.iT~r3~rw606 Nassau/Paradlse Island-- i from S/99 to ~452" including round-trip air fare. Also includes hotel for 4 fiche disco and Tradew~mds Lounge (2-drink minimum not included). Does not cover y sur- ~ervice charge. JTD£ 3 CT~'~030 @ Check ~ur professional Travel Agent. Or call Delta Vacation Planning Centra~ tNl-free at 800-24%3796. Or call Deka m Near York at (212) 239-0700, in Nassau at (526) 292-1555, in New Jersey at (201) 622-2121, All tour rates aae from New York/Newark and are subject to change without notice. ~ c~t_-rA Delta is readywhenyou are" Dr~ am \~c at ons to (3 lando are good t hra April 39,1984 Na~ou thra April 28,19~. ~,ll pne¢~ ~e per p~z~on, double oc~upan¢5: S~ts and ~'commodations arc ~ublect to awdabfi~ty Make reservations 7 to I¢ da~ in adwnc~ *Mon and Tues. depar tur~ only ~Gas, taxes, renfal deposit o~d optional collision damage wa/vet ~¢ extra
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Olds Delta 88. It's the family car that didn't forget the famil3~
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Today# Chevrolet In Monte Carlo SS we took a stock Monte Carlo and g £1~ec~ t _owered n five full liters of brute V8 force, rol ~ng out TS Dower ~rwougFi oLJa exhausts¸ Then modified it to . maKe It irls[ant~ Clear yOU Ve stuck yOur r ght foot into 5omeTJqtng good We out a coIlecL~on of dtals an{] gages Where yo~J can ~e~them. Thee.backed them razor nearly seventeen fee the wind. We stiffened the shocks sth~ened the sprlng~ stabilize r ears ana pu~ DID, fat Goodyear Eagle GT ml~ her at all four corners And cal edtt Monte Carlo 5S
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To improve your accounts receivable, shift your point ot view. ~Today, there's a powerful way to improve your accounts receivable. Do it by shifting your point of view a~y from easily ignored collection letters. Shift it to the Bell network. You already have access to the Bell network, the world's largest and most advanced information management system. 8o you can make contact at once. Can discuss and interact with your customer or clienr~ can have personal rapport. But how you use the network-the techniques of a Ball credit management program-is what makes the interaction pay off. The Bel_l program offers you a cost-effective method for reducing bad debts and increasing cash flow, so that your receivables can earn interest. Meanwhile, customer good will remains intact. Bell's program is so effective with overdue accounts that many collection firms use it. Bell can discuss programs and services to help you use the network to your best advantage. ~ All you have to do is call now 800-821-2121, /%/'~/'% /%/'~1 /%~1/'~1 toll free. In Missouri, call 800-892-2121. ~SUU-~L/'LIL/ See how easy it is to put our knowledge to work for you.~ The knowledge business @
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O OOR H~ ~~-'-- SEPTEMBER 1981 FEATURES 24 Wllepe Haee all tbo Trlcl( Shots GunnY F~)" f@l~ decades trick-$hoot]nfi tlt~hadoUl~ enle/~alne~d around the U S Gune tlow, tales of lketr stants remain. By Dick Baldwin and C]p/e Con]ey 33 Deer Ikmting 1981 What kind of deer season can you expect thin year? We talked w~th experts a~d here's what they told us. By Rich LaRocco 39 Whrk Ilepd for Big MuleYS 102 Mulcy bucks don't come as easy as runny hunters thlrd¢ but if you work hard and hunt the right way you can fill your t~ By Bruce Brady Mad About Whitetails Every yea[ I quit my job and hunt deer ful] time. It doesn't put money in tile b~lk. ~ it put II trophy racks on tile wall By Paul Miekey 48 The Stolen Iltmt With a ,22 or even a flintlock, you can relive boyhood drcRrds when sqtti~ceIs are moving in the hJekortel By Fan] J, Rundell DEPARTMENTS e2 s~amw~n Mare =mple He~'s how to slgtlt-m your rifle by firing only ann shot. If you re wi~', howewr, you'll tim a few moi~ to i1t~¢ sure. By Jim Carrmchel 64 The Orange That Let's You Get Your Duck Since science hat proved that deer do see color, mn t it true that weari/lg safety orange rmns yol~ cna~¢~ to score? By George H. Hma~ The Versatile Spinnmrbatt A somnerbatt does it all. YOU earl fish tt on the su~ac¢ lUS[ 5eT~-~(h~ or emw] it on thn T~ By J~ ~h 106 The Mh,acleat BkAntleps From nubbins to a big IXCK, h¢lt:'$ how ~I1 e]k grows the weapons be uaes to test tim mettle of oval bulls. By Mickael Lapinsky EAST SPECIALS 35 Baatepn ~er nmtdup 50 SIII'I~I~WaytO Field Dress Your Deer ~, m-depth look at the top trophy spare and best areas to get your Oct* thl~ f~dl. By Tom Fegely Here's a st~by-smp guide to gutting your deer It's easy to d ...... if you're tackling the lob for the first tmle. ~ ~ammwddolat: A Surf-Flahbag Mecca By George H, Ha~ Foltow me oa a mp *ffound Chappaquiddick Is/and in search 54 What to do With Your DeeP HIdo of stoned bass, v~eakfish, and bluefish By A. J Hand It" you Iag a buck this fall, put its ~km to gc~u t~e. Here's ~ ~GUbl0 P.I-A.Y. how, plus a list of tmmeries By Jim Zulftb0 ][~1~ pearLsylvwatia League of AIl~ln-g Yout~ reeelve~ an O~TOOOR L[~ service award. BY S, R, Slaymaker Ll 56 ~ll[at~ed 8.1~ When I saw a be~'s claw marks t0 feet Mgb on a cabin wall.~ ~ Ym]r I decided to try for the giant wlth m3 bo~. Could I do it'~ A guide to Ea~team hunting preserves. I new nuntln~ anti By Larr> L Frye as told to John O. Cartier fishing area for New J~'rsey, Maryland s~nper~. ~ttd more COMMENTARY 12 Starees at Largo Secrets for dealing in used guns Field re ports of new gear nil mlt~dllg Deer and amelope rifles 72 B~llltll Answers to your boating questions 77 fl~l.g wltlt Jerry Gibbs Frog rigs: old mad new Cover photograph by Gary. K~lepp 2 78 Rsldng with ratty I(reh Splnmng in saltwater 86 Recreati0nal Vellicles Ford's new small I~ck for 1983 92 Bowhuntlnu exp~l~ s ailsweL" readers' quest]otis 119 Huatlitu OqiS Wounded d~¢r and track~rtg hounds 4 Editorial Trails Yes, w~ have some icM~lls 10 Lattm's Wa~ in The woods READER INFORMATION 30 lhisllappened to Me 115 811dopiag 122 WtoI~ to GO 126 Classified OU ~OOB I.IFF
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DOVE BY RICHARD STARNES, EDITOR-AT-LARGE My hunt with Uncle Wesley was one of almost unrelieved disaster• It left my self-esteem wounded, but I suspect he taught me more about shooting doves than anyone else in my life. Even when he lived, Uncle Wesley was people, but he treated them as if he what might be termed obsolescent-- intended to keep each one of them for- out of date, of a type no ionge~ pro- ever. He treated dogs and "chaps" (his dated. He was au old style gentleman, name for kids) pretty much alike: with a bird shooter and dog trainer, a quiet patience and good humor but always man who almost always managed to with firtmaess that brooked no non- hide the spring steel and whalebone sense. The only arae be ever blew me that formed his character. He k a up was once when I bed run a favorite wide robber band around his wl(~et, horse of his lmo a lather on a hay hot althongh he was by no means penuri- enough to kill a mule, and I'll never ous, mad he was elegantly tucking snnff forget it. in kis cheek long before anybody ever Uncle Wes was besleally a quail heard of Walt Garrison. man. He was as good at geawing lespe- He'd been an oil wildcaller and he deza as lie was at cotton, for he was a prosperous South Carolina cottort believed it had addictive qualifies for farmer when our paths so happily quail, and in a day long before deep crossed, an old man by then who had freezershenevershot abirdthatwasn't lived enough lives to safisfy a dozen destined to end up on his, or some- lesser mortals. It is owing to him that I body's, table. But be also shot doves, do not disgrace myself more than I do and he prized them for their heart and when 1 swing a shotgun, and ] hate to the swift beauty of their flight, think howrapidiyit is comdigup on 50 "Buck," he once said te me after years since my first lesson at his bands, we'd spent a beaudfn] freeze frame of In those days I was convinced he knew time watching n fiigbt Wheal above a everything there was to know about the comtiebi in a soft autumn twilight, "a outdoors and, viewed now from a long- dove can fly twice as fast as a quail, lab distance down the road, I may have been near right, lie knew why you should always ~Ut" to hunt doves with the wind at the back of your neck, and he knew why a dog, even a good dog, will hunt his heart out on one day and be emery and no 'count the next. 1 suppose he dressed up in a black suit for church on Sunday, but in the files of my memory he always appears wearing Iris suntans, always crisp and freshly ironed, with his panama hat and that mysterious half-smile that never seemed to leave his face. Now that I am hdiping to raise a grandson, 1 think I nan understand why he lavished so much care and time th trying to teach me. I was young and. as he put it, "bld- dable," and it is a matter of entrusting hard-won lore where it will survive to be passed on to succeeding genera- lions. Uncle Wesley always seemed to have a bewildering succession of dogs on his place. I realize now he was prob- ably training most of them for other 12 which makes it pre-cisely four times as hard to shoot." He knew a thing about bird dogs that a lot of us have to re-learn periodically, which is that a good dove dog is a rare and wonder ful zalmal. Mostly dogs do not like to re~eve doves, and one that does it with skill and endinalasm is to be abndabed. He owned one such dog that I remember, a chunky, black sinuous-heifer random lineage whose name was Rip. Rip did not much like to work in the generally accepted sense of the word as it applies to dogs, He would lie with his beed on his paws, unmoved, wfifle a envoy of qugg rust tied and browsed in a peaPater h not a dozen yards from his nose. But Pat him at the edge of a field of stubble when the doves were flying and he was all business, lie was just a natural-bum retriever of doves, and not much else. Although l'd been out for quail and rabbits any number of times with Uncle Wes (rabbits were somewi~ae near bull weevils on ins scale of worthiess erea* tures, and be hunted them mostly to protect the gatdeal patch) be showed great reluctance to let me go with him when he and Rip went out far doves. I came as close to nagging him about it as anyone ever came to nagging him about anything, but all I'd ever get was that fleeting half-sndle. Once, when he was sitting on the porch in his high-hacked rocker fanning himself with a copy of OLTD(~OB LIFF
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how quickly the teieptIones ~taried ring- goals ing at the page's desk eutskJe the studio Even if the pJay bom~e~, a writer would be I~eck in a few weeks or months wl~h another pl~y aPrO[he r C~t~c$ AI one ti~e thole were sever1 anthology' dram~ Oft the air every we~K which meant the gleamy cameras ~eveured 3(~ or 4~0 original p~ays a year¸ (There were few '~ummer repea~s, ) If young actors, wri~ ors al~ dJrectorl¢ were t~len[ed an(J in~I~0u~, ~t was more ~h~rl possible was practically ieevilable their they ~o~ld t~e given their chance When Defore in the history of entertai0ment was that evel at Northwest Orient Airlines Irt 1953 whe~ Fred Gee bought rny first ~ript (I h~d written ~nere than ~0) a play about aduI- TV ~,~= ~UGUST 22 981 Jug before air time a quiet woeld de- ~cerl~l The director and his te~l~nical ! assi~tams weald s~t ~e their plaee~, ear~ phOtle~ comparably arranged for aotien, hands poieed, wa~tin~ Beyond them¸ through the gla~S partition, the sets were ligh~d; ti~e ~amefa~ in pla~e tot ~'n~ir openln~ shots; the actors On their mack$; everyone still nloti~nles~, waiting¸ The filial minuta wO~ld s(~i~ interminable; and when ~'f~ swe~ har~d leaoh~d tt~e hour, a crash of music would set everyone in m otiO~l a voice wou[d ~tnneun~e, ¸'Live from New '¢ork!" and a wrilet knew that his ~,y, ~ c~i~d Ot his tr sm~lir,,~ he~¢l ~as going out to 20 million peOple. ~t was ~ thrill uneq~al~ in ~ny o{her dramatic t3rm. 13
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ANN JILLIAN'S PAID HER DUES -AND HOW! What 14 pigeons did to her on a Broadway stage every night should happen only to statues i By Glenn Eslerly i chair right n ]rent of a killer D atlas? "Well I have AI age 31 witfl tw~ event All of this sounds a bit waitlng far me if this one [ fuI decades of show. reporter another series project business expsdence be- : hind her and the giddy I audacious tot someone I d°esn'tmaKeit Icanttalk prospect Ot full-fledged wilosinasefiesthat has abovtit alibis point But I stardominfrortelher Ann had a rOCky history and would have something JiHian is not inc]ineu to be faces an unceriait, future else lo go into and it would COy about her ambitions ..i Sei in a posh re~laurant, be my show YOU have to want' she says with hub- with Ann ~ls die of five = be ready for whatever i ply for'nrightness to be at eye catching waitresses• might happen in this busi least what Len, Anderson It's a LJ'ving got yanked off hess, and I am" is. and I h013e to transcend the air last season Jar re- She was, indeed When thata~ddosomesucoess- vamping The series will It,~ a Living got shelved ful leature l:ms aS well as return this fall Urlder a new "Wllile we were on hiatus. ' ~inglng and dancing m , name, minustwoefitsotlg- says Ann .,i worked up a Las Vegas lye beer in : ina~ stars, Susan Sullivan , nightClub act that~-a gem this business SO ~ong lye and Weedy Schaal; end and gel a 1big response s~n the ups a/ld downs with one new il lamiliar whanlperiormeditinNew and I krOw that I have the 18ee: Louise Lesser OJ york" New $i~ing [n her talent People h~lve told Mary Hattman, Mary Hart- drnssing locrn she waves me from the time I wa~ a man fame 'Louise is a i a bogus newspapel that litlle girl thai I have talent great addition•" saYS Ann. a fan has sent ~et bearing and now I can see it my- "and my character has the headline: ANN JILLIAN ~elf I do~t have to De shy been revised arid I hope NAMED 803 NO 1 SEX S~M aboJt'it wil~ be playing a larger SOL "1 ICYe it, gays Ann Sothere roleWellbegettingoutof Jillian Dressed for re- : Blithely she acKnowl- the Ies!aurant r~te, tom- hearsels in a baggy bPack edges [bat the though1 of Pining mere comic si41~- sweat suit thai hide~ her 13acorn ng a big star heSS whiehHovewiththe voluptuous figure Ann i routinely ricochets around prOblems ane issues the pauses in the gleeful ! her mind-- at leas~ three charaClerS lace ,, appraise] 01 her future and ! times a day The thought, But wh~l ebOul ABe's laughs at her own ehutz as a matter of fact makes scheduling ot the re- pah:"£mreallypreltyhum- her clap her hands ~nc vamDedshowoppositethe blefor bepngasw0nderfu! chortle anc IDOl.he e in her second half hour of series- as I am" 16 T~ GUIDE ,~UG J~T 22 ~-
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k.lpr essimllstic irna~Q of a swirnmen lightness and freedom, frlghtertlr~y subnler B~ Rtnlning har se: a~.ressiotl, turbl4ence Behavior • "See & Tell": Color Phototherapy horse latticed with bands of light a jag god greenish sv.irl, a diver polsed bzforo t akeoiT These phob3graphs, ranging from illlpresslonism to clear Rhstraetion, a/e, the work of ~oel Walker, a gifted area- leur cameraman, who took them for his amusement and ~hen was pleased eaough with the results to hang them on the wallz of his Toronto offle~ as decoration Walker, 39, is a psychiatrist¸ These e • . lmag s that reveal secrets n the vtewers heart A swo0ping swiramcr in churning blue " i four. mniSlXOher rrtage~,bcgan oob¢l water, a lteariy invisible run~ng conunents from his patients, often pro- Jagged abstr action It1 shades ~ green Demome, death reflected tn a pao[. riding him with a catalyst for thorapemle ~dk, air opetlftxg to the patieI~s pret~- cupat 0he. soon Walker began asldhg whether any of the photographs stirred axt emotional respond. "People expressed feelings," he says,"and at appropriate mo- ments I could break through initial re- sistance and get to the hc~trt of their prob Iota." One of Walker's patients, a mau in 30s complained of chest Imlns arxd feared heart attacks, even though cardi- ologists could fred trothing wrong with him Walker assumed the problem was psychosomatic, but could not get the m~ll to ~lJ~ freely. One day WaLker #lapperleuJ to oak him how he felt about the running horse photograph, *.nd the image pro- voked a sudden torrent of rage against the raarl's negiec~,ft father tbac 1le ~d previously been unable to express. "The picture CLeRrLy triggered this a~areness," says Walker "As he began to deal with I /a~ o~I rage and aeger, the Falas bcff~n to ~lubside a~d eventually left him" Walker does not regard the photo- graphs as a diagrtt~dc tool like the Ro~- schach bec/miqu¢, JR whxeh patients de- scribe what they see in inkblots and the fe.spollset~ file scor~0., Nol- do~s h~ use them like the Thematic Api0erceptfan T~t. in which vlewcts ~.veal patterns by ¢xmstruct fag stones from a esasaaemotional faebreaker: "Theinitfttl i relponse gives roe cues abou~ where to go from there." But Canadian Psychologist Paul Lemcr, an expert on the Rorschaeh I method believes WaLkers approach may very well become a n~w diagnostic toot for 54 assee~L.ag personality "Like the Ror- sedach," Lerner says, "it ~0uld be, used to show what aspect the patient pays attea- tion ~ and wh~.t he igllor~ " Phototftcrltpy, in fact, is not new:.an English s~ed~ (and pioneer photogra- pher) n,treed ltugit Diamond used pic- tures of madwf~mell in ~is work with inch- ! tal patients in (he mtd-19th cent~t~r But photogrRphy has only recently come rote tends to involve patients' responses Lo im- serious psyebinhcrapeuho use, and it edll ages of tlieiEs~lves or IRembers of their immediate family. No erie before Walk- er h~ts collected reactions as syst~matl- rally, or from as many people. The reasort is that he also became in- , terestcd in learning how the general pub- i Oiv~ poised befo~ t~eoff O~ a cl~ t~ ~ king abou~ ~ ~/ter death ~]ME ~.UGUST 17 Iggl
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HAVE WE SOLD YOU, DEAR VIEWER?. Experts say these words in TV- movie titles deJiver high ratings By Ben Stein ~ide~ the TV-movie. n may cost one or two mil- lion dofln¢~. ~t may even- tue~ly draw three or four million dollars in advertis- ing Yet i1 ig a me~Jlessly ShOT~-hte,d phgflomenon II ap~rs mcce or [e~ OUt 0t the blue There is no "word of mouth" to tell yOU about it Its ~lors, genero ~lly CUt from the same cOOkie CLAret, do Pot help to distinguish it f~om any of a ~lundred others HOW can you decide 34 whether to watch the TVo derived horn years of ex- movie? More importer to perience to tell an audi- the networks (sipce each ence that ii had betier ~ot tenth of a Nielsen point is miss Ihis nlgilT's lreel? worlh big bucks in advef- "We r0Ok for words of tislngbonusesorlebat~s), rnovemer~ ~rcfs of ac- how can they lure you to tion*' s,ays an executive of tune in a film you know NBCsTV-films."We~iketo nothing about?have* Itle word .~0ve¸ in 1he The answer is simple: tille if at air possible. If we giveitagoodname Says can get an acEion word Deanne B~rkley, a proauc- anO '~)ve' in the sarr~ litle er who helped im:ent the il'e perfect When we I~.rr~*vie genre While she 10ougl~t Jill Robinson's was at ABC: "For ~he TV- 'Bed lime Story,' we tested movie, there is r~ worcl of 15 titles unti~ we came up nlouth Execution is with'ACpjfcrLcve'That irrelevant. YOU haVe only wee icest perfect" oPaa shot B~ the aLl~ienGo, Yes, ~he r~Btv~r ks do use Thetitlehas~gmbti~em." a computer. In ~n ugly HOW, then, do the net- white building On Sunse~ woke dec,idewhaititlesto BOl~leVard, human guinea LJsevWhat r~Jles have they pigs spe~d evenings
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NATIONAL AFFAIRS The March he first helicopter took off for its T ir~UgL~al bombing ~n, only to be forced to ground 45 minutes later by a broken pump, Mission No. 2 w~s also a misfit, and inght rMd No. 3 wa~ cut short in part by a thick fog. In the battle against the Mcthterr~ean fruit fly, Calff~ and Gov. Edmund (3. (Jerry) Brown Yr. seemed to be losing fest week. Choppers began to sprayi m/xtcre of molasseslike bait laced with the Prsflalde m~JathJ~ over ~ two-county area south of San Franalsco, but delays siowed the proee- durt: even as the infestation sta~ed to spread perilously dose to the prodnce.rivh San Joaquin Vallay. Sudderdy, Brown had tittle akoice: he announced that tbe situa- tion ]~vw p~ed an ¢co~.omlc t kreat of e~n- prevedented propor~inns" ~ti asked ~is p~heessor, Ronald Reagan, to declare ~he affected region a national disasler are~. At the weekend, die W~te House still hadn't decided whether to grant Brown's request But in the meantime, some Adminis- tralion aides were privately ex- pressing satisfaction at the gov- ¢nlor's discor~01re, tfluch of it of ~s own making. As one top official at the US. Depart- ment of Agficvhureput in "A J] tt~s could have beea a voidad." Attac~ Brown had been slow to respond to the early alarms, preferring a t~rogram of tree-stripping and ~ovnd spraying, and he ordcxed the aerial attack only after Agri- culture Secretm'y Joh~ Block thr earned to qParamine most o f California's fruit and veget a- bfe industry. Las~ week the aer- ial spraying, ~pposed by loc~ groups womed about the po- tem~d Jong-~.~m ~m~ct of 26 malathion on humans, wu plagued by last7 minut~ court battles ~nd logisdnal prob- lems. Defense Secretary Caspar Wcia- better, fearing disruptive anfi-~praylag demonstrations, origlndil~ blocked a plan tO allow the helicopters to me a Navy air- strip. He permitted the copters to land at Moffet t Field only when the proteats failed to mater/afize. By the weekend, the ekop~ pets had covered less then two-thfeds of the ..... 180 square miles designated for spraylng~ Brow~,feult~amagedby.~redd~Ylar*'ae And the L~fcsfad area seemed to be growing. O~elals discovered Madfly mag- due¢, such as certificates guaranteeing that tots weft beyond the cadginal spraying the shipment originated in ma area tmaf- are~, forcdmg them to quadruple the size of fected by the Medfly. Other states, among the spray pattern. But growers in the Saa them Florida and Texas, set oerufieatinn Joaquin Valley, with a $4.3 billion fruit- standards so high that California produce and-vegetahle industry at stake, were not will he effectively bented unless it is film~- waiting: they began to prepare fumigation gated first--prompting a probakla ¢ou~ ohember~ to save what produce they could, fight this week. Me.aawhil~ severdi states imposed thither Can the Medfly be licked? Barring fux- fcs~ic~ons on imports o~ Cal/forhia pro- d~r comp/icatioas, agcla~/v2re exF~a~s be- Peddling ma~ks in the spray a~a: How #erings a h~alth threat? here that an aerial-spraying program over the next severM weeks can eliminate the pesi and contain the damage m the state's huge agriculture indus. try. Political experts are not sc optimistio about the prospr'c~ of the state's gOVerilof ]~V¢~ before the latest Medfly crisis Brovat was beset by po*ential ly damaging charges that staff had engaged in uofa~ pofitical praetice~ By ~d accounts, he intends to ~u~ for the U.S. Senate seat cur rently occupied by Repubtic~ S. I. Hayakawa---and his i~ep handling of the Medfly attac] might sting him ha next ygar' campmgn. MICHAEL R~SE. ~ gETH ZLCK~N in $~n Fr a~e~, ~e2~Ry BUCKLE~' in W~shm gxo and b~au r~c¢ NEWSWEEK/JULY 27 19!
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Find the case of C.C.~ we hid along the Lewis and CJark trail We retraced Lewis and Clark's historic expedition up the Missouri River into Montana. And where they found their roughest going, we hid a case of the smootbest whisky, Canadian Club. Where Lewis and Clark had floated the unspoiled river, Canadian C[ub's ~afts foll~ved, We tested our nerves, as the explorers had, on the wild rapids of the Clark's Fork As we explored those historic Montana streams, we buried a,.case of Canadian Club overlooking the very site of one of the expedition's most important sightings. One clue: neither Lewis nor Clark made it. Discover the taste of the world's final whisky. AS you search along Ibis historic trail, remember Canadian Club has a proud hlstory of its own. For over 120 years it% been enjoyed by those who seek the very best. Canadian Club is lighter than Scotch, smoother than bour[~on, and enjoyable on the rocks, in a sou r or Manbettan, or with your favorite m ixe~ So come search along the Lewis and Clark trail to discover why g% "The Best I rl Fhe House',' or simply venlu re down to your favoTite bar and say, "Canadian Clul~, please!"
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3 SSION: SLMMER SMALLMOUTHS FISHING BY JERRY GIBBS Don't be intimidated by the you-should- have-been-here-yesterday excuse. Here are five tips that should put you into summer bass action no matter how hot the weather. It's your first day of summtr vacation, anti the guy at the boat dock has just dropped one on you LLk¢ a bomb. I-le said you should have been here a few weeks ago, ngld? That's when the smailmouths were acting like the Oak- land Raiders at breakfast. Now it's too hot. there's too much water skgng, or something. Wlmtever his excuse, the fish am not biting. I've been there, friend, atxi here's how 1 deal with the situation. The idea thai in summer small- mouths are as easy to come by as mer- maids is baloney. Most fishermen believe that in hot weather smaSies are just too deep for practical fishing. Sometimes they are, sometimes they're just n~dium deep, and other times they can be caught from shallow places where you might not expect them until spring. Try mty five proved methods wherever you fish for bmnzebacks. At any #yen time. one or more of them should catch smallies for you no matter how hot it gets. Work with the wind In summer sraallmouths are in deep water only part of the thn¢. Early and late in the day they often move to shal- low feeding grounds. The best places are those that have bottoms zor~sist~ng of honldca-s interspersed with smaller rocks. The best lures to use kn these areas are hair or plastai-tail jigs, small crankbaitg and flyrod poppers. The bes~ way to work the shin nw shelves is by taking advantage of the wind. The perfect setup is an easy on- shore breeze that puts a steady ripple on the surface. I let my boat drift from deeper wster to the thading zone. I use jigs when the fish seem to be foraging on bottom. [ cast, let the leadheads set- give Up using poplars for smaihnouths after the spring spawning season is over. "[hat's a mistake, I've had some of the best surface action of the year whe~ I've used poppets over rocks, old cribbing, and underwater pilings near shore during midsummer. I've scored well using the me~ early in the morning, but the technique seems to be mostprotodnctiv¢ during evebil~s. The bass feod on schools of bait~sh over shallow slllletttre Inost s~!mmer nights, but you've got to semvh for the mea they're using. The action lasts only" a short time. I've stood shoulder-to- shoulder with friends and used spin- ning or light baitcasring gear and matched them fish-for-fish with my popp~rs during these evening feeding binges. You still can use this technique when the wind gets stronger. In a medium blow you can maintain a desired drift by using an electric motor When the wind is too strong for the ele~rai, keeping pour main motor idlin~ as you drift. It doesn't frighten fish m water fie, then ~tttap-swim them back. When more than eight feet deep When you I hang up on the bottom I use break off near shole~ slowly bircle back without so I won'l spook the sraallies by thragh= *arming over the fishing area. Use jigs thg ahont Io free the lure. White jigs are or crankbaits. my favoshes, followed by yellow ones. Cmakbaits are good middepth htr~. You also should have deep divers that can tick the bottom occasionally, and medium divers that swim just over the Target trolling From midmorabig to midaftemoon smallmouths usually head for deep water, especially in surrey weather. Depending off cover ava ekle n yoxtr bottom when retrieved. Most of the lake, you may find the fisla axoued plugs I use have a crayfish, silver, blue, deep-water weedbefis, sunkzn logs, or or parch finish, reefs away from shore. You can find As the sun begins to sink 1 like to these places ea.sily with a flasher lmti or break out my fly rod. Most fishermen a chart recorder. Without this equip- Jetty aiDhs hefts a nice smagmoolh h~ss take# o~ ~uper fast sgltdng line. At right are toD smagmouth flies for deep #ahing Top row, lelt in d~nl: era~4ish, A~ec, mafabotJ m{ol3ow. Secoftd few: Sroneflg nymph¸ Aztec, sou/pin Third row.¸ Keel ttl~t~oow, b~s~ se~iDin on Keel hook, Zonkef. Lasl row: Woogy Worm, JeDch ~t]f fJy, t~d tT~c~fsDou mlt~t3ow 58 Ot~DOOIt LIFE
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Even in picked-over purlieus, local analysts can tum up companies with rising prospects. YOU Be The Presndent. By taking charge of a com- pute" s~ted company you can now join the ga'ow- in~ number of competing phyers who are learning file tools o:~ business man- ~ement which are ~pplJc- ~ble to any business. With the ~9~is~nce oJ~ an imag~- ~ry consulting fJ~n you will ~lot your company to hi~her and higher ~ofits as you |earn to re~d and understand ~inancial state- ments and to utilize this infotTaation to make sound managerial decisions. For free information send name and address to: Business Environmental Siraulat~ Ine, P. O* Box 8~19 Baton Rouge, .L~, 708D8 66 MC~E¥ provi~g productivity. Even in Ihe thread- bare fire btlsines,s. PreScott can still recommend Cooper Tire & Rubber (N YSE. $ 33.75/. This relatlvely small pri vale label cortlpany, whose earmngs dora- bled in 1980, is picking up m~rket strafe as mole%IsiS [radc down to c~esper tires. Wisconsin has 124 publicly held com- panies, and RobelX W. Baird Co. lit Mil- waukee 1414-765-35001 tracks 115 of them¸ Baird's 16 analysts head out of the Badger State to covcr machluery com- pani¢~ and oil-selViee stocks; hilt mostly they stick to the upper Midwest. In ~978 the lirm de,zlsed Bairdir Eq- uity 20 Report On regional companle~ that ha~e had an annual return on eq- ui ly oF 20% or more and Jcs~ tha~t $ I bil- llon in revetlues The list has r~ow grown to 60 firms. Over the 12 months through April, thelr shares rose an average Of 91% a performance tha~ amazed even the folks at Baird¸ Crandall Hays. direc- tor of¸ research, concede~ that 1980 wa~ "the klnd of year for us that comes once ,goal of selecliD$ Mocks thai every year will rise twice as much as the S&P 500. "in the past fo'¢ years we've accom ptJshed that except for one year," I~ports re.~¢arch directiBr Art Al/u]lann. "We've committed small alistakes, but these were r0ore titan made tip for by the winners." Some of thos~ Witlncrs h~ve ~en KRM Petroleum (OTC, $10.50). a Den vor oil company, up 128070 since I]oeitch- er began recommending it two years ago, and Umted Cable TV of Englewood. Colo.. first spotted three years ago aRd no~ up 625% after two stock splits. Am- mann figures that oil- and gasMrilling stocks will be good perfomlers through the 1980s. Fie is cominholg to reeom- men~ KR M. along wi~h ttamlhon I~mth- er~ (OTC. $20), Vanderbilr (O~C, $7.75) and Double Eagl~ {OTC, $4}. But he is looking for still bigger gains in the next 1~ months from 0. less #amorous i~sue. Mnnfort of Culorado/OTC. $4.50), a i0- eal meat packer whoae earnings are ris- ing with the price of beef. in a decade, and we don't expect it to he : Oivcn their l~ation in Southern Cat- duplicated." But he adds: We believe ifo rnla, i!isno~surprisingthatthesixan: you should make good money in these stocks over three or four years, They're investments, r~a[ly." Baird continues to recommend Air WLsconsin (eTC. $16,25L a regional car- rier The stock spilt 3 for 2 in April after hltlmg a record $26. up From $16 in Jan uary, and it should keep fltriag h!gh, Baird's analyst thinks, as deleg~lation en- courages m~re big airlines to pull out of small markets. Another recommendation is Chi-Chi's (OTC, $23.75), a chain of Mexican-style restaurants. Though based in Kemucky. Chi-Chi's made heads spin at Baird when ~ts analysts heard that the Madison. Wts. franchise serves 280 gal Ions of m~rgaritas on a Saturday uight arid that there is an hour's wait to get in TFIE W~$T in [974, wheu Den~e(s Boctteher & Co. (303-629-2020) was mainly a munic~ ipa] bond house, the firm set oul re be come, in the words of managing partner 2 Wil~i~m Svreasea, "lhv Wall Stleet of the Rockies" Today it has 20 offices in seven western states and a research de- ,artmem that is earning fame in energy and high-technology stocks. Sin analysts cover about /30 issues with the stated alysts at Crowell Wooden in Los Augeles (213-620-1850) have discovered many high-technology stOcks, The five sUCh is sues on C rowell's 1980 buy list rose an av- er~ge 245%. Everybody, it seems, wants those California high-tech shares, so there aren't magly horgains le~, Howev- er, Croecell an~lystt; arc S~Jll re'otT~///c ft d- in~t a few local stccl~ Among them: Rogers Corp. {ASIa, $25). a supplier of flexible circuats and keyboards to the electronics, compllter 3nd Office equi]~- meat industries; Genisco TechrtoIogy {ASE. $18.50). a diversified electronics company; and Optical Radiation (OTC, $15), which makes electro-optical sys- tems and components for the military Even in the pic ked-over purlieus ¢~f SiI- icon Valley, then. local analysts cart still turn up companies with rising prospects. Whether they are combing your hack- yard or someone else% firms that are near lh~ scene can help you in your search for sleek market proflLs. []
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asking price and they won't have to pay a te~1 estate agent's 6% commis- alon---a $6,780 saving m~thls ca~. Tha winner will have to pay a tax on the windfalI, but will be able to dc that handily with a steM1 mortgage. Are the Redmans starting a trend~ "I certainly hope not," cues Washing- ton rgal estate bmkea" Peter Miller, Miller thinks there is a natuzal limit to novclly: "People will purchase ra~ lie tfukets once or twice.mad that's it." lohn Redman ageces. "We're selling out fast because it's a new idea," he say$~ "fult all area gan~ suppOlt more one ia~[ie a y/car" But Miller perceives a ~ more seri- ous and chilling point behind the Red m~ns' plight and their solution: "It's emblematic of p~obiems sellers are having in the marketplace and Jso of desperation/' ha says. "Many people The Redman faro@ of Fa/~fa~ ~ and the house they are ra~ng off possess the illualon of equity. Thcy A ~l qf ~' ~n. tell you their house is worth $200,C00. but the reality is they can't sell iu Noc telephone to the Internal Revenue tfuce-hedroomhnusebutitwasworth at $176,000 o. $185,000, but not at Servic~ to F0arlax County and to as- the $iC~ chance/' says Canlyn. all." It sounds like the tmal winsde lit sorted la~ers. The ra~e, they For the Rcdmans it is an especially the great game of "profiting" in learned, had to be held by a nonprofit attractive deal. They will car a check houses that so fascinated the Amerl orgathz~rion, from the 8oys Club for nearly the full can middle class in the last decade. • - So m luiy the Redmans, in effect, sold tha~r house to the Annandale {Va.)BoysClubfor$113,000. Theclub Second mortgages are being then commenced a sale of up to 2,000 ro ae icko sats ooo h, ,atotalanswer to a homeowner's prayer. By rd $200,000. ,,lt,s the , ialng, whom? By lenders looking for collateral. swer, there are no lls about it;" says Paul Kelly, executtve director rd the Annandale Boys Club. "We'll make $85,000 in gross profits Wc pay U2 of 1% o£ the $200,07~1 I$I,000l to the county and keep the rest." Comxty officials are examining the deaI---and the Kedmans and the Boys Club are woI'kln~ o13 minor contract ch~lges~ to make sure it accords with Virgnala inttei3' laws. The club has mid more than 1~000 of the tickets and has set a dzawing for Sept. 5 The club did no advertising but news stories spurred sales---sQ much that the club installed an elac*ronically recorded message telling ~olks where to send the checks. "The entire countI3~ hes called," says Carllyn. Redman. "The phone rings ell the hook flora v a,m. to 11 p.m every night. We've heard ~rem htmdseds ot po0plc--dm Calt~omia, Texas~ Michigan, Arizona, Kentucky, Nebraska. About 70% ot the callers want to buy a ehance~ 30% want to lemul how to raffle o~ their own houses fp Who's buying the uckets! Several of the gedmans' nelghbozs. Doct~rs~ dentists, lawyers and college students. "A woman in New Jersey expecting her tffth child cal]ed and told me she co~akhi't ~ord to move out ot he~ Nothing to lose but your house By Miehael Kolbemschlag HOUS~ IS TO LIVE IN~ no~ to ]ev- Ayour bank, tinanc~ company erage. Keep that Lu mind when or savings and loan association urges you to take a second mortgage to pay h~r the kids' crd]ege educations, to consolidate your d~his or to take that long-postponed vacation to H~waiL Fin.2mcial institutions aze pushing second mortgages because they see them as a way to |cud to the consum- er profitably yet s~aly following the liburalmation of federal bankruptcy regulations ~ccond~--loans agair~st the eqmty a homeowner has accmnu- fated ha his house---now total nearly $40 billion or some ,3% of the $] .3 trillion in consumer debt, And they are the fastest g.'owing fi)nn of con- sumer lending. Two major New York banks, Manu- facturers Hanover Tlust and Chemi- cal Batik, are pushlng s~conds ~lhiw- inga recent relaxation in New York State usury laws and prohibitions againsz second mortgage inmls. "The homeowner is by his vc~3' i~ature a good nak," says Wilhert palmosch, vice pre~idsnt for consttmer banking at Chemical, which has $2.~ blihon na FO g~ ES, JULy 2~A 1981 47
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The promise of methane: Vast supplies of future gas energy. Methane: Most peOple know it as natural gas, which today serves more than 1?oO millLon consumers nationwide. But convett~onal natural gas resources underground rep- ps~ent o~ly ~ small part of methanes true potential LOng-latin supply sources of m~thane inclUde gasification of coal arid pe~t, gas flora tight rock formations, geepressured aquifers1 CO~l 6~ms an(l hydrates. And t~mo methane sources ~'~ rermewabfe, ~uch as con~rsion of land and m~rfne h~mass, an¢t the use of ud0an waste re~ources. This d~versity of 6u pply prOvides a high level of COr~sumer assurance that gas can coP,- gnt~e to be available~and delivered at co mpet~ffve prices. The de~very system for these new methane supplies is already in place. Our nation's million-mile gas pipeline network derivers energy more efgciently (sourc~ to consumer) than any Otfler major energy'derisory syst~tn. And because tPa ur=der= ground, it is a~o the most environmentally desirable way of b'an~pomlJtrg energy Methane is a vet satile, efficient fuel. It Is clean Bq, less costly, and is adaptable to more energy applications than other m~or fuelS. And because methane molecules are the same regar~ less of the source, future geneTa~lons can have exactly the s~me clean lu~l, AH sourc~ of e~Brgy wPl ~Jay a~ inS or I an t role in rnee~i ng Americas future energy needs, And the gas InduStry has con- siste~ly r~cg razed that each should make its biggest contribu- tJen irt the jobs it dOes best, 0il, for instance, is essential as our pdmary transportation fuel; efecthofty for tightS, mo~ors, indus- bia~ automatk~n, and many other uses. Gas serves over 55% of the homes in Amedca'mand provides nearly 40% of the energy for industry end agriculture. And coal, of which we have such a tremendous supP~ can and must he used to a far greater extent, and gas energy can greatly enhance its use AS we move to-develop future energy sources, the ~dvantages ~f ~ gas By'ate m become/ncre~s~J/y ~/~nif,tC~nL The f~.ots are clear, W hat we ~eed today and tomorrow--clean, efficient economical energy--the G~S system (~eliver s, The Gas Option is one we cannot afford to ignore gas: The future belongs to the efficient.
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b lramn l, odBat PEOPLE's weekly degartments read like a who's who of whatb happening You don t miss a trick, a treat, a face. a place And if you think t he writing's lively. wait 'til you see the pictures Pick up your week Pick Up a People today By (lerat¢l IqP, o~ler The names of 20 prominent people are hidden in the maze of letters, HOW many can you find by consulting the brief clues? The names read forward, backward, up, down or diagonally, ate always in a straight line and never skip letters. We have started you off by circling DONOGH UE, the answer to 1 In the diagram. The ,ames may over= tap and letters may be used more than once, but not all of the letters wil] be used. Super PEOPLE sreuths should be able to identify 15 c r more n ames. Answers in next week's issue. IG Y N Z U A O G Y U S F I P W O N E P D L E LSFALH/~IS ,TTENR'UB EESTERN RALKLTO R'RSLLIS Y U E V E S I RFHTGRR LFOSTER PI"RCEIO WRELLIM Clues '1 . Baedekerofmoneyfunds = . He'shard]yworking 3 . Tar baby 4 . Dunaway's ex 5 . Tim & Harvey's friend 6 . Tony and Janet's girl 7 . Shuttlingr.. 8 . ,..inspace 9 , Yale's famous fresh t0 , Frnnce'ssurprise 11 , Johnny on the green 12 Feminist fee 13 ExealibuPs king 14 Sat. Nite Live alum t§ Diva turned impresario 16 Carnegie fiddler 17 H-bomb physicist t8 . Thsthief'sgal t9 . TVheadmistress 20 , MarveIComics chief An~versto June t6 puzzhl 1 Mariie WSJ~:O 2 Brooke Sh~lds 3 ~mot~ HUUK~ 4 R0~dIBell 5. ~r ~ Ear.h 6.1sadore R~enfQIcl 7. ~deli~ Fell~nl 8, C~:I~ 13aker 9 J0hn Blaok 10 Yves I~mtand 11 R0ben Mu~e 12 AnselAdm t 3. Er~t Gmln 14 p~er O'1"ool8 15 ,~)be~ QoLdet I~ Sally Field 17. Ken Howard 18. Carly Simon ~S Eva~gelineaGIdltas20 MeJvin BmJU U D D E 8 E (S H f E L
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LP. D~e ~o (PhiJ~delpkia International) Q Don't let her past holiday.£~re rendi dons thr~w you; this lady has talent. m Her~, ~he also has a little l~elp ~rom her friends: Kenneth Gamble of the Phil~ delphia Gamble & Huff dynasty and ~ongwriter P~nl 'IVil~n. Jerry Buder teams up with ]3ee Dee on Everyday zlff~ir to add his own mellow touch of class. Upbeat, commercial cl]ts llke B'eaking and EnteTing and ~a~y ~llonry ~ keep things jumping. Sin~er snngwriterL those foolhardy ,5onI~ who wlpe tbelr ]le~rts oil K~te[r sleeves, tend, [or critic, to he irt a spe- cial categ~ry You can love their work a~ ~ who]e but fee] tElat ~t pa~-tlc~ll,0r album was flukls]lly undecnourished, There has been a rash oI albums by major ~inger-~ongwrlters lately and each polnt~ mn some $peclaJ ~$p¢cls of thelr collect lye £1atL ~iramy Buffett J~, of courfe, the un- /~ispllted king o~ GuIE and ~tera n!u~ic He describes beach life swollen w!t]L hnm~d~y and In.glint--and C~ut ~/~gmph (MCA) is Lhe Iatest entr'¢ from his mnslcal diary. 1~ persists in its calyp- goIllan seductlveness. Buf[ett i~, alt¢l" a~l, an appealing soclal commentator who ~ccasiona]ly has to bc excused for taking himsdI a little toc~ seriougIy. C, oco~ Telegraph carrle~ its minimal freight: It's pleasant e~o~h, just doesn't have a ~rlt[ca]ly ira[Jortant met~g~. ]$ul~et~ didn't write the best ~ong oll the album, lt's ~ Job, but, happily, he sings it a~ though he wishes he had, James TayIor'~ Dad ~es ~;s Work (Co- lumbia) r~a$$cr[$ [hal ]1o l~-ites ,¢m~r~ music melodically familiar yet challeng- ~n~, with lyrics that dlsse£~ and Jnstrnct. It always makes sense to che~k ~n with Taylor, if only because hi~ work get~ what may be the best production trea~ merit ~n the [ndttstry There ar~ some ~qice c/1~$ o~ this ~l[)tlm, su~[1 as Her Tow~ Tot2 (writtell wJt[l J D. ~outhe~ a~d Wadd~ ~'¢achteli. but ~t d0e~ no~, generalIy, ilave the appeal of a watershed album like J'/Z We w~nder, though: ~ow can anyone marri~ to Cal']y ~mon II,~ve l]t~l zna~ly colnp~iilts? Jesse ~Vi~chester keeps gelting better, His songs are more vocal lhan cerel~aJ, but t~ey often have a sneak!¸ and sincere depth, ro/k Memphis (Bearsvi//c) shows him in lesl than lull gait. buL when ]le conks (as wltlx HOOl and Holle~), he'~ ~$ good a~ anybody out there, x~hidl nl,'tkes soph~mnrlc ¢ont~$ ~ttcIi as Baby B2tte all tire more di~appolntlng Ry Cooder /loestFt x~ite mos~ of [~is owI1 m~r~[; but elery ~ong lie takes DYer I~ecome~ strallgely h~s nn~. ]~ver fince ~lad~e ~tll Lithely, he ~a~ £Dn. 5~stentJy /leen one of the 51narte~I arch~ vists o[ Amer L~an music. Dealing i~ pop, bop, blues, iazz, sw~ng and, yes, Ha- 38 waiian, Cooder isn't ~raid to wear a loud BIP BOP BOOM, YOU'RE LIKE A FLOWER IN BLOOM: Here "/ou go, true greasers--the restdts at last of our Nostalgia Quiz #~2! ~ar thanks and a tip of the l~Iuslc Section hat to Michael Brozovic for sending in an actual 45 o£ The Greas~ Cblc~e~z, proving he)ro~d doubt it was b~' Andre Wi]llams---~rry, Michae], bn~ we're keeping Jr. Tile answer to that burning qnes. vcho did Btp Bop Boom?, was a ~nap for molt of yo uM.Mickey Hawks, with Moon Mullim and His Night Raiders. Special thanks to Roekin' Richard for reminding us of Chuck Higgins' obscure version: to Cathy Ab~amowitz [or suggesting "rite Dap per~. And a much needed histozy les~ son to those of ~x~u who thought it was The Bip Bop So~g by Paul M~ Car they g- Wings. ~-~ow many versions of Hearts ol 5tone are there? ~[ed D. Johnlnn ot Canonsburg, pennsylvanla, listed. Top Notes, Vicki Young. Big Dave, The McGnlre S~sters, Bop-A-Loof, The Bill Black Combo, "The ~lue Kidge Rangers and Mel Tillis ]plus the three we mentioned, the ~ewels, the Charms and, ugh, The For~tane Slslers Adcl;t;t~nal c~ndlttates were Red Foley, The Heartbeats and The Bluejays. We'd send you winners--the first 50 wl~o had any of these righ*~me of Annette's o]d T~hilts, bttt too xtlally of yOU tolL[ Its what bizarre things yo~ were going to do wlt~ ~hem, so you'll have to s¢[ile fo~ a ~ee OTte~leac su hsta'ip [ioI1. Lat,2r, aI]igtttor~bul, yott knc~w, come to [h~nk of it~ ~omebody w~s wonderin~ jnst th~ oilier d~ty how iR&lxy I~cP~ "¢e~ious o[ Slorm~ lVec~t~ ~r there ~re. Hmmm ....
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"You can feel NEW BRIDGESTONE SUPERFILLER RADIALS. The Bridgestone Tire Company announces new %uperFiller steel belted ladial tires. Bridgestone's ath, anee. ments in tire technolo~, have resulted in a radial tire that gives you premium pe ~OlITl~rlCe. 7can [eel new Bridge- s me )upcrFiller radiaL~ w}w~l [stop, strzrt or conzer... when I dHz~ " The Bridgestone Supe~ Filler radial tim is built with two steal belt~ for strength, a polyester cord body, and a spedaI hard rubber insert in the bead area ' near the tim, This is SuperFillen the key to our perform~ce. Think of the three areas of a tire (the bead, the side wall and the tread) as springs. stnlcfion allows these three areas to have different s rate~ The2e is a very stiff SuperF'dleT bead area, a fleya~te sidewall for l Bridges~0ne SuperFiller radials are designed for a big foot~rtht and an even tread pattern designed for long wear 'Tin catainly not the first to ldl ),cat ttlat the grip is #nportant when Freewa7 or fairwa, roads or in the rough, grip is near ~:i :; BRIDGESTONE ! 5
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0 M k' ]lira into the sqlmd rOOm, where more than 5~ police and deputy sheriffs were gathered, They'd been to]d nothing more than that they'd be introduced to the narc whose gTand jury testimony had implicated every suspected dnpel in to'an. Only Jondahl and two men oa his staff knew Black's secret, and they hadn't broken faltk with hiiE. Tile lest of tim officers knew him oMy as Sial Davis, the swaggering biker and reputed dt~pe dee2. er they all hated "Gentlemen," said jondahL "I I~ant }OH LO lileet Dal2 ~lack, the Ulldercoy~ agent wln)'~ been on loan to ug from Lake County." For • moment, the lenin was stltllped inlo silence. And then Black's [ellm~ u~hcers slued lip and c]lee~¢d. They gadl~red around him, con~laiii]tt~n~ him, shaking his Iland, clapping 16In on the b~ck. They bathed him in respect and admiration, hut he was trange]y mnno~ ed. Iul file nexl fotu~ hollrs, Rlaek led car~ tilled with law officers to ~mdous ht)/l~es ill ~nd arOUild Wk~Rh, ~nd 1]y nine t) dock, 28 peopl~ineluding Cedric--had been arrested. During his se~en months in Ukiah, Black had spent $40,000 of law-enturcement money nn drugs that he delive~ed and on suspecL~ that lie bagged. He had done a inagnifi cent job And yet he stiil didn'k kno~ hol~ to teli Mary Jo he was a nare. The next morning, she and a gir]friend "~'ent down m poli~e headquarter~ to hal/ Cedric ou~. A colleague of Black's led lxer into another room, where Sial was waJtlng for her. "Mary Jo, my name is Dan Black," he said. "i've beerl a Cop [or seven years." Mary Jo wa~ in a state of shock for L~vo da~s, Black asked her noL to leave hizn, but the idea that she'd ]ived with a nape was almost i~lposslb]e lot her to der] with. "'I wouId never have assocl- ated wltb. him if I knew lie was a cop," ~he told a writer ~r the Sa~ Francisco f~hronicle. F[rla l]y, t]lC~/l~h, she Chose to May with Itim. "He completely aband~/ned h~ wife and kids [or me," ~le said. "l thought for two dayt and then ] told h~m it took me five months to Jail in love with him, be I'd slay wltll/l~iu lie nlat ter W]laL." When tile Ukiah investlgatlon ended, • e state o~ California got 25 conv!ctions out o1" 28 arfelts Black decided not to tesd£y agamst Cedric Weir, though the Peacock Bar lost its liquor license and /~]ack was transfelred io detective work, but he just couldn't hack being a cop anymore. 141~ superiors sensed his changed outlook and tried to shape hlm np by reassigning h~m m uniform duty in October 1977. Ne tried it for two da~ and then quit the ~orce, By then, he'd moved back to Mary Jo's house in Ukiah. Ahhnngh severaI police ~ou~ce~ informed him thai the HeWs Angels had issued a c~ntraet oft his life, /]lack made no pIal~s to [¢a~e Northern California. He felt that i[ the Angch were truly out [or hi~ blood, the only way he'd escape would be by Iegt'/ing the t.ountry, ai~d ~ just wasn't ready fur that, He was sure the Ang¢l~ would event~a][y realize he hadn't tried to take them down. In time, ~ they didn'L exactly torglve 1tim, he was rea- ~nabIy certain they'd at least ~orget about him. Shun alter he moved back to Ukiah, Black heard that Cedric wanted iu see him. The two men met [or a drink. "I have no hard ~eelings," cedric told hlm. "You were only doing a job." "Yo~ know fomethlng, Gedric? I think I better get my as~ into a diffelent line o[ work," In November, ]9~7, Black took a job a~ a ~on~uetiolt work~ and began us- ing speed ~galn Heavy rains throughout Northern C~]i[ornla v]~inMly shttt down the eonstrueti~ll indnstr7 that al]tnmn, a~d [~[a~l~ ~0on sank into ~ ~tare o[ depression. 'de w~.~ an nnhappy, con-, fused man, and Mary Jo found him difficult to llve with¸ In earl,/ Deceraher, she aiinl)uil~ed Ihat her hnsbanft w;~s 236
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BAI~.CIAY 99% tar free. I MI] 1/11 The pleasure is back. BARGIAY ~ warnlng The Surgeon ae~pel~l Has DetE'rnired £haT Ciqarer!e Smnkl¢l,; i30anger,3 Js to'lear Health
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NOW YOU CAN BE1TER ABOUT GEmNG INTO HOT WATER. Stepping into a steaming tub for a long soak requires energy. Yours. And the country's. But, now there's a way you can save a little of both. Compared to dectric, the new gas water heaters can save you $178.66 a year. For the average famib; the cost of heating water with an electric water heater is 2V2 times the cost of using a gas model. Comparing dollars to dol- lars, the cost of using an electric modeI is $289.01 a year. Using a new gas water heater, the cost is only $110.35--a substantial savings in anybody's pocket* You see, today s gas water heaters are equipped with many energy-saving features--improved burners, flues and heat transfer, better insulation and low- input pilots. All of which helps you keep water heating costs down. So, the next time you feel like get- ting into a little hot water, why not feel a lot better about it. A new gas water heater will save you ¢ and money. 0 Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association The newgas appliances are good foryour econon~ *CorLlparlsons ~rc b~s~¢~ Oil ~h¢ average ¢on~iliotxs Specified in the I~paytgtl¢llt of Energy test pl'c~edures aS a~pl 1~ tQ T.I [11I ~ xvho$~ Cal~aClt y 15 usec; [~cdozT111~at ~Iy i~ ~iden~I] ~lpll~t lOH~. House & G~r~
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Thepleasure is back. j / BARCIAY BARGI_AY I MG TAR i 99% tar free. Warning !he Surge,nn G(neral Has De[ermined Thai Ciqaretle Smokm~ Is Bange,OdS to Ygur meallh ,ILso al'at/clb/i, m lO0;s attd BI,~ Kings ~n:l Hu× I E11g "tar', D.2 m~ niE[It r:a 1113's 3 rng 'tar" 04 rng ~icolrle i]~ oel ~lrjaf~tG !:l't FTC m~th3 J
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Dodge Omni Miser: Chrysler engineering applied the advanced technology of front-wheel-drive to achieve the highest highway gasoline mileage of anyAmerican built car. mpg* 1nl978, Chrysler took an An engine that #thinks" Quality engineered for irapressive step forward in effi- for itself, durability. den automotive design by applv- To achieve such a mileage rat- Omnl Miser is buBt in one of ing the advanced technology, of • ing Chrysler engineered an Elec- the world's most technologically tronic Fuel Control System. lfs front- wheebdrive to a small advanced plants. Omdi Miser's American car. The Dodge OmnL controlled by an electronic corn- structural strength is the result of An automobile so far ahead of puter that processes signals from Udibody construction. Monitored other small cars that upon intro- engine and environmental sen- by computer, the body sheet duction, Omni won the coveted sors to monitor engine speed and n~etel and structural menthers are Motor Trend "Car of the Year load, coolant and ambient air welded by batteries of robots into Award." Today, after more tban19 tern erature while you drlve-- asingleunitizedframeworkto billion miles of owner experience for It~e most efficient operation of insure precision and durability. with a frill line of smaB front- Omni Miser at all times. Dodge Omnl Miser only $5499?* wheel-drive cars, Chrysler sets An engine thoughtfully Dodge Omni Miser's base yet another standard by offering a designed fe~ ease of servicing, sticker price includes: Rack and new generation Omni of that Few automobiles have been as pinion steering. Front disc brakes, same technology, Dodge Omni meticulously designed for ease of Allvinyl high back bucket seats. . Miser The l~ghest highway gaso- servicing. Most major service Electronic ignition. Steel road line n~ileage car ever built in parts on Omnl Miser--distributor, wheels. Omni Miser is roof that America. pugs, even flu d reservoirs--are you don't have to sa~e quali~v 50 est. hwy [] EPA est. mpgY right up front and easy to reach _ to ach eve value. " 5-passenger. The epitome of economy and efficiency. Omni Miser's 1.7 liter OHC engine has been speciaI]y cali- brated for the most efficaent use of every drop of fuel. Designed spe- cifically for front wheel drive, not merely adapted as with many other cars, Miser's engine is h-ans versely mounted between the front driving wheels. At the same time OUr eIlgineers replaced the tradi- tional drive shaft and rear-axle differential with a spe- daily calibrated 4-speed manual Dodge Omnl Euro-godan as low as $6679?* tvansaxle. ]he savings in weight A sporty new breed Omhi in sill moldings as well as black adds up to tremendous fuel econ- the tradition of more expensive remote conVrol mirror and cast omv, an incredible 50 estimated European sedans. Standard higtlway. ~ EPA estimated miles equitpment includes a 2,2 Eter per gallon? The more efficient OHCengine. Rallye histrument wheels. use of space mear~ Miser seats Cluster--tachometer, electric 5 passengers with an ample 10 clock, needle gauges for alternator The NewChrysler cubic feet of room remaining and fuel level. Sport high back for cargo and luggage, bucket seats. Black bumpers and Corporation "50 es~ ~,,~y ~ E~A esL mpg Use ~ Ei~A esl. mpg ¢or ~ompariso~ YOLJr m~age may vary ~leperlding or1 Speed, weat~m and Irlp ~ngth ActUal b~jh~v ay m~eage ~[fl Ot Ohabl~' lie ]0weg ""SllCMtI pri~e It~cludln~ tR]~, I~e$ ~lld i~¢~[[n ~i0n ~h~r~] e~ WNW $~1 e~ir~ B~ Of le~lse ~t yOOr OOdg0 ~lllOr.
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B~M~tCIAY 99°7o tar free. The pleasure is back. BARCIAY ~.'~'~i11~ rn Surgeon General Has DelErmlne Tllat C~afelte Sm~ki~lg Is Dar~gefous lo Your He,lib
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The pleasure is back. BARGIAY
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Fiat has given new life to the perennial Spider by adding fuel injection and a 100,000 rpm turbocharger tothe 1981 model, i SUPER BY WADE HOYT rd]nariLy, a 15 year old sports cat wouEd be complelthy Qevef, a ~2tliqlJe cotT~i~atior~ Ol ¢itct:m~a~ce~ ~as ~;~f}~ outdated and tottering on the brink of exlinction. HOW- the Fia~ Spider in brisk demand since its introduclian in 1965. First the s~lin~) by Pininfarina was neither radical r~or trerldy when ~t was originally drawn, so that, like so many other Pinthfarirla de- signs, I~ has aged remarkably little over the years. Second, il is about lfle or~fy 2 4- 2 convertible shll available tha~ doesn'l cosl more than the average condominium¸ Lastly, Fist has m~,naged to maintain and even improve the Spider's performance over the years by i~cres, sing ~ts engine ~ize, adding fuel injeclion, and, for 1981, making turboeharging an opliOn or1 about ten 10ercent of the 12,000 Spider~ that lhey ~×13ect Io sell ~tlis year¸ Legend Industries of Hauppauge, Long Island, has bu~qt an excellent reputation witt~ their Windblown brand of turbo0har~] er k~, ar~t they are famil~r w'l~h meetin~ US emission control laws; $o tt~ey wer~ able 10 pro. duce a reliable, workable inslS, t- ~atlon i~ ~es$ th&n 18 months 1-he turbo package consists of Ihe blower ilself plus Iow-pro- fil~ 185/60 x 14 Pirel~i P6 radial tires or] Cromodor~ thloy wheels and tt~e mandatory vinyl "graph its" treatment and perhaDs some other goodi~ that had not yet been decided Upon at ~3ress ~ime, [his will add about $2,000 Io $2,~t20 to the slandar~l S~der, br thgthg its price te $13,000¸ There are two schools Of Ihought when it comes to turbocharg ing The Power School, as ex~ mplified by the ?orsehe 924 Turbo, rul~s th~ little e:<haust powered turbine as l~$t as it Can ~o in order to jam as mucf~ a~r-fuef mix(ur~ into the cylthder~ as p~ssibfe for maximlJm horsepower gain. The drawbac}4 is that th~ power a~l ~ends to COme on Wilh a great whack al about 3,000 rdrq, At lOWer speeds, the engine ~s a bil str angled. The Torque School, f~w3red by Sa~3 a~d Fiat, ~lses lower boost pressiJre~ 2*rid ~acrifices sorfl~ peak ~ors~13ow~T lot ~ smoot~l, even flow of extta torque across the whole rpm range¸ The resull is thai it feels like you've got a big, torquey engine under the hood¸ You'd swear there were S[×, maybe eight, cylinders ~mcothly c)~rhihg OUt ~he ~Owe~ ~r pa~slng cr cJJrnbing bJ~J5 w~th no ~ra me, rio unseerrlly rabbit punches i~ the stl~al] of the back from your bucket se&L t- In fact. [be broad torque band makes a manual transmissl almost $uDerlluo~J$. The atttomatLc Turbo is t3ot or~ly e&~ier d~ve; i~$ aJso fa~r lhan ~he slJrJ~ &bif~ aJ~ lhe way t~ to 8(3 r~pt which is about a8 mu~h as most Americans ran get away wit! a~ywey The automati~ Turbo goe~ from zero to 60 in 8~ sec- onds and through the quarter mile in 16t/~ seconds ~t 82 m13h The live-speed Torbo t~kes 8.8 an~ 17 seconds, respectively, al k lhough it f~ doif~g 83 rnph at the end ~f ~e quarter, wher~ it just about to overtake the aLlloma~i¢. If you hav~n'l been in a Fis.t Spider in a few years, t~e Turb~ will knock your socks oil. Sp~nthg at about 100,000 rpmr t~e tiny LH.I Iurbirle provides a. modest 6 psi of boost¸ This results in 120 hp &l 6,000 rpm and 130 't-lb of torque at 3 600 rpm corn pared wLth 102 hp and 110 ft-lb by the fuel-injected 1981 engir~ and an ahemic 80 hp from th c~lrburetored engine of 1979 ,~l,~c*uf2b the ~rbo's bo~¸ doesn't look ~tartling on pape it feth~ startlin~ on lhe road I h~ a Chance ~o try oLIt four ver$ior efthe Spider--normaq and Tu, b(I, I~ye:speed and ac~tomarfc-- d~ring a day's outing in and arOund New Yorks Bear Moun- tth~ State Park Both Turbo ver- sions combine the Spider's ter- " a~lou$ handling with e~ough¸ power to break away the rear wheel~ if you "~ ~.nl Io. The Turbo h~s a quick ~rld responsive feth~ w~reas ~he ncv'rnal en~lir~e, aJ~ '~ th0ugh peppy, olteri seems la be~ . ~abcdng in it~ effort Io show ils worthiness. The infamous "~urqo lag" has beenengineered o~t o~ this in- stallalion, ~s the boost gauge on the dashboalrd clearly demon-~ strales If you are c,38stthg in gear and then :~uddenly #oor theC pedal, you can w£.tch Ih~ needle zoom from 21 inches of vacuum to full boogt in under a second. If you pick a gear tha~ keeps the-~ needle near zero, the Iransilion to full boost is irlstantaneo~s Its~ a~lot of fun, and allhough the tu~b~ addlhon h~s hard{y changed the S,oider's excellenl fuel economy (25/36 mpg for the f~e-{ slueed, 22/29 mpg for the automatic), the enthusiastic driver who like~ le keep the needle in the boost zone wi[I no doubt have !o~ pay Ihe piber at the gas pump¸ The Spider's J,~D recen~ im~o~ovl~menls, lue~ i~) e~ion ahd tur bochargin9 have broul]ht a g racetol evolut~r~n of a classic 1960s design inlo Ihe 1980S.C.4-'~ PHOTOGRAPHS BY GARY E. HEERY 166 PEN [HCUSE
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99% tar free. The pleasure is back. BARCLAY
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1 MOTAR L • , OX Also avadable ~ 100 s and B :,
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co~,n~ed rnent because of the visa 6it~atJ~n, and Im sticking t~ this stoP/", At 7!30 P.M tile hotel halls are de, serT~ d; ~ ~e~ the streetS, The COU~iP/ i~ watching the evening news bu[ there Is nothing new to worry abQut. Until ~ AM, that is, when New Yod~ wakes 8~terman with a State Del3attment report of fresh Soviet troop movefflent$ in II~e southwest Saturday the hotel suite is upside dawn. By dawn Bb~errna~ J$ ~t to make a liveIhQUr c~rive to Legnica near the bolcler But Polish officials hive denied the repot1 ',~rned ttTat f~mlng mRitary equip- ment and air bases i~ ferbidUen "If we go gangbe~ting d¢~wn there we ~l~n get thiown eel of the country," says ECitte r m an, "Ana if Im there E have no one c¢~vefing for r~e here, ih Warsaw Yo/J re sLJd~eflLy remincJed that ~ satel~ite=,qge ¢orrasl3Ond- ant isn't Sul~erman~nly Clark Kent A~e[ consulting with producer pal Thompson, Bitterman decides to send her to Legni¢~ with ~ cameraman and minima~ equip- merit 'l wonder if the Dorresl~orlder~s fro~ the ot3er nels are going,' h~ S~,ys , if they are we?e in Dig tmuDi~' "if they are theyre rL~n~ing big risks' when the Wa~w t~evilion ¢en~et sh~s dOWn Even when the/re out Io to0op one another, however, AIBC, CBS an~ NBC w~nct uo sl~sdng baggage sto~ce on the • ame flight --as Well as sp~i~ting the t=b. What if the government grour~ded the charters? In that ease, ~he networks would lai~ back on cominge~cy ~lans ~e~ ~ ~er- m6n says ~re "top secr~,t, In the event the Soviets di(J invade and the cOrrespOnd- entz were quarantined in the hotel, one plan ca~ls for Poles ale*rig the invask~n loute to relay the news to the networks by an undisclosed means Today, the net- wo'ks aon't h~e to womb, 8bo~ cor~m- gen;y plans BItt~rman himself order~ a charter to fly ou! a spot Scheduled re! the NIght~ ~VeW'~ The SI:,O ~ contains Bittermen's ir~t eP~lew with Solidarity spokesman Janusz Orgy ~.= kiewiez A KraP-~w professor the young toilet anl ~as the LLghttla~rted air of a man wh~ loves his life Bittetma~ ~ue~ns him on h~s reactions to the indurating d=n* get 'We are doing whaJ we have to do." Onyszkiewicz repJies sc~renely Bitterman is impressed "Die you ~ what he was caI~ing along wlth hi~?" he ael(s me afterward 'H~S recorder: he J3layS the recorder.' Bitte~rnan uled to play the E~izebet h terminals him '~Ne don't have t~ gLli~ar. NOW he h~s r~ t~me ~'~ rr~ Soviets to keow the~' ~re fhere ' But Bitterman isnf mollified, ILmake~ me mad :hat the Stele Depar~merll leJ~ked • e ~0ry to Tt~e New York T~m~ arid CB~'¸ he say~ ~m having enough trou- ble Ie~r~ing this ~to~y without tiering WashiNgton ageins~ me AS ~he morning W~alS or1, Jerry King el A~C sticks his he~d in the ~loor bt~t lhere is no ~ign o~ CE~S News ¢olresl~)ndent Bert Quint¸ "U s~J ally a good w~y to kr~ew if lhe ether net5 hive serrlethirtg hot ,I SBy~ ~il~ermatl, '~is by w~tching whrJ starts me gnarler.¸' Ti~e e~attet i~ ~ pd~te plane thal ~ cor- le$~rlderlt S New YOrk h eEdQua rN=.r S will f requen~[y hire to t~y in, retrieve the tal3~ that r~as beet1 shot =~rlct ~ty ,]at 8g~ir~ ~t~ destin~tien Franklurt WIs~ Germany, where ~he local TV facilities be~lr~ t~lQ ~o~ege ba¢l~ to New ~ork C[~r{ering ~e a necessity on wee~nds and tl~lidays, ~E~S s~ds ~a3td t~at they ate j'~in~ng the chatter. An hour later, ABe comes abaard $kic3ping I~nohl ~itterman o~3ne~ of ~r • bhe~ng on t'tle ~uthwe~t sit eerier1 D)y one of his sources, a mili~tJry attach~ 'O~e of the fits~ things I t~ to do i~ work op ~. co IteCtlon ~ seen=de Often officials at C~nadian anO Australian amid ~5$ies are exce~l~n~, ~y rain doe~n'~ think Russia is about to invade He says it'S i0~t Wa~hin~n cly]ng ~lf again." The milita~ atlach~, receiving us in his s~burban home is dressed tot tennis, ,,i ~ni~ we should take a walk around Jhe b~ock," he Say~, raising a ~i~nificant ~ye~3rDw toward an ir3vieib~e aLIdie~c8 of e~eclronic devic~t~, "C~, da~lin~ do take the dog with you¸' be~ his wife. b~t he iurrls her down¸ He a~ declines to take me When lhe men re(U~T1, eC*l~e i~ served and we ate suUd~n~y in one ~f those --~ 1~ GU D_c ~JNE ~5 I~
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99% tar free.
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O m It if ~omebody wants my Butngraph, then I'~ going Io g'ire it ~o them, because although it may just be a plece of paper oz" a magazlae or whatever, if they feel it's something special and something binding between them and ntyself, then wily not? It's just a fleeting moment of your time and of your efltorts~physical and mental--tO write yoar name. And if they want it, then why not? It's a chance to put back something itlto the gsme o[ basehall from tile fan stand- point, that we get ~tl{ of it /~o~a their eheer~, their applause End their rein- forcement of us. Again, a lot of people don't want to take the time, don't feel it's important. But [ think it is. That one litde piece of paper--although it may be thrown away an hour latezc~t that moment was special. Tile fan alld the athlete came together in a personal way. ptAYIIOy: Sometimes the interaeticm im't that pleasant Haven't you also gotten on th~ wrong sMe o~ dera agnzd /ntis? Ot,~'cF¢: Well, I had three death threats just last year. Ft)r tunately, none wa~ real. And hopefully there never will be one. L~ut there's the real~ty--lt exists and it has happened before in other profes. sions. I just hope that people put intu perspt~ctJve WJLqt We're doJng~e are entertainment, we're entertaining others. Fans release their anxiety and borne of the pa'oblems in their life by watching us atld cheering for us. But when it comes to the poill t where it affeet~ ~:.tne- body's acxio~Is .,l~ ellm~lating a hllmaD being I would hope that that would never conic. I*LAyEoy: Cart you feel safe wanderlug around freely when you visit other parts of the £oun ta'y? O#.R¥|¥t YOU can't. Yon really e~l~'t. Over th~ year~ 1're had, say. four set/otis death thxeats. People who think Steve Garvey's life is ~ery simple and easy, [La~tg/t*] But i've had six plaindothes po~ieeraea walking at:mad me out o~ stadiums, I've had bomb threats in New York and Los Angel~, I have to be very cunsclous of the gecurity of ~y fatally. And what makes me so mad is to flare the papers instigate or plant the seed or whatev~ it may be, burglary. PIAyIIOy: Kidnaping9 oAItV~Yt Oh, 8ore. I'~ rely £onsclout of it. It's very tough. 'I21e -/eay safety Of where our little girls ~re outside my own Imuse. But that doesn't make me dowr~ on soeiet~ It's just something that's transpired aroun{[ the world--the threat of kldnap~g to executlv~ ha* foroed them to ]nave bodyguards. Security s3~ terns at home now. Cars. Rulletproo| cal~, .=l&!q~ x,h/e tJo~'t ~llt to ad~l to* your security problems, but today a lot o~ talk about baseball centers on money. We undea*tand that the la~ slx-year con- tract you s/gned ~ not up to tod~y'g sky-hlgh standard, What is Steve Garvey of the thought into the mind of some- worth? one wltk articles. My s~lary and my _o~tllv~i': With free agents and with sig;v whole contract ha~ been listed in the lugs, we are gettir~g a very good idea of papers with my n~ne in headlines. Steve what Steve Garvey it worth in baseball. Garvey makes X number 0£ dollars per ]t's going to change even furtb.er with dry, each ensuing month and year, so that by ptA¥~OY~ It's ~t good thing you're, not !he thuel start to negotiate for my !ate paid much. ........... monrraet, I'll have a good idea, an even elt!el~: [Laughs] Well first oI all, it's an invasion of privacy. 1 don't see any publishers or editors puttiIlg their con. tracts in the paper. They put mine in t~ere and then they pu[ my ;~lme ~n the headlines. They separate me and pat me in h~dline~l ').'hey think nothing of who the/ are poasibly i~stigating to jeopardize my f~mily tln'o ngh gldnaplng bett~r idea than when you and I axe talking about it today. pW, y~.o¥: You said the paper~ have al- read,/ reported their e~tlroat~s, so Ie~'~ just ask: How much per year do you make playing for the Dodgers? GAllON: Three htmdred and thirty thou- sand dollars wouId bc in the ball park, ff..tg¢~ol~ S/ram you're no~ scheduled h~r
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/s BA~3]~ I MG TAR 99% tar free. [ Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Oen~erous to Your Health. Also available in lO0"s and Box Eings and BDx.1 mg. 'ta(', 02 rag. nco~ne; 100 s. 3 rag. at", 0.4 mg.zdco he av. per cigar~ce by RC m~hod.
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0 N ml 22~ againsl Bogdanovlch for encouraging Dornlhy to leave him. Goldsteins job was to build a ca~e. Male Goldsteln was the son of a Bev- erly Hills psychologist. He wanted to be a Iawyer and he started practicing early, as aI~ undergraduate at Berkeley and at Hastings College of the Law His license pixie ~r l~w school read i ITm.S, and liti- gate lie did. At various times hed sued telephone eompanle'% a parking lot, )q'a~y's, ~t camera store for ]o~ing" trans parencies. Fabe~c lot cologne injury. Yellow Cab for false imprisonment and e/Ilotio~l distress. Whlrlpool {or axl e~ plodlng washer, his family's orthc~don. t~st for pro[essional negiigence, his own uncle for f~aud. A defendant in one suit charged that Go]dstein had tllreatened to have him klilcd. He was refused ac~ mi~on to the California bar on grounds of "moral di~{ualificatlon." American I~Xl)leSS threatened in pi~lsecute hhtt for r el~)r ring several t honsarld dollat~" WOrLh of money oFcJers missing, acceptirtg reim ]~urlement and then spendln~ the "mi~. ~ng¸' iiion~ orders tr~e made good to AmEx. Opposition lawyers in one law- suit described him as a "pernicious, greedy scoundrel who 'uses" the legal process as a me~ng of extorting money." C, oltlsteltl ~nd Solder hit it off imme- diately. Paul went to s~ Boh Ho~4sloi] ahouE financial arrangements¸ Dorothy had in- strneted Hotlston to pa!r PaLi]'s rent and other living expen~ She also agreed to several hlnp sun] payn~ents, including one to repay a ]nun Paul had received from his mother¸ "Dorothy's going to pay nil !our bills," Bob told Pan], "plus a cash settlement. Under California law, ~otl're entitled to I half of everything earned to date. What cot]hi he f~irer thar~ that!" AJftel taxes. Houston calculated, dial ~ould come to about $40,000¸ Enough, in his estimation, for a healthy young man In buy himself a new start¸ Snlder had other ideas¸ He was thlnl~ ing about alimony¸ Maybe 50 percent of Dorothy's ~oss income for the B~Xl ~hrce ~ear~. "T]nlt's riot real~stic, paul," HottstoR said¸ "you've taken enough from this woman, you're not going to extort al~y more ,, But Paul wasn't listening. He collect- ed more than ~5000 in ea~h advances in the month of July, but he told Chip Clark that Dorothv had cut him off Dorothy and Peter kept their rein. tionshlp quiet in New York. The New York press mls~ed the story entirely. Each had oEcasion to call Hefner during ploduclion, but neither melationed it to "One day Bogdanovlch walked c~ver rn collch, where Dorothy sat chewing ~/inr ' Carpenter would write ,, +You shouldn'I chew gum,' he admonished. ~It has sugar in it.' [Dorothy] playfully removed the wad |rum her mouth and deposltcd Jt in his palm." By that time, Bogdanovic] had affectionatdy begun calling her" D.R. lor Dorothy Ruth; she, in tuzn, had begun tailing him P.B. Domday*s role in They dll Laughed isn't a big one, but as Ca/penter ~q'ote in The ~illage Voice, "Dorothy, by all accounts, emerges as a shimmering set. aph, a vision of pertection clad perennl ally in white In one scene she is found sitting in the Algonquin Hotel balhed ilx a diaphanous light 'It wa~ one of those scenes that could make a career.' recalls a member of the ccew. 'People in the screening room rustled when they saw her'. The film wrapped fn mid.~uly. Peter him :flew witlt Dorothy to London OR the Dorothy called to ask Hefner's adv;ce Cono0ide for a short vacation They Peter had suggested she switch agents and sign with Willizm ~,[orris. a major talenl a~eney Hefnea- thought fhe ougitt to wait nn%Jl her return to L.A.. ~hell they cotdd discuss the change at length. pete~ called to tell Hef~er ]low we]] Dnrnthy was doing in the picture. He'd given her additional lines, he said. and added a tol]er-skatlug sequeno-~ Ile was enlhu~ia~t~c ~,bo~t her I)er~ormanee, l)ut he neglected to add that they had Pallen in l~e, New York Village Voice reporter Tel~a Carpenter discovered later that not even the production crew really no- ticed the romance ulltJl near the end of ~hooting: Their Peter and Dorothy be- gan coming to work holding hands. "I am in touch with my [eellngs, ~$fichelle. ~Vbat I want s for volt o be n to tch w th my feet ngs.' registered at the Dorchester Hotel under : assumed names. He bought her a new wardrobe and proceeded to show her the town. PanI Snlder h~d always found time for .. other ~¢onlen A( a XI~IlsioII part) t)t~ previous summer, a starLied gtlest Ila~ come upon him on a lounge chair by tht. pool screwing someone else's date. No~ Chip noticed that he w~s seeing sevelal differe2~t girls. They all had s) mpathet ic, COlIlforting nature, patti would spend the whole evening talking about Dor- othy and the girls would console ]lilil. One regular overnight guest was a student at Loyola ~[aIylltOunt named Lynn Hayes. Paul had picked her up at the Max 15] ditto in Beverly Hills. Lynn i took paul's obse~slon with Dorothy per- sonally. It made her jealous. When Paul !alkcd about Dorothy, she got mad. For his part, Snider directed his detective friend Goldstein to look into Lynn's family a~ets. Paul asked Chip if he'd llke to t~oxe into the spare bedroom He could use the money, lie said, so he vcanted to sublease it. Chip wasn't interested, so Paul offered the loom to Patti Lan~ man, who lived way out in ILiver~ide I4ed met Pattl at an auto show in November ]979 and was grooming her to he a second Dorodly ~tratten. .~. young, Monde check out glrI who mod- eled on the side, Patti was no Dorothy, Snlder ha¢l uied to interest Casilli in photographing he¢ for t'l~y~ov, hut lie lind declined, hecattse, at 17, she was $tl]l under the age o[ consent. Patti agreed to take the room and moved in with her water bed* lie[ dotIxes and her record collection. '1o ealn money that summer, Paul and Chip built weight benekes with tile metalwmking tools Paul had a~embled
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nI Hennessy stands tail, all around the world. For special occa: " everywhere, the drink is Hennessy. The reason is simple: consistent quality and excellence. Ne t special x time call for Hennessy, and know the rewards of the world s most clvlhzed spirit. HgNNE$~YCOGN~&~.Nap~F IMI~DR~EDSy$1;HIEFgEIrN&c( NY
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PLAYBOY'S TI? VEL GUIDE - " By STEPHEN BIRNBAUM TRAVELER S C~ECKS are very big bnsiness about $5 hi[lion gollars at last count and the induslry continues to ~ow On the surface e~er~one seems to bc happy. Travelers ploflt ])t~atlse the cllecks ale replacealb]e and ttsuall} yieId bettei C,. change rates [han dollars olerseas, lhe companies that issue tile checks profxt because theI get to hold vour mones, wiIhout pas[ng ~on any interest, unlll },nt get around to t.aslliiI~ [he chceks. Bat the prOftL~ that companies earl make during this homing period--nor molly called the float in tile trade lisle led to a barrage of eonflicllng adxerris ilig daiHla aIld lois of raucolls rhetoric that ca:l make it difficult for unwary n :lvdel s to telI which cheek is file belt-- o,, ;o f, ct. if any diffelence exists at all '£ml nl;:/ recall that over a year ago we tiled i,J ;2lid Out firsthand. Since Ih¢ time of our original reseat all. tile eorqi> tition for travelev~' dollars has grn>,n enolmousIy, arid there is one impnrlant new player in the traveler's cheek sweep,takes B,udays Bank. once the lssner O[ its own checks, has joined tile new Visa group and is selling cheeks und¢* tile Visa name &a thls seemed a pea feet time to go ]lack hlto the ~eh/ ta see how the current crop of comped. tors--Anlelican Express, Citicorp (which issues First National City and/or Citl- corp d/elks), Bank~merica Xhomas Cook and Visa--Kunlpares today birst tile good news: .t*ll o[ tile travel er's check companies ha~e maintained or imploxed t]le[r refund capacity u'ithill Ihe U.S. !Ve chose the lhanksgi~ing weekend to utisplace' all frye ul the leading blinds, and by tile conclusion lit Thanksgiving Eve, our researcher had called all fl~e companies and arranged to re~ehe refnnds. We aKe able to advise therefore, that any traveler headed fol a domestic destination will have little dib ficult? in choosing &ore among the rival brands XX e think tile ~,risest tnalse is to acquire diode dleeks that are axada- ble at least cost (free is even betcerg since e,er3 one of the competitors seems to offer cqltd ref.nd sel vice. That is UOt It all t~tle wllen VOlt travel abroad hox%e~er I persc}nall} t/~ok all five brands to London herwecri Christ lrtas and tile New year, "misplaced' them and lnund slgniflcanr diffoenees in obtaining refurtds. Results for fore of tile bram/s that we ha(I investigated pre- viously Ainerlean Express. W]lonlas Cook. BankAmerica and Citkorp wele just af belore. American Fxpress is elearl} tile easiest lirm t/unl w]/ie]l to obtail~ a retund on ~eekends and hoIidi}~*, because it has offices that ale open REFUND RESEARCH REDONE The field's newest entrant delivers the lowest forsi~n perfor/17ance. Cook again was a dose second, since it has branches open toy a half day on Satnrday. ~qlilc Citico~p and Bank .~nl~i~a a~e just fine "*hen it comes to making retund~ dining normal business hoLirs oll lm*lmal business days, they are nearly hopeless on a weekend or a holi- da~ in ,~ foreign country Whidl br!ngs ns ro the questinn rd Visa, file i)ewe~t eilITLtIl~ in tile [fa~ele~'s cheek colnpecitlon Based on our domes tic ~esearch. we had high hopes for the Visa system, but getting a lefund finn Visa in a foreign eOllritr}r turned out tO be ~ lon~r unflill~ ni~hllnaFe I made m} fil~t call to the Visa lolks at approximately 9:30 * ~ on Satm'day, Dt'cemller 27. The number I called was one I fotlnd in the London telephone book and, regrettably, I was first con- fronted with that infernal recorded voice that ?eques!ed that ] lease a message Since I'd be out of my hotel most of that do) that was not particularl) practical Next, I followed the snggestion on the sllp that accompanied my Visa cheeks and called collect ta a number in San F~anciscu. That nulnber is billed as a 2,1 hum refund nefeual serslce, hut two calls made that Saturday went nnan- swered. To doublecheck tile Visa telephone number, I called a fliend in N'eW Yolk on ,Xl~nday morning and ]lad her call V~sa's ltlaln nuiilber in San FranclsLn. during dlose periods Thotllts She leas gi~ea a different number from that printed on the check {orm~hut to keep this research consistent--we wele comparing refund capacity oJ~ weekends and holiday[ 0.1dll't tly the new laUra- bet until New year's Day. Turned out it didn't much matter, slrtce the second number c~dn*t answer, ~ither. On a last desperate" h/tile]l, ~ tTied the original number agaln, nnd thai time the phone was answered, Soineo]le named Charlotte took down reams of information and then ~lmly informed me shoe could not anthorlze a refnrld Ii~. rail se I was r~or ring my loss more than 72 hours after it had occurred, It would be necessary tot me to rail Chleago the next day Why Chicago? ~you mighl nsk 1VEIL Visa traveler's cheeks are odd a~nalg~m. ] hall pnrehased inine troltl all office (if DeakPerera (the international currency firm) in New York, but the checks also bore file name of the First Chicago Cheque Corp, which (it turned out) was the prime ixsller. Reine~nber, i was ca]llng on Thursday, New Year's Day, and I pointed out thai the Six.hour time differeDee between CIticago and London would mean that even the earliest possible call {nlne ~.M} to Chicago the next day ~ould nearIv coincide with closlng time at most Lon- don banks. Charlotte could dn nothing but give me tile Chicago number anti say l should ask for a Air. Serpico, At precisely three p.~t. London tlme¸ I ealled 2*in Serpico, and although Charlotte was rn h~ve notified him about my loss* he klaeW Ilothing whatel er abuu t it. lie told me he w~uld have to calf San Francisco himself to check the de- tails At 3:40 r.~t in London, San Fran clsco called me, and "Ella" told me my Ye[und had at last been authorized. Since the last baltk~ close ~n London at 3:30, that was of Iittle help, thnugh Ella said London s Bank of Credit and Corn meree Would give me a refaillt oil Saturday, The conclusion o[ what was fast 13e. coming The Great Visa Refund Caper was Ion more proKltlctlve t]laii its slarL A very nice Indlall gentleman at [he Bank of Credit and Commerce calmly told me it dldn't make refunds (it only set~ Visa cheeks) and po~ me nit to the Barcla~ Bank ~efund center in North alnpton. He told me th;~t there were only two refund eente~ near london that were open on SaltLrda~ nile in dis tat]t North London and tile o[]lei at e!en lnDre dislanl HeathlOW Airport¸ Since [ was leaving for home fro~l Heathrow the following day, I decided m pick np myrefund then wh[d~ I did. Foreign conclusion: It looks as i£ Karl Malden knows whereof he speaks. O 51
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k is \ _7: ) m| 99% tar Warn n# The Surgeor Genera has Be[ermined t ThatC garelte Smok ng fs Dangerous to Your heap[r I Also al gilable in lO0's and Box K~ngs and Box, m8`'a OZmBnca ne IOO's, 3 rng."tar' 0.4 rn~ n coI na ~. oer #igarette by ~C method.
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I M G "JAR 99% tar free. tWerntog: The Surgeon General Has Determined Thai Cigarette Smoking Is [3angerous to Your Health. Also available lO0's and Box Kings and Box,1 mg,"mr", B.Z rag. nicoiine; log s, 3 rag. ' a ", 0.4 rag. n'co no av. par cigarBlte by FIC method. i.......
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Deeply rewarding flavor 99 % tar fred Waming~ The Sorgeon General Has Oetermined That Cigarette Smokiag Is Dangerous toYour Heallh. Also available in lO0"s and Box Kings and Bo;~ T rag. "tar", O.Z rag. nicotine= lrlo~. 3 rag, "tar" f/.4 mg.nieotino a~ pet clgareaa by FTK melhod.
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The i J MG TAB ! 99% tar freeS. Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dang+rous toYcur HeaJth+ A~o ~++ble in lOO'a and Box Kings and Box, 1 m~ "Ira' ,112 mg nicotine: 111 {]'s, 3 mg '*t a~r' [J.4 m~. D[c OtigE av+per mgarette by FIC mmhod.
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Thepleasure is back. BARCLAY BARCIAY I \!l, T'tl~ Deeply rewarding flavor 99 % tar free Also ovailable in lO~)~s and Box Warning: The Surgeon General Has Oetermined ~i.~s ~nu Ha~,l mo "I~[' D.2 CT~q niI~tin~ I~]~S 3 ¢~g 'tsr¸¸, Thal CigateI1e Smoki'Ig I$ D angero~l$ IoYour HBoIIh. 0.4 mq. ni¢onnm ~w per li~r~ L b~ FTC ~c~Iol
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Z¸ /!J
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Thepl~isback. BARCIAY .... BARCtAY -~ 99% tar free. Warm~O The Su196Gn Genel~ HS~ Oelexmmet Also available in IO0"s m~d BOX That Cig~e~ SrnokJng Is Oangelo~ lo ~o~t ~ea~
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BEST BASS WATERS confinued from page 89 contender this year. "If I was going to choose one place to fish in the summer and another spot for the winter I'd pick the St. Lawrence in warm weather, just like Bo. It's one of the most beautiful places l've ever been to. It offers some of the best fish- ing anywhere. Dunng the winter Pd fish in some Midwestern waters, then go down to north-central I~ofida mad fish the lakes in that area¸ If you gave me only one choice I'd live in Spnng- field, Missouri, where I'm living right nOW, ' Td fish Lake of the Ozarks most of the time It's got t~ be one of the two best man-made lakes in the country. Fishing's fantastic. In the heart of winter it freezes over, though When Lake of the Ozarks is frozen, I'd run 50 miles south and fish Bull Shoals and Table Rock reservoirs. But we've got a new lake that's really coming on. It's Harry Truman Reservoir, and you'd better keep an eye on it." Rick Chinn A guide and tackle consultant. Rick won the B.A.S.S. Classic tottmaments in 1976 and 1977. He came in first in the B .A.S.S. East Division last year In the 1978 and 1979 Classic evenls he placed second and third, respectively. "If I could live in two difi~rent places i would choose a place like New york's St. Lawrence River area in summer, and then somewhere in the South for the winter. -~ "But I don't think I'd want to be that mobile, i'm mobile now, and I think as time goes by you want to sit down in ORe place. "I think if I had only one choice i'd probably stay in eastern Texas. A mart could llve around the towns of Naeog doches or LuBdn and he within an hour's drive of Sam Raybum and Tole do Bend lakes. Those lakes are getting even better than they were. Because of the fuel problems, the fishe~ is not as pressured as it was. "Both those lakes are vet3' fertile. and there's a lot of weed gax~wt h. The Florida bass that wet~ introduced are making quite an impact. 1 also like the Smaller lakes in east Texas. "Another lake I'd like m spend a lot of time on is Powell in Utah. It offers fabulous fishing, but I'm afraid it would get old for me after awhile. 1 don't think I'd want to wake up every morning and see desert. "i've fished a lot of areas, and 1 guess that makes me appreciate what 1 have at home/' Randy Fi~ One of the best daepwater fisbennen arotmd, this Comoe. Texas, angler makes his living as a guide. Though be's:known for his ability to read a daprhfindet and catch fish in deep- water, he earned his berth in last year's Classic by fishing shallow. Now he's a double-threat fisbemaan whn womes a lot ofilhe old pros. "In the winter I'd pick eastern Tex- as, The weather's stable then. One thing that s helped the area's fishing is the introduction of Florida-strain large- momhs in the small power plant lakes. Because the water stays warm year- round, there usually are two spawning ~asons and a longer growing period. We're getting big fish The slate record was broken here last year, and there's reason to believe that eastern Texas will provide more record bass in the future. "Fayette ~ounty Lake. 55 miles west of Houston, is the power-pIam water I Bke best, It's not yielding 12 to 14-pound bass right now because it's only about ~ years old, and it just opened last year. But il's the best lake I've fished You can catch 20 fish that weigh more titan four pounds each. and day's catch may be 60 or 70 t of nec- esgal~ as three fish a day with none less than 16 inches. Fayette County restricts the number of boats on the lake to 125 each day as wetl. Ot TI)OOR I ]Y~.
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Eventually, the widow ' esponsibJ}Jty mus[ assume r for decisions. Send $3 fi~r catalogue to Depl.MO-oy I~ox Jz44z, San .rranctsco, CA 9#x3z LARGE PBOFITS & TAX BENEFITS from OIL & GAS LEASE-RIGIIT$ ON PUBLIC LANDS Tax deductible entry fees af only $30.(30 could yield you immediate profit~ of $20,00(3.00 to ever $100,(300.00 plus poesiMe fargo future income from over- riding royalties, Oil & Gas Leaae-Rigbfe on Public Lands ings conducted by the Bureau of Land are awarded bimonthly through Draw- Management to t:ro~de all Citizens Equal Opportunity. Send $1.~0 for ¢0mplete infermat(0n: Ir~JEJIAL OIL i gll$ LEAS[~, IIIC. G*Ok~pc~l & Marb4 EyakJsl~ S,,vJal4 320fl Bill Une ~Omd p.O, Bolt ~ll, [lepl, MDM ¢,11 ~lrolitDn, Tlxas 750C6 Pt~, (214) 243-42~3 Conlmuous Ma,kehng & ~eluat,on So, :ce~ ~,nce ]g67 (Net Alllllltod ~lth U.$. I~a~er nmlnl~ 94 V~©NEy ready been prod or that the debt was = aclo.~Jly incurred. She s~uld also deIer- mine whether her husband carried an in- surance policy that will pay off the morLgage and other 1cans. A widow ought to W~.it slx months o1" a ~ar before ccmsideririg kives(dig her inheshgnve in artythlng thaz csa '~ ~af¢ and llqnid "She won't be thinking straight before then." says Virginia Deaton of D~rnd/le, Cki~, ~ '~da~¸ ~o teazh¢~ courses ill the ~an Frdlleiseo Bay area on co13Lng with the problems of widow- hood. Ad~ses ~e Chasell Willis: "Buy yourself time. You cer!a~nly dan't want to do a~ything that's going to e~danger your cttp~l" Says/kis 2"~ymore S¢~i~ ze~ a fi/lallelal adv~s~er in Bost~ll; "A ~idow will hear from just about anyone who~ sclllng in~stmcar$, bty first words of advice are ~o bold onto your rrtoney" [t can be kept safely in eer~thcale~ of de- pt~it a[ld mofl¢~-nk~'k~t alld coase~a- tire stock fnnds until the widow is ready to absorb the counsel of pr ofessiortals and decide how to diversify her i~vestments, To rdinimizc her sense of l~ethlessne~s ia the mematime, she may find useful in- formation in ~everal books, ir~cluding those by Lyna Caine and ChaifotIe l~rs¢l~ Mar tha Yate~' Coping (Preatice- Hall, $4.95) and a pamphlet, What Do ¥~ Be. Naw~ available for 51.10 from the Life Insurance Marketing & Research Association {P,O. Box 208. Hartford, Corm. 06141). The Tboos Foundation (Penn HLBs Mall. Suite 306. Pittsburgh, Pa. 15235) ca~ suggest addittonal mure- e~ ~f fina~ci~/~ad eraot/onal counsel. Eventually, howcvcr~ a widow must begin assuming respon~feillty for impor- tant decis/o.~s, no ma~er ho~, pai~ful they may be. Thus, a woman lRe rkity can not afford I~ enicr widowhood raystifted¸ by the meella~ics of Vayiag bills ~r ovcr- whelmnd by the n¢cessl~ of making in- v~tment declsions. If she is properly prepared for wldowhc~d, she wdi have l~ect~ left a legacy of serenity ~s well as economic security. [] : .7 : Amusing summer jobs The s~areh ~or summer cmpleymer~t shifl~ into high gear this month Job pos sibillties for the nation's 2 million h~gh school aItd college studetlts beg~tl al face- food counters and ascend all the xvay to internships at Fortune 500 corporations for tho~e sho~leg exceptkinal promise. Youngsters who favor a more playful atmosphere along wifh pay that's rtot bad ($2.80 ¢o 5~ 70 ~zn houri might apply ¢o a Jlear~y amusement park. Over 300 Tile biggest a~c 33 corporate-owned parks will lake on summer help thl~ year. theme parks, including Walt Di~ney World irt Florida, Kings Island, near Cin- cinna¢i* llkx Flags owr Te;cas, near Dal- las, and Marriott's Great America in lla~la C{ar~l, Calif. Large parks like those employ 600 ~o 4,0~ s~ ~r~e~ wothcr3. Most theme parks hise teenagers as young a~ [6 with lithe or no experience. They work as gift ~hog clerks, waiters, ride operators, lifeguards, ticket sellers or park bot~¢keepers CoIlege students may apply for jobs in marketirtg, pur- chasing or I~IS~nnel. ~t~r~it~rs look for smart, stir-possessed sltJde~ts ~.ho are good ul hatudliag money, children and grumpp adults. To ~ep die ~tEmmer belp smiikig, Six Flags over Texas off~rs them off hours use of an Olympic-size pool. Awards such as new cars and trips (o the/3a/~alrtas go to employees ~vfth the best aLt~IIdance and p~l~ormaIlee records Some parks glx,~ op~ p~ss¢~/or crapJoyee$' f~end~ a~d relatives, put nn aflcr-dours live cone¢lls mid show free nlovles to staflbss. TITcra¢ parks {?rov~d~ co~t(ffae~ or uni- forms but usually nol ~bucs. Tbey en- force rigid grooming codes (for boys. no handlebar mus~ches or ?~alr ~e/ow the earsl. Those irHcl~sted can wriLe to a park for in formation, but a persotlal interview is raunda¢ory, Billboard Publk:allans (P.O [~x 24970, Nashville,Tenn. 37202) publlthes a F~n Park~ Directory for $22.50; some lthcarles ~l~vc lt
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99% tar free~ I l~ G TAR Also available in lO0's and Box Warning; ,the Sergeon General Ha5 Determined That Digalene Drno[nO Is Dangerous to Your Health
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A oston widow lost he, entire inheritance by heeding her son's harebrained advice. $1&ll00 after paying her attorney's fee. FoBawing her hvshand's death, Mrs. Basbley continued to live as if the family was still cehecting his $40,000 salary. "Yes, I was used to paying the bills." she says, "but all of a sudden I didn't know where the money was con fill8 [rom to pay them." When she could no longer keep up with bar debts, sha had t~ ask her mother for help. Now Mrs. Barkley thinks twice before dinthll out and buy- ing new clothes. She also h~s started ~ll- i~g life disu~ance to hulp support ~e three of her four children who ore still at home. Hou~on's Janet Pl~zer ~L~ learned about finance the hard way. When a le- gal dispute cut offher income from one of her inhurhed oil properties, none of the t~ther investors told her how to keep the cash flowing¸ ld fact, all ~ha had to do was obtain a bond ~ledging her to re- turn whatever the court ffdght order. Mrs, Purzer came to suspect that men weI~ taking advantage of her lack of tinanulal expertise. Says she: "[ got to hate deal- Widow (Bantam Books, $1,95), Lynn Calne, who was a public rdiati~ns ex- ecutive when her husband dJed in 197[, recalls that three months later, the im- pulsively moved with her child~n from their familiar Manhattan apartment to a suburban house---and alrao~t immediate- ly had rogers. Culne's solution was simple: she moved back to the city. But any finan- cial adviser call recite cad talcs of irre- veISdilu and costly or[ors made by wldo'~s. Ray Gehrdig, diderot & ben- efits planning at Aetna Life & C~suahy, leds of a midw~rem earporate execu- tive's ~,idow eel~ it~ves~ed $1ll7,090 in Mexican certificates of dapo~lt--and lost 40% of her capital. Pat Thompson re- calls a woman who paid off the 7.5% date--and put in writing--an the ldfor. marion that can help the survivor and the executor settle the estate. This shodid bteluda I~tekgxo~nd facts such ~s birlh- pface~ the names of professional adais- t~s ~leh ~ al~ aJ~eo~rdailt~ att~r~ey~ stc~kbrohcr and ldsttcallce agent; the death benefits prrndded by employers;the location of all bank accoums and of im- pottaflt documenl.~ such as wdis, dee~ and partnership agreements; and a list of a~ets and debts¸ It's a good idea to keep copies of'everything lda falda~ Mrst ld'ep To be~ld prepai~ng for she b~sssbil~ty of wido~vltood, a woman s~lo uld learn die rudimems of money ahd ldvesi'rae nt. The wrong tulle for her to start asking tha moitgage on her house, thus cutting in difference between monay-market a~d half the c~sh foe could have ldve~ted for stock ldnds i$ when she has to slart man much-needed illterest and divid¢l~d ld- aging the %rally assets alone. Nonether come, Had these widow~, discussed with less, a ~urprlethg number of womenm their husbands what to do with their ill- ~vell caf~er ~omell--show little iltterest befit allces, they might have saved them- tmtfi i~ is too late. Reports Casbetule W. selves both vcotry and money. Willis, who heads the Chase Manhattan leg ~ith male humans?' Gradually, with the help of friends-- men and w~nlen~he put her afi~a~rs Jn order. A friend at a bank helped her get a new credit card. Another acquaintance ndvi~ed her bow Io deal mote effec~vdy with the tenants of a small house her bus- hand had bought as an investment. Mar- shali~lg her resources shrewdly, Mr~ Purzer earlier this year paid off her bus- hand's $ll7,000 loan. She now has con- siderable confidence in her ability to manage her income of more than $100,- 000 a year. If deals fall through with all- men who want to drill on her properly in Texas, she no longer feels a sense ¢~f perscmal rajectul~,as she once did, "Horn ey, it's just business," Mrs. Pulzer de- elates, cocking her head "If they need to drill, they'll be back." Contingency Day NOt every eventualfiy of widowhood can be foreseen, but it's an easy matter to avoid many of the pfa'alls ther dene~ Purzer and J~ne Barkley faced. Finan- cial Ifiannem and widows are united in sbeir advice oh holy to deal with money in the event of a spouse's death: prepare beforehand and go slowly afterward. [n her ha~t-sellillg autobiographical Ix~k i;12 ~ Men and women alike are often am Bank's financial advisory service for eom%rtable in confronting their own women: "We ~¢e yonr~g profes~nal mortality, and nlen wllo have not b~e/~ woi~lell who are mlbalievab[y Ignorant touched by the feminist movement may about money." fee] that their wives have no business A usefo[ fost ~tep is t~ tend financial mlkld~ bu~in~s~ Still, wi..'e.s ~'ho dor1'~ in- ll~ges i~1 ld¢ Fre~ re~ldad]< A wife ~lso sist Ot~ perindieaby reviewing their thin- should dandle herown ¢heekfog account. i[y assets and liabilities with their paysbeblllsperi¢~dicallyandtahaana¢- husbaldis may be condeta1~il~ she~- tiwparlittmeednSswidiberhtisba~d~ selvestoyearsofeeonomichardsi~ip=_____pro!'e~)~dal adviser~. That way. she Lynn Caine suggests that a couple set reside an annual "eontldgeney day" to as- sess what the surviving ~ouse would in- herit and comidar what he orshe should do with it, Eullene Sehurr. a partner in the aecoantthg firm of peat Marwick Mitchell in New York City, says a cou- ple must ask die--Ires a series of que$- tldm: "It" he dies tomorrpw, how much is there? [s that enough? And if it's not enough, how can it be ldereasedha If the annoyer i~ ~dll "not ~ll~ffg~ ,' fhe conp~ should tulk about ways the survivor could manag~ with less income. They should dlsct~s wdafoes he or she ought In sd] the major assets that will be diherited-- for examllle, a house, art cdilectio~ or hasiness. The couple also should r~- examine their wills and discuss where the widow should seek financial advice. Most important, the couple should uP- wo~ld know where to tram for c oullsel if he dies first, Then there would be le~s danger of her turning to inexpert re]a- tive~ for financial guidance. For exam- pie, a Boston widow lost her entire inherhunce by heedldg her son'~ hare- brained advice. A New Y~rk widow in- vested in tax,free m,,~niclpal bonds at the recommendation of an di-informed fatu- ity ftiert~; a professienal mlght have sus- poeted that the widow's reduced income made dm lax datm~es wo~thless. A widow~ first priority shoald be to preserve her ldhefitallce, Thoughtlessly ~h ~ be waste ful, for ~l~ta~ce It may he posssbie to delay paying some bills s~ that mOlley can earn bank ~nterest. TO guard against ndstaha~ and con men, a new wtdow is well advised to double- cheek whether questionable bills have a~-
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~0 INSIDE SFORT$ ' he stuck out his hand and asked, . "Have we got a deal?" Harcourt and Sfi~nor~ spoke fOr an hour and 20 min,.Ites. Dalton, Salig ' and theft wives gacefl gnid'~n the rag [ in the adjoining room. When Die! ltacketh the Bz~ver vice-presidem fo m~a'het Ln g~ came by, Dalton asked Bin [ to find Dee Fo~dy. Daltm] want~ Pondy 1o get in touch with the Phi IBe~ who were w~it'n$ w~ h Roe~ Nole~, Lurch and Munningboff--t last option opln if Simmons did n~ ¢onl~ ~tl ound, Outside the pr*-c~s i'oom, where a gal- lows watch was being kept by the oth- er Brewer personnel still in Dallas, running his " when Haekett came looking for ; Fondy. The PR director thought the deal w~s dead. at 3:40, Harcourt came out o£ Dalton's bedroom--there were some small qu~tion{ left. Daltoa said the Brewer offer wls final and Ha~- court called Simmons again. At 4:07, December 22, /ess ~an eight hours ~nder deadline, Ted Sim- mons, Ro/lle Fidgets and Pete Vuc~- ovieh became Milwaukee Brewers. In Milwaukee the next momhxg, Bud Setig met with Dick Hoffmann -to fifid room for the new ecquisilions. Together they wonid add $875,000 to the annual payroll. The trade, Selig raised Milwaukee's break-even, paid attendance of 1.5 ,n to something betxv~n 1.6 and 1.7 million. ~/~vo weeks later, the Brewers had completed an extraordi nary budget review and had slashex five to six per cent frc~a each depart menFs operations. Buc Dick Hacker had good news. Season-ticket sales h~ been running 3/~0 units behind the pr, vious year, but in the week after tt trade, the gap w~.~ closed by 2f Gross revenue increased by $130,00' Wh~ WhJt@y Herzog got home Louis, he had not anly cut had ehar~ed the Car contractual picture: He knew would have Sixto Lezcauo thrm 1984~-or the players who would ec for him if he demanded a trade r winter; he would have Soren through 1983; he would have LaP¢ and Orecn for six year~ of mz league play each Milwaukee had Vuekovieh fo. year, Fingers for a year, Simmor~s three. But all the "~e~m needed one pennant to make it worthwhile. Da~iet Okrent's ~he Uliimate Base[ c#~s ~uz I~ pape~ba~'k ~h# m~ntJ
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u¢ era player's trade rights. Blyleven's agent was the first to negotiate ad- ditional money--in this ease $]00,000 a year--to be paid by the club to a player for a waiver of his trade rights, YhaI agent was LaRue Harcourt. Dalton and Harcourt talked for the t~rst time Thursday afternoon. ]7he fans wanted thla deal badly¸ As early as Tuesday, the Milwaukee papers were wondering if Fingers hadn't al- ready slipped from Dalton's grasp. Harcourt put his million-dollar figure on the tab/e, thinking, "How gad do they want to make this trade? 1 tea soned thai Ted's worth $1-gl.1 rail lion a year in today's market---est~e- orally in the American League. The Brewers were g*ttthg a righthanded to turn el'sewher¢ Ht could go back to the Plsdhes, who, Dee Fondy had learuad, were wilhng to part wdh var- ious combinations of Ron Reed, Dlekie Noies, Randy Leech and Scott Munnthghoff for gixto Lezcano-- comparatively slim pickings. Or, bet- ter, he* could go with a smaller St. Louis deal--one that wnuldn't include either Simmons or Green. Simmons was dearly admired by the Brewers, bet Dalton wa.~ looking for a rehevcr. By now word was out that Sim- mons' 100-games-as-c~.tcher szrJcture dld not apply to the American League, where the DH option made Simmons' distaste for first base le~ important. One of the clubs that picked up oil tMs was the New York Yankees. "The Yankees came hack to me," Dalton arrived, expecting to talk about Fingers. Instead, Herzog said, 'Okay, if you want the pennant, here it is. Ted S'rnmons. in order to accommodate the deal. In the morning, the man his one- time general manager, Frank Lane had called "Budget Bud," phenol Brewer controller Dick Hoffmann and told him to get started. Pat Dalton had been a hasebell wil for 20 years, a baseball executive's rr 15, had attended eight winter me~ Lags. On Sunday, she had nearly go hom~the strain was worse than si had ever seen it. "The guy I love w~ going through the tortures of the damned. It was gke outer space" At seven o'clock Friday merging. Dalton left his room. He only had until one o'clock that afternoon to make a deal, The Yankees were stilI taLkiog to Herzog aboul G~idry, gut their arguments inchded disparnge- he Mdwaukee players Herzog was trying to pick up. Questioning his baseball judgment. Hcrzog thought, was not their most ~ensible approach, hot their deal was a good one. When Dalton and Hareout~ broke at 10:30, Dalton said Harcourt thought Simmons would turn down the $375,000 he had offered. His last hope, he said, was to talk to Sim mons--then on a plane from South Carolina to St. Louis~irectly. He :wanted to tall Simmons about Mil- DH. a lefthanded DH, close t0 an out- standing catcher and a backup at first base. He oughl to be wllrdi a ton." Dalton asked that certain nonl~uall- eial considerations~nvolving future freedoms for Simmons--be removed from the table Harcourt agreed, and they began to argue over money. Dai ton had no problem with buying a player's right to approv~ a trade; it was, he reasoned. "just like a free agent's situation--an attempt to buy a I~layer's acceptance of employment." In tl~e ~ong torn, this made sound business sense. As Harcourt pointed out, "The l?ee-agunt explosion was the result of supply and demand. Itlstead of signing 20 kids and having one of them reach the gig Ieagues five years later as an avezage player, yDU ~ould plek up prime talent with no devel- opment costs. The cost to the cbdi for those 20 players wotgd run half a million dollars; for an outstanding player, it might cost one or two or three million," Dalton thought Har- court's half-million-dollar estimate might he low He said he had no way of gue-ssing how much it takes 1o de- velop a player lihe~ say. Ted Simmons. Before midnight Friday, though, Dalton would have to try But if he failed, he reasoned, he was prepared 78 INSIDE SPORTS Herzog said, "and I told them I had Waukee, about the team, about Buck a deal with Hart3" Dalton. I wasn't going to do anything unless Harry called me and said hc could not sign Simmolls. But the Yankees offered me a very good deal" it incladad Ran GuidD'--"and I knew I could make that if Harry couldn't come to an agreemetlt with Ted " Late Thursday afternoon. Dalton learned that his second choice, the smaller St. Lokis deal, was no longer possible. It was all seven players, or no deal at all There was little progress Thursday night. Harcourt and Dalton and Brew- er president Bud Seilg talked at one another until 2 a.m It was, said Ray Self borough, "'nul-cu~tlng" tim~ Har- cnurt had brought his price down to ggtx3,000; the Brewers were offering less tha~ half that¸ At 2:15, Dalton took a call from the Associated Press. The reporter asked "if I can go to bed now." Dalton said, "You can do what~vez" yo$.l want, hut l'm going to bed now. We don't have a deal yet." In the room adjoining Dalton's, SC- tig paced, trying not to let temptation blur th~ Brewer vision, He kn~w he'd have to cu~ his budget across the board Rodgers' plans to use him. He wanted. too, to tell Simmons how Frank Rob- inson had come to Dalton's Orioles in 1966. lifted a contender into a champion and was now in the Hail of Fame. It was noon before Dalton reaehec Simmons; they talked for 20 minutes. Harcourt and his wife met for lone: a gttle after noon¸ He didn't thin the Brewers wouhi come up with th money, bnL he saw no reasoll to lowt his pllce. He was convinced Dalt¢ and Selig would readily have sent g four players and the $800,000 to t" Card~ for ~he St. Louis Three; he asking only that the money be s, to a different bank account. He kn Dalton was concerned about his ov all salary ~ructure but, he said. they don'l come up with it now. fi" they---or someone else~will, in F~ tuary or March," during the next terleague trading period. While Harcotlrt waited out t lunch hour with his wife, Dale negotiated a deadline extension fn the Cardinals. He wa% he tnld Herz~ "90 per cent there." When the age enterad Dalton's room after lunl Dalton jumped the Milwaukee oft to $745,000 ov~ three years. Th
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p* @ tO D* *t fit courtlh]c~s Out ot his deDth, it's eit[lel" t]lat or the cruelty. Beside, it's not only the ne~ yollng Illis~ess he'$ with: there's also Jet,ha, Our Sacred Virgi~ of Pad cliffc College. Daughter of the first lucky ma~oc]llst who made a film in bi~ arms, The intloeent child isnt supposed to know yet what a twisted, disgulting, maggoty eleature Fa~Jler ~s" When the), were back in the limousine, ~ dve.# b, er~l~ up ~a~ghl inside the flame.cn[nred veils and looked out the windnw "H~w did you get into all tilts?" he a~kell ~s they drove alor*g "I~ you wele ) a]~t~ to ~e a non Or a mother." ' 'All this,' meaning what?" she said ~harpl~ 'Shc)wblz? Masochiml~ \Vhor~ dora? How did I get into ~ll dill? You ~ound llke a man in bed with a prostl- rule " "An~ltJ=er twi~ted, disgustin[~, rflaggoty ¸¸()It¸ Nathan, I'm ~ony,'' She gripped hi~ ann and held it ~s though they had t '*Damn il, Grogtm, flint's not the way they taug]ll )ou at tJte academy~~' been togetller ~II their lives "o11, I got into all tills as innocently as any girl I~)tdd. Playing Anne Frank at the Gate Theater. I was nlnetecn years old. I had half o[ Dublin in tear~ " ,'] d~dn,t k~low that," ~aid Zuckerman. They were b~ck at tile pierre. "Would yotl like to ¢oroe up~ Oh. of course you would." said Caesara No ~alse modesty about bet magi~ but. on t]le other lla~d, He foEowed her into the lobby, his face blurrillg out agaln ~s Iler~ now eaogh~ the gaze of people le~v[ng rbe hotel He was thinking o~ Caesara star~ i~g at ]9 as th~ ~ch~mi~g Al~e F~a~k~ and of the photographs of hlm stars llkc the enchant ~ng C~e~ara that An~e Frank pi~ned up beside that attic bed. That Anne Frank should ~ome to [tim in thif gui~e That h@ should meet her at his agent's house, in a dress of veils and pe~thotts~ suite. Y@s~ t its ow~ flippant ideas die serious felfows like yo~: have to do is wait an~ all there is to know abot~ comedy. The first thing hc saw in ht room waq a high pile of brand-n oil tile dresser; thTet w~-e by papelbltek copies of Hzgher Edt*~. ,~,Iixed t~mo~ion~ and l~ew~ed In, tinny. Beside the boo~s was a ~*ase ho~ ing two dozen yellow x~c.~e~. He ,~o ~d¢l ¢~ who they were from, and when she pLtl down her shawl and went off to the bath room, he sidled over to the dresser and read the card• "To my Irish rose, Love and love and love, F," When she came back into the room, he ~ag in the wing chair that looked across the park to the LOwers oil Central park West, leafing through file book that had been open on the table beside file chair. It was by be~ds and co¢.katoo ~eathers. Tlmt he = S6ren=Ki~rl~egaaxd' of alI people. Called should take her to Elaine'~ to be gaped The Crisis in the Li~e of an Actres~ zl That she should ~n~he him tip to her ,,And what ~ the crisis in file llfe of an actre~.@,, be asked her. She m~.de a gad face and dropped into the sett~e across lrom him. "Gettiilg older." "Aecordlng to Kierkegaard or accordk " ing to you?" "Both n[ us" She reached across and he banded her ihe book. She flipped 4he rlght • page. =- ~,qArhen;,., she read, J, ,she, the a¢ tress--'i~-only¸ thirty¸ year* old, she is essentially passd.' " "In Denmark, msybe, in 1850. I wouldn't Lake it to helrt J[ i were you. Why are you rvadlng this?" He woladered if it had come lrom "F," along with the roses. "Why shnuldn't l~" ~sked Cae~ra. "No reason. 1 suppose ever'~body - ~should. What else kave you under]ined~'" "Wba~ everybody underlines," she ~a[d. "Everything that says me." " "May | see?" He [called over to take the book back. "Would you llke drlnk?" said Caes,~a-a. "No, t]~anks. I'd like to see the book" "You tan 1ooi5 across the park trom here a]I fl~e way uF to where Mike Nichols llve~. That's hi* trlple~¢ whcae the lights are. Do you know him?" "Cae~ara, everybody knows Mik~ ?qieh. ols," Zu~kerman mid. "Knowing ?,like Nidlols Js considered nothiag in this t~owt/. C~met nit, ~t ~tle se~ rite I1oo[,. I never heard of it before." "You're making ~un o[ me," she said. "For le~vi~g Kierkegaard o~t to inapress ~1~ ~'ou' But 1 also [ett your books out to L'COm~ on. let me see what interests aiotl so lltnch." Fina]l~', she pa~sed it back to him "Well, l want a drink," ~he said, and got up an~ poured hertelt some wine horn
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\ That's the reaction that's made Puerto Rican Gold Rum one of the most popular and (astes~ grovAng liquors in America today. An'/way you try it, Gold Rum is a smooth alternative to bourbons, blends, Canadians-even Saotch. Enjoy it o:~ the rock~, or with a dash of soda or your favorite mlxe~ The first sip wiU amaze you The second wiU convert you. Make sure the rtma is I~erto Rican. The people of Puerto Rico have been makkug rum for ~most five centuries.Their specialized skills and dedication result in a rum of exceptivnal taste and purit~ No wonder over 85% of the rum sold in this ¢ountr¢ q comes from Puerto Rico. PUERTO RICAN RUMS Aged for smoothness and taste.
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BAPd3I~ B I_AY 99% tar free. Also available in lO0"s and Box Kinq~ and l]ox. 1 ro~ "~r", 0.2 toq m~tm~: L00's. 3 m0 tar". 0.4 rag. nieo~in~ av. per mgarene ov -~C method. Wart] ng Th~ Surgeon General No! Determined I Ihal Cigarelle Smoking ts Dangerous In ~'nut Heal1~ ]
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24 PE~THOJSE ¢
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not the alsks in London, although h* did say they were from the slopes ol Mt. Kilimanjaro. Or was he simply mistaken about their origin7 AS if the matter weren'I su fllnlently muddled already, the fine ~ontempo ra~ writer Erwin A. Bauer in his book Treasury of Big Game Animals nmst have been as dizzy from his research as I was. He wrote: "'~he largest known singJe tusk weighed 237 pounds and cmrte from a bull shot in 1899 in Kili- manjaro. The next keavinst tusk. from an animal shot in Kenya [Kilimanjaro is in Tanzmaa], weighs 226 pounds and measures slighdy more than l0 feet long. Tae opposite rash weighs 214, the two totaling 440. Both are today ha the British Museum of Natural Histo- ry," So. by Bauer's understanding, and oot utxeasonably, there are three selxarate g~at tusks from two different locations! It s impossible to say where he got the date 1899 for the biggnst rusk which, if accurate, would rule out the Kilimanj aro Elephant because his ivory is documented as having been photo- it was a fascinating idea¸ Were there two separate rushers, one from Kilimanjaro and another from Kenya? Whom abouid I believe? Guys like Blunt, Sandetson, Smith. and ' Bauer are certainly not casual about facts, and what about the museum? I imposed on my old friend Malcolm Lyell, managing director of Holland & famou~ ~tmls makers of to see what he could find cut. He kindly handed my |er~er to Carey Keates, himself born in Kenya. He is that legnndary firm's expert on Afri- eana. Mr. Keates did quite a bit of probing into the matter, ~specially with • Rowland Ward. His return letter statad same as those from the Kilimanjaxo • Elephant and that they orlginally weighed about 235 pounds each. Not ...lOt'wear on concrete. "This concrete floor was cold and l~ard till I slarted wearing my Red Wings. These cushion soles make cement feel like carpet And the wedge shape lgives support from eel to toe, So whey I leave work, mv feet still feel good For wear on con- s~ crete, nothing else compares• --J ~d I've earned ii}y \l{"il~gs!~' ~95 For feet that have earned the best. t g~ R.~ ~ plg Shoe( u e,e~ ~ in~ MN 55qK£, ~o much consistency there, but he added that they now weigh about 210 pounds each beeatLse of loss of moisture as the tusks dried out over the years¸ Unable to invest~ate further, 1 decidad to include this version iD my book, although reltlctaatly. That version was reprinted in the May |980 issue of Ou~ DOOR LIF~, in one of my stones Oll Afrl- can ~isphunts. A lol more than Ihe discrepancies in weight botbemd me, though, and the itch to mully deterraln¢ the true story of the magnificent tusks kept gnawing away at me. Cormaander Blunt, for example, says the ivory was ".. • sup- posed to have been found near Mt. Kil- imanjmo." Keates said in his letter that the tusks had been "found," there bcinh no record of whether the hull had boca killed or had died a natural death. Hill, of the museum, writes that the ivory was taken by a hunter: "It is said OL'ql)OO R LIFE
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T he Antiques Show I PelannO;'~rvatnhae Y;a;Sita~hetiUni~es~t°Y i~nf I Philadelphia has developed into one of the most presliginus and comprehensive SHOWS ill the country Celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, the show shoald be something special indeed, with I o~cr 50 of the ¢ountry's leading dealers participaIing An importam feature, the loan exhihfl "Christ Church Philadel- phi~Arls, Architecture, Archive~" ex- plores the rich heritage of this historic church furniture, siber, documents, books, decorative arts In ¢onjuedon with this exhlbit--a tour ($15) of Christ Church itself, the Bishop White House, and several recently restored lath-cen- tury homes. Other highlights of the show include symposiums on Oriental decorative arts. gallery tour~, luncheons featuring Phi]adalphia specialties: All this takes place April 7 through April iI at the 103rd Engineers Armory., 33rd Street north of Market. For fidl infor- mation and tickets (regular admission, $3), write Universily Hospital Antiques Show. c/o Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Box 754, Philadelphia; Pa. 19104, or call 215-661-2576. C raft Cornucopia IYou'll probably think twice spending $100 for a crafts book that doesn't give complete project inMruc- tions~r one that does, for that matter Nevertheless, The Encyclopedia of Crafts (Scrlbner's) edited by Laura Torbet de- serves a place in the library uf profes- sionals or amateurs who take their crafts seriously. In three handsome volumes, it lists alphabetically just about everything you m~ght want to knnw aholll 50 crafts--every term used, every proce- Write for address of nearest showroom Send $3,00 for new full color, 36 page booklet to: McGuire, HG-I, 38 Hotaling Place, San Fravcisco 94111 C*~i~sult your interior designer, architect or furniture dealer. McGUIRE 32 dure, every tool The editors claim there are over 12,000 extensively cross-refer- enced emtri~ (I didn't count them, but 1 believe it) and 2,5(30 original illustra- tions While you may not, for ins~nce, get step-by step instructions for knitting a particular sweater, you will have all kalzting stitches explained, the yarns to use, the needles to buy, blocking proce dures, whatever. And project instruc tions are e2,sy to come by elsewhere. W lneTtaiiing Tour I 1 Want an adventure in wine and food samp ng? If so, sign up for one of the monthly tours be ng condueed this l year by noted food-and-wlne journalist and broadcaster Amhony Dias Blue. Be 1 ginning in San Francisco; you go by de- i Iuxe coach to the Sonoma Valley, Naps Valley, Carmel, and Santa Barbara, vAnding up in L,A. For $L339 a person, you get eigM syberhi¢ days and nights of deluxe accommodations, gourmet meals, picnic lunehes, full breakfasts, plus lectures by Mr Blue on the foods and wines (with t~.stings) of the regmns. For fur information, write World of Oz, 3 Eiml 54th St., New York, NY 10022, or call 212-751~3250 in New York State; 800-223-1506 elsewhere. If you want to tour the wine coamry but wou d ra her go il alone, get yourself a copy of Across the Golden Gate (Har- per/Colophon, $6.59 paperback) Alan and Kerstin Fraser Magary tel[ you where and how to go, where to stay, where to ~mt, what to see, what wines ro sample in Callforala's wine country, and give similar travel information for the north ccast and redwood area of lbe state as weU. TO prepare you for the wines, over lO0 pages are devoted to Ihe grapes and various varlet sis, the making of wine, what to look for on bottle labels, how to taste wine like a professional H hwcdion Splendor mUnless you've been to Honolulu's Bishop Museum, your idea of the Is- lands may be ukeleles, floral [eis, and swaying hips. But Hawaii has a rich cul- tural background, and for ~he first time many of its national treasures are on lcur on the mainland, The more than 300 objects range from 16th century artifacts to contemporary sculpture and painting. Highlights are the fabulous red-and-yellow feathered floor-length clnak belonging to rile great king Kame- hameha I and the koa wood throne with red silk damask seat of Kamepameha IIl. While many items predate the ar- rival of Captain Cook m 1778, others re- fleet the merging of Hawaiian and Western cultures. You can see all this exOtiCS at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County through April 26: the Seattle Art Museum, June 3 to Jttly 26. It will then travel to San Fran- cisco, New York, Boston, and Washing- ton, D,C. Watch for it[ • ~,us~ & Gar~n
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| I MGTAR 99% tar free. Also available in lO0"s and Box ~ings and Box,1 m~ "tar'', 0.2 mg. niculi~m 3B's, 3 ms 'tag', UA rag. niemlne qv. per cigaretla by FIC method. I Warning; The Surgeon General Has Oeterminad / lhal ~iga[elI~ Smoking Is Oangerous to Your Health
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CEKITOOT Be Jay Herber T he Anffques Show iOver the years, the University of Pennsylvania Hospda! Antiques Show in Philadelphia has developed into one of lhc most prestigious and comprehensive i '.boxes in Ihe country. Celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, the show should be something special indeed, with over 50 of the country's leading dealers loan exhibd "Christ Church Phfladcl- participating. An important feature, the ihia--Arts. Architecture, Archives" ex- plores lhe rich heritage of 1his historic church furniture, silver, documents, books, decorative arts. In conjuctien with this exhibit--a tour (S15) of Christ Church itself, the Bishop White House, and several recently restored lath cen- tury homes. Other highlights o[ the show include symposiums on Otiental decorative arts, gallery tours, luncheons featuring Philadelphia specialties All this takes place April 7 through April I 1 at the 103rd Engineers Armory, 33rd Street north of Market For full infor- mation and tickets (regular admission, 53), write University Hospilal Antiques Show, c/o Hnspdal Of the University of Pennsylvania, Box 754, Philadelphia, Pa. 19104, or call 215-661-2576 [ C Cornucopi* iYou'll probably think twice about spending $100 for a erafts book that doesn't give complete project instruc- tions---or one that does, for that matter Nevertheless, The Encyclopedia of Crafts (Scribner's) edited by Laura Tother de serves a place in lhe library of profe~ sinnals or amateurs who take their crafts seriously, in Ihree bandsonle volumes, it lists alphabetically just about everything you might want to know about 50 crafts---every term used, every prate Write for address of nearest showroom. Send $3.00 for new full color, 36 page booklet to: McGulre, HG-L a8 Hotallng Place, San FranciSCo 94111 Consult your interior designer, architect or furniture dealer. McGUIRF $2 dure, every tooL The editors claim there are over 12,(X30 extensively cross-refer- enced entries (I &dn't count them, but 1 believe it) and 2,500 original illusLra- tions. While yau may not. for instance, get step-by-stud instructions for knitting a particular sweater, you will have all knitting sfitchrs explained, the yarns to use, the needles to buy, bloelong proce dures, whatever. And project instruc- tions are easy to come by elsewhere W lnd'talting Tour lWant an adventure in wnle and food sampling? If so, sign up for one of the monthly tours being conducted this year by noted food-and-wine journalist and broadcaster Anthony Di*ts Blue. Be- ginning in San Francisco, you go by de- luxe coach to the Sonoma Valley, Napa Valley, Carmel and Santa Barbara, winding up in L.A, For $1,539 a person, you get eight sybantlc days and nights of deluxe accommodations, gourmet meals, picnic lunches, full breakfasts, plus lectures by Mr. Blue on the foods and Wnl~ (willt tastlngs) of the regions. For full information, write World of Oz. 3 East 54th St., New York, N.Y 10022, or call 212-751-3250 in New York State; 800-223-1306 eIsewhere. If you want to tour the wine country but would rather g~ it alone, get yourself a cop"d of Acras~ the Golden Gate (Har- per/Colophon, 56,59 paperback). Alan and Kerstnl Fraser Magary tell you where and how to go, where to sta), where to eat, whal Io see, what wines to sample in California's wine country, and give similar travel information for the north coast and redwemd area of the state as well TO prepare you for the wines, over 100 page, are devoted to the grapes and various varietaJs, the making of wine, what to look for on bottle labels, how to taste wine like a professional H awallbh Splendor iUnless you've been to Honolulu's Bishop Museum, your idea of the Is- lands may b¢ ukuleles, floral lois, and swaying hips Bug Hawaii has a rich cul- tural background, and for the first time many of its national treasures are on tour on the mainland, The more than 300 objects range from 16th-centur~ artifacts to contemporary sculpture and painting. Highlights are the fabulous red-and-yellow-feat hered floc~r -]engt h cloak belonging to the great king Name- hameha [ and the koa wood throne "~rit h t~d silk damask seat of Kamehameha IIL While many items predate the ar rival of Captain Cook in 1778, others re- fleet the merging of Hawaiian and W~tern cultures. You can see all this exotiea at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County through April 26; the Seattle Art Museum. June 3 to July 26. it will then travel to San Fran- cisco. New York, Boston, and W~shnlg- ton, D.C. Watch for it! • ~4o~eo & G~rd~n
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/s \ . -- -• . BARCLAY • " B Al:tlTl_b f I MG TAR 999'o tar free. Also available in lO0's and Box ~i~s and Box,1 mg,"ta(', 0.2 rag. nicotine; O0's, 3 rag. "tar", 0.4 rag. nicatine iv. I~r cigarette by FIC method• Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous 1o Your Health
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Blue water. White sand. Red carpet. Holland America presents *.he Caribbean plus Bermuda. 10 and ll-day cruises from New York on the incomparable s.s.Rotterdam. Sailing on the s.s.Rotterdam has come to mean cruising in the grand manner. Elegant. Excit- ing. Relaxing. Now you can spend 10 days aboard this tecredible ship, exploring St. Maarten, St.Thomas, and Bermuda. Or Ii days sailing to San Juan, St. Thomas. Anti~a. and B~rrauda. By day, surrender to balmy breezes'and tropical sun. By night, enjoy superb cuisine and lively entertainment. You'll be wined, dined, and pampered with the kind of warm Dutch hospitar~t~, that made us famous. Choos~ from 8 departure dates, all on Mon- days or Fridays, in April, May, September, October. and Novembe~ Call your ~ave[ agent or write for our brochure. Holland America Cruises, Two Penn Plaza, New York, N.Y 10121, Dept. HGN. s.s.Rotterdam: Netherlands Antilles registry. Holland America Cruises ~Welkom aan Boord!~
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AVI3ltWI • aaaj' J~ 1% 66 "~taDq s?. aan.~alclatl.L q~ x~q~owa
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TV Mov Guide L~I~ tb.s j~u.'ce lo ~ your w~exs mov~ vtewlng. Compile (]eta~lS ~lre Ln ire ~;;ula¢ IL~tlngs SATURDAy 5;30 A.M. (9) "~' (W~r~n) Fred ~dur ray. 6.+O0 A.M. (SHO) "W,E C~r~JtW 3OSEY WALES- • d0 ~M. f~ "W~D ~ 1lie EVFR- Q4Jd~" (0rBm~ Cilr ~t O~her Plumma~ 10;¢~ A.M. (9) "DESTINATION SA- TURN" C~s~, Anl~ony Wsr ~e. 1 ~ P.M. (3) ,,,n~ BIQ FI~F~qMAH" (Drama) HOmed Keel, Su~n K~hner. John ,~X o n, M~ha ~ EN BL~.L~" (Crime O~'~r~) Stepher~ |oyd, Y-torte ~:~ p.M. ~;0/'q~ LUP.J( OF G;WP~ (~rsrn~ ROlbe=t ~h~w. Ma~ UFe, g:00 pJ~L tliHO) "BI~ "~.l~q E,, (Corne~y) P~ peler Se41er s+ _ .~ ~g..00 p.M. t~ "~4E JEW#' (CO~ R; ~'~,e Ma, lltl, 9~0 p,M. (ll) '~ WGflL~ COLLIDE" i~¢~el...ce Fctlonl RIc~sr cl Deft. 11~0 p,M. |K, BO) "1r1~ FOG" (Thr ~ller~ R: Adrlenrm Bml:~su. t 1~0 p M. (3) "COOL NANO I.LW.E" tt~ Pau~ t~. 11;30 P,M, (¢t "NOW. VOYAGIi~' (~tSflql) Bette DAVIS, Pmll :-~mr(~d. 11 :~0 p.M. ('/) .'FJ. CONDOle* (Wel~tm) ,~im 8town. Lee Van Ckmf pat~k C,']~k~t Me.,Jan~ H j~L 11:95 p. M, (~) ' q~fl3RCE I,l~l~~ Mimieux, Gicva~dU, f~K~r~ (Or~ I~ Taytor, Richar~ ; :30 p J~l. (S) 'W~IEASlJRE OALt.E(W~" BL~O~, B~ ~" ,'~o~, C~'rle Nye. 1:2 p.M (41) "LO~ 'nEMPOS ~Ep.~" (C,~ned/a) ~rs QU~nmna. 2:03 p.M (11) "K]tJJNG GAME" ~r=r~a) Edd Byrnw, Ingdd pro. Jam~ ~¢k, Trevor Bax~r. 3:00 p.M. (5,) ,'O~tlM$ ALONG ~ MO- ~WX- ~j Clau~ C~tbarf. ~00 P.M. ~-~10~ "IBOR~RIJKE,~ (Cn nm Cca=r.~) PG; cha~k~l B ror~on 4:00 pJd. (10) "tll,l~ U OP ST. TRIHI. (Come~y) A~stair Sire, J ¢~1~¢e C~t foil. 5~0(I p,~ 0tBO) 'qllE E URO FF.N~.S" (Oram~ Lse,Rem~¢k, Robin EHia. (D~ma) P3; ~ester 5t~ll~ne. S:~ P,M, (41) '*ptlEBLE~NA" t~t~tra=) C¢lumbe Domlngue~ ?;00 p.M. Ct/hT) ,'THE BLAI:~ F[r~.uON" ~30 p.M. (ItBOI ~KOT LEAD AND COLD (Cor,~dy-w~er ~ G; Jim DS~ 9:~ F~M. 113) "BLr't~E SpiRrr~ (Corc~) Rex I,~ri~n, M~trg=ret RmJ~r~ord, K,~y HemmOnd. A.I~ "~/GUFCE (Drallt~ Maf.~n She~ Linda BklJr. Jeanne Cooper, Bert Remse~+ 11:45 p .M. ('&1.IT) "i'l.m J~ ~) R; 8te~ Martin, 1~O mid. (IIKO) "I~M FORCE" (Cr~me Orae'~) ~ C~t E~stwood. ~;00/,Jd. tt) "0('~ HtS,' (D~tm~t R~ilaro~ 6"urtml. El~eth Taylor, B~rry Foet~', Cax[fe N~e. I:0O ^~V. t~ "t~.iY '~ ASWONE WANT TO tat.t. A N~E (]~L Ltl~ yOU?" Hul~lChmid, Peter V&ughan. 1:00 A.M. (41) "LO~ "nl~pO6 Vi~" (Com~k~ FJvk~ Qu~namL 1:0o A,M. (~;BO) ,,BO~- (Crlm~ 0 ~.a] P(]: P..h~k~ Bronson. t:15 A.M. (?) "~IAP~EN OF ~EVIL" {Wesi~m) ~ Cooper, Rlcherd WiCk- ~',ark, C4mlerolt M~t ¢~1e1~, 1~5¢ A.M. ~ '1tELL TO ~ ~ (Gcame) Je4frey Hunter. L-0o ~.u, (~ "f/,R. ~=F.AJmO't AND ~4E MERMAIO" ~ (~y) WUikLm POWelL Ann 81y~. ~rene I~. An~ King, Fied Cl,,uk.
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IBROADWAY I WELCOMES I RICHARD THOMAS J "THE BEST PLAY OF THE SEASON!" -RexReed TICKETS NOWON SALE AT BOX OFFICE AND BY MAIL CHARGIT (212) 944-9300 TICKETRON (212) 977.9020 NEW APOLLO THEATRE 234 West 43rg SI. New YO~k City 10036 • 921 ;8558
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Thepleasure , 99% tar free. Waming, 1he Surgeon Generai Has Determined 1~at C~arene Srnokm9 is [~angerm~ toYour Health. Also available in 100~r and Box 0.4 m~ tl~a~ ~ ~ e, wate ~C method
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R~RCL ~ is back. 99% tar free. BARCLAY
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It~ all we need for Itches and Rashes. instead of a medicine cabinet full of skin care products, all you need for tbe temporary relief of itches and rashes is Cortaidff Cortaid contains one of the most effective anti-itch, anti-rash medicines available today without a prescription. Pharmacists recom- mend Cortaid most? For mild poison ivy, oak and sumac, insect bites, dermatitis, eczema, detergent and jewelry rash, ask your physician or pharmacist about soothing, odorless Cortaid. Cortaid is recommended for children down to the age of two, (under two use only under a doctor's supervision). *As rellorted itt September i edition of Araedcan l)l~g~ist..available in cream, oinlment and lotion. Read and Follow Label Directions Cortaid. All you need for itches and rashes.
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/[B.lf/J IEIRIFItll/E ¢o0~/nuea three years younger, was president of his class and a sesiolLs drummer. Marvin idohacd Julius for his ul~eties. Julius loved Mar'an because he had qualities that Julius lacked. "1 felt ha would be a lawyer or a doctor," says Jidius. "I was an introvert. He was an extrovert. I ad- mired him for that." Mrs. Lindsey rein=tubers how Marvin insisted they pay Julius a surprise visit at the UMass campus in Amherst ~n his birthday, Feb. 22. "UMass had a game that= night," sha: ~ys, "and at the spectators and the team sang Happy Birthday for /ullu~ and I was sc very Ourtcam~ proud and happy On the way back to have been lh New York we were caught in the WOlSt count~ Bllt w¢ snowstorm I can reRlemb¢l next day Marvin began complaining that championship, not cried since '69. 1 really loved him and I wanted to cw, but I coiddn'l cry. ] felt people ¢xpect~l me Io cry, so I forced ~als to come into my eyes, hut [ can't really say I cried." If Martin's death was tha point at which Erring gave up trying to control things, was it also the time that The Leg- end b~gan? "Yes," he says, "and you know what, R w~s all ii mystery to me. Take basl~hall, for example... 7 "Take haskct- his arms and haees hurt:' The condilaon to UMg~s mainly because my h w~ diagnc~scd as arthritis, and whcn Jal- coach, Ray Wilson. iu.~ came home for spring break Marvin Leaman, the UM~ss ccJacin Onc6~l wag hospitalized, there, i'~y perspective w0s regional. 1 tree- "He had always been slckly," says Jul- er considered that 1 could play on th~ ius~ "so 1 never thought it was serious, level of guys from UCLA or purdue. It Bot somehow my molJ2cr 2~ust J~svc jl:.~tne'/cTctCCOlTadtori*te. Myfit$1,~w~k- knowt] becau~ the night heroic l went eBing came al~er my sophomolc year back to school she crled and cded." No when Mr. Lemnan got n~e into the Olym- sooner did Julius get back to Amhars~ :pic development camp. There I was w~ - than he was called home again, l!efore guys like Paul Westphal, an AU-An: ica from USC, Tom McMihan ff Maryland, loby Wright from JndlaL Well, l led that team id sconng and re- bounding and I began to think, Hmmm. Mayb~ But those guys would ~it around saying, 'WelL I won't sign for anything less than $50,000 up front with a four- year nogut at $125,000'; and 1 couldn't even ~ port in the COnvcrsatiotL [ w~s completely naive about iL Pro ball? I had never considered it a r~ality." Westphai, now with the Seatde lluper- Sot t/cs, n=cal2s Ihat he ~ nevvr hea~'d of Julius ~ving until that camp. "l may be crazy," h¢ says now. "but my impressloll of him was that he was only 6' 5" or so." In fact ha was more like 6'4" and 180 pounds. "[ do remember that he had some uausual alfdides. I say that because he was inconsi~¢nt and real quiet. One night ha would teat the place up with 35, 40 points and the next he would Icok llke he was twing to be molx flashy than he had to ha. He was v¢I~ ~ood, however, at learning what hc could do and he started playing without throwing on mustard at the exp¢~lse oftha shot *, In Fawing's junior year at UMass. the imme '~EPAng. Jidil~~ bcga~ oootm~e~ he got there, Marvin died. Lamr, the cause of Marvth's d~th was diagnosed Lupug Erythcmotosus, a dis~0.~ in which antfoodics, deadly to the body's own tissues, are produced. Now Erring has taken on the fight against Lupus 0s one of his lifo mig~inns. "[ went to the cemetery ['or three straight days and cried," says Julius. "Then I stopped. [ was really brought t~ my knees and made to feel helpless and po'~erless. It wag lille I no inngcr had con- fro1. J ~ald be goll¢ tomofI'OW. 1 folt helpless, but I also became fearless. I feR, 'W~ll, if ]'tn going to do somethlng I'm going to let it all hang out. [f ~omeththg's meant for you, thetl it's going to fail into place. But you have to pu~ forth the ef- fort and energy for it to happen. And you have to be a good person You have to have a pure h~art.' "I haven't eded ~nce that dayb and I'm not sure what would maha me cry Two y¢~ys ago J had a thvorite uncle die, my father's brother Phil]ilx [ went to his wake and 1 was fully aw0~e tha~ I had O~- J,s ~y ~ove~ a~nd t~ b~op r~¢tkc blm thc 76¢ts" lop s¢ore, r tmd t~e NBA ~, hT~eJ]est l'.l'Vl~ }
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KENTUCKY COMBINES A FAST-FACED BUSINESS TEMPO WITH A GRACIOUS SOUTHERN LlFE STYLE. Today in Kentucky, youql find something new mixing with the white fences and thoroughbreds of the Bluegrass. It's business In fact, right in the heart of Lhoroughbred country, you'll find : ~m~ anies lik~ IBM and ]errico And ess than a short gallop from historic Churchill Downs, you'll find General Electric, Humana, Brown-Foi'man and Brown and Williamson just to mention a few, Many Kentucky businesses have deep roots here, while others are new to Ihe Commonwealth The~e are compames, like General Motors, that went through an extensPce search process before finaUy choosing Kentucky for its ~ew Corvette assembly plant. The reasons for that selection vary by company. But the starting point is Kentucky's strategic locaBon between the Sun Belt and the Manufacturing North. Major transportation faoBties turn this central location into an attractive business advantage. And Kentucky builds on that advantage with an abundant availabiEty of energy. Kentucky is lhe nation's leading producer of coal. There are also major ene~By reserves of natural gas and crude oil Of MI the states, Kentucky may well be the closest to being energy serf sufficlent People are ~uaother rich Kentucky resource. Compames can draw from a large and produdiw labor force. When you add it up, all the essentials for a successful business ~- are here, i~cl~d{ng a posidve z business attitude that starts with Governor Brown and ex ends throughout Kentucky state government All the essentials for @ a lull ncb life are here, toc~. Mayor construction is in ffrog~ess throughout gentudcv In Louisville, "'TIw Gallerla" p~iect is virtually providing a nero ¢0r¢ for downtown. Major dawntcaw redevclopment is also underway in Lexington. The Gallerza alone reFrese, ts an investraent of more than $100 miffion and total construction in Kentucky in 1981 cunld ¢.vceed $10 bdlio,t One o] General Electrie's Iarge~t manufacturing plants, AppBanc¢ Park, is Iotated in Lo~lsville. Produced a~ th~ Park are a ~I{ ~ange of kitchen appI~nces fat the home. Kentudcy b a nationaJ leader in ~;ocatlo~a[ edtlcatlon. There are 14 state ~;ocatlo~tal ~¢hools and 69 area vocational K~uc~ Industrial Training (KIT) program ll~a~ develops slalled manpower for n~w or expandi~ bu~b~sse~ There are over 9,000 churches a~d synagogues in Kentu~, l~th mertlbetship of rao,¢ than 2 million
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Barrela Ladders. Furniture Firture~. [f it's made of woad, c~nce~ are it comes from Kentu£ky. Both the Iumber and wood products and the furnlture and ~tttre industries a~ growing at a rate exoeecilng the national average Kentucky is a strong producer 0¢ a diverse list of farm product5 Corn, coheat and soybeans are the largest cash crops wash both b~ and dairy catge lepres~ntlng sizable farm induslrzs, The ¢b~yId's revord sTrlall ~tlo~h bas~ came out o] a Kentw'~.u lake And chance5 arc, there are some ever* blgger (ish waiting to be caught in Kentucl, y" s 200,000 plus surface acres of impounaad g,atcr and lak¢~ There are also some I4,000 miles of rivers streams and cre~. Exc¢Ilent f~hing l~ jl~st one reason Kentucky t~mr*sm ha~ grw~'u to be a two-billion dollar business
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NEWS MEDIA Following the uews in the White ltouse pre~s room: A confusion of sources TV News Under the Gun nee again tdevision news was there Ofrom the stat~--literally bringing home the horror by bearing eyewitness to the c/5/r/~ Eve/~ a~er dozens of ~lo~,v-mo~ tion, stop=action, close-up replays; the vid- eotapes of last week's attempted Presiden- tial assassination never lost their einlhogly graphle impact¸ Yet if the pictures were all too effective, the words sometimes failed. Live television's immediacy was also its built-ln vldllerabinty: under the deadline.every-second pressure, all three networks unwittingly transmitted major ldaeeuraales during the story's chaotic ear- ty hours. In addition t~ the pres~-pool crew, each network llad it $ owrt career a t ealrt stalhined outzide the WashMgto~ H~lton i~o~el when the gunman let loose his fusillade. ABC was first to ]Lash the news on both radio and "IV, starting just four minutes after the first shot was fired. Yet nearly 40 mhio utes elapsed bet'ore the iintial ttl~surances that the President had escaped the gunfire were finally col:rex:ted. A]I three networks rslso erro~leoltqly announced that 13ress sec- retary James Brady had died of his head wound, with CBS and ABC goirtg so far as to pre~ent em~ic~ael euingie~ of Brady. ALS the ~f*erooon ,.vor~ o/~. the /2~voF]¢5 aired eortRicting reports about the caliber of the bullets, the extemt of the President's injury and the length and nature of ins surgery. Gaffe: When the picture fina//y began to dear. each network pointed out that usu- ally r elJaine source* had gone astray¸ CBS's Dan Rather, for example, explained that deputy press secretary Karn~t Sfflhil had passed the ~vord that Reagan was un- harmed. ABC eorresgundent Bill Green- wood blamed another Brady assistant, Da- vid Prospeti, for the report of his hoss's headi--~ stot3." Prospnh aisguies. /n fagy- hess, the fact that the goess ol~¢e WaS sud- den[}' bereft of he leader aeoounted for much of the confusion; Brady's sttumed staff at times re~eted slowly in releasing hiformatldn~ and at le~t once a staffer had to be prodded to pick up a phone and ask questions. In the cpais, the press-offlce staff often had to rely on regurts from top-level offic~hi soutc~ that Frove Even so, none ofdmt cohid ¢ most dangerous gaffe. NBC lace passed, on a report that old President was undexgoing stffgery," whe~ Welidce's sore tually said "open-chest." That N~C to eaopath on a lengthy with a surgaon about the grim ir of such a m~dieal paoceher~ ConslderingM1 their proiner the newsmen performed with rchle professionalism. Camer~¸ three t~etworks kept their equi~ even as the shots rmtg ou~ eatcldng a glimpse of the s pounced on by sceudty agant s. don Fidmaa caught a fleeting. gun still pointed at the Presp and ABC'S Hank Brown was s later was able to gin¢ a deset the blond gtmman. Correspond' Tucker of C.~S ran into a nearby d and coramandeer~ a phone/~y pr the manager $100 for his favorite c ABC's Smm Doniddson ~aUed in hls b~ from inside the hotel. With that, the ebinesp of TV news itultandy swar~g I10/l$|Op I~odoY~. Unlike thzit counterparts in the pr ranks, TV rego~ers rarely enjoy the luxuJ ' of hours to rede~t anti zdpid-eheek. Tbo some ~ctued ~Jp-fl~ppL~8 seems foevhobJ~ when live TV covers such a eoneple~, fast- breaking st0xy. Fo~ that matter, pri~ jou~ llidi/its were~l't inaiilttil~ to ¢~ror; after the Assoelated Press distributed a photo said to show su~pact .To/an Hthe[dey Jr. in a Nazi uniform, his parents and Nazi leaders disputed the identification. Alld the men at TV~s anchor desks wexz painfully con- scious of their vulnerability, warning re- peatedly that their infcemation nught be suspect and always trying to name sour ces. P..estrldut~ In some cases, competitive fervor gave way to eXtl~orcfmary restraldt ABC'S ]Frar~k R~ynoJds refitsed to pass along the nime of the would-be assa~mn until he could verify ri. While the White House was ~til] insisting that P~aga~a was unhurt. NBC reporter Ken Bode stole a peek at the President's chest X-ray. But the network decided not ~ go with I~ode's ¢o~iduzive fo1" want of Official confirmation. For the first time hi yeats, the home CBS'~ Rather. ABC's Reynolds, NBC~s Wallace: A ~utionar). touch, a loss of com eosure, a dangerous mkstake ce~ ~Bc NBC 104 NEW~VEEK/ApR~L 13, 1981
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The Antics of Spring XTHELM the not altogether traumatic that the 1981 baseball sea- l with a player strike on May 5e to prcsent $ot~te S~agonal medmtely while the belea- s~ll care. In the deadlocked e strike negodafions. I have rnlad pet Rions in all categcrfos must end ~llng ties. Owners of the Year are George ret~ner and Ruly Carpenter. In the York Yankee camp, George has r¢- i the trophy for sham~iass media mpulatldn. HIS annual tfieee-stage rite spring began with the tmdkional hea~ ~c-geabbldg pseudo-feud ~th Reggie ~ekson, He folldwed up with his familiar ,anishment of an allegedly gutless young i~ltcher. ]~tlis year'8 ]kapldss successor to Jim Beatise and Ken Clay was Mike Griffin. FinaUy, there were last week's blockbuster, instant-fix trades; you won't catch G~orge waiting for his fanm system to miprove on his 103-viatoly division champs. One such trade brought a center-grid savior named Jerry Mumphrey from San Diego in exchange for Ruppert Jones, who may be recalled as iast year's center-field savld~ Another featured enough reedy SteinbrenneT cash to inspire Commkssioner Bowie Kuho to cancelthe deal--amid more headlines for George, After such an out- standing spring, George will he hard- pressed to outdo himsalf this fall when he flees the maaaager. Dramm Rdiy Carpenter, owner of those lovable world champions from Philadel- plna. has piayed out a simpier dranm. Cidng his "deeply ingrained philosophical diffc~ ences" with overspending feBow owners like Ted Turner of Atlanta, Rtfiy stunned the Phllfies last month by announcing that he was putting the alub up for sale "I jtlst don't think you can continue, , .paying players this kioff of money," said t fie shaken owner. Three weeks later Carpenter took an unhappy outfielder named Gary Mat- thews off the profligate Turner's hand.~--- and gave Satdicws a ~egodated five-ye2q contract worth $3.25 million. If this type of steely resolve leads Car- penter to go ahead and sell, the price on the Plqdlles" heads is sind to be over $30 million. This figure does not ilminde any guarantee that Bake McBride will hustle for the new owner or that Steve Carlton will tMk to him. You jast can't put a price tag on that iadect~ous Phllho chaim. The players have battled keenly for their own Ansi¢ Awards. Among the ldso-rans, base stealer ann LeFlore, who left Mont- real after he showed up late for several games during a heated pennant race, has warmed up for his Chicago White gox cam- paign by missing die team bus to one ex- hibition game. But he brings a uhique game plan to the season: "I got a new alarm clock that rings for tllree minute~," he boasts. "You e~xn sleep through a one-min- ute alarm, but not thr~ minutes," In the violence department, Reg~e Smith of Los Atlgal~ scored a one-punch knockdown As opening day nears, the baseball worm is winning plenty of weird and wonderful honors. of a heckling fan last week. Among non- violent counterparts, tfiexe are members of San Francisco's (iod Squad. Finny manage~" F~ank Robinson's r~sponse should be in- triguing the first time one of them tells him that a game-feshig gopher bali was a result of God's will Johnny Bench has sacrificed his battered body so much for Cincinnati that he did not realty contend for these dubious honors. But in light of his $450,000-a-year salary, he has annoyed some teammates with his insistence that he will catch only two game~ a week. Finally, two Players of the Year have enlerged from the fierce competition. Bos- ton's Jhn Rice gets a special Honorary Me- ter Maid citation for attacking a 6~ year- old club offieial in a dispute over a parking spacc. And Slugger Dave Kingman has syn- thesizad all the exquisite logic of pinyer- management byplay. Traded years ago by the New York Mers, Y-dngman has most recently spread his locker-room blight to the Chicggo Cubs. Now the Mets have not only taken him back but raised his huge salary. Will the money mfusldn help achieve basebell's first successful ekaraeter transplam? Well, Kdigman began the spring by presenting peas to the New York writels as a goodwill gestttr¢~ Soon after- ward visiting writers asked him about the thoughtful gifts. He replied that he now refuses to talk to visiting writers, Pep Talk: The Managers of the Year are ggecldlly deserving of ~aviy awards. They may not be around long enough for later ones. The first witmer is M~ury. Wills of fieagge. Teaching infielders tile rtmdown play recently, he told them to chase the runner to the most advanced base---a tactic that could otfiy help future base runners oi1 rival teams. He also sent Up nile p~lch hitier who had already pinch hll e~rliar . in tile same game. And when he wanted to vggt some friends one day, lviaury quietly went AWOL in the singg irmmg fOlly Martin managed to tle WiLls with one charactealsllc pep lalk. AS his Oakland A's prepared for an exhibition against 3a- port's Taiyo gghales, BiLly was overheard telling his men, "I don't want to make a fool of myself, but when you go out there, remember Peat Harbor." Armed with his award, Martin shotfid also play a starring role in one of several trends that can be predlated for this season, ~flly's charisma seldom lasts mn~e than a year or xwo, and tile A's spect ocular im- provemtmt last season was accomplished by wringing ~ ounce of energy out of $ome fine young pftchdig amos As the arms grow tired mad fOlly gets mad, Oakland oould he the season's biggest flop. As for the most improved club, try Montreal, The phohing-dch Expos added by subtracting haFlor~, and ffmanage~ Dick Wil~am~ cart somehow get moody Earle Valentine to piny hard~ they shodid surge past the Phtfii~s in the National Leaguz East. In the piayeffs, look for Montreal to beat Los Angales and Baltimore to edge Kansas City. Then the Orioles will he,lie the Expos through six games punct~aled by throe weeks of postponements due to Canadian blizzards. In the seventh game an umpire wdi make a blatant error in interpreting the rules, and manager Earl Weaver will pull the Orioles off the field and forfeit. Earl has alr~dy done that once this spring, and like all my award winners, fie seems to have ~,~t gghshcd a wonderful pattern. NEWSWEEK/APRIL 13, lqgl 101
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330 million years ago, Rock of Ages granite was born. A gift of the earth's creatlon..,for all time. Dark, flawless, finely textured, sapphire-hard, the world's most perfect memorial granite is found only in one small spot in the world Barre, Vermont. Its name Rock of Ages granite• Born from the very process of the earth's crea tion, hundreds of millions of years ago, this granite is nature's time- less gift to all those searching for a memorial that will endure, liteF ally, forever• forever, Sealmark Rock of bear this exclu- What nature creates, crafts...intO the finest monu- ~ges memorial ments available anywhere. :without time limit. For you, and Bountiful as nature has been with futpre ge~eia~ions, there is no her granite, eighty-five percent 0f Str~nger ~ua~antee-- hat what ~t is disca ded by Rock of Ages af- t~at~re [~ag e~ated and man has ter quarrying. Only the very finest Forever. of the remaining fifteen percent is : perfect enough to be used in And it remains for man, the artg san, to craft it. At the Rock Ages Craftsman Center, perts from a[I over the world the g an te through a pa nstaking metamorphosis into exquisite memorial art.
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• ;ii~~ iii~I/I • the %..voted most signif'w.ant domestic car 1981" Readers' Choice Poll. CAR AND DRlYI~, t~A %..almost a dream car..: S VW Rabb]L Honda Accord. |o¥o~a Corolla Hotchback. aeQlers
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LIZ TAYLOR Asmashing stage debut at49 How to survive a two-career marriage
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Cinema Stolen Thoughts THIEF Directed and Written by Michael Mann 11 right, Frank (James Can) is good Aat bJs craft. And Thief deserves ca'edit for presenting a hard, cool look at how the anc2e~¢ art of ss£cctsck2ng has ndept~d itself to the latest advances in ¢lectroincs and metallurgy But if Frank is too ewaart ever te get caught in the act, the fuzz nfig~.t consider busting Mishae[ Mama's debut film for loitering with in- tent to talk existential philosophy ~tt the sc~e of tha crlme. This taleRted youn~ wriscr-dLrecLOr (~o won un Emmy with his gritty TV movie The Jelqcho Mile) has a ~dt ~r ac- tion and su'eet-suafl dial0gae But he is fa- tal/y dmvm to making big statements. And r~lmating them. Aa~ acing them out , --to make sure his poin~ has pcnetmt~ th0 mo~t thickly armored braha ha the finu~e. But all he really has to s~y is that golden oldie, haloved by people try~ag to tart up adventure storie~¢ ~ha one about a. man bream8 to get dowrL to nothing, to lOOk into the abyss of non-beha8, if ke is going to find the p~ect freedom required to ply dmagerous trades fearlessly. finds ways of translating these exist~ntinl thoughts into the argot c,f the Chicago ex-con that arc reasonably be- lle.;abl¢; and ]'ames Cae.n finds ways of i ~yhlg t~tem wlthom ¢hoklag. Ladeed. ~t the center of the film there is a fine scene whan t:rank proposes to Jessie [Tuesday Wold), a coff~-shap cashier astonished to have an offer of marrm~ on her first date with tha guy from the back booth, and to find oqt what he actually does for a living. Hero Mann gels a subtler mes- sa~p~ across, ha a scene with comedy, oi]g i~llW and dramatic power as played by two good actors. The blocdbaths that fol- low a~ flashy but e~apty excretes, pSeudotragic searchings for a big finish. much of Th/ef ~ R/¢/n~dSadtke/ They make one tired and edgy and dis- sipett~ the p~ that has energized
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In 1906 Diamond Jim Brady threw a legendary party at Belmont Park. Diamond Jim Brady knew how to show his friends a good tLme and impress his business associates. He made his parties as famous as the guests he invited. So when the summer was scorching in 1906, he direw open the doors of Belmont's Turf and Field Club and, with Lilliml Russell on his arm, he welcomed the mos~ famous faces of his era. They toasted the fi~st race with chilled champagne and feasted on the delicacies of the da3~ Eg~ stuffed with caviar. Cold pheasant. Spanish oranges steeped in claret. But extravagant food could be found at a dozen New York restau- rants. The attraction that made Dia- mond Jim's party a legend was the day of Thoroughbred racing found only at Belmont Park. In 1981 the legendary party can be yours. No one will ever forget the party you throw at Belmont Park or Aqueduct. In the private Executive programs range from $5 to $85 per person for groups of 22 or more. For complete details, call James Blunt at (212) 682-1305. Or .send in the coupon and receive your own Post Time Patty Plamaer. Two bit. Jamez Blunt T~e hrelv Y~rk Racing Association inc. ~ O. BoxgO Jamaka, New York 11417 pIc~ send me coral~lete info rmaticm e~a how mygroup can enioy a ~ay ~t Aqueduct, Saratoga• or Belmom park. Naaat Ta~ BOX or the Turf and Field Club, you and your guests can enjoy a day at [ c~ s .... z~p the races in the grand tradition of [ T~,o~ si~a~.p Diamond Jim Brady. Customized *- .......... "~ A tradition o/legendary parries. At Aqueduct, Saratoga, and Belmont Park.
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qt can'~. MuL~l u'hi(¢ meat and fena~w (h~rk mrdL dHicioush buth'r ba.,tcd (7oldi n Star Bm~eles., 7itrk(x by Armolo: ~¢s qticn as )'o~i lik~
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99% tar ~Warnmg: The Surgeon Generat Has Determined 1hat Cigerelte Smoking is Dangerous to Your Health. TM Atso available m lO0"s ctnct Bo.~ Kings and Box, l rng."~a *. 0.2 mg qico~l~e lO0's, 3 rng."ts(', 0.4 mg.n¢ozme av 3er c~g~Ie~t~ I~ F[C method
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is back. \ ll¢~mmmmR 11 BPd~CI.AY L~ 1~ 1 MGTAR 99% tar free. Also available in lO0"s and Box Kings and Bex I rag. klagr, 0.2 m~, nicotine 10[~'S. a rag,"l~T",O.4 rag. meoune av, p~r ctgaretle e~ FTC "nelhod Warnng. Ihn Surgeon Genera Mas Oe~errntned That C~gareTte SrnekJng Is Oangerous Io Your Near[r
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)( Ms. Jackson is one of a quartet of English actresses who are fdm and stage stars on both sides af the Atlmttic gets to 40 there's really nothing to stretch her in the cla~ical thoatre until she gets to g0 and can Start ¢~n the otd Shagespearlan hags. In some etarinus way the f~ that there are so few great middle-aged parts for woraen affects their standil~g in the the atre. Men of that age get to play great leaders, but hecatts¢ we don't, nobody then thinks of us as l~tder$. You can't furee ~t wrilel" to ~eate a ~-o]e he do~$D'l w~tllt to write--which is why the women's gp0ups With Waller M~tthat~ i,J ~h~ mo~ ]v Hop~olch in the theatre have h2,d Io be so n~tr~owly feminist. The theatre is stilt at its highest re~che$ a mR[e preserve" Divorced now from Roy Hodges, but still gvlng in her Blackhe~.th, London, home with a son and a sister, Glealda Incksov mauages to keep her private life just that. '*One of the good things about the Eng- lish theatre is that you can go home at night ~tfter work and tot be disturbed. In America, especially in Holtywood, all that hustling for work tn~ns that you never really get to go home at all, Bu~ I'm very happy working in Caiitornia or on Broad- way as long as 1 know it is for a limtted ~e~son and thai I'll get back Io BJacgheath afterwards." A two-time Osemr winner (for A Touch O~ CJasa nod Wo~at2 J~ LOw, ~he lazler a film for which she got barely five thousand dollars) and the holder of countless stage awards, Glenda /aekson hes a simple working philosophy: "I won't work just to pay ol~ the tax I can only do a ~lm or a play i~ 1 reagF like I6 the script. Acting is hard enough, Ood knows, when you are doing wfiat you think is right for you. It" you think/t may he tile wrong script, then it gets really Lml~sible to do. ~e older I get, the morn eollvincod I am that the best perforlflan~ ttr¢ the ones you give before you know what can go wron~ The older you get, the more terrifying it all bec~me*. "In Britain they all pay llp service to the company ideal, but d~ down the old star system still operat*s and you get one or two peopin earryin~ a show while the r~t avoid much respo~siMlity for its succets or failure. There's ~thl ~ great b¢- I~ that you shouldn't show how much yo~ cla'e, how mush ~e the/re m~tters In you, sca sort of apathy ~t~ in and actors in a long rut* tend lust to turn up for a co~ple of hours i~ the evening and think that they've dmae the job. 'q worry about the future gc~eralip, Ihough ~o¢ much about my ~tm'e. 1 ]usl go on doing films anti plays that I like awl if they work out, well that's fate. If laot, on to ~he next. You ean~: v~orry about r~- viewsI at ally r~.te itoI film ~vlew~. ~f they are had, theft it's a delayed wake; if good, {hen ~. distanced eeie/~ratioa. Either way they are not going to ehang~ a $ingl~ frame of the piettlre. Theatre r~'clews ar~ dif- ferent, and you kind of itope they are goixlg to b~ o0~strttctive or useful inst~d of th~ boring old t~td-of -t erln reports that most papers shil publish." Ms, J ~tekson's fortqer htmhand once said of herin"If she gad gou~ into politics, shffd I~ow be Brimln's Prin~ Minister. If she h~d taken to crtnl~, she would be Jack the Ripper?' More ~haritably, one might add that in Hollywood 30 years ago, she'd have been B~tt¢ Da'cis. And, of ¢~ourtic, tod~y she's Rose. For somebody who ~tar ted out in th¢~ theatre 20 y~ars ago on $20 a week, the daughter of a Bitheahe~l bricklayer, G]eoda Jacgson can't be said to be doing tc~ badly. Sheridan Mo~l~y ~ 1ha Zondon drama cr~Iie of Punch and Ihe [nt~ationsI Herahl Trib- une 31t~ sixth blog~ghy, {~ud¢ Law- r,~nce, ha~ ]~t been g~blishe~ ilt Net,~ york by McGraw H~I~
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LETTERS n,., it's a ferrwilnous 1 enjoyed "Great Moments in the Out- doors," in your December issue, hut one of/be photographs shows what the author calls a peregrine falcon, Tile bird is not even a falcon, much less a per¢~rlne. The angle is difficult for identlficedon, hilt my guess is it is an immature redtall hawk or. second choice, a female marsh hawk.--Phil Cartier, New York, New York. (You are in the right ballg~rne hut the wrong inning. Tge bird was not. as you correcg} state, a peregrine falcon. It was an adult ferruginous hawk. The O~JTDOOR L4FE design department used 1he ~vrong pkatagraph to go with that piece of writing. Magazines are put rngether by fallible pe~q~le.-Tom Brakefield.) Cowardly garbage 1 am wrding because of the outrage felt after reading the letter titled "Thrill foc Cowards" in the December 1980 issue, What a misinformed, dang slinging, pitiable person he must he tc write such garbage. AS an avid. conscientious hunter, I hunt mainly to he out in the woods. [ have been hunting deer for nine yea~ and have yet to get one. But 1 will con tinue to bu~, my big-game license each gear The thrill involved in hunting is in stalking prey and, if successful, know- ing you have put food on the family table. That's nothing to he a~hamed of. No hunthr I know grins mathaeallg *rid drools at the thought of killing The foolish author of the letter should understand one thing: Hunting has survived for centuries and will cun- tinue to survive, Tomorrow morning bright and early Yll he out hunting, enloythg and respecting my surround- ings The writer of that letter, however, would rather watch all of us "bleeps" being shot down by a firing squad.-- C.R. Johnson, Jamestown New YorL k's l'a q nma 1 have just finished reading "Animal Rights" by Richard Stames in your January 1981 issue, and I am raging mad~ No, I am not mad at OUTDOOR LIP~e nor at Mr Starncs hut at Dr Michael Fox and his stinking ideas! 1 was particularly angry when I read about coo-guerrilla tactics The fact that these people are destroying deer stands, as well as mining our hunting seasons, v, as hard for me to swallow. Do hunters ~nd fishermeD go to their meetings and bust up their property? Should we lace thtir sidewalks with repellent to keep dogs and cats away? 1 hope sportsmen crack down on the pen- pie and nag them to the ground before they seriously hurt hunting and fish- ing.--Mark Basge. lm I have just finished re-reading "1 Was a Big Time Poacher" in the April 1977 issue of OUTDOOR LIF£. and it made my blood boil Commercial market hunters are slaughtermg game in several states. notably Texas and Michigan, These criminals kill for money, shooting doz- ens of deer in a single night or trapping waterfowl by the thOUsands. Once again we hunters must speak out to stop this grisly slaughter. This means ]on~ p/Json te~r~s, ~ol fines. Fining a commercial poacher several hundred dollars is nothing. He will only kill and Sell more game animals to make up the diffe~nce. We need m make our elected t~ffi cials recognize that killing animals for money is a serinus crime On November 4th we elected a pres- ident who is a welhknown supporter of sputa hunting and long time member of the NRA He also has a Cong~ss will- ing to support him. It will take tbe American spo~sman, however, to get the hall rollthg, Ware youF congi'cssnlan, your senaIol'~ your govemoL and the President and let them know that you support prison terms for these goons.--Craig Caftan, Cheyenne, ~V~oming. A gReat investment l have been a reader of Ou3"Doo~t Lira since 1 was a bey hack in the 1940s. Jack O'Connor was my idol as far as gun articles were concerned, and I must say Jim C armiebel is doing a fine job in that poslnorI. Recently I purchased a subscription to Otr/lx~R LIFE for my son Jeff• He s I4, and I must say I ~ever made a better investment in my life. When his copy arrives, it's really a treat to watch him. It's almost like taming the clock back to when I was a boy. Keep up the good work. We enjoy T the magazln¢ and each and every za'd cle in it.--Don Duncan. Halifax, Nova Scotia. kSt im ml ! read with great interest your article '.22 Rimfire: The ALl-Round Light- weight" (December 1980), Shooting magazines publish stories on the .22 almost every year. but this one is by far the best I have seen. Congratulations on a fine magazine. and especiaLly on your articles b'~ Jim Carmiehel.--William B. Thomas, At lama, Georgia. Iml eta tM Imal Haying just completed my cover-to- cover readitig of the January OUTDOne. LWE, 1 am compelled to write to you. My mind is ~eelnig wfih mixed emo- tions. 1 am outraged over poaching. thrilled after having been on a hunt for • Alaska browns, shaking from a brush with a "Buff" in the Afrtean hush, and mellowed by the thonght of the debt I owe my parents and the years of super- lative reading that OUTDOOR LIFE has given me. I wish that all your readers cnnid have the memories that hunting and fishing and just being in the outdoors have given me. My dad started me on a love affais with nature before 1 was eight years aid. He look me with him into the woods after whitetails and small game and began teaching me their habits. He showed me how to han- dle firearms with respect. He taught me the rules of fair chase, and l came to love and respect this ancient heritage. He died when 1 Was 12. and I sup- pose my In'co of the ot~tdoors would have too if my mother hadn't steppod in. She got a hunting license so I could hunt (our state required a minor to be aecnmpamed by an a dufilicensee), She saw to it thai I didat miss a chance to bu~t pfiessaD~ because she wear ~ith ixle. I commend O~'roooR Lt~E for allow- ing us to hunt with the best aU over the world, and to experianee through our imaginations the trips we can ne~er take. 1 thank you for your efforts to remind us al of the dan ei'~ to our her tage. Take pride in the ~2ct that among your readers ale those whose love of life and wildlife can only be enlarged through contact with your magazlne.-- S*ephen A. Shover, Whitesboro, New York. 10 Ot'TDOOR LIFE
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99% tar free Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Oangerous to Your Health. Also available in lO0"s and Box ~Jll 0 S and BOX. ] glg,"tar", 0.2 rag, nicotine: lO0's, 3 mg."Car", 0.4 rng. nicotine av, per c garutle by FTC method.
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The $150 Million Cigarette Troubled Brown & Williamson Tel: ccois betting ' its future on a new brand• by ARTI40R M. LOUIS Th~ Brown & William~la Tobac~ Corp is eng~ed in one of the mosl dra- t~atic business gambles of moderD times¸ Plagued by a suoce.~sion of m~rketing fail ~lres, it i~ risking an efl~rmous amount of mo~ey on a single ne'~ product, an ultra-low-tar cigarelte called Barclay, in- troduced early in September. II [~arclay succeeds, it will give Brown & Wllliamson a Badly r~eded )ease oR Ii~ it Barclay ~lls, it cotlld he th~ cotnpa~y's I~st try at Competitors estil~ate that BrowB & Williamson will spend $150 million tc~ ~d- vet tis~ and promote tSar<lay--a slaggering Sum, eveII Ln lh¢ fi~rtely ~ol~petitive to bacco industry. Until now, a $60-mii/ion R~tear( h asac~iat¢ Li~a Miller .~Aesda~ ouday has been tops foe launching a new cigarette. I3rm~m & WilliamsQ~x officials suggest lhat the figure is ~'~ bit on [he high side,¸¸ though they won't be more specih~. Brown & Wlliiam~m, whose olln~r brand~ include Kool, Viceroy, Raleigh, and [h~]~ir, devised a prc~motional gim- ro&k Ihat puts Barclay Jn ~ cla~s by i fs~l£ Ma~uf~c[ur~ep5 comr~on]y pa~s o~t tr~e ~cks ~q~co i~tro~uci~ ~ ci~ret~e, blt~ Bgc~V has become [he ill'st tO pass out tr~ c~r~ns Through mid-Oclober, any- one interested h~d ol~ly to call a toll-free telephone n~mber alld state t~e n~l~qe of h[~ present bral~d. B~ ret'arn i'nall he r/,- (ei~ ed a co~.pon rede~mable ~t any retail out]et for u $6 carton of Barc]ay. B&W Calls t~ pr~mot ~o~ •*a ~re~t success," a~d say8 it may be resutfled. TBe¢~ ate Some 54 million smokars ir~ the U g, and if a quarter of thorn ~sk for a fre~ cartDrt Of 8arclay--a real ppssibillty if the promo- tion coDtinues--the company's cost would be close tel $80 rail[ion, on top of tens of millions of dollars to advertise Bar- clay in 18 natJon*~] m~gazines and most major newspapers, Right now the ciga- rette is being tested maildy in tile Mid- wesL and the company has the option of aborting Barclay if pufiIic interest in free carLons isn't followed by an inlerest in bnying the brand. Despite all flxe ballyhoo mad bravado, Brown & Williamsol~ has lately played the iole of errant child to a prosperous parez~t. Based in Louisville, it is a sub-
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The booming market for ultra-low-tar cigarettes may find room for 22 brands by next year. $idiary of the largest cigarette producer in the l~on-Comnaunist ,a.orld, BAT In- ¸ dustries Ltd., forlxle~ly British American Tobal~0. a Lol~don-based company with annual r~vel~Ues exceeding $15 billion. about $15 bilHon of lhose revenues, has conslstently boiched il~ new-product fo- trodu~ ~ion~, alul its share of the t~t~n/estic market has beE!n decllrti~g steadily for the pds~ ~ll ~II~. Th.. COtTl~ly tlO'~¸ makes fewer than 14% of the cigarettes consu toed in the U,S., placing it a distant third after R~. Reynolds and Philip Morris. each of which hold~ more than 3D% of the marL~ The outsized proI~otion of Barclay is vlewed as BAT's final, desperate attempt to reverse the decline of its subsidia~, B&W has continued to be pro~table exact/y how prch~ta~le ~s a cor~pany se- ¢retr alad il is not th danger of im~edlate death, i~u~ it could fade away t~ward noth- fog ov~t ~ period of years, much as the once-proud L~ggett & Myers tobacco op- e~al~t~ ~em$ ~o be doing Competitors say th~ Barclay prolvtolio~ is bold to the p~int of folly, but they ac- knowledge that Brown & Williamson is at leastmand at las~--puttirtg it~ money where the action is. WhiIe total cigarette Sales have raraalned virtually sta~naItt ~n recent year~, the nlilrket for ultr~a~[~w-tar clgarett~s has b~n~.ed, Barclay i~ B&W's first ultra low-tar producl, making the compal~y the lasl to bring one 1o lx~arket. It wa~ beater~ rto~ ollly by R~ync~/ds and Philip Morris, but ~lso by American To- bacco, which i~ No. ~! in the industry; Lor- illard, which is NO 5; and Ligge~l & Myers, which ranks a mlcrosco~i¢ sixth with a voarket ~hare Of less than 3%. A cheerin~ reprieve The ultra-low-tar boon~ dates from a specifi~ time and cause. Ir~ Augtlst 1978, Gio B. Gorl, then deputy director of the National Ca~tcer ]nstitut¢'~ causes-an~ prevention d/vision, discussed wi~h the Ass~-iated Press a ~tudy of cigarettes he bad uvtdertaken with Cornelius J. Lynch, a ~ta~i~tician. Gori ~nd Lynch [lad con- 122 ~ORSUNE ,~r~ Iz ~o eluded that cigarettes yleldfog the lowest q~antities o~ toxic ~ubskaltces rtot ortly l~r~ bu~ also nicotine, carbon tTtono×id~, hydrogen cyanide, nitrogen oxlde% and a~ro]e~n ~uld be ~t~oked in laaodecate ~lot/rRs wilhout ~rtous dal~el to th~ smoker's health. The AP'S ~count ~f thi~ study, picked up by newspapers through- out the country, ~as read as a ch~'erlng re- prieve by cOUl~tles~ smokers. ~1 had beert comraon~)¸ ass/2r~/ed that ~,~r~ the/Tt J]tJe~ cigarettes pr~sed a signif&al~t health haz- ard. I~u~ here was a quasi-tul&ial source, with nc~ ties Io the tobacco industry, sug- g~est[t~g thai certain ~igal~ttes were tea- Sol~al2~y ~afo. God and Lynch named names¸ ~f~ey cited Amedca~ Tobacco's Carlton brai~d and Reynolds's Now brand as the safest, and sales of these brands ~urged. Abo~t 400 ~Jl~r~ pack~ of Ca~t~x~s had bee~ Sold in 1977; this year foe figure may reach 850 millior~ In the same period, Now has riser~ from 140 million p~cks an. nuaIly to an estimated 250 r~illion. These gains were achieved even ~s other pnan~ ufactulels rushed to market wlth their o~l uI~r~ low-tar bl~nds, No 1~$ thart 16 encompassing 39 var~ar~ts--are~ither on the I~arke~ Or in la~. Cori wa~ denounced by meixthers of the heal~ establishment for seetnirtg to Condone smoking, but he has managed tt~ push srt~okers in what he consider~ the right direcllon. "5~nce the public per- sists in smoking cigarettes and other to~ bacc~ products," he has argued, "the o~y course oi actiDn ~s b9 develop less hazb ar dous cigarettes." The industry do~sn'l a,gree on wha~ qu~lules as an u~tra-low tar cigalette. The term usually applies to cigarettes yieldin~ no more than fi.ve ot six rn ~lligl-an*t $ of tar when burned down to the nub irt smok- ilag n~acfones. From a commercial sland- pt~int, a lot d~pends on w~ter~ one dra~vs the llne between "very low tar" and '~l- tra low tar?" R J, Reynolds insists that cig- arette~ yielding six milligrams ~>r less belong in the ultra-low-lar category, whil~ Lorillard contends th, at the upper limit should be twe milligrams. ~y either ~ef- inition, the new Barclay brand lies safely within the pale. I~ com~s in two varianl$ an 85-millimeter yielding one milligram of tar, and a 100-milli~eter yie]dfog t tu'ee milllgr~Tts ~/halever else the cigarette ~mkei~ ~ay be. they ~re unabashedl.v me~r it- If one ~ccepts the R~ynolds definitionm which would be properly reverential since Reynuld~ is the industry leader--the ul- tras ~o~¢ ac~m~l ft)r about 9% of ~l £igz arette sales, up irom around 1% in 197Z Gerald ~. Gong, the e×ec~t~ve vi¢~ pres- iden~ in charge of marketing at Reynolds, eslimate~ that the ultras will capture 11.3% of the 1oarkol ite×t year. but he Won't pro- ject beyond that. "We project 18 months ahead every six mor/tbs," he observes, ,,and w~'v~ had to ilacr~ase the flgulcs twice th~s year/' I~ is ~r~ axiom ~f the business that a brand c~n surviv~ o~ly ~f ~ capt~ares at least one half of 1% of the total cig- arette m~rket within a year or t~co--or volume of ~ovae 150 million packs an nually ll lakes that many to keep tlxe dis- lrthutor~ inte~ted and to itadu¢~ ¢~ough retailers to display a braFtd on their shelves, If the ultras do captu~ 11,3% of the market new year, there will theo- retically be room for 22 b~ands~six more th~n aL pres~Itt Too muchl too early The ultraqow~ar marke~ is by no mea~s ~wenly d~strib~ted among the var ious brands. Carlton, with a 27% share of the total cig~retle rl~arket, ¢arrently ac- cot/t~ts for naar]y one ~)~ of every thr~ ul- tras sol~, while Now (0.8%) ranks second, Some n~wer brands have found it dil- l/cult 1o ~ompete with these entreIach~<l fa- vorites. Cambridge, inlrod~ced five monLhs ago by Philip Morrls, was r~ ce~tly ~truggllng along with a market share of 0.3%, despite some $50 rtlilli~l~ of advertising and pro~a~otloi~. ~We could have brought out Cambridge thr~ years ago," says James J. Morgan, the executive vice president for marketing, "t~ut we d~d~'t want to until the category expand- ed enough ~o make it worth~ hil~ It Iook~ cantinue~
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Not surprisingly, there has been considerable upheaval in the executive ranks. as though we might not have waited long enough." Philip Morris hopes to do much better with another new brand, Meril Ultra-Lites, Currenlly being ~ested in Des M~il/~s and Sacramento, it will feed off the r~putation of the hlagely successful Merit line, which has captured 4% of the market since its $50 nlillion introduction ill 1976. Till now, the brand's eight to ten milligrams of tar have placed it above the ultra-k~w-tal category Despi~e the ~obering realltles, Brown & kVil]iamson says it won't be satJsfied with Iess than 11 quarter/If all ultra low- tar sales, and it e~pet !s to Jlo[d on to that proportion as ~he market glows¸ That's big talk from ¢ ,on/pany with less than 14% of cigarette sales¸ Practically all its brands have participated in the company's relentless dedlne irt market share. Kool jazz B&W is still reeling horn two enor- mously expensive marketing hops, both in the very-low-tar category. "fl]e first was Fact ill fa~t, Fact hopped twice. It '~as Erst brought out in 1976, and after a bulst of initial enthusiasm it slumped to a mar- ket share of less than 0.2% It was with dlawn, relormulaled, repackaged, and released again in 1977. Now it is gone tgain, probably lur good. Part nf the prob em was the advertising. The tens of mil- ons worth of advertising dwelt on Fact's ability to fiker out gases, hut evidently smokers are worried not about gase~ but about tar and nicotine The latest flop is a menthM bl~nd called Alctic Lights. It came out in August 1979 in two sizes, 85 millimeter and 1130 mi[ limeter, and under heavy promotion al ta[n~d a peak market shale of just 0,2%. With that share now halved, the cigarette seems doomed A former vice president of B&W says he opposed launching Aic- tie [ights, because they seemed Ion slm- liar to other menthol brands. You really have Io wonder about Brown & Wi[llan~son's marketing acumen The company decided this year to sponsor tile Newport Jazz Pesliva], succeeding the Jo seph Schlitz Brewing Co, which had sponsored it since 1966 B&W made a large contribution, and the festival was re named the KOQI Newport Jazz Festival, in honor of the ¢orrtpallv's best-selling brand. Neww)rt, of course, is also the name of a popular cigarette produced by gorillard so it enjoyed a free ride at B&W's expense. NDI surprisingly, there has been con- siderable upheaval in Brown & Wiltiam- son's executive vdnks. In the past four years Ihe company has llad three pres- idenls, three vice presidents for brand management, and two vice presidents for marketing The company's hopes now rest maildy on the shoulders of the latest marketing v.p., Scott A. Wallace, 38, who is in charge of the Barclay venture. A zlative of Pitts- burgh, with degrees fronl Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, he canto to B&W last February from Swift & C~, where he had launched several suc- cessful new products, among them Soup Starter and Sizzhan, a low calorie bacon substitute He ro~e to become president of Swift's consumer-products division, but was demoted after his division merged with another one. Six weeks after his demotitm he ioined B&W. Despite his delr/otil)n~ his former superiors salute ]/it]] as "brilliant" and "an intellecma]." Says art ex-colleague, "At Swift, pricing vari ations arc" a day to-day preoccupation, ~hereas tobacco is bought months in ad- vance, costs are known, and profit mar gills are large { hough to give considerable leeway Scott's skills are conception and conceptualization" He is said to be out standing at pronlotiort. He also happens to be a heavy smoker. Wallace and his colleagues insls{ that Brown & Wil[iamson has found the r{ght combination in Barclay The clgal~'tte's nanle is n]eant In surest "quality," and {o appIa] In people in the nfidd]e and upper classes the better-educated smok- ers who are most likely to buy ultra low- tar brands. "Our research showed that there were tw!~ needs not being nlet by the other u hi~-low-lal cigarettes" one ex- ecutive remarks. "No 1, those cigarettes are hard to draw, and No. 2, they do not provide a satisfying taste, halday meets t~th these needs." The company under- scores this theme with its advertising slo- gan; "The pleasu re is back." Many smokers who try the ultra-low- lar cigarettes find them tasteless--while demanding an effort that is enough to cause "facial hernia" The biters and pa per used tor uhra-low-tar cigarettes are highly porous, and the smoker does take in mote wind than sn]nke. Shepard P Pol- lack, president of Philip Morris USA., lik ens their taste to a cocktail containing one part Scotch and 99 parts water One variant oi the Cambridge brand yields less than 0.1 milligram of tar, and a note on " the package warns that the smoker can ex- pect a "different" experience a cigarette with little taste that may prove difficult to light But Brown & Williamsou, with- out divulging how, claims to have licked the problems of taste and draw. (An in- formaI survey among smokers at FORTL NE suggests that Ihe <ompany may indeed have done just that.) Cryptic boast The Barclay advertisements don't stress the brand's tar content which in itself is a radical departure While most ultra low tar ads buIge with tables and statistics, Brown & Willlamson simply declares: "99% tar f re~." The meaning of the phrase is ob~'ure, and several B&W competitors confess themselves stumped by it. It se~ms to suggest that a typical cigarette yields 100 milligrams of ear, sil~ce the lowest tar Barclay "yields one milliglam, but no cigarette even approaches the 100- milligram level Asked to explain, a B&W officer replied, "One percent or less of the smoke drawn from the cigarette is tar." Given that clue, the advertising claim makes sense, al- though no other cigarette company has ever thnught to measure tar in this odd way. Seeking e~ery edge over the com- p~ {ilion, B&W has chosen to stress the ab- sence of tar, nl)t its presence. Although it is a slender thread on which to hang a company, it just might work. [] FORTUNE ~bv~'~ fZ !~3 125
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BARCLAY 99% tar free. AlSO awduble tz lO0's and Box ,( J
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TO CATCH K,L,E severe mauling by a grizzly each year. Some vie'tiros died, some didn't. Spoon and fli~perCOmbi. nafunthat ~oi~sDead~ f~r coh~ chin~k, lake trout ~ndsteelhe~d Fishes dee with a deadly wobbling acti NickelorGoldFl~or~cent~r~ el/NeDn 81o~ ~, ~ and ~ oz. pROUFDENCE. tc~le ~ R102907 Why the increase in ariacks? Bob Hinman. deputy dffector ot~ the state game division, thinks it is a matter of numhets, • "Alaska's broWrdgrizzly population is probably at its highest ia several decades." he said. Alaska's human population also is iltcreasing There ave more visitors each year¸ "With more peopie in the woods. and mine bears, the~ is more chance fur interaction." Hinman added. The impact of current game-man- agement practices and hunting a]so may have trlggcred more attacks. Most of the huge old bea~ with nine and 10- fun1 hides have been killed by hunters. leaving a growing population of yo~a- get apimal~, This gives more bunters a chance to tsh¢ a bear. and a sevep or eight-foot bide is a nice trophy. But young hears aremore thisty tkan otd fines and more likely to attack. Carl Williams. who lived with Alaska's brown bears for 40 years (see "My 40 Years with Bears". OUTDOOR LIFE. February 1980) believes young bears are like human teenagers-- they have to prove themselves. The National Park Service (NPS) is concerned about the safety of visitors to Alaska's parks, while also wanting vlsilors t~) h~ve maximum opportuni- ties Io See bears, John Cook. NPS area dboctor fur Alaska. proposed regu]a finns for Alaska's ne'.vparks that wouId allow visdors to carry ~rcarms for pro- tecdon from bears¸ This is a break from past NPS policy. Even ~oday visitors Io Alaska's new national monuments me advised by rangers to carry firearms. The park ~ervthe has reason In wo~ ry. There have been 13 known attacks by grizzlies in Motmt McKinley Na- tional Park in 60 years, and nine of these occurred since 1971. The attack increase i~ linked¸with a tremendous increase in visitors¸ In 1971 about 44.500 people visited¸ McKinthy; in 1979 there were 251,000. Two killings by hears have t~ken place in Alaska's Glacier Bay National Monument¸ in ~976 a grizzly killed Alan Precup. a 25-year old Illinois camper. His partly eaten body was found after a fuur-day search. In July 1980 a young black hear th the Monument apparently killed and ate Thomas Shulz. a 27 year old camp er from Juneau. Rangers killed the bear. but they could find no abnormal- ifie~ ~bout the a~imal. Ignorance was largely responsible for some recent bear maulings Most persons who were mauled bad no expe- rience with wild bears. Many are city- drnd and wer~ raised on Disney's nature pap. Idealistic youngsters from almost any city in the nation can put together a pack, and in a few hours the v ~an fly to McKinley Park or elsewhe~ in Alaska where wild ~Szzlies are the dominant Species. Crowd a bear to get a better picture and you:re likely to get slapped with a clawed paw. If you hike in thick brash you may surprise an old gsiz; grid it may react by slapping you down• park hears can't be hunted, so they have little fear or respect fur man. They learn that there is food in packs, teats. and ears. Rangers in McKithey Pad~ had to shoot a sow in July ] 980 when it repeatedly tore into tents for food. D~', Fred Dean, leader of the Alaska Cooperative Park Studies Unit at the Ualveralty of Alaska since 1972, out- Iliind this common park situation: '~You're backpacking in bear countt3' and a hear threatens or charges. Your first reaction is to drop the pack and climb a tree or give the bear something to chew on besides you. The bear digs "[ held my breath until I almost passed out, playing dead, while the beat" chewed on my back." into tl~e pack and finds food. What is thai bear going to do the next tinle he encoun!crs a backpacker?" Dr. Dea~ agrees that there probably wilI¸ be an thcrease in bear attacks th Alaska. He thinks that most of the attacks will occur in new parks because park hears have little fear of humans and because most visitors wl]l head fur those parks. In 1955 while researching an article on A fiLsha ' S browll bears for O UTDOOIg L~ ("The Shy Killer" October 1955), [ found only one rebabth report of a brown bear eating a human body, and that was a man who drowned mid washed ashore¸ Since 1974 1 have added to my flies five eases of Alaska boats eating ththr victims. Two were grizzlies, two were black bears, and one was either a black or a grizzly. In August 1974 Jay 18. Reeves Jr, a 3g-year-old postal employee and area- mur photographer from Anchorage, Alaska, flew to Cold Bay, headquarters fur the nearby Izembek National Wild- life Refuge. There he asked refuge manager Bob Jones and his assislanl ilL3 I)I~R I IFE
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99°7o tar free. BARCIAY • The pleasure is back. t~,l,~l,,n ! Waning Tt, e Su'qeon Geneal Has [elermlned ,' ~ ! T~at £~garett¢ Smok rg Is Oaqg~rous IOYOUr Heahh .4{~'o ,ivl,'ilubte m I00 ~ ~md tI,J~ ~ ....
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TV Movie GukJe 1SATURDAy ~:~0 AM. (9] "~HUNm O'WIER I~AINS" 0Nestgrn) Randolph $~¢ttt. R:C~ A,M. (6) "ISlG FOOT.--MAN OR It, EAIrr?" ~, (Speeula~on~ 10;00 k,M (e) "bll~CfY 40~ yO¢~O" Use thl~ gutde to plan your~,,eak's v~-~c~r6~ C0mp~e defat/~ are in • ~. It'~ mg~ar lisinRs CablesubSc bets 'p{~O, ShowtJme =tn~ WF~r pay-T,/ movies =re Ln tl~e Pa¥-TV G~ide On page A-16, • 11:35 p,M. (1~ ~11HE PURSUIT O~ , II~PP'.NBSS" ~. (DraJna) iCdche41 ~arra=n. Barbara !~ ~hW. ArthuT Hill, Flulh WhLt~. • . 11:4~ p,M, (2) "114E UIPO IkiClDF.Hr" (O:am~) EStelIe parlons. JamWa Earl ~, J or,~. Bsmard Hughee. 12;00 mi(t (S) 'lIX44¢f ~ A M~DMAI¢' ScOtt. i~bara 8litton, Gnbml ROISP~, Q~'ema) Ingrld ~llgnmn, Anthony f=er- kinCyvmsMon~nd, Fe~r~ut;. 1:16 A,M. 17) "M/d~YJANE" (Dasm~ Fabian, D(ane Mc~a(n. Patty McC, o~m~ck. HOUSEWIFE', (Ortcm~l Carrie Sr~odg{~ R]cl~t(~ Ben~4min, Ff'iSRK Lsrl~8~, Flair hie Mi. rile1. LC, t~dne CUlleR, I.(*e Ad~o,lts. ZOO AM. (It) "THE IB~IN 11rlAT WOUt.n~'T BE" ~ 0"hdller) J~,Or, Eveq, V~rginit Lehh. Leslie DenieI. 8:4S A.M. (;9 "I'~/IEI, C~f pLUS T,f/O" ~ Craln, Olna M~r rill. A,M. (41) '~ I&SS, E" (IDr~Tna) Lilia pr~o~ Jc~¢~ub~ C.Drder ~, FIof SlNle,~lt r e, Aido MO:ltl, 11:00 A.M, ,(~= *"r~ZAI/A/~ THIE SLAVE . row. ~ ~d~r,~t~) L~X ~rkm, Var, ea~ 1 ~:30 .&.l~ {~1~ "L.rr'rLE Gl~tN2" 8~ d,:~c~. J~(oe,Vn,s da Wit. Eft~(lr~rl C~wa¢ Witd*, ,~nn~Yer ~((. ff:antasy) Te~ M(~ore, Ben Johr~soh, "(Th.illee) V}r¢4ht price, ChrJ= W~r- ~oberl &rmslfollg. Fratlk Mg~ugh. fl(dd, Nlncy KoVick. 1:0o P,M. ~9) ~I;OC~ILLA "v~k MEGALON" 12:~ A.M. (11Q ~MO'J]!~ y/Op~ T~,. (S~a~Qe P,~Jon) Kab~hJ~m F.e~kl, tMmwc~d) Betty Grable. ~ Ceils./, Hil oyuld ~',av=a#~. YUlaka Heyasl~;. - Mona ~, yan~sa Browf~. 1:30 PM. (4] "IT~AIL OF "~lll WILD" ",:00 ~M. (4t) "m. CAP~TAN K~O" (Docum~san~ 1:~0 P M (S) "ILOOO ON ~ SUN" (~rem~ Jern~ C,~gnsy, syh.~ Sides't. W~l~ce Ford, Robert Axrna~ron~a,, ~arne) Chertes Laughton. Randolph Scoff, Bsrbam Br~ffon, ~l~tbe~ RoUnd, 4:00 p.M. (SO) '~JMNGLE ~IGI.mZR$" 4~ ~ Fl~h=(rd T~dd. La~ fence Pt~lr. vey, Richard H~lrr ts. ~3~ P.~, (4fI "KE~f4E~" (O~nlla) Ulil~ ~= fsd¢~, JOllq uift Cord~ro, F~or ~llt.~st re, AIC(O MOnlL e~O0 P.M. (tr~ '~OMMAND OI.ClSlOW' ~ (Or~nta) Cl~rk Q~b(e, W~Ltm pk~n, V~I Johnson, Bnatt OOnk~y, Ch=d~ Bfckfor~. John Hodlak. 8130 P.M. ('~1) "trEy LARGO~ (Orams) Humphrey Bogl~rt. Edwar~ G. Robir t SO~, Laulen Bac~dl. (l)ramBI WIIllmm ;(at~ ~n De)', .toh.t f~rd, E, evedy D'AnQelo, 9~00 p M. IS0) "THE LON~MNESS OF THE LOI~i O~S'rANCE RUNNEr (D~ama) T~m Couri~. Mi~hne~ Red- ¢~Pave, ~.'~ts B~lnjg~, 11:30 P.M, ~ "n~E ~¥ CD4sr' (Crim~ Dr~m~) Oermls COI~, Witliara GSOr ge. C;larlr~/T~dmaN. pARK., V&nt. Richar(~ Bright, Klel Marbn. A-IO ~/GUIDE
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No. 9 in a 8erles KRAFT'S AFTER SCHOOL T.V. SNACKIN' DIP KIT . Sur prise you~ children. Pretend they're company. Say things like, "How nice to see you," and =May I take your . coat?" • . Fluff the pillows on the couch. ~n on tl~e~ fa- vorite program. Bring out one of I~ra~'s seven Ready-to-Serve Dips, Crean~, Cucumber is ab '~ solutely ~far out" with a plate of tempting vegetables. . Look for signs of shock. Clean rooms. Combed hai~ -7~ ~To~is~ like "Pleas e"aud "Thank yoN" It'D. take them weeks to i~eoven Delicious dips for tastier T~.
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Thepleasure is back. ~TNle~WTCa 99 % tar free. ~'aming; lhe Surgeon General I'las Determined That Cigaretze Smokm9 Is Oaz~gerous loYour Health. AIso available in IQO's and Box longs an~ tlo~, 1 ta~ "~ar', 0.2 r~g rm©~14ne 106"¢ a mg 'l~t" 04 al9. alvin av. ~r alga;else b¢ FfC mezh~ff
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PIONEER SYSCOM, FOR THOSE WHOSE LOVE IS MUSICAL, NOT TECHNICAL. Fina/ly, the music-lovers of our world can have the wonders of great music without the complexity of great hi-fi. Pioneer, the leading maker of high fidelity components in America, has created a system for you. It's.called SyscomP yfor ~ystem was both r Pioneer engineers, you can't make a mistake. (c ~peakers. Syscom even comes with its own specially designed cabinet. So it's as easy to look at as it is to listen to. There are seven Syscom systems to choose from. One is perfect for your budget, your roomr your music. For the name of the Pioneer Syscom dealer nearest you, call us at 800-621-$19~°It'lI be the bcginning of a new love. * ci. nIiaois 800.972 5855I Ncadphone, mleropho.e ~nd di~t al ar~r DFClenaL ® P=ONEEr=" Wc bring it back alive.
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~ ~ BARCLAY 99% tar free. | MQTAR Also available in lO0's and Box Warning: The Surgeon Ceneral Has Oalermined That Cigarette Smelting Is Dangerous to Your Health.
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youths, Economists Thomas Sowell and Walter Williams. both blacks, argue that the miblmum wage has grossly increased unemployment among blacks, flawell notes that until lhe minimum wage be- gan rising sharply in the rnid*1950s, teenag~ unemployment was /ower among blacks than whflas--aoul has been going up steeply for blacks ever since. Williams adds that if youngsters could be hired at wages below the minimum, Ihey would glofi critically important opport ubltlos ~ loam job sloi]s. ~. Combat p,eo~l@nlgnfl° So long as lhe governmellt 0on- t fauns to resist Inn auto induslry's calls for higher tariffs or im- port limits on Japanese cars, the consumer will continue to have Ifla widest choice of cars at list price or less. If quotas were clamped on, foreign ear dealers would add premiums to their prlces~ They did that in 1979. when Hondas were in short supply, and prices scooted up $400 per car. With the im- port prices risfag, Amerloan manufacturers then added around $200 to the price of their small cars. Domesllo steel prbles have jumped 32% since "trigger" price rules were put en imports in 1978. Tiffs has raised pllces for cars, appliances and other producls using steel. Eliminating the triggers would reduce those inflationary pressures and in- crease jobs in steel using industries. While Iflat might also raise unemployment slightly among sleelwotkers~ they should be re- irained rather than kept in their present jobs by spreading in- flation throughout the economy. Along with all these measures, Congress should cut busi- ness and personal taxes from their discouragingly high loveis. That would reduce almesl everybody's personal inflation in de×. There is strenuous debate over which taxes should be eu~ how milch arid when, hut Xoweffa~ bu$ine~ laxe$ Fctroa~tive to .fan. I should have top priority¸ Tax nuts that encourage fa- vestrflent help improve productivity and thus work against in- flation, as the ardcle on page 98 argues. Though Amerlcans seem willing to be patient in seeking a so- lution to inflation, a long spell with liltle progress could boost suplxarl [cr malldabory wage alld prble eornrol~. They seen~ at~ tranllve because lflay appear to spread ~acrifla¢ cverdy through- nut society. In practice, they hurt th~ bro~] majority. Governments always gl'ant L~emeFgellcy" e):¢~ ffllollS, and [bl3sc with political clout are most likely to berlefit. M~3reover~ Amer leans learned in 1974 that when controls are removed, prices ex- plode with even slronger force¸ A continued combination ef both high inflation and a slug- gish economy might eventually lead to calls for even greater gov#'rllment in [el*refit ion~ perha~ e'~en n a[ionfdization o~ $q01flc industries to protect jobs, To see where that leads, one need only look at the bllflans that have been poured into Brlltsh state- owned indl~stry witll s~ch ~rry r esulEs. The ~0ain of th~se afflicted by faflalinn-curblng cutbacks will be immediate and the political reaclion will be swift. But rath- er than drift afang with the chronic low-level pain and grow- ing danger of ever-higher inflation, Americans should accept the temporary sacrifices that nan reduce inflaliorl and a[low the economy to resume healthy growth¸ [] q6 MONEY Ifomcowne13 Fo~d- s~p t~ipien~ F~ t The Money/Yankelovich Poll: Some willingness to sacrifice Everybody talks abOul inflation, but no- body knows what people arc willing to do about it. To find out just which sacrifices Americans wot~ld accept in order to rein irt galloping price increas~, Mene),asked the o~iblon research firm of Yankelovloh Skelly & White to in- terview people from all eeonomlo levels around the U,S. fifths ~f them said they would be willing to accept a lower st an- The telephone survey of 1,219 eligible voters found thai fou r- PAI~,TINCS BY MARK SABqN
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BARCLAY 99% tar fred. 1 MGTAB Also available in lO0"s and Box BAR13 Warning: The Surgeon General ~tas Dezermi~ed That Cigaretle Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
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GN TTI k corJr~u~ when I first started playing pro ball, even some of the outfielders hollered a lot. We reed Io think thai was a form of h~t[e. At least a lot of the monage~ nscd to thi~k thai it showed thai the tealll was alive, eler~, hustling. But I'm not so sllre ~1~ ~ ~ ¢~ bt, ca'ase ~ay2ae Of +,he besl hustler~ and most intelligent players ] knew weren't the guys who were doing all the hollering, l think it's overrated." ]~ thi~ hnrtlng you, too? An old war- ho~c like Jim Freg saying chatter is ovcr- rat¢cl? Telling us that all those carefully ehanIed pheases [hat you and I Special- ized i~ ~ j~/st s~) m~h ho~ ~ir? If you're not depressed IlOW, check otlt the opinions of PilL~burgh's Phll Qarner, generally cnnsidered a throwback to the old days, a guy with the nickname of Scr~p Iron. '+Baseball has become a thinkint$ man game," says (~arncr. "you try to Ihink be ¢l~itcriflg your mind with a lot of that rah-rah chatter stuff. This isn't Little League (Xl~ here Oh. yo~J~ll hear ~ome noise ffoo2 our club ~metlmes We're not like the Du,J~ers wJ~o don't say a damtl word. It's almost like they have an ai[ of sophistication abo~t them. a~d they 4~n't "~t ~ get tb,¢lr ~nff(~t ~ 41~ty |'ll whistle occasionally, maybe talk to the rul~n~r~¸ ".~]" [ th two out, I'll Say, 'O.K.. let's t~rn that DP.,~ anti ma~ha gel Ihe canner screwed ~p a little bit. During infield, once ill a while we"ll throw [t aron0d and talk it up [Jolly Cholly would be so hap- py 1 Of coorse, w~ don't aJways t~ke in- geld." /~ nelly Cb~l~ ~u{4 he ¢~ sa4./ One ev~0ing #asl season Garner broke up an attempted double play by the Phi] lies by casually throwing up his hand to block the relay to first If a guy like ~hat isn't into chat terlng, who is? Is there no one lelt, no descendanLs of (:har]ie Grimm and his infield, no one in the ma ~o~ wh,~ c~u[d ple~e t~tR~ (p,~ucan~e- salesman ~oach Of" m~lle? "yoo know WhO still chalice?~' G~rner said a~'ler that game "KBr~ Bevagqua. Yeah, Bevacqua Talk to him. He's ~razy." [~evacc!l~a was still pl~yelg for San Diego then. Later he ended up with Pills- burgh, and ~ like to think of him and Gar net sitting togclher in tile Pi~at¢ du~- o/~1~ spltticlg toba~eil juice, and ~,ar~ef ~na]~y a~t'veing that, ye~, chatter wEJs ~uade Gar~r, it would be Bevaec]ua. A~r all, it wn.~ he who had blown a little more sophisticated. But after a '~hlle I goI off him." That coulff.'~e 10¢e~ becaus~ the plt~her, rookie C]larlie Lea. breez~6 past Ihe Padr~ 9-1. Jolly Chol- ly never said fills ~toffwas ~o[proog "You know. that's why I sel a kick out of h~gh sckool artd other amateur ~ames," conthlued B~vacqtla. "W~ Were out in ~t. Louis while there w.s a high school ~ournanmm going on. and | watched the whol~ thing b~ause it brought hack so many memories. Like, 'Hum, Shoot, rc~:k, fire, babe, brim. shOOt. rock, fire!' "("Babe" is used conjunctive- t~ in thisc~e, liukit~g the t~a t~a~rt clam es of "Hum, ~oot, reck, fire¸") Bevacqua, '#ho plays many positions, none of them impeccably, td~s to calm his pit~hers with make him-hit-to+me chalter, though whet her it actually calms them is a moot point. He'd given St~ve Mura st~ch advice in a game e~rlisr It/st ~as~u i~ Phhad~lphla at~d M~ra did his best to obey; the only p rol~[em was t~at balls hit by Mike Schmidl and Gre~ Luz- inskl toward ]~evacqun, who was plt~- ing [~field, went a bit over his head and Tanded in the upper deck. "I to~d Steve he was o~1 tha right tracL thouSh." said B~vacqua. E~ett though.his chatter docsl~'t always produce ~$uha. Be~'acqua IS det¢rmilled to keep it rip. "[ do it because you have Io do something Io SLay lOOSe ~n thi~ game" he sald. "No One can keep you [oose hm yourscff. And. who knows, you might distract the opposition with it a~d help your own ~uys. Your guy roight ~sve every muscle in his body tightcrmd ~p, and ffyou can tetl him something to mske hhn t'elax just ~ liRle [*it, it could loosen his whole body. +'yoLt know. they have studies oil [he fact that ther¢~ a ]o~ Oaore pre~ure put on the body when yotl frown lhan when you snlile. ]t's just, well, easier to smJis. and chattedhg mighi halp you do ihat. At Ica~t, that's the way I look ~t it" I ~¢it much hett~r after my ¢ollver- $ation ,,~ith ~acqua. F'oY~ile~ ~csc~*tch ~vea]ed thai severaI of Bevaeclua's ¢on- temporaris~ ~lt the same way ahoul chatle~. San Francisco Giants Pitcher Greg Minton ~ays. "1 think ~'d lik~ to hear some chatter behind me. |'d lJk¢ to know my tt~anmatcs are behind me, that we respect each oIher I don't ththk ~s b~. | d~'( agre~ t~at ~ w~.aki be a distraction ,, Del Unser of the Phi]lles. c~rted 82
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Science At Last, a Hale Columbia Rewing for aci~'on, the once wayward space bus pa~ses a te~t a6 11 engines are up and runm~!" A Chars ro~ from th~ ranks of sci- entists and technicians paaked into the Cai~ Canavot al control ounter when th© ward came. Millions of Americmas watch- hag on morning television breathed a sigh ofreRe£ Thane red and ¢a'an~ flames liar- ing out from boneath th~ Columbin sgace shuttle, the irmmensc cloud of storm ere~ a~ed by borning ilqind oxygen and hydr~ ~stt (hat ~ out to s~ were emblems of success. Th~ long delayed final 1¢~t fir- bag of Coimnbia's three main engines had bia's moment of trinrnp]l made i~ probable at Last gone off" without a Itltchi Cobim- that as early as April the shuttle would carry an American into space for the first time since 1975 and take ha place as the world1$ fast reusable rocket ship. flying rotnd trips between e.az't h and orbit. The te~t-Rd.ng ec~antdown.had to be pushed back three times last week. First te.c/lm¢ians struggled to t)urgo imptttltl~s from tee ind-eeil pipes, th~n to r~place a f~tulty ~lzctrmli~ module, aud finldly to wheel a huge s¢rri~ tower away from tee launch pad Explained Launch Ed rc~tof George Page: "This is our v~ry firs~ countdown for the shuttle, and you ~xjpect these kinds of probi~ms." Indaad~ 66 the shuttle !0rogtarn's proble-~rts have becona~ a kind of national headache. Columbia's latmeh, originally sched- uhal for March 1979, was delayed in part for repLac~menf of thousands of heat- resistant illc$, which ale attached to its alttrninttrn shell to keep the shuttle from borning up o~ re-ontry It has also b~n plago~ by trouble inits complex engines. winch born foe[ at 6)0C~ C, holier than the boiling point of most metals, I~¢ en- twines deliver a thntst of more than 1 rni] 1£o~ lbo (roughly she power outpu~ of 23 1-1oowr Dams). They I~ck tfiree finacs more power for their weight than the J-2 engines that boI~ the Apollo astronauts aloft. Unlike the I-2s. they are not dr~pp~d ~tw~y aftor takeoff but are. d~- sig~ed to be r~used for as many as 55 flights, and to be throttled up and down, producing more or l~s power as needed, Ia ~trlier test ildngs, beadass inside the angines splintered, valves sluek, welds meil~d ~ud engines blew ~p. Ot~e ~xplc~ sion, in ~oly 1979, so bediy damaged the rocket stand at the National Space Tech- noio~y Lab in Bay St. Louis. M3ss.. that furthar te~thig was delayed four moaths Last w~k's firing waz the culmination of a setisa of t~ts that engineers required to I~ sttro all ©ngthe ]problms had be~n ove~- eom~ bofore Co]umbia lifts off with its first two astronauts, John Young~ 50, aud Robort Crippen, 43. n the assumption of coafinucd su¢- Oeess, more lhan 75 falme Righis oftha shuttle la~v¢ ~dy be~n booked. RoJglfiy one-third of them are reserved iln" the d~ fer~e ~tablishrneoli which will use the shuttle, starting in L983, to latmch survetL!an~e satd~tee. Tim remaining two-thirds will be devoted to both com- m~reo and seio~tt~ endeavor, like the pla¢~ of a giant space tdescopc. Amer- icaa industry will be able to buy cargo spaes in the sht~ttlo to h~uneli cox~mtmi- cations satellites and conducl a wide array of e.xla~rlments in tha weightlessness of space m hopes of discovoring n~w ways to produce drt~. crystals and metal al- loys. Coltt~abia's cargo hold, 60 It. long, can c~a'y 65,000 Lbs. S~ace ~lieats eaa r~n~ the whole thing for on~ trip for i $35 milllo~. BU/. NASA offers many smaller "g~taway specials from as intle as $3,000 for 60 lbs. NASA is acut e2y ~.war¢ thai the shut- tlo Will ha viewed a.s a ~st of U.S tecli- nologfoal skill and that, espcefaily in view of ~t Reagan's economy program, the level of future Governm~tt funding for spac~ efforts may hinge o~ how well this c~sleslial freighter p~rfo~ms, Recalling the httrtutn and mcehnisal failures that crippled the special "Blue Ligin" com- mando • .m{t during the doomed h~lieopt wr f~cue missionin h-an last ye~J') a NASA Of_ ~.cial streamed up the ~tge~cy'~ p~sent re sol~. ~id h~: "We intend trot to httve a Blue Light failure ~a oar pad" • TIME, MP~KCH 2,1~ 1
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INTRODUCINC-- THE he ii buya ['arnous a~d feel
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Thepleasure is back. , Y 5~% IP BARCIAY BARCIAY I M(; TAR 99% tar free. I Warning: The Surgeon General Has Delerrmned Thai Cigarelte Smoking Is Dangerous iu Your Heal[h AIs-o available in lO0"s and Bo~ lOG's, 3 rrLc "i~r {}4 irLg riic[JIirie ]/,. pnr (:ig~relle b7 PTO rr ~thmi
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l BUSINESS The Reluctant Rebaters etroit auto ex~u*ives are calling it D World War llI. Buffeted by Japenese imports and extraordinal~ly high interest rates~ wotmded Ford Motor Co. reported a staggering SLfi billion Ices for 1980 last week, the wOrst deficit ever recorded by an Amezinan co~o~afio~. That red-ink rec- ard won't last long: this week Chrysler Corp. is expected to announce a 1980 less of $1.8 blilinn. Earlier, General Motors re- pormd its fixst profitless year since the Great Depre~n-~ed even tin),- Amerl- can Motors ~omplieg a $197 million los& Desperate for a tumarouod in sMe*, the autormLkOr~ are nOW turmng to a o0stly ~eapon they rarely use: cash payments to e~smmers ~o buy slow,selling models The reasons for the r~bates annoxmced by GM and Ford Beean painfally ob'aous. Sales are stalled in a grim two-pear-inng depr ¢~-gton, more than 200,000 a~towcrkers are on indefinite Iayoff and the combined Big Three losses for 1980 totaled nearly $4 biBino. "No year Ln the hlato~ y of the IY.S. auto indttstry w~s more difficult,~* says Ford chairman Philip CaldwelL The winter of 19gl has proved just as bleak_ Prospec- tive buytas confmlae ~o shun showrooms of U.$, manofacttwers, a~d imporls now take a near-reeotxl share of the Amesl- can market. Even with De~r oit's profinetton throttled back to the lowest level in twent7 years, the cars coming off assembly hnes are backing up, and a~ a resu~ factory and dealer invetttorlas are ballooning. With a long-awaited sal~ up~urn nowhere in sight, Gen- er al Mot or s sltebs to restmcifate the market by givthg customers $700 in cash !f they buy mid- size models, like Fie POntiac Fir ebird, and $5013 ifth~ buy tiny Chevrolat Ch~ettes er X ¢~rs "We didn't want to do i~,botwedidn'thaveasholce," explathed one C~M execLltive. Scrambling to follow GM's lead, Ford came up with a plan to give back l0 per cent of the sticker pri~e on most 1981 mid-siz~ and large ears and even more on 1979 and 1980 models that remain un- sold. &mexican Motors said it ~uld extend a sales-thceBlive pr ograill already in effect, and an~ysts expect ~hryal~ to follow salt.* Selling cars wifu rebates is *In f~-L Ch~er hen bee~ f~ ¢rmg a ldm~e thai reatky ~me~mta to t, ub- $1m~ ~c~a~l~t ~rom pi~aillng &nt~fl r~ee ob~rg~* NEWSW EEK/3JARCH 2, [951 a risky game. The month-long promotions of GM and Ford profinbly will crmte only a slight upturn in sales, the experts believe. "It ~ have a pomtine but temporary ef- fect/' says Malymm Keller, auto thdu~try analyst at Paine Webbsr Mitched Hutchins. l~er t~am fino~ttog roles by cr~ting ~ew demand, auto rthates often harrow future sales by giving a g~eater incz~aslve to eus- Desperate automakers turn to a costly wkapon they rarely use--rebates on slow-selling models. tempts wfin wert planning tohuy eros even. t~aliy. What's more, the cash-rebs.t e pro- ~ams are expe~sl~e. Had GM's "/~t's Get America Rol~li A~#in" campaign b~en in motion inst lalondt, says auto a~alyst David Healy of Drexd Burnham L~mpert, it would have cost the company well over $2~ miR/on. Unlike past rebate programs when the automobile companies paid the full tab, both GM and Ford now require that their dealers share tha cost of Bie cash giveaway. ANDC =TA As a result, cttstome~s who shop for rebated e.nrs will find that they don't have much bargaining room on the thawroom fleer. "Wfinn you take $200 out of the price of a Chevett¢, tlier¢'s not a who[t ficil era lot left,~ says Keith La Rtte, new-car man- aliet at soburban Detroit's Roger Pe~ske Chevrolet, where ihowroom tta~e has risen conslde*ably ~ace the rebates were alanounced. Many dealers grouse abou~ having to kick in a share of the re.re, b~t mozc of them welcome anything that promises to perkup tha market. "Bett~r two fast nickels thma ont slow dime," says Che'¢rolet dealer Chester Luby of Fcr~t Hills, N.~L And most dealers aren't won'ying at al/ about a post-rebate sales slump. '~hcxc haven't b~e~ any sales up to th~ rebale pe~'Sod," says West Lol Angeles t'ontiae dealer 8tan Chazen. "so I don't se~ what the rebates ea~ talo~ away." Bmlgod ~ Both General Motors and" Ford hope that the rebates ~d ¢leax away sluggish seller* m make room for new mod- els they plan to introduce this spring. In April Ford is planning to launch new sports v¢islons of the popular lkont-wbselMrive ~ort a]of Lym~, and ~M's new compact J ear will debut in MaY. AUto execuuves believe that there il pent~up d~nand for nt:w e.ar~ and they c~unt on the llew mod- els to boost lagging sales, But GM is r,~l already liedgtng its bets: the iudustry ginn¢ plan~ to slash co~ts mad lay eft 10 per cent of its akeady reduced wlii*e- collar work force. The *tutomakers also want s~ae help from washfugten-- a~d they seem likaly to ge~ i~ In Detroit last week Transpor- tatinn Secretary Drew Lewis mtt with auto executives and mtmbsrs of the United Auto Workers un/oa. At~rwaed, he sent, a clear si~ that the Reagan Administ rallon misht a~'ee to som~ term of ~rial rettralnt on imports. "My po- altion," Lcw/s |ahi, "is that the present level of Japanese im- ports is una~cepteble." Still, Detroit'a b~t hope for a re. tufa to prosperity rests on a sharp upntrn in the eeon~rny a~l a substantial finwntUrlt in interest rntes. And in the near future, at least, the outleok on either count is hardly encouraging. WILLIAM D. ~g.AXB ACIT wth 1 ON Lo'4r~LL/a Detr~ ~d ~a~ re/xx~s
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America's got enough coal to keep your lights on for hundreds of years. And Texaco~ coal gasification process could mean you won't have to worry about how it affects the envi6onment. One of the main problems with burning coal to generate electricity has been, of course, to burn it in an environmental]y acceptable manner But Texaeo's developed a process to turn our most plentiful energy resource (nto clean burning fuel gas which can be used to produce power for generating electricity We've already successfully proven the gasification process in small scale plants. Now Texaco is working with other companies and oc~anizations to build a large coal gasification/eledrical gener- ating plant in the P/o;ave Desert. It wil! turn a thousand tons of coal a day into electdcit~ Some years from now, Texaco's investment in coal gasifi- cation technology can mean you'll have the electricity you'll need--and without worrying] about environmental effects, You can ~rust t~ne $~ar at home, at work, or in your car,
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The good things in life stay that wa~: Dewars never vanes,
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Sure & Natural Maxishields. If you're like Sue you probably won't believe the Sure & Natural ston/either, It's hard to imagine a full-size napkin this thin and comforb able, The truth is, for women who don't need all that bulk, and for women who've given up tampons, Sure & Natural is the answer, It's a whole new technology in fluid absorption using Superabsorbent Fibers. Tiny fibers f- that absorb many times their own weight. Yet the pad stays flat and comfortable. ~ thin (that's actually half the size of old bulky napkins), Sure & Natural Maxishields are the thinnest, most com- forkable full-size napkins ever invented, Sure It's unbeliev- able, But it's true. The first full-size protection this thin and comfortable.
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@~S, mB~WT~a Thepleasure llllll I BARCLAY B IAY 99% tar free. Also available in lO0"s and Box Kings and Box.1 mg "tad*, 0.2 rag. nicotine; ~O0's, 3 m§. "tar", 0.4 mg.nicot ne " av. per cigarette by FTC method, [ Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined Thal Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your HeaLth.
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} I ~1 i ,!; The pleasure is back, BARCIAY Wam']O T~ ,'{4~[:] qor~]i H~is 0o!efmlnP~ I'ha! {21gal ll! ;~o~ n,1 h ['~B ~'OU! !oY('ul Healt~
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'The more successful a guy gets,' says Johnny, 'the better women he gets' It was supposed to do for country what SaturdayNightFeverdld for disco, and up to a point it succeeded, Though Urban Cowboy wa~ a dis~ppr~ntme~ at the box office, its two-record sound- track album has hung on the charts nearly ~ year, and ~ nsv~ third recocd from the track recently joined it. That's good news for people rike Kenny Rog- ers. Llnda Ronstadt and Bob Sager, alJ of whom sang for the movie, but even better for Johnny Lee, who sings Cowboy's biggest hit, Lookin" for Love. It's alsoj ustice at last for the 34-year- old ar tiat who's taken one five-day vacation in 10 y~ars. Since 1971, in fact, he had been playing some 300 nights a year with his friend Mickey Gilley, whose Texas club was the setting for Cowboy. Lee was chosen to sine in the movie after a co-producer of th~ film Saw him perform there. Then, luckily, Johnny, wh~i~ ~umma~ing ~hrou~h box of dBmo tapes, found L ookin', a catchy ballad written by two Mississippi schoolteachers, Wanda Maltatt e and Patti Ryan. To skepdss who doubted Lee could have made the grade without LookJn', Johnny has a point to prove, and he's doing it. He has air eady re- corded a second NO I oountry single, One in e M/I/ton, and his latest hit, pewt CherOkee, Lee (hm.o wltlh MJi~.~y OJhey) po~ o=~.tmlOlal~F f or Indian benefits. He itopes to itm't hh~ O,,l~m bancL Pick/n" Up St[angers, is currently mov- ing up fast. "JOhnny was impatient," says Gldsy, "but since he's had to worl~ so hard for what he~s go~, I think he ap- preciates it more." As grateful ~s he.is to have made lhe leap lrc, m obscuRt'/, Le~ is ~r~,~ to his lyrics and still Iookin' for love. Well, sort of. "The more successful ~t guy gets," the lifelong bachelor observes. "the better quality of we men he g ~*t s. I get a few hundred letters a week fro m women now. Some say they'd like to meet me, and I tell them to send me a plct Lira. Sometimes I c~il and it works out. Other lfm as," he adds crudely, phet~gmphl by Te~y/u~lurl@ameca 5 "they're real pooches. That's when t say, 'NIce meeting you,' " Someday, Johnny concedeS, he might like ~o get ma~lf e~i and heat the pitter~0atter of little guitar pickers, but this I~n't (4 uite the time. "A wom- ~ Wo'J~d h~,ve to love me t~ lot to p~ up with my bugShlf," he says. "1 get funny sometimes. I h~ve ~o get off by myself with ~y music. I haven't found anyone who understands me well enough to share th~b" Meanwhile, Lee recorded two so~t~s for the sound track of the forthcoming Dyar~ Ca nno~t movie Coasf to Coast and bec~me part owner of a 1,500-se~t nightclub in Pasadena, Texas ialended to accommodate the overflow from Gil- lay's+ four miles aw~.y. Lee was originally Johnny's middle name. He adopted it as his surname because his father divorced his moth- er when Johnny was an inlant, "and I don't claim him," Raised in Alia Loma, Texas by his mother, Virginia CalHer, now ~n offset pr~ tect~nlciaa, e~d his stepfather, an oil refinery worker, Johnny decided early on he wanted to be a musician but ~=ncountered a car t~ln resistance. "Where I lived," h~ recalls, "they thought that if you were a musician, you were subject to doin' weird things," Undiscouraged, he formed a b~ad called Johnny Lee and the RoadRunners, and cut an album CONT[N~JE~
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LETTERS least five ~eaxs, and several more years of study will be required before the de- partmealt can reaah a conclusion that any salt dome is suitable for a m/ned geohigie repository. COLIN A. HEATH Office of Nuele~ Energy Department of Energy Washington, D.C. The Atlanta KUlmgs I w~nt to eommcnd you on your excellent atdcle about the Atisata Idllin~s (NATION- AL AFFAIRS, March 2). The ldUin~ and the diistrust they are causing are horrible, [ only pray l$1at the Idllla" read yollr article and felt ~at remor~ for all the terTor and pain that have been caused. TA M]M~ T~NER Suttleld, Ohio Rarely do*s a pllotograpll clmvey a me*- sage powo~l etlough to move me to t e~l~. But The pain On the fate's of the viesims' mot her~ t old a stolT/~kat words flever eoulll. perhaps t/ue justice world be better served when apprehended, the killer were hand- ed over not to the penal system but to the familles whose ehildl en were so ¢nle]Iy stol- egt away. L. ]-~o ULE G g~YIERREZ Rio Rico, Ariz. Ther~ is more speculation about the race of the Atl~ta killer than the sex. HOW does the kilJer Jure ~in/Jms off tha strut in broad daylight? What do th~ children see wh~ *.hey see The Man? Maybe they ~ a wool&n, GERALDINE ~ACOBSON Salt Lake City, Utah Can It ltappen Here? I11 ' ~Fa~ei~la ill Fratlee" (INTEI~NATtON- AL, Mar~h 2) you say, "Ever/F~chman Is taught in school that his eouzttry is the cxadle of freedom and human rights, a llb- craland opea society built upon t ha bedrock of Christian hi~manism. Most Frenchmen accept that IL~efmg image u~rilically, even thot~h many are aware that it does not quite cover the facts of modern French history," It is irresistible to 6ubstitute "~eri~n" for "Fre~ah." ~l~ E~AGA YAMAGIS~t Pis~c~n, N,J, Trouble at Fort Apache 1 was s~ed to read about the strong adve~ r~on some New York~ ~e having to the picture "Fort Apache, The Bronx" (MOWES, Feb, 16). While the movie may have some Seliotls faulls, it tlever oc- CulTed to me that the m~lyher~ ~aJaJse and diepar agement depicted in tho li]m r eal- ly have to do solely with N~w York City. The movie eoutd ~v~ beea portraying lif~ in any of our natinn's big~it y ghettos and b~fios. There axe, &course, dcccut citizens NEWSWEEK/MARCH 16, 1981 WHY SETTLE FOR NEXT-DAY SERVICE? SAME-DAY PACKAGE SERVICE IS OUR BAG. Y~ur urgeat small package gets there ~flay with Sprint2- Eastem's same-day package servic~ Get ~x~urp~ackagc to our airport passenger counter a~d~ wc'll put it on the next flight out. So it arrives that vet/ same da~: Guaranteed. (Unless the specific flight is scheduled to arrive after midnight. ) kVe have same-da~, Sprint service to more than 90 cities nationwide on over 1,500 daily flights. Eastern can also Sprint ~ur small packages to Canada, Mexico and other inter13ationa[ destirtatioias. For rates and flight information, call Eastern. For pickup and delivety in the U.S., call 800-336-0336, toll-flee. EASTI I N
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FREEDOM BEGINS AT HOME GanneLt is a nationwide in forma- tion comI~my with a world of different vo/ces, eac/* speakklgindepende~t/y for its communiW. Gannett consists of 81 daily netvs- p~pers; seven television and 13 radio stations; the largest outdoor advertis- ing company in North America; news, marketing ~.nd research branches; and magazine and fiin~ prodact/on ur~its. They serve in 35 states, two lIS. territedes and Canadit Yet Gannett has no voice of its owr~ That is a matter of principle-- the princi~e of frendom. Every Gannett voice is flee express it~ own opthklns, &cc to serve its own community, free to meet its pmfossiondi respondibilthes as its local executives see fit That means heing an irwest~ga ter and~ardlan against wrongdothg~ as the Gannett News Service did • when it helped heklers of bonds isstled for a bankrupt shrine recover money they the~ght they would never see again. That means be/ng a helpr~rnat~ co the weak and distcessed, as KO CO- TV in Oklahoma City did in helping hard-te~pl~lace children find adoptive homes. Of, as the Burlington Frec Press did, with a series to help people cope with the proklems of growing old. That means retlect~g the mood of America, as Gannett Outdoor Advertising did with its ~Free At Last~' billheard gIcating to the return- ing hestages., Gannett s 24,000 men and women have a corrtr~tment to flee- doll. Freedom to ~hare in the blessings of a fr~ society and firee- e~lte~pfise systen~ Freedom b0 fiflfiU the Hrst Amendment obllgations~ Ir~ to serve theln/ormat~a • needs of each communJ~ and the American people'~ guarantee o[ Irendom. At Gannett that fleedom rings from Atlanta to Hondidiu, Bridge- water to Boise, Los Angel~s to Little FalIs, Pheeni~ to Poughheeba/~ It rings in news coverage, in editorlat oI~mlons, in community servic~ E~ch member serves its own audience ill its own way. IL' .W A WORLD OF OIFFERENT VOICES WHERE FRF.EDOM SPEAKS For more in farn,at~on abou t Oann etfs world of fl[ffercnt Voices, write G~nnc~t, Li.col ~ Towon Rochester, N ~L 14604, or Call (71-6) 546=8fi00.
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PIONEER SYSCOM, FINALLY, ALLTHAT'S INVOLVED IN OWNING GREAT HI-FI IS A LOVE OF MUSIC. Now, the music-lovers of our world ca n have the wonders of great music without ;111 fl~e complexity of great hi-fi• Pioneer, the leading maker of ~igh fide ty components in America, has created a system for you. Its called Syscom'.~ Syscom is serious, substantial, superb hi-ft. Each component was created specificaIIy for Syseom. Arid since the entire system was both built and matched by Pioneer engineers, yon can't make a mistake• Syscom is everything you need to maximize your mnsic.Tur ntable, amplifier and tuner (or receiver), tape deck, and speakers Sysctlm e~ell comes widl its own specially designed cabme~ So it's ;is easy ro look at a~ it is to listen to. There are seven Syscom systems m choose fronn One is perfect for your budget, yot r room, your music. For the name of the Pioneer Syseom dealer nearest you, call us at 800-621-5199 It'll be the Ilegimling of a great new love. "1 in lUmois 800.972 5855 i Headph~IIc, mltrophon¢ ~r~4 digital timer aptLonM
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BARCLAY I MG TAR 99% tar free. Also available in lO0"s and Box Kings and Box, l mg."ta+", 0.2 mg nicotine: lOg's, 3 mg. "mr", g,4 mg. nicotio8 av. per cigarette by FTC method. Warning: The Surgeon General Has Oetermined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous m Your Health
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Agee Jettisons Three Bendix Directors Bendix Corp. was back in the news last a high-technology acquisition. Ague has week, but for once it had nothhig to do made no secret of his dec.ire to diversify with Mat~y Cutmlngham (page 51). Ynree members of the Bendix board--Harry B. Cunningham (no relation), Paul S. Mira- hito and Alan E. Schwartz---abruptly re. signed. As it turned out, the three are also directors of Burrou#as Corp., and Bendix choirman Willlam M. Ague had asked them to choose one company or the other. All inteelccking directors except one, Coy G. Elduad, picked Burroughs. Some analysts figured r~ent Wall Street rumors were coming tnze: Btmdix must be prepaelng to buy the big computer com~ pony. But when analyst Arthur Davis of Prescott, Ball and Turhen called Bendix headquarters to find out, he was told "it wouM be a mistake to o~.~tmae that." It would not he a mistake, however, to assume that Bendix is in the market for out of automabiie and aerospace suppJfas into bigh-gro~h fields, and several recent divestitures have left his eompauy with about $500 milfinn in cash and marketable secuelties. Accordfag to some analysts, Ague waisted to free h~s board of any p~ten- tial conflieLs of interest in case Bendix aad Bur~ou~ wind up competing head-on. The two ¢ompahics do have tangled con- ~ ne~tions. Mirabit o, for instance, served as ehofaman and chief executive of~cer of Bur- roughsuntil last year. Hla successor, former Treasury Secretary W. Michael Bin- ment hal, was the fo~aer chairman of Ben- d~ who helped Ague rise to the top. Re- cently, relations between Ague and Blumcmhal have been chilly: according to hisid~rs, Blumenthal was miffed by Agee's failure to hivlte him to johi Bendix's Imard. says small-busiaess expert William C. Dun- k¢lherg of Purdue Univershy. In a new sttr- vey fur Waller E. Hellar Imemafinnal Corp?s gmall Business Institute, The Ro per Organization pollad 1,007 chief exec- utives of small firms and found that ac- celerated depreciation ranked f~urth on their "wish list" of tax reforms¸ Far more importam were scrapping double taxation of dlvidends and red uoing inherit once t axes on famdy-~wned businesses. Squeez¢~ For smhil and big buelness alike, there are si~lafleant tmeermintie~ ahead¸ L~.st week Federal Reserve chair man Paul A. Volaker announced the Fed's in~ention t¢ reduce growth in the money supply over the next year a policy Keggan has endorsed. '[~Lat almost surely means continuing volatility ill foterest i-ares and miglit pelsttade hltSinessm~l~ to p~tpolle capital spending plans even if mx breaks are e~acted If the Federal deficit for 1982 ~ums out to lie much larger than the $45 billio~ Reagan's findget makers predlat, aud mzaay private economists think it will, business could he squeezed out of the cggtial m~rkets by g~vetnment hoF~owing The greatest une~r toillty is what eoulse Congress will take. So far, Demoerahe broadsides at Reagan's tax proposals have foeosed on the potentialinflationary impact of the Kemp-Roth cuts; last week, in an otherwise cntiual 97-page repnrt, the Democratic maj~elty of the Joim Economic Committee endorsed accelerated depreci- ation. But new hilsine~s-tax breaks might arouse oid su~plaions that the GOP eltrying to help businessmen at the expense of ev- eryone e2se, Politic~ might still kill some of Reagan's refomas. In that evebu thebears would liggbi m ~rowl agoi~. MEP~RILL SHELLS with CONNIE I~$LIE h~ New yo~k, RICH THOMAS in W~h~ngt~n and b urca~ rep0r ts How to Play Post Office hrough rain, through sleet, through senators introduced a bill coiling for an T gfoom of night, the U.S. Postal Service end to the Postal Servlae's plan to increase has doggedly continued its appointed zSpcodestoninediglts~measure, pasmi rovndssinceitw~bumadeeadeago. Reti authorities argue, ~hal cbuld eventually ink no~ the elements has ahe~ys beeI~ aliminate 60,~ postal jobs and save $500 its biggest ollskaela. Since it was formed out of the financial ruin of the old U.S. Post Office Dep~'tmen* back in 1971, the quasi-iadepebuent se~wlae has a~eumulat ed staggering losses of $3,9 billion. For all of i~ past travail, however, ~t was clear last week that the beleaguered Postal ge~v- ice is headed for even heavier weather. In his economla address to the nation, Presidem Reagan chided the Postal Seta4ee for bein g "un edle t ~ Iive wit lfm its oper atiag budge~" and propo~d • heavy ~ut in its Federoi subsidy, The next day the Postal Rate Commission turned down a Postal Sor~lae request for permission to hiere¢se the price of a fir~t-elass stamp from 15 t o 2D eeont s, r ec~mmendfog ] 8 cent~ in~t cad, And last week a bipartisan gi~up of 58 million a year by permitting more e~ioient sorting and delivery. ]~st 7"ae Administration's pro- posed ~ut ia sudsidie~882 million over the next two fiscal years---yarns on the nofinn that a subsidy impedes Post oi Serv- ice efforts to achieve operating effic~enoies. Postmaster General William FL Bolger counters that despite a $306 rcfidion loss in I980 and a projected lc~s this year, the Postal getwiee is actually far healthier than it has been in years. He has some ~acts on his side. In 1979 the service aetuaby made moaey ($470 minion) aad it now handles 20 lYdifon more pieces of mail each year than it did in 1971--with 74,0~ few- er employee~,----even though many disgrun- tied eorporaze customers are i~cr~siug Bolger: Stormy weather NEWSWEEK/MAP.CH 9, 1981
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in lO0"s and Box Warning The Surgeon General Has Oetermined Thai Cigarelle Smoking Is Oangerous [oYouf ~lealth.
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~a 7~ L~ % I1~~
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NATIONAL AFFAIRS B~t raaan ^rahlvo FP~ The bumper crop of babies born in the 1940s and "50s jammed elementary schools: Demography is destiny The Baby Boomers Come of Age he nurses were toasting the new year Tat South Chicago Community Hos- pital on San. l, 1956, when Cathy Saban was imm. She was more than Chicago's first baby of the year--her birth marked nearly the peak of the hshy boom that fol- lowed World War II. Growing up on Chi- cago's South Side, she had everything she ever wanted--and when she got her driver's : license, her father, a steelworher~ bought her a new Chevy for $2,800. "Back then," she says, "I thought nothing coald go wrong." But after the gladuatod from high school, she couldn*t find a steady job for two yea~. "I eded everywhere-- stores, fac- toring, the mills,7 she reme~mbers. Now 25, she makes $10,(X)0 a year managing ajew- eky shop and lives with her mother because she can't afford her own apartment. She and her boyfriend, a construction worker, are trying to save before they get m0xrfed, and she worries whether they wl]l be able to afford to have children. "l think our parents gave more to their ldds." she says, *'than we'll be able to give to ours." Dabra and Robert Drumheller are much more fortunate. They both breezed tbrongh college hi three years and earned M.B.A. degrees at the University of Chicago. At 27, she zs a financial analyst for Exxon; at 28 he is a fmanCtal adviser for Mohil. Together, they earn more than $90,C(~0 a year. They five in a loft in New York's Gleenwlch VilLage that they bought two years ago for $125,000, they spend week- ends skiing in Vermont and they hope to boy a summer home next year. They pla~ eventually to have one ohlld and they in- tend to hire a full-time boby-eitter. "Our parents came from middle-class famfaes." says Debra. "For them. to own a home and two cars and enjoy a suburban llfe- style was to aekleve a god I expected that ['6 get t hose things without t tying too hard. Doing v:ell ha a earner was my goal." 34 The" bshy boom has come of age. That intcxest rates have put the homes thay geew bumper crop of 64 million infant s born be- upinlargely out of reach. They are reaching tween i946 and 1961 is now 20 to 35 years their peak childbearing years at a time of old--and just as they crowded the mater- delayed matrmges and record-high divorce nity wards, the elemcmtary schools, the high ~ some have decided they cannot .af- schools and the colleges, they are now jos- ford the time or the cost of having children. tlthg one another for jobs. housing and the They are so numerous that they have al- adult Good Life. They are by far the largest ready depressed their own wages, and ;hey generation in American history nearly edl] face inttmse competiitort for prome- one-third J3f the U~S. pt~pulatmn today: By elonsrand-¢op ,salaries throughout their the she~r force of their nmabers, they have working llve~. "The baby boom grew up set the nation's tone at every stage of their witWa hirtlu~ght--the eoneept that their lives. In the 195~, they made the united emmomin well.being woul6 exceed thor parents'," ~ys mmaagemtmt consultant Mitehall Levitt. "This will not be the case. More than 64 million, so the baby boomers are changing their thinking about themselves, the future and born between 1946 the American economic dream." Stl'et eh Machs: Tha baby boom's coming and1961, nowcrowd of age has wldeepread zamiheallons for ev- • : ery~ody else as" well. Some economists one another far jobs, h~e the armies of new adults, at least homes and the good life. States a child-oriented society of new schools, suburbs and station wagtms. In the 1960s, they rocked the na~/on with their troubled youth. Now, with more than 45 millinn Americans set to turn 30 in the next decade, the cotmtry is inevitably con- corned with the problems of young adult- hccd--fi ndin g work, setth~g down, boinnc= ing family and career. Theirs is at once an advantaged and a ddsadvantaged genecado~. Rinsed in n pe~ rind of tmpreeedented wealth, health and education, they grew up with boundless hopes. A few, hhe the Drumhullers, have achieved and even surpassed their expec- tauons. But many others, like Saban, have come face to face with the Age of I.imfls. They are entering the job market at a time of eeonomfa stagnation, They are seeking houshag at a time when soaring prices and in part, for iinLatiO~L Young, inexperienced workers have flooded the job market, this argument goes, depressing productivity rates just when they are stimulating de- mand for consumer goods, Hard pressed to save money, the baby boomers are bor- rowing a lob ~uperheating the demand for oonsnmer oredh and home mortgages, Criminologists say that their vas~ numbers in the crime-prone ages of 15 to 24 con- tributed heavily to the record crime rates of the fate 1970s. And poIitieal analystg even blame them for the over-all deehae hi voter tnmout in recent years. The reason: young adults are the least likely to vote. Because the baby boom was followed by a hahy bust, the American economy new has some hlgifly els/hfe stretch marks. Many of the new schools bffflt to accom- modale the elOWds of students in the 1960s are now closed or haft empty. Colleges are already scrambling to keep enrollments up atxd milltax7 planners eye with a/arm sta- NEWSWEEK/MARCH ~ 1981
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BARCL&Y The pleasure is back. 99% tar free. BARCLAY Cdarnlng TI ~ >jri~lm ~,~r:O t~ Flas o@ler~r~ni~i~ Thali]iO~ieP<, ~,c!kn~l 3~iterc, u T,IYou N~I'!,
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99% tar free. Warning: The Surgeon Genera t~as Oe~ermined 'Tha~.Uig~are~xe Smoking Is Oangerou$ ~o Your HeaJth. Also available in lO0"s and Box rings and Box. 1 mg."ta(', 0.2 rag. nicotine, TOO's, 3 m~."tar". 0.4 rag. nicotine av. per cigar~Ite by FTC n~e~hod.
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Flet s tire pmblent: AERO FIP=CD×A*q*V (Aerodynamic horsepower =Coefficient of drag X frontal area X dynamic air pressure X velocity.) 19~ lgui~ ll~e~J. At t~e ,,sk of telling you a lot more about physics than you ever cared to know, we'd llke to tell you how we arrived at the shape for the new Regal. Basically, the pnoblem is ai~ In fact, at 50 miles an hour, at least half of a car's fuel is burned just pushing air out of the way Hardly a producbve use of your hard earned money. ........ So, when we redesigned the Regal, we worked very hard to make it more aerodynamic than its predecessors. And what came out of the ht~ndreds of hours of designing, t~ting and gne tuning in the aerodynamics labpratory is the magnificent looking car you see here¸ Its low front and h~jh rear not only delight the eye, but the engineers as well¸ Because what it accomplishes is an 18% reduction in the coeflicient of drag over last year's Regal. And what that means is impr~ve economy gut while the engineers have been busy making it effcient, the people in charge of making it look and feel like a Buid< have also been very successful A fact which one look and a test dPve w~] confirm. The 1981 Regal. A very nice solution to a very knotty problem, Come and see how thoroughly enjoyable physics can be. At your Buick dealer's now [~ HW'~• EST EpA~ ~4p[~ 30 [] • RE MEMbEr{: CO ~l~ar e the "est~ma ~-d mp~' to the 'r~tLma~e~ mpg' ol other cars You may ~e~ ~lifferen t mil~9~, dependin9 on how f~l~L you orive weather condi~mn~ and ln~ len~lh Actual hiNhway milea~ will proba bl~ be less lha ~ the eslirllat ed highway l~el economy Estimates lower in ~alif or nia (Buicks,lr@ equi~l~4 wrth G "~1~ ~i~ er~me~ su ppli~ b7 wrious div~o ns, 3ee y~r dealer f Ot det,~ls )
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-I=
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BAHC[AY 99% tar free. E ,t The pleasure is back. BARCLAY ! Tt~ CIg~ ~ T~ I i k I ~ I! l 3 ]~Ict!~¢ "2~l~u~ ~ !h
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- ~lii .~/~ ~ ,,hi
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It~ called print-through. And if you think it interferes with your reading, you should hear what it does to your listening. It happens on tape that has low magnetic stability. Music on one layer of the tape is transferred to music on an adjacent layer, causing an echo. At Maxell, we've designed our tape for superior magnetic stability. So whatg happening to the opposite page won't happen to your music. You see,we believe you should only hear the music you want to hear. Nothing less, and nothing more. IT'S WORTH IT. 63
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tera. But it does mean that it has no absolute vaJues It has an amoral philos- ophy: nothing is absoluleLy right or wrong. We used to call it siluation ethics, but it's really worse Ihan that, because it devel- ops a total society based upon what the Book of Judges in the O]d Testament de- scribes, dbeng the most horrible time in Israel's history; Judges 21:25 says, "In those days there was no king in Israel" that is, na authori~"and every man did that which was right in his own eyes," And, of course, that is chaos And that is exactly, as I see it, wr~ere the public school system is today,. The ultimate end of promoting amorality, atheism, and devel- oping a permissive society where there is no authority for right or wrong is, of course ultimately going Io be the wipeout of the family, the wipeout of a~l the tradi- hahn[ values that have made the .United Slates, in my oplnion, t~e greatest free so ciety in the wodd for many years The ultimate goal [of humanism] Js in- ternationalism, i'm not an isolationist, I don't think that we should not be aware of the rest of the wodd I preach very strongly that we have an obligation, that America's only importance to God is as we minister to the wodd But I do see that one wor[d soc:alism, one-world govern- ment--internafionalism--is just the opDo site of what freedom is all about, what the world is all aboul I think the fuliiity of the Unbed Nations at this moment in dealing with, for e'~ar~ple;'the Iranian situation, is an indication of how totally impotent and helpless and useless they are Pet~thotJse:.. Surely whal you're advo eating is a slight contradiction, because it's freedom for peopJe who believe in what you believe. Abortion, for instance-- your position seems to be absolutely cer- tain and su re, which would not allow free- dom to other people who don't feel the same way as you. Falwell: Rules and regulations, standards of behavior, are absolutely essential in any eiWized society. For example, [ be- lieve in freedom of speech, but that does not permit me to stand up in this restaurant and yell "Fire!" when there is no fire, be- cause my fTeedom of speech is now in fringing upon the rights and benefits and well-being of the people in this room. And I have no r~ght to use my freedom of speech to libel or slander someone's character. My freedom of speech ends where someone else's well-being begins Now that is likewise true in the matter of abortion It has always been the po- sition of the Bible that life has dignity; life begins with conception, not birlh. And it's not a Roman Catholic position; abortion is not a Roman Catholic issue, as the poli- ticians Iry to make it. It's a moral issue, And it's to our discredit, who are not Catholics, that were ailowed the Roman Catholics to carry that ball. Now the idea of "freedom of choice," which is what they prefer to use, rather than "freedom to kill," to me [s an obnoxious statement and a ridiculous statement. It's like a bank robber saying, "1 have free.£1om to break safe& and I want my freedom." Well, we believe that rules, standard regulalions--and this is regardless of what a~yone thinks about America; il was, indeed, founded upon ~he Judee-Christiar~ ethic Our founding fathers were net all committed Christians or eommilled Jews, but 1hey were committed to biblical pnn- ciples, which &re found written right through lha doeuments--Ihe Cons~tution, the Declaration, the Bill of Rights, et cet- era oa which the nabon i8 founded. Penthou~:.. g's quite okay for you to have your opinions but other people may not share those And yet you are try- ing to impose, are you not, your attitudes on them? Based on the Bible, which they may not believe in? Falwell: Well, they can say the same Ihing about "Thou shalt not steal" If we tell folks, if we write it down and say, "You're not going to break in this restaurant at nighttime and steal--" "Well, where did you pet that?" "1 pot that from the Rible: 'Thou shall not steal.'" "Well, I dun'l be lieve the 8ibis." That doesn't matter! Its the matter of law! For exarnp[e, in this country, homosexuality,.,, There ~re COati INU ED Oil pAGE i~ "The he//with a tall, coo/grasp of t~aturalty csrDonated Rocky Mountain water.. I?/settle for a wet dream." 66' pENTHOUSE
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,s. /5' B ! M G TAR 99% tar Also available in lO0"s and Box ~Jog~ and Box.1 mq "taf'.fi.2 m~. nicotine= log's. 3 mg."tar".O.4 m(l. nieo6ne av. per ctgarette ev FTC me~ed, Warning The Surgeon General Has OelermmeO That Cigarette Smok=ng Is Dangerous re Your Health ~2
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:/ WatCH, ~, ~t FJle~ltJ~ Edlto~ ROgel ¥oumon Mlllllgir~] Editor: RolRfl C, ,~l;]lt h ~¢l~illant MII~I~IIHI E~ An~lew Mills Jane HSll (Pict.s) J~,~h ~in~an, Mary Murky, CImthia young (Pf~'lules) W~hln~l~ BUm; J~h ~llm~ ~m L~ EdQb m'~: Jol~n H ayt~s. Eblt or; Mlcn~t MC~S. Man~pg EddO,~ pauITlr~enba~m. ~ rigid:InS Mana~ .k~n Hmr'~s. program mmg Marl~r; P..~r/~bct h~ Ed~e.r~ Judll~ C~St. Steve Gelraan+ Rob~l MacKen*,~ J~l~'tl~in9 ~ E~ic G L~on ~1~1 01mcto~ HU~I CrOCke~ Mmke4h~ Oil P~r ~ct Zu~er I~.~lt~m~ MmUlOm: Frar¢~ J HOwiey Mmglg~: Bli~n p Bra~fie~d Edltm(~ Dl~cto~ Memll P~r~l
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r~ ~ BARCLAY ~o~ ...... BAP I 99% tar freO. : Also available in ltTO's and Box "la¢', r~Qti~a 1~)9's, ~ m§. 0.4 m~. ~d~ ~. per ~l~nmo
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BARCI_AY BARCI.AY 99% tar free. Warning The S~rgeo~ General Has Dererm ned That CigareTte Smog ng Is Dangerous (o Your Neaith. Al~o ava#able in lO0"s and Boa" I~nos and Box, 1 mg."lar", 0.2 mg oicoti.~. lOrl's. 3 rag: "in ~ ~4 rag. ~Jeotine av. per cr~arelle by FTC melh~d
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BRITANNICA 3 PAYMENT PLAN 3, Tae On~.'~lu~¢ Oatliae of Know tectge.-~ar ipAde to the entlre e~cyclopaedia ,~ +~imlts ~eu to plan yeer own oourse of s~dy on aay subject cadet the $t~ The New El:cy¢lo~tedta Britannica 3 covers more sttbjccts more ¢m~ptetel~ ]i l~ ,~lO9~y ~po~it~ io |~1¢: ctl~,n? judg© by i~ 43 milllon wo~, 3rod1 H agree flint Bzitanalca 3 delivers mm~ value vet dollar tlma any o_~r ~t~cepced regcfe~ce ¢/o¢k. SO if ~t¢~ subflcrs t~m ymz'~ fred in any ~ ~ souroe, you u Brim • ~*ke Adv~tat* d d*~ FIII~ 0[~- - •
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mLlSkoxen {k~r their meu[ :rod hides, pneJ~r to lake y*~un~ huE~ ~lr clips Mature hulls have be~n allowed Io reach ncir lull Imphy p~ltcnltaL M~!y ~l.l,eh hetwccn 900 uld I I(10 ~o ~lld,, LLIId CalEy h~lrl/~/aide ~l]OU~h [o ;-~:! ccord li~taliliC~lil~[l~ ~¢t by the F!~!,,, . md (~rc~ckctl Club I he cur~nt ~dg,~ n ~l Records (it ~/r[h !l,t/lelicatl Big (llnl c" lisE~ l~!wel Th:m 80 mu~ko× trophie,~ Abi!u[ hall ~elc I,ikclt I]oru the IUTn of ~hc ccntur! [~/ Igl3 rhc oilier h~]l¸ came tlom Nuni~k [~land Al~k~h where !imttedhl]nfln£ ha~hcen alk~utd i~)l ]0 venus Ihis ?eft'. Cartadlan hun( was set il~[l'r IDLlit/ lt~li~ ,>cvcral £c}[ilrllullilj~s [ictitioneil the .l~l~i,rllrll~T/I lil a]ltlw ~f~lr[h~l!tll!g b¥ ll/I]lrlaliVe~ it SC¢It]S tile [nu~t~ r~aJizcd [hey could co[lllllarld il £oixI llrtce I(ir ~]lu~kllx hUlll$, nlDch more that) [11~:) cllLihl ~[ lot hide~ Bioh/g[~ns ~ay tile Ilunt ~,il/ not mcrc;l~c [hc a]l~wa b]e har~e~I of mtl~k ~en The Inu[~ arc ~m!ply aJ]owLng vl~i[in~ ip~lI~luntUl~ i~ kill ~!~:n [h~ll WOLlll] rlor~l/~LIIv h~ tak~I1 by I)*lliv~ hunter*, lnu]l! will outtil and guide the sp()rlhuntcrs, who will be cnufied to the horns, skins and some ln~',l[ o] the animals they kiLL [he hunts will stat~ on lklur Saturdays beginning Febmac,' 28 Muskoxen were q~'arl exI,~rmi]llftM by the end of WorLd War [ mainl~ by whalcr~ opcrafing in the Arctic Occm. Goed game managenlcnt hlouffht the aninlalS hack until l]tl~, le(oriling to some biologib(s, s~?me island5 have too many Ovcrgrtzing ~nl/ d]e-~lts have occurred in seine arokls '" ['hoLe c[iri [~. [io doub( that w~- ha~e badly mismanaged the mu~kox," says one bkdogi~l wh~ prelers to he an*m ymous "We clluhl have allowed a bLg gel harv*'sl Ioi ill*" i]a~l 20 ~eals " Part el the inismun igcnlont is du~ to lack el lunding (o nlonil or die animals and their uinges The lear ili an~i llu[lt in~ Scnlhll*"zl( and ]Hath~llal illlltection iSl~l is a~,t) to blame. Aultl/~i'llies csli- male (hat 10,000 to 12,U00 iJluskllxct/ live in C m ~lhl Po[ 1110112 [lll/~rlllatioll. wiite Canad i North Oullitting. Box 345,4, Station C. Hamilton Ontaril/. Canada LSH ?M I, [,all ,ll(i 5tll 891)0 fell)me Klu;p a multitude of sins. Funny what uver/the most experlt n{ ~,d fl sh[,~ [nun =.~em to catch (/r~ the way to a fishing tTip Which is why more anti mere of them bring ato~:g the Ugly Stik rod by Shakespeare Its built to take on wfiatevt!r 51ands between a fish and a fisherman But its atso bui[t m d~ something ever~ fisherman loves to do catch loads of fish TO build a rod w~th unmatched st[ engtfi and sensitivity we use an exch~ve Shakespeare Doubl~Bilt" process, Rrst. glas& ~zl you get a rod that can take what yeu catch, no matter where you catch it Remember that the next time you hook up ~th the un expectc-<t Because. after all to e[r is humaE But to fo[gJve takes an Ugly Stik roe[ ~;, And remembe~ for the best results whea ~u go fish}rig, be sure to Use a IB filament--the b
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~z~J / FISI41KG BY JERRY GIBBS Trolli124_ ;: I BestB tl forE lyl pnngl When the ice melts, the winds settle, and temperatures begin to climb, you're ready to get at your favorite fishing waters Trolling may be the best way to enjoy that early spring action, Given a choice of fishing methods, I'd pick casting over trolling ever)' time. simply because I'd rather pitch a lure than haul it behind my boat, I'd also rather catch fish. and sometimes troll- ing is the most effective way to do that¸ Spnng is une of the best limes of cear to troll. In the North spring fishing may begin at ice-out: in the South fish- ing can begin as soon as the winds set- tie and temperatures permit lighter cluthing to be worn. When spring arrives, fish are heed- ing ~om deep hdies to the shallows. That means yuu can troll without a thl of equipment. You don't need to fish the extreme depths yet, But yon raay want to stop aldi east if you see a con- centradon uf active fish¸ Evetl if you don't, using the right techniques and continuing to troll in the proper places vflll attract fish. As with any angling method, good trolling is a skill Don't drag a lure behind your boat just anywhere. The key In success is to preser~t your i~s or baits at the right speeds and depths over and around iish-bolding areas¸ Vary the speed and depth until you start catching fish. Then continue to do what yo~'re doing, Let's look at lozalion, the first thing In consider. an indicator to maintain a particular speed, I've used the T~lcx aed the Grizzly Speed Indicator. Acu Troll, a new unit made by Wright and McGill, is available at must tackle shops. These speed indicators work by a weight dragged through the .,voter off tlae boat's side. A cable from the weight fastens to the indicator, which shows your speed. By using these traits you can maintain fish-catching speeds It's best to check the actions of your lures near the boat. Generally, plugs are medium to shtw-lroJl lures. My favorite fast-trdil lures are spoons, par- ticdiariy the Seneca Sidewinder, Mee~eluok Wobbler. and Twistin' Minni. The Sidewinder can be trolled the fastest. When you drop to a slow troll these spoons lose their action. Fur slow trolling 1 use MilIer and Sutton flutter spoons, Toe fastest artifieed to troll is a sB~rnel- ~y. Yo~ cam ase one or two streamers on a spinning outfit or a fly rod. Streamers, popular at ice-out anaong Northern anglers who fish for trout and landlocked Atlantic salmon. are now popular in Pacific salmon fish- cries. Landlocked Adanties respond to ' a urolI that moves along smartly Though tandem streamers usualty are used for trout or salmon, I've found Early spring fish holding areas im that smaller streamers with single oiede stream mouths that attract forage, hcok~ troll as well or better than t~n- edges of river channels, and currents that bring warming water and feed. They also include all the usual places--where the summer weedlines will form, bars, man-made devices, points, coves, and narrows. Where yon fish depends on the species you're after¸ Trolling speed is the second thing to consider. Once you find the prefern~d lure speed for existing weather-wate£ condilions, maintain it, Some lures must he trolled quickly, while others are designed to move sluwly. You need dsms. This makes sense, since much of the forage salmonids eat early in die year is small I've done rely well however, fast ~rollthg big streame#s for nordierns~ pickerel, and even smallmouth fiats early in the year. Usually I fish smaller lures and troll slowly for largemouth bass. My favorite lures for early season trolling for inrgemouths are plugs and spoon plugs If they don't produce, i Iry trout salmon spuons When il's important to male conlinuous cuntact with bottom contours, or when timber ~ [~ BrSl~ded Wire-- " 5oft. iol&Mono. 3-7~c, 5-61b,~1 ppe~ H ayw[reTwlst or" CrimFed Sl~ve Little Clod or Swlwl oLher type Wobbler Spoon Here are the cam#orients or the wire ng aeveloped by Pete Renkert tot deep fishing because he befeves downrigget weights sometimes spook hsh He uses braided line because #'s easy to work with and rot prone to tangling 28 OUTDOOR LII-E
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